WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapy physical principles

  1. Cosmological principles. II. Physical principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, E.R.

    1974-01-01

    The discussion of cosmological principle covers the uniformity principle of the laws of physics, the gravitation and cognizability principles, and the Dirac creation, chaos, and bootstrap principles. (U.S.)

  2. Variational principles in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Optimization under constraints is an essential part of everyday life. Indeed, we routinely solve problems by striking a balance between contradictory interests, individual desires and material contingencies. This notion of equilibrium was dear to thinkers of the enlightenment, as illustrated by Montesquieu’s famous formulation: "In all magistracies, the greatness of the power must be compensated by the brevity of the duration." Astonishingly, natural laws are guided by a similar principle. Variational principles have proven to be surprisingly fertile. For example, Fermat used variational methods to demonstrate that light follows the fastest route from one point to another, an idea which came to be known as Fermat’s principle, a cornerstone of geometrical optics. Variational Principles in Physics explains variational principles and charts their use throughout modern physics. The heart of the book is devoted to the analytical mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, the basic tools of any physicist. Prof. Basdev...

  3. Differences between the family-centered "COPCA" program and traditional infant physical therapy based on neurodevelopmental treatment principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Tineke; Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H; Hulshof, Lily J; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-09-01

    Evidence for effectiveness of pediatric physical therapy in infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders is limited. Therefore, "Coping With and Caring for Infants With Special Needs" (COPCA), a family-centered, early intervention program, was developed. The COPCA program is based on 2 components: (1) family involvement and educational parenting and (2) the neuromotor principles of the neuronal group selection theory. The COPCA coach uses principles of coaching to encourage the family's own capacities for solving problems of daily care and incorporating variation, along with trial and error in daily activities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the content of sessions of the home-based, early intervention COPCA program differs from that of traditional infant physical therapy (TIP) sessions, which in the Netherlands are largely based on neurodevelopmental treatment. The study was conducted at the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands. A quantitative video analysis of therapy sessions was conducted with infants participating in a 2-arm randomized trial. Forty-six infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders were randomly assigned to receive COPCA (n=21) or TIP (n=25) between 3 and 6 months corrected age. Intervention sessions were videotaped at 4 and 6 months corrected age and analyzed with a standardized observation protocol for the classification of physical therapy actions. Outcome parameters were relative amounts of time spent on specific physical therapy actions. The content of COPCA and TIP differed substantially. For instance, in TIP sessions, more time was spent on facilitation techniques, including handling, than in COPCA sessions (29% versus 3%, respectively). During COPCA, more time was spent on family coaching and education than during TIP (16% versus 4%, respectively). The major limitation of the study was its restriction to the Netherlands, implying that findings cannot be generalized automatically to

  4. Principles & practice of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mazur, Eric; Dourmashkin, Peter A; Pedigo, Daryl; Bieniek, Ronald J

    2015-01-01

    Putting physics first Based on his storied research and teaching, Eric Mazur's Principles & Practice of Physics builds an understanding of physics that is both thorough and accessible. Unique organization and pedagogy allow you to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. *New learning architecture: The book is structured to help you learn physics in an organized way that encourages comprehension and reduces distraction.*Physics on a contemporary foundation: Traditional texts delay the introduction of ideas that we now see as unifying and foundational. This text builds physics on those unifying foundations, helping you to develop an understanding that is stronger, deeper, and fundamentally simpler.*Research-based instruction: This text uses a range of research-based instructional techniques to teach physics in the most effective manner possible. The result is a groundbreaking book that puts physics first, thereby making it more accessible to...

  5. The viper fangs: clinical anatomy, principles of physical examination and therapy (a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Oliveri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of fangs is a fundamental part of clinical examination of viperid snakes. The long curved venom fang is carried by short, highly mobile maxilla. Short anaesthesia is advised for safe physical examination and radiography of the mouth cavity. The fangs are gently forced outside the fang pocket by passing the bar or forceps on the palato-maxillary arch, and rotating them rostrally shifting the mucosal fold. Functional fangs are periodically shed and several generations of replacement teeth lie behind and beneath each fang. In case of fang fracture, therapy should be limited to flushing with a solution of chlorhexidine or povidone iodine, and topical application of pro-coagulant and antibacterial cream. Therapy of chronic fang inflammation is based on removal of necrotized fang and repeated abundant irrigation of the fang pocket. Treatment of chronic stomatitis consists of flushing with chlorhexidine or povidone iodine, physical removal of the plaques, administration of analgesics and antibiotics (marbofloxacin, enrofloxacin or ceftazidime. Extra-oral surgical approach is the best method for odontogenic abscess removal. A vigorous flushing with sterile saline solution, chlorhexidine and povidone iodine and topical application of antibiotics (antibiotic embedded surgical sponge is advised. Force feeding of the anorectic patient suffering from fang inflammation is a mandatory part of the standard treatment protocol.

  6. Principles of modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, A K

    2014-01-01

    Principles of Modern Physics, divided into twenty one chapters, begins with quantum ideas followed by discussions on special relativity, atomic structure, basic quantum mechanics, hydrogen atom (and Schrodinger equation) and periodic table, the three statistical distributions, X-rays, physics of solids, imperfections in crystals, magnetic properties of materials, superconductivity, Zeeman-, Stark- and Paschen Back- effects, Lasers, Nuclear physics (Yukawa's meson theory and various nuclear models), radioactivity and nuclear reactions, nuclear fission, fusion and plasma, particle accelerators and detectors, the universe, Elementary particles (classification, eight fold way and quark model, standard model and fundamental interactions), cosmic rays, deuteron problem in nuclear physics, and cathode ray oscilloscope. NEW TO THE FOURTH EDITION: The CO2 Laser Theory of magnetic moments on the basis of shell model Geological dating Laser Induced fusion and laser fusion reactor. Hawking radiation The cosmological red ...

  7. Principles of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.P.; Share, F.S.; Goodman, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation oncology now represents the integration of knowledge obtained over an 80-year period from the physics and biology laboratories and the medical clinic. Such integration is recent; until the supervoltage era following World War II, the chief developments in these three areas for the most part were realized independently. The physics and engineering laboratories have now developed a dependable family of sources of ionizing radiations that can be precisely directed at tumor volumes at various depths within the body. The biology laboratory has provided the basic scientific support underlying the intensive clinical experience and currently is suggesting ways of using ionizing radiations more effectively, such as modified fractionation schedules relating to cell cycle kinetics and the use of drugs and chemicals as modifiers of radiation response and normal tissue reaction. The radiation therapy clinic has provided the patient stratum on which the acute and chronic effects of irradiation have been assessed, and the patterns of treatment success and failure identified. The radiation therapist has shared with the surgeon and medical oncologist the responsibility for clarifying the natural history of a large number of human neoplasms, and through such clarifications, has developed more effective treatment strategies. Several examples of this include the improved results in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, seminoma, and epithelial neoplasms of the upper aerodigestive tract

  8. Video games and rehabilitation: using design principles to enhance engagement in physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Keith; Shirzad, Navid; Verster, Alida; Hodges, Nicola; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2013-12-01

    Patient nonadherence with therapy is a major barrier to rehabilitation. Recovery is often limited and requires prolonged, intensive rehabilitation that is time-consuming, expensive, and difficult. We review evidence for the potential use of video games in rehabilitation with respect to the behavioral, physiological, and motivational effects of gameplay. In this Special Interest article, we offer a method to evaluate effects of video game play on motor learning and their potential to increase patient engagement with therapy, particularly commercial games that can be interfaced with adapted control systems. We take the novel approach of integrating research across game design, motor learning, neurophysiology changes, and rehabilitation science to provide criteria by which therapists can assist patients in choosing games appropriate for rehabilitation. Research suggests that video games are beneficial for cognitive and motor skill learning in both rehabilitation science and experimental studies with healthy subjects. Physiological data suggest that gameplay can induce neuroplastic reorganization that leads to long-term retention and transfer of skill; however, more clinical research in this area is needed. There is interdisciplinary evidence suggesting that key factors in game design, including choice, reward, and goals, lead to increased motivation and engagement. We maintain that video game play could be an effective supplement to traditional therapy. Motion controllers can be used to practice rehabilitation-relevant movements, and well-designed game mechanics can augment patient engagement and motivation in rehabilitation. We recommend future research and development exploring rehabilitation-relevant motions to control games and increase time in therapy through gameplay.Video Abstract available (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A61) for more insights from the authors.

  9. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Physical Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Physical Therapy Print en español Terapia física Physical Therapy Basics Doctors often recommend physical therapy (PT) ...

  10. [Physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2008-01-01

    Recently, pulmonary rehabilitation program is widely considered one of the most effective and evidence-based treatment for not only chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but many clinical situations including neuro-muscular disease, post-operative status and weaning period from the ventilator, etc. The essential components of a pulmonary rehabilitation program are team assessment, patient training, psycho-social intervention, exercise, and follow-up. In 2003, Japanese medical societies (J. Thoracic Society, J. Pul. Rehabilitation Society and J. Physiotherapist Society) made a new guideline for pulmonary rehabilitation, especially how to aproach the execise training. As for the duration after surgical operation, airway cleaning is the important technique to prevent post-operative complications including pneumonia. Postural dranage technique is well known for such condition, at the same time, several instruments (flutter vulve, positive expiratory mask, high frequecy oscillation, etc) were also used for the patient to expectrate airway mucus easier. Lung transplantation is a new method of treatment for the critically-ill patients with chronic respiratoy failure. Several techniques of physical therapy are must be needed before and after lung transplantation to prevent both pulmonary infection and osteoporosis.

  11. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) - Basic Principles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 4. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) - Basic Principles. Bhaskar G Maiya. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 4 April 2000 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/04/0006-0018 ...

  12. Differences Between the Family-Centered "COPCA" Program and Traditional Infant Physical Therapy Based on Neurodevelopmental Treatment Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirks, Tineke; Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H.; Hulshof, Lily J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background. Evidence for effectiveness of pediatric physical therapy in infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders is limited. Therefore, "Coping With and Caring for Infants With Special Needs" (COPCA), a family-centered, early intervention program, was developed. The COPCA program is

  13. Physical principles in chemoreception

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegel, Frederik W

    1991-01-01

    Is it not sheer foolishness to try to apply the methods of theoretical physics to biological structures? Physics flowered because it limited itself to the study of very simple systems; on the other hand, the essence of "living things" seems to have to do with the extreme intricacy of their structure. Is it a hopeless endeavour to attempt to bring the two together, or should one try nevertheless? Most of my colleagues in theoretical physics feel one should not waste one's time and stick to "the good old hydrogen atom", but some of them feel one should try anyhow. This minority point of view was shared by Bohr in the thirties, Schrödinger in the fourties, Delbrück in the fifties and sixties, PurceIl in the seventies, etc. The theory of chemoreception represents only a very small part of this immense scientific question. Its study was started by Delbriick and others in the fifties. I was introduced to these problems by Charles DeLisi, during a visit to the National Institutes of Health in the summer of 1980. D...

  14. Dystonia: Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Physical Therapy Physical therapy may be an important component of treating ... everyday tasks, Since dystonia is a neurological disorder, physical therapy does not treat the dystonia directly but ...

  15. General principles of antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L; Edson, Randall S

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community.

  16. American Physical Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Do APTA represents more than 100,000 members: physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students of physical therapy. Other Popular Resources: - Member Directory - Annual Reports ...

  17. Physical Consequences of Mathematical Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical consequences are derived from the following mathematical structures: the variational principle, Wigner’s classifications of the irreducible representations of the Poincar ́ e group and the duality invariance of the homogeneous Maxwell equations. The analysis is carried out within the validity domain of special relativity. Hierarchical re- lations between physical theories are used. Some new results are pointed out together with their comparison with experimental data. It is also predicted that a genuine Higgs particle will not be detected.

  18. Physical acoustics principles and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Warren P

    1964-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume l-Part A focuses on high frequency sound waves in gases, liquids, and solids that have been proven as powerful tools in analyzing the molecular, defect, domain wall, and other types of motions. The selection first tackles wave propagation in fluids and normal solids and guided wave propagation in elongated cylinders and plates. Discussions focus on fundamentals of continuum mechanics; small-amplitude waves in a linear viscoelastic medium; representation of oscillations and waves; and special effects associated with guided elastic waves in plat

  19. Physical acoustics principles and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Warren P

    2012-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume IV, Part B: Applications to Quantum and Solid State Physics provides an introduction to the various applications of quantum mechanics to acoustics by describing several processes for which such considerations are essential. This book discusses the transmission of sound waves in molten metals. Comprised of seven chapters, this volume starts with an overview of the interactions that can happen between electrons and acoustic waves when magnetic fields are present. This text then describes acoustic and plasma waves in ionized gases wherein oscillations are subject to hydrodynamic as well as electromagnetic forces. Other chapters examine the resonances and relaxations that can take place in polymer systems. This book discusses as well the general theory of the interaction of a weak sinusoidal field with matter. The final chapter describes the sound velocities in the rocks composing the Earth. This book is a valuable resource for physicists and engineers.

  20. [Physical therapy for scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanovic, Marguerite Guillot

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy consists notably of hand or mechanical massages, pressure therapy using various fabrics or splints, cryotherapy, laser therapy, etc. It forms part of the range of therapies used to treat pathological scars, including medical and surgical treatment. While the results are often satisfactory for hypertrophic scars, they remain uncertain for major keloids.

  1. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  2. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  3. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation ... Inc. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 5 Physical and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ...

  4. Principles and applications of nanomems physics

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Hector

    2005-01-01

    ""Principles and Applications of NanoMEMS Physics"" presents the first unified exposition of the physical principles at the heart of NanoMEMS-based devices and applications. In particular, after beginning with a comprehensive presentation of the fundamentals and limitations of nanotechnology and MEMS fabrication techniques, the book addresses the physics germane to this dimensional regime, namely, quantum wave-particle phenomena, including, the manifestation of charge discreteness, quantized electrostatic actuation, and the Casimir effect, and quantum wave phenomena, including, quantized elect

  5. Nuclear physics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lilley, J S

    2001-01-01

    This title provides the latest information on nuclear physics. Based on a course entitled Applications of Nuclear Physics. Written from an experimental point of view this text is broadly divided into two parts, firstly a general introduction to Nuclear Physics and secondly its applications.* Includes chapters on practical examples and problems* Contains hints to solving problems which are included in the appendix* Avoids complex and extensive mathematical treatments* A modern approach to nuclear physics, covering the basic theory, but emphasising the many and important applicat

  6. Islamic Principles and Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Karen; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Based on interviews with five Islamic respondents, this paper investigates stricter Islamic parents' difficulties with certain assumptions and practices of Australian education, particularly health and physical education. Concerns about modesty and separation of sexes conflict with central aims based on equal educational opportunities and equality…

  7. Physical principles of semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micek, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    The general properties of semiconductors with respect to the possibilities of their use as the ionization radiation detectors are discussed. Some chosen types of semiconductor junctions and their characteristics are briefly presented. There are also discussed the physical phenomena connected with the formation of barriers in various types of semiconductor counters. Finally, the basic properties of three main types of semiconductor detectors are given. (author)

  8. Principles and practice of proton beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Indra J

    2015-01-01

    Commissioned by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for their June 2015 Summer School, this is the first AAPM monograph printed in full color. Proton therapy has been used in radiation therapy for over 70 years, but within the last decade its use in clinics has grown exponentially. This book fills in the proton therapy gap by focusing on the physics of proton therapy, including beam production, proton interactions, biology, dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, commissioning, motion management, and uncertainties. Chapters are written by the world's leading medical physicists who work at the pioneering proton treatment centers around the globe. They share their understandings after years of experience treating thousands of patients. Case studies involving specific cancer treatments show that there is some art to proton therapy as well as state-of-the-art science. Even though the focus lies on proton therapy, the content provided is also valuable to heavy charged particle th...

  9. A cyclic symmetry principle in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, H.S.; Adelaide Univ., SA

    1994-01-01

    Many areas of modern physics are illuminated by the application of a symmetry principle, requiring the invariance of the relevant laws of physics under a group of transformations. This paper examines the implications and some of the applications of the principle of cyclic symmetry, especially in the areas of statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics, including quantized field theory. This principle requires invariance under the transformations of a finite group, which may be a Sylow π-group, a group of Lie type, or a symmetric group. The utility of the principle of cyclic invariance is demonstrated in finding solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation that include and generalize known solutions. It is shown that the Sylow π-groups have other uses, in providing a basis for a type of generalized quantum statistics, and in parametrising a new generalization of Lie groups, with associated algebras that include quantized algebras. 31 refs

  10. Physical Therapy and Manual Physical Therapy: Differences in Patient Characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M; Pool, Jan J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  11. Physical therapy and manual physical therapy: Differences in patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, G.G.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  12. Physical Therapy and Manual Physical Therapy: Differences in Patient Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G. M.; Pool, Jan J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  13. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  14. The physical principles of rock magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 5: The Physical Principles of Rock Magnetism explores the physical principles of rock magnetism, with emphasis on the properties of finely divided magnetic materials. It discusses the origin and stability of rock magnetizations, the role of remanent magnetism in interpreting magnetic surveys, magnetic anisotropy as an indicator of rock fabric, and the relationship between piezomagnetic changes and seismic activity. Organized into 13 chapters, this volume discusses the properties of solids, magnetite and hematite grains, and rocks with magnetite grains

  15. Physical acoustics v.8 principles and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Warren P

    1971-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume VIII discusses a number of themes on physical acoustics that are divided into seven chapters. Chapter 1 describes the principles and applications of a tool for investigating phonons in dielectric crystals, the spin phonon spectrometer. The next chapter discusses the use of ultrasound in investigating Landau quantum oscillations in the presence of a magnetic field and their relation to the strain dependence of the Fermi surface of metals. The third chapter focuses on the ultrasonic measurements that are made by pulsing methods with velo

  16. Physical Principle for Generation of Randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2009-01-01

    A physical principle (more precisely, a principle that incorporates mathematical models used in physics) has been conceived as the basis of a method of generating randomness in Monte Carlo simulations. The principle eliminates the need for conventional random-number generators. The Monte Carlo simulation method is among the most powerful computational methods for solving high-dimensional problems in physics, chemistry, economics, and information processing. The Monte Carlo simulation method is especially effective for solving problems in which computational complexity increases exponentially with dimensionality. The main advantage of the Monte Carlo simulation method over other methods is that the demand on computational resources becomes independent of dimensionality. As augmented by the present principle, the Monte Carlo simulation method becomes an even more powerful computational method that is especially useful for solving problems associated with dynamics of fluids, planning, scheduling, and combinatorial optimization. The present principle is based on coupling of dynamical equations with the corresponding Liouville equation. The randomness is generated by non-Lipschitz instability of dynamics triggered and controlled by feedback from the Liouville equation. (In non-Lipschitz dynamics, the derivatives of solutions of the dynamical equations are not required to be bounded.)

  17. Nuclear detectors. Physical principles of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochet, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear detection is used in several domains of activity from the physics research, the nuclear industry, the medical and industrial sectors, the security etc. The particles of interest are the α, β, X, γ and neutrons. This article treats of the basic physical properties of radiation detection, the general characteristics of the different classes of existing detectors and the particle/matter interactions: 1 - general considerations; 2 - measurement types and definitions: pulse mode, current mode, definitions; 3 - physical principles of direct detection: introduction and general problem, materials used in detection, simple device, junction semiconductor device, charges generation and transport inside matter, signal generation; 4 - physical principles of indirect detection: introduction, scintillation mechanisms, definition and properties of scintillators. (J.S.)

  18. Molecular physics. Theoretical principles and experimental methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demtroeder, W.

    2005-01-01

    This advanced textbook comprehensively explains important principles of diatomic and polyatomic molecules and their spectra in two separate, distinct parts. The first part concentrates on the theoretical aspects of molecular physics, whereas the second part of the book covers experimental techniques, i.e. laser, Fourier, NMR, and ESR spectroscopies, used in the fields of physics, chemistry, biolog, and material science. Appropriate for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and chemistry with a knowledge of atomic physics and familiar with the basics of quantum mechanics. From the contents: - Electronic States of Molecules, - Rotation, Oscillation and Potential Curves of Diatomic Molecules, - The Spectra of Diatomic Molecules, - Molecule Symmetries and Group Theory, - Rotation and Oscillations of Polyatomic Molecules, - Electronic States of Polyatomic Molecules, - The Spectra of Polyatomic Molecules, - Collapse of the Born-Oppenheimer-Approximation, Disturbances in Molecular Spectra, - Molecules in Disturbing Fields, - Van-der-Waals-Molecules and Cluster, - Experimental Techniques in Molecular Physics. (orig.)

  19. Clinical databases in physical therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, I.C.S.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Bakker, D. de; Wees, Ph.J van der; Hart, D.L.; Deutscher, D.; Bosch, W.J.H. van den; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical databases in physical therapy provide increasing opportunities for research into physical therapy theory and practice. At present, information on the characteristics of existing databases is lacking. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical databases in which physical therapists

  20. Neutron capture therapy. Principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, Wolfgang A.G.; Moss, Raymond; Wittig, Andrea; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    State of the art report on neutron capture therapy. Summarizes the progress made in recent decades. Multidisciplinary approach. Written by the most experienced specialists Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is based on the ability of the non-radioactive isotope boron-10 to capture thermal neutrons with very high probability and immediately to release heavy particles with a path length of one cell diameter. This in principle allows for tumor cell-selective high-LET particle radiotherapy. NCT is exciting scientifically but challenging clinically, and a key factor in success is close collaboration among very different disciplines. This book provides a comprehensive summary of the progress made in NCT in recent years. Individual sections cover all important aspects, including neutron sources, boron chemistry, drugs for NCT, dosimetry, and radiation biology. The use of NCT in a variety of malignancies and also some non-malignant diseases is extensively discussed. NCT is clearly shown to be a promising modality at the threshold of wider clinical application. All of the chapters are written by experienced specialists in language that will be readily understood by all participating disciplines.

  1. Physics of electronic materials principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rammer, Jorgen

    2017-01-01

    Adopting a uniquely pedagogical approach, this comprehensive textbook on the quantum mechanics of semiconductor materials and devices focuses on the materials, components and devices themselves whilst incorporating a substantial amount of fundamental physics related to condensed matter theory and quantum mechanics. Written primarily for advanced undergraduate students in physics and engineering, this book can also be used as a supporting text for introductory quantum mechanics courses, and will be of interest to anyone interested in how electronic devices function at a fundamental level. Complete with numerous exercises, and with all the necessary mathematics and physics included in appendices, this book guides the reader seamlessly through the principles of quantum mechanics and the quantum theory of metals and semiconductors, before describing in detail how devices are exploited within electric circuits and in the hardware of computers, for example as amplifiers, switches and transistors. Includes nume...

  2. Solid state physics principles and modern applications

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, John J

    2018-01-01

    This book provides the basis for a two-semester graduate course on solid-state physics. The first half presents all the knowledge necessary for a one-semester survey of solid-state physics, but in greater depth than most introductory solid state physics courses. The second half includes most of the important research over the past half-century, covering both the fundamental principles and most recent advances. This new edition includes the latest developments in the treatment of strongly interacting two-dimensional electrons and discusses the generalization from small to larger systems. The book provides explanations in a class-tested tutorial style, and each chapter includes problems reviewing key concepts and calculations. The updated exercises and solutions enable students to become familiar with contemporary research activities, such as the electronic properties of massless fermions in graphene and topological insulators.

  3. Thermodynamics principles characterizing physical and chemical processes

    CERN Document Server

    Honig, Jurgen M

    1999-01-01

    This book provides a concise overview of thermodynamics, and is written in a manner which makes the difficult subject matter understandable. Thermodynamics is systematic in its presentation and covers many subjects that are generally not dealt with in competing books such as: Carathéodory''s approach to the Second Law, the general theory of phase transitions, the origin of phase diagrams, the treatment of matter subjected to a variety of external fields, and the subject of irreversible thermodynamics.The book provides a first-principles, postulational, self-contained description of physical and chemical processes. Designed both as a textbook and as a monograph, the book stresses the fundamental principles, the logical development of the subject matter, and the applications in a variety of disciplines. This revised edition is based on teaching experience in the classroom, and incorporates many exercises in varying degrees of sophistication. The stress laid on a didactic, logical presentation, and on the relat...

  4. Building physics from physical principles to international standards

    CERN Document Server

    Pinterić, Marko

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides thorough coverage of the most important building physics phenomena: heat transfer, moisture, sound/acoustics, and illumination. Since the book is primarily aimed at engineers, it addresses professional issues with due pragmatism, and by including many practical examples and related ISO standards. Nevertheless, in order to guarantee full comprehension, it also explains the underlying physical principles and relates them to practical aspects in a simple and clear way. This is achieved with the aid of more than 100 figures and consistent cross-referencing of formulas and ideas. In addition, interrelationships between the different building physics phenomena are elucidated in a way that will enable readers to develop performance specifications that inform the design process. The book will primarily appeal to students of civil engineering and architecture, as well as to all practitioners in these areas who wish to broaden their fundamental understanding of topics in building physics.

  5. The physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Khan's classic textbook on radiation oncology physics is now in its thoroughly revised and updated Fourth Edition. It provides the entire radiation therapy team—radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists—with a thorough understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies, including 3D-CRT, stereotactic radiotherapy, HDR, IMRT, IGRT, and proton beam therapy. These technologies are discussed along with the physical concepts underlying treatment planning, treatment delivery, and dosimetry. This Fourth Edition includes brand-new chapters on image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and proton beam therapy. Other chapters have been revised to incorporate the most recent developments in the field. This edition also features more than 100 full-color illustrations throughout.

  6. On the superposition principle and its physics content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, M.

    1984-01-01

    What is commonly denoted the superposition principle is shown to consist of three different physical assumptions: conservation of probability, completeness, and some phase conditions. The latter conditions form the physical assumptions of the superposition principle. These phase conditions are exemplified by the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. Some suggestions for testing the superposition principle are given. (Auth.)

  7. A New Principle in Physics: the Principle 'Finiteness', and Some Consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternlieb, Abraham

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I propose a new principle in physics: the principle of 'finiteness'. It stems from the definition of physics as a science that deals (among other things) with measurable dimensional physical quantities. Since measurement results, including their errors, are always finite, the principle of finiteness postulates that the mathematical formulation of 'legitimate' laws of physics should prevent exactly zero or infinite solutions. Some consequences of the principle of finiteness are discussed, in general, and then more specifically in the fields of special relativity, quantum mechanics, and quantum gravity. The consequences are derived independently of any other theory or principle in physics. I propose 'finiteness' as a postulate (like the constancy of the speed of light in vacuum, 'c'), as opposed to a notion whose validity has to be corroborated by, or derived theoretically or experimentally from other facts, theories, or principles.

  8. Physics Without Physics. The Power of Information-theoretical Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2017-01-01

    David Finkelstein was very fond of the new information-theoretic paradigm of physics advocated by John Archibald Wheeler and Richard Feynman. Only recently, however, the paradigm has concretely shown its full power, with the derivation of quantum theory (Chiribella et al., Phys. Rev. A 84:012311, 2011; D'Ariano et al., 2017) and of free quantum field theory (D'Ariano and Perinotti, Phys. Rev. A 90:062106, 2014; Bisio et al., Phys. Rev. A 88:032301, 2013; Bisio et al., Ann. Phys. 354:244, 2015; Bisio et al., Ann. Phys. 368:177, 2016) from informational principles. The paradigm has opened for the first time the possibility of avoiding physical primitives in the axioms of the physical theory, allowing a re-foundation of the whole physics over logically solid grounds. In addition to such methodological value, the new information-theoretic derivation of quantum field theory is particularly interesting for establishing a theoretical framework for quantum gravity, with the idea of obtaining gravity itself as emergent from the quantum information processing, as also suggested by the role played by information in the holographic principle (Susskind, J. Math. Phys. 36:6377, 1995; Bousso, Rev. Mod. Phys. 74:825, 2002). In this paper I review how free quantum field theory is derived without using mechanical primitives, including space-time, special relativity, Hamiltonians, and quantization rules. The theory is simply provided by the simplest quantum algorithm encompassing a countable set of quantum systems whose network of interactions satisfies the three following simple principles: homogeneity, locality, and isotropy. The inherent discrete nature of the informational derivation leads to an extension of quantum field theory in terms of a quantum cellular automata and quantum walks. A simple heuristic argument sets the scale to the Planck one, and the currently observed regime where discreteness is not visible is the so-called "relativistic regime" of small wavevectors, which

  9. Hadron therapy physics and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This brief provides an in-depth overview of the physics of hadron therapy, ranging from the history to the latest contributions to the subject. It covers the mechanisms of protons and carbon ions at the molecular level (DNA breaks and proteins 53BP1 and RPA), the physics and mathematics of accelerators (Cyclotron and Synchrotron), microdosimetry measurements (with new results so far achieved), and Monte Carlo simulations in hadron therapy using FLUKA (CERN) and MCHIT (FIAS) software. The text also includes information about proton therapy centers and carbon ion centers (PTCOG), as well as a comparison and discussion of both techniques in treatment planning and radiation monitoring. This brief is suitable for newcomers to medical physics as well as seasoned specialists in radiation oncology.

  10. [Physical therapy for parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, M

    2011-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex neurologic and progressive incapacitating disease. Parkinson's disease severely threatens the quality of live and the number of patients worldwide is expected to rise considerably in the coming decade due to aging of the population. Even with optimal medical management using drugs or neurosurgery, patients are faced with progressively increasing impairments (e.g. in speech, mental and movement related functions), and restrictions in participation (e.g. domestic life and social activities). Physical therapy is often prescribed next to medical treatment but there is a lack of uniform treatment. A systematic literature search for guidelines, systematic reviews, trials, and expert opinions lead to a better understanding. The key question: Is physiotherapy able to optimally treat the Parkinson's disease symptoms? In which way, how and on which scientific bases can the physiotherapist participate to improve autonomy and to help them living independently and avoid, as long as possible, institutionalization? This article has integrated clinical research findings to provide clinicians with an overview to physical therapist management of disorders in people with Parkinson's disease. An Evidence-Based Physical Therapy Guideline providing practice recommendations was developed by the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF). Evidence from research was supplemented with clinical expertise and patients values. Randomized clinical trials reflect specific core areas of physical therapy, that is, transfer, posture, balance, reaching and grasping, gait and physical condition. Another aspect is that of educating patients (as well as their partners and family) about the disease process and the benefits of exercise therapy. Alternative therapies can be helpful like Tai Chi, virtual games, dancing, yoga, ball games for example.

  11. Principles of radiologic physics, dosimetry, and treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, J.A.; Lightfoot, D.A.; Glasgow, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    A solid foundation in the principles of radiologic physics, dosimetry, and treatment planning is essential for the practice of radiation oncology. In this chapter, the authors consider several topics that lay the foundation for the material covered other chapters. Among the topics discussed here are atomic and nuclear structure; the production of x-rays; radioactivity; the interaction of x-rays with matter; radiation therapy treatment machines; the measurement of radiation exposure; the determination of absorbed dose; and definitions of various dosimetry parameters, such as percentage depth dose and tissue-air ratio. This chapter also discusses basic concepts used in calculations of dose and the standard correction methods used to account for air gaps and tissue inhomogeneities

  12. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos Fábio Guilherme

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  13. Enhancing the Therapy Experience Using Principles of Video Game Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkins, John Wm; Brackenbury, Tim; Krause, Miriam; Haviland, Allison

    2016-02-01

    This article considers the potential benefits that applying design principles from contemporary video games may have on enhancing therapy experiences. Six principles of video game design are presented, and their relevance for enriching clinical experiences is discussed. The motivational and learning benefits of each design principle have been discussed in the education literature as having positive impacts on student motivation and learning and are related here to aspects of clinical practice. The essential experience principle suggests connecting all aspects of the experience around a central emotion or cognitive connection. The discovery principle promotes indirect learning in focused environments. The risk-taking principle addresses the uncertainties clients face when attempting newly learned skills in novel situations. The generalization principle encourages multiple opportunities for skill transfer. The reward system principle directly relates to the scaffolding of frequent and varied feedback in treatment. Last, the identity principle can assist clients in using their newly learned communication skills to redefine self-perceptions. These principles highlight areas for research and interventions that may be used to reinforce or advance current practice.

  14. Radiation protection principles for radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Lassmann, M.

    1999-01-01

    In Germany, approximately 30,000 treatments with radioiodine are performed yearly on patients with benign or malignant thyroid diseases. These are carried out generally in specialized therapy wards which are equipped with radiation protection facilities. Ambulant (fractionated) radioiodine treatment is not permitted in Germany. More recently, the situation has been that the discharge of patients is permitted, when they have spent a stay of at least 48 hours in the ward without the dose rate exceeding 3.5 μSv/hour at 2 meters distance from them, corresponding to 1 mSv/year (this correlates to a residual activity in the body of the patient of 250 MBq). The radiation exposure of personnel in the therapy ward due to both external and internal exposure lies within a range of a few mSv per year. According to recent studies, the exposure to family members and close friends via external exposure, inhalation or incorporation does not exceed the effective dose of 1 mSv/year. This value has been laid down in a recommendation by the European Union as the dose constraint for children; for adults younger than 60 years of age, 3 mSv are recommended, for older persons 15 mSv. (orig.) [de

  15. Orff Music Therapy: History, Principles and Further Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Voigt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orff Music Therapy, a developmental approach to music therapy, was developed by Gertrud Orff within the framework of social paediatrics in Munich, Germany. A short historical background of Orff Music Therapy is discussed. The history of the clinical setting in which it was developed is described as is Gertrud Orff’s professional background. The role of Orff-Schulwerk in Orff Music Therapy and the development of theoretical foundations are discussed. Current principles and practice of Orff Music Therapy, illustrated by a case example show how the profile of Orff Music Therapy has developed. On the basis of the case example, theory is related to practice. Finally, changes influencing Orff Music Therapy today, training and research are considered.

  16. Basic principles of chemistry and physical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmenares, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    A course designed to provide communications between the designer of a system such as a mechanical engineer or a physicist and the material scientist such as a chemist or chemical engineer is presented. The topics discussed are stoichiometric principles, behavior of ideal gases, vapor pressure, humidity and saturation, solubility of gases in liquids, diffusion of gases, chemical reaction kinetics, and application of concepts to compatibility problems. The appendix provides problems to be used in conjunction with TV lectures

  17. Towards physical principles of biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2018-03-01

    Biological systems reach organizational complexity that far exceeds the complexity of any known inanimate objects. Biological entities undoubtedly obey the laws of quantum physics and statistical mechanics. However, is modern physics sufficient to adequately describe, model and explain the evolution of biological complexity? Detailed parallels have been drawn between statistical thermodynamics and the population-genetic theory of biological evolution. Based on these parallels, we outline new perspectives on biological innovation and major transitions in evolution, and introduce a biological equivalent of thermodynamic potential that reflects the innovation propensity of an evolving population. Deep analogies have been suggested to also exist between the properties of biological entities and processes, and those of frustrated states in physics, such as glasses. Such systems are characterized by frustration whereby local state with minimal free energy conflict with the global minimum, resulting in ‘emergent phenomena’. We extend such analogies by examining frustration-type phenomena, such as conflicts between different levels of selection, in biological evolution. These frustration effects appear to drive the evolution of biological complexity. We further address evolution in multidimensional fitness landscapes from the point of view of percolation theory and suggest that percolation at level above the critical threshold dictates the tree-like evolution of complex organisms. Taken together, these multiple connections between fundamental processes in physics and biology imply that construction of a meaningful physical theory of biological evolution might not be a futile effort. However, it is unrealistic to expect that such a theory can be created in one scoop; if it ever comes to being, this can only happen through integration of multiple physical models of evolutionary processes. Furthermore, the existing framework of theoretical physics is unlikely to suffice

  18. Physical therapy education in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Zafar, Hamayun; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To review the physical therapy educational program model, professional curriculum, and gender representation at major universities, as well as the quality and scope of physical therapy practice in Saudi Arabia. [Methods] Information regarding course curriculum, gender representation, and the quality and scope of physical therapy practice was collected from six universities in Saudi Arabia, the Saudi Physical Therapy Association, and the Saudi Health Commission. [Results] The first b...

  19. Principles and Reality of Proton Therapy Treatment Allocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Asch, David A. [Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); The Wharton School and Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Friedberg, Joseph [Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vaughn, David J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rash, Ellen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Raksowski, Kevin [Department of Internal Medicine, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To present the principles and rationale of the Proton Priority System (PROPS), a priority points framework that assigns higher scores to patients thought to more likely benefit from proton therapy, and the distribution of PROPS scores by patient characteristics Methods and Materials: We performed multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between PROPS scores and receipt of proton therapy, adjusted for insurance status, gender, race, geography, and the domains that inform the PROPS score. Results: Among 1529 adult patients considered for proton therapy prioritization during our Center's ramp-up phase of treatment availability, PROPS scores varied by age, diagnosis, site, and other PROPS domains. In adjusted analyses, receipt of proton therapy was lower for patients with non-Medicare relative to Medicare health insurance (commercial vs Medicare: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.64; managed care vs Medicare: OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.28-0.56; Medicaid vs Medicare: OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.13-0.44). Proton Priority System score and age were not significantly associated with receipt of proton therapy. Conclusions: The Proton Priority System is a rationally designed and transparent system for allocation of proton therapy slots based on the best available evidence and expert opinion. Because the actual allocation of treatment slots depends mostly on insurance status, payers may consider incorporating PROPS, or its underlying principles, into proton therapy coverage policies.

  20. Principles and Reality of Proton Therapy Treatment Allocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Asch, David A.; Tochner, Zelig; Friedberg, Joseph; Vaughn, David J.; Rash, Ellen; Raksowski, Kevin; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present the principles and rationale of the Proton Priority System (PROPS), a priority points framework that assigns higher scores to patients thought to more likely benefit from proton therapy, and the distribution of PROPS scores by patient characteristics Methods and Materials: We performed multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between PROPS scores and receipt of proton therapy, adjusted for insurance status, gender, race, geography, and the domains that inform the PROPS score. Results: Among 1529 adult patients considered for proton therapy prioritization during our Center's ramp-up phase of treatment availability, PROPS scores varied by age, diagnosis, site, and other PROPS domains. In adjusted analyses, receipt of proton therapy was lower for patients with non-Medicare relative to Medicare health insurance (commercial vs Medicare: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.64; managed care vs Medicare: OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.28-0.56; Medicaid vs Medicare: OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.13-0.44). Proton Priority System score and age were not significantly associated with receipt of proton therapy. Conclusions: The Proton Priority System is a rationally designed and transparent system for allocation of proton therapy slots based on the best available evidence and expert opinion. Because the actual allocation of treatment slots depends mostly on insurance status, payers may consider incorporating PROPS, or its underlying principles, into proton therapy coverage policies

  1. 75 FR 50880 - TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 0720-AB36 TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech... referrals of beneficiaries to the Military Health System for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and... practitioners will be allowed to issue referrals to patients for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and...

  2. Limited entropic uncertainty as new principle of quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, D.B.; Ion, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Uncertainty Principle (UP) of quantum mechanics discovered by Heisenberg, which constitute the corner-stone of quantum physics, asserts that: there is an irreducible lower bound on the uncertainty in the result of a simultaneous measurement of non-commuting observables. In order to avoid this state-dependence many authors proposed to use the information entropy as a measure of the uncertainty instead of above standard quantitative formulation of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In this paper the Principle of Limited Entropic Uncertainty (LEU-Principle), as a new principle in quantum physics, is proved. Then, consistent experimental tests of the LEU-principle, obtained by using the available 49 sets of the pion-nucleus phase shifts, are presented for both, extensive (q=1) and nonextensive (q=0.5 and q=2.0) cases. Some results obtained by the application of LEU-Principle to the diffraction phenomena are also discussed. The main results and conclusions of our paper can be summarized as follows: (i) We introduced a new principle in quantum physics namely the Principle of Limited Entropic Uncertainty (LEU-Principle). This new principle includes in a more general and exact form not only the old Heisenberg uncertainty principle but also introduce an upper limit on the magnitude of the uncertainty in the quantum physics. The LEU-Principle asserts that: 'there is an irreducible lower bound as well as an upper bound on the uncertainty in the result of a simultaneous measurement of non-commuting observables for any extensive and nonextensive (q ≥ 0) quantum systems'; (ii) Two important concrete realizations of the LEU-Principle are explicitly obtained in this paper, namely: (a) the LEU-inequalities for the quantum scattering of spinless particles and (b) the LEU-inequalities for the diffraction on single slit of width 2a. In particular from our general results, in the limit y → +1 we recover in an exact form all the results previously reported. In our paper an

  3. Physical working principles of medical radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aardal, Øyvind; Paichard, Yoann; Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2013-04-01

    There has been research interest in using radar for contactless measurements of the human heartbeat for several years. While many systems have been demonstrated, not much attention have been given to the actual physical causes of why this work. The consensus seems to be that the radar senses small body movements correlated with heartbeats, but whether only the movements of the body surface or reflections from internal organs are also monitored have not been answered definitely. There has recently been proposed another theory that blood perfusion in the skin could be the main reason radars are able to detect heartbeats. In this paper, an experimental approach is given to determine the physical causes. The measurement results show that it is the body surface reflections that dominate radar measurements of human heartbeats.

  4. Orbital radiation imaging with various physical principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Toru; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of orbital radiation and authors' investigations on the high spatial resolution X ray-CT, fluorescence X ray-CT and phase-type X ray imaging. Orbital radiation is an X ray generated by relativistic electron bended by magnet in the synchrotron and possesses the high photon density/unit area (>100,000 times higher than that of the ordinary X ray generated by the tube) and broad energy spectrum, which make it possible to select the X ray with appropriate energy for the target. The high spatial resolution X-CT has the resolution of 0.05 mm in contrast to 0.5 mm of the ordinary X-CT and is used for the hard structure like tooth and bone. The CT images of rat lumbar vertebrae and artificial bone are presented. Fluorescence X-CT is utilized for detection of trace elements. Images of the thyroid are presented on iodine detection. Concerning the phase-type X-imaging, the principle using the X ray interferometer is described and actual phase-images of blood vessels and 3-demensional ones of metastatic colon cancer in the liver are given. Imaging with the orbital radiation can be a useful technique in the near future. (K.H.)

  5. Orbital radiation imaging with various physical principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toru; Itai, Yuji

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of orbital radiation and authors' investigations on the high spatial resolution X ray-CT, fluorescence X ray-CT and phase-type X ray imaging. Orbital radiation is an X ray generated by relativistic electron bended by magnet in the synchrotron and possesses the high photon density/unit area (>100,000 times higher than that of the ordinary X ray generated by the tube) and broad energy spectrum, which make it possible to select the X ray with appropriate energy for the target. The high spatial resolution X-CT has the resolution of 0.05 mm in contrast to 0.5 mm of the ordinary X-CT and is used for the hard structure like tooth and bone. The CT images of rat lumbar vertebrae and artificial bone are presented. Fluorescence X-CT is utilized for detection of trace elements. Images of the thyroid are presented on iodine detection. Concerning the phase-type X-imaging, the principle using the X ray interferometer is described and actual phase-images of blood vessels and 3-demensional ones of metastatic colon cancer in the liver are given. Imaging with the orbital radiation can be a useful technique in the near future. (K.H.)

  6. Physical principles of microwave assisted magnetic recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivkin, Kirill; Benakli, Mourad; Yin, Huaqing; Tabat, Ned

    2014-01-01

    While the basic physics of Microwave Assisted Magnetization Reversal (MAMR) phenomenon is well established both theoretically and experimentally, its application in a practical magnetic recording environment was so far studied primarily with the help of micromagnetic recording models. In this work, we instead attempt to use analytical formulation and simple numerical models to understand the main challenges as well as benefits that are associated with such a system. It appears that the main difference between the previously introduced theory [G. Bertotti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 724 (2001); K. Rivkin et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 153104 (2008); S. Okamoto et al., J. Appl. Phys. 107, 123914 (2010).] and recording environment is that both the RF and DC magnetic fields are applied at a substantial angle to the anisotropy axis. While the associated symmetry breaking prevents one from describing the reversal process explicitly, it is possible to approximate the solutions well enough to satisfactorily match numerical models both in the case of wire and Spin Torque Oscillator generated RF fields. This approach allows for physical explanation of various effects associated with MAMR such as high gradient of writeable anisotropy and reduction of track width, and offers a clear guidance regarding future optimization of MAMR recording.

  7. Physical principles of microwave assisted magnetic recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, Kirill; Benakli, Mourad; Yin, Huaqing [Seagate Technology, Edina, Minnesota 55435 (United States); Tabat, Ned [Semaphore Scientific Inc., Chanhassen, Minnesota 55317 (United States)

    2014-06-07

    While the basic physics of Microwave Assisted Magnetization Reversal (MAMR) phenomenon is well established both theoretically and experimentally, its application in a practical magnetic recording environment was so far studied primarily with the help of micromagnetic recording models. In this work, we instead attempt to use analytical formulation and simple numerical models to understand the main challenges as well as benefits that are associated with such a system. It appears that the main difference between the previously introduced theory [G. Bertotti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 724 (2001); K. Rivkin et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 153104 (2008); S. Okamoto et al., J. Appl. Phys. 107, 123914 (2010).] and recording environment is that both the RF and DC magnetic fields are applied at a substantial angle to the anisotropy axis. While the associated symmetry breaking prevents one from describing the reversal process explicitly, it is possible to approximate the solutions well enough to satisfactorily match numerical models both in the case of wire and Spin Torque Oscillator generated RF fields. This approach allows for physical explanation of various effects associated with MAMR such as high gradient of writeable anisotropy and reduction of track width, and offers a clear guidance regarding future optimization of MAMR recording.

  8. Physical Therapy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy & FSHD Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy A Guide for Patients & Physical Therapists Authors: Wendy M. King, P.T., Assistant ... Shree Pandya, P.T., M.S., Assistant Professor, Neurology & Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation A publication of the FSH ...

  9. The principle of least action history and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rojo, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    The principle of least action originates in the idea that, if nature has a purpose, it should follow a minimum or critical path. This simple principle, and its variants and generalizations, applies to optics, mechanics, electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics, and provides an essential guide to understanding the beauty of physics. This unique text provides an accessible introduction to the action principle across these various fields of physics, and examines its history and fundamental role in science. It includes - with varying levels of mathematical sophistication - explanations from historical sources, discussion of classic papers, and original worked examples. The result is a story that is understandable to those with a modest mathematical background, as well as to researchers and students in physics and the history of physics.

  10. The physical principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokan, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    This lecture reviews the production of ionising radiation from the naturally occurring radioactive decay chains and introduces the mathematical expressions relating to secular equilibrium and the calculation of the activity of daughter products. The absorption of α, β and γ radiation is discussed from the point of view of the physical processes which occur, e.g. the photoelectric, Compton and pair production processes for γ-rays. Linear energy transfer and range-energy relationships are discussed for α and β particles. Units of measurement for ionising radiation, relative biological effectiveness, dose equivalence and quality factors for each type of radiation are reviewed. the behaviour and properties of radon, thoron and their daughter products are described, and units used in the assessments of effective dose from radon daughters are discussed. 16 refs., 1 tab., 15 figs

  11. Solid State Physics Principles and Modern Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, John J

    2009-01-01

    Intended for a two semester advanced undergraduate or graduate course in Solid State Physics, this treatment offers modern coverage of the theory and related experiments, including the group theoretical approach to band structures, Moessbauer recoil free fraction, semi-classical electron theory, magnetoconductivity, electron self-energy and Landau theory of Fermi liquid, and both quantum and fractional quantum Hall effects. Integrated throughout are developments from the newest semiconductor devices, e.g. space charge layers, quantum wells and superlattices. The first half includes all material usually covered in the introductory course, but in greater depth than most introductory textbooks. The second half includes most of the important developments in solid-state researches of the past half century, addressing e.g. optical and electronic properties such as collective bulk and surface modes and spectral function of a quasiparticle, which is a basic concept for understanding LEED intensities, X ray fine struc...

  12. The physical principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokan, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    The production of ionising radiation from the naturally occurring radioactive decay chains is reviewed and mathematical expressions relating to secular equilibrium and the calculation of the activity of daughter products are introduced. The absorption of α, β and γ radiation is discussed from the point of view of the physical processes which occur, e.g. the photoelectric, Compton and pair production processes for γ-rays. Linear energy transfer (LET) and range-energy relationships are discussed for α and β particles. Units of measurement for ionising radiation, relative biological effectiveness, dose equivalence and quality factors for each type of radiation are reviewed. The behaviour and properties of radon, thoron and their daughter products are described, and the definition of the Working Level introduced

  13. Epitaxy physical principles and technical implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Herman, Marian A; Sitter, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    Epitaxy provides readers with a comprehensive treatment of the modern models and modifications of epitaxy, together with the relevant experimental and technological framework. This advanced textbook describes all important aspects of the epitaxial growth processes of solid films on crystalline substrates, including a section on heteroepitaxy. It covers and discusses in details the most important epitaxial growth techniques, which are currently widely used in basic research as well as in manufacturing processes of devices, namely solid-phase epitaxy, liquid-phase epitaxy, vapor-phase epitaxy, including metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy and molecular-beam epitaxy. Epitaxy’s coverage of science and texhnology thin-film is intended to fill the need for a comprehensive reference and text examining the variety of problems related to the physical foundations and technical implementation of epitaxial crystallization. It is intended for undergraduate students, PhD students, research scientists, lecturers and practic...

  14. Squids: principles and basic applications in experimental physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocio, M.

    1990-01-01

    The basic principles and the description of the technical aspects of SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) are described. The applications of SQUIDs in experimental researches and low temperature physics experiments are given. The concepts of fluxoid quantization in a superconductor and Josephson tunnelling are reviewed. The principles, the operation, the noise and the different configurations of r.f. and direct current bias SQUIDs are summarized. The principal characteristics of several SQUIDs are reported

  15. The principle of finiteness – a guideline for physical laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternlieb, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    I propose a new principle in physics-the principle of finiteness (FP). It stems from the definition of physics as a science that deals with measurable dimensional physical quantities. Since measurement results including their errors, are always finite, FP postulates that the mathematical formulation of legitimate laws in physics should prevent exactly zero or infinite solutions. I propose finiteness as a postulate, as opposed to a statement whose validity has to be corroborated by, or derived theoretically or experimentally from other facts, theories or principles. Some consequences of FP are discussed, first in general, and then more specifically in the fields of special relativity, quantum mechanics, and quantum gravity. The corrected Lorentz transformations include an additional translation term depending on the minimum length epsilon. The relativistic gamma is replaced by a corrected gamma, that is finite for v=c. To comply with FP, physical laws should include the relevant extremum finite values in their mathematical formulation. An important prediction of FP is that there is a maximum attainable relativistic mass/energy which is the same for all subatomic particles, meaning that there is a maximum theoretical value for cosmic rays energy. The Generalized Uncertainty Principle required by Quantum Gravity is actually a necessary consequence of FP at Planck's scale. Therefore, FP may possibly contribute to the axiomatic foundation of Quantum Gravity.

  16. Physical Premium Principle: A New Way for Insurance Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir H. Darooneh

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In our previous work we suggested a way for computing the non-life insurance premium. The probable surplus of the insurer company assumed to be distributed according to the canonical ensemble theory. The Esscher premium principle appeared as its special case. The difference between our method and traditional principles for premium calculation was shown by simulation. Here we construct a theoretical foundation for the main assumption in our method, in this respect we present a new (physical definition for the economic equilibrium. This approach let us to apply the maximum entropy principle in the economic systems. We also extend our method to deal with the problem of premium calculation for correlated risk categories. Like the Buhlman economic premium principle our method considers the effect of the market on the premium but in a different way.

  17. Physical Premium Principle: A New Way for Insurance Pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darooneh, Amir H.

    2005-03-01

    In our previous work we suggested a way for computing the non-life insurance premium. The probable surplus of the insurer company assumed to be distributed according to the canonical ensemble theory. The Esscher premium principle appeared as its special case. The difference between our method and traditional principles for premium calculation was shown by simulation. Here we construct a theoretical foundation for the main assumption in our method, in this respect we present a new (physical) definition for the economic equilibrium. This approach let us to apply the maximum entropy principle in the economic systems. We also extend our method to deal with the problem of premium calculation for correlated risk categories. Like the Buhlman economic premium principle our method considers the effect of the market on the premium but in a different way.

  18. The beauty of physics patterns, principles, and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, A R P

    2014-01-01

    The beauty of physics lies in its coherence in terms of a few fundamental concepts and principles. Even physicists have occasion to marvel at the overarching reach of basic principles and their ability to account for features stretching from the microscopic sub-atomic world to the cosmological expanses of the Universe. While mathematics is its natural language, physics is mostly about patterns, connections, and relations between objects and phenomena, and it is this aspect that is emphasized in this book. Since science tries to connect phenomena that at first sight appear widely different, while boiling them down to a small set of essential principles and laws, metaphor and analogy pervade our subject. Consider the pendulum, its swing from one extreme to the other often invoked in social or economic contexts. In molecular vibrations, such as in the CO2 molecule, the quantum motions of electrons and nuclei are metaphorically the pendulums. In electromagnetic radiation, including the visible light we observe, t...

  19. Using Physics Principles in the Teaching of Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulden, Warren

    1996-01-01

    Presents three examples that show how students can use traditional physics principles or laws for the purpose of understanding chemistry better. Examples include Coulomb's Law and melting points, the Faraday Constant, and the Rydberg Constant. Presents a list of some other traditional topics in a chemistry course that could be enhanced by the…

  20. Basic Principles of Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokben Hizli Sayar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy is a psychotherapy modality that helps the patient recognize the relationship between disruptions in social rhythms and the onset of previous episodes of psychiatric disorders. It uses psychoeducation and behavioral techniques to maintain social rhythm and sleep/wake regularity. It is closely related to and ldquo;social zeitgeber theory and rdquo; that emphasizes the importance that social rhythm regularity may play in synchronization of circadian rhythms in individuals with or at risk for bipolar spectrum disorders. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy have been shown to stabilize social rhythms and enhance course and outcome in bipolar disorder. This review focuses on the theoretical principles and the basic steps of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy as a psychotherapy approach in bipolar disorder. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar databases were searched without temporal restriction. Search terms included interpersonal social rhythm therapy, bipolar, mood disorders. Abstracts were reviewed for relevance, and randomized controlled trials of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy in bipolar disorder selected. These researches also summarized on the final part of this review. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 438-446

  1. Relativistic nuclear physics: symmetry and the correlation depletion principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The author's view on the role of symmetry in fundamental physics is presented. The concept of the 'symmetry of solutions' is analyzed. It is stressed that it is impossible to deduce the basic laws of relativistic nuclear physics from the QCD Lagrangians without recourse to additional hypotheses about the symmetry of solutions (Green functions). The test of these hypotheses is the major prospect of the study of hadron and nuclear collisions. Special importance is given to the Correlation Depletions Principle that makes it possible to construct mathematical models of relativistic nuclear physics, and analyze, by using simple terms, topologically complicated events of nucleus-nucleus collisions. 15 refs., 4 figs

  2. Separation and sorting of cells in microsystems using physical principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Ahn, Kihoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Joong Yull

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, microfabrication techniques have been combined with microfluidics and applied to cell biology. Utilizing such new techniques, various cell studies have been performed for the research of stem cells, immune cells, cancer, neurons, etc. Among the various biological applications of microtechnology-based platforms, cell separation technology has been highly regarded in biological and clinical fields for sorting different types of cells, finding circulating tumor cells (CTCs), and blood cell separation, amongst other things. Many cell separation methods have been created using various physical principles. Representatively, these include hydrodynamic, acoustic, dielectrophoretic, magnetic, optical, and filtering methods. In this review, each of these methods will be introduced, and their physical principles and sample applications described. Each physical principle has its own advantages and disadvantages. The engineers who design the systems and the biologists who use them should understand the pros and cons of each method or principle, to broaden the use of microsystems for cell separation. Continuous development of microsystems for cell separation will lead to new opportunities for diagnosing CTCs and cancer metastasis, as well as other elements in the bloodstream.

  3. Targeted radionuclide therapy for neuroendocrine tumours: principles and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Maralyn R; Lewington, Val; Grossman, Ashley B

    2010-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours comprise a group of neoplasms with variable clinical behaviour. Their growth and spread is often very slow and initially asymptomatic, and thus they are often metastatic at the time of diagnosis and incurable by surgery. An exciting therapeutic strategy for cytoreduction, both for stabilisation of tumour growth and inhibition of hormone production, is the use of targeted radionuclide therapy. Evidence from large-scale, randomised, placebo-controlled trials is very difficult to obtain in these rare diseases, but current data appear promising. It is timely to review the principles underlying the use of these therapies, together with the clinical outcomes to date and potential directions for future research. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Applying lean principles to continuous renal replacement therapy processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfield, C Brett; Brummond, Philip; Lucarotti, Andrew; Villarreal, Maria; Goodwin, Adam; Wonnacott, Rob; Talley, Cheryl; Heung, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The application of lean principles to continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) processes in an academic medical center is described. A manual audit over six consecutive weeks revealed that 133 5-L bags of CRRT solution were discarded after being dispensed from pharmacy but before clinical use. Lean principles were used to examine the workflow for CRRT preparation and develop and implement an intervention. An educational program was developed to encourage and enhance direct communication between nursing and pharmacy about changes in a patient's condition or CRRT order. It was through this education program that the reordering workflow shifted from nurses to pharmacy technicians. The primary outcome was the number of CRRT solution bags delivered in the preintervention and postintervention periods. Nurses and pharmacy technicians were surveyed to determine their satisfaction with the workflow change. After implementation of lean principles, the mean number of CRRT solution bags dispensed per day of CRRT decreased substantially. Respondents' overall satisfaction with the CRRT solution preparation process increased during the postintervention period, and the satisfaction scores for each individual component of the workflow after implementation of lean principles. The decreased solution waste resulted in projected annual cost savings exceeding $70,000 in product alone. The use of lean principles to identify medication waste in the CRRT workflow and implementation of an intervention to shift the workload from intensive care unit nurses to pharmacy technicians led to reduced CRRT solution waste, improved efficiency of CRRT workflow, and increased satisfaction among staff. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULA IN PHYSICAL THERAPIST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Edward P; DeVahl, Julie

    2017-10-01

    The specialty niche of sports physical therapy has grown at a significant rate over the past 40 years. Despite this growth there is little information or direction from the physical therapy education accreditation body or professional association to guide academic programs on the interest or necessity of this type of practice content in physical therapy professional degree programs. The purpose of this survey study is to report on the prevalence, attitudes, barriers, resources, and faculty expertise in providing required or elective sports physical therapy course work. Cross-sectional descriptive survey. A 57-item questionnaire with branching logic was distributed via a web-based electronic data capture tool to survey all Commission on Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) accredited and candidate schools in the United States. Response data was analyzed to describe typical educational program profiles, faculty demographics, and correlational factors consistent with the presence or absence of specific sports physical therapy curricular content. Thirty one percent of the schools responded to the survey and the program demographics were consistent with all currently accredited schools in regards to their geography, Carnegie classification, and faculty and student size. Forty three percent of programs offered a required or elective course distinct to the practice of sports physical therapy. Descriptive information regarding the sequencing, curricular make-up, resources, and assessment of content competence is reported. The odds of providing this content nearly doubles for programs that have faculty with sports clinical specialist credentials, accredited sports residency curriculums, or state practice acts that allow sports venue coverage. This survey provides an initial overview of sports physical therapy educational efforts in professional physical therapy degree programs. The data can used to spur further discussion on the necessity, structure, and

  6. Perfect Form: Variational Principles, Methods, and Applications in Elementary Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isenberg, C

    1997-01-01

    This short book is concerned with the physical applications of variational principles of the calculus. It is intended for undergraduate students who have taken some introductory lectures on the subject and have been exposed to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Throughout the book the author emphasizes the historical background to the subject and provides numerous problems, mainly from the fields of mechanics and optics. Some of these problems are provided with an answer, while others, regretfully, are not. It would have been an added help to the undergraduate reader if complete solutions could have been provided in an appendix. The introductory chapter is concerned with Fermat's Principle and image formation. This is followed by the derivation of the Euler - Lagrange equation. The third chapter returns to the subject of optical paths without making the link with a mechanical variational principle - that comes later. Chapters on the subjects of minimum potential energy, least action and Hamilton's principle follow. This volume provides an 'easy read' for a student keen to learn more about the subject. It is well illustrated and will make a useful addition to all undergraduate physics libraries. (book review)

  7. Low dimensional physics and gauge principles : Matinyan Festschrift

    CERN Document Server

    Klümper, Andreas; Sedrakyan, A G

    2013-01-01

    This is a collection of articles on fundamental physical principles and methods, the topics ranging from matrix models, random surfaces, quantum dots and rings, to black holes, cosmology and testing of the tiny effects predicted by General Relativity. Among the authors are Sir Roger Penrose and other well-known experts and the articles are addressed to graduate students and researchers. The volume is a Festschrift to a noted physicist and mentor Sergei Matinyan.

  8. Principles of physics from quantum field theory to classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, Ni

    2014-01-01

    This book starts from a set of common basic principles to establish the formalisms in all areas of fundamental physics, including quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, general relativity, electromagnetic field, and classical mechanics. Instead of the traditional pedagogic way, the author arranges the subjects and formalisms in a logical-sequential way, i.e. all the formulas are derived from the formulas before them. The formalisms are also kept self-contained. Most of the required mathematical tools are also given in the appendices. Although this book covers all the disciplines of fundamental physics, the book is concise and can be treated as an integrated entity. This is consistent with the aphorism that simplicity is beauty, unification is beauty, and thus physics is beauty. The book may be used as an advanced textbook by graduate students. It is also suitable for physicists who wish to have an overview of fundamental physics. Readership: This is an advanced gradua...

  9. Physical therapy and occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radder, Danique L M; Sturkenboom, Ingrid H; van Nimwegen, Marlies; Keus, Samyra H; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M

    2017-10-01

    Current medical management is only partially effective in controlling the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. As part of comprehensive multidisciplinary care, physical therapy and occupational therapy aim to support people with Parkinson's disease in dealing with the consequences of their disease in daily activities. In this narrative review, we address the limitations that people with Parkinson's disease may encounter despite optimal medical management, and we clarify both the unique and shared approaches that physical therapists and occupational therapists can apply in treating these limitations.

  10. Physical therapy and occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radder, D.L.M.; Sturkenboom, I.H.W.M.; Nimwegen, M. van; Keus, S.H.; Bloem, B.R.; Vries, N.M. de

    2017-01-01

    Current medical management is only partially effective in controlling the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. As part of comprehensive multidisciplinary care, physical therapy and occupational therapy aim to support people with Parkinson's disease in dealing with the consequences of their disease in

  11. Principle of minimum distance in space of states as new principle in quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, D. B.; Ion, M. L. D.

    2007-01-01

    The mathematician Leonhard Euler (1707-1783) appears to have been a philosophical optimist having written: 'Since the fabric of universe is the most perfect and is the work of the most wise Creator, nothing whatsoever take place in this universe in which some relation of maximum or minimum does not appear. Wherefore, there is absolutely no doubt that every effect in universe can be explained as satisfactory from final causes themselves the aid of the method of Maxima and Minima, as can from the effective causes'. Having in mind this kind of optimism in the papers mentioned in this work we introduced and investigated the possibility to construct a predictive analytic theory of the elementary particle interaction based on the principle of minimum distance in the space of quantum states (PMD-SQS). So, choosing the partial transition amplitudes as the system variational variables and the distance in the space of the quantum states as a measure of the system effectiveness, we obtained the results presented in this paper. These results proved that the principle of minimum distance in space of quantum states (PMD-SQS) can be chosen as variational principle by which we can find the analytic expressions of the partial transition amplitudes. In this paper we present a description of hadron-hadron scattering via principle of minimum distance PMD-SQS when the distance in space of states is minimized with two directional constraints: dσ/dΩ(±1) = fixed. Then by using the available experimental (pion-nucleon and kaon-nucleon) phase shifts we obtained not only consistent experimental tests of the PMD-SQS optimality, but also strong experimental evidences for new principles in hadronic physics such as: Principle of nonextensivity conjugation via the Riesz-Thorin relation (1/2p + 1/2q = 1) and a new Principle of limited uncertainty in nonextensive quantum physics. The strong experimental evidence obtained here for the nonextensive statistical behavior of the [J,

  12. Neutron therapy planning: Principles and practice in Edinburgh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Williams, J.R.; Redpath, A.T.; Arnott, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of treatment planning using beams of fast neutron irradiation are the same as that involved in X-ray therapy. The optimum treatment technique to be employed and the standard of dose distribution depend on the penetration of the beam, the sophistication of the treatment head and certain clinical constraints. These inter-related factors are briefly discussed. The Edinburgh Cyclotron produces d(15)+Be neutrons and compared to megavoltage X-rays it is necessary to use a greater number of fields, respect greater restraints on planning and, when wedge filters are used, accept relatively higher doses in 'hot spots'. With careful and detailed planning satisfactory dose distributions can be achieved. The procedures followed in clinical planning, field selection and dose computation are described. (orig.)

  13. Microfluidics and nanofluidics handbook chemistry, physics, and life science principles

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Sushanta K

    2011-01-01

    The Microfluidics and Nanofluidics Handbook: Two-Volume Set comprehensively captures the cross-disciplinary breadth of the fields of micro- and nanofluidics, which encompass the biological sciences, chemistry, physics and engineering applications. To fill the knowledge gap between engineering and the basic sciences, the editors pulled together key individuals, well known in their respective areas, to author chapters that help graduate students, scientists, and practicing engineers understand the overall area of microfluidics and nanofluidics. Topics covered include Cell Lysis Techniques in Lab-on-a-Chip Technology Electrodics in Electrochemical Energy Conversion Systems: Microstructure and Pore-Scale Transport Microscale Gas Flow Dynamics and Molecular Models for Gas Flow and Heat Transfer Microscopic Hemorheology and Hemodynamics Covering physics and transport phenomena along with life sciences and related applications, Volume One: Chemistry, Physics, and Life Science Principles provides readers with the fun...

  14. Effect of physical therapy on breast cancer related lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambour, Mette; Tange, Berit; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical therapy treatment of patients with lymphedema includes treatment based on the principles of 'Complete Decongestive Therapy' (CDT). CDT consists of the following components; skin care, manual lymphatic drainage, bandaging and exercises. The scientific evidence regarding what...... trial. A total of 160 breast cancer patients with arm lymphedema will be recruited from 3 hospitals and randomized into one of two treatment groups A: Complete Decongestive Therapy including manual drainage or B: Complete Decongestive Therapy without manual lymphatic drainage. The intervention period...... type of treatment is most effective is sparse. The objective of this study is to investigate whether CDT is equally effective if it includes manual lymphatic drainage or not in the treatment of arm lymphedema among patients with breast cancer. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized, single-blind, equivalence...

  15. Physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Constantine G; Winfree, Erik

    2017-06-19

    DNA tiles provide a promising technique for assembling structures with nanoscale resolution through self-assembly by basic interactions rather than top-down assembly of individual structures. Tile systems can be programmed to grow based on logical rules, allowing for a small number of tile types to assemble large, complex assemblies that can retain nanoscale resolution. Such algorithmic systems can even assemble different structures using the same tiles, based on inputs that seed the growth. While programming and theoretical analysis of tile self-assembly often makes use of abstract logical models of growth, experimentally implemented systems are governed by nanoscale physical processes that can lead to very different behavior, more accurately modeled by taking into account the thermodynamics and kinetics of tile attachment and detachment in solution. This review discusses the relationships between more abstract and more physically realistic tile assembly models. A central concern is how consideration of model differences enables the design of tile systems that robustly exhibit the desired abstract behavior in realistic physical models and in experimental implementations. Conversely, we identify situations where self-assembly in abstract models can not be well-approximated by physically realistic models, putting constraints on physical relevance of the abstract models. To facilitate the discussion, we introduce a unified model of tile self-assembly that clarifies the relationships between several well-studied models in the literature. Throughout, we highlight open questions regarding the physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

  16. Magnetic resonance angiography: Physical principles and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausmann, R.; Mueller, E.

    1992-01-01

    Within the last four years magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) developed very rapidly towards a well accepted screening technique for vascular examinations as a fast add-on to conventional MR. This review describes the basic physical principles as well as the different methods like time-of-flight and phase-sensitive MRA for visualization of blood vessels. Different applications of 3D, 2D sequential and 3D multivolume MRA are shown from various regions of the head and body. A short outlock to quantitative flow measurments is given in the last chapter including some interesting applications of these techniques which show the still expanding potential of magnetic resonance. (orig.) [de

  17. Pelvic floor physical therapy in urogynecologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarinos, Rhonda K

    2003-08-01

    Physical therapists are uniquely qualified to treat pelvic floor dysfunction with conservative management techniques. Techniques associated with incontinence and support functions of the pelvic floor include bladder training and pelvic floor rehabilitation: pelvic floor exercises, biofeedback therapy, and pelvic floor electrical stimulation. Pain associated with mechanical pelvic floor dysfunction can be treated by physical therapists utilizing various manual techniques and modalities. Research documents that conservative management is effective in treating many conditions associated with pelvic floor dysfunction. Research should be conducted to determine if addressing diastasis recti and contracture of the pelvic floor musculature should be a component of the standard physical therapy protocol.

  18. Using Axline's Eight Principles of Play Therapy with Mexican-American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Sylvia Z.; Flores-Torres, Leila L.; Kranz, Peter L.; Lund, Nick L.

    2005-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature on the application of client-centered play therapy to diverse cultures. In this regard, the purpose of the article is to discuss considerations related to using Axline's eight principles of play therapy with Mexican-American children. The principles involve multicultural acceptance and understanding, relationship…

  19. Where and how does physical therapy fit? Integrating physical therapy into interprofessional HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Heather; Andrews, Matthew; Cudd, Stephanie; Leung, Ellie; Petrie, Alana; Chan Carusone, Soo; O'Brien, Kelly K

    2018-03-13

    To investigate the role of physical therapy in HIV care from the perspective of people living with HIV and health care professionals with expertise in HIV care. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using semistructured interviews (with health care professionals) and focus groups (with people living with HIV). We purposively sampled health care professionals and recruited people living with HIV in collaboration with an HIV-specialty hospital. We asked participants about their knowledge of and experiences with physical therapy, and perceptions of the physical therapy role in interprofessional HIV care. We analyzed data using content analytical techniques. Thirteen people living with HIV and 12 health care professionals conceptualized physical therapy as positively influencing independence and social participation, and as a valuable ally in interprofessional collaboration. The Framework of Physical Therapy Role in HIV Care consists of two components: (1) multidimensional and client-centered roles of physical therapy addressing physical, psychological and social health domains; and (2) contextual factors important to consider for the role of physical therapy: aging, episodic nature of HIV, multimorbidity, competing priorities, continuity of care, stigma, resource security and social isolation. The interaction between contextual factors and health domains can influence the role of physical therapy. The role of physical therapy in HIV is multidimensional and client-centered. This Framework can be used by rehabilitation professionals working with people living with HIV. Implications for Rehabilitation Participants living with HIV in this study experienced physical therapy as a means of addressing rehabilitation goals that positively influenced physical health and social participation. The role of physical therapy in HIV care is multidimensional and client-centered and can address health challenges in physical, social and psychological health domains. The presence

  20. Physical principles of thermoluminescence and recent developments in its measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, P.W.

    1974-01-01

    The physical principles which are the basis of thermoluminescence techniques for dating and authenticating archaeological and fine art objects are described in non-technical terms. Included is a discussion of the interaction of alpha particles, beta rays, i.e., energetic electrons, and gamma rays with solids, particularly electron-hole ion pair formation, and the trapping of charges by crystal imperfections. Also described is the charge-release process induced by heating and the accompanying emission of luminescence resulting from charge recombination and retrapping. The basic procedure for dating and/or authenticating an artifact is described in a ''how it is done'' manner. Lastly, recently developed apparatus is described for simultaneously measuring luminescent light intensity and wavelength and sample temperature. Examples of studies made with this ''3-D'' apparatus are given and applications to dating and authenticating are described. (U.S.)

  1. Physical principles of neutron-gamma materials monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarskii, G. Sh.

    1986-03-01

    The physical principles of secondary radiation methods in nondestructive testing are discussed. Among the techniques considered are: neutron activation analysis (NAA); the induced-radiation method; and quasialbedo recording of secondary gamma-radiation. Emphasis is given to the neutron-gamma method which consists of exposing test material to a neutron flux and recording the secondary gamma-radiation by means of a spectrometer. The limitations of the method in detecting local inhomogeneous defects (filled pores cracks, and inclusions) in metal layers and multicomponents materials are described, and some advantages of the method over NAA are discussed. Formulas are derived for estimating the optimum density of the gamma-ray flux which is received by the detector.

  2. A New "Principal Principle" (#14) of Physical Activity Education Is Emerging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Earle F.

    2011-01-01

    There is every reason to believe that a new "principal principle" of physical activity education is emerging. In this article, the author talks about the new "principal principle"(#14) of physical education. Revisiting a historical milestone in the field's history to explain the origin of the term "principal principle," Dr. Arthur H. Steinhaus,…

  3. Applications of the maximum entropy principle in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1990-01-01

    Soon after the advent of information theory the principle of maximum entropy was recognized as furnishing the missing rationale for the familiar rules of classical thermodynamics. More recently it has also been applied successfully in nuclear physics. As an elementary example we derive a physically meaningful macroscopic description of the spectrum of neutrons emitted in nuclear fission, and compare the well known result with accurate data on 252 Cf. A second example, derivation of an expression for resonance-averaged cross sections for nuclear reactions like scattering or fission, is less trivial. Entropy maximization, constrained by given transmission coefficients, yields probability distributions for the R- and S-matrix elements, from which average cross sections can be calculated. If constrained only by the range of the spectrum of compound-nuclear levels it produces the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE) of Hamiltonian matrices that again yields expressions for average cross sections. Both avenues give practically the same numbers in spite of the quite different cross section formulae. These results were employed in a new model-aided evaluation of the 238 U neutron cross sections in the unresolved resonance region. (orig.) [de

  4. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy part I - Systems and principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Eric J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: This course is designed for residents in radiation oncology, preparing for their boards. It includes the physics and chemistry of the absorption of radiation, a description of the biological systems used to obtain a quantitative relationship between dose and biological effect, as well as a review of the basic principles in radiation biology that have been established. The biological effects of radiation may result from the direct action, which refers to ionizations in the DNA itself, or the indirect action which is mediated by free radicals. For x or gamma rays, about 70% of the damage is by the indirect action, which can be modified by oxygen and various chemical agents. Radiation-induced DNA damage may lead to carcinogenesis and hereditary effects, which are important in personnel protection, or to cell lethality which is the basis of radiotherapy. Chromosome aberrations and cell lethality appear to result from the interaction of two lesions (probably double strand breaks) which leads to the linear-quadratic relationship. This refers to mitotic death, which is the most common form of radiation induced death. Programmed cell death orApoptosis also occurs which appears to be important in more radiosensitive tumors, and relatively unimportant in radioresistant tumors. A number of quantitative biological test systems have been developed to quantify the effects of radiation as a function of dose. Cells may be cultured in vitro, of normal and neoplastic origin, and survival curves produced with reproductive integrity plotted as a function of dose. Normal tissue systems where reproductive integrity can be scored as an endpoint include skin, gut, colony forming units in the bone marrow, as well as breast, thyroid and testis. The response of some normal tissues depends, not only on the fraction of cells killed, but on the tissue architecture in terms of functional subunits, this will be discussed in Part III. A range of transplantable tumors have been studied

  5. Ultra-high energy physics and standard basic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres Luis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It has not yet been elucidated whether the observed flux suppression for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR at energies above ≃ 4 x 1019 eV is a signature of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK cutoff or a consequence of other phenomena. In both cases, violations of the standard fundamental principles of Physics can be present and play a significant role. They can in particular modify cosmic-ray interactions, propagation or acceleration at very high energy. Thus, in a long-term program, UHECR data can hopefully be used to test relativity, quantum mechanics, energy and momentum conservation, vacuum properties... as well as the elementariness of standard particles. Data on cosmic rays at energies ≃ 1020 eV may also be sensitive to new physics generated well beyond Planck scale. A typical example is provided by the search for possible signatures of a Lorentz symmetry violation (LSV associated to a privileged local reference frame (the "vacuum rest frame", VRF. If a VRF exists, the internal structure of standard particles at ultra-high energy can undergo substantial modifications. Similarly, the conventional particle symmetries may cease to be valid at such energies instead of heading to a grand unification and the structure of vacuum may no longer be governed by standard quantum field theory. Then, the question whether the notion of Planck scale still makes sense clearly becomes relevant and the very grounds of Cosmology can undergo essential modifications. UHECR studies naturally interact with the interpretation of WMAP and Planck observations. Recent Planck data analyses tend to confirm the possible existence of a privileged space direction. If the observed phenomenon turns out to be a signature of the spinorial space-time (SST we suggested in 1996-97, then conventional Particle Physics may correspond to the local properties of standard matter at low enough energy and large enough distances. This would clearly strengthen the cosmological

  6. Review of electron beam therapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Almond, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    For over 50 years, electron beams have been an important modality for providing an accurate dose of radiation to superficial cancers and disease and for limiting the dose to underlying normal tissues and structures. This review looks at many of the important contributions of physics and dosimetry to the development and utilization of electron beam therapy, including electron treatment machines, dose specification and calibration, dose measurement, electron transport calculations, treatment and treatment-planning tools, and clinical utilization, including special procedures. Also, future changes in the practice of electron therapy resulting from challenges to its utilization and from potential future technology are discussed. (review)

  7. Ethical principles for novel therapies in veterinary practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, J W

    2016-02-01

    To present insights to aid decision-making about novel veterinary treatments from regulations concerning animal experimentation and human clinical medical trials. EU Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes and EU Regulation 536/2014 on clinical trials on medicinal products for human use were analysed, evaluated and "translated" into relevant principles for veterinary surgeons. A number of principles are relevant, relating to treatment expectations, thresholds and objectives; client consent; minimising harms; personnel; review committees; assessment and publication. These principles should assist veterinary surgeons to make good ethical decisions about novel treatments. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  8. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Liu, Lucie X; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-01-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes. (topical review)

  9. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Liu, Lucie X.; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2017-04-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  10. Gamification in physical therapy: More than using games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J; Verschuren, O.; Renger, W.J.; Ermers, J.; Ketelaar, M.; Ee, R. van

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of computer games in physical therapy is motivated by characteristics such as attractiveness, motivation, and engagement, but these do not guarantee the intended therapeutic effect of the interventions. Yet, these characteristics are important variables in physical therapy

  11. Gamification in Physical Therapy : More Than Using Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Joep; Verschuren, Olaf; Renger, Willem Jan; Ermers, Jose; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; van Ee, Raymond

    The implementation of computer games in physical therapy is motivated by characteristics such as attractiveness, motivation, and engagement, but these do not guarantee the intended therapeutic effect of the interventions. Yet, these characteristics are important variables in physical therapy

  12. Physical engineering and medical physics on boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    The contents of physical engineering and medical physics that support boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be roughly classified to the four items, (1) neutron irradiation system, (2) development and improvement of dose assessment techniques, (3) development and improvement of dose planning system, and (4) quality assurance and quality control. This paper introduces the BNCT at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, with a focus on the basic physics of BNCT, thermal neutron irradiation and epithermal neutron irradiation, heavy water neutron irradiation facilities of KUR, and medical irradiation system of KUR. It also introduces the world's first BNCT clinical cyclotron irradiation system (C-BENS) of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, BNCT dose assessment techniques, dose planning system, and quality assurance and quality control. (A.O.)

  13. BIOMECHANICAL PRINCIPLES PHYSICAL REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Korshunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We studied the basic biomechanical principles of physical rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy.Materials and methods. Methods of Motion Tracking and electromyography investigated the biomechanical characteristics of gait in children with cerebral palsy. It is shown that the main differences between dynamic stereotype walk pediatric patients is to delay moving forward center of gravity and the disorganization of the lower limb movements (especially knee in the vertical plane. Prevailing flexion - leading position of the lower extremities during locomotion cycle associated with limitation of motion in the hip joint, offset by an increase swinging body, weakening activity in the rear shock phase and its sharp increase in the fourth phase. Changes in the structure of the movement of the shoulder girdle and upper extremities can be considered as compensatory. Characteristically excessive involvement in the locomotion of the calf muscles and the rectus muscles of the back, with the central mechanisms gipersinhronizatsii activity of motor units are the primary mechanism for adaptation in a group of children that are capable of self-locomotion.Results. As a result of the research it shows that in motor rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy should include the following elements: exercise to maintain the body balance when performing arm movements, exercises for coordination of hand movements, including motor brushes, exercises to increase mobility in the hip joints and in the back, exercises designed to exercise the calf muscles, the front thigh muscles and the rectus muscles of the back, massage to relieve hyper calf muscles. 

  14. Physical Therapy Protocols for Arthroscopic Bankart Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFroda, Steven F; Mehta, Nabil; Owens, Brett D

    Outcomes after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be highly dependent on compliance and participation in physical therapy. Additionally, there are many variations in physician-recommended physical therapy protocols. The rehabilitation protocols of academic orthopaedic surgery departments vary widely despite the presence of consensus protocols. Descriptive epidemiology study. Level 3. Web-based arthroscopic Bankart rehabilitation protocols available online from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited orthopaedic surgery programs were included for review. Individual protocols were reviewed to evaluate for the presence or absence of recommended therapies, goals for completion of ranges of motion, functional milestones, exercise start times, and recommended time to return to sport. Thirty protocols from 27 (16.4%) total institutions were identified out of 164 eligible for review. Overall, 9 (30%) protocols recommended an initial period of strict immobilization. Variability existed between the recommended time periods for sling immobilization (mean, 4.8 ± 1.8 weeks). The types of exercises and their start dates were also inconsistent. Goals to full passive range of motion (mean, 9.2 ± 2.8 weeks) and full active range of motion (mean, 12.2 ± 2.8 weeks) were consistent with other published protocols; however, wide ranges existed within the reviewed protocols as a whole. Only 10 protocols (33.3%) included a timeline for return to sport, and only 3 (10%) gave an estimate for return to game competition. Variation also existed when compared with the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' (ASSET) consensus protocol. Rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic Bankart repair were found to be highly variable. They also varied with regard to published consensus protocols. This discrepancy may lead to confusion among therapists and patients. This study highlights the importance of attending surgeons being very clear and specific with

  15. Elementary physical approach to Mach's principle and its observational basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, Z.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that Mach's principle and the general principle of relativity are logical consequences of a 'materialistic postulate' and that general relativity implies the validity of Mach's principle for a static (or quasistatic) homogeneous and isotropic universe, spatially self-enclosed. The finite velocity of propagation of gravitational field does not imply a retardation of inertial forces due to the distant masses and therefore does not exclude the validity of Mach's principle. Similarly, the experimentally verified isotropy of inertia is compatible with this principle. The recent observational evidence of very high isotropy of the actual universe proves that the 'anti-Machian' Godel world model must be rejected as a nonphysical one. This suggests the possibility of a renaissance of Einstein's first cosmological model by considering-in the spirit of an older idea of Herbert Dingle-a superlarge-scale quasistatic universe consisting of an unknown number of statistically oscillating regions similar to our own, momentarily expanding, metagalaxy. (author)

  16. 42 CFR 410.60 - Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services furnished under § 410.62; (iii) Outpatient physical therapy and speech-language pathology services... physical therapy and speech-language pathology services furnished by a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions...

  17. Modern Principles of Oral Rehydration Therapy in Treatment of Acute Enteric Infections In Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Ye. Abaturov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with basic principles of oral rehydration therapy in children with infectious diarrhea, which occur with the development of exsicosis. It was emphasized that prescription of oral rehydration therapy promotes more rapid recovery of children and prevents adverse outcomes.

  18. Disability reconsidered: the paradox of physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Susan E; Sharby, Nancy

    2011-12-01

    The purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to explore models of disability from the perspective of the academic discipline of disability studies (DS), (2) to consider the paradox of improving functional capacities while valuing disability as diversity, (3) to identify how physical therapy's use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) disablement model intersects with various disability models, and (4) to apply this broader understanding of disability to physical therapist practice, education, and research. The DS literature has been critical of rehabilitation professionals, particularly targeting the medical model of disability. In contrast, advocates for a social model of disability recognize disability as diversity. It is paradoxical for physical therapy to simultaneously work to ameliorate disability while celebrating it as diversity. The ICF biopsychosocial disablement model offers a mechanism to practice within this paradox and suggests that it is no longer sufficient to conceptualize disability as a purely individual matter that requires attention in isolation from the impact of the larger society.

  19. [Etiopathogenesis of diarrhea and basic principles of diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, J

    2002-06-01

    Acute diarrhoea is worldwide the second most frequent disease after acute inflammations of the airways. Chronic diarrhoea is a less frequent disease, nevertheless the GP, specialist in internal medicine or gastroenterologist encounters it very frequently. For correct understanding of basic diagnostic and therapeutic principles of diarrhoea knowledge of its etiopathogenesis is necessary. In the submitted review the author mentions the functions of the small and large intestine and their part in the development of diarrhoea. He gives also the definition and classification of diarrhoea. The author presents the basic characteristics of osmotic, secretory, inflammatory, motor diarrhoea and diarrhoea associated with increased intestinal filtration. The basic diagnostic and therapeutic principles are in the last part of the review which has an educational character.

  20. Autoimmune Thyroiditis: Clinical Course Features and Principles of Differential Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Ye. Bobyryova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Constant increase in the incidence of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT in different regions of Ukraine puts this problem in actual number that determines the need to identify features of the clinical course of AIT, the principles of differentiated treatment depending on the nature of the metabolic changes and taking into account regional differences in thyroid pathology, particularly AIT. The paper presents data on the study of features of clinical course and complex treatment of AIT.

  1. Music-evoked emotions: principles, brain correlates, and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes principles underlying the evocation of emotion with music: evaluation, resonance, memory, expectancy/tension, imagination, understanding, and social functions. Each of these principles includes several subprinciples, and the framework on music-evoked emotions emerging from these principles and subprinciples is supposed to provide a starting point for a systematic, coherent, and comprehensive theory on music-evoked emotions that considers both reception and production of music, as well as the relevance of emotion-evoking principles for music therapy. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Occupational therapy and physiotherapy for the patient with burns: principles and management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, M; King, S; Edgar, D

    2003-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are a tool to assist with clinical decision making. They provide information about the care for a condition and make recommendations based on research evidence, which can be adapted locally. A focus group within the Allied Health Interest Group of the Australian and New Zealand Burn Association has compiled the "Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy for the Patient with Burns--Principles and Management Guidelines." These guidelines are designed as a practical guide to the relevant clinical knowledge and therapy intervention techniques required for effective patient management. Content areas include respiratory management, edema management, splinting and positioning, physical function (mobility, function, exercise), scar management, and psychosocial and mutual elements. The document has undergone extensive review by members of the Australian and New Zealand Burn Association to ensure clarity, internal consistency, and acceptability. The guidelines have been endorsed by the Australian and New Zealand Burn Association. An abridged version of the guidelines is included in this article, with the full document available from www.anzba.org.au.

  3. Principles of Bobath neuro-developmental therapy in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimont, L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the basics of Bobath Neurodevelopment Therapy (NDT) for the rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy, based on the fundamentals of neurophysiology. Two factors are continually stressed in therapy: first, postural tension, whose quality provides the foundation for the development of motor coordination, both normal and pathological, and plays a role in shaping the mechanism of the normal postural reflex; and secondly, the impact of damage to the central nervous system on the process of its growth and development. The practical application of the theoretical assumptions includes the use of inhibition, facilitation, and stimulation by key points of control, preparatory to evoking more nearly normal motor responses.

  4. [Physiotherapy and physical therapy in pain management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, M; Seeger, D; Schöps, P

    2015-10-01

    Patients attend physiotherapy and physical therapy (PT) due to pain problems and/or functional impairments. Although the main focus for therapists has traditionally been physical examination and treatment of tissue structures and biomechanics, over the last few decades a growing body of research has highlighted the importance of central nervous system processing and psychosocial contributors to pain perception. Treatment with PT aims to reduce disability and suffering by reducing pain and increasing tolerance to movement. In Germany, pain management conducted by physiotherapists is currently undergoing major changes. Firstly, PT education is transitioning from a vocational to a degree level and additionally new concepts for improved multidisciplinary treatment approaches are being developed. However, there still remain substantial differences between therapists working in multidisciplinary pain clinics and those following medical referral in private practices. This article provides information on how national and international impulses have contributed to the development of different concepts of passive therapies and active/functional pain rehabilitation in Germany. In the future PT will need to provide more evidence about efficiency and modes of actions for different treatment options to selectively reason the application to patients with acute, subacute and chronic pain.

  5. Physical Therapy for Neurological Conditions in Geriatric Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeli, Eli

    2017-01-01

    With more of the world's population surviving longer, individuals often face age-related neurology disorders and decline of function that can affect lifestyle and well-being. Despite neurophysiological changes affecting the brain function and structure, the aged brain, in some degree, can learn and relearn due to neuroplasticity. Recent advances in rehabilitation techniques have produced better functional outcomes in age-related neurological conditions. Physical therapy (PT) of the elderly individual focuses in particular on sensory-motor impairments, postural control coordination, and prevention of sarcopenia. Geriatric PT has a significant influence on quality of life, independent living, and life expectancy. However, in many developed and developing countries, the profession of PT is underfunded and understaffed. This article provides a brief overview on (a) age-related disease of central nervous system and (b) the principles, approaches, and doctrines of motor skill learning and point out the most common treatment models that PTs use for neurological patients.

  6. Applying principles of intercultural communication to personality disorder therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leising, Daniel

    2008-09-01

    Psychotherapy with patients who were diagnosed with a personality disorder bears a strong resemblance to intercultural communication. I suggest conceptualizing the situation of a patient with a personality disorder as being similar to that of an overseas traveller. Like the traveller, the patient faces the task of getting along in a social environment that does not share many of his or her ingrained values regarding 'appropriate' interpersonal behaviour. In order to reduce the potential for misunderstandings and interpersonal problems, the patient would benefit from (a) learning about the culturally accepted rules of interacting and (b) partly adopting those rules. Borrowing from training manuals for intercultural communication, I suggest a number of therapeutic principles that specifically address the discrepancies between the patient's habits and internalized values, and the cultural conventions that govern the social environment in which the patient lives.

  7. Radiobiology in clinical radiation therapy - Part I: Systems and principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Eric J.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: This course is designed for residents in radiation oncology, preparing for their boards. It begins with the principles of cell and molecular biology as they relate to carcinogenesis, and concentrates on the principles of radiation biology that have been established by the use of quantitative biological systems. Malignant cells are characterized by their capacity for unlimited proliferation; this change from normal cells is the consequence of genetic changes that may include the activation of dominantly acting oncogenes and/or the deletion of recessively acting tumor suppressor genes. The biological effects of radiation may result from the direct action, which refers to ionizations in the DNA itself, or the indirect action which is mediated by free radicals. Radiation-induced DNA damage may lead to carcinogenesis and hereditary effects, which are important in personnel protection, or to cell lethality which is the basis of radiotherapy. Chromosome aberrations and cell lethality appear to result from the interaction of two lesions (probably double strand breaks) which leads to the ubiquitous linear-quadratic relationship. This refers to mitotic death, which is the most common form of radiation induced death. Programmed cell death or Apoptosis also occurs which is important in more radiosensitive tumors, and relatively unimportant in radioresistant tumors. A number of quantitative biological test systems have been developed to quantify the effects of radiation as a function of dose. Cells may be cultured in vitro, of normal and neoplastic origin, and survival curves produced with reproductive integrity plotted as a function of dose. Normal tissue systems where reproductive integrity can be scored as an endpoint include skin, gut, colony forming units in the bone marrow, as well as breast, thyroid and testis. The response of some normal tissues depends, not only on the fraction of cells killed, but on the tissue architecture in terms of functional subunits

  8. Scattering theory in quantum mechanics. Physical principles and mathematical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrein, W.O.; Jauch, J.M.; Sinha, K.B.

    1977-01-01

    A contemporary approach is given to the classical topics of physics. The purpose is to explain the basic physical concepts of quantum scattering theory, to develop the necessary mathematical tools for their description, to display the interrelation between the three methods (the Schroedinger equation solutions, stationary scattering theory, and time dependence) to derive the properties of various quantities of physical interest with mathematically rigorous methods

  9. Physical Principles of Discrete Hierarchies Formation in Protein Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshko, E. V.; Tverdislov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    A model for chiral periodicity with alternating chiral sense in hierarchies of protein and nucleic acid structures is proposed and substantiated. Regular alternation of the chirality sense is revealed in transitions from the lowest to higher levels of structural-functional organization in proteins where it is L-D-L-D. The stratification principle combines the ideas of biomacromolecules folding and molecular biological machines.

  10. Pedagogical Principles of Learning to Teach Meaningful Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Chróinín, Déirdre; Fletcher, Tim; O'Sullivan, Mary

    2018-01-01

    Background: Concerns that current forms of physical education teacher education (PETE) are not adequately providing teachers with the tools necessary for working with the realities and challenges of teaching physical education in contemporary schools has led some scholars to advocate for an approach that prioritises meaningfulness in physical…

  11. Some method for teaching physics to residents in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.B.

    A method is presented for teaching physics to residents in radiation therapy. Some of the various responsabilities of a hospital physicist are listed, with particular reference to radiation therapy departments [pt

  12. Oncology. Pt. 1. General part, epidemiology - pathogenesis - basic principles of therapy. 2. upd. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Bartram Claus R.

    2010-01-01

    The book Oncology is aimed to communicate the compiled knowledge on tumor development and cancer: fundamental knowledge base, practice related know-how for diagnostics and therapy. Part 1 includes the following chapters: epidemiology and pathogenesis, basic principles of diagnostics, basic principles of therapy, complication of malign growth, tumors in the gastrointestinal tract, female genital carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract carcinomas, respiratory tract and lung carcinomas, carcinomas in the head - neck area, bone and soft tissue carcinomas, pediatric tumors, hematological neoplasm, other carcinomas. The book can be used as reference for clinical work. [de

  13. Osteoarthritis, Application of Physical Therapy Proceduers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijana Avdić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a group of overlapping disorders, which may have different aetiology but similar biological, morphologic and clinical outcome. In osteoarthritis, process will not encompass the joint cartilage only, but the entire joint, including sub-hondral bone, ligaments, capsule, and sinovial membrane and surrounding muscles. Osteoarthritis is a multi-factor disorder of sinovial joints, which occurs as result of mechanical and biological factors, which destabilise normal hondrocyte function, partitioning of cartilage, extra-cellular matrix and sub-hondral bone. The earliest changes, which are restricted to the joint cartilage surface only, do not cause any subjective feeling. The pain in arthrosis occurs (or re-occurs a bit later, Diagnosis will be determined based on clinical exam as well as signs and symptoms present. Symptomatic and functional treatment of osteoarthritis as one of rheumatic disorders must be taken throughout years, sometimes throughout a lifetime. It encompasses application of many medications and physical therapy procedures.

  14. Physics for health from diagnosis to therapy; La physique pour la sante du diagnostic a la therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibler, M.; Poizat, J.C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2003-07-01

    The different titles of conferences and contributions are as follow: interaction of waves and particles with biological matter; living signals and their interpretation; scanner: principle, technology, applications; nuclear medicine: gamma camera and positron cameras; medical physics: outlets and professions; electro neurology: electric signals (EEG) and magnetic signals (M.E.G.); medical imaging: the photons techniques; lasers, diagnostic tools: example of application to the detection of dental caries; nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); ultrasonics: medical applications; animals models and imaging; laboratories on chips: physics and chemistry in the wings of the genomic revolution; biomaterials; ultrasonics: from fundamental physics to medicine; imaging by ultrashort laser pulses; Pull and twist a molecule of DNA or how watch an enzyme working; treatment of cancers by ionizing radiations; hadron therapy by light ions: situation of the E.T.O.I.L.E. project; PET imaging in hadron therapy; evaluation and management of risks linked to the physical methods of investigation. (N.C.)

  15. Experiential learning in physical therapy education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith SN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan N Smith, Amy F Crocker School of Physical Therapy, University of the Incarnate Word, San Antonio, TX, USA Background and purpose: Experiential learning can provide students in entry-level physical therapy (PT education programs the opportunity to practice skills and techniques, learned in the classroom, in a real-world setting. Experiential learning is currently being utilized in all entry-level PT programs in the form of professional practice experiences but may be integrated throughout the curriculum to enhance student engagement and knowledge application and retention. The purpose of this paper is to express the need for increased integration of experiential learning into entry-level PT education curricula. Position and rationale: Experiential learning can effectively replace a portion of in-class laboratory time in entry-level PT education programs. Several methods of experiential learning exist, including simulation, integrated clinical experiences, service learning, community patient resource groups, and professional practice opportunities. Students benefit from the ability to practice hands-on skills in a safe, nonjudgmental environment. Students can still experience consequences of poor decisions but can have multiple opportunities to master the skill without the fear of negative outcomes. Incorporation of high-risk age ranges and diagnoses can be achieved through simulation. Discussion and conclusion: Experiential learning can be integrated into any PT curriculum if faculties are committed and flexible. Experiential learning may be particularly useful in specialty practice areas where there are fewer opportunities for students to practice skills. The practice of reflection upon experiences that is commonly performed in conjunction with experiential learning will help prepare students for the type of reflective practice that is essential to transition from novice to expert practitioners. Keywords: simulation, integrated clinical

  16. Photodynamic therapy and diagnosis: Principles and comparative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Jane; de Queiroz, Genilson Fernandes; Golding, Jon P

    2018-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an evolving method of treating superficial tumours that is non-invasive and carries minimal risk of toxicity. It combines tumour-selective photosensitiser dyes, tissue oxygen and targeted illumination to generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the tumour. In addition to directly acting on tumour cells, PDT damages and restricts tumour microvasculature, and causes a local inflammatory response that stimulates an immune response against the tumour. Unlike surgery or radiotherapy, the surrounding extracellular matrix is unaffected by PDT; thus, tissue healing is excellent and PDT seldom causes scars. This, combined with the ease of light application, has made PDT a popular treatment for cancers and pre-cancerous conditions in human beings. Moreover, because photosensitiser dyes are fluorescent and selectively accumulate in tumour tissues, they can additionally be used to visualise and discriminate tumour from normal tissues, thereby improving the accuracy of tumour surgery. In veterinary practice, PDT has been used successfully for treatment of superficial squamous cell carcinomas of the feline nasal planum; urinary tract, urinary bladder and prostate neoplasia in dogs; and equine sarcoids. The purpose of this article is to provide a comparative review of the current literature on PDT in human and veterinary medicine, and to establish a basis for future development of PDT in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells physical principles of materials and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Eikerling, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a systematic and profound account of scientific challenges in fuel cell research. The introductory chapters bring readers up to date on the urgency and implications of the global energy challenge, the prospects of electrochemical energy conversion technologies, and the thermodynamic and electrochemical principles underlying the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The book then presents the scientific challenges in fuel cell research as a systematic account of distinct components, length scales, physicochemical processes, and scientific disciplines. The main part of t

  18. Generalized Tellegen Principle and Physical Correctness of System Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Cerny

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a new problem of physical correctness detection in the area of strictly causal system representations. The proposed approach to the problem solution is based on generalization of Tellegen's theorem well known from electrical engineering. Consequently, mathematically as well as physically correct results are obtained. Some known and often used system representation structures are discussed from the developed point of view as an addition.

  19. Anthropic principle and the structure of the physical world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, B J; Rees, M J [Cambridge Univ. Inst. of Astronomy (UK)

    1979-04-12

    It is stated that the basic features of galaxies, stars, planets and the everyday world are essentially determined by a few microphysical constants and by the effects of gravitation. Many interrelations between different scales that at first sight seem surprising are straightforward consequences of simple physical arguments. Several aspects of our Universe - some of which seem to be prerequisites for the evolution of any form of life -depend rather delicately on apparent 'coincidences' among the physical constants.

  20. Alternative approaches to research in physical therapy: positivism and phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, K F; Jensen, G M; Schmoll, B J; Hack, L M; Gwyer, J

    1993-02-01

    This article presents philosophical approaches to research in physical therapy. A comparison is made to demonstrate how the research purpose, research design, research methods, and research data differ when one approaches research from the philosophical perspective of positivism (predominantly quantitative) as compared with the philosophical perspective of phenomenology (predominantly qualitative). Differences between the two approaches are highlighted by examples from research articles published in Physical Therapy. The authors urge physical therapy researchers to become familiar with the tenets, rigor, and knowledge gained from the use of both approaches in order to increase their options in conducting research relevant to the practice of physical therapy.

  1. Principles of general relativity theory in terms of the present day physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervushin, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    A hystory of gradual unification of general relativity theory and quantum field theory on the basis of unified geometrical principles is detected. The gauge invariance principles became universal for construction of all physical theories. Quantum mechanics, electrodynamics and Einstein gravitation theory were used to form geometrical principles. Identity of inertial and gravitational masses is an experimental basis of the general relativity theory (GRT). It is shown that correct understanding of GRT bases is a developing process related to the development of the present physics and stimulating this development

  2. 42 CFR 409.23 - Physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech-language pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-language pathology. 409.23 Section 409.23 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... § 409.23 Physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech-language pathology. Medicare pays for... therapy or speech-language pathology services must be furnished— (1) By qualified physical therapists...

  3. Physically based principles of cell adhesion mechanosensitivity in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladoux, Benoit; Nicolas, Alice

    2012-01-01

    The minimal structural unit that defines living organisms is a single cell. By proliferating and mechanically interacting with each other, cells can build complex organization such as tissues that ultimately organize into even more complex multicellular living organisms, such as mammals, composed of billions of single cells interacting with each other. As opposed to passive materials, living cells actively respond to the mechanical perturbations occurring in their environment. Tissue cell adhesion to its surrounding extracellular matrix or to neighbors is an example of a biological process that adapts to physical cues. The adhesion of tissue cells to their surrounding medium induces the generation of intracellular contraction forces whose amplitude adapts to the mechanical properties of the environment. In turn, solicitation of adhering cells with physical forces, such as blood flow shearing the layer of endothelial cells in the lumen of arteries, reinforces cell adhesion and impacts cell contractility. In biological terms, the sensing of physical signals is transduced into biochemical signaling events that guide cellular responses such as cell differentiation, cell growth and cell death. Regarding the biological and developmental consequences of cell adaptation to mechanical perturbations, understanding mechanotransduction in tissue cell adhesion appears as an important step in numerous fields of biology, such as cancer, regenerative medicine or tissue bioengineering for instance. Physicists were first tempted to view cell adhesion as the wetting transition of a soft bag having a complex, adhesive interaction with the surface. But surprising responses of tissue cell adhesion to mechanical cues challenged this view. This, however, did not exclude that cell adhesion could be understood in physical terms. It meant that new models and descriptions had to be created specifically for these biological issues, and could not straightforwardly be adapted from dead matter

  4. Using spatial principles to optimize distributed computing for enabling the physical science discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaowei; Wu, Huayi; Huang, Qunying; Li, Zhenlong; Li, Jing

    2011-04-05

    Contemporary physical science studies rely on the effective analyses of geographically dispersed spatial data and simulations of physical phenomena. Single computers and generic high-end computing are not sufficient to process the data for complex physical science analysis and simulations, which can be successfully supported only through distributed computing, best optimized through the application of spatial principles. Spatial computing, the computing aspect of a spatial cyberinfrastructure, refers to a computing paradigm that utilizes spatial principles to optimize distributed computers to catalyze advancements in the physical sciences. Spatial principles govern the interactions between scientific parameters across space and time by providing the spatial connections and constraints to drive the progression of the phenomena. Therefore, spatial computing studies could better position us to leverage spatial principles in simulating physical phenomena and, by extension, advance the physical sciences. Using geospatial science as an example, this paper illustrates through three research examples how spatial computing could (i) enable data intensive science with efficient data/services search, access, and utilization, (ii) facilitate physical science studies with enabling high-performance computing capabilities, and (iii) empower scientists with multidimensional visualization tools to understand observations and simulations. The research examples demonstrate that spatial computing is of critical importance to design computing methods to catalyze physical science studies with better data access, phenomena simulation, and analytical visualization. We envision that spatial computing will become a core technology that drives fundamental physical science advancements in the 21st century.

  5. Inorganic scintillators for detector systems physical principles and crystal engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, Paul; Korzhik, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    This second edition features new chapters highlighting advances in our understanding of the behavior and properties of scintillators, and the discovery of new families of materials with light yield and excellent energy resolution very close to the theoretical limit. The book focuses on the discovery of next-generation scintillation materials and on a deeper understanding of fundamental processes. Such novel materials with high light yield as well as significant advances in crystal engineering offer exciting new perspectives. Most promising is the application of scintillators for precise time tagging of events, at the level of 100 ps or higher, heralding a new era in medical applications and particle physics. Since the discovery of the Higgs Boson with a clear signature in the lead tungstate scintillating blocks of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter detector, the current trend in particle physics is toward very high luminosity colliders, in which timing performance will ultimately be essential to mitigating...

  6. Facilitating Transfer of Skills and Strategies in Occupational Therapy Practice: Practical Application of Transfer Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babulal, Ganesh M; Foster, Erin R; Wolf, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    In Occupational Therapy (OT) practice, practitioners assume that the skills and strategies taught to clients during rehabilitation will transfer to performance and participation in everyday life. Despite transfer serving as a practice foundation, outcome studies conclude that this assumption of transfer is not occurring and it often results in decreased efficacy of rehabilitation. This paper investigated key aspects of transfer and found concepts in the psychology literature that can support transfer of skills and strategies in OT. Six key principles proposed from educational psychology can serve as a guide for practitioners to better train for transfer. In this paper, we discuss the six principles and apply concepts from psychology. Each principle is supported with examples of how they may be incorporated OT practice. If occupational therapists understand these principles and implement them in treatment, the efficacy of treatment may improve for many populations.

  7. Shock waves: a new physical principle in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, W

    1986-01-01

    Shock wave therapy of kidney- and gallstones, i.e. extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), is a new, noninvasive technique to destroy concrements in the kidney, the gallbladder and in the ductus choledochus. This method was developed by the Dornier Company, Friedrichshafen, FRG, and tested in animal experiments at the Institute for Surgical Research of the University of Munich. In the meantime, kidney lithotripsy has gained world-wide acceptance. More than 60,000 patients suffering from urolithiasis have been treated successfully, what made surgical removal of their kidney stones obsolete. Gallstone lithotripsy is, however, still at the very beginning of clinical trial. Lithotripsy of gallbladder stones will have to be applied in combination with urso- or chenodesoxycholic acid in order to obtain complete dissolution of the fragments. Potential hazards to living tissues are briefly mentioned. Since the lung is particularly susceptible, shock waves must enter the body at an angle which ensures that lung tissue is not affected.

  8. Physical and measuring principles of nuclear well logging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loetzsch, U.; Winkler, R.

    1981-01-01

    Proceeding from the general task of nuclear geophysics as a special discipline of applied geophyscis, the essential physical problems of nuclear well logging techniques are considered. Particularly, the quantitative relationship between measured values and interesting geologic parameters to be determined are discussed taking into account internal and external perturbation parameters. Resulting from this study, the technological requirements for radiation sources and their shielding, for detectors, electronic circuits in logging tools, signal transmission by cable and recording equipment are derived, and explained on the basis of examples of gamma-gamma and neutron-neutron logging. (author)

  9. Laser physics from principles to practical work in the lab

    CERN Document Server

    Eichhorn, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This textbook originates from a lecture course in laser physics at the Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A main goal in the conception of this textbook was to describe the fundamentals of lasers in a uniform and especially lab-oriented notation and formulation as well as many currently well-known laser types, becoming more and more important in the future. It closes a gap between the measureable spectroscopic quantities and the whole theoretical description and modeling. This textbook contains not only the fundamentals and the context of laser physics in a mathematical and methodical approach important for university-level studies. It allows simultaneously, owing to its conception and its modern notation, to directly implement and use the learned matter in the practical lab work. It is presented in a format suitable for everybody who wants not only to understand the fundamentals of lasers but also use modern lasers or even develop and make laser setups. T...

  10. Comparison of Efficacy of Neural Therapy and Physical Therapy in Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Sahin, Fusun; Atalay, Ali; Akkaya, Nuray

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of neural therapy, and physical therapy on level of pain, disability, quality of life, and psychological status in patients with chronic low back pain. Patients admitted to the physical therapy and rehabilitation outpatient clinic with the complaint of low back pain of at least 3 months duration. Group 1 (n=27), physical therapy (PT, hotpack, ultrasound, TENS 15 sessions), group 2 (n=33), neural therapy (NT, 1:1 mixture of 20 mg/mL...

  11. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choogn-Seock [Princeton University

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  12. WE-D-BRB-01: Basic Physics of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjomandy, B. [McLaren Cancer Institute (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  13. WE-D-BRB-01: Basic Physics of Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjomandy, B.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  14. The fundamental principles of the physical protection, the group of six point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claeys, M.; Carnas, L.; Robeyns, G.; Rommevaux, G.; Venot, R.; Hagemann, A.; Fontaneda Gonzalez, A.; Gimenez Gonzalez, S.; Isaksson, S.G.; Wager, K.; Price, C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the joint experience of the Group of Six in the field of physical protection against the theft or unauthorized removal of nuclear material and against the sabotage of nuclear material and nuclear facilities, which emerged from the joint discussion. Several fundamental principles stem from this experience. Of course the particular terms and conditions of the implementation of these principles are specific to each country. (authors)

  15. Quantum Physics Principles and Communication in the Acute Healthcare Setting: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Heidi L; Peyerl, Colleen Kraft; Solheim-Witt, Marit

    This pilot study explores whether clinician awareness of quantum physics principles could facilitate open communication between patients and providers. In the spirit of action research, this study was conceptualized with a holistic view of human health, using a mixed method design of grounded theory as an emergent method. Instrumentation includes surveys and a focus group discussion with twelve registered nurses working in an acute care hospital setting. Findings document that the preliminary core phenomenon, energy as information, influences communication in the healthcare environment. Key emergent themes include awareness, language, validation, open communication, strategies, coherence, incoherence and power. Research participants indicate that quantum physics principles provide a language and conceptual framework for improving their awareness of communication and interactions in the healthcare environment. Implications of this pilot study support the feasibility of future research and education on awareness of quantum physics principles in other clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanoscale theranostics for physical stimulus-responsive cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Ke, Hengte; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Zhuang

    2015-12-01

    Physical stimulus-responsive therapies often employing multifunctional theranostic agents responsive to external physical stimuli such as light, magnetic field, ultra-sound, radiofrequency, X-ray, etc., have been widely explored as novel cancer therapy strategies, showing encouraging results in many pre-clinical animal experiments. Unlike conventional cancer chemotherapy which often accompanies with severe toxic side effects, physical stimulus-responsive agents usually are non-toxic by themselves and would destruct cancer cells only under specific external stimuli, and thus could offer greatly reduced toxicity and enhanced treatment specificity. In addition, physical stimulus-responsive therapies can also be combined with other traditional therapeutics to achieve synergistic anti-tumor effects via a variety of mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress in the development of physical stimulus-responsive therapies, and discuss the important roles of nanoscale theranostic agents involved in those non-conventional therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physical Therapy for Neurological Conditions in Geriatric Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Carmeli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With more of the world’s population surviving longer, individuals often face age-related neurology disorders and decline of function that can affect lifestyle and well-being. Despite neurophysiological changes affecting the brain function and structure, the aged brain, in some degree, can learn and relearn due to neuroplasticity. Recent advances in rehabilitation techniques have produced better functional outcomes in age-related neurological conditions. Physical therapy (PT of the elderly individual focuses in particular on sensory–motor impairments, postural control coordination, and prevention of sarcopenia. Geriatric PT has a significant influence on quality of life, independent living, and life expectancy. However, in many developed and developing countries, the profession of PT is underfunded and understaffed. This article provides a brief overview on (a age-related disease of central nervous system and (b the principles, approaches, and doctrines of motor skill learning and point out the most common treatment models that PTs use for neurological patients.

  18. "How do I say that?": Using communication principles to enhance medication therapy management instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denvir, Paul M; Cardone, Katie E; Parker, Wendy M; Cerulli, Jennifer

    2018-02-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) is a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to improving medication use, reducing the risk of adverse events and improving medication adherence. Given the service delivery model and required outputs of MTM services, communication skills are of utmost importance. The objectives of this study were to identify and describe communication principles and instructional practices to enhance MTM training. Drawing on formative assessment data from interviews of both pharmacy educators and alumni, this article identifies and describes communication principles and instructional practices that pharmacy educators can use to enhance MTM training initiatives to develop student communication strategies. Analysis revealed five key communication challenges of MTM service delivery, two communication principles that pharmacy teachers and learners can use to address those challenges, and a range of specific strategies, derived from communication principles, that students can use when challenges emerge. Implications of the analysis for pharmacy educators and researchers are described. Proactive communication training provided during MTM advanced pharmacy practice experiences enabled students to apply the principles and instructional strategies to specific patient interactions during the advanced pharmacy practice experiences and in their post-graduation practice settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gamification in Physical Therapy: More Than Using Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Joep; Verschuren, Olaf; Renger, Willem Jan; Ermers, Jose; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; van Ee, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of computer games in physical therapy is motivated by characteristics such as attractiveness, motivation, and engagement, but these do not guarantee the intended therapeutic effect of the interventions. Yet, these characteristics are important variables in physical therapy interventions because they involve reward-related dopaminergic systems in the brain that are known to facilitate learning through long-term potentiation of neural connections. In this perspective we propose a way to apply game design approaches to therapy development by "designing" therapy sessions in such a way as to trigger physical and cognitive behavioral patterns required for treatment and neurological recovery. We also advocate that improving game knowledge among therapists and improving communication between therapists and game designers may lead to a novel avenue in designing applied games with specific therapeutic input, thereby making gamification in therapy a realistic and promising future that may optimize clinical practice.

  20. Strength training versus chest physical therapy on pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zeinab Ahmed Hussein

    2016-03-04

    Mar 4, 2016 ... physical therapy treatment program on pulmonary functions in Down syndrome children. Methods: ... There is an increased prevalence of sleep-related upper airway ... eral health and daily activity performance ability [12].

  1. Chronic vulvar pain from a physical therapy perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dee

    2010-01-01

    When assessing women with chronic vulvar pain, women's health physical therapists search for comorbid mechanical components (including musculoskeletal, fascial, and visceral) and other disorders that may contribute to or be caused by chronic vulvar pain (CVP). Pelvic floor hypertonicity is a key perpetuating factor for CVP. Comprehensive physical therapy evaluation and suggested physical therapy interventions are described. Anatomy of the pelvis, common evaluative findings, and specifics for pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation are presented. Normalization of pelvic floor muscle function contributes to the reduction of CVP. Successful treatment includes the identification and treatment of co-existing physical abnormalities throughout the trunk and pelvis. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The physical basis and future of radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortfeld, T; Jeraj, R

    2011-06-01

    The remarkable progress in radiation therapy over the last century has been largely due to our ability to more effectively focus and deliver radiation to the tumour target volume. Physics discoveries and technology inventions have been an important driving force behind this progress. However, there is still plenty of room left for future improvements through physics, for example image guidance and four-dimensional motion management and particle therapy, as well as increased efficiency of more compact and cheaper technologies. Bigger challenges lie ahead of physicists in radiation therapy beyond the dose localisation problem, for example in the areas of biological target definition, improved modelling for normal tissues and tumours, advanced multicriteria and robust optimisation, and continuous incorporation of advanced technologies such as molecular imaging. The success of physics in radiation therapy has been based on the continued "fuelling" of the field with new discoveries and inventions from physics research. A key to the success has been the application of the rigorous scientific method. In spite of the importance of physics research for radiation therapy, too few physicists are currently involved in cutting-edge research. The increased emphasis on more "professionalism" in medical physics will tip the situation even more off balance. To prevent this from happening, we argue that medical physics needs more research positions, and more and better academic programmes. Only with more emphasis on medical physics research will the future of radiation therapy and other physics-related medical specialties look as bright as the past, and medical physics will maintain a status as one of the most exciting fields of applied physics.

  3. The physical basis and future of radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortfeld, T; Jeraj, R

    2011-01-01

    The remarkable progress in radiation therapy over the last century has been largely due to our ability to more effectively focus and deliver radiation to the tumour target volume. Physics discoveries and technology inventions have been an important driving force behind this progress. However, there is still plenty of room left for future improvements through physics, for example image guidance and four-dimensional motion management and particle therapy, as well as increased efficiency of more compact and cheaper technologies. Bigger challenges lie ahead of physicists in radiation therapy beyond the dose localisation problem, for example in the areas of biological target definition, improved modelling for normal tissues and tumours, advanced multicriteria and robust optimisation, and continuous incorporation of advanced technologies such as molecular imaging. The success of physics in radiation therapy has been based on the continued “fuelling” of the field with new discoveries and inventions from physics research. A key to the success has been the application of the rigorous scientific method. In spite of the importance of physics research for radiation therapy, too few physicists are currently involved in cutting-edge research. The increased emphasis on more “professionalism” in medical physics will tip the situation even more off balance. To prevent this from happening, we argue that medical physics needs more research positions, and more and better academic programmes. Only with more emphasis on medical physics research will the future of radiation therapy and other physics-related medical specialties look as bright as the past, and medical physics will maintain a status as one of the most exciting fields of applied physics. PMID:21606068

  4. Combining Voice Therapy and Physical Therapy: A Novel Approach to Treating Muscle Tension Dysphonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jennifer; Tomlinson, Carey; Stevens, Kristin; Kotagal, Kiran; Fornadley, Judith; Jacobson, Barbara; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Francis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the role of a specialized physical therapy program for muscle tension dysphonia patients as an adjunct to standard of care voice therapy. Study Design Retrospective Cohort Study Methods Adult MTD patients seen between 2007 and 2012 were identified from the clinical database. They were prescribed voice therapy and, if concomitant neck pain, adjunctive physical therapy. In a pragmatic observational cohort design, patients underwent one of four potential treatment approaches: voice therapy alone (VT), voice therapy and physical therapy (VT+PT), physical therapy alone (PT), or incomplete/no treatment. Voice handicap outcomes were compared between treatment approaches. Results Of 153 patients meeting criteria (Median age 48 years, 68% female, and 30% had fibromyalgia, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, depression, and/or anxiety), there was a similar distribution of patients with moderate or severe pre-treatment VHI scores across treatment groups (VT 45.5%, VT+PT 43.8%, PT 50%, no treatment 59.1%; p=0.45). Patients treated with VT alone had significantly greater median improvement in VHI than those not treated: 10-point vs. 2-point (p=0.02). Interestingly, median VHI improvement in patients with baseline moderate-severe VHI scores was no different between VT (10), VT+PT (8) and PT alone (10; p=0.99). Conclusions Findings show voice therapy to be an effective approach to treating MTD. Importantly, other treatment modalities incorporating physical therapy had a similar, albeit not significant, improvement in VHI. This preliminary study suggests that physical therapy techniques may have a role in the treatment of a subset of MTD patients. Larger, comparative studies are needed to better characterize the role of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26012419

  5. New perspectives on the theory of justice: implications for physical therapy ethics and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ian; Delany, Clare M; Townsend, Anne F; Swisher, Laura Lee

    2011-11-01

    Recent revisions of physical therapy codes of ethics have included a new emphasis concerning health inequities and social injustice. This emphasis reflects the growing evidence regarding the importance of social determinants of health, epidemiological trends for health service delivery, and the enhanced participation of physical therapists in shaping health care reform in a number of international contexts. This perspective article suggests that there is a "disconnect" between the societal obligations and aspirations expressed in the revised codes and the individualist ethical frameworks that predominantly underpin them. Primary health care is an approach to health care arising from an understanding of the nexus between health and social disadvantage that considers the health needs of patients as expressive of the health needs of the communities of which they are members. It is proposed that re-thinking ethical frameworks expressed in codes of ethics can both inform and underpin practical strategies for working in primary health care. This perspective article provides a new focus on the ethical principle of justice: the ethical principle that arguably remains the least consensually understood and developed in the ethics literature of physical therapy. A relatively recent theory of justice known as the "capability approach to justice" is discussed, along with its potential to assist physical therapy practitioners to further develop moral agency in order to address situations of health inequity and social injustice in clinical practice.

  6. Evaluation of patient satisfaction with physical therapy following primary THA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Kimona; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Memon, Talha; Dattilo, Jonathan; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Physical therapy following total hip arthroplasty (THA) is intended to maximize a patient's range of motion and function and improve the quality of life. No universally accepted standard of care exists for physical therapy among physicians or therapists. However, it may be crucial to enhance efforts to more fully elucidate contributing parameters that affect patient experiences. The purpose of this study was to evaluate various factors contributing to patient satisfaction with postoperative physical therapy. One hundred consecutive patients (110 hips) who underwent THA were prospectively surveyed for satisfaction with postoperative physical therapy. All surveys were filled out anonymously by the patients, and investigators were blinded to clinical outcomes and who was surveyed. Seventy-six percent of patients reported being satisfied with their rehabilitation experiences. Factors, including patient age and sex, duration of therapy, number of patients per session, continuity of care with the same therapist, amount of hands-on time spent with the therapist, number of patients per session, and total number of sessions completed, were significantly correlated with patient satisfaction. Co-pay amount did not significantly affect patient satisfaction. These factors may be underappreciated by physicians and physical therapists. To maximize patient satisfaction with physical therapy, physicians should identify institutions whose therapists are willing to spend adequate hands-on time during one-on-one or small-group sessions while maintaining the greatest possible continuity of care with a single provider. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Mathematical, physical and numerical principles essential for models of turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, David Howland [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lim, Hyunkyung [STONY BROOK UNIV; Yu, Yan [STONY BROOK UNIV; Glimm, James G [STONY BROOK UNIV

    2009-01-01

    We propose mathematical, physical and numerical principles which are important for the modeling of turbulent mixing, especially the classical and well studied Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities which involve acceleration driven mixing of a fluid discontinuity layer, by a steady accerleration or an impulsive force.

  8. Interpretation of the extreme physical information principle in terms of shift information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vstovsky, G.V.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that Fisher information (FI) can be considered as a limiting case of a related form of Kullback information---a shift information (SI). The compatibility of the use of SI with a basic physical principle of uncertainty is demonstrated. The scope of FI based theory is extended to the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation

  9. Physical Principles of the Method for Determination of Geometrical Characteristics and Particle Recognition in Digital Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyomin, V. V.; Polovtsev, I. G.; Davydova, A. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    The physical principles of a method for determination of geometrical characteristics of particles and particle recognition based on the concepts of digital holography, followed by processing of the particle images reconstructed from the digital hologram, using the morphological parameter are reported. An example of application of this method for fast plankton particle recognition is given.

  10. 42 CFR 440.110 - Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and services for individuals with speech, hearing, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and..., occupational therapy, and services for individuals with speech, hearing, and language disorders. (a) Physical...) Where applicable, licensed by the State. (b) Occupational therapy. (1) Occupational therapy means...

  11. 42 CFR 418.74 - Waiver of requirement-Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and dietary counseling. 418.74 Section 418.74 Public Health... requirement—Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and dietary counseling. (a) A... providing physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and dietary counseling services...

  12. Physical properties of the tetragonal CuMnAs: A first-principles study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Máca, František; Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Carva, K.; Baláž, P.; Turek, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 9 (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 094406. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015042 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : first-principles calculations * defects * CuMnAs * transport properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  13. A retrospective analysis of ethics knowledge in physical therapy (1970-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Laura Lee

    2002-07-01

    Purtilo, Guccione, and others have noted that increased clinical autonomy for physical therapists presents more complex ethical dilemmas. The body of literature examining physical therapy ethics, however, is relatively small and has not been analyzed. The primary purposes of this research were: (1) to use multiple perspectives to describe and analyze literature examining ethics in physical therapy from 1970 to 2000, (2) to develop a model to describe the evolution of knowledge of ethics in physical therapy during this period, and (3) to compare the proposed model with the evolutionary models proposed by Purtilo in physical therapy and by Pellegrino in bioethics. The sample consisted of peer-reviewed journal articles cited in the MEDLINE or Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases between 1970 and 2000 or referenced in Ethics in Physical Therapy. A two-phase mixed quantitative and qualitative method was used to analyze publications. In the quantitative phase, the author sorted publications into a priori categories, including approach to ethics, author, decade, country of publication, role of the physical therapist, and component of morality. During the qualitative phase of the research, the author analyzed and sorted the publications to identify common themes, patterns, similarities, and evolutionary trends. These findings were compared with the evolutionary models of Pellegrino and Purtilo. The 90 publications meeting inclusion criteria were predominantly philosophical, using the "principles" perspective; focused on the patient/client management role of the physical therapist; and addressed the moral judgment component of moral behavior. As predicted by Purtilo's model, the focus of identity evolved from self-identity to patient-focused identity, with increasing representation of societal identity. Recurrent themes included the need to further identify and clarify physical therapists' ethical dilemmas, the interrelationship

  14. Promotion of ethical principles in provision of medication therapy management services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Kelling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As pharmacists move toward more patient-centered care through medication therapy management (MTM, important issues and conflicts may arise within the therapeutic relationship, requiring pharmacists to use ethical knowledge and skills toward conflict-resolution. The purpose of this paper is to explore practical strategies that pharmacists and other champions of MTM may utilize to support the ethical principles of autonomy, veracity, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice, along with an ethic of care during the provision of MTM services. With a deeper understanding of ethical principles and the Code of Ethics for Pharmacists, pharmacists may be more prepared to make difficult ethical decisions, and ultimately, guide better patient care.   Type: Idea Paper

  15. Effects of Brief Communication Skills Training for Workers Based on the Principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Norio; Somemura, Hironori; Nakamura, Saki; Yamamoto, Megumi; Isojima, Manabu; Shinmei, Issei; Horikoshi, Masaru; Tanaka, Katsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Stimulating communication is an important workplace issue. We investigated the effects of a brief communication skills training (CST) program based on the principles of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 206 white-collar workers. The intervention group underwent a 2-hour CST group training conducted by an occupational physician. Result: The results of the intention-to-treat analysis using a mixed-effects model showed that there was a significant interaction between group and time observed for the item “thinking together to solve problems and issues” (P = 0.02). The effect size (Cohen d) was 0.35 (95% confidence interval, 0.07 to 0.62). Conclusions: The present study suggests that a brief CST based on the principles of CBT could improve the communication behavior of workers. PMID:28045799

  16. PERCIVED STRESS AMONG PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENTS OF ISRA UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiq ur Rehman memon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently increasing concern among stress is seen during health care undergraduate students but there is lack of such studies in physical therapy students in Pakistan. Higher stress levels the students in their education the effect of stress in physical therapy students throughout is well documented in western countries. This study aims at assessing the level of perceived stress among physical therapy students of Isra University. Method: It’s a Cross-sectional type of descriptive study that was conducted on hundred physical therapy students of Isra institute of rehabilitation sciences, ISRA University, Hyderabad. A Convenient, non-probability technique of sampling is used. All the Physical therapy students were included. Results: Overall response rate was 100%. Moderate level of stress was found in 73% students (scored between 51-75%, severe level of stress was found in 8% students (scored >75% whereas low level of stress was found in 19% of students (scored between 25-50%. Conclusion: The current study presents the level of stress perceived by physical therapy students of Isra University, Hyderabad. The findings of the study revealed higher levels of stress in the physical therapy students. Majority of student perceived moderate stress and about 8% of students reported severe stress. Further detailed and generalized studies are needed to evaluate the causes, effects and coping approaches adapted by the students. Furthermore level of stress should also be correlated with academic performance of the students. Findings of such studies may help to initiate certain strategies that may help students overcome their stress and cope efficiently with the upcoming problems.

  17. Physical therapy management of low back pain has changed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendijk, Jolanda Jozina; Swinkels, Ilse Catharina Sophia; de Bakker, Dinny; Dekker, Joost; van den Ende, Cornelia Helena Maria

    2007-03-01

    Since the 1990s, new insights in the physical therapy management of low back pain have been described in guidelines. Furthermore, insurance companies introduced a volume policy to control the costs for physical therapy. This study aims to establish if developments in knowledge and health policy since the 1990s have resulted in changes in the physical therapy management of patients with low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands. Data from 3148 patients, referred because of LBP, were selected from the databases of two registration studies (1989-1992 and 2002-2003) of patients treated by physical therapists. Descriptive statistics were used to compare patient characteristics. A multi-level regression analysis was carried out to determine a change in the number of treatment sessions adjusting for patient and disease characteristics, and to control for different levels (patient and physical therapist). A small decline in the number of treatment sessions was observed. In 2002, exercise therapy was the most frequently applied intervention, while massage and physical modalities were the interventions of first choice in the early 1990s. Our results suggest that since 1990 the management of patients with LBP by physical therapists in the Netherlands has changed. Both quality management by the profession and volume policy by government and insurance companies seem to have been instrumental in bringing about a decline in the number of treatment visits and an increase in the use of evidence-based interventions.

  18. Prevalence of Physical Disability and Accommodation Needs among Students in Physical Therapy Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Martha R.; Peterson, Cathryn A.; Gibbs, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Most research on graduate students with disabilities (SWDs) has focused on medical education. The purposes of this study were to: (1) estimate the prevalence of students with physical disabilities (SWPDs) in physical therapy programs, (2) identify common types of physical disabilities, (3) document the types of accommodations requested by SWPDs,…

  19. Core journals that publish clinical trials of physical therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Moseley, Anne M; Sherrington, Catherine; Maher, Christopher G; Herbert, Robert D; Elkins, Mark R

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify core journals in physical therapy by identifying those that publish the most randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions, provide the highest-quality reports of randomized controlled trials, and have the highest journal impact factors. This study was an audit of a bibliographic database. All trials indexed in the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) were analyzed. Journals that had published at least 80 trials were selected. The journals were ranked in 4 ways: number of trials published; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal, regardless of publication year; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal from 2000 to 2009; and 2008 journal impact factor. The top 5 core journals in physical therapy, ranked by the total number of trials published, were Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Rehabilitation, Spine, British Medical Journal (BMJ), and Chest. When the mean total PEDro score was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Stroke, Spine, and Clinical Rehabilitation. When the mean total PEDro score of the trials published from 2000 to 2009 was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, and Pain. The most highly ranked physical therapy-specific journals were Physical Therapy (ranked eighth on the basis of the number of trials published) and Journal of Physiotherapy (ranked first on the basis of the quality of trials). Finally, when the 2008 impact factor was used for ranking, the top 5 journals were JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, and Thorax. There were no significant relationships among the rankings on the basis of trial quality, number of trials, or journal impact factor. Physical therapists who are trying to keep up-to-date by reading the best

  20. Amount and Focus of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy for Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Begnoche, Denise M.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Chang, Hui-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) services for a cohort of 399 children with cerebral palsy (CP), 2-6 years old, residing in the United States and Canada. Parents completed a services questionnaire by telephone interview. Therapists classified children's Gross Motor Function Classification…

  1. 42 CFR 409.17 - Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-language pathology services. 409.17 Section 409.17 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES..., and speech-language pathology services. (a) General rules. (1) Except as specified in this section, physical therapy, occupational therapy, or speech-language pathology services must be furnished by...

  2. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Combined With Physical Therapy in Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Arnal-Gómez, Anna; Balasch-Bernat, Mercè; Inglés, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the treatment effectiveness of the combination of manual therapy (MT) with other physical therapy techniques. Systematic searches of scientific literature were undertaken on PubMed and the Cochrane Library (2004-2014). The following terms were used: "patellofemoral pain syndrome," "physical therapy," "manual therapy," and "manipulation." RCTs that studied adults diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) treated by MT and physical therapy approaches were included. The quality of the studies was assessed by the Jadad Scale. Five RCTs with an acceptable methodological quality (Jadad ≥ 3) were selected. The studies indicated that MT combined with physical therapy has some effect on reducing pain and improving function in PFPS, especially when applied on the full kinetic chain and when strengthening hip and knee muscles. The different combinations of MT and physical therapy programs analyzed in this review suggest that giving more emphasis to proximal stabilization and full kinetic chain treatments in PFPS will help better alleviation of symptoms.

  3. Education Research in Physical Therapy: Visions of the Possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gail M; Nordstrom, Terrence; Segal, Richard L; McCallum, Christine; Graham, Cecilia; Greenfield, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    Education research has been labeled the "hardest science" of all, given the challenges of teaching and learning in an environment encompassing a mixture of social interactions, events, and problems coupled with a persistent belief that education depends more on common sense than on disciplined knowledge and skill. The American Educational Research Association specifies that education research-as a scientific field of study-examines teaching and learning processes that shape educational outcomes across settings and that a learning process takes place throughout a person's life. The complexity of learning and learning environments requires not only a diverse array of research methods but also a community of education researchers committed to exploring critical questions in the education of physical therapists. Although basic science research and clinical research in physical therapy have continued to expand through growth in the numbers of funded physical therapist researchers, the profession still lacks a robust and vibrant community of education researchers. In this perspective article, the American Council of Academic Physical Therapy Task Force on Education Research proposes a compelling rationale for building a much-needed foundation for education research in physical therapy, including a set of recommendations for immediate action. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  4. Laboratory Experiments in Physics for Modern Astronomy With Comprehensive Development of the Physical Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Golden, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This book presents experiments which will teach physics relevant to astronomy. The astronomer, as instructor, frequently faces this need when his college or university has no astronomy department and any astronomy course is taught in the physics department. The physicist, as instructor, will find this intellectually appealing when faced with teaching an introductory astronomy course. From these experiments, the student will acquire important analytical tools, learn physics appropriate to astronomy, and experience instrument calibration and the direct gathering and analysis of data. Experiments that can be performed in one laboratory session as well as semester-long observation projects are included. This textbook is aimed at undergraduate astronomy students.

  5. Application of the Pareto principle to identify and address drug-therapy safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Fabian; Dormann, Harald; Pfistermeister, Barbara; Sonst, Anja; Patapovas, Andrius; Vogler, Renate; Hartmann, Nina; Plank-Kiegele, Bettina; Kirchner, Melanie; Bürkle, Thomas; Maas, Renke

    2014-06-01

    Adverse drug events (ADE) and medication errors (ME) are common causes of morbidity in patients presenting at emergency departments (ED). Recognition of ADE as being drug related and prevention of ME are key to enhancing pharmacotherapy safety in ED. We assessed the applicability of the Pareto principle (~80 % of effects result from 20 % of causes) to address locally relevant problems of drug therapy. In 752 cases consecutively admitted to the nontraumatic ED of a major regional hospital, ADE, ME, contributing drugs, preventability, and detection rates of ADE by ED staff were investigated. Symptoms, errors, and drugs were sorted by frequency in order to apply the Pareto principle. In total, 242 ADE were observed, and 148 (61.2 %) were assessed as preventable. ADE contributed to 110 inpatient hospitalizations. The ten most frequent symptoms were causally involved in 88 (80.0 %) inpatient hospitalizations. Only 45 (18.6 %) ADE were recognized as drug-related problems until discharge from the ED. A limited set of 33 drugs accounted for 184 (76.0 %) ADE; ME contributed to 57 ADE. Frequency-based listing of ADE, ME, and drugs involved allowed identification of the most relevant problems and development of easily to implement safety measures, such as wall and pocket charts. The Pareto principle provides a method for identifying the locally most relevant ADE, ME, and involved drugs. This permits subsequent development of interventions to increase patient safety in the ED admission process that best suit local needs.

  6. Interprofessional Peer Teaching of Pharmacy and Physical Therapy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Cheryl A; Li, Johnson Ching-hong; Pasay, Darren; Jones, C Allyson

    2015-12-25

    To evaluate an interprofessional peer-teaching activity during which physical therapy students instructed undergraduate pharmacy students on 3 ambulatory devices (canes, crutches, walkers). The pre/post evaluation of 2 pharmacy undergraduate classes included 220 students, 110 per year. After pharmacy students completed a 10-point, knowledge-based pretest, they participated in a hands-on activity with physical therapy students teaching them about sizing, use, and safety of canes, crutches, and walkers. A 10-point posttest was completed immediately afterward. The mean difference of pre/post scores was 3.5 (SD 1.9) for the peer-led teaching, and 3.8 (SD 2.2) for the peer learning group. Students had positive responses regarding the learning exercise and recommended further peer teaching. The peer-learning activity involving physical therapy students teaching pharmacy students was an effective method of improving knowledge and skills regarding basic ambulatory devices.

  7. 42 CFR 485.713 - Condition of participation: Physical therapy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Agencies as Providers of Outpatient Physical Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology Services § 485.713 Condition of participation: Physical therapy services. If the organization offers physical therapy services... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Physical therapy...

  8. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Koes, B.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  9. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. A randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan Lucas; Koes, Bart W.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; van Mameren, Henk; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.; Pool, Jan J. M.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  10. TEACHING PHYSICS: An experiment to demonstrate the principles and processes involved in medical Doppler ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D. G. H.

    2000-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound is widely used in medicine for measuring blood velocity. This paper describes an experiment illustrating the principles of medical Doppler ultrasound. It is designed with A-level/undergraduate physics students in mind. Ultrasound is transmitted in air and reflected from a moving target. The return signal is processed using a series of modules, so that students can discover for themselves how each stage in the instrument works. They can also obtain a quantitative value of the speed of the target.

  11. Khan's lectures handbook of the physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M; Mihailidis, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    Khan's Lectures: Handbook of the Physics of Radiation Therapy will provide a digest of the material contained in The Physics of Radiation Therapy. Lectures will be presented somewhat similar to a PowerPoint format, discussing key points of individual chapters. Selected diagrams from the textbook will be used to initiate the discussion. New illustrations will used, wherever needed, to enhance the understanding of important concepts. Discussion will be condensed and often bulleted. Theoretical details will be referred to the textbook and the cited literature. A problem set (practice questions) w

  12. A description of professional pediatric physical therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Joe; Goodgold, Shelley; Moerchen, Victoria A; Remec, Nushka; Aaron, Carolanne; Kreger, Alison

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to reexamine the status of professional pediatric physical therapy education in the United States. A task force designed a 16-item survey and contacted representatives from all professional physical therapy programs. Surveys were gathered from 151 programs for a return rate of 75%. Much variability exists across programs in total number of hours devoted to pediatrics (range, 35-210 hours). In addition, almost 60% of respondents indicated that the individual responsible for delivering the pediatric content will be retiring within the next 15 years. These results describe current pediatric professional education and provide numerous opportunities and challenges for the development of optimal professional pediatric education.

  13. SU-E-T-191: First Principle Calculation of Quantum Yield in Photodynamic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolfath, R; Guo, F; Chen, Z; Nath, R [Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a first-principle method to calculate the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen induced by any photon fields especially in MeV energy range. The optical pumping is mediated through photosensitizers, e.g., porphyrin and/or ensemble of quantum dots. Methods: Under normal conditions, oxygen molecules are in the relatively non-reactive triplet state. In the presence of certain photosensitizer compounds such as porphyrins, electromagnetic radiation of specific wavelengths can excite oxygen to highly reactive singlet state. With selective uptake of photosensitizers by certain malignant cells, photon irradiation of phosensitized tumors can lead to selective killing of cancer cells. This is the basis of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Despite several attempts, PDT has not been clinically successful except in limited superficial cancers. Many parameters such as photon energy, conjugation with quantum dots etc. can be potentially combined with PDT in order to extend the role of PDT in cancer management. The key quantity for this optimization is the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen by any photon field. The first principle calculation model presented here, is an attempt to fill this need. We employ stochastic density matrix description of the quantum jumps and the rate equation methods in quantum optics based on Markov/Poisson processes and calculate time evolution of the population of the optically pumped singlet oxygen. Results: The results demonstrate the feasibility of our model in showing the dependence of the optical yield in generating spin-singlet oxygen on the experimental conditions. The adjustable variables can be tuned to maximize the population of the singlet oxygen hence the efficacy of the photodynamic therapy. Conclusion: The present model can be employed to fit and analyze the experimental data and possibly to assist researchers in optimizing the experimental conditions in photodynamic therapy.

  14. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C.M.; Ostelo, Raymond W.J.G.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical

  15. Testing principle working mechanisms of the health action process approach for subjective physical age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Julian; Kuhlmann, Tim; Fink, Sebastian; Hambrecht, Rainer; Lippke, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated differences in social-cognitive predictors and self-regulatory planning, as proposed by the health action process approach (HAPA), across three different subjective physical age groups for physical activity. With a cross-sectional design, 521 participants across the chronological age span from 25 to 86 years (M = 48.79; SD = 12.66) were separated into three groups: those who feel physically younger than they are in terms of chronological age, the same perceived and chronological age, and feeling physically older compared to their chronological age. Participants were assessed regarding their perceived vulnerability, outcome expectancies, general intentions, planning, self-efficacy, and stages of physical activity (non-intenders, intenders, and actors). Data were analysed via mean comparison and multigroup structural equation modelling. Mean differences for all but one construct were eminent in all groups, generally showing that those feeling physically younger also report better social-cognitive predictors of physical activity (e.g. lower perceived vulnerability) in comparison to those who feel the same age or older. The model showed that basic working mechanisms of the HAPA can be applied to all groups. With that, the results provide for the first time evidence that principle working mechanism of the HAPA can be applied to all subjective physical age groups. These may be used to tailor health promoting interventions according to participants' needs as a more suitable proxy than chronological age.

  16. Physical Therapy in Elderly Suffering from Degenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svraka, Emira; Pecar, Muris; Jaganjac, Amila; Hadziomerovic, Amra Macak; Kaljic, Eldad; Kovacevic, Almir

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis of the joints (osteoarthritis or arthritis) represents the largest group of rheumatic diseases. Within rheumatic diseases 50% are degenerative rheumatic diseases, 10% inflammatory and 40% extra-articular. To determine the modalities of physical therapy for elderly with degenerative diseases. The study is retrospective-prospective and descriptive. The survey conducted included 25 patients with degenerative diseases of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems in Gerontology Center in Sarajevo, from May 1, 2014- April 30, 2015. As research instruments were used: Questionnaire for users of physical therapy in Gerontology Center in Sarajevo, self-developed, visual-analog scale to assess pain and patient records. Of the total number of patients with degenerative diseases (25), 10 (40%) were male and 15 (60%) were female. The most common degenerative disease is knee osteoarthritis which had 11 patients (29%), 3 males and 8 females. From physical therapy modalities in the treatment of degenerative diseases at the Gerontology Center in Sarajevo, kinetic therapy was administered to all patients, followed by manual massage and TENS in 15 cases (60%). From twenty-two patients, who completed a questionnaire, 11 (50%, 2 male and 9 female) rated their health as poor. Seven patients (32%, 3 male and 4 female) assessed their health as good. Three patients (14%, 2 male and 1 female) rated their health as very poor, and one patient (4%, 1 male) rated its health as very good. The Research Physical therapy in elderly with degenerative diseases is a pilot project, which highlights the need for: Conducting research for a longer time period, with a larger sample; Quality of keeping health records; Implementation of a continuous evaluation of functional status and; Stricter control for optimal effectiveness of physical therapy in order to improve the quality of life of elderly patients.

  17. Constructing the principles: Method and metaphysics in the progress of theoretical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Lawrence C.

    This thesis presents a new framework for the philosophy of physics focused on methodological differences found in the practice of modern theoretical physics. The starting point for this investigation is the longstanding debate over scientific realism. Some philosophers have argued that it is the aim of science to produce an accurate description of the world including explanations for observable phenomena. These scientific realists hold that our best confirmed theories are approximately true and that the entities they propose actually populate the world, whether or not they have been observed. Others have argued that science achieves only frameworks for the prediction and manipulation of observable phenomena. These anti-realists argue that truth is a misleading concept when applied to empirical knowledge. Instead, focus should be on the empirical adequacy of scientific theories. This thesis argues that the fundamental distinction at issue, a division between true scientific theories and ones which are empirically adequate, is best explored in terms of methodological differences. In analogy with the realism debate, there are at least two methodological strategies. Rather than focusing on scientific theories as wholes, this thesis takes as units of analysis physical principles which are systematic empirical generalizations. The first possible strategy, the conservative, takes the assumption that the empirical adequacy of a theory in one domain serves as good evidence for such adequacy in other domains. This then motivates the application of the principle to new domains. The second strategy, the innovative, assumes that empirical adequacy in one domain does not justify the expectation of adequacy in other domains. New principles are offered as explanations in the new domain. The final part of the thesis is the application of this framework to two examples. On the first, Lorentz's use of the aether is reconstructed in terms of the conservative strategy with respect to

  18. 42 CFR 418.72 - Condition of participation: Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology. 418.72 Section 418.72 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology. Physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, and speech-language pathology services must be available, and when provided, offered in...

  19. Self-assessment of professionalism in physical therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deborah K; Irwin, Kent E

    2013-01-01

    With the physical therapy (PT) professions' advancement to the clinical doctorate degree and the promotion of autonomous practice, exemplary professional conduct is an expectation of the PT profession. PT education programs are being challenged to develop methods to teach and assess professional behavior. Forty-three PT students (11 male and 32 female, ages 20-28 years) completed the APTA Professionalism in Physical Therapy: Core Values Self-Assessment (PPTCVSA) after their first 3 week clinical experience and again after their final clinical experience. A mixed design ANOVA compared participants' total scores and individual Core Value scores on the Professionalism in Physical Therapy: Core Values Self-Assessment (PPTCVSA) after 3 and 33 weeks of clinical education. The effects of gender, age, and undergraduate area of study on growth in professionalism scores were also investigated. Total PPTCVSA scores and individual Core Value scores on professionalism (accountability, altruism, compassion/caring, excellence, integrity, professional duty, and social responsibility) were higher after 33 weeks compared to scores after 3 weeks of clinical education. Female student's total professionalism scores were higher than male student's scores on both the first and second self-assessments. In addition, female students scored themselves higher than their male peers on accountability, excellence, integrity, and professional duty. Improved scores on the PPTCVSA indicate that physical therapy education is playing an important role in the development of professional behavior, knowledge, and application in practice.

  20. [Physical therapy in pediatric primary care: a review of experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Miriam Ribeiro Calheiros; Thomazinho, Paula de Almeida; Santos, Fabiano Luiz; Cavalcanti, Nicolette Celani; Ribeiro, Carla Trevisan Martins; Negreiros, Maria Fernanda Vieira; Vinhaes, Marcia Regina

    2014-11-01

    To review pediatric physical therapy experiences described in the literature and to analyze the production of knowledge on physical therapy in the context of pediatric primary health care (PPHC). A systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA criteria. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane; Brazilian Ministry of Health's CAPES doctoral dissertations database; and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (SIGLE). The following search terms were used: ["primary health care" and ("physical therapy" or "physiotherapy") and ("child" or "infant")] and equivalent terms in Portuguese and Spanish, with no restriction on publication year. Thirteen articles from six countries were analyzed and grouped into three main themes: professional dilemmas (three articles), specific competencies and skills required in a PPHC setting (seven articles), and practice reports (four articles). Professional dilemmas involved expanding the role of physical therapists to encompass community environments and sharing the decision-making process with the family, as well as collaborative work with other health services to identify the needs of children. The competencies and skills mentioned in the literature related to the identification of clinical and sociocultural symptoms that go beyond musculoskeletal conditions, the establishment of early physical therapy diagnoses, prevention of overmedication, and the ability to work as team players. Practice reports addressed stimulation in children with neurological diseases, respiratory treatment, and establishing groups with mothers of children with these conditions. The small number of studies identified in this review suggests that there is little knowledge regarding the roles of physical therapists in PPHC and possibly regarding the professional abilities required in this setting. Therefore, further studies are required to provide data on the field, along with a continuing

  1. Innovative physical therapy practice: a qualitative verification of factors that support diffusion of innovation in outpatient physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabus, Carla; Spake, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    New ideas, methods, and technologies spread through cultures through typical patterns described by diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory. Professional cultures, including the physical therapy profession, have distinctive features and traditions that determine the adoption of practice innovation. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) proposes a framework of innovation implementation specific to health care services. While the CFIR has been applied to medical and nursing practice, it has not been extended to rehabilitation professions. The purpose of this qualitative study was to verify the CFIR factors in outpatient physical therapy practice. Through a nomination process of area rehabilitation managers and area directors of clinical education, 2 exemplar, outpatient, privately owned physical therapy clinics were identified as innovation practices. A total of 18 physical therapists (PTs), including 3 owners and a manager, participated in the study. The 2 clinics served as case studies within a qualitative approach of directed content analysis. Data were collected through observation, spontaneous, unstructured questioning, workflow analysis, structured focus group sessions, and artifact analysis including clinical documents. Focus group data were transcribed. All the data were analyzed and coded among 4 investigators. Through data analysis and alignment with literature in DOI theory in health care practice, the factors that determine innovation adoption were verified. The phenomena of implementation in PT practice are largely consistent with models of implementation in health care service. Within the outpatient practices studied, patient-centered care and collaborative learning were foundational elements to diffusion of an innovation. Innovation in outpatient physical therapy practice can be understood as a social process situated within the culture of the physical therapy professional that follows predictable patterns that strongly align with

  2. Physical therapy in preschool classrooms: successful integration of therapy into classroom routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerak, Darlene Massey; Kirkpatrick, Dana B; Nelson, Kristal C; Propes, June H

    2003-01-01

    This exploratory investigation identifies factors that contribute to success of physical therapy services delivered in the context of the daily routines in preschool classroom settings. Ten pediatric physical therapists from rural and urban communities across North Carolina served as informants during telephone interviews. Qualitative analysis of the data led to the identification of six major themes: interactions among classroom personnel, impact of the classroom environment, individual characteristics of the child, logistical considerations, administrative policies and practices, and service delivery options. All 10 informants shared the perception that the cooperation and commitment of the teacher was essential for successful incorporation of therapy activities in classroom routines. Furthermore, the informants agreed that multiple models of service delivery were necessary to meet the individual needs of children. These results lead the authors to question the wisdom of promoting any one service delivery model as "best practice" and suggest guidelines for successful integration of physical therapy in the preschool classroom.

  3. High-energy cosmic rays and tests of basic principles of Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres L.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the present understanding of data, the observed flux suppression for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR at energies above 4.1019 eV can be a signature of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK cutoff or be related to a similar mechanism. But it may also correspond, for instance, to the maximum energies available at the relevant sources. In both cases, violations of special relativity modifying cosmic-ray propagation or acceleration at very high energy can potentially play a role. Other violations of fundamental principles of standard particle physics (quantum mechanics, energy and momentum conservation, vacuum homogeneity and “static” properties, effective space dimensions, quark confinement… can also be relevant at these energies. In particular, UHECR data would in principle allow to set bounds on Lorentz symmetry violation (LSV in patterns incorporating a privileged local reference frame (the “vacuum rest frame”, VRF. But the precise analysis is far from trivial, and other effects can also be present. The effective parameters can be related to Planckscale physics, or even to physics beyond Planck scale, as well as to the dynamics and effective symmetries of LSV for nucleons, quarks, leptons and the photon. LSV can also be at the origin of GZK-like effects. In the presence of a VRF, and contrary to a “grand unification” view, LSV and other violations of standard principles can modify the internal structure of particles at very high energy and conventional symmetries may cease to be valid at energies close to the Planck scale. We present an updated discussion of these topics, including experimental prospects, new potentialities for high-energy cosmic ray phenomenology and the possible link with unconventional pre-Big Bang scenarios, superbradyon (superluminal preon patterns… The subject of a possible superluminal propagation of neutrinos at accelerator energies is also dealt with.

  4. Production cost structure in US outpatient physical therapy health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubiani, Gregory G; Okunade, Albert A

    2013-02-01

    This paper investigates the technology cost structure in US physical therapy care. We exploit formal economic theories and a rich national data of providers to tease out implications for operational cost efficiencies. The 2008-2009 dataset comprising over 19 000 bi-weekly, site-specific physical therapy center observations across 28 US states and Occupational Employment Statistics data (Bureau of Labor Statistics) includes measures of output, three labor types (clinical, support, and administrative), and facilities (capital). We discuss findings from the iterative seemingly unrelated regression estimation system model. The generalized translog cost estimates indicate a well-behaved underlying technology structure. We also find the following: (i) factor demands are downwardly sloped; (ii) pair-wise factor relationships largely reflect substitutions; (iii) factor demand for physical therapists is more inelastic compared with that for administrative staff; and (iv) diminishing scale economies exist at the 25%, 50%, and 75% output (patient visits) levels. Our findings advance the timely economic understanding of operations in an increasingly important segment of the medical care sector that has, up-to-now (because of data paucity), been missing from healthcare efficiency analysis. Our work further provides baseline estimates for comparing operational efficiencies in physical therapy care after implementations of the 2010 US healthcare reforms. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. [Special features of physical therapy for elderly rheumatic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, R

    2012-07-01

    The demographic shift is leading to a rapid rise in the number of elderly citizens. Accordingly, the number of geriatric problems is also increasing within the population of rheumatic patients. Geriatric patients are characterized through the triad of high age, multimorbidity and functional deficits. Almost all will show signs of arthritis and other degenerative musculoskeletal illnesses. Inflammatory rheumatic diseases within the geriatric population are found to be mostly in the chronic stage or with defective conditions. Problems typical of this population, such as comorbidities especially in the cardiovascular sector, must be assessed prior to the application of therapeutic concepts. The focus is on activating therapies, such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy, where the functional usefulness is proven. The use of thermal therapy, especially applied in the form of heat, as well as electrotherapy and high frequency therapy are also useful when indicated. Balneotherapy and hydrotherapy, as well as massage therapy and lymphatic drainage, must be adapted to the cardiovascular function of geriatric patients; this applies especially to heart failure patients. Physical therapy concepts in elderly rheumatic patients should preferably be implemented and managed by a multidisciplinary geriatric team.

  6. Differentiation with Stratification: A Principle of Theoretical Physics in the Tradition of the Memory Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    The art of memory started with Aristotle's questions on memory. During its long evolution, it had important contributions from alchemists, was transformed by Ramon Llull and apparently ended with Giordano Bruno, who was considered the best known representative of this art. This tradition did not disappear, but lives in the formulations of our modern scientific theories. From its initial form as a method of keeping information via associations, it became a principle of classification and structuring of knowledge. This principle, which we here name differentiation with stratification, is a structural design behind classical mechanics. Integrating two different traditions of science in one structure, this physical theory became the modern paradigm of science. In this paper, we show that this principle can also be formulated as a set of questions. This is done via an analysis of theories, based on the epistemology of observational realism. A combination of Rudolph Carnap's concept of theory as a system of observational and theoretical languages, with a criterion for separating observational languages, based on analytical psychology, shapes this epistemology. The `nuclear' role of the observational laws and the differentiations from these nucleus, reproducing the general cases of phenomena, reveals the memory art's heritage in the theories. Here in this paper we argue that this design is also present in special relativity and in quantum mechanics.

  7. Innovative physical therapy practice: a qualitative verification of factors that support diffusion of innovation in outpatient physical therapy practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabus C

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Carla Sabus,1 Ellen Spake2 1Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, 2Rockhurst University, Kansas City, MO, USA Background and purpose: New ideas, methods, and technologies spread through cultures through typical patterns described by diffusion of innovation (DOI theory. Professional cultures, including the physical therapy profession, have distinctive features and traditions that determine the adoption of practice innovation. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR proposes a framework of innovation implementation specific to health care services. While the CFIR has been applied to medical and nursing practice, it has not been extended to rehabilitation professions. The purpose of this qualitative study was to verify the CFIR factors in outpatient physical therapy practice.Design: Through a nomination process of area rehabilitation managers and area directors of clinical education, 2 exemplar, outpatient, privately owned physical therapy clinics were identified as innovation practices. A total of 18 physical therapists (PTs, including 3 owners and a manager, participated in the study.Methods: The 2 clinics served as case studies within a qualitative approach of directed content analysis. Data were collected through observation, spontaneous, unstructured questioning, ­workflow analysis, structured focus group sessions, and artifact analysis including clinical documents. Focus group data were transcribed. All the data were analyzed and coded among 4 investigators.Results: Through data analysis and alignment with literature in DOI theory in health care practice, the factors that determine innovation adoption were verified. The phenomena of implementation in PT practice are largely consistent with models of implementation in health care service. Within the outpatient practices studied, patient-centered care and collaborative learning were foundational

  8. The next generation mass storage devices - Physical principles and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Gai, S.

    2014-04-01

    The amount of digital data today has been increasing at a phenomenal rate due to the widespread digitalisation service in almost every industry. The need to store such ever-increasing data aggressively triggers the requirement to augment the storage capacity of the conventional storage technologies. Unfortunately, the physical limitations that conventional forms face have severely handicapped their potential to meet the storage need from both consumer and industry point of view. The focus has therefore been switched into the development of the innovative data storage technologies such as scanning probe memory, nanocrystal memory, carbon nanotube memory, DNA memory, and organic memory. In this paper, we review the physical principles of these emerging storage technologies and their superiorities as the next generation data storage device, as well as their respective technical challenges on further enhancing the storage capacity. We also compare these novel technologies with the mainstream data storage means according to the technology roadmap on areal density.

  9. Emission tomography with positrons principle, physical performances of a ring detector and quantitative possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soussaline, F.; Plummer, D.; Todd Pokropek, A.E.; Loc'h, C.; Comar, D.

    1979-01-01

    Satisfactory qualitative and quantitative data in positron emission tomography requires the use of a well adapted tomographic system. A number of parameters have been identified which can be considered as the critical characteristics for evaluation and intercomparison of such systems. Using these the choice of a single slice ring positron camera could be justified by its physical performance, which is presented and discussed. Series of physical and mathematical simulations allow an appropriate knowledge of such a system, which has been in use for more than a year in a clinical environment. These studies aid to the interpretation of very interesting physiopathologic studies. In principle, a positron tomographic system permits measurement of absolute quantitative concentration values, which are essential for precise metabolic studies. The main sources of error comprising the calibration of the system, the tail effects and the precision for attenuation correction are analysed. When taking in account these errors, a precision of the order of 10% should be obtainable [fr

  10. Bridging the gap between the Babinet principle and the physical optics approximation: Vectorial problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubické, Gildas; Bourlier, Christophe; Delahaye, Morgane; Corbel, Charlotte; Pinel, Nicolas; Pouliguen, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    For a three-dimensional problem and by assuming perfectly electric conducting objects, this paper shows that the Babinet principle (BP) can be derived from the physical optics (PO) approximation. Indeed, following the same idea as Ufimtsev, from the PO approximation and in the far-field zone, the field scattered by an object can be split up into a field which mainly contributes around the specular direction (illuminated zone) and a field which mainly contributes around the forward direction (shadowed zone), which is strongly related to the scattered field obtained from the BP. The only difference resides in the integration surface. We show mathematically that the involved integral does not depend on the shape of the object but only on its contour. Simulations are provided to illustrate the link between BP and PO. The main gain of this work is that it provides a more complete physical insight into the connection between PO and BP.

  11. Principles Supporting the Perceptional Teaching of Physics: A ``Practical Teaching Philosophy''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurki-Suonio, Kaarle

    2011-03-01

    This article sketches a framework of ideas developed in the context of decades of physics teacher-education that was entitled the "perceptional approach". Individual learning and the scientific enterprise are interpreted as different manifestations of the same process aimed at understanding the natural and social worlds. The process is understood to possess the basic nature of perception, where empirical meanings are first born and then conceptualised. The accumulation of perceived gestalts in the "structure of the mind" leads to structural perception and the generation of conceptual hierarchies, which form a general principle for the expansion of our understanding. The process undergoes hierarchical development from early sensory perception to individual learning and finally to science. The process is discussed in terms of a three-process dynamic. Scientific and technological processes are driven by the interaction of the mind and nature. They are embedded in the social process due to the interaction of individual minds. These sub-processes are defined by their aims: The scientific process affects the mind and aims at understanding; the technological process affects nature and aims at human well-being; and the social process aims at mutual agreement and cooperation. In hierarchical development the interaction of nature and the mind gets structured into a "methodical cycle" by procedures involving conscious activities. Its intuitive nature is preserved due to subordination of the procedures to empirical meanings. In physics, two dimensions of hierarchical development are distinguished: Unification development gives rise to a generalisation hierarchy of concepts; Quantification development transfers the empirical meanings to quantities, laws and theories representing successive hierarchical levels of quantitative concepts. Consequences for physics teaching are discussed in principle, and in the light of examples and experiences from physics teacher education.

  12. Principles governing heart failure therapy re-examined relative to standard evidence-based medicine-driven guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lip-Bun; Chinnappa, Shanmugakumar; Tan, David K H; Hall, Alistair S

    2011-09-01

    Although all aspects of clinical work nowadays are modified by the pervading influence of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and multiplicative guidelines, not many clinicians realize that the underlying premise of EBM-driven guidelines is a particular strain of consequentialist ideology. Subservience to this ideology has transformed modern medical practice, but there is a real risk of distorting good medical practice, of belittling clinical judgement, of disempowering clinicians, and subjecting patients to skewed medical reality and treatment options. With so many heart failure (HF) guidelines issued by various august bodies, it is therefore timely to reappraise principles governing modern HF therapy with a fresh examination of the hierarchy of medical imperatives, the role of alternatives to consequentialism including deontological principles in HF therapy. In addition, other ideology worth re-examining, aside from EBM, are the principle of appropriate definition of HF underlying therapeutic goals and the principle of prioritizing objectives of HF therapy. Even within standard EBM, there are many questions to reconsider: about what types of evidence are admissible, different interpretations of available evidence, emphasizing patient-centered outcome measures instead of randomized controlled trials quantifiable therapeutic outcomes, how to prescribe drugs for prognostic versus symptomatic benefits, and how to deliver HF therapy based on pathophysiological features through mechanistic considerations and not just confined to randomized controlled trials or meta-analytical statistical imperatives. Through re-examination of these fundamental principles of HF therapy, it is hoped that clinicians will be empowered to manage HF patients more holistically and better deliver HF therapies in the best interest of each individual patient.

  13. Investigation of the blood behaviour and vascular diseases by using mathematical physic principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardimci, Ahmet; Simsek, Buket

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we prepare a short survey for using of mathematical physic principles in blood flow and vascular diseases researches. The study of the behavior of blood flow in the blood vessels provides understanding on connection between flow and the development of dieseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, aneurysms etc. and how the flow dynamics is changed under these conditions. Blood flow phenomena are often too complex that it would be possible to describe them entirely analytically, although simple models, such as Poiseuille model, can still provide some insight into blood flow. Blood is not an "ideal fluid" and energy is lost as flowing blood overcomes resistance. Resistance to blood flow is a function of viscosity, vessel radius, and vessel length. So, mathematical Physic principles are useful tools for blood flow research studies. Blood flow is a function of pressure gradient and resistance and resistance to flow can be estimates using Poiseuille's law. Reynold's number can be used to determine whether flow is laminar or turbulent.

  14. Physical therapy for Bell s palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Lázaro Juliano; Soares, Bernardo Garcia de Oliveira; Vieira, Vanessa Pedrosa; Prado, Gilmar F

    2008-07-16

    Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis) is commonly treated by physical therapy services with various therapeutic strategies and devices. There are many questions about their efficacy and effectiveness. To evaluate the efficacy of physical therapies on the outcome of Bell's palsy. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Register (February 2008), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2007), MEDLINE (January 1966 to February 2008), EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2008), LILACS (January 1982 to February 2008), PEDro (from 1929 to February 2008), and CINAHL (January 1982 to February 2008). We selected randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving any physical therapy. We included participants of any age with a diagnosis of Bell's palsy and all degrees of severity. The outcome measures were: incomplete recovery six months after randomisation, motor synkinesis, crocodile tears or facial spasm six months after onset, incomplete recovery after one year and adverse effects attributable to the intervention. Titles and abstracts identified from the register were scrutinized. The assessment of methodological quality took into account secure method of randomisation, allocation concealment, observer blinding, patient blinding, differences at baseline of the experimental groups, and completeness of follow-up. Data were extracted using a specially constructed data extraction form. Separate subgroup analyses of participants with more and less severe disability were undertaken. The search identified 45 potentially relevant articles. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Three trials studied the efficacy of electrostimulation (294 participants) and three exercises (253 participants). Neither treatment produced significantly more improvement than the control treatment or no treatment. There was limited evidence that improvement began earlier in the exercise group. There is no evidence of significant

  15. Physical Therapy for Neurological Conditions in Geriatric Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Carmeli, Eli

    2017-01-01

    With more of the world’s population surviving longer, individuals often face age-related neurology disorders and decline of function that can affect lifestyle and well-being. Despite neurophysiological changes affecting the brain function and structure, the aged brain, in some degree, can learn and relearn due to neuroplasticity. Recent advances in rehabilitation techniques have produced better functional outcomes in age-related neurological conditions. Physical therapy (PT) of the elderly in...

  16. Bernoulli's Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2004-01-01

    Some teachers have difficulty understanding Bernoulli's principle particularly when the principle is applied to the aerodynamic lift. Some teachers favor using Newton's laws instead of Bernoulli's principle to explain the physics behind lift. Some also consider Bernoulli's principle too difficult to explain to students and avoid teaching it…

  17. IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL INDEPENDENCE OF PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS BY PHYSICAL THERAPY AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Ticărat

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with multiple sclerosis can have a normal life despite of their real or possible disability and of the progressive nature of it. Scope. Patients who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy will have an increased quality of life and a greater functional independence.Methods. The randomized study was made on 7 patients with multiple sclerosis, from Oradea Day Centre, 3 times/week, ages between 35 – 55 years, functional level between mild and sever. Assessment and rehabilitation methods: inspection, BARTHEL Index. Frenkel method, brething exercises, weights exercises, gait exercises, writind exercises and games were used in the rehabilitation process. Group therapies: sociotherapy, arttherapy, music therapy. Results analysis consisted of the comparison of baseline and final means.Results. By analizing baseline and final means for Barthel Index for each functon separately, it was shown a mild improvement of functional independence for almost assessed functions, with at least 1-1,5 points.Conclusions. Persons with multiple sclerosis who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy presents a better functional independence after the treatment.

  18. Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Surgery for Many Patients Spotlight on Research Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery ... to avoid surgery and achieve comparable relief from physical therapy, according to a recent, multisite study funded ...

  19. Response to pediatric physical therapy in infants with positional preference and skull deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.M. van; Pelsma, M.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C.G.; IJzerman, M.J.; Vlimmeren, L.A. van; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric physical therapy seems to reduce skull deformation in infants with positional preference. However, not all infants show improvement. OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to determine which infant and parent characteristics were related to responses to pediatric physical therapy

  20. Comparison of efficacy of neural therapy and physical therapy in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Sahin, Fusun; Atalay, Ali; Akkaya, Nuray

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of neural therapy, and physical therapy on level of pain, disability, quality of life, and psychological status in patients with chronic low back pain. Patients admitted to the physical therapy and rehabilitation outpatient clinic with the complaint of low back pain of at least 3 months duration. Group 1 (n=27), physical therapy (PT, hotpack, ultrasound, TENS 15 sessions), group 2 (n=33), neural therapy (NT, 1:1 mixture of 20 mg/mL Lidocaine HCl (Jetokain simplex®) and saline for 5 sessions. For pain, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), for disability Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), for quality-of-life Nottingham-Health-Profile (NHP), for depression, and anxiety, Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale (HADS) were used before and after the treatment. Mean age was 47.3±11.32 years, symptom time was 13.78±11.98 months. There were no differences for demographic variables between groups. Significant improvements were detected for VAS, RMDQ, NHP-Pain, NHP-Physical activity, HADS for both of two groups after treatment. In addition to these findings, significant improvements were found for NHP-Energy, NHP-Social isolation in NT group. The differences of pre- and post-treatment values of parameters were evaluated for each group. Although there were no differences for VAS, NHP-sleep, NHP-Emotional reaction, HADS between groups, RMDQ, NHP-Pain, NHP-Physical activity, NHP-Social isolation were higher in NT than PT before treatment, the improvements for these parameters were better in NT than PT. In conclusion both of NT and PT are effective on pain, function, quality of life, anxiety, and depression in patients with chronic low back pain.

  1. ALARA principle - new philosophy in radiation therapy of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjieva, T.

    2003-01-01

    The papillary thyroid carcinoma is a model for a successful multidisciplinary oncological therapy with the early stage survival similar to that for normal population. The iodine radiotherapy is a part of the complex treatment leading to these results. The radiation protection principle ALARA is created for healthy people. The authors have formulated it for the purposes of radiotherapy and have built in, as a basic philosophy, in the new radiotherapy concept. It has increased the benefit:risk ratio for the patient. In this case ALARA means: reduction of the indications for treatment with 131 I in the early stages of papillary carcinoma; achievement of tumor control with minimal possible activity in advanced cases; medicamentous, dietary and other measures, reducing the dose burden during and after the treatment, extension of the overall treatment period through a control of the tumor marker thyroglobulin; special treatment and diagnostic regime for children and adolescents, a minimum radiation invasive and economically and socially adequate algorithm for the long-time follow-up of the patients. This ensures a high life quality for the healed patients, comparable with that of the other people

  2. Tendinopathy: Evidence-Informed Physical Therapy Clinical Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicenzino, Bill

    2015-11-01

    Patients presenting with pain at the tendon, which is associated with physical tasks and activities that specifically load that tendon, are at the center of this special issue. The current terminology for a symptomatic tendon presentation is tendinopathy, as this does not denote an underlying pathology, but rather signals that all is not well in the tendon. Tendinopathy is a prevalent and substantial problem, as it interferes with a person's capacity to lead a physically active and healthy life, which has a considerable flow-on effect on society in general. This issue deals with the contemporary physical therapy management of tendinopathy by providing a mix of evidence review and clinical expert opinion on commonly presenting tendinopathies of the lower and upper limbs. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2015;45(11):816-818. doi:10.2519/jospt.2015.0110.

  3. Systematic Clinical Reasoning in Physical Therapy (SCRIPT): Tool for the Purposeful Practice of Clinical Reasoning in Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sarah E; Painter, Elizabeth E; Morgan, Brandon C; Kaus, Anna L; Petersen, Evan J; Allen, Christopher S; Deyle, Gail D; Jensen, Gail M

    2017-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is essential to physical therapist practice. Solid clinical reasoning processes may lead to greater understanding of the patient condition, early diagnostic hypothesis development, and well-tolerated examination and intervention strategies, as well as mitigate the risk of diagnostic error. However, the complex and often subconscious nature of clinical reasoning can impede the development of this skill. Protracted tools have been published to help guide self-reflection on clinical reasoning but might not be feasible in typical clinical settings. This case illustrates how the Systematic Clinical Reasoning in Physical Therapy (SCRIPT) tool can be used to guide the clinical reasoning process and prompt a physical therapist to search the literature to answer a clinical question and facilitate formal mentorship sessions in postprofessional physical therapist training programs. The SCRIPT tool enabled the mentee to generate appropriate hypotheses, plan the examination, query the literature to answer a clinical question, establish a physical therapist diagnosis, and design an effective treatment plan. The SCRIPT tool also facilitated the mentee's clinical reasoning and provided the mentor insight into the mentee's clinical reasoning. The reliability and validity of the SCRIPT tool have not been formally studied. Clinical mentorship is a cornerstone of postprofessional training programs and intended to develop advanced clinical reasoning skills. However, clinical reasoning is often subconscious and, therefore, a challenging skill to develop. The use of a tool such as the SCRIPT may facilitate developing clinical reasoning skills by providing a systematic approach to data gathering and making clinical judgments to bring clinical reasoning to the conscious level, facilitate self-reflection, and make a mentored physical therapist's thought processes explicit to his or her clinical mentor. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  4. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into “a training package”, based on the patient’s functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  5. Nanotechnology in hyperthermia cancer therapy: From fundamental principles to advanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beik, Jaber; Abed, Ziaeddin; Ghoreishi, Fatemeh S; Hosseini-Nami, Samira; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali; Kamrava, S Kamran

    2016-08-10

    In this work, we present an in-depth review of recent breakthroughs in nanotechnology for hyperthermia cancer therapy. Conventional hyperthermia methods do not thermally discriminate between the target and the surrounding normal tissues, and this non-selective tissue heating can lead to serious side effects. Nanotechnology is expected to have great potential to revolutionize current hyperthermia methods. To find an appropriate place in cancer treatment, all nanotechnology-based hyperthermia methods and their risks/benefits must be thoroughly understood. In this review paper, we extensively examine and compare four modern nanotechnology-based hyperthermia methods. For each method, the possible physical mechanisms of heat generation and enhancement due to the presence of nanoparticles are explained, and recent in vitro and in vivo studies are reviewed and discussed. Nano-Photo-Thermal Therapy (NPTT) and Nano-Magnetic Hyperthermia (NMH) are reviewed as the two first exciting approaches for targeted hyperthermia. The third novel hyperthermia method, Nano-Radio-Frequency Ablation (NaRFA) is discussed together with the thermal effects of novel nanoparticles in the presence of radiofrequency waves. Finally, Nano-Ultrasound Hyperthermia (NUH) is described as the fourth modern method for cancer hyperthermia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Applications of the principle of maximum entropy: from physics to ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos; Volkov, Igor

    2010-02-17

    There are numerous situations in physics and other disciplines which can be described at different levels of detail in terms of probability distributions. Such descriptions arise either intrinsically as in quantum mechanics, or because of the vast amount of details necessary for a complete description as, for example, in Brownian motion and in many-body systems. We show that an application of the principle of maximum entropy for estimating the underlying probability distribution can depend on the variables used for describing the system. The choice of characterization of the system carries with it implicit assumptions about fundamental attributes such as whether the system is classical or quantum mechanical or equivalently whether the individuals are distinguishable or indistinguishable. We show that the correct procedure entails the maximization of the relative entropy subject to known constraints and, additionally, requires knowledge of the behavior of the system in the absence of these constraints. We present an application of the principle of maximum entropy to understanding species diversity in ecology and introduce a new statistical ensemble corresponding to the distribution of a variable population of individuals into a set of species not defined a priori.

  7. Applications of the principle of maximum entropy: from physics to ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banavar, Jayanth R; Volkov, Igor; Maritan, Amos

    2010-01-01

    There are numerous situations in physics and other disciplines which can be described at different levels of detail in terms of probability distributions. Such descriptions arise either intrinsically as in quantum mechanics, or because of the vast amount of details necessary for a complete description as, for example, in Brownian motion and in many-body systems. We show that an application of the principle of maximum entropy for estimating the underlying probability distribution can depend on the variables used for describing the system. The choice of characterization of the system carries with it implicit assumptions about fundamental attributes such as whether the system is classical or quantum mechanical or equivalently whether the individuals are distinguishable or indistinguishable. We show that the correct procedure entails the maximization of the relative entropy subject to known constraints and, additionally, requires knowledge of the behavior of the system in the absence of these constraints. We present an application of the principle of maximum entropy to understanding species diversity in ecology and introduce a new statistical ensemble corresponding to the distribution of a variable population of individuals into a set of species not defined a priori. (topical review)

  8. Physical principles, geometrical aspects, and locality properties of gauge field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.; Hamburg Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Gauge field theories, particularly Yang - Mills theories, are discussed at a classical level from a geometrical point of view. The introductory chapters are concentrated on physical principles and mathematical tools. The main part is devoted to locality problems in gauge field theories. Examples show that locality problems originate from two sources in pure Yang - Mills theories (without matter fields). One is topological and the other is related to the existence of degenerated field configurations of the infinitesimal holonomy groups on some extended region of space or space-time. Nondegenerate field configurations in theories with semisimple gauge groups can be analysed with the help of the concept of a local gauge. Such gauges play a central role in the discussion. (author)

  9. Physical principles underlying the experimental methods for studying the orientational order of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limmer, S.

    1989-01-01

    The basic physical principles underlying different experimental methods frequently used for the determination of orientational order parameters of liquid crystals are reviewed. The methods that are dealt with here include the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility, birefringence, linear dichroism, Raman scattering, fluorescence depolarization, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The fundamental assertions that can be obtained by the different methods as well as their advantages, drawbacks and limitations are inspected. Typical sources of uncertainties and inaccuracies are discussed. To quantitatively evaluate the experimental data with reference to the orientational order the general tensor formalism developed by Schmiedel was employed throughout according to which the order matrix comprises 25 real elements yet. Within this context the interplay of orientational ordering and molecular conformation is scrutinized. (author)

  10. Nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy preparation in rheumatology in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, A M; Becker, M C

    1980-11-01

    Directors of undergraduate programs in nursing, physical therapy, and occupational therapy in the United States and Canada were surveyed to determine the amount and perceived adequacy of the current degree of classroom and clinical exposure to the rheumatic diseases. One hundred ninety-one (73%) of the 262 mailed questionnaires were returned. Results indicate that regardless of the actual degree of rheumatologic classroom exposure, directors in all three disciplines view current amounts as adequate. A larger proportion views levels of clinical exposure as inadequate. In general, the Canadian programs had a greater emphasis on rheumatology than their United States counterparts.

  11. Physical therapy after total mastectomy surgery in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Cismaş

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in the whole world. It is caused by the development of malignant cells in the breast. In cancer patients, physical therapy has resulted in improved physical functioning, cardiovascular fitness, sleep, quality of life, psychological and social well-being, and self esteem, and significant decreases in fatigue, anxiety and depression. Aim: The aim of this study is to underline the importance of physical therapy in the rehabilitation of patients after total mastectomy surgery in breast cancer. Material and methods: We investigated 14 women aged between 45 and 75 years old, diagnosed with breast cancer (stages I–III, having a total mastectomy surgery 6 months ago. At the beginning and after 2 weeks of intervention, the subject`s evaluations consisted in: each patient was evaluated in regard to shoulder flexibility (from Test 1 to Test 8; on the other hand, we measured the upper limb circumferences on the surgery side. The physical therapy programme consisted in 10 sessions of 20 minutes lymphatic drainage and 10 minutes individualized physical therapy programmes. Results: At the end of intervention, it was observed a score improvement at Test 2 (from 1.28±0.99 to 1.85±0.53, p=0.041, Test 3 (from 0.42±0.85 to 1.57±0.85, p=0.001, Test 7 (from 0.5±0.51 to 0.85±0.36, p=0.019 and Test 8 (from 1.28±0.99 to 1.85±0.53, p=0.041. In terms of total score (Total, the improvement was also significant increased (from 13.25±9.08 to 18.13±10.12, p=0.044. Circumference values significantly improved at arm (from 30.36±4.25 to 29.79±4.41, p=0.001, forearm (from 23±2.18 to 22.04±2.26, p=0.001 and wrist level (from 17.46±1.74 to 17.11±1.67, p=0.012. Despite the intervention, elbow circumference didn`t reached the statistical significance (p<0.05. Conclusions: After 2 weeks of intervention we noticed a significant improvement at most of the parameters which means a life quality increase in

  12. Physical exercise as therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, Stefano; Sacchetti, Massimo; Haxhi, Jonida; Orlando, Giorgio; D'Errico, Valeria; Fallucca, Sara; Menini, Stefano; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Many studies have highlighted the importance of physical activity (PA) for health, and recent evidence now points to the positive improvements associated with exercise in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, few physicians are willing to prescribe exercise as a therapy for diabetic patients. In addition, there is a lack of information on how to implement exercise therapy especially in long-term exercise regimens. The purpose of this manuscript is to summarize standards of exercise therapy for patients with T2DM, both in terms of prescribing and monitoring, according to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association guidelines. We present details of the exercise therapies used in long-term studies, describing how the parameters for exercise prescription were applied in clinical practice. These parameters are described in terms of frequency, intensity, duration, mode and rate of progression in long-term therapeutic prescriptions. Individual responses to exercise dose are discussed, and critical issues to be considered in patients with underlying disease and in T2DM patients are highlighted. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Metrics for Performance Evaluation of Patient Exercises during Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakanski, Aleksandar; Ferguson, Jake M; Lee, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    The article proposes a set of metrics for evaluation of patient performance in physical therapy exercises. Taxonomy is employed that classifies the metrics into quantitative and qualitative categories, based on the level of abstraction of the captured motion sequences. Further, the quantitative metrics are classified into model-less and model-based metrics, in reference to whether the evaluation employs the raw measurements of patient performed motions, or whether the evaluation is based on a mathematical model of the motions. The reviewed metrics include root-mean square distance, Kullback Leibler divergence, log-likelihood, heuristic consistency, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and similar. The metrics are evaluated for a set of five human motions captured with a Kinect sensor. The metrics can potentially be integrated into a system that employs machine learning for modelling and assessment of the consistency of patient performance in home-based therapy setting. Automated performance evaluation can overcome the inherent subjectivity in human performed therapy assessment, and it can increase the adherence to prescribed therapy plans, and reduce healthcare costs.

  14. Physical activity for women with breast cancer after adjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahart, Ian M; Metsios, George S; Nevill, Alan M; Carmichael, Amtul R

    2018-01-29

    Women with a diagnosis of breast cancer may experience short- and long-term disease and treatment-related adverse physiological and psychosocial outcomes. These outcomes can negatively impact prognosis, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and psychosocial and physical function. Physical activity may help to improve prognosis and may alleviate the adverse effects of adjuvant therapy. To assess effects of physical activity interventions after adjuvant therapy for women with breast cancer. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group (CBCG) Specialised Registry, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, on 18 September 2015. We also searched OpenGrey and Healthcare Management Information Consortium databases. We searched for randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing physical activity interventions versus control (e.g. usual or standard care, no physical activity, no exercise, attention control, placebo) after adjuvant therapy (i.e. after completion of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, but not hormone therapy) in women with breast cancer. Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. We contacted trial authors to ask for additional information when needed. We calculated an overall effect size with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each outcome and used GRADE to assess the quality of evidence for the most important outcomes. We included 63 trials that randomised 5761 women to a physical activity intervention (n = 3239) or to a control (n = 2524). The duration of interventions ranged from 4 to 24 months, with most lasting 8 or 12 weeks (37 studies). Twenty-eight studies included aerobic exercise only, 21 involved aerobic

  15. Evidence - based medicine/practice in sports physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Robert C; Lehecka, B J

    2012-10-01

    A push for the use of evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice patterns has permeated most health care disciplines. The use of evidence-based practice in sports physical therapy may improve health care quality, reduce medical errors, help balance known benefits and risks, challenge views based on beliefs rather than evidence, and help to integrate patient preferences into decision-making. In this era of health care utilization sports physical therapists are expected to integrate clinical experience with conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of research evidence in order to make clearly informed decisions in order to help maximize and optimize patient well-being. One of the more common reasons for not using evidence in clinical practice is the perceived lack of skills and knowledge when searching for or appraising research. This clinical commentary was developed to educate the readership on what constitutes evidence-based practice, and strategies used to seek evidence in the daily clinical practice of sports physical therapy.

  16. Cerebral palsy: the meaning of physical therapy for mother caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Pereira Domenech

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Exercise therapy, as applied by a physiotherapist, aims to improve the acquisition of functional skills by children with cerebral palsy (CP. Treatment instructions are given to mothers, but are frequently not followed. Objective: To get to know the meaning of the role of physiotherapy in the treatment of children with CP, according to their mothers' perception; and to check mothers' compliance with physiotherapists' recommendations at home. Methods: This was a qualitative study. Interviews were conducted with 11 mother caregivers. Data were collected through interviews based on a guide questions about the meaning of the role of physiotherapy in the treatment of children with CP, and about the continuity of care outside the outpatient setting. All the interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using Bardin's content analysis technique. Results: These women have a positive perception of the physical therapy treatment; they value and recognize the benefits, by emphasizing that it provides for the physical, psychological and social recovery of their children. Mothers are aware of the benefits of treatment and that it is important to continue treatment at home. They show themselves willing and able to implement the recommendations given by the physical therapist, and demonstrate their constant concern for the welfare of their children. Conclusion: Physiotherapists should work more intensively with mothers who fail to adhere to home treatment programs. They should try and identify the reasons for their non-compliance, offer them guidance, advice, and assistance in order to clarify doubts and help solve difficulties faced by caregivers.

  17. Physical and mathematical modeling of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgermeister, Lisa; López, Fernando Romero; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is a promising method to treat local bacterial infections. The therapy is painless and does not cause bacterial resistances. However, there are gaps in understanding the dynamics of the processes, especially in periodontal treatment. This work describes the advances in fundamental physical and mathematical modeling of aPDT used for interpretation of experimental evidence. The result is a two-dimensional model of aPDT in a dental pocket phantom model. In this model, the propagation of laser light and the kinetics of the chemical reactions are described as coupled processes. The laser light induces the chemical processes depending on its intensity. As a consequence of the chemical processes, the local optical properties and distribution of laser light change as well as the reaction rates. The mathematical description of these coupled processes will help to develop treatment protocols and is the first step toward an inline feedback system for aPDT users.

  18. Physical methods of treatment of complications of anti tumoral therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukovets, A.G.; Ulashchik, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    Numerous experimental and clinical materials about expediency of the use of physical methods for lowering of frequency and heaviness of complications of radial therapy are reviewed. One of such methods, possessing most expressed radioprotection ability, is low intensity laser radiation. Some of the authors demonstrated that use of this method move aside the time of appearance of early radial reactions. Preliminary local use of laser irradiation (λ = 510 nm) permits to avoid of development of epidermis disease and such radial reactions as ulcer and skin fibrosis in cancer patients after neutron-photon therapy. There are good results of application of ultraviolet irradiation in the region of action of ionizing radiation in the case of medical treatment of skin cancer. Low frequency magnetic field can reduce the expression of radial reactions

  19. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy: Suggested Readings [and] Physical Therapy: Supply/Demand--Some Facts [and] Occupational Therapy: Supply and Demand--Some Facts. Information on Personnel Supply and Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Professions in Special Education, Reston, VA.

    Brought together are two fact sheets on the supply of and demand for physical therapists and occupational therapists. The fact sheets cite statistical data from the National Easter Seal Society, the American Physical Therapy Association, and the American Occupational Therapy Association. The cited facts focus on the need to recruit and retain…

  20. ANALYSIS OF LEVEL OF BOTH SHOULDERS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazala Noor Nizami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: During lectures, usually students sit in an awkward position, for prolonged period of time and that may cause postural instability. For a good posture, bilateral landmarks should be on same level, when viewed from front or behind. Therefore, both shoulders should also be on same level as well. Any alteration in level of shoulders in healthy individual may lead to deformity in spine or extremity. The objective of this study was to analyze the level of both shoulders in the physical therapy students and to find its correlation with the perception of students about their shoulder balance. Methods: An observational (cross – sectional study was conducted on students of Doctor in Physical Therapy (DPT from colleges of Physical Therapy, Karachi. 100 Students were selected by Simple Random Sampling technique. Data from students was collected by administering a questionnaire. It includes close-ended questions. Afterwards, the level of both shoulders of the students, were assessed by using Scoliosis Meter. Results: Response from students showed that 79% of them assumed that both shoulders are in same level. When level of shoulder of students was assessed by scoliosis meter, it showed that 37% students have absolute level shoulder. Spearman’s Correlation coefficient (r = 0.046, p= 0.65 showed a weak, positive correlation between perception of the students about shoulder level and assessment of shoulder tilt. Conclusion: This showed that the perception of students about level of both shoulders was not correlated to the actual levels of the shoulders. Hence, as they were not assuming it uneven, so they may not pay any attention to keep themselves straight.

  1. Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy for Vulvodynia: A Clinician's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Stephanie A

    2017-09-01

    Vulvar pain affects up to 20% of women at some point in their lives, and most women with vulvar pain have associated pelvic floor impairments. Pelvic floor dysfunction is associated with significant functional limitations in women by causing painful intercourse and urinary, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. A quick screening of the pelvic floor muscles can be performed in the gynecology office and should be used when patients report symptoms of pelvic pain. It is now known the vulvar pain syndromes are heterogeneous in origin; therefore, successful treatment plans are multimodal and include physical therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The physical principles of near infrared breast diaphanography and early diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Feijun; Jia Zhuoying

    2009-01-01

    The early-screening and diagnosis of breast cancer is very important for improving the life quality of women as well decreasing the death rate. As a main diagnostic technique, mammography might cause radiation damage to the human body. Near infrared (NIR) computer diaphanography imaging diagnosis (CDI) is a new technique for breast cancer diagnosis which can be performed multiple times with no harm. However, its high incidence of false positivity has raised doubts and questions. We introduce the physical principles of CDI, and discuss the mechanism of how a malignant growth surrounds itself with a dense network of tiny blood-filled capillaries to feed oxygen and nutrients to active tumors, thus forming unique NIR transmittance markers that reveal the presence of cancer. The advantages and difficulties of CDI are evaluated, with the conclusion that CDI satisfies all the 'three-conditions' of imaging diagnosis. The influence of competition with mammography in the development of CDI is reviewed. The opportunities of physics interacting with the life sciences are outlined. (authors)

  3. Review of the gas centrifuge until 1962. Part I: Principles of separation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, S.

    1984-01-01

    There are two sets of principles involved in the development of the gas centrifuge, the internal separation physics and the external means of spinning a rotor at very high speeds. Only the first aspect is discussed in this part of the review. First, the industrial requirement for the separation of the uranium isotopes is defined so that the separation history can be put in a modern perspective. The history of separation physics itself is then traced back to the theory of centrifugal force by Huygens and the equivalence of this force to that of gravity. The barometric equation giving the variation of atmospheric pressure with height and the law of partial pressures can then be adapted to the centrifuge to give the steady-state theory of separation. This work was completed in the last century but was not confirmed in its application to isotope separation until 1936. The detailed separation physics for non-steady-state conditions required for a production centrifuge was developed during the American wartime Manhattan Project. During this work the theory giving the maximum output of a centrifuge was developed by Dirac, and soon afterwards Cohen and Kaplan showed that the best method of operation for a production centrifuge is in a countercurrent mode of operation. This method gives a large separation factor at relatively small flow rates through the rotor. The theory of how to set up an internal countercurrent was given by Martin during an equivalent wartime German project, and refinements to the theory, showing how the countercurrent persists along a centrifuge rotor, was given by Dirac and Steenbeck, the latter during a postwar Russian project. This theory was extended by Parker, Ging, and Mayo of the University of Virginia, whose work was completed by 1962, the limit of this review

  4. A distance learning model in a physical therapy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, T; Harrison, A L; Hart, A L

    1998-01-01

    In response to the rural health initiative established in 1991, the University of Kentucky has developed an innovative distance learning program of physical therapy instruction that combines classroom lecture and discussion via compressed video technology with laboratory experiences. The authors describe the process of planning, implementing, and evaluating a specific distance learning course in pathomechanics for the professional-level master's-degree physical therapy students at the University of Kentucky. This presentation may serve as a model for teaching distance learning. Descriptions of optimal approaches to preclass preparation, scheduling, course delivery, use of audiovisual aids, use of handout material, and video production are given. Special activities that may enhance or deter the achievement of the learning objectives are outlined, and a problem-solving approach to common problems encountered is presented. An approach to evaluating and comparing course outcomes for the distance learnere is presented. For this particular course, there was no statistically significant difference in the outcome measures utilized to compare the distance learners with the on-site learners.

  5. Effect of Physical Therapy Students' Clinical Experiences on Clinician Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivko, Susan E; Abbruzzese, Laurel D; Duttaroy, Pragati; Hansen, Ruth L; Ryans, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Physical therapy clinical education experiences (CEEs) are difficult to secure, particularly first-level CEEs. Our purpose was to determine 1) what impact student full-time CEEs have on PT clinician productivity and 2) whether there is a productivity difference between first vs final CEEs. Productivity logs, including possible factors impacting productivity, were distributed to clinician-student pairings on first and final CEEs. Two-week baseline data (without a student) were compared to weeks 1 and 6 (with a student) for 31 logs using a 2x4 repeated-measures ANOVA. In a subset of 17 logs for CEEs 8 weeks or longer, a 2x5 repeated-measures ANOVA was performed. There was a significant increase in the number of patients seen and CPT units billed by both levels of CEEs comparing weeks 1 and 6. In the subset of CEEs, 8 weeks or longer, there was a significant increase in the number of patients treated per hour at week 6 and a trend toward a change at week 8 when compared to baseline week A. The factors selected as impacting productivity were census (59%) and staffing (32%). Physical therapy clinician-student pairings showed an overall increase in productivity during both full-time first and final level CEEs.

  6. Selected Physical Therapy Modalities for the treatment of Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, S.; Sayed, N.; Al-Gazzar, S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of using selected physical therapy modalities for the treatment of diabetic polyneuropathy. Thirty patients participated in this study. Patients were randomly divided into study group (ten males and five females) and control group (six males and nine females). The study group received interferential current on the lumbosacral region, followed by repeated contraction as specific technique of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) to the anterior tibial group muscles. The control group did not receive physical therapy treatment. The treatment for the study group was conducted three times per week, for a period of six weeks. The patients were assessed for intensity of pain, manual muscle testing of the anterior tibial group muscles, and the level of superficial sensation on their feet. Patients were assessed the beginning of the treatment session and after the last session. The result of this study showed a significant decrease in the pain intensity, increase anterior tibial group muscles strength and increase level of superficial sensation in patients of study group in comparison to the control group at the end of the treatment. The control group did not show significant changes. It can be concluded that the combination of interferential current and repeated contraction (specific technique of PNF to the anterior tibial group muscles) is effective in decreasing the pain, increasing anterior tibial group muscles strength and the level of superficial sensation in patients suffering from diabetic polyneuropathy. (author)

  7. Two-dimensional models as testing ground for principles and concepts of local quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, Bert

    2005-04-01

    In the past two-dimensional models of QFT have served as theoretical laboratories for testing new concepts under mathematically controllable condition. In more recent times low-dimensional models (e.g. chiral models, factoring models) often have been treated by special recipes in a way which sometimes led to a loss of unity of QFT. In the present work I try to counteract this apartheid tendency by reviewing past results within the setting of the general principles of QFT. To this I add two new ideas: (1) a modular interpretation of the chiral model Diff(S)-covariance with a close connection to the recently formulated local covariance principle for QFT in curved spacetime and (2) a derivation of the chiral model temperature duality from a suitable operator formulation of the angular Wick rotation (in analogy to the Nelson-Symanzik duality in the Ostertwalder-Schrader setting) for rational chiral theories. The SL(2,Z) modular Verlinde relation is a special case of this thermal duality and (within the family of rational models) the matrix S appearing in the thermal duality relation becomes identified with the statistics character matrix S. The relevant angular 'Euclideanization' is done in the setting of the Tomita-Takesaki modular formalism of operator algebras. I find it appropriate to dedicate this work to the memory of J. A. Swieca with whom I shared the interest in two-dimensional models as a testing ground for QFT for more than one decade. This is a significantly extended version of an 'Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics' contribution hep-th/0502125. (author)

  8. Two-dimensional models as testing ground for principles and concepts of local quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [FU Berlin (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2005-04-15

    In the past two-dimensional models of QFT have served as theoretical laboratories for testing new concepts under mathematically controllable condition. In more recent times low-dimensional models (e.g. chiral models, factoring models) often have been treated by special recipes in a way which sometimes led to a loss of unity of QFT. In the present work I try to counteract this apartheid tendency by reviewing past results within the setting of the general principles of QFT. To this I add two new ideas: (1) a modular interpretation of the chiral model Diff(S)-covariance with a close connection to the recently formulated local covariance principle for QFT in curved spacetime and (2) a derivation of the chiral model temperature duality from a suitable operator formulation of the angular Wick rotation (in analogy to the Nelson-Symanzik duality in the Ostertwalder-Schrader setting) for rational chiral theories. The SL(2,Z) modular Verlinde relation is a special case of this thermal duality and (within the family of rational models) the matrix S appearing in the thermal duality relation becomes identified with the statistics character matrix S. The relevant angular 'Euclideanization' is done in the setting of the Tomita-Takesaki modular formalism of operator algebras. I find it appropriate to dedicate this work to the memory of J. A. Swieca with whom I shared the interest in two-dimensional models as a testing ground for QFT for more than one decade. This is a significantly extended version of an 'Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics' contribution hep-th/0502125. (author)

  9. Using principles of learning to inform language therapy design for children with specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Mary; Meyers, Christina; Ancharski, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Language treatment for children with specific language impairment (SLI) often takes months to achieve moderate results. Interventions often do not incorporate the principles that are known to affect learning in unimpaired learners. To outline some key findings about learning in typical populations and to suggest a model of how they might be applied to language treatment design as a catalyst for further research and discussion. Three main principles of implicit learning are reviewed: variability, complexity and sleep-dependent consolidation. After explaining these principles, evidence is provided as to how they influence learning tasks in unimpaired learners. Information is reviewed on principles of learning as they apply to impaired populations, current treatment designs are also reviewed that conform to the principles, and ways in which principles of learning might be incorporated into language treatment design are demonstrated. This paper provides an outline for how theoretical knowledge might be applied to clinical practice in an effort to promote discussion. Although the authors look forward to more specific details on how the principles of learning relate to impaired populations, there is ample evidence to suggest that these principles should be considered during treatment design. © 2012 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  10. Physical principles and current status of emerging non-volatile solid state memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Yang, C.-H.; Wen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Today the influence of non-volatile solid-state memories on persons' lives has become more prominent because of their non-volatility, low data latency, and high robustness. As a pioneering technology that is representative of non-volatile solidstate memories, flash memory has recently seen widespread application in many areas ranging from electronic appliances, such as cell phones and digital cameras, to external storage devices such as universal serial bus (USB) memory. Moreover, owing to its large storage capacity, it is expected that in the near future, flash memory will replace hard-disk drives as a dominant technology in the mass storage market, especially because of recently emerging solid-state drives. However, the rapid growth of the global digital data has led to the need for flash memories to have larger storage capacity, thus requiring a further downscaling of the cell size. Such a miniaturization is expected to be extremely difficult because of the well-known scaling limit of flash memories. It is therefore necessary to either explore innovative technologies that can extend the areal density of flash memories beyond the scaling limits, or to vigorously develop alternative non-volatile solid-state memories including ferroelectric random-access memory, magnetoresistive random-access memory, phase-change random-access memory, and resistive random-access memory. In this paper, we review the physical principles of flash memories and their technical challenges that affect our ability to enhance the storage capacity. We then present a detailed discussion of novel technologies that can extend the storage density of flash memories beyond the commonly accepted limits. In each case, we subsequently discuss the physical principles of these new types of non-volatile solid-state memories as well as their respective merits and weakness when utilized for data storage applications. Finally, we predict the future prospects for the aforementioned solid-state memories for

  11. Design of an instrument to measure the quality of care in Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Leny Vieira; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta; Talerman, Claudia; Prado, Cristiane do; Gobbi, Fátima Cristina Martorano; Andreoli, Paola Bruno de Araujo

    2015-01-01

    To design an instrument composed of domains that would demonstrate physical therapy activities and generate a consistent index to represent the quality of care in physical therapy. The methodology Lean Six Sigma was used to design the tool. The discussion involved seven different management groups staff. By means of brainstorming and Cause & Effect Matrix, we set up the process map. Five requirements composed the quality of care index in physical therapy, after application of the tool called Cause & Effect Matrix. The following requirements were assessed: physical therapist performance, care outcome indicator, adherence to physical therapy protocols, measure whether the prognosis and treatment outcome was achieved and Infrastructure. The proposed design allowed evaluating several items related to physical therapy service, enabling customization, reproducibility and benchmarking with other organizations. For management, this index provides the opportunity to identify areas for improvement and the strengths of the team and process of physical therapy care.

  12. A Novel Physical Sensing Principle for Liquid Characterization Using Paper-Based Hygro-Mechanical Systems (PB-HMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, Angel; Stiharu, Ion; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio

    2017-07-20

    In recent years paper-based microfluidic systems have emerged as versatile tools for developing sensors in different areas. In this work; we report a novel physical sensing principle for the characterization of liquids using a paper-based hygro-mechanical system (PB-HMS). The PB-HMS is formed by the interaction of liquid droplets and paper-based mini-structures such as cantilever beams. The proposed principle takes advantage of the hygroscopic properties of paper to produce hygro-mechanical motion. The dynamic response of the PB-HMS reveals information about the tested liquid that can be applied to characterize certain properties of liquids. A suggested method to characterize liquids by means of the proposed principle is introduced. The experimental results show the feasibility of such a method. It is expected that the proposed principle may be applied to sense properties of liquids in different applications where both disposability and portability are of extreme importance.

  13. Gait and physical impairments in patients with acute ankle sprains who did not receive physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Ilona M; Ziltener, Jean-Luc; Laidet, Magali; Armand, Stéphane; Allet, Lara

    2015-01-01

    To assess ankle function 4 weeks after conservative management and to examine the correlation of function with gait. A prospective comparison study. Thirty patients with grade I or II acute ankle sprains were followed up after 4 weeks of conservative management not involving physical therapy. Participants underwent a clinical assessment and had to walk at a normal self-selected walking speed. Their results were compared with the data of 15 healthy subjects. Participants' joint swelling, muscle strength, passive mobility, and pain were assessed. In addition, patients' temporal-spatial, kinematic, and kinetic gait data were measured while walking. Muscle strength and passive mobility were significantly reduced on the injured side compared with the noninjured side (P ankle sprains showed slower walking speed, shorter step length, shorter single support time, reduced and delayed maximum plantar flexion, decreased maximum power, and decreased maximum moment (P ankle sprain, patients who did not receive physical therapy showed physical impairments of the ankle that were correlated with gait parameters. These findings might help fine-tune rehabilitation protocols. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ergonomic principles and tools for best interdisciplinary psycho-physical stress prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Cason, Dott Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The psycho-physical stress is a risk to all intents and purposes,finally acknowledged, it requires increasing attention. Measures forits protection are reflected in the appropriate application of organizational policies on a human scale, or in respect of the"macro-ergonomics". This work consists on several inter-disciplinary tools available to the proper prevention, outbreaks of work-related stress.During work, adequate rests are important to prevent work related physical and mental fatigue. The strategies for maintaining a healthy balance between work rate and work breaks, may differ depending on the individual, subjective habits and peculiarities related to the work environment. Resting does not necessarily mean "going to break". The break-time is important as the work-time. While the latter is regulated, the first is not always clearly defined, though necessary. Knowing the employment contract is the first step towards the implementation of their rights relating to periods of suspension from the activity of work is also essential for high performance working. Breathing exercises, massage therapy, biofeedback, role-playing are some of the tools used during work breaks to prevent mental and physical fatigue. At the end music has a rhythm by alternating strong and weak accents. If the musical notes represent the "vertical" trend of music (melody), figures and pauses, inserted into the rhythmic structure of the measure, regulate the duration of sounds over time and determine the "horizontal" trend of a song. Transferring this concept on work, is meant to understand, using a metaphor, the importance of respect of changes in both vertical and horizontal trends inside a cycle.

  15. Oncology. Pt. 1. General part, epidemiology - pathogenesis - basic principles of therapy. 2. upd. ed.; Die Onkologie. T. 1. Allgemeiner Teil, Epidemiologie - Pathogenese - Grundprinzipien der Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiddemann, Wolfgang [Muenchen Univ. Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik III; Bartram Claus R. (eds.) [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Humangenetik

    2010-07-01

    The book Oncology is aimed to communicate the compiled knowledge on tumor development and cancer: fundamental knowledge base, practice related know-how for diagnostics and therapy. Part 1 includes the following chapters: epidemiology and pathogenesis, basic principles of diagnostics, basic principles of therapy, complication of malign growth, tumors in the gastrointestinal tract, female genital carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract carcinomas, respiratory tract and lung carcinomas, carcinomas in the head - neck area, bone and soft tissue carcinomas, pediatric tumors, hematological neoplasm, other carcinomas. The book can be used as reference for clinical work. [German] Die gesamte Onkologie - verlaessliches Wissen fuer Ihre Kompetenz. ''Die Onkologie'' stellt sich der Herausforderung, das staendig wachsende Wissen ueber Tumorerkrankungen in seiner Gesamtheit zu vermitteln. Sowohl inhaltlich als auch didaktisch auf hoechsten Niveau: Fundiertes Grundlagenwissen zum umfassenden Nachschlagen Praxisrelevantes Know-how fuer Diagnostik und Therapie Systematischer Aufbau fuer das Verstaendnis der komplexen Zusammenhaenge Die Onkologie - eine Enzyklopaedie der modernen klinischen Tumorlehre. Angesehene Experten aus Klinik, Forschung und Praxis liefern Ihnen in Teil1 klinisches Grundlagenwissen zu den Grundprinzipien der Therapie, Epidemiologie, Aetiologie und Pathogenese, sowie zu Komplikationen des malignen Wachstums. Zum Nachschlagen und Anwenden: finden Sie alle Optionen - auch fuer Ihren schwierigsten Fall. Der uebersichtliche Aufbau und die exzellenten Abbildungen erleichtern Ihnen das schnelle Auffinden und Verstaendnis der gesuchten Informationen. Fuer den Alltag onkologisch taetiger Aerzte ist Die Onkologie ein unentbehrlicher Meilenstein. (orig.)

  16. Cervical syndrome - the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumovic, Mersija; Gorcevic, Emir; Gorcevic, Semir; Osmanovic, Jasna

    2013-12-01

    The cervical syndrome refers to a set of disorders caused by the changes in the cervical spine and the soft-tissue surrounding it, with pain as the predominant symptom. Sore neck has been a common problem among a large section of today`s population. The factors contributing to this issue include the modern lifestyle, prolonged sitting and incorrect, fixed or constrained working postures. The root of these difficulties is found in the mechanical disorders of the cervical spine structures, poor body posture and jerky body movements. In the Scandinavian countries neck pain is considered to be a public health problem. The study evaluated 25 patients with an established diagnosis of cervical syndrome. The research was conducted at the PI Institute of Occupational and Sports Medicine of Zenica-Doboj Canton. Each patient received twenty physical therapy treatment sessions. The study included 25 patients suffering from the cervical syndrome. The statistical analysis of gender distribution indicated that 36% of the patients were male, while 64% were female. The mean age of study participants was 46.76±4,23. The patients ranged in age from 39 to 54 years, with no statistically significant difference in the mean age of male and female patients, p=0.691. Analysing the types of occupational activities performed by the patients, the study found a positive relation between neck pain and prolonged sitting at work. The patients who performed office work made up 76% of the total number. Each method of physical therapy applied in the treatment of neck pain patients proved useful. However, the combination of electrotherapy, kinesiotherapy and manual massage proved to be most effective. The cervical syndrome is a common medical condition primarily affecting adult population, with prevalence being higher among women and office workers. The condition places a considerable socioeconomic burden on the afflicted. Cervical pain ranges greatly in severity - from moderate to unbearable, thus

  17. Humanoid infers Archimedes' principle: understanding physical relations and object affordances through cumulative learning experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Emerging studies indicate that several species such as corvids, apes and children solve ‘The Crow and the Pitcher’ task (from Aesop's Fables) in diverse conditions. Hidden beneath this fascinating paradigm is a fundamental question: by cumulatively interacting with different objects, how can an agent abstract the underlying cause–effect relations to predict and creatively exploit potential affordances of novel objects in the context of sought goals? Re-enacting this Aesop's Fable task on a humanoid within an open-ended ‘learning–prediction–abstraction’ loop, we address this problem and (i) present a brain-guided neural framework that emulates rapid one-shot encoding of ongoing experiences into a long-term memory and (ii) propose four task-agnostic learning rules (elimination, growth, uncertainty and status quo) that correlate predictions from remembered past experiences with the unfolding present situation to gradually abstract the underlying causal relations. Driven by the proposed architecture, the ensuing robot behaviours illustrated causal learning and anticipation similar to natural agents. Results further demonstrate that by cumulatively interacting with few objects, the predictions of the robot in case of novel objects converge close to the physical law, i.e. the Archimedes principle: this being independent of both the objects explored during learning and the order of their cumulative exploration. PMID:27466440

  18. Efficiencies and Physical Principles of Various Solar Energy Conversion Processes Leading to the Photolysis of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergene, T

    1996-12-31

    In the application of solar energy, hydrogen is likely to be used as an energy carrier and a storage medium. Production of molecular hydrogen and oxygen from water requires energy input, which may come from solar energy in various ways. This thesis begins with a literature survey of the different conversion processes and the efficiencies, which is an introduction to a series of enclosed papers. These papers are: (1) Trapping of Minority Charge Carriers at Irradiated Semiconductor/Electrolyte Heterojunctions, (2) Model Calculations on Flat-Plate Solar Heat Collector With Integrated Solar Cells, and (3) Efficiencies and Physical Principles of Photolysis of Water By Microalgae. In the papers, The qualitative features of the ``illumination-current``-characteristic curve are deduced. The hypothesis is that trapping originates in some specific cases because of confinement, which leads to charge injections into energy states above that corresponding to the band edge. The quantitative features of certain hybrid photovoltaic/thermal configuration are deduced. An analysis of the theoretical and realizable efficiencies of the photolysis of water by micro algae is given. 151 refs., 18 figs., 1 table

  19. Humanoid infers Archimedes' principle: understanding physical relations and object affordances through cumulative learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ajaz Ahmad; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Sandini, Giulio; Morasso, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    Emerging studies indicate that several species such as corvids, apes and children solve 'The Crow and the Pitcher' task (from Aesop's Fables) in diverse conditions. Hidden beneath this fascinating paradigm is a fundamental question: by cumulatively interacting with different objects, how can an agent abstract the underlying cause-effect relations to predict and creatively exploit potential affordances of novel objects in the context of sought goals? Re-enacting this Aesop's Fable task on a humanoid within an open-ended 'learning-prediction-abstraction' loop, we address this problem and (i) present a brain-guided neural framework that emulates rapid one-shot encoding of ongoing experiences into a long-term memory and (ii) propose four task-agnostic learning rules (elimination, growth, uncertainty and status quo) that correlate predictions from remembered past experiences with the unfolding present situation to gradually abstract the underlying causal relations. Driven by the proposed architecture, the ensuing robot behaviours illustrated causal learning and anticipation similar to natural agents. Results further demonstrate that by cumulatively interacting with few objects, the predictions of the robot in case of novel objects converge close to the physical law, i.e. the Archimedes principle: this being independent of both the objects explored during learning and the order of their cumulative exploration. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Radiation-hygienic estimation of interstitial gamma therapy conducted according to principle of subsequent introduction of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamyatin, O.A.; Golikov, V.Ya.; Korenkov, I.P.; Ter-Kazar'yan, N.S.; Mindlin, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    A comparative study of two radiation-hygienic methods of interstitial gamma-therapy: with subsequent introduction of radioactive needles of a standard type; with subsequent manual introduction of 60 Co sources have been carried out. Chronometry-dosimetric methods of investigation and the methods of individual dosimetry underlie the studies. The obtained data showed, that doses of irradiation to which medical personnel is subjected during the use of the method of subsequent manual introduction of the active sources are 3-4 times lower, than those during the introduction of standard radioactive needles with a higher quality of the procedure performance, ensuring a good therapeutic effect. All this makes it possible to consider interstitial gamma-therapy with the use of the principle of subsequent introduction of the source to be a more perspective method than interstitial gamma-therapy with the use standard radioactive needless 60 Co

  1. Grade II whiplash injuries to the neck: what is the benefit for patients treated by different physical therapy modalities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehner, Christoph; Elbel, Martin; Strobel, Philipp; Scheich, Matthias; Schneider, Florian; Krischak, Gert; Kramer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background In a majority of cases, whiplash injuries are a domain of conservative therapy. Nevertheless it remains unclear whether physical therapy is of medical or economic benefit in patients with whiplash injuries. Methods Seventy patients with acute Quebec Task Force (QTF) grade II whiplash injuries were randomized to two therapy groups and received either active (APT) or passive (PPT) physical therapy. Patients were compared with regard to pain and range of motion with data obtained in an earlier study from a group with grade II whiplash injuries in which the therapy recommendation had been "act as usual" (AAU; n = 20). The above-mentioned parameters were assessed at 24 hours and two months after the injury. Furthermore patients' period of disability was documented after two months. Results After two months, patients in both the APT and PPT groups showed significant improvement in the median period of disability (active: 14 days; passive: 14 days) compared to the AAU group (49 days). No group difference was observed with regard to median improvement in range of motion (active: 120°; passive: 108°; activity as usual: 70°). The median pain reduction was significantly greater in the APT group (50.5) than in the PPT (39.2) or AAU group (28.8). Conclusion Our data show that active physical therapy results in enhanced pain reduction and shortening of post-injury disability. Therefore, active physical therapy should be considered the treatment of choice in patients with QTF grade II whiplash injuries. Trial registration The study complied with applicable German law and with the principles of the Helsinki Declaration and was approved by the institutional ethics commission. PMID:19149880

  2. Grade II whiplash injuries to the neck: what is the benefit for patients treated by different physical therapy modalities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krischak Gert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a majority of cases, whiplash injuries are a domain of conservative therapy. Nevertheless it remains unclear whether physical therapy is of medical or economic benefit in patients with whiplash injuries. Methods Seventy patients with acute Quebec Task Force (QTF grade II whiplash injuries were randomized to two therapy groups and received either active (APT or passive (PPT physical therapy. Patients were compared with regard to pain and range of motion with data obtained in an earlier study from a group with grade II whiplash injuries in which the therapy recommendation had been "act as usual" (AAU; n = 20. The above-mentioned parameters were assessed at 24 hours and two months after the injury. Furthermore patients' period of disability was documented after two months. Results After two months, patients in both the APT and PPT groups showed significant improvement in the median period of disability (active: 14 days; passive: 14 days compared to the AAU group (49 days. No group difference was observed with regard to median improvement in range of motion (active: 120°; passive: 108°; activity as usual: 70°. The median pain reduction was significantly greater in the APT group (50.5 than in the PPT (39.2 or AAU group (28.8. Conclusion Our data show that active physical therapy results in enhanced pain reduction and shortening of post-injury disability. Therefore, active physical therapy should be considered the treatment of choice in patients with QTF grade II whiplash injuries. Trial registration The study complied with applicable German law and with the principles of the Helsinki Declaration and was approved by the institutional ethics commission.

  3. The physics, biophysics and technology of photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Brian C; Patterson, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light-activated drugs to treat diseases ranging from cancer to age-related macular degeneration and antibiotic-resistant infections. This paper reviews the current status of PDT with an emphasis on the contributions of physics, biophysics and technology, and the challenges remaining in the optimization and adoption of this treatment modality. A theme of the review is the complexity of PDT dosimetry due to the dynamic nature of the three essential components-light, photosensitizer and oxygen. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the problem and in developing instruments to measure all three, so that optimization of individual PDT treatments is becoming a feasible target. The final section of the review introduces some new frontiers of research including low dose rate (metronomic) PDT, two-photon PDT, activatable PDT molecular beacons and nanoparticle-based PDT. (topical review)

  4. The physics, biophysics and technology of photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brian C; Patterson, Michael S

    2008-05-07

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light-activated drugs to treat diseases ranging from cancer to age-related macular degeneration and antibiotic-resistant infections. This paper reviews the current status of PDT with an emphasis on the contributions of physics, biophysics and technology, and the challenges remaining in the optimization and adoption of this treatment modality. A theme of the review is the complexity of PDT dosimetry due to the dynamic nature of the three essential components -- light, photosensitizer and oxygen. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the problem and in developing instruments to measure all three, so that optimization of individual PDT treatments is becoming a feasible target. The final section of the review introduces some new frontiers of research including low dose rate (metronomic) PDT, two-photon PDT, activatable PDT molecular beacons and nanoparticle-based PDT.

  5. The physics, biophysics and technology of photodynamic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Brian C [Division of Biophysics and Bioimaging, Ontario Cancer Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9 (Canada); Patterson, Michael S [Department of Medical Physics, Juravinski Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 699 Concession Street, Hamilton, ON L8V 5C2 (Canada)], E-mail: wilson@uhnres.utoronto.ca, E-mail: mike.patterson@jcc.hhsc.ca

    2008-05-07

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light-activated drugs to treat diseases ranging from cancer to age-related macular degeneration and antibiotic-resistant infections. This paper reviews the current status of PDT with an emphasis on the contributions of physics, biophysics and technology, and the challenges remaining in the optimization and adoption of this treatment modality. A theme of the review is the complexity of PDT dosimetry due to the dynamic nature of the three essential components-light, photosensitizer and oxygen. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the problem and in developing instruments to measure all three, so that optimization of individual PDT treatments is becoming a feasible target. The final section of the review introduces some new frontiers of research including low dose rate (metronomic) PDT, two-photon PDT, activatable PDT molecular beacons and nanoparticle-based PDT. (topical review)

  6. Case report: Physical therapy management of axial dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Mariana Callil; Oliveira, Tatiana de Paula; Piemonte, Maria Elisa Pimentel; Barbosa, Egberto Reis

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have described physical therapy approaches to provide functional independence and reduce pain in individuals with dystonia. This report describes the physical therapy treatment of a 46-year-old woman diagnosed with idiopathic segmental axial dystonia. For two years, the patient was treated with kinesiotherapy (active and resisted movements and stretching of neck and trunk muscles), abdominal taping (kinesiotaping techniques), functional training, and sensory tricks. She was assessed with parts I, II and III of Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS-I, TWSTRS-II and TWSTRS-III), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Six-Minute Walk Test (6-MWT), and the motor domain of Functional Independence Measure (FIM-motor) before and after the two-year treatment and after the one year follow-up. Postural control and symmetry improved (TWSTRS-I: from 30 to 18), functional independence increased (TWSTRS-II: from 27 to 15; BBS: from 36 to 46; 6-MWT: from 0 to 480 meters (m); FIM-motor: from 59 to 81), and the pain diminished (TWSTRS-III: from 12 to 5). The functional improvement was retained after one year (TWSTRS-I: 14/35; TWRTRS-II: 12/30; TWRTRS-III: 5/20; BBS: 48/56; 6-MWT: 450 m; FIM-motor: 81/91). This program showed efficacy on providing a better control of the dystonic muscles and thus the doses of botulinum toxin needed to treat them could be reduced. Outcomes support the therapeutic strategies used to deal with this type of dystonia.

  7. Effect of magnetic therapy on selected physical performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, David M; Ishee, Jimmy H; Titlow, Larry W

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of magnetic therapy in the form of shoe insoles on vertical jump, bench squat, 40-yd dash, and a soccer-specific fitness test performance. Subjects were 14 collegiate male soccer players who were pretested, retested 3 weeks later, and then placed into a double-blind control or treatment group using a matching procedure. The control group received magnetic shoe insoles with a rating of 125 gauss, and the treatment group received insoles with a rating of 600 gauss. Subjects wore the insoles during practice and games for 7 weeks and were then retested. Results indicated significant differences among test scores during the 3 time periods but not between the treatment and control groups. There was a decline in 40-yd dash performance from the initial evaluation (5.10 seconds) to the final evaluation (5.08 seconds). There were no other significant differences. Within the limitations of the study, magnetic therapy did not improve physical performance.

  8. Effect of physical therapy frequency on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eun-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to investigate the effect of physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 161 children with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for children with physical disabilities in South Korea. Gross Motor Function Measure data were collected according to physical therapy fr...

  9. Physical therapy for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Lázaro J; Valbuza, Juliana S; Prado, Gilmar F

    2011-12-07

    Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis) is commonly treated by various physical therapy strategies and devices, but there are many questions about their efficacy. To evaluate physical therapies for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial palsy). We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2011), MEDLINE (January 1966 to February 2011), EMBASE (January 1946 to February 2011), LILACS (January 1982 to February 2011), PEDro (from 1929 to February 2011), and CINAHL (January 1982 to February 2011). We included searches in clinical trials register databases until February 2011. We selected randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials involving any physical therapy. We included participants of any age with a diagnosis of Bell's palsy and all degrees of severity. The outcome measures were: incomplete recovery six months after randomisation, motor synkinesis, crocodile tears or facial spasm six months after onset, incomplete recovery after one year and adverse effects attributable to the intervention. Two authors independently scrutinised titles and abstracts identified from the search results. Two authors independently carried out risk of bias assessments, which , took into account secure methods of randomisation, allocation concealment, observer blinding, patient blinding, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other bias. Two authors independently extracted data using a specially constructed data extraction form. We undertook separate subgroup analyses of participants with more and less severe disability. For this update to the original review, the search identified 65 potentially relevant articles. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria (872 participants). Four trials studied the efficacy of electrical stimulation (313 participants), three trials studied exercises (199 participants), and five studies compared or combined some form of physical therapy

  10. Physical Therapy for Metabolic Syndrome Prevention in Workers: Novel Role of Physical Therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tomonori; Nemoto, Yuki; Utumi, Takako; Munakata, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, physical therapists have usually been involved in physical therapy for patients with functional disorders associated with cerebrovascular or orthopedic diseases in hospitals. With the aging of Japanese society, the number of diseased people will progressively increase; thus, it is important to pay much more attention to disease prevention. In this regard, physical therapists are expected to play a new role in the field of preventive medicine. Metabolic syndrome or central obesity with multiple cardiometabolic risks is associated with a high risk of type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular diseases and is now a central target for early detection and intervention for disease prevention. The incidence of metabolic syndrome increases with age, and men showed a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome than women in all generations. We have been involved in the guidance of workers with metabolic syndrome for a long time, and we conducted a multicenter study to establish effective guidance for these worker. In this paper, we will use our evidence to discuss the role of physical therapists in providing guidance for preventing metabolic syndrome. We are now conducting worksite supporting exercise intervention for workers who were resistant to conventional lifestyle guidance. In addition, the unique role of physical therapists in this new trial will be introduced.

  11. AAMFT Master Series Tapes: An Analysis of the Inclusion of Feminist Principles into Family Therapy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Shelley A.; MacPhee, David; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler

    2001-01-01

    Content analysis of 23 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Master Series tapes was used to determine how well feminist behaviors have been incorporated into ideal family therapy practice. Feminist behaviors were infrequent, being evident in fewer than 3% of time blocks in event sampling and 10 of 39 feminist behaviors of the…

  12. PROJECTING PRINCIPLES OF «MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL BASICS IN INFORMATICS» MODULE AS PART OF A UNIVERSAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Samerkhanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a presentation of “Mathematical and Physical Basics in Informatics” Module projected as part of universal baccalaureate model realized in Minin State Pedagogical University, Nizhny Novgorod, within the educational program for an extended group of qualifications “Informatics and Calculating Machines”. Module authors defined a strategy for baccalaureates preparation in the field of informational technology, which is realized due to a bunch of principles: education fundamentalization, learning systematization, activity, integration and student-centration. The principle of education fundamentalization requires consolidation of scientific and methodological preparation of students. The principle of learning systematization guarantees formation of students’ holistic ideology. The principle of integration is directed onto qualitative interdisciplinary conversion based on mutual enrichment of knowledge and skills. The principle of activity considers student personality, its formation and growth with respect to practical activity as a special form of psychical activity. The principle of student-centration is displayed as social-humanistic purpose of the educational process.

  13. A Classification System to Guide Physical Therapy Management in Huntington Disease: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Nora E; Busse, Monica; Jones, Karen; Khalil, Hanan; Quinn, Lori

    2017-07-01

    Individuals with Huntington disease (HD), a rare neurological disease, experience impairments in mobility and cognition throughout their disease course. The Medical Research Council framework provides a schema that can be applied to the development and evaluation of complex interventions, such as those provided by physical therapists. Treatment-based classifications, based on expert consensus and available literature, are helpful in guiding physical therapy management across the stages of HD. Such classifications also contribute to the development and further evaluation of well-defined complex interventions in this highly variable and complex neurodegenerative disease. The purpose of this case series was to illustrate the use of these classifications in the management of 2 individuals with late-stage HD. Two females, 40 and 55 years of age, with late-stage HD participated in this case series. Both experienced progressive declines in ambulatory function and balance as well as falls or fear of falling. Both individuals received daily care in the home for activities of daily living. Physical therapy Treatment-Based Classifications for HD guided the interventions and outcomes. Eight weeks of in-home balance training, strength training, task-specific practice of functional activities including transfers and walking tasks, and family/carer education were provided. Both individuals demonstrated improvements that met or exceeded the established minimal detectible change values for gait speed and Timed Up and Go performance. Both also demonstrated improvements on Berg Balance Scale and Physical Performance Test performance, with 1 of the 2 individuals exceeding the established minimal detectible changes for both tests. Reductions in fall risk were evident in both cases. These cases provide proof-of-principle to support use of treatment-based classifications for physical therapy management in individuals with HD. Traditional classification of early-, mid-, and late

  14. White Paper: Movement System Diagnoses in Neurologic Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Lois D; Quinn, Lori; Gill-Body, Kathleen; Brown, David A; Quiben, Myla; Riley, Nora; Scheets, Patricia L

    2018-04-01

    The APTA recently established a vision for physical therapists to transform society by optimizing movement to promote health and wellness, mitigate impairments, and prevent disability. An important element of this vision entails the integration of the movement system into the profession, and necessitates the development of movement system diagnoses by physical therapists. At this point in time, the profession as a whole has not agreed upon diagnostic classifications or guidelines to assist in developing movement system diagnoses that will consistently capture an individual's movement problems. We propose that, going forward, diagnostic classifications of movement system problems need to be developed, tested, and validated. The Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy's Movement System Task Force was convened to address these issues with respect to management of movement system problems in patients with neurologic conditions. The purpose of this article is to report on the work and recommendations of the Task Force. The Task Force identified 4 essential elements necessary to develop and implement movement system diagnoses for patients with primarily neurologic involvement from existing movement system classifications. The Task Force considered the potential impact of using movement system diagnoses on clinical practice, education and, research. Recommendations were developed and provided recommendations for potential next steps to broaden this discussion and foster the development of movement system diagnostic classifications. The Task Force proposes that diagnostic classifications of movement system problems need to be developed, tested, and validated with the long-range goal to reach consensus on and adoption of a movement system diagnostic framework for clients with neurologic injury or disease states.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A198).

  15. Effects of Brief Communication Skills Training for Workers Based on the Principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Norio; Somemura, Hironori; Nakamura, Saki; Yamamoto, Megumi; Isojima, Manabu; Shinmei, Issei; Horikoshi, Masaru; Tanaka, Katsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Stimulating communication is an important workplace issue. We investigated the effects of a brief communication skills training (CST) program based on the principles of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 206 white-collar workers. The intervention group underwent a 2-hour CST group training conducted by an occupational physician. The results of the intention-to-treat analysis using a mixed-effects model showed that there was a significant interaction between group and time observed for the item "thinking together to solve problems and issues" (P = 0.02). The effect size (Cohen d) was 0.35 (95% confidence interval, 0.07 to 0.62). The present study suggests that a brief CST based on the principles of CBT could improve the communication behavior of workers.

  16. Assessing the Efficacy of Mobile Health Apps Using the Basic Principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbone, Amy Leigh; Clarry, Laura; Prescott, Julie

    2017-11-28

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in its basic principle has developed itself as a stand-alone, substantial method of therapy. With effective application in therapy for a range of mental health issues, the spread of CBT methods to Web-based therapy sources is evident. The development of mobile phone apps using CBT principles is increasing within the research area. Despite the move to Web-based methods of therapy, it is argued that these methods lack the same efficacy of face-to-face therapy sessions. The aim of this review was to assess extent research findings with regard to the effectiveness of CBT-related mobile health (mHealth) apps. By assessing only studies employing a randomized controlled trial design, the review aimed to determine app efficacy within the highly regarded method of investigation. A comprehensive literature search was conducted across several databases. Search results were filtered, and results were subject to strict inclusion and exclusion criteria because of the nature of the review. Where possible, analysis of effect size was calculated and results reported. A total of 8 studies investigating the effectiveness of mHealth CBT-related apps across a range of mental health issues were reviewed. Three studies used the app against a control group, and 5 studies used the app intervention against another form of treatment or intervention. A range of effect sizes were seen across all included studies (d=-0.13 to 1.83; 0.03-1.44), with the largest effects often being seen when comparing the data from pre- to posttest for the app engaged group. The studies reviewed support the use of mHealth apps containing CBT principles for a range of mental health issues. However, the effectiveness over longer time periods should be assessed. Researchers and professionals should seek to collaborate effectively when creating new apps to enhance their effectiveness as a treatment for the general public. ©Amy Leigh Rathbone, Laura Clarry, Julie Prescott

  17. Evidence-Based Evaluation of Practice and Innovation in Physical Therapy Using the IDEAL-Physio Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, David; Hamilton, David; Davies, Loretta; Cook, Jonathan; Hirst, Allison; McCulloch, Peter; Paez, Arsenio

    2018-02-01

    The IDEAL framework is an established method for initial and ongoing evaluations of innovation and practice for complex health care interventions. First derived for surgical sciences and embedded at a global level for evaluating surgery/surgical devices, the IDEAL framework is based on the principle that innovation and evaluation in clinical practice can, and should, evolve together in an ordered manner: from conception to development and then to validation by appropriate clinical studies and, finally, longer-term follow-up. This framework is highly suited to other complex, nonpharmacological interventions, such as physical therapist interventions. This perspective outlines the application of IDEAL to physical therapy in the new IDEAL-Physio framework. The IDEAL-Physio framework comprises 5 stages. In stage 1, the idea phase, formal data collection should begin. Stage 2a is the phase for iterative improvement and adjustment with thorough data recording. Stage 2b involves the onset of formal evaluation using systematically collected group or cohort data. Stage 3 is the phase for formal comparative assessment of treatment, usually involving randomized studies. Stage 4 involves long-term follow-up. The IDEAL-Physio framework is recommended as a method for guiding and evaluating both innovation and practice in physical therapy, with the overall goal of providing better evidence-based care. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association.

  18. Is Pelvic-Floor Muscle Training a Physical Therapy or a Behavioral Therapy? A Call to Name and Report the Physical, Cognitive, and Behavioral Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Helena C; Dean, Sarah G; Slade, Susan C; Hay-Smith, E Jean C

    2017-04-01

    This perspective article explores whether pelvic-floor muscle training (PFMT) for the management of female urinary incontinence and prolapse is a physical therapy or a behavioral therapy. The primary aim is to demonstrate that it is both. A secondary aim is to show that the plethora of terms used for PFMT is potentially confusing and that current terminology inadequately represents the full intent, content, and delivery of this complex intervention. While physical therapists may be familiar with exercise terms, the details are often incompletely reported; furthermore, physical therapists are less familiar with the terminology used in accurately representing cognitive and behavioral therapy interventions, which results in these elements being even less well reported. Thus, an additional aim is to provide greater clarity in the terminology used in the reporting of PFMT interventions, specifically, descriptions of the exercise and behavioral elements. First, PFMT is described as a physical therapy and as an exercise therapy informed predominantly by the discipline of physical therapy. However, effective implementation requires use of the cognitive and behavioral perspectives of the discipline of psychology. Second, the theoretical underpinning of the psychology-informed elements of PFMT is summarized. Third, to address some identified limitations and confusion in current terminology and reporting, recommendations for ways in which physical therapists can incorporate the psychology-informed elements of PFMT alongside the more familiar exercise therapy-informed elements are made. Fourth, an example of how both elements can be described and reported in a PFMT intervention is provided. In summary, this perspective explores the underlying concepts of PFMT to demonstrate that it is both a physical intervention and a behavioral intervention and that it can and should be described as such, and an example of the integration of these elements into clinical practice is provided

  19. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds...... mesenchymal stromal cells, unless there is proof that they exhibit the fundamental in vivo characteristics of pluripotency and the ability to self-renew. That said, these cells from various tissues hold great promise for therapeutic use in horses. The 3 components of tissue engineering - cells, biological...... factors, and biomaterials - are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources.The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently...

  20. Psychometric properties of the PROMIS Physical Function item bank in patients receiving physical therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine H P Crins

    Full Text Available The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS is a universally applicable set of instruments, including item banks, short forms and computer adaptive tests (CATs, measuring patient-reported health across different patient populations. PROMIS CATs are highly efficient and the use in practice is considered feasible with little administration time, offering standardized and routine patient monitoring. Before an item bank can be used as CAT, the psychometric properties of the item bank have to be examined. Therefore, the objective was to assess the psychometric properties of the Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Physical Function item bank (DF-PROMIS-PF in Dutch patients receiving physical therapy.Cross-sectional study.805 patients >18 years, who received any kind of physical therapy in primary care in the past year, completed the full DF-PROMIS-PF (121 items.Unidimensionality was examined by Confirmatory Factor Analysis and local dependence and monotonicity were evaluated. A Graded Response Model was fitted. Construct validity was examined with correlations between DF-PROMIS-PF T-scores and scores on two legacy instruments (SF-36 Health Survey Physical Functioning scale [SF36-PF10] and the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability-Index [HAQ-DI]. Reliability (standard errors of theta was assessed.The results for unidimensionality were mixed (scaled CFI = 0.924, TLI = 0.923, RMSEA = 0.045, 1th factor explained 61.5% of variance. Some local dependence was found (8.2% of item pairs. The item bank showed a broad coverage of the physical function construct (threshold-parameters range: -4.28-2.33 and good construct validity (correlation with SF36-PF10 = 0.84 and HAQ-DI = -0.85. Furthermore, the DF-PROMIS-PF showed greater reliability over a broader score-range than the SF36-PF10 and HAQ-DI.The psychometric properties of the DF-PROMIS-PF item bank are sufficient. The DF-PROMIS-PF can now be used as short forms or CAT to measure the level of

  1. The common extremalities in biology and physics maximum energy dissipation principle in chemistry, biology, physics and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Moroz, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This book is the first unified systemic description of dissipative phenomena, taking place in biology, and non-dissipative (conservative) phenomena, which is more relevant to physics. Fully updated and revised, this new edition extends our understanding of nonlinear phenomena in biology and physics from the extreme / optimal perspective. The first book to provide understanding of physical phenomena from a biological perspective and biological phenomena from a physical perspective Discusses emerging fields and analysis Provides examples.

  2. Principles of etiopathogenetic therapy for acute respiratory viral infections in frequently ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kharitonova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the impact of incorporation of cycloferon into a therapy regimen on the efficiency of treatment for acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI in frequently ill children. Subjects and methods. The results of treatment were analyzed in 117 children divided into three groups according to the therapy regimen. Thus, symptomatic and local antiviral therapies (interferon nasal ointment and viferon suppositories were prescribed to all the children; furthermore, Group 1 (control used antibiotic therapy; Group 2 (Comparison Group 1 took antibiotics and cycloferon (tablets, and Group 3 (Comparison Group 2 had Cycloferon. Results: At the beginning of treatment, there was a reduction in interferon-a and interferon-y values with preserved serum interferon levels, suggesting the diminished compensatory responses ensuring antiviral protection. Analysis of the immune status revealed that virtually half of the children exhibited activation of compensatory mechanisms (stimulation of CD4+ and CD8+ production and an increase in NST test activity, one third displayed a disturbance (decreases in CD4+, CDlfrf, IgA, and NST test activity. After treatment, interferonogenesis was recovered in the majority (86,7% of the patients taking Cycloferon, in 74,1% of those who had a treatment regimen containing cycloferon and antibiotics, and only in 47,1 % of those who received antibiotics. Comparison of the immunological indicators during therapy with antibiotics alone or in combination with cycloferon demonstrated a more noticeable and balanced response to the latter: the normalized CD4+ and CD8+ values in the patients on antibiotic therapy was 8,9 and 5,8%, respectively, and 11,1 % in those who received antibiotics and cycloferon. Conclusion. Incorporation of cycloferon into ARVI treatment regimens for frequently ill patients has the positive effect on immunological indicators, which shows itself as recovery of initially diminished interferonogenesis

  3. Effects of hydration and physical therapy on tracheal transport velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, S.K.; Taplin, G.V.; Simmons, D.H.; Coulson, A.; Elam, D.

    1976-01-01

    A new tracer method for quantitative measurements of tracheal transport velocity (TTV) in mm/min in dogs has been described recently. Using the same technique, the effects of dehydration, hydration, postural drainage and physical therapy on TTV were studied. There was a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in TTV following dehydration and these values reverted to normal with hydration in all ten dogs. Tracheal transport velocity increased on the average of 39.7 percent with a mean change of 7.7 mm/min (p < 0.01) following postural drainage in seven dogs. On the other hand, TTV increased on the average of 51 percent with a mean change of 8.2 mm/min (p <0.01) following chest percussion in six dogs. Postural drainage and chest percussion each increased TTV significantly beyond the base-line values. However, hydration only restored TTV to base-line values when applied to dogs in the hydropenic state. These therapeutic measures have been used empirically in the past. The present study gives objective evidence of their beneficial effects in dogs and suggests that such treatments may have a definite scientific basis for clinical application in chronic obstructive airways disease

  4. Comparison of Teaching Strategies for Cultural Humility in Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparella-Pitzel, Susan; Eubanks, Robin; Kaplan, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competence and cultural humility are ongoing processes that healthcare professionals should continually strive for in order to provide effective and comprehensive plans of care for patients. This 2-year, longitudinal, educational pilot study describes the levels of competency in second-year entry-level physical therapy students and compares the outcomes of three teaching strategies for cultural competence and cultural humility. All students received a standard 2-hour lecture; study volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two enriched educational groups, involving a standardized patient or a paper case enrichment. Students shifted from initial levels of "culturally incompetent" and/or "culturally aware" to "culturally competent" as measured by the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professionals-Revised. This shift was maintained after 1.5 yrs following the exposure. Because the enriched educational groups were underpowered, preliminary quantitative data are inconclusive, but qualitative feedback from students is strongly positive. A minimal dose of a structured 2-hr lecture with a skilled instructor, who creates a safe environment for cultural learning, produced positive shifts toward greater cultural competence. Five processes emerged for teaching cultural humility that may assist in designing comprehensive educational experiences on this topic. A framework for organizing course content is presented.

  5. 42 CFR 413.106 - Reasonable cost of physical and other therapy services furnished under arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of therapy, to therapists working full time in an employment relationship. (2) Fringe benefit and... geographical area in which the services are furnished and a standard travel allowance. (3) If therapy services... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reasonable cost of physical and other therapy...

  6. Development of a Quantitative Tool to Assess the Content of Physical Therapy for Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H.; Dirks, Tineke; Hulshof, Lily J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The study aim was to describe and quantify physical therapy interventions for infants at high risk for developmental disorders. Methods: An observation protocol was developed based on knowledge about infant physical therapy and analysis of directly observable physiotherapeutic (PT) actions.

  7. Integrating Therapy Dog Teams in a Physical Activity Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrusnikova, Iva; Bibik, Janice M.; Cavalier, Albert R.; Manley, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    The use of therapy-dog teams in programs for children with disabilities is becoming increasingly popular in school and therapeutic settings and has been shown to provide physical, social, and emotional benefits for the children. This article describes the basic steps for implementing therapy dog-assisted activities in physical activity programs…

  8. Principles of designing cyber-physical system of producing mechanical assembly components at Industry 4.0 enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjanov, A. V.; Zakoldaev, D. A.; Shukalov, A. V.; Zharinov, I. O.

    2018-03-01

    The task of developing principles of cyber-physical system constitution at the Industry 4.0 company of the item designing components of mechanical assembly production is being studied. The task has been solved by analyzing the components and technologies, which have some practical application in the digital production organization. The list of components has been defined and the authors proposed the scheme of the components and technologies interconnection in the Industry 4.0 of mechanical assembly production to make an uninterrupted manufacturing route of the item designing components with application of some cyber-physical systems.

  9. Principles of management of recurrence of breast cancer after tamoxifen therapy (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, I.

    1999-01-01

    The management of recurrence of breast cancer after Tamoxifen therapy needs special attention. The recurrence can be local or distant. The patient, should be thoroughly investigated to find out exact sites of recurrences. Local recurrence is managed by excision, skin grafting or various types of flaps. If extensive radiation is administrated or if not given previously. The distant recurrence in patients who have had adjuvant menopausal status, sites of recurrence while life threatening or not and previous response. The patients who are post menopausal have responded to previous Tamoxifen therapy, long DFI and soft tissues and bony metastasis are best managed by Aromatase inhibitors i.e. Letrozole. (author)

  10. Virtual patient care: an interprofessional education approach for physician assistant, physical therapy and occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Michael J; Platko, Christina M; Cleghorn, Susan M; Booth, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this retrospective qualitative case report is to describe how a case-based, virtual patient interprofessional education (IPE) simulation activity was utilized to achieve physician assistant (PA), physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) student IPE learning outcomes. Following completion of a virtual patient case, 30 PA, 46 PT and 24 OT students were required to develop a comprehensive, written treatment plan and respond to reflective questions. A qualitative analysis of the submitted written assignment was used to determine whether IPE learning objectives were met. Student responses revealed three themes that supported the learning objectives of the IPE experience: benefits of collaborative care, role clarification and relevance of the IPE experience for future practice. A case-based, IPE simulation activity for physician assistant and rehabilitation students using a computerized virtual patient software program effectively facilitated achievement of the IPE learning objectives, including development of greater student awareness of other professions and ways in which collaborative patient care can be provided.

  11. Exposure to, Knowledge of, and Interest in Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy as Career Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prisca M. Collins

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Lack of awareness and knowledge of the occupational therapy (OT and physical therapy (PT professions has been cited as a barrier to consideration of these professions as career options. This study examined the types of exposure to, knowledge of, and career interest in OT and PT of students from underrepresented minority (URM and non-Hispanic White and Asian American (NHW-AA populations. A questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 150 high school and undergraduate college students. Demographic data and student responses to questions regarding exposure to, knowledge of, and career interest in OT and PT were collected. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests of association were computed, and qualitative data were analyzed for themes. The study findings revealed limited exposure to and knowledge of the OT profession among URM and NHW-AA students. Even though participants from both groups showed better knowledge about PT, they reported limited to no interest in the professions as careers. Further research is needed to examine contextual factors that may influence student perceptions of the OT and PT professions, including how clinical encounters can best be leveraged to improve public knowledge and consideration of these professions as careers for high school and undergraduate college students.

  12. Do occupational therapy and physical therapy curricula teach critical thinking skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Kimberly A; Geelhoed, Michael; Grice, Kimatha O; Murphy, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated whether critical thinking ability can be improved through participation in occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) curricula. The researchers compared levels of the critical thinking skills of OT and PT students at the beginning and end of their programs to determine whether changes occurred and to examine facets of the curricula that may have caused the differences. The curricula include teaching strategies of problem-based learning modules, small group discussion and problem-solving, case studies, clinical observation, and evidence-based practice assignments, as well as teaching about critical thinking as a process in itself. Fifty OT and PT students completed the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal at the beginning and end of 20 mos of the academic phase of their master's degree programs. Researchers analyzed the data using a one-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Results showed no differences between OT and PT students on the pretest or post-test and no differences for PT students between the pretest and post-test. OT students' scores increased significantly from pretest to post-test. The influence of the timing of teaching critical thinking skills in the resulting differences between the two curricula, as well as the validity of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal is a valid measure of critical thinking changes in allied health students are discussed.

  13. Clinical trial registration in physical therapy journals: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; Veluswamy, Sundar Kumar; Rao, Pratiksha Tilak; Maiya, Arun G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trial registration has become an important part of editorial policies of various biomedical journals, including a few physical therapy journals. However, the extent to which editorial boards enforce the need for trial registration varies across journals. The purpose of this study was to identify editorial policies and reporting of trial registration details in MEDLINE-indexed English-language physical therapy journals. This study was carried out using a cross-sectional design. Editorial policies on trial registration of MEDLINE-indexed member journals of the International Society of Physiotherapy Journal Editors (ISPJE) (Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, Journal of Hand Therapy, Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Journal of Physiotherapy [formerly Australian Journal of Physiotherapy], Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Manual Therapy, Physical Therapy, Physical Therapy in Sport, Physiotherapy, Physiotherapy Research International, Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, and Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia) were reviewed in April 2013. Full texts of reports of clinical trials published in these journals between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012, were independently assessed for information on trial registration. Among the 13 journals, 8 recommended trial registration, and 6 emphasized prospective trial registration. As of April 2013, 4,618 articles were published between January 2008 and December 2012, of which 9% (417) were clinical trials and 29% (121/417) of these reported trial registration details. A positive trend in reporting of trial registration was observed from 2008 to 2012. The study was limited to MEDLINE-indexed ISPJE member journals. Editorial policies on trial registration of physical therapy journals and a rising trend toward reporting of trial registration details indicate a positive momentum toward trial registration. Physical therapy journal editors need to show

  14. Community-based physical activity intervention using principles of social marketing: a demonstration project in Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subitha, L; Soudarssanane, M Bala; Murugesan, R

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to study the development and implementation of promotion of physical activity in a rural community by applying the principles of social marketing and to determine participation behaviour in a physical activity programme in a community setting. The intervention targeted 485 people, 20-49 years of age, residents of Periakattupalayam and Rangareddipalayam villages, Tamil Nadu. This community-based participatory research was based on the principles of 'social marketing'. Health education by one-to-one counselling, written materials and community events were used to popularize moderate intensity physical activity (brisk walking for 30 minutes on 4 days/week). We formed 30 walking groups under four coordinators, in a home-based setting with professional supervision and guidance. A log of physical activity sessions for the 10-week intervention period was maintained in the form of group attendance record. Village leaders, self-help groups and youth clubs were involved in promoting physical activity. Of the 485 subjects, 265 people (54.6%) engaged in brisk walking >4 days a week, while 156 subjects (32.2%) performed walking on 1-4 days per week during the intervention. The drop-out rate was 13.2% (64 subjects). Age, occupation and educational status were important determinants of participation and adherence to the physical activity programme. Application of social marketing techniques in an intervention to promote physical activity was successful in a rural Indian community. Studying the determinants of adoption of a physical activity programme and addressing the barriers to behaviour change are essential for designing relevant policies and effective programmes. Copyright 2012, NMJI.

  15. Efficacy of Manual Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy in Chronic Low Back Pain Due to Lumbar Spondylosis. A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Sharma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this work was to compare the efficacy of Maitland mobilization and conventional physical therapy on pain response, range of motion (ROM and functional ability in patients with chronic low back pain due to lumbar spondylosis. Methods: A total sample of 30 subjects (40–70 years of age with complaints of slow insidious onset of low back pain (LBP, with or without radiation not less than three months duration and decrease ROM were randomly assigned to: group-I, Maitland mobilization and lumbar stabilization exercises; group-II conventional physical therapy (traction, strengthening, stretching exercises. and outcomes were assessed for dependent variables. Results: There is statically a significant difference between pre and post measurement readings with time (p = 0.00 and between groups (p < 0.05 with respect to pain and function, but, with respect to ROM readings, showed statistical significance with time (p = 0.00 and no significance between groups (p > 0.05, indicating manual therapy group-I is improving faster and better than conventional physical therapy group-II. Conclusion: Our results showed that manual therapy interventions are more effective in managing low back pain, and function and range of motion of the lumbar spine than conventional physical therapy treatment.

  16. Allergic Rhinitis in Children: Principles of Early Diagnosis and Effective Therapy. Overview of Clinical Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Baranov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article briefly summarizes the key provisions of the clinical recommendations on medical care delivery for children with allergic rhinitis: modern approaches to diagnosis and therapy. The current document was developed by the professional association of pediatric specialists —the Union of Pediatricians of Russia — together with the leading experts of the Russian Association of Allergists and Clinical Immunologists. The recommendations are regularly updated due to the latest evidence-based results of effectiveness and safety of various medical interventions. The article presents information on the epidemiology of allergic rhinitis in children, specific diagnostic features which provide the opportunity for the timely and correct diagnosis and an effective therapy with personal approach.

  17. THE PRINCIPLES OF USING GAME AND ANIMAL THERAPY OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borys MYKHAYLOV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The specifics of the animal-assisted play therapy of children with special needs mental retardation is focused on child-oriented relationship development, where the therapist came in the childworld, examining the thoughts, feelings, perceptions and ideas that are important for the child, and through the relationships that follow, provides emotional safe environment where children could overcome the problems, to cope with fear and anxiety, and to move forward in the direction of psychosocial health.Used on the basis of the Centre's psychosocial rehabilitation of children and adolescents “Feldman”, the Ecoparkanimal-assisted play therapy for children with special needs are sustained on the natural ways, with which children learn about themselves and their relationship with the world around them. This approach helps the child to develop respect for themselves and others, bodyawareness, self-esteem, as well as a wider recognition and enforcement of their own abilities.

  18. Magnetic Hyperthermia and Radiation Therapy: Radiobiological Principles and Current Practice †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiridon V. Spirou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia, though by itself generally non-curative for cancer, can significantly increase the efficacy of radiation therapy, as demonstrated by in vitro, in vivo, and clinical results. Its limited use in the clinic is mainly due to various practical implementation difficulties, the most important being how to adequately heat the tumor, especially deep-seated ones. In this work, we first review the effects of hyperthermia on tissue, the limitations of radiation therapy and the radiobiological rationale for combining the two treatment modalities. Subsequently, we review the theory and evidence for magnetic hyperthermia that is based on magnetic nanoparticles, its advantages compared with other methods of hyperthermia, and how it can be used to overcome the problems associated with traditional techniques of hyperthermia.

  19. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  20. Efficacy of Physical Therapy in the Treatment of Gonarthrosis in Physically Burdened Working Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumovic, Mersija; Gorcevic, Emir; Gorcevic, Semir; Osmanovic, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Gonarthrosis is most frequently defined as the change involving damage of the articular cartilage of the knee joint, emergence of abnormal knee tissue, reactive changes in synovial membrane, and pathological synovial fluid. The site of initial damage most often remains unknown. Goal of the research The goal: The goal of this research is to demonstrate the efficacy of individual physical therapy during the medical treatment for gonarthrosis in the working population engaged in physical labour, and to compare the state of pain and mobility before and after the treatment. Subjects and research methods: The research encompassed 30 subjects diagnosed with gonarthrosis, and it was conducted in the Institute of Occupational Health and Sports Medicine of the Zenica-Doboj Canton. On the basis of the applied physical treatments, we divided the subjects into control group and treatment group. All the subjects were treated during 21 days. Results and conclusions: In the largest number of subjects in both groups gonarthrosis occurred primarily as a consequence of knee joint trauma, and then because of weight and physical strain. Of the total number of subjects covered by this research, 9 subjects in control and 8 in treatment group had gonarthrosis of their right knee. 4 subjects in the control and 5 in the treatment group had gonarthrosis of the left knee, while 2 subjects from each group had gonarthrosis on both knees. By the analysis of clinical symptoms of gonarthrosis prior to the treatment, it was found that all the subjects from both groups had pain symptom, in 13 subjects from the control and 14 subjects from the treatment group limited range of motion was established, while 8 subjects from control and 9 subjects from treatment group had swelling in the joint area. The condition of the subjects prior to the treatment was analyzed by means of pain scale, and it was found that both groups experienced moderate level of pain before the treatment. After the 21

  1. When the uncertainty principle goes up to 11 or how to explain quantum physics with heavy metal

    CERN Document Server

    Moriarty, Philip

    2018-01-01

    There are deep and fascinating links between heavy metal and quantum physics. No, there are. Really. While teaching at the University of Nottingham, physicist Philip Moriarty noticed something odd--a surprising number of his students were heavily into metal music. Colleagues, too: a Venn diagram of physicists and metal fans would show a shocking amount of overlap. What's more, it turns out that heavy metal music is uniquely well-suited to explaining quantum principles. In When the Uncertainty Principle Goes Up to Eleven, Moriarty explains the mysteries of the universe's inner workings via drum beats and feedback: You'll discover how the Heisenberg uncertainty principle comes into play with every chugging guitar riff, what wave interference has to do with Iron Maiden, and why metalheads in mosh pits behave just like molecules in a gas. If you're a metal fan trying to grasp the complexities of quantum physics, a quantum physicist baffled by heavy metal, or just someone who'd like to know how the fundamental sci...

  2. Computational anatomy based on whole body imaging basic principles of computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Masutani, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    This book deals with computational anatomy, an emerging discipline recognized in medical science as a derivative of conventional anatomy. It is also a completely new research area on the boundaries of several sciences and technologies, such as medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics. Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging highlights the underlying principles, basic theories, and fundamental techniques in computational anatomy, which are derived from conventional anatomy, medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics, in addition to various examples of applications in clinical data. The book will cover topics on the basics and applications of the new discipline. Drawing from areas in multidisciplinary fields, it provides comprehensive, integrated coverage of innovative approaches to computational anatomy. As well,Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging serves as a valuable resource for researchers including graduate students in the field and a connection with ...

  3. Education Affects Attitudes of Physical Therapy Providers toward People with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, William H.; Killian, Clyde B.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was sent to every skilled nursing home (N = 495) in Indiana regarding the demographics, education, and whether the severity of dementia impacts the attitudes of people in physical therapy practice. Physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) practicing in nursing homes spend considerable time (44.0%) working with…

  4. Does Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Reduce Future Physical Abuse? A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephanie C.; Kim, Johnny S.; Tripodi, Stephen J.; Brown, Samantha M.; Gowdy, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use meta-analytic techniques to evaluating the effectiveness of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) at reducing future physical abuse among physically abusive families. Methods: A systematic search identified six eligible studies. Outcomes of interest were physical abuse recurrence, child abuse potential, and parenting stress.…

  5. The evidence-based principles of negative pressure wound therapy in trauma & orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice.

  6. Dosimetry in intrathecal radiogold therapy. 5. Principles of gonad dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hliscs, R; Doege, H [Medizinische Akademie, Dresden (German Democratic Republic). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    1980-10-01

    Basing on MIRD recommendations the absorbed dose per unit of accumulated activity in the ovaries and testes is calculated when radioactivity is accumulated in the spinal and cerebral liquor space as well as in the liver following instillation of /sup 198/Au colloid for intrathecal therapy of acute leukemia in childhood. The calculations were made for the IAEA standard man as well as for a 100 cm tall child. Besides that the maximum value of ovarian exposure for the child was determined which arises when the ovaries are close to the spinal column.

  7. Promoting Clinical Reasoning in Undergraduate Physical Therapy Education: A Review of Strategies and Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    2015-01-01

    Title: Promoting Clinical Reasoning in Undergraduate Physical Therapy Education: A Review of Strategies and Approaches Juneja H1, Brekke A F2 1,2 Physical Therapy Education, University College Zealand, Denmark Background: Clinical reasoning (CR) also referred to as “critical thinking” or “decision....... It is imperative that physical therapy educators utilize innovative pedagogical methods to facilitate learning of reasoning skills in students. Purpose: The review is an attempt to highlight and discuss selected pedagogical strategies and approaches to enhance clinical reasoning skills in undergraduate physical...... programs was shortlisted for the review. References of pertinent literature were scanned to identify further relevant citations. Results: The review provides a detailed insight into the interwoven nature of pedagogical techniques to promote clinical reasoning being used by different physical therapy...

  8. Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Physical Therapy Modalities in Women With Provoked Vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Mélanie; Carroll, Marie-Soleil; Bergeron, Sophie

    2017-07-01

    Pelvic floor muscle physical therapy is recommended in clinical guidelines for women with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). Including isolated or combined treatment modalities, physical therapy is viewed as an effective first-line intervention, yet no systematic review concerning the effectiveness of physical therapy has been conducted. To systematically appraise the current literature on the effectiveness of physical therapy modalities for decreasing pain during intercourse and improving sexual function in women with PVD. A systematic literature search using PubMed, Scopus, CINHAL, and PEDro was conducted until October 2016. Moreover, a manual search from reference lists of included articles was performed. Ongoing trials also were reviewed using clinicaltrial.gov and ISRCTNregistry. Randomized controlled trials, prospective and retrospective cohorts, and case reports evaluating the effect of isolated or combined physical therapy modalities in women with PVD were included in the review. Main outcome measures were pain during intercourse, sexual function, and patient's perceived improvement. The literature search resulted in 43 eligible studies including 7 randomized controlled trials, 20 prospective studies, 5 retrospective studies, 6 case reports, and 6 study protocols. Most studies had a high risk of bias mainly associated with the lack of a comparison group. Another common bias was related to insufficient sample size, non-validated outcomes, non-standardized intervention, and use of other ongoing treatment. The vast majority of studies showed that physical therapy modalities such as biofeedback, dilators, electrical stimulation, education, multimodal physical therapy, and multidisciplinary approaches were effective for decreasing pain during intercourse and improving sexual function. The positive findings for the effectiveness of physical therapy modalities in women with PVD should be investigated further in robust and well-designed randomized controlled trials

  9. Principles of the complex therapy of gliomas in Latvia (1993-1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apskalne, D.; Ozolins, J.; Krumina, R.; Razuks, R.; Dzelzitis, J.

    1998-01-01

    60-70 malignant gliomas of 3rd and 4th degree of anaplasia are diagnosed in Latvia every year. The basic method of treatment of malignant gliomas is their surgical evacuation using CUSA, coagulation loops, binocular operation loupes and in several stages of surgery - microscope. Detailed morphological analysis of operation material according to 7 qualitative and 1 quantitative (Ki-67 antibody detection) signs. This analysis determines in general the choice of further method of complex therapy. Most often in the cases of malignant gliomas complex fractionated radiotherapy (55-60 Gy per course, 2 Gy per procedure) and systemic chemotherapy were used. In the cases when radiotherapy is not possible because of various side reasons and PI of gliomas is less than 5% and the structure is rich in blood vessels, only chemotherapy is used. Main agent are ACNU and CeeNU. Chemotherapy is carried in 2-3 stages, 6-courses in every stage. Interval between the courses - 6 weeks, between the stages - 6 month. When the schedule is accomplished CT and MR are done. At the present time 71% of the patients after complex therapy are in the phase of remission and in 29% of cases recurrent gliomas were diagnosed. (Full text)

  10. Design principles and clinical possibilities with a new generation of radiation therapy equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruden, B P [Department of Hospital physics Karolinska institute, (Sudan)

    1997-12-31

    The main steps in the development of isocentric megavoltage external beam radiation therapy machines are briefly reviewed identifying three principal types or generations of equipment to date. The new fourth generation of equipment presented here is characterized by considerably increased flexibility in dose delivery through the use of scanned elementary electron and photon beams of very high quality. Furthermore, the wide energy range and the possibility of using high resolution multi leaf collimation with all beam modalities makes it possible to simplify irradiation techniques and increase the accuracy in dose delivery. The main design features are described including a dual magnet scanning system, a photon beam purging magnet, a helium atmosphere in the treatment head, a beam`s eye view video read-out system of the collimator setting and a radiotherapeutic computed tomography facility. Some of the clinical applications of this new type of radiation therapy machine are finally reviewed, such as the ease of performance, became flattening, beam filtering and compensation, and the simplification of many treatment techniques using the wide spectrum of high quality electron and photon beams. Finally, the interesting possibility of doing conformation and more general isocentric treatments with non-uniform beams using the multi leaf collimator and the scanning systems are demonstrated. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Physiological and biochemical principles underlying volume-targeted therapy--the "Lund concept".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Carl-Henrik

    2005-01-01

    The optimal therapy of sustained increase in intracranial pressure (ICP) remains controversial. The volume-targeted therapy ("Lund concept") discussed in this article focuses on the physiological volume regulation of the intracranial compartments. The balance between effective transcapillary hydrostatic and osmotic pressures constitutes the driving force for transcapillary fluid exchange. The low permeability for sodium and chloride combined with the high crystalloid osmotic pressure (approximately 5700 mmHg) on both sides of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) counteracts fluid exchange across the intact BBB. Additionally, variations in systemic blood pressure generally are not transmitted to these capillaries because cerebral intracapillary hydrostatic pressure (and blood flow) is physio-logically tightly autoregulated. Under pathophysiological conditions, the BBB may be partially disrupted. Transcapillary water exchange is then determined by the differences in hydrostatic and colloid osmotic pressure between the intra- and extracapillary compartments. Pressure autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is likely to be impaired in these conditions. A high cerebral perfusion pressure accordingly increases intracapillary hydrostatic pressure and leads to increased intracerebral water content and an increase in ICP. The volume-targeted "Lund concept" has been evaluated in experimental and clinical studies to examine the physiological and biochemical (utilizing intracerebral microdialysis) effects, and the clinical experiences have been favorable.

  12. Concepts and principles of photodynamic therapy as an alternative antifungal discovery platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George eTegos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic fungal pathogens may cause superficial or serious invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised and debilitated patients. Invasive mycoses represent an exponentially growing threat for human health due to a combination of slow diagnosis and the existence of relatively few classes of available and effective antifungal drugs. Therefore systemic fungal infections result in high attributable mortality. There is an urgent need to pursue and deploy novel and effective alternative anti-fungal countermeasures. Photodynamic therapy was established as a successful modality for malignancies and age-related macular degeneration but photodynamic inactivation has only recently been intensively investigated as an alternative antimicrobial discovery and development platform. The concept of photodynamic inactivation requires microbial exposure to either exogenous or endogenous photosensitizer molecules, followed by visible light energy, typically wavelengths in the red/near infrared region that cause the excitation of the photosensitizers resulting in the production of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species that react with intracellular components, and consequently produce cell inactivation and death. Anti-fungal photodynamic therapy is an area of increasing interest, as research is advancing i to identify the photochemical and photophysical mechanisms involved in photoinactivation; ii to develop potent and clinically compatible photosensitizers; iii to understand how photoinactivation is affected by key microbial phenotypic elements multidrug resistance and efflux, virulence and pathogenesis determinants, and formation of biofilms; iv to explore novel photosensitizer delivery platforms and v to identify photoinactivation applications beyond the clinical setting such as environmental disinfectants.

  13. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poludniowski, G; Esposito, M; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Green, S; Parker, D J; Price, T; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed. (paper)

  14. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Esposito, M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Price, T; Evans, P M

    2014-06-07

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed.

  15. Physics fundamentals and biological effects of synchrotron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prezado, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of radiation therapy is to deposit a curative dose in the tumor without exceeding the tolerances in the nearby healthy tissues. For some radioresistant tumors, like gliomas, requiring high doses for complete sterilization, the major obstacle for curative treatment with ionizing radiation remains the limited tolerance of the surrounding healthy tissue. This limitation is particularly severe for brain tumors and, especially important in children, due to the high risk of complications in the development of the central nervous system. In addition, the treatment of tumors close to an organ at risk, like the spinal cord, is also restricted. One possible solution is the development of new radiation therapy techniques exploiting radically different irradiation modes and modifying, in this way, the biological equivalent doses. This is the case of synchrotron radiation therapy (SRT). In this work the three new radiation therapy techniques under development at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), in Grenoble (France) will be described, namely: synchrotron stereotactic radiation therapy (SSRT), microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) and minibeam radiation therapy. The promising results in the treatment of the high grade brain tumors obtained in preclinical studies have paved the way to the clinical trials. The first patients are expected in the fall of 2010. (Author).

  16. Basic Principles of Creation of Topometrical Cards of Beam Therapy in the Cases of High-grade Malignant Supratentorial Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepa, Z.; Platkajis, A.; Apskalne, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background. High-grade malignant supratentorial gliomas: anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AO), anaplastic oligoatrocitomas (AOA), anaplastic ependimomas (AE), glioblastomas (GB) and other less occasional forms of gliomas are approximately 1,82% of all cases of malignant tumors. Life expectancy for such patients still is very low, for several forms of tumors -12-18 months. High-grade malignant gliomas need for combined approach, and one part of such approach is beam therapy. For reaching qualitative results of beam therapy, method of topometrical planning of beam therapy is crucial, because it allow planning therapy due to anatomic features of every patient. The aim of work was comparison of basic principles of creation of 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) topometrical cards of beam therapy. Material and methods. In the process of research, analyse of creation of 2D and 3D cards for patients in period 2000-2005 were made. For creation of 2D cards pelviometer, conturometer of head (Picture 1), pictures of tests of brains in the biggest cross - section of tumor (Picture 2) were used. For creation 3D cards computertomography LightSpeed Rt, which is suitable for topometry (Picture 3), planning system of 3D reconstruction ECLIPSE (Picture 4), 3D reconstruction by data from pre - surgery and/or after - surgery tests of brain (Picture 5), and matching in format of DICOM (Picture 6) were used. In this research 214 patients with supratentorial malign gliomas were covered (Table 1,2). Results. In 98 cases 2D topometrical cards were made, which allows creating only two contrary areas of entry of beams or two areas of entry under angle (Picture 7, 8). In 55 cases in 2D topographic cards two contrary areas of entry were made and in 43 cases plan of beam therapy with areas of entry under angle were made. 3D cards anatomic features of patient as well as location of critical organs were taken into account (picture 10). In case of 3D the number of

  17. Development of a Positive Youth Development Program: Promoting the Mental Health of Stressful Adolescents Using Principles of Problem Solving Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T.L. Shek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the proposal for the development, implementation, and evaluation of a positive youth development program that attempts to promote the mental health of stressful Chinese adolescents using principles of Problem Solving Therapy (PST. There are two general aims of PST: to help clients identify life difficulties and resolve them, as well as to teach them skills on how to deal with future problems. The proposed project will utilize the principles of PST as the guiding framework to run two mental health promotion courses for adolescents who are experiencing disturbing stressful responses and students who want to improve their stress management style. Both objective and subjective outcome evaluation strategies will be carried out to assess the effectiveness of the intervention to promote the psychological well-being in adolescents who are experiencing stress. A related sample proposal is described that can give social workers some insight on how to prepare a proposal for developing the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programs.

  18. Use of physical therapy to augment dilator treatment for vaginal agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVearry, Mary E; Warner, William B

    2011-05-01

    : Dilator therapy has been used successfully for many years to treat vaginal agenesis. Our objective was to show how established physical therapy techniques can be used to augment dilator therapy. : A 36-year-old woman desiring nonsurgical management of vaginal agenesis was instructed in the use of vaginal dilators by a pelvic-floor physical therapist. Manual stretching of the vaginal tissues was performed during office visits after application of heat and therapeutic ultrasound to the perineum. In addition, the patient's husband was taught how to perform the vaginal stretching at home in conjunction with dilator therapy. : The patient was able to attempt intercourse after 6 weeks of treatment and achieved full penetration by 9 weeks. At the completion of treatment, she scored 31.9 on the Female Sexual Function Index. The patient and her husband were very satisfied with the treatment approach, especially the encouragement and guidance received in physical therapy. : By using established physical therapy techniques in conjunction with dilator therapy, a faster time to intercourse may be achieved with high patient and spouse satisfaction. We recommend the involvement of a physical therapist specializing in the pelvic floor as an adjunct to standard dilator therapy in the treatment of vaginal agenesis.

  19. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulati...

  20. Application of basic physics principles to clinical neuroradiology: differentiating artifacts from true pathology on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakky, Michael; Pandey, Shilpa; Kwak, Ellie; Jara, Hernan; Erbay, Sami H

    2013-08-01

    This article outlines artifactual findings commonly encountered in neuroradiologic MRI studies and offers clues to differentiate them from true pathology on the basis of their physical properties. Basic MR physics concepts are used to shed light on the causes of these artifacts. MRI is one of the most commonly used techniques in neuroradiology. Unfortunately, MRI is prone to image distortion and artifacts that can be difficult to identify. Using the provided case illustrations, practical clues, and relevant physical applications, radiologists may devise algorithms to troubleshoot these artifacts.

  1. 42 CFR 485.719 - Condition of participation: Arrangements for physical therapy and speech pathology services to be...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... physical therapy and speech pathology services to be performed by other than salaried organization... Agencies as Providers of Outpatient Physical Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology Services § 485.719 Condition of participation: Arrangements for physical therapy and speech pathology services to be performed...

  2. 42 CFR 484.38 - Condition of participation: Qualifying to furnish outpatient physical therapy or speech pathology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... outpatient physical therapy or speech pathology services. 484.38 Section 484.38 Public Health CENTERS FOR... furnish outpatient physical therapy or speech pathology services. An HHA that wishes to furnish outpatient physical therapy or speech pathology services must meet all the pertinent conditions of this part and also...

  3. Physical principle and engineering features of the deep pool reactor for residential heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Gong; Zhao Zhaoyi; Guo Jingren; Tian Jiafu

    1999-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy for low temperature heating is confronted with challenges of safety and economy. The deep pool reactor, a low temperature heating reactor based on novel design principles, has been studied in detail. Results show that it has excellent safety and economic features, and is very suitable for low temperature heating purposes. The whole heating system including the nuclear reactor will be a simple and easy engineering system with the characteristics of reliability, safety and economy because the system and all its devices are based on low temperature and ordinary pressure

  4. Creative Problem Solving and Social Cooperation of Effective Physical Therapy Practice: A Pioneer Study and Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Carmeli

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Action research (AR has an important role to play in educating physical therapists. Increasing efforts should be encouraged to instigate AR programs in physical therapy practice and clinical education. Such programs commonly require considerable effort and understanding by clinical instructors, and require adoption of new educational methods. AR programs can lead physical therapists and clinicians to be more questioning and reflective in evaluating practical questions regarding patient therapy and education. The purpose of this article is to educate the readers on the importance of AR and to provide a few relevant references on that topic. A specific study is described in this paper in which physical therapy clinical instructors participated in a structured workshop designed to demonstrate the values of AR and how such values can be incorporated in teaching their students. AR can lead to improved therapist-patient interaction and help solve specific practical problems arising during therapy sessions.

  5. Tailored cognitive-behavioural therapy and exercise training improves the physical fitness of patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spillekom-van Koulil, S.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Helmond, T. van; Vedder, A.; Hoorn, H. van; Donders, A.R.T.; Wirken, L.; Cats, H.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Evers, A.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with fibromyalgia have diminished levels of physical fitness, which may lead to functional disability and exacerbating complaints. Multidisciplinary treatment comprising cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and exercise training has been shown to be effective in improving

  6. Development of a quantitative tool to assess the content of physical therapy for infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H; Dirks, Tineke; Hulshof, Lily J; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    The study aim was to describe and quantify physical therapy interventions for infants at high risk for developmental disorders. An observation protocol was developed based on knowledge about infant physical therapy and analysis of directly observable physiotherapeutic (PT) actions. The protocol's psychometric quality was assessed. Videos of 42 infant physical therapy sessions at 4 or 6 months of corrected age were analyzed. The observation protocol classified PT actions into 8 mutually exclusive categories. Virtually all PT actions during treatment could be classified. Inter- and intrarater agreements were satisfactory (intraclass correlations, 0.68-1.00). Approximately 40% of treatment time was spent challenging the infant to produce motor behavior by themselves, whereas approximately 30% of time facilitation techniques were applied. Tradition-based sessions could be differentiated from function-oriented ones. It is possible to document PT actions during physical therapy treatment of infants at high risk for cerebral palsy in a systematic, standardized, and reliable way.

  7. On the use, by Einstein, of the principle of dimensional homogeneity, in three problems of the physics of solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDO L. LOBO B. CARNEIRO

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Einstein, in 1911, published an article on the application of the principle of dimensional homogeneity to three problems of the physics of solids: the characteristic frequency of the atomic nets of crystalline solids as a function of their moduli of compressibility or of their melting points, and the thermal conductivity of crystalline insulators. Recognizing that the physical dimensions of temperature are not the same as those of energy and heat, Einstein had recourse to the artifice of replace that physical parameter by its product by the Boltzmann constant, so obtaining correct results. But nowadays, with the new basic quantities "Thermodynamic Temperature theta (unit- Kelvin'', "Electric Current I (unit Ampère'' and "Amount of Substance MOL (unit-mole'', incorporated to the SI International System of Units, in 1960 and 1971, the same results are obtained in a more direct and coherent way. At the time of Einstein's article only three basic physical quantities were considered - length L, mass M, and time T. He ignored the pi theorem of dimensional analysis diffused by Buckingham three years later, and obtained the "pi numbers'' by trial and error. In the present paper is presented a revisitation of the article of Einstein, conducted by the modern methodology of dimensional analysis and theory of physical similitude.

  8. [Clinical and neurologic characteristic and principles of therapy of late-onset Myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosachev, V D; Alekseeva, T M; Khalmurzina, A N

    2016-01-01

    In the present work the results of the clinic-epidemiological analysis of 223 patients with the onset of the myasthenia at 60 y. o. and later, admitted and treated in the clinic of neurology for the passed 25years are represented. A dynamic growth of incidence of the late-onset myasthenia through the passed 10 years was administered. We administered a prevalence of the generalized form of the myasthenia gravis (61,5 %). The whole clinical table of the myasthenia was developed during an year in 76,7 % of the cases. A wide range of the concomitant somatic pathology in this group of the patients (especially, with a cardio-vascular pathology - 93,3 %) was found to worsen the course of the myasthenia itself. We found that the set of the therapeutic measures in myasthenia in the elderly is determined by the course of the myasthenia and the multiple organ failure due to the concomitant diseases. The scheme of complex corrective therapy of myasthenia gravis in elderly was developed.

  9. Foundations & principles of distributed manufacturing elements of manufacturing networks, cyber-physical production systems and smart automation

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnle, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    The book presents a coherent description of distributed manufacturing, providing a solid base for further research on the subject as well as smart implementations in companies. It provides a guide for those researching and working in a range of fields, such as smart manufacturing, cloud computing, RFID tracking, distributed automation, cyber physical production and global design anywhere, manufacture anywhere solutions. Foundations & Principles of Distributed Manufacturing anticipates future advances in the fields of embedded systems, the Internet of Things and cyber physical systems, outlining how adopting these innovations could rapidly bring about improvements in key performance indicators, which could in turn generate competition pressure by rendering successful business models obsolete. In laying the groundwork for powerful theoretical models, high standards for the homogeneity and soundness of the suggested setups are applied. The book especially elaborates on the upcoming competition in online manu...

  10. EFFECT OF MUSIC THERAPY ON INTRINSIC MOTIVATION, PHYSICAL SELF EFFICACY AND PERFORMANCE OF FEMALE FOOTBALL PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Mamta Sharma; Gagandeep Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is increasingly used in sports for enhancing sport performance. It provides a mean of improving mental strength among sportspersons. The purpose of this study is to enhance intrinsic motivation, physical self-efficacy and performance of female football players through music therapy. For this purpose, twenty two female football players, in the age group of 21-26 were screened on the basis of their scores on Sport Motivation Scale and Physical Self-Efficacy Scale. Then, they were ...

  11. Seasonal Admission Rates of Geriatric Patients with Musculoskeletal Problems to Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Zubeyir; Yurdalan, Saadet Ufuk; Polat, Mine Gulden; Ozgul, Bahar; Kanberoglu, Ayfer; Onel, Selma

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal variations in the admission rates of geriatric patients with musculoskeletal problems to physical therapy and rehabilitation clinics were examined in this study. Totally 2257 patients (1802, 79.84% female; 455, 20.16% male) over the age of 65 years (mean age 72.32±5.67years) who were admitted to Duygu Private Hospital and Burcu Private Physical Therapy Branch Center in Istanbul were included. Monthly admissions and seasonal distribution were retrospectively calculated for 2 years. Ad...

  12. Professional tools and a personal touch - experiences of physical therapy of persons with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutberg, Stina; Kostenius, Catrine; Öhrling, Kerstin

    2013-09-01

    The aim was to explore the lived experience of physical therapy of persons with migraine. Data were collected by conducting narrative interviews with 11 persons with migraine. Inspired by van Manen, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used to analyse the experiences of physical therapy which these persons had. Physical therapy for persons with migraine meant making an effort in terms of time and energy to improve their health by meeting a person who was utilising his or her knowledge and skill to help. Being respected and treated as an individual and having confidence in the physical therapist were highlighted aspects. The analysis revealed a main theme, "meeting a physical therapist with professional tools and a personal touch". The main theme included four sub-themes, "investing time and energy to feel better", "relying on the competence of the physical therapist", "wanting to be treated and to become involved as an individual" and "being respected in a trustful relationship". The therapeutic relationship with the physical therapist is important and the findings of this study can increase awareness about relational aspects of physical therapy and encourage thoughtfulness among physical therapists and other healthcare professionals interacting with persons with migraine. Physical therapists use both professional tools and a personal touch in their interaction with persons with migraine and this article can increase physical therapists' awareness and encourage thoughtfulness in their professional practice. Being respected and treated as an individual and having confidence in the physical therapist are important aspects of the therapeutic relationship and indicate a need for patient-centred care. By making the effort of spending the time and energy required, physical therapy could be a complement or an alternative to medication to ease the consequences of migraine.

  13. Principles of physics in surgery: the laws of mechanics and vectors physics for surgeons-part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anurag; Sood, Akshay; Joy, Parijat S; Mandal, Shubhyan; Panwar, Rajesh; Ravichandran, Suresh; Sarangi, Sasmit; Woodcock, John

    2010-10-01

    In this sequel, to an earlier article, we discuss the laws of Mechanics, Thermodynamics and Vectors as they apply to soft and bony tissues. These include the Laplace's Law as applied to colonic perforation, compression therapy, parturition, variceal rupture, disc herniations etc. The Pascal's Law finds use in hernia repair and the Heimlich maneuver. Trigonometrically derived components of forces, acting after suturing, show ways to reduce cut-through; the thickness and the bite of suture determines the extent of tissue reaction. The heating effect of current explains the optimum gap between the prongs of a bipolar cautery and the use of law of transfer of heat in determining relation between healthy wound healing and ambient temperature.

  14. Failure, Remediation, and Success in Physical Therapy Clinical Education: Is Mindfulness Present?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgens, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Mindfulness, a purposeful and nonjudgmental awareness of internal affective states, is emerging rapidly in the field of occupational therapy and medicine, but has not yet gained credibility in the education of the physical therapy profession. Some students lack the self-awareness needed to act on professional values, which prevents them from…

  15. Perceptions among Occupational and Physical Therapy Students of a Nontraditional Methodology for Teaching Laboratory Gross Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K. Jackson; Denham, Bryan E.; Dinolfo, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess the perceptions of physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) students regarding the use of computer-assisted pedagogy and prosection-oriented communications in the laboratory component of a human anatomy course at a comprehensive health sciences university in the southeastern United States. The…

  16. Predictors of Substance Use and Family Therapy Outcome among Physically and Sexually Abused Runaway Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Gangamma, Rashmi

    2006-01-01

    There is a dearth of research that examines the impact of family systems therapy on problems among sexually and/or physically abused youth. Given this void, differential outcome and predictors of substance use change were evaluated for abused, as compared with nonabused, runaway adolescents who were randomly assigned to family therapy or treatment…

  17. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 8 Occupational/Physical Therapy Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    job analysis was implemented to a level of methodology determination. These methods and curriculum materials constituted a third (instructional) sub...Technician 8494 Physical Therapy Technician 8495 Dermatology Technician 8496 Embalming Technician 8497 Medical Illustration Technician 8498 Medical...IGIVE ICE PACK TREATMENT 9 IAPPLY WET COMPRESSESISOAKSIPACKS I 10 IGIVE INFRARED TREATMENT 11 IGIVE ULTRAVIOLET TREATMENT 12 EXPLAIN UVL THERAPY

  18. Comparative effectiveness of Tai Chi versus physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis. Objective: To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy f...

  19. Solid-State Physics An Introduction to Principles of Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    Ibach, Harald

    2009-01-01

    This new edition of the popular introduction to solid-state physics provides a comprehensive overview on basic theoretical and experimental concepts of material science. Additional sections emphasize current topics in solid-state physics. Notably, sections on important devices, aspects of non-periodic structures of matter, phase transitions, defects, superconductors and nanostructures have been added, the chapters presenting semi- and superconductivity had been completly updated. Students will benefit significantly from solving the exercises given at the end of each chapter. This book is intended for university students in physics, engineering and electrical engineering. This edition has been carefully revised, updated, and enlarged. Among the key recent developments incorporated throughout GMR (giant magneto resistance), thin-film magnetic properties, magnetic hysteresis and domain walls, quantum transport, metamaterials, and preparation techniques for nanostructures. From a review of the original edition �...

  20. Security and privacy in cyber-physical systems foundations, principles, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Houbing; Jeschke, Sabina

    2017-01-01

    Written by a team of experts at the forefront of the cyber-physical systems (CPS) revolution, this book provides an in-depth look at security and privacy, two of the most critical challenges facing both the CPS research and development community and ICT professionals. It explores, in depth, the key technical, social, and legal issues at stake, and it provides readers with the information they need to advance research and development in this exciting area. Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are engineered systems that are built from, and depend upon the seamless integration of computational algorithms and physical components. Advances in CPS will enable capability, adaptability, scalability, resiliency, safety, security, and usability far in excess of what today's simple embedded systems can provide. Just as the Internet revolutionized the way we interact with information, CPS technology has already begun to transform the way people interact with engineered systems. In the years ahead, smart CPS will drive innovat...

  1. The physics of degradation in engineered materials and devices fundamentals and principles

    CERN Document Server

    Swingler, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Degradation is apparent in all things and is fundamental to both manufactured and natural objects. It is often described by the second law of thermodynamics, where entropy, a measure of disorder, tends to increase with time in a closed system. Things age! This concise reference work brings together experts and key players engaged in the physics of degradation to present the background science, current thinking and developments in understanding, and gives a detailed account of emerging issues across a selection of engineering applications. The work has been put together to equip the upper level undergraduate student, postgraduate student, as well as the professional engineer and scientist, in the importance of physics of degradation. The aim of The Physics of Degradation in Engineered Materials and Devices is to bridge the gap between published textbooks on the fundamental science of degradation phenomena and published research on the engineering science of actual fabricated materials and devices. A history o...

  2. Health physics considerations at a neutron therapy facility cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleck, J.H.; Krueger, D.J.; Mc Laughlin, J.E.; Smathers, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The U.C.L.A. Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) is one of four such facilities in the United States currently involved in NCI sponsored trials of neutron therapy and reflects the present interest in the use of high energy neutron beams for treating certain types of human cancers. The NTF houses a CP-45 negative ion cyclotron which accelerates a 46 MeV proton beam for production of neutrons from a beryllium target. In addition to patient treatment, the NTF is involved in the production of positron emitting radioisotopes for diagnostic use in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The activation of therapy treatment collimators, positron and neutron target systems, and a high and rapidly varying external radiation environment in a clinical setting have contributed to the need for a comprehensive radiation control program in which patient care is balanced with the maintenance of occupational exposures to ALARA levels

  3. Introduction of Vertical Integration and Case-Based Learning in Anatomy for Undergraduate Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Suresh K.; Rathinam, Bertha A. D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present pilot study was to evaluate the benefits of innovative teaching methodologies introduced to final year occupational and physical therapy students in Christian Medical College in India. Students' satisfactions along the long-term retention of knowledge and clinical application of the respiratory anatomy have been…

  4. Theory of heavy ion collision physics in hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.

  5. First-principles investigations of the physical properties of binary uranium silicide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin; Long, Jianping; Yang, Lijun; Li, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Total density of states for USi 2 . Display Omitted -- Abstract: The structural, elastic properties and the Debye temperature of binary Uranium Silicide (U-Si) alloys are investigated by using the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential density function theory within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The ground states properties are found to agree with the available experimental data. The mechanical properties like shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio σ and ratio B/G are also calculated. Finally, The averaged sound velocity (v m ), the longitudinal sound velocity (v l ), transverse sound velocity (v t ) and the Debye temperature (θ D ) are obtained. However, the theoretical values are slightly different from few existed experiment data because the latter was obtained at room temperature while the former one at 0 K

  6. Principles and applications of a neutral current detector for neutrino physics and astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukier, A.; Stodolsky, L.

    1982-01-01

    We study neutrino detection through the elastic scattering of neutrinos on nuclei and identification of the recoil energy. The very large value of the cross section compared to previous methods indicates a detector would be relatively light and suggests the possibility of a true 'neutrino observatory'. We examine a realization in terms of the superconducting grain idea, which appears in principle feasible through extension and extrapolation of presently known techniques. Such a detector would permit determination of the neutrino spectrum and should be intensive to neutrino oscillations. Various applications and tests are discussed, including spallation sources, reactors, supernovas, solar and terrestrial neutrinos. A supernova would permit a simple determination of the number of neutrinos and their masses, while for solar neutrinos rates of thousands of S.N.U. are theoretically attainable. A preliminary estimate of the most difficult backgrounds is attempted. (orig.)

  7. Professional tools and a personal touch – experiences of physical therapy of persons with migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenius, Catrine; Öhrling, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to explore the lived experience of physical therapy of persons with migraine. Method: Data were collected by conducting narrative interviews with 11 persons with migraine. Inspired by van Manen, a hermeneutic phenomenological method was used to analyse the experiences of physical therapy which these persons had. Results: Physical therapy for persons with migraine meant making an effort in terms of time and energy to improve their health by meeting a person who was utilising his or her knowledge and skill to help. Being respected and treated as an individual and having confidence in the physical therapist were highlighted aspects. The analysis revealed a main theme, “meeting a physical therapist with professional tools and a personal touch”. The main theme included four sub-themes, “investing time and energy to feel better”, “relying on the competence of the physical therapist”, “wanting to be treated and to become involved as an individual” and “being respected in a trustful relationship”. Conclusions: The therapeutic relationship with the physical therapist is important and the findings of this study can increase awareness about relational aspects of physical therapy and encourage thoughtfulness among physical therapists and other healthcare professionals interacting with persons with migraine. PMID:23311671

  8. Introduction to Stochastic Simulations for Chemical and Physical Processes: Principles and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    An introduction to digital stochastic simulations for modeling a variety of physical and chemical processes is presented. Despite the importance of stochastic simulations in chemistry, the prevalence of turn-key software solutions can impose a layer of abstraction between the user and the underlying approach obscuring the methodology being…

  9. Principles of astrophysics using gravity and stellar physics to explore the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Keeton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a survey of astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level.  It originates from a two-semester course sequence at Rutgers University that is meant to appeal not only to astrophysics students but also more broadly to physics and engineering students.  The organization is driven more by physics than by astronomy; in other words, topics are first developed in physics and then applied to astronomical systems that can be investigated, rather than the other way around. The first half of the book focuses on gravity.  Gravity is the dominant force in many astronomical systems, so a tremendous amount can be learned by studying gravity, motion and mass.  The theme in this part of the book, as well as throughout astrophysics, is using motion to investigate mass.  The goal of Chapters 2-11 is to develop a progressively richer understanding of gravity as it applies to objects ranging from planets and moons to galaxies and the universe as a whole. The second half uses other aspects of physics to addr...

  10. Design principles for cancer therapy guided by changes in complexity of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sebastian; Tuszynski, Jack A; Rietman, Edward A; Lakka Klement, Giannoula

    2015-05-28

    The ever-increasing expanse of online bioinformatics data is enabling new ways to, not only explore the visualization of these data, but also to apply novel mathematical methods to extract meaningful information for clinically relevant analysis of pathways and treatment decisions. One of the methods used for computing topological characteristics of a space at different spatial resolutions is persistent homology. This concept can also be applied to network theory, and more specifically to protein-protein interaction networks, where the number of rings in an individual cancer network represents a measure of complexity. We observed a linear correlation of R = -0.55 between persistent homology and 5-year survival of patients with a variety of cancers. This relationship was used to predict the proteins within a protein-protein interaction network with the most impact on cancer progression. By re-computing the persistent homology after computationally removing an individual node (protein) from the protein-protein interaction network, we were able to evaluate whether such an inhibition would lead to improvement in patient survival. The power of this approach lied in its ability to identify the effects of inhibition of multiple proteins and in the ability to expose whether the effect of a single inhibition may be amplified by inhibition of other proteins. More importantly, we illustrate specific examples of persistent homology calculations, which correctly predict the survival benefit observed effects in clinical trials using inhibitors of the identified molecular target. We propose that computational approaches such as persistent homology may be used in the future for selection of molecular therapies in clinic. The technique uses a mathematical algorithm to evaluate the node (protein) whose inhibition has the highest potential to reduce network complexity. The greater the drop in persistent homology, the greater reduction in network complexity, and thus a larger

  11. A grounded-theory investigation of patient education in physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindflesch, Aaron B

    2009-04-01

    Patient education is a critical component of physical therapy and is used frequently in practice. Research describing the practice of patient education in physical therapy is scarce, however. Qualitative research methods can be used to describe the practice of patient education in physical therapy and to identify supportive theory. This study describes the practice of patient education grounded in data obtained from nine physical therapists in three settings: outpatient, acute care, and inpatient rehabilitation. From the data common themes are reported. From the themes, supportive theory can be identified. Results show four primary themes regarding patient education in physical therapy. First, the physical therapists in this study were not able to easily differentiate patient education from primary interventions. Second, the purpose of patient education was to empower patients toward self-management and prevention. Third, therapists used a patient-centered approach to decide upon content. Finally, each therapist used function or demonstration to assess the outcome of patient education interventions. The results of this study can be used to inform current practitioners, for future research and to identify theoretical underpinnings to support the practice of patient education in physical therapy.

  12. Clinical Guide to Music Therapy in Physical Rehabilitation Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Elizabeth Wong, MT-BC presents tools and information designed to arm the entry-level music therapist (or an experienced MT-BC new to rehabilitation settings) with basic knowledge and materials to develop or work in a music therapy program treating people with stroke, brain injury, and those who are ventilator dependent. Ms. Wong offers goals and…

  13. Feasibility and safety of early combined cognitive and physical therapy for critically ill medical and surgical patients: the Activity and Cognitive Therapy in ICU (ACT-ICU) trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel, N.E.; Girard, T.D.; Ely, E.W.; Pandharipande, P.P.; Morandi, A.; Hughes, C.G.; Graves, A.J.; Shintani, A.K.; Murphy, E.; Work, B.; Pun, B.T.; Boehm, L.; Gill, T.M.; Dittus, R.S.; Jackson, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Cognitive impairment after critical illness is common and debilitating. We developed a cognitive therapy program for critically ill patients and assessed the feasibility and safety of administering combined cognitive and physical therapy early during a critical illness. METHODS We randomized 87 medical and surgical ICU patients with respiratory failure and/or shock in a 1:1:2 manner to three groups: usual care, early once-daily physical therapy, or early once-daily physical therapy plus a novel, progressive, twice-daily cognitive therapy protocol. Cognitive therapy included orientation, memory, attention, and problem solving exercises, and other activities. We assessed feasibility outcomes of the early cognitive plus physical therapy intervention. At 3-months, we also assessed cognitive, functional and health-related quality of life outcomes. Data are presented as median [interquartile range] or frequency (%). RESULTS Early cognitive therapy was a delivered to 41/43 (95%) of cognitive plus physical therapy patients on 100% [92–100%] of study days beginning 1.0 [1.0–1.0] day following enrollment. Physical therapy was received by 17/22 (77%) of usual care patients, by 21/22 (95%) of physical therapy only patients and 42/43 (98%) of cognitive plus physical therapy patients on 17% [10–26%], 67% [46–87%] and 75% [59–88%] of study days, respectively. Cognitive, functional and health-related quality of life outcomes did not differ between groups at 3-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS This pilot study demonstrates that early rehabilitation can be extended beyond physical therapy to include cognitive therapy. Future work to determine optimal patient selection, intensity of treatment and benefits of cognitive therapy in the critically ill is needed. PMID:24257969

  14. The Treatment of Chronic Coccydynia and Postcoccygectomy Pain With Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kelly M; Fisher, Lauren W; Bernstein, Ira H; Bradley, Michelle H

    2017-04-01

    Coccydynia is a challenging disorder that often is refractory to treatments such as medications and injections. Physical therapy for coccydynia rarely has been studied. To evaluate the efficacy of pelvic floor physical therapy for reducing pain levels in patients with coccydynia. Retrospective chart review. The pelvic floor rehabilitation clinic of a major university hospital. A total of 124 consecutive patients over age 18 with a chief complaint of coccydynia between 2009 and 2012. A subgroup of 17 of the 124 patients had previously undergone coccygectomy with continued pain postoperatively. The primary treatment intervention was pelvic floor physical therapy aimed at pelvic floor muscle relaxation. Secondary treatment interventions included the prescription of baclofen for muscle relaxation (19% of patients), ganglion impar blocks (8%), or coccygeus trigger point injections (17%). Primary outcome measures included final minimum, average, and maximum pain numeric rating scales. A secondary outcome measure was the patient's subjective percent global improvement assessment. Baseline demographics were used to determine which pretreatment characteristics were correlated with treatment outcomes. Of the 124 patients, 93 participated in pelvic floor physical therapy and were included in statistical analysis. For the 79 patients who completed treatment (with a mean of 9 physical therapy sessions), the mean average pain ratings decreased from 5.08 to 1.91 (P physical therapy. Pain duration and history of trauma did not affect treatment outcomes. Pelvic floor physical therapy is a safe and effective method of treating coccydynia. III. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recommendations for physical and occupational therapy practice from the perspective of clients undergoing therapy for breast cancer-related impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Jill B; Giuliano, Susan; Meehan, Caitlin; Sander, Beth; Wootten, Rachel; Zimmerman, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Evidence points to the efficacy of physical and occupational therapy intervention for the management of impairments and functional limitations related to the treatment of breast cancer. However, few studies give voice to the women participating in the physical rehabilitation programs intended to ameliorate their deficits. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore the experience of physical rehabilitation as well as to identify recommendations for physical and occupational therapy practice from the perspective of the client undergoing therapy for breast cancer-related impairments. A phenomenological design was chosen and included a purposive sample of women (n = 10) undergoing physical rehabilitation for impairments related to breast cancer treatment. Data included semistructured interviews and artifact examination. Ten semistructured interviews were conducted at a setting of the participants' choice. Data collection continued until saturation was reached. Data analysis was cyclical and ongoing and involved all six researchers in analyzing and triangulating all pieces of data. Member checks and a peer review were conducted to confirm relevance and validity. Five themes emerged: 1) challenges with obtaining referrals, 2) challenges with patient education, 3) improvements in functional impairments, 4) emotional support, and 5) benefits of a specialized clinic environment. Consideration of the five themes led to four recommendations for physical and occupational therapist practice from the perspective of the client: 1) advocate for presurgical therapy consultations, 2) be competent in the management of all impairments and functional limitations associated with breast cancer treatment, 3) be aware of the emotional support the therapist has the capacity to provide or not provide, and 4) as much as possible, create an inviting, nonclinical environment.

  16. Order-of-magnitude physics of neutron stars. Estimating their properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisenegger, Andreas; Zepeda, Felipe S. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Instituto de Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Macul (Chile)

    2016-03-15

    We use basic physics and simple mathematics accessible to advanced undergraduate students to estimate the main properties of neutron stars. We set the stage and introduce relevant concepts by discussing the properties of ''everyday'' matter on Earth, degenerate Fermi gases, white dwarfs, and scaling relations of stellar properties with polytropic equations of state. Then, we discuss various physical ingredients relevant for neutron stars and how they can be combined in order to obtain a couple of different simple estimates of their maximum mass, beyond which they would collapse, turning into black holes. Finally, we use the basic structural parameters of neutron stars to briefly discuss their rotational and electromagnetic properties. (orig.)

  17. [Convalescence and decline in physical function level following intensive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, J.B.; Moller, K.; Perner, A.

    2009-01-01

    prolong convalescence after discharge. Thus, strategies to counteract neuromuscular dysfunction and to improve physical outcome may reduce the overall burden of critical illness. This review describes the most common predisposing factors and discusses preventative measures and interventions Udgivelsesdato......More patients survive critical illness, which emphasises the need to assess outcome measures other than mortality. A prolonged decline in physical function is frequently observed after discharge in the critically ill. Neuromuscular dysfunction and muscle atrophy incurred during intensive care may...

  18. [Convalescence and decline in physical function level following intensive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, J.B.; Moller, K.; Perner, A.

    2009-01-01

    More patients survive critical illness, which emphasises the need to assess outcome measures other than mortality. A prolonged decline in physical function is frequently observed after discharge in the critically ill. Neuromuscular dysfunction and muscle atrophy incurred during intensive care may...... prolong convalescence after discharge. Thus, strategies to counteract neuromuscular dysfunction and to improve physical outcome may reduce the overall burden of critical illness. This review describes the most common predisposing factors and discusses preventative measures and interventions Udgivelsesdato...

  19. Problem based learning approaches to the technology education of physical therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida M; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación M E; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A Ga; Iglesias-Alonso, Alberto A; Fernández-Fernández, Maria Jesus M J; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen C

    2012-01-01

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a whole-curriculum concept. This study aimed to compare learning preferences and strategies between physical therapy students taught by PBL and those receiving conventional lectures on massage therapy, trauma physical therapy, and electrotherapy, hydrotherapy, and thermotherapy. This quasi-experimental study included 182 male and female students on physical therapy diploma courses at three universities in Andalusia (Spain). The Canfield Learning Skills Inventory (CLSI) was used to assess learning strategies and the Approaches to Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) to analyze study preferences. At the end of the academic year 2009/10, physical therapy students taught by PBL considered the most important learning strategies to be group work, study organization, relationship of ideas, and academic results. In comparison to conventionally taught counterparts, they considered that PBL reduced lack of purpose, memorizing without relating, the law of minimum effort, and fear of failure. Among these PBL students, the most highly rated study preferences were: organization of course tasks, cordial interaction with the teacher, learning by reading and images, and direct hands-on experience. For these physical therapy students, PBL facilitates learning strategies and study preferences in comparison to conventional teaching.

  20. Effectiveness of Physical Therapy as an Adjunctive Treatment for Trauma-induced Chronic Torticollis in Raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Benjamin N; Robinson, Narda; Kratz, Gail; Johnston, Matthew S

    2015-03-01

    Management of trauma-induced chronic torticollis in raptors has historically been challenging. Euthanasia is common in affected birds because of their inability to maintain normal cervical position, although they may be able to function normally. To assess effectiveness of physical therapy of the neck and head as an adjunct treatment for this condition, a case-control study was done in raptors admitted to the Rocky Mountain Raptor Program from 2003 to 2010. Eleven cases were identified with a diagnosis of chronic torticollis resulting from traumatic brain injury. Five cases were treated with physical therapy of the head and neck, and 6 control cases did not receive any physical therapy for the torticollis. Of the control cases, 0 of 6 had resolution of the torticollis, 0 of 6 were released, and 5 of 6 were euthanatized. Of the treated cases, 4 of 5 had complete resolution of the torticollis and 5 of 5 were released. Resolution of torticollis differed significantly between cases receiving physical therapy and controls. These results indicate that physical therapy should be used as an adjunctive therapy in cases of chronic torticollis induced by trauma in raptors because it results in better resolution of the torticollis and increased likelihood of release.

  1. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G M; Staal, J Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2017-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  2. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D.; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G.M.; Staal, J. Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    2018-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D.; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G. M.; Staal, J. Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  4. Physical therapy as an adjunctive treatment for severe osteoarthritis in a Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Tammy Culpepper; Stringer, Elizabeth; Krauss, Sue; Trout, Tim

    2015-03-01

    This case report describes a new physical therapy technique, specifically the Wolfe Kinetic Technique, as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of severe osteoarthritis in a 20-yr-old Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis). This animal was managed with oral analgesics for 3 yr with fair to minimal response over time. Due to worsening of lameness and mobility, physical therapy was initiated. Ten treatment sessions were administered at 1-wk intervals. Within 1 mo the Komodo dragon exhibited marked improvement in gait and function, increased responsiveness to his environment, and increased mobility which continued to improve over the subsequent sessions. Although outcomes could not be measured by standardized objective measures, this study provides a reference for treatment of future cases and a foundation for future research substantiating treatment practices in animal physical therapy.

  5. The physical therapy profile questionnaire (PTPQ): development, validation and pilot testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizon, Janine Margarita R; Grimmer-Somers, Karen; Kumar, Saravana

    2011-09-19

    Country by country similarities and differences in physical therapy practice exists. Therefore, before updates in practice can be provided, such as trainings in evidence-based practice, it is necessary to identify the profile and nature of practice in a given country or setting. Following a search of the international literature, no appropriate tool was identified to collect and establish data to create the profile of physical therapy practice in the Philippines. We therefore developed, validated and pilot tested a survey instrument which would comprehensively describe the practice of physical therapy in the Philippines We used a mixed methods design to answer our study aims. A focus group interview was conducted among a group of physical therapists to establish the content and contexts of items to be included in the survey instrument. Findings were amalgamated with the information from the literature on developing survey instruments/questionnaires. A survey instrument was drafted and named as the Physical Therapy Profile Questionnaire (PTPQ). The PTPQ was then validated and pilot tested to a different group of physical therapists.The final version consisted of five separate parts namely (A) General information and demographics, (B) Practice Profile, (C) Treatment Preferences, (D) Bases for clinical work and (E) Bases for educational/research work. At present the PTPQ is relevant to the Philippines and could be used by any country which has a similar nature of practice with the Philippines. The Physical Therapy Practice Questionnaire (PTPQ) was shown to have good face and content validity among the Filipino physical therapists and their context of practice. It has also been found to be useful, easy to administer tool and in a format appealing to respondents. The PTPQ is expected to assist comprehensive data collection to create a profile of physical therapy practice in the Philippines.

  6. The physical therapy profile questionnaire (PTPQ: development, validation and pilot testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimmer-Somers Karen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Country by country similarities and differences in physical therapy practice exists. Therefore, before updates in practice can be provided, such as trainings in evidence-based practice, it is necessary to identify the profile and nature of practice in a given country or setting. Following a search of the international literature, no appropriate tool was identified to collect and establish data to create the profile of physical therapy practice in the Philippines. We therefore developed, validated and pilot tested a survey instrument which would comprehensively describe the practice of physical therapy in the Philippines Findings We used a mixed methods design to answer our study aims. A focus group interview was conducted among a group of physical therapists to establish the content and contexts of items to be included in the survey instrument. Findings were amalgamated with the information from the literature on developing survey instruments/questionnaires. A survey instrument was drafted and named as the Physical Therapy Profile Questionnaire (PTPQ. The PTPQ was then validated and pilot tested to a different group of physical therapists. The final version consisted of five separate parts namely (A General information and demographics, (B Practice Profile, (C Treatment Preferences, (D Bases for clinical work and (E Bases for educational/research work. At present the PTPQ is relevant to the Philippines and could be used by any country which has a similar nature of practice with the Philippines. Conclusion The Physical Therapy Practice Questionnaire (PTPQ was shown to have good face and content validity among the Filipino physical therapists and their context of practice. It has also been found to be useful, easy to administer tool and in a format appealing to respondents. The PTPQ is expected to assist comprehensive data collection to create a profile of physical therapy practice in the Philippines.

  7. [Adapted physical activity in the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosković, Ksenija; Gava, Branka Protić; Grajić, Mirko; Madić, Dejan; Obradović, Borislav; Todorović, Snezana Tomasević

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by the progressive loss of bone tissue, is one of the most common complications of aging. According to some calculations, there were 25% of women and 4% of men older than 50 years with osteoporosis in the world in 2010. It is assumed that the number of patients with osteoporosis will increase by 30% in every 10 years in the 21st century. There are many reasons for that: the world's population is growing older, diet is getting poorer in vitamins and minerals and physical activity is decreasing. THE QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF BONE TISSUE: Developing bones are much more responsive to mechanical loading and physical activity than mature bones. This suggests that training in early childhood may be an important factor in the prevention of osteoporosis in later life. It is important to note that the quality of bone achieved by training at younger age cannot be maintained permanently if it is not supported by physical activity later in life. Adapted physical activity represents physical activity individually tailored according to the psychosomatic capabilities of a person and the goal to be achieved. It can be applied at any age in order to maintain strong bones and reduce the risk of fracture. Adapted physical activity is different for men and women, for different age, as well as for the individuals. Aerobic exercises, which lead to an acceleration of breathing, increased heart rate and mild perspiration, as well as resistance exercises and exercises against resistance done by stretching elastic bands, for hands, legs and torso have been proven to increase bone density and improve bone strength. Coordination and balance exercises are important in an individual workout program. An explanation of the action of adapted physical activity is the basis for the theory of control and modulation of bone loss, muscle strength, coordination and balance. Physical activity is very effective in reducing sclerostin, which is known to inhibit bone

  8. Effects of physical exercise therapy on mobility, physical functioning, physical activity and quality of life in a population of community dwelling elderly patients with impaired mobility, physical disability and/ or multi morbidity: a meta analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Nienke; Staal, Bart; van Ravensburg, Dorine; Hobbelen, Hans; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Nijhuis-van der Sande, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This is the first meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems, physical disability and/or multi-morbidity. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of physical exercise therapy on mobility, physical functioning, physical activity and quality of life. A broad systematic

  9. Outcomes of physical therapy, speech pathology, and occupational therapy for people with motor neuron disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meg E; Perry, Alison; Bilney, Belinda; Curran, Andrea; Dodd, Karen; Wittwer, Joanne E; Dalton, Gregory W

    2006-09-01

    This article describes a systematic review and critical evaluation of the international literature on the effects of physical therapy, speech pathology, and occupational therapy for people with motor neuron disease (PwMND). The results were interpreted using the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. This enabled us to summarize therapy outcomes at the level of body structure and function, activity limitations, participation restrictions, and quality of life. Databases searched included MEDLINE, PUBMED, CINAHL, PSYCInfo, Data base of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE), The Physiotherapy Evidence data base (PEDro), Evidence Based Medicine Reviews (EMBASE), the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Evidence was graded according to the Harbour and Miller classification. Most of the evidence was found to be at the level of "clinical opinion" rather than of controlled clinical trials. Several nonrandomized small group and "observational studies" provided low-level evidence to support physical therapy for improving muscle strength and pulmonary function. There was also some evidence to support the effectiveness of speech pathology interventions for dysarthria. The search identified a small number of studies on occupational therapy for PwMND, which were small, noncontrolled pre-post-designs or clinical reports.

  10. Patients' mental models and adherence to outpatient physical therapy home exercise programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Jon

    2015-05-01

    Within physical therapy, patient adherence usually relates to attending appointments, following advice, and/or undertaking prescribed exercise. Similar to findings for general medical adherence, patient adherence to physical therapy home exercise programs (HEP) is estimated between 35 and 72%. Adherence to HEPs is a multifactorial and poorly understood phenomenon, with no consensus regarding a common theoretical framework that best guides empirical or clinical efforts. Mental models, a construct used to explain behavior and decision-making in the social sciences, may serve as this framework. Mental models comprise an individual's tacit thoughts about how the world works. They include assumptions about new experiences and expectations for the future based on implicit comparisons between current and past experiences. Mental models play an important role in decision-making and guiding actions. This professional theoretical article discusses empirical research demonstrating relationships among mental models, prior experience, and adherence decisions in medical and physical therapy contexts. Specific issues related to mental models and physical therapy patient adherence are discussed, including the importance of articulation of patients' mental models, assessment of patients' mental models that relate to exercise program adherence, discrepancy between patient and provider mental models, and revision of patients' mental models in ways that enhance adherence. The article concludes with practical implications for physical therapists and recommendations for further research to better understand the role of mental models in physical therapy patient adherence behavior.

  11. Prevalence of myofascial chronic pelvic pain and the effectiveness of pelvic floor physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedaiwy, Mohamed A; Patterson, Betsy; Mahajan, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of myofascial pain and the outcome of transvaginal pelvic floor physical therapy for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain caused by myofascial pelvic pain in a tertiary care facility. A retrospective chart review was performed on all women who presented to our facility between January 2005 and December 2007. Those diagnosed with myofascial pelvic pain and referred for transvaginal pelvic floor physical therapy over this 3-year period were evaluated. Participants with an initial pain score of > or = 4, myofascial pelvic pain on examination, and who attended 2 or more physician visits were included in the analysis. Patient physical examination findings, symptoms, and verbal pain ratings were reviewed. In all, 146 (13.2%) of 1,106 initially screened patients were diagnosed with myofascial pain. Seventy-five (51%) of the 146 patients who were referred for physical therapy were included, and 75% had an initial pain score of > or = 7. Pain scores significantly improved proportional to the number of physical therapy visits completed, with 63% of patients reporting significant pain improvement. Transvaginal physical therapy is an effective treatment for chronic pelvic pain resulting from myofascial pelvic pain.

  12. PREPARTICIPATION SCREENING – THE SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Turner A.; Boucher, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The sports physical therapist (SPT) is uniquely qualified to participate in the provision of preparticipation physical examinations (PPE). The PPE is recommended prior to athletic participation and required by many jurisdictions. There is little research to support the process and components; however, a number of professional organizations have recommendations that direct the PPE process. Description of Topic and Related Evidence: This clinical commentary highlights the role of the sports physical therapist and current evidence related to the preparticipation physical examination process. Data sources were limited to include professional positions and peer reviewed publications from 1988 through January 2013. Relation to Clinical Practice: Preparticipation physicals should be useful, comprehensive, and cost effective for the athlete and the health care team. Additional research is indicated in many of the areas of the PPE. The SPT is a valuable member of the health care team and can be a primary facilitator of the PPE in concert with the physician, athletic trainer, athletic organization administrators, and others. Well‐designed and inclusive PPEs can be provided to meet the major objectives of identification of athletes at risk. Controversy continues over the extent of the cardiac screening component as well as other sport or athlete specific components. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:23593556

  13. A retrospective, descriptive study of shoulder outcomes in outpatient physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, A Lynn; Lasheway, Philip A; Eaton, Wendy; Christensen, Frances

    2006-06-01

    A retrospective, descriptive study of clients with shoulder dysfunction referred to physical therapy. To (1) describe the clinical and functional outcomes of clients with shoulder dysfunction following outpatient physical therapy, and (2) to compare the outcomes by type of shoulder dysfunction. Although individuals with shoulder dysfunction are commonly referred to physical therapy few large descriptive studies regarding outcomes following physical therapy are available. Data for 878 clients (468 female, 410 male) were retrieved and analyzed. This database was developed between 1997 and 2000 and included 4 outpatient facilities from 1 healthcare system in the southwest corner of Michigan. Clients were classified by type of shoulder dysfunction, and standardized tests were performed upon admittance and discharge to physical therapy. Descriptive and inferential statistics were calculated for all data. Of all clients, 55.1% had shoulder impingement, while 18.3% had postoperative repair, 8.9% had a frozen shoulder, 7.6% had a rotator cuff tear, 3.0% had shoulder instability, 2.1% were post fracture, and the remaining 4.9% had miscellaneous diagnoses. The average (+/-SD) age of the patients was 53.6 +/- 16.4 years, with an average (+/-SD) number of treatment sessions of 13.7 +/- 11.0. All groups showed significant changes following physical therapy intervention. Clients with diverse types of shoulder dysfunction demonstrated improvement in both clinical and functional measures at the conclusion of physical therapy, although it is not possible to determine whether these changes were due to the interventions or due to time. The type of shoulder dysfunction appears to affect the prognosis, thus expected outcomes should be based upon initial diagnosis and specific measures.

  14. An Overview of Thematic Evolution of Physical Therapy Research Area From 1951 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Moral-Munoz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical Therapy is a profession which development and conceptual framework have been performed in the twentieth century. One of the major challenges of Physical Therapy in the twenty-first century is to identify the intellectual basis of its scientific domain. The aim of the present paper is to analyze the evolution of Physical Therapy research throughout scientific literature published in Web of Science (WoS and Scopus databases. In order to perform the analysis, WoS and Scopus bibliographic databases were used to download all records. A set of journals with overall topics in Physical Therapy discipline with the largest history in the Journal Citation Report were selected: Physiotherapy, Physical Therapy, and Australian Journal of Physiotherapy/Journal of Physiotherapy. The bibliometric tool SciMAT was employed to perform a science mapping analysis in order to detect and visualize the research themes and their evolution across three periods: 1951–1984, 1985–2000, and 2001–2013. The analysis carried out shows that Physical Therapy research field is mainly divided into nine thematic areas: Middle-Aged People, Muscle Function Alterations and Recovery, Health Education, Gait and Biomechanics, Central Nervous System, Heart Rate and Exercise, Diagnosis, Low Back Pain, and Animals. In conclusion, Physical Therapy citations and production are primarily focused on two large thematic areas, diseases that involve middle-aged population and muscle function and its alterations. Results can be used to provide a historical perspective on research conducted in this emerging field and to provide a scientific evidence-based practice model on which future studies can be built.

  15. A criticism to the fundamental principles of physics: The problem of the quantum measurement (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mormontoy Cardenas, Oscar; Marquez Jacome, Mateo

    2008-01-01

    The wave packet model collapse debt to extremely fast fluctuations of quantum field leads to interpreting the phase speed of the harmonic waves that compose the packet, as the speed of time flux. If it consider that harmonics waves keep different phases, the waves packet scattered almost instantly and, as consequence of that, allows the possibility of the quantum system energy it is measure with exactitude absolute in given time. These results induce to think that the time would being a superforce which would determine finally the events of universe and being responsible of the intrinsic pulsations observable in the physics systems. (author)

  16. Principles of structural physics in building construction in the Egyptian desert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awady El Wakil, Shafak El

    1981-12-01

    Building construction in accordance with the climate in oases of the Egyptian desert is discussed. Climatic conditions and the resulting consequences for structural physics play a major role. With the aid of Olgay's comfort diagram, requirements to be made on buildings in various oases are derived from the climatic data of these oases. To optimize the indoor climate, shading, heat storage and ventilation measures are discussed, and suggestions are made on how to make use of this knowledge in consideration of traditional Egyptian architecture.

  17. From Random Walks to Brownian Motion, from Diffusion to Entropy: Statistical Principles in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology textbooks is dominant contribution of the entropy in driving important biological processes towards equilibrium. From diffusion to cell-membrane formation, to electrostatic binding in protein folding, to the functioning of nerve cells, entropic effects often act to counterbalance deterministic forces such as electrostatic attraction and in so doing, allow for effective molecular signaling. A small group of biology, biophysics and computer science faculty have worked together for the past five years to develop curricular modules (based on SCALEUP pedagogy) that enable students to create models of stochastic and deterministic processes. Our students are first-year engineering and science students in the calculus-based physics course and they are not expected to know biology beyond the high-school level. In our class, they learn to reduce seemingly complex biological processes and structures to be described by tractable models that include deterministic processes and simple probabilistic inference. The students test these models in simulations and in laboratory experiments that are biologically relevant. The students are challenged to bridge the gap between statistical parameterization of their data (mean and standard deviation) and simple model-building by inference. This allows the students to quantitatively describe realistic cellular processes such as diffusion, ionic transport, and ligand-receptor binding. Moreover, the students confront ``random'' forces and traditional forces in problems, simulations, and in laboratory exploration throughout the year-long course as they move from traditional kinematics through thermodynamics to electrostatic interactions. This talk

  18. Physical therapy workforce shortage for aging and aged societies in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraiwong, Ratchanok; Vongsirinavarat, Mantana; Soonthorndhada, Kusol

    2014-07-01

    According to demographic changes, the size of the aging population has rapidly increased. Thailand has been facing the "aging society" since 2005 and the "aged society" has been projected to appear by the year 2025. Increased life expectancy is associated with health problems and risks, specifically chronic diseases and disability. Aging and aged societies and related specific conditions as stroke require the provision of services from health professionals. The shortage of the physical therapy workforce in Thailand has been reported. This study investigated the size of physical therapy workforce required for the approaching aging society of Thailand and estimated the number of needed physical therapists, specifically regarding stroke condition. Evidently, the issue of the physical therapy workforce to serve aging and aged societies in Thailand requires advocating and careful arranging.

  19. Management of falls in community-dwelling older adults: clinical guidance statement from the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avin, Keith G; Hanke, Timothy A; Kirk-Sanchez, Neva; McDonough, Christine M; Shubert, Tiffany E; Hardage, Jason; Hartley, Greg

    2015-06-01

    Falls in older adults are a major public health concern due to high prevalence, impact on health outcomes and quality of life, and treatment costs. Physical therapists can play a major role in reducing fall risk for older adults; however, existing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) related to fall prevention and management are not targeted to physical therapists. The purpose of this clinical guidance statement (CGS) is to provide recommendations to physical therapists to help improve outcomes in the identification and management of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults. The Subcommittee on Evidence-Based Documents of the Practice Committee of the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy developed this CGS. Existing CPGs were identified by systematic search and critically appraised using the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research, and Evaluation in Europe II (AGREE II) tool. Through this process, 3 CPGs were recommended for inclusion in the CGS and were synthesized and summarized. Screening recommendations include asking all older adults in contact with a health care provider whether they have fallen in the previous year or have concerns about balance or walking. Follow-up should include screening for balance and mobility impairments. Older adults who screen positive should have a targeted multifactorial assessment and targeted intervention. The components of this assessment and intervention are reviewed in this CGS, and barriers and issues related to implementation are discussed. A gap analysis supports the need for the development of a physical therapy-specific CPG to provide more precise recommendations for screening and assessment measures, exercise parameters, and delivery models. This CGS provides recommendations to assist physical therapists in the identification and management of fall risk in older community-dwelling adults. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  20. Longitudinal bunch diagnostics using coherent transition radiation spectroscopy. Physical principles, multichannel spectrometer, experimental results, mathematical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Bernhard; Wesch, Stephan; Behrens, Christopher; Koevener, Toke; Hass, Eugen; Casalbuoni, Sara

    2018-03-01

    The generation and properties of transition radiation (TR) are thoroughly treated. The spectral energy density, as described by the Ginzburg-Frank formula, is computed analytically, and the modifications caused by the finite size of the TR screen and by near-field diffraction effects are carefully analyzed. The principles of electron bunch shape reconstruction using coherent transition radiation are outlined. Spectroscopic measurements yield only the magnitude of the longitudinal form factor but not its phase. Two phase retrieval methods are investigated and illustrated with model calculations: analytic phase computation by means of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation, and iterative phase retrieval. Particular attention is paid to the ambiguities which are unavoidable in the reconstruction of longitudinal charge density profiles from spectroscopic data. The origin of these ambiguities has been identified and a thorough mathematical analysis is presented. The experimental part of the paper comprises a description of our multichannel infrared and THz spectrometer and a selection of measurements at FLASH, comparing the bunch profiles derived from spectroscopic data with those determined with a transversely deflecting microwave structure. A rigorous derivation of the Kramers-Kronig phase formula is presented in Appendix A. Numerous analytic model calculations can be found in Appendix B. The differences between normal and truncated Gaussians are discussed in Appendix C. Finally, Appendix D contains a short description of the propagation of an electromagnetic wave front by two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation. This is the basis of a powerful numerical Mathematica trademark code THzTransport, which permits the propagation of electromagnetic wave fronts through a beam line consisting of drift spaces, lenses, mirrors and apertures.

  1. Longitudinal bunch diagnostics using coherent transition radiation spectroscopy. Physical principles, multichannel spectrometer, experimental results, mathematical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Bernhard; Wesch, Stephan; Behrens, Christopher [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Koevener, Toke [Hamburg Univ. (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hass, Eugen [Hamburg Univ. (Germany); Casalbuoni, Sara [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany). Inst. for Beam Physics and Technology; Schmueser, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    The generation and properties of transition radiation (TR) are thoroughly treated. The spectral energy density, as described by the Ginzburg-Frank formula, is computed analytically, and the modifications caused by the finite size of the TR screen and by near-field diffraction effects are carefully analyzed. The principles of electron bunch shape reconstruction using coherent transition radiation are outlined. Spectroscopic measurements yield only the magnitude of the longitudinal form factor but not its phase. Two phase retrieval methods are investigated and illustrated with model calculations: analytic phase computation by means of the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation, and iterative phase retrieval. Particular attention is paid to the ambiguities which are unavoidable in the reconstruction of longitudinal charge density profiles from spectroscopic data. The origin of these ambiguities has been identified and a thorough mathematical analysis is presented. The experimental part of the paper comprises a description of our multichannel infrared and THz spectrometer and a selection of measurements at FLASH, comparing the bunch profiles derived from spectroscopic data with those determined with a transversely deflecting microwave structure. A rigorous derivation of the Kramers-Kronig phase formula is presented in Appendix A. Numerous analytic model calculations can be found in Appendix B. The differences between normal and truncated Gaussians are discussed in Appendix C. Finally, Appendix D contains a short description of the propagation of an electromagnetic wave front by two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation. This is the basis of a powerful numerical Mathematica trademark code THzTransport, which permits the propagation of electromagnetic wave fronts through a beam line consisting of drift spaces, lenses, mirrors and apertures.

  2. Theoretical and practical outline of the Copenhagen PACT narrative-based exercise counselling manual to promote physical activity in post-therapy cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midtgaard, Julie

    2013-02-01

    Sedentary behaviour and reduced exercise capacity are potential persisting effects of anti-cancer therapy that may predispose to serious health conditions. It is well-established that physical exercise may prevent some of these problems. However, the extent to which cancer survivors are able to adopt long-term physical activity habits depends largely on their motivation. This theoretical paper aims to outline how researchers and practitioners can draw from Antonovsky's salutogenetic theory and White & Epston's Narrative Therapy to develop and implement intervention efforts centered on promotion of long-term physical activity behaviour, while at the same time increasing the individual cancer survivor's sense of meaning and personal health resources. The Copenhagen PACT (Physical Activity after Cancer Treatment) Study targeting adoption and maintenance of regular physical activity in post-therapy cancer survivors is briefly presented including a brief review of the theoretical rationale behind the psychological component of the intervention, i.e. a narrative-based exercise counselling programme. Subsequently, particular attention is given to the core principles, different components and structure of the counselling manual including sample questions and examples of written documents that have emanated from the individual counselling sessions. The discussion includes consideration of some methodological challenges that arise when attempting to evaluate narrative-based interventions in the context of physical activity promotion in cancer rehabilitation and survivorship care.

  3. Modifiable variables in physical therapy education programs associated with first-time and three-year National Physical Therapy Examination pass rates in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Cook

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to examine the modifiable programmatic characteristics reflected in the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE Annual Accreditation Report for all accredited programs that reported pass rates on the National Physical Therapist Examination, and to build a predictive model for first-time and three-year ultimate pass rates. Methods: This observational study analyzed programmatic information from the 185 CAPTE-accredited physical therapy programs in the United States and Puerto Rico out of a total of 193 programs that provided the first-time and three-year ultimate pass rates in 2011. Fourteen predictive variables representing student selection and composition, clinical education length and design, and general program length and design were analyzed against first-time pass rates and ultimate pass rates on the NPTE. Univariate and multivariate multinomial regression analysis for first-time pass rates and logistic regression analysis for three-year ultimate pass rates were performed. Results: The variables associated with the first-time pass rate in the multivariate analysis were the mean undergraduate grade point average (GPA and the average age of the cohort. Multivariate analysis showed that mean undergraduate GPA was associated with the three-year ultimate pass rate. Conclusions: Mean undergraduate GPA was found to be the only modifiable predictor for both first-time and three-year pass rates among CAPTE-accredited physical therapy programs.

  4. The contribution of conceptual frameworks to knowledge translation interventions in physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Anne; Gervais, Mathieu-Joël; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of knowledge translation activities in physical therapy to ensure that research findings are integrated into clinical practice, and increasing numbers of knowledge translation interventions are being conducted. Although various frameworks have been developed to guide and facilitate the process of translating knowledge into practice, these tools have been infrequently used in physical therapy knowledge translation studies to date. Knowledge translation in physical therapy implicates multiple stakeholders and environments and involves numerous steps. In light of this complexity, the use of explicit conceptual frameworks by clinicians and researchers conducting knowledge translation interventions is associated with a range of potential benefits. This perspective article argues that such frameworks are important resources to promote the uptake of new evidence in physical therapist practice settings. Four key benefits associated with the use of conceptual frameworks in designing and implementing knowledge translation interventions are identified, and limits related to their use are considered. A sample of 5 conceptual frameworks is evaluated, and how they address common barriers to knowledge translation in physical therapy is assessed. The goal of this analysis is to provide guidance to physical therapists seeking to identify a framework to support the design and implementation of a knowledge translation intervention. Finally, the use of a conceptual framework is illustrated through a case example. Increased use of conceptual frameworks can have a positive impact on the field of knowledge translation in physical therapy and support the development and implementation of robust and effective knowledge translation interventions that help span the research-practice gap. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  5. Wavelets-Computational Aspects of Sterian Realistic Approach to Uncertainty Principle in High Energy Physics: A Transient Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Toma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents wavelets-computational aspects of Sterian-realistic approach to uncertainty principle in high energy physics. According to this approach, one cannot make a device for the simultaneous measuring of the canonical conjugate variables in reciprocal Fourier spaces. However, such aspects regarding the use of conjugate Fourier spaces can be also noticed in quantum field theory, where the position representation of a quantum wave is replaced by momentum representation before computing the interaction in a certain point of space, at a certain moment of time. For this reason, certain properties regarding the switch from one representation to another in these conjugate Fourier spaces should be established. It is shown that the best results can be obtained using wavelets aspects and support macroscopic functions for computing (i wave-train nonlinear relativistic transformation, (ii reflection/refraction with a constant shift, (iii diffraction considered as interaction with a null phase shift without annihilation of associated wave, (iv deflection by external electromagnetic fields without phase loss, and (v annihilation of associated wave-train through fast and spatially extended phenomena according to uncertainty principle.

  6. The Development of Enterprise Systems based on Cyber- Physical Systems Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Ştefan Sacală

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in the area of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS and Internet of Things (IoT become, in the last 3 years a priority for both research entities and companies. Implementing Enterprise Systems based on the two paradigms is focused on merging real and virtual objects and thus deals with an increased degree of complexity. The aim of the present paper is to discuss an Enterprise Architecture and a Framework based on the integration of CPS and IoT technologies within Enterprise Systems. An important aspect is related to process mining implemented in two focus areas: the ability to generate business processes from data acquired from sensors and the ability to integrate sensor acquired data with existing business processes.

  7. The complex itinerary of Leibniz’s planetary theory physical convictions, metaphysical principles and Keplerian inspiration

    CERN Document Server

    Bussotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This book presents new insights into Leibniz’s research on planetary theory and his system of pre-established harmony. Although some aspects of this theory have been explored in the literature, others are less well known. In particular, the book offers new contributions on the connection between the planetary theory and the theory of gravitation. It also provides an in-depth discussion of Kepler’s influence on Leibniz’s planetary theory and, more generally, on Leibniz’s concept of pre-established harmony. Three initial chapters presenting the mathematical and physical details of Leibniz’s works provide a frame of reference. The book then goes on to discuss research on Leibniz’s conception of gravity and the connection between Leibniz and Kepler. .

  8. Clinical profile of newborns undergoing physical therapy in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Ferreira Biazus

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: In neonatal therapy units, physical therapy is directed toward integral baby care. Objective: To describe the profile of newborns (NBs hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. Methods: Retrospective documentary study with data collection from medical records from July 2011 to July 2013. The sample consisted of NBs who performed motor and respiratory therapy. Data were grouped into five categories according to birth weight (≤ 1000g, 1001-1500g, 1501-2000g, 2001-2500g, ≥ 2501g. Results: total of 1,884 newborns were admitted to the NICU within the stipulated period, 168 (13.9% underwent physical therapy. Of the 168 NBs who underwent physical therapy, 137 were born in the hospital (81.5% and 31 were transferred there (18.5%; 17 of these babies died during the neonatal hospital stay (10.1%. All newborns of the extremely low birth weight group (≤ 1000g required mechanical ventilation, 72.7% non-invasive ventilation and 16.6% high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. The occurrence of pneumothorax in the extremely low birth weight group was 13.8% and 16% in the group with birth weight 1001-1500g. Conclusion: Infants with low birth weight (<2500g constituted the profile of NBs who underwent physical therapy, which was directly related to higher incidence of death and pneumothorax, as well as increased use of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation.

  9. Radiation chemistry; principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, F.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The book attempts to present those fields of radiation chemistry which depend on the principles of radiation chemistry. The first four chapters are some prelude about radiation chemistry principles with respect to how ionizing radiation interacts with matter, and primary results from these interactions and, which kinetic laws are followed by these primary interactions and which equipment for qualitative studies is necessary. Following chapters included principles fields of radiation chemistry. The last six chapters discussed of principle of chemistry from physical and chemical point of view. In this connection the fundamentals of radiation on biological system is emphasised. On one hand, the importance of it for hygiene and safety as neoplasms therapy is discussed. on the other hand, its industrial importance is presented

  10. Pelvic floor physical therapy for lifelong vaginismus: a retrospective chart review and interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissing, Elke D; Armstrong, Heather L; Allen, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Pelvic floor physical therapy is used in the treatment of sexual pain disorders; however, women with lifelong vaginismus have not yet been included in treatment studies or have not been differentiated from women with acquired vaginismus and/or dyspareunia. This retrospective chart review and interview study was intended to obtain initial information on physical therapy interventions, course, and outcome in women who have never been able to experience vaginal intercourse. The files of 53 women, consecutively treated at one physical therapy clinic, were included in the chart review; 13 of these women volunteered to be interviewed. The chart review revealed significant pelvic floor pathology and an average treatment course of 29 sessions. Internal manual techniques were found to be most effective, followed by patient education, dilatation exercises, and home exercises. Although participants were very satisfied with the physical therapy, some symptoms, such as pain, anxiety/fear, and pelvic floor tension remained and scores on the Female Sexual Distress Scale and Female Sexual Function Index indicated clinical levels of sexual distress and impaired sexual function after treatment. Although there appears to be no linear relation between symptom reduction and healthy sexual function, this initial information suggests that physical therapy may be a promising treatment option for some women with lifelong vaginismus and merits further evaluation.

  11. Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy in bronchiectasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A; Rowe, B H

    2000-01-01

    This study had two objectives: (1) to examine the effects of bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy on patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis; (2) to determine any differences between manual and mechanical techniques for bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy. The study design was a systematic review of the literature that used an exhaustive search for trials and review methods prescribed by the Cochrane Collaboration. Randomized controlled trials examined patient groups, interventions, and dependent variables. Patients included those with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (emphysema or chronic bronchitis) or bronchiectasis. Any of the following interventions or combinations thereof were included: manual interventions, such as postural drainage, chest percussion, vibration, chest shaking, directed coughing, or forced exhalation technique. Controls of the study were as follows: no intervention; placebo; coughing; and mechanical interventions, such as mechanical vibration. The search identified 99 potential trials; inclusion or exclusion analysis left 7, which examined a total of 126 patients. Mean score on trial quality was 1.4 (5 = greatest). Three separate trials (N = 51) found statistically significant effects for bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy on sputum production and radioaerosol clearance. No trials (N = 126) found statistically significant effects on pulmonary function variables or differences between manual and mechanical techniques. Considering the small sizes, low quality, and mixed results from the trials, the research on bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy is inconclusive. There is a need for adequately sized, high-quality, randomized controlled trials with uniform patient populations to examine the effects of bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy.

  12. The role and effectiveness of computer-assisted learning in physical therapy education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneri, Diana

    2011-05-01

    Physical therapy educators seek teaching methodologies to efficiently educate students. The purpose of this article was to perform a systematic review of the literature pertaining to the use and effectiveness of computer-assisted learning (CAL) in physical therapy education. Criteria were established for article selection. Articles related to use included those reporting at least a 30% survey response return and a sample of at least 50. Articles regarding effectiveness included only randomized control studies related to use in physical therapy and physical therapy assistant education. Six articles related to the use and 17 articles related to the effectiveness were identified. Early published investigations were focused in the area of anatomy. The survey studies related to use indicated that educators highly valued CAL, but they reported initial use to be low due to cost. Expanding software development has resulted in higher contemporary use. CAL can effectively convey content material compared to traditional methods of instruction. CAL is largely underresearched in the field of physical therapy compared to other health professions. Recommendations for future research include larger studies, broader representation of the practice field, and development of interactive programming.

  13. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-01-01

    Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical therapy, particularly active exercise therapy (PT) in patients with non-specific neck pain. Patients neck pain, aged between 18-70 years, were included in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect and functioning (Neck Disability Index), the secondary outcome was pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale for Pain). Outcomes were measured at 3, 7, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. Multilevel analyses (intention-to-treat) were the primary analyses for overall between-group differences. Additional to the primary and secondary outcomes the number of treatment sessions of the MTU group and PT group was analyzed. Data were collected from September 2008 to February 2011. A total of 181 patients were included. Multilevel analyses showed no statistically significant overall differences at one year between the MTU and PT groups on any of the primary and secondary outcomes. The MTU group showed significantly lower treatment sessions compared to the PT group (respectively 3.1 vs. 5.9 after 7 weeks; 6.1 vs. 10.0 after 52 weeks). Patients with neck pain improved in both groups without statistical significantly or clinically relevant differences between the MTU and PT groups during one-year follow-up. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843.

  14. Progress in the Full-Text Publication Rate of Orthopaedic and Sport Physical Therapy Abstracts Presented at the American Physical Therapy Association's Combined Sections Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Stuart J; Fletcher, Jacquelyn M; Barker, Rick G; Guildenbecher, Elizabeth A; Gorkis, Colleen E; Thompson, William R

    2017-10-07

    Study Design Descriptive study. Background Professional meetings, such as the American Physical Therapy Association's (APTA's) Combined Sections Meeting (CSM), provide forums for sharing information. However, it was reported that only one-quarter of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy abstracts presented at the CSM between 2000 and 2004 went on to full-text publication. This low conversion rate raises a number of concerns regarding the full dissemination of work within the profession. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the full-text publication rate of work presented in abstract form at subsequent CSMs and investigate factors influencing the rate. Methods A systematic search was undertaken to locate full-text publications of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy abstracts presented at CSMs between 2005 and 2011. Eligible publications were published within 5 years following abstract presentation. The influences of year of abstract presentation, APTA section, presentation type, institution of origin, study design, and study significance were assessed. Results Over one-third (38.6%) of presented abstracts progressed to full-text publication. Odds of full-text publication increased if the abstract was presented as a platform presentation, originated from a doctorate-granting institution, reported findings of an experimental study, or reported a statistically significant finding. Conclusion The full-text publication rate for orthopaedic and sports physical therapy abstracts presented at recent CSMs has increased by over 50% compared to that reported for the preceding period. The rate is now in the range of that reported in comparable clinical disciplines, demonstrating important progress in the full dissemination of work within the profession. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 7 Oct 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.7581.

  15. Physics at the biomolecular interface fundamentals for molecular targeted therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses primarily on the role of interfacial forces in understanding biological phenomena at the molecular scale. By providing a suitable statistical mechanical apparatus to handle the biomolecular interface, the book becomes uniquely positioned to address core problems in molecular biophysics. It highlights the importance of interfacial tension in delineating a solution to the protein folding problem, in unravelling the physico-chemical basis of enzyme catalysis and protein associations, and in rationally designing molecular targeted therapies. Thus grounded in fundamental science, the book develops a powerful technological platform for drug discovery, while it is set to inspire scientists at any level in their careers determined to address the major challenges in molecular biophysics. The acknowledgment of how exquisitely the structure and dynamics of proteins and their aqueous environment are related attests to the overdue recognition that biomolecular phenomena cannot be effectively understood w...

  16. Cancer rehabilitation with a focus on evidence-based outpatient physical and occupational therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Gilchrist, Laura S

    2011-05-01

    Cancer rehabilitation is an important part of survivorship as a distinct phase of treatment. Although cancer rehabilitation may involve many disciplines, this article specifically covers evidence-based treatment in physical and occupational therapy. Patients may need physical and occupational therapy services for a variety of cancer-related or cancer-treatment-related problems, including pain, fatigue, deconditioning, and difficulty with gait. They may also have problems resuming their previous level of function, which can impact on activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, return to previous home and community activity levels, and return to work. This review discusses the role of physical and occupational therapy in helping cancer patients improve pain and musculoskeletal issues, deconditioning and endurance effects, fatigue, balance and falls, and lymphedema and psychosocial problems.

  17. [Physiotherapy, occupational therapy and physical therapy in fibromyalgia syndrome : Updated guidelines 2017 and overview of systematic review articles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, A; Bork, H; Brückle, W; Dexl, C; Heldmann, P; Henningsen, P; Krumbein, L; Pullwitt, V; Schiltenwolf, M; Häuser, W

    2017-06-01

    The regular update of the guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome, AWMF number 145/004, was scheduled for April 2017. The guidelines were developed by 13 scientific societies and 2 patient self-help organizations coordinated by the German Pain Society. Working groups (n =8) with a total of 42 members were formed balanced with respect to gender, medical expertise, position in the medical or scientific hierarchy and potential conflicts of interest. A literature search for systematic reviews of randomized, controlled trials on physiotherapy, occupational therapy and physical therapy from December 2010 to May 2016 was performed in the Cochrane library, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Scopus databases. Levels of evidence were assigned according to the classification system of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine version 2009. The strength of recommendations was achieved by multiple step formalized procedures to reach a consensus. Efficacy, risks, patient preferences and applicability of available therapies were weighed up against each other. The guidelines were reviewed and approved by the board of directors of the societies engaged in the development of the guidelines. Low to moderate intensity endurance and strength training are strongly recommended. Chiropractic, laser therapy, magnetic field therapy, massage and transcranial magnetic stimulation are not recommended.

  18. Continuous passive motion and physical therapy (CPM) versus physical therapy (PT) versus delayed physical therapy (DPT) after surgical release for elbow contractures; a study protocol for a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveen, Jetske; Doornberg, Job N; Kodde, Izaak F; Goossens, Pjotr; Koenraadt, Koen L M; The, Bertram; Eygendaal, Denise

    2017-11-22

    The elbow is prone to stiffness after trauma. To regain functional elbow motion several conservative- and surgical treatment options are available. Conservative treatment includes physical therapy, intra-articular injections with corticosteroids and a static progressive or dynamic splinting program. If conservative treatment fails, an operative release of the posttraumatic stiff elbow is often performed. The best Evidence-Based rehabilitation protocol for patients after an operative release is unknown to date and differs per surgeon, hospital and country. Options include early- or delayed motion supervised by a physical therapist, immediate continuous passive motion (CPM), (night) splinting and a static progressive or dynamic splinting program. The SET-Study (Stiff Elbow Trial) is a single-centre, prospective, randomized controlled trial. The primary objective of this study is to compare the active Range of Motion (ROM) (flexion arc and rotational arc) twelve months after surgery between three groups. The first group will receive in-hospital CPM in combination with early motion Physical Therapy (PT) supervised by a physical therapist, the second group will receive only in-hospital early motion PT supervised by a physical therapist and the third group will receive outpatient supervised PT from postoperative day seven till ten. Secondary outcome measures will be Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) including the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS), the Oxford Elbow Score (OES), the quick Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (qDASH) score, Visual Analogue pain Scale in rest and activity (VAS), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), the Short Form (SF)-36, the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale Revised (CESD-R) and the Work Rehabilitation Questionnaire (WORQ) for the upper limb. A successful completion of this trial will provide evidence on the best rehabilitation protocol in order to (re)gain optimal motion after surgical release of the stiff elbow

  19. In situ growth of Ag nanoparticles on α-Ag2WO4 under electron irradiation: probing the physical principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Miguel, Miguel A.; da Silva, Edison Z.; Zannetti, Sonia M.; Cilense, Mario; Fabbro, Maria T.; Gracia, Lourdes; Andrés, Juan; Longo, Elson

    2016-06-01

    Exploiting the plasmonic behavior of Ag nanoparticles grown on α-Ag2WO4 is a widely employed strategy to produce efficient photocatalysts, ozone sensors, and bactericides. However, a description of the atomic and electronic structure of the semiconductor sites irradiated by electrons is still not available. Such a description is of great importance to understand the mechanisms underlying these physical processes and to improve the design of silver nanoparticles to enhance their activities. Motivated by this, we studied the growth of silver nanoparticles to investigate this novel class of phenomena using both transmission electron microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. A theoretical framework based on density functional theory calculations (DFT), together with experimental analysis and measurements, were developed to examine the changes in the local geometrical and electronic structure of the materials. The physical principles for the formation of Ag nanoparticles on α-Ag2WO4 by electron beam irradiation are described. Quantum mechanical calculations based on DFT show that the (001) of α-Ag2WO4 displays Ag atoms with different coordination numbers. Some of them are able to diffuse out of the surface with a very low energy barrier (less than 0.1 eV), thus, initiating the growth of metallic Ag nanostructures and leaving Ag vacancies in the bulk material. These processes increase the structural disorder of α-Ag2WO4 as well as its electrical resistance as observed in the experimental measurements.

  20. Movement-based interaction applied to physical rehabilitation therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Navarro, Juan Enrique; Ruiz Penichet, Victor Manuel; Lozano Pérez, María Dolores

    2014-12-09

    Health care environments are continuously improving conditions, especially regarding the use of current technology. In the field of rehabilitation, the use of video games and related technology has helped to develop new rehabilitation procedures. Patients are able to work on their disabilities through new processes that are more motivating and entertaining. However, these patients are required to leave their home environment to complete their rehabilitation programs. The focus of our research interests is on finding a solution to eliminate the need for patients to interrupt their daily routines to attend rehabilitation therapy. We have developed an innovative system that allows patients with a balance disorder to perform a specific rehabilitation exercise at home. Additionally, the system features an assistive tool to complement the work of physiotherapists. Medical staff are thus provided with a system that avoids the need for them to be present during the exercise in specific cases in which patients are under suitable supervision. A movement-based interaction device was used to achieve a reliable system for monitoring rehabilitation exercises performed at home. The system accurately utilizes parameters previously defined by the specialist for correct performance of the exercise. Accordingly, the system gives instructions and corrects the patient's actions. The data generated during the session are collected for assessment by the specialist to adapt the difficulty of the exercise to the patient's progress. The evaluation of the system was conducted by two experts in balance disorder rehabilitation. They were required to verify the effectiveness of the system, and they also facilitated the simulation of real patient behavior. They used the system freely for a period of time and provided interesting and optimistic feedback. First, they evaluated the system as a tool for real-life rehabilitation therapy. Second, their interaction with the system allowed us to obtain

  1. Impact of Post-Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy Education on the Role of a School Based Physical Therapist: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Susan; Brown, Suzanne Robben

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the impact of the post-professional doctor of physical therapy curriculum on the role of one physical therapist employed as a special education related service provider. Physical therapists working in the public school setting play an important role in promoting success for students with physical disabilities as…

  2. Abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Proof of principle in an experimental model of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivillin, Veronica A.; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Schwint, Amanda E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Radiobiology, B1650KNA San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, Emiliano C.C.; Curotto, Paula [Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Research and Production Reactors, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Colombo, Lucas L. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thorp, Silvia I.; Farias, Ruben O. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Instrumentation and Control, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Garabalino, Marcela A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Radiobiology, B1650KNA San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, Sara J. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Instrumentation and Control, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Santa Cruz, Gustavo A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Carando, Daniel G. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, for the first time, the abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Twenty-six BDIX rats were inoculated subcutaneously with 1 x 10{sup 6} DHD/K12/TRb syngeneic colon cancer cells in the right hind flank. Three weeks post-inoculation, the right leg of 12 rats bearing the tumor nodule was treated with BPA-BNCT (BPA-Boronophenylalanine) at the RA-3 nuclear reactor located in Buenos Aires, Argentina, at an absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy to skin as the dose-limiting tissue. The remaining group of 14 tumor-bearing rats were left untreated and used as control. Two weeks post-BNCT, 1 x 10{sup 6} DHD/K12/TRb cells were injected subcutaneously in the contralateral left hind flank of each of the 26 BDIX rats. Tumor volume in both legs was measured weekly for 7 weeks to determine response to BNCT in the right leg and to assess a potential influence of BNCT in the right leg on tumor development in the left leg. Within the BNCT group, a statistically significant reduction was observed in contralateral left tumor volume in animals whose right leg tumor responded to BNCT (post-treatment/pre-treatment tumor volume <1) versus animals who failed to respond (post/pre ≥1), i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 271 ± 128 mm{sup 3}. In addition, a statistically significant reduction in contralateral left leg tumor volume was observed in BNCT-responsive animals (post/pre <1) vs untreated animals, i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 254 ± 251 mm{sup 3}. The present study performed in a simple animal model provides proof of principle that the positive response of a tumor to BNCT is capable of inducing an abscopal effect. (orig.)

  3. Abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Proof of principle in an experimental model of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivillin, Veronica A.; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Schwint, Amanda E.; Pozzi, Emiliano C.C.; Curotto, Paula; Colombo, Lucas L.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Farias, Ruben O.; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; Carando, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, for the first time, the abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Twenty-six BDIX rats were inoculated subcutaneously with 1 x 10 6 DHD/K12/TRb syngeneic colon cancer cells in the right hind flank. Three weeks post-inoculation, the right leg of 12 rats bearing the tumor nodule was treated with BPA-BNCT (BPA-Boronophenylalanine) at the RA-3 nuclear reactor located in Buenos Aires, Argentina, at an absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy to skin as the dose-limiting tissue. The remaining group of 14 tumor-bearing rats were left untreated and used as control. Two weeks post-BNCT, 1 x 10 6 DHD/K12/TRb cells were injected subcutaneously in the contralateral left hind flank of each of the 26 BDIX rats. Tumor volume in both legs was measured weekly for 7 weeks to determine response to BNCT in the right leg and to assess a potential influence of BNCT in the right leg on tumor development in the left leg. Within the BNCT group, a statistically significant reduction was observed in contralateral left tumor volume in animals whose right leg tumor responded to BNCT (post-treatment/pre-treatment tumor volume <1) versus animals who failed to respond (post/pre ≥1), i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 271 ± 128 mm 3 . In addition, a statistically significant reduction in contralateral left leg tumor volume was observed in BNCT-responsive animals (post/pre <1) vs untreated animals, i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 254 ± 251 mm 3 . The present study performed in a simple animal model provides proof of principle that the positive response of a tumor to BNCT is capable of inducing an abscopal effect. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear physics applications in diagnostics and cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, Ugo

    2005-01-01

    Only 1% of the 18,000 world accelerators are devoted to the production of radioisotopes for medical diagnostics. In fact at present about 85% of all the medical examinations use /sup 99m/Tc produced in nuclear reactors. But the development of Positron Emission Tomography and of its combination with Computer Tomography will boost the hospital use of cyclotrons. Much more general is the use of electron linacs in cancer therapy about 40% of the world accelerators are used for this so called "conventional" radiotherapy. In the developed countries every 10 million inhabitants about 20,000 oncological patients are irradiated every year with high-energy photons (called X-rays by radiotherapists) produced by electron linacs. Much less used is "hadrontherapy", the radiotherapy technique that employs protons, neutrons or carbon ions. Protons and ions are 'heavy' charged particles: they assure a more 'conformal' treatment than X-rays and thus spare better the surrounding healthy tissues allowing a larger dose and thus a...

  5. The Contribution of Conceptual Frameworks to Knowledge Translation Interventions in Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Mathieu-Joël; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of knowledge translation activities in physical therapy to ensure that research findings are integrated into clinical practice, and increasing numbers of knowledge translation interventions are being conducted. Although various frameworks have been developed to guide and facilitate the process of translating knowledge into practice, these tools have been infrequently used in physical therapy knowledge translation studies to date. Knowledge translation in physical therapy implicates multiple stakeholders and environments and involves numerous steps. In light of this complexity, the use of explicit conceptual frameworks by clinicians and researchers conducting knowledge translation interventions is associated with a range of potential benefits. This perspective article argues that such frameworks are important resources to promote the uptake of new evidence in physical therapist practice settings. Four key benefits associated with the use of conceptual frameworks in designing and implementing knowledge translation interventions are identified, and limits related to their use are considered. A sample of 5 conceptual frameworks is evaluated, and how they address common barriers to knowledge translation in physical therapy is assessed. The goal of this analysis is to provide guidance to physical therapists seeking to identify a framework to support the design and implementation of a knowledge translation intervention. Finally, the use of a conceptual framework is illustrated through a case example. Increased use of conceptual frameworks can have a positive impact on the field of knowledge translation in physical therapy and support the development and implementation of robust and effective knowledge translation interventions that help span the research-practice gap. PMID:25060959

  6. Physical therapy in relation to gait and balance in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anniele Martins Silva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine if there is a benefit of physical therapy intervention in relation to balance and gait in the elderly. Methods: An interventional study held in 2009 in Caruaru-PE, Brazil, evaluated elderly women aged 60 and 82 years, randomly divided into two groups, control and intervention, undergoing physical therapy assessment (posture, balance and mobility through Timed Get Up and Go Test scorings- TUG, analysis of socio-demographic profile (age, sex, history of falls, fear of falling, physical activity, smoking and drinking and physical therapy intervention for 10 weeks. Statistical analysis included chi-square test, Fisher’s exact and ANOVA. Results: We found that the risk of falls was more evident in the control group (p <0.05 regarding to the scores and rankings obtained in the TUG test. After the intervention, no participant in the experimental group reported fear of falling, and no longer reported the presence of pain. Conclusion: Physical therapy achieved through stretching exercises and training of balance and strength brought benefits to both the balance and the gait of the studied sample.

  7. Complementary physical therapies for movement disorders in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Da Rocha, P; McClelland, J; Morris, M E

    2015-12-01

    The growth and popularity of complementary physical therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD) attempt to fill the gap left by conventional exercises, which does not always directly target wellbeing, enjoyment and social participation. To evaluate the effects of complementary physical therapies on motor performance, quality of life and falls in people living with PD. Systematic review with meta-analysis. Outpatients--adults diagnosed with idiopathic PD, male or female, modified Hoehn and Yahr scale I-IV, any duration of PD, any duration of physical treatment or exercise. Randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials and case series studies were identified by systematic searching of health and rehabilitation electronic databases. A standardized form was used to extract key data from studies by two independent researchers. 1210 participants from 20 randomized controlled trials, two non-randomized controlled trials and 13 case series studies were included. Most studies had moderately strong methodological quality. Dancing, water exercises and robotic gait training were an effective adjunct to medical management for some people living with PD. Virtual reality training, mental practice, aerobic training, boxing and Nordic walking training had a small amount of evidence supporting their use in PD. On balance, alternative physical therapies are worthy of consideration when selecting treatment options for people with this common chronic disease. Complementary physical therapies such as dancing, hydrotherapy and robotic gait training appear to afford therapeutic benefits, increasing mobility and quality of life, in some people living with PD.

  8. Thrust joint manipulation curricula in first-professional physical therapy education: 2012 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noteboom, J Timothy; Little, Christian; Boissonnault, William

    2015-06-01

    Descriptive online observational survey. To identify the extent of thrust joint manipulation (TJM) integration into first-professional physical therapy program curricula. The most recent survey of TJM curricula was published in 2004, with a wide variation in faculty responses noted. Since that time, faculty resources have been developed and TJM language in "A Normative Model of Physical Therapist Professional Education" from the American Physical Therapy Association has been updated, leaving the current status of TJM education in curricula unknown. Faculty from 205 accredited physical therapy programs were invited to participate in an anonymous 35-item electronic survey during the summer of 2012. Seventy-two percent of programs responded to the survey, with 99% of programs teaching TJM and 97% of faculty believing TJM to be an entry-level skill. Cervical spine TJM is still being taught at a lower rate than techniques for other body regions. Faculty deemed 91% and 77% of students, respectively, at or above entry-level competency for implementing TJM in their clinical practice upon graduation. Most respondents indicated that increased utilization of TJM during clinical affiliations (78%) and lab hours (78%) would be beneficial to the student's knowledge/application of TJM. The utilization of TJM and faculty perceptions in first-professional physical therapy programs in the United States have evolved over the past decade. With TJM content more fully integrated into educational curricula, programs can now look to refine teaching strategies that enhance learning outcomes.

  9. Adaptive plasma for cancer therapy: physics, mechanism and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael

    2017-10-01

    One of the most promising applications of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is the cancer therapy. The uniqueness of plasma is in its ability to change composition in situ. Plasma self-organization could lead to formation of coherent plasma structures. These coherent structures tend to modulate plasma chemistry and composition, including reactive species, the electric field and charged particles. Formation of coherent plasma structures allows the plasma to adapt to external boundary conditions, such as different cells types and their contextual tissues. In this talk we will explore possibilities and opportunities that the adaptive plasma therapeutic system might offer. We shall define such an adaptive system as a plasma device that is able to adjust the plasma composition to obtain optimal desirable outcomes through its interaction with cells and tissues. The efficacy of cold plasma in a pre-clinical model of various cancer types such as lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin has been demonstrated. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies revealed that cold plasmas selectively kill cancer cells. Recently mechanism of plasma selectivity based on aquaporin hypothesis has been proposed. Aquaporins (AQPs) are the confirmed membrane channels of H2O2 and other large molecules. We have demonstrated that the anti-cancer capacity of plasma could be inhibited by silencing the expression of AQPs. Additional possible cell feedback mechanism was recently discovered. It is associated with production of reactive species during direct CAP treatment by cancer cells. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide by different cells can lead to adaptation of chemistry at the plasma-cell interface based on the cellular input. In particular we have found that the discharge voltage is an important factor affecting the ratio of reactive oxygen species to reactive nitrogen species in the gas phase and this correlates well with effect of hydrogen peroxide production by cells. This work was

  10. Physical measurements for ion range verification in charged particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, M.

    2010-10-01

    This PhD thesis reports on the experimental investigation of the prompt photons created during the fragmentation of the carbon beam used in particle therapy. Two series of experiments have been performed at the GANIL and GSI facilities with 95 MeV/u and 305 MeV/u 12 C 6+ ion beams stopped in PMMA and water phantoms. In both experiments a clear correlation was obtained between the C-ion range and the prompt photon profile. A major issue of these measurements is the discrimination between the prompt photon signal (which is correlated with the ion path) and a vast neutron background uncorrelated with the Bragg-Peak position. Two techniques are employed to allow for this photon-neutron discrimination: the time-of-flight (TOF) and the pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD). The TOF technique allowed demonstrating the correlation of the prompt photon production and the primary ion path while the PSD technique brought great insights to better understand the photon and neutron contribution in TOF spectra. In this work we demonstrated that a collimated set-up detecting prompt photons by means of TOF measurements, could allow real-time control of the longitudinal position of the Bragg-peak under clinical conditions. In the second part of the PhD thesis a simulation study was performed with Geant4 Monte Carlo code to assess the influence of the main design parameters on the efficiency and spatial resolution achievable with a multidetector and multi-collimated Prompt Gamma Camera. Several geometrical configurations for both collimators and stack of detectors have been systematically studied and the considerations on the main design constraints are reported. (author)

  11. Influence of the physical environment on treatment effect in exercise therapy for knee or hip pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Louise Fleng

    treatment outcomes in other health-care settings, such as rehabilitation and exercise therapy settings. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the role of the physical environment as a contributor to context effects in the treatment response from exercise therapy as treatment for muskuloskeletal pain......Context effects are defined as the effects of a given treatment, not directly caused by the treatment itself, but, rather, caused by the context in which the treatment is delivered. The patient-practitioner relationship is a known context factor, but it is hard to standardize across health-care...... settings. The physical environment is easier to standardize and may act as a context factor and influence treatment outcomes. Studies from hospital environments have shown that the physical environment influences health outcomes, patients, and clinicians. It is unknown if the physical environment affects...

  12. Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A P; Rowe, B H

    2000-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy is a form of chest physical therapy including chest percussion and postural drainage to remove lung secretions. These are applied commonly to patients with both acute and chronic airway diseases. Despite controversies in the literature regarding its efficacy, it remains in use in a variety of clinical settings. The various forms of this therapy are labour intensive and need to be evaluated. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of bronchial hygiene physical therapy in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles up to July 1997. We also wrote to study authors. Randomised trials in which postural drainage, chest percussion, vibration, chest shaking, directed coughing or forced exhalation technique was compared to other drainage or breathing techniques, placebo or no treatment. Two reviewers applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria on masked publications independently. They assessed the trial quality independently. Only data from the first arm of crossover trials were included. The seven included trials involved six comparisons and a total of 126 people. The trials were small and not generally of high quality. The results could not be combined as trials addressed different patient groups and outcomes. In most comparisons, bronchial hygiene physical therapy produced no significant effects on pulmonary function, apart from clearing sputum in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in bronchiectasis. There is not enough evidence to support or refute the use of bronchial hygiene physical therapy in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

  13. WITHDRAWN: Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Arthur P; Rowe, Brian H

    2011-07-06

    Bronchopulmonary hygiene physical therapy is a form of chest physical therapy including chest percussion and postural drainage to remove lung secretions. These are applied commonly to patients with both acute and chronic airway diseases. Despite controversies in the literature regarding its efficacy, it remains in use in a variety of clinical settings. The various forms of this therapy are labour intensive and need to be evaluated. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of bronchial hygiene physical therapy in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and reference lists of articles up to January 2007. We also wrote to study authors. Randomised trials in which postural drainage, chest percussion, vibration, chest shaking, directed coughing or forced exhalation technique was compared to other drainage or breathing techniques, placebo or no treatment. Two reviewers applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria on masked publications independently. They assessed the trial quality independently. Only data from the first arm of crossover trials were included. The seven included trials involved six comparisons and a total of 126 people. The trials were small and not generally of high quality. The results could not be combined as trials addressed different patient groups and outcomes. In most comparisons, bronchial hygiene physical therapy produced no significant effects on pulmonary function, apart from clearing sputum in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in bronchiectasis. An update search carried out in January 2007 did not identify any new studies for inclusion. There is not enough evidence to support or refute the use of bronchial hygiene physical therapy in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis.

  14. Physics of epi-thermal boron neutron capture therapy (epi-thermal BNCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Ryoichi; Wakisaka, Yushi; Morimoto, Nami; Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Toki, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The physics of epi-thermal neutrons in the human body is discussed in the effort to clarify the nature of the unique radiologic properties of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). This discussion leads to the computational method of Monte Carlo simulation in BNCT. The method is discussed through two examples based on model phantoms. The physics is kept at an introductory level in the discussion in this tutorial review.

  15. Physics of radiation therapy of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment of head and neck cancers probably requires more individual planning than for any other cancer site because of the large number of variables that exist. The fact that tumors may be superficial or relatively deep-seated, the complex shape of the head and neck region, the presence of significant inhomogeneities such as bone and air spaces, and the need to spare critical structures such as the eyes or central nervous system all add to the need for careful considerations of the physical parameters involved in radiotherapy. In addition, the high mobility of the head allows it to assume a wide variety of positions so that techniques have had to be developed for careful simulation, repositioning, and immobilization during treatment. In the head and neck region shaping of the beam becomes important, and therefore, blocked fields, compensators, or wedges are often used. Although the specific radiotherapy techniques for each site of head and neck cancer are described in the various chapters of this book, a general description of the various types of radiation beams, radioactive sources, beam modifiers, treatment planning techniques, and treatment implementation is given in this chapter. The discussion is divided into three main categories: (1) external beam, (2) brachytherapy, and (3) simulation and immobilization

  16. Particle accelerators from Big Bang physics to hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical physicist Victor “Viki” Weisskopf, Director-General of CERN from 1961 to 1965, once “There are three kinds of physicists, namely the machine builders, the experimental physicists, and the theoretical physicists. […] The machine builders are the most important ones, because if they were not there, we would not get into this small-scale region of space. If we compare this with the discovery of America, the machine builders correspond to captains and ship builders who really developed the techniques at that time. The experimentalists were those fellows on the ships who sailed to the other side of the world and then landed on the new islands and wrote down what they saw. The theoretical physicists are those who stayed behind in Madrid and told Columbus that he was going to land in India.” Rather than focusing on the theoretical physicists, as most popular science books on particle physics do, this beautifully written and also entertaining book is different in that, firstly, the main foc...

  17. Microbeam radiation therapy. Physical and biological aspects of a new cancer therapy and development of a treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartzsch, Stefan

    2014-11-05

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is a novel treatment strategy against cancer. Highly brilliant synchrotron radiation is collimated to parallel, a few micrometre wide, planar beams and used to irradiate malignant tissues with high doses. The applied peak doses are considerably higher than in conventional radiotherapy, but valley doses between the beams remain underneath the established tissue tolerance. Previous research has shown that these beam geometries spare normal tissue, while being effective in tumour ablation. In this work physical and biological aspects of the therapy were investigated. A therapy planning system was developed for the first clinical treatments at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble (France) and a dosimetry method based on radiochromic films was created to validate planned doses with measurements on a micrometre scale. Finally, experiments were carried out on a cellular level in order to correlate the physically planned doses with the biological damage caused in the tissue. The differences between Monte Carlo dose and dosimetry are less than 10% in the valley and 5% in the peak regions. Developed alternative faster dose calculation methods deviate from the computational intensive MC simulations by less than 15% and are able to determine the dose within a few minutes. The experiments in cell biology revealed an significant influence of intercellular signalling on the survival of cells close to radiation boundaries. These observations may not only be important for MRT but also for conventional radiotherapy.

  18. Factors influencing the use of outcome measures in physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedge, Frances M; Braswell-Christy, Jennifer; Brown, Cynthia J; Foley, Kathleen T; Graham, Cecilia; Shaw, Sharon

    2012-02-01

    Use of outcome measures in physical therapy practice is central to evaluating the effectiveness of treatment interventions, providing accountability and addressing quality of physical therapy programs. There is limited discussion on barriers and facilitators to using outcome measures in physical therapy practice. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence a physical therapist when deciding to use outcome measures in clinical practice. Participants were 21 physical therapists, seven each from skilled nursing facilities, outpatient clinics, and inpatient rehabilitation facilities. A grounded theory approach was used for interview and data collection. Common themes were determined from the data and a theory developed to explain the rationale behind physical therapists' decisions to use or not use outcome measures in clinical practice. Three overlapping themes related to (1) concepts of time, (2) knowledge, and (3) facility culture were indentified as factors influencing the use of outcome measures. A fourth encompassing theme, professionalism, identified the value placed on the use of outcome measures in practice. Data revealed that therapists require more information on the outcome measures available, and this information needs to be easily accessible within the workplace. Therapists value information generated by using outcome measures in the clinical setting, but need information on what measures are available and psychometric properties. Information must be easily accessible and measures easy to use. Newer graduates and recent learners have a foundation in the use of outcome measures, but more needs to be done in the clinic and through continuing education to promote increased use and understanding.

  19. Variational principles

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2004-01-01

    This graduate-level text's primary objective is to demonstrate the expression of the equations of the various branches of mathematical physics in the succinct and elegant form of variational principles (and thereby illuminate their interrelationship). Its related intentions are to show how variational principles may be employed to determine the discrete eigenvalues for stationary state problems and to illustrate how to find the values of quantities (such as the phase shifts) that arise in the theory of scattering. Chapter-by-chapter treatment consists of analytical dynamics; optics, wave mecha

  20. Proton therapy with spot scanning: the Rinecker Proton Therapy Center in Munich. Part 2: Technical and physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchert, H. J.; Mayr, M.; Schneider, R. A.; Arnold, M. R.; Geismar, D. E.; Wilms, M.; Wisser, L.; Herbst, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Rinecker Proton Therapy Center (RPTC) in Munich is about to introduce into clinical radiation therapy, a 2D scanning technique (spot scanning) of a single proton pencil beam. It will be available at four gantries and a fifth treatment room allocates a fixed beam unit for a scattering technique. A superconducting cyclotron extracts protons with a constant energy of 250 MeV. Far upstream of the patient follows modulation of the energy with a degrader according to the prescription of the patients treatment planning. A 10 mm pencil beam at full width of half maximum (FWHM) will enable scanning of individual tumour volumes at any depth i.e. 1 minute for a target volume of 1 litre and a dose of 2 Gy. Innovative solutions will be established for other important issues such as dosimetric monitoring, safety concepts and positioning of the patient. The physical characteristics of proton beam spot scanning offer exceptional possibilities in conformal radiation therapy. Together with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) it significantly improves the sparing of organs at risk and of healthy tissues. (author)

  1. Assessing participants' perceptions on group-based principles for action in community-based health enhancing physical activity programmes: The APEF tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herens, Marion; Wagemakers, Annemarie

    2017-12-01

    In community-based health enhancing physical activity (CBHEPA) programmes, group-based principles for action such as active participation, enjoyment, and fostering group processes are widely advocated. However, not much is known about participants' perceptions of these principles as there are no assessment tools available. Therefore, this article describes the development of the APEF (Active Participation, Enjoyment, and Fostering group processes) tool and reports on its implementation in a Dutch CBHEPA programme. Indicators for the principles have been identified from literature research, interviews with professionals, and secondary analysis of three group interviews with 11 practitioners. To address the identified indicators, the APEF tool was developed, pretested, and used in 10 focus groups with 76 participants. The APEF tool consists of eight statements about group-based principles for action, on which CBHEPA participants vote, followed by in-depth discussion. The voting procedure engages participants. Spider diagrams visualise participants' perceptions of group-based principles. The APEF tool addresses the challenge of relating group level outcomes to individual outcomes such as physical activity behaviour. The tool facilitates as well as evaluates group-based principles for action, it stimulates dialogue and is culturally sensitive, but it needs strong facilitating skills to manage group dynamics. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings: Evidence from a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2015-12-01

    Increased accountability and growing fiscal limitations in global health care continue to challenge how occupational therapy practices are undertaken. Little is known about how these changes affect current practice in acute hospital settings. This article reviews the relevant literature to further understanding of occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings. A scoping review of five electronic databases was completed using the keywords Occupational therapy, acute hospital settings/acute physical hospital settings, acute care setting/acute care hospital setting, general medicine/general medical wards, occupational therapy service provision/teaching hospitals/tertiary care hospitals. Criteria were applied to determine suitability for inclusion and the articles were analysed to uncover key themes. In total 34 publications were included in the review. Analysis of the publications revealed four themes: (1) Comparisons between the practice of novice and experienced occupational therapists in acute care (2) Occupational therapists and the discharge planning process (3) Role of occupation in the acute care setting and (4) Personal skills needed and organisation factors affecting acute care practice. The current literature has highlighted the challenges occupational therapists face in practicing within an acute setting. Findings from this review enhance understanding of how occupational therapy department managers and educators can best support staff that practise in acute hospital settings. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  3. Sports Physical Therapy Section Poster Presentations (Abstracts SPO1-SPO166).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    These abstracts are presented here as prepared by the authors. The accuracy and content of each abstract remain the responsibility of the authors. In the identification number above each abstract, SPO designates a Sports Physical Therapy Section poster presentation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(1):A203-A276. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.48.1.A203.

  4. Physical Therapy Provision in Multiple Sclerosis Across Europe: A Regional Lottery?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řasová, K.; Martinková, Patrícia; Pavlíková, M.; Cattaneo, D.; Jonsdottir, J.; Henze, T.; Baert, I.; Van Asch, P.; Santoyo, C.; Smedal, T.; Beiske, A.G.; Stachowiak, M.; Kovalewski, M.; Nedeljkovic, U.; Bakalidou, D.; Alves-Guerreiro, J.; Nilsagard, Y.; Dimitrova, E.N.; Habek, M.; Armutlu, K.; Donzé, C.; Ross, E.; Ilie, A.M.; Martic, A.; Freeman, J.; Romberg, A.; Feys, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2015), s. 850-852 ISSN 1973-9087 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 260045/SVV/2014; GA UK(CZ) 260168/SVV/2015; Univerzita Karlova(CZ) Prvouk P34 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : organisation of physical therapy * multiple sclerosis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.063, year: 2015

  5. The gender gap in peer-reviewed publications by physical therapy faculty members: a productivity puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Regina R; Chevan, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Studies of peer-reviewed article publication by faculty in higher education show men publish more than women. Part of the difference in publishing appears to be attributable directly to gender. Gender differences in publishing productivity have not been explored in physical therapy. The purpose of this study was to explore effects of gender on peer-reviewed publication productivity in physical therapy. This was a cross-sectional study using survey methods. A survey was administered to a random sample of 881 physical therapy faculty members; 459 responses were used for analysis. Men were more likely than women to be married, have children, hold a PhD degree, be tenured or on a tenure track, and hold the position of department chair. There was a significant difference in peer-reviewed publication rates between male and female respondents. Negative binomial regression models revealed that female gender was a negative predictor of peer-reviewed publication, accounting for between 0.51 and 0.58 fewer articles per year for women than for men over the course of a career. Reasons for the gender differences are not clear. Factors such as grant funding, laboratory resources, nature of collaborative relationships, values for different elements of the teaching/research/service triad, and ability to negotiate the academic culture were not captured by our model. The gender gap in peer-reviewed publishing productivity may have implications for individuals and the profession of physical therapy and should be subject to further exploration.

  6. Simultaneous feedforward recruitment of the vasti in untrained postural tasks can be restored by physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Sallie M; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W; Crossley, Kay M; McConnell, Jenny

    2003-05-01

    Physical therapy rehabilitation strategies are commonly directed at the alteration of muscle recruitment in functional movements. The aim of this study was to investigate whether feedforward strategies of the vasti in people with patellofemoral pain syndrome can be changed by a physical therapy treatment program in a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Forty (25 female, 15 male) subjects aged 40 yrs or less (27.2+/-7.8 yrs). Subjects were allocated to either a placebo treatment or a physical therapy intervention program. The postural challenge used as the outcome measure was not included in the training program. Electromyography (EMG) onsets of vastus medialis obliquus (VMO), vastus lateralis (VL), tibialis anterior and soleus were assessed before and after the six week standardised treatment programs. At baseline the EMG onset of VL occurred prior to that of VMO in both subject groups. Following physical therapy intervention there was a significant change in the time of onset of EMG of VMO compared to VL with the onsets occurring simultaneously. This change was associated with a reduction in symptoms. In contrast, following placebo intervention the EMG onset of VL still occurred prior to that of VMO. The results indicate that the feedforward strategy used by the central nervous system to control the patella can be restored. Importantly, the data suggest that this intervention produced a change that was transferred to a task that was not specifically included in the training program. Furthermore, the change in motor control was associated with clinical improvement in symptoms.

  7. Psychometric Properties of a Standardized Observation Protocol to Quantify Pediatric Physical Therapy Actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonderer, Patrizia; Ziegler, Schirin Akhbari; Oertle, Barbara Gressbach; Meichtry, Andre; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Purpose: Pediatric physical therapy (PPT) is characterized by heterogeneity. This blurs the evaluation of effective components of PPT. The Groningen Observation Protocol (GOP) was developed to quantify contents of PPT. This study assesses the reliability and completeness of the GOP. Methods: Sixty

  8. Exploring the experiences of novice clinical instructors in physical therapy clinical education: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, B H; Bridges, P H; Phillips, T A; Drill, A N; Gaydosik, C D; Krishnan, A; Yandziak, H J

    2014-12-01

    To explore the perceptions of novice physical therapy clinical instructors (CIs) about their interactions and teaching behaviours with physical therapy students. A phenomenological approach using semi-structured interviews and a focus group. Six novice physical therapy CIs (less than two years as a CI and supervised fewer than three students) were recruited purposefully from a large metropolitan area in the USA. All participants were credentialed by the American Physical Therapy Association as CIs. Transcripts of interview data and focus group data were analysed using interpretative analysis for themes and subthemes. Participants viewed the transition of students from the classroom to the clinic as their primary role, using strategies of 'providing a way in', 'fostering critical thinking', 'finding a balance', 'overcoming barriers' and 'letting go'. While novice CIs showed skill in fostering student reflection and providing orientation, they struggled with student autonomy and balancing the competing obligations of patient care and clinical instruction. They expressed issues related to anxiety and lack of confidence. In the future, novice CIs could benefit from training and support in these areas. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Case Report Writing in a Doctor of Physical Therapy Education Program: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillyaw, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Case reports are an established form of scholarship used for teaching and learning in medicine and health care, but there are few examples of the teaching and learning activities used to prepare students to write a case report. This report describes the implementation of two courses that prepare physical therapy students to write and disseminate a…

  10. Curricular intersections of university extension and teaching in Physical Therapy programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamyr Sulyvan de Castro

    Full Text Available Introduction University extension can be a vehicle for social change and aid in the education of university students; however, it is important to study how it is inserted in university programs so that educational actions and policies can be planned more adequately. Objectives To study the insertion of extension activities in undergraduate physical therapy curricula in Brazilian federal universities. Method Documentary research conducted by accessing files available on the Internet. Data were analyzed quantitatively in the form of numbers and percentages. We examined documents from 22 of the 29 federal universities that offered physical therapy programs. Results University extension takes the form of complementary academic activities together with other options such as participating in conferences, specific training courses and working as a teaching assistant. Undergraduate physical therapy courses have a 4,000h to 4,925h course load, of which 0.72% to 8.9% are dedicated to extension activities. Conclusion The data indicate that the insertion of extension activities in undergraduate physical therapy programs offered by Brazilian federal universities needs to be reassessed according to recommended policies and guidelines.

  11. 17th World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) Congress 2015, Networking Session

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbelen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    IPTOP research survey. A survey was conducted with the participation of 11 of the 16 IPTOP Members representing 11 countries worldwide. Every country is interested in research in geriatric physical therapy, some are already very active while others are inactive at this moment. Funding differs

  12. Physical therapy in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parezanović-Ilić Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI is an involuntary release of urine through the urethra during the increase of abdominal pressure in the absence of m. detrusor contraction. The exercise of pelvic floor muscles is recommended as the first line of cure. It is the least invasive and the only method without any undesirable side effects, which leads to either improvement or complete cure of SUI in 80-85% of cases. Objective. The aim of this study was to establish whether the strengthening of pelvic floor muscles using proprioceptive neural facilitation (PNF spiral dynamic technique was more efficient in comparison to classical Kegel exercise. Methods. The research was carried out at the Centre for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Centre Kragujevac. Sixty-six female patients with the symptoms of SUI were monitored in the period of two years. Thirty-four patients did pelvic floor muscle exercises twice a day, in the morning and in the evening, with 15-20 contractions. Thirty-two patients used PNF spiral dynamic technique for strengthening pelvic floor muscles. The patients who used the spiral dynamic technique also did some exercises from the program; they exercised twice a day, in the morning and in the evening, following the prescribed schedule. Treatment outcome was assessed by measuring the pelvic floor muscles by a vaginal dynamometer. Results. The values of the pelvic floor muscle force that were measured using the vaginal dynamometer in both examined groups (PNF spiral dynamic technique or Kegel exercise were statistically significantly higher after the implemented exercise program (t-test; p=0.000. No statistically significant difference in pelvic floor muscle values was found between the patients who applied PNF spiral dynamic technique and those who did Kegel exercise either before or after the exercise (two-factor analysis of variance with repeated measurements, factor of exercise type; p=0.899. Conclusion

  13. Physical Therapy in the Treatment of Central Pain Mechanisms for Female Sexual Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandyken, Carolyn; Hilton, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    The complexity of female sexual pain requires an interdisciplinary approach. Physical therapists trained in pelvic health conditions are well positioned to be active members of an interdisciplinary team addressing the assessment and treatment of female sexual pain. Changes within physical therapy practice in the last ten years have resulted in significant utilization of pelvic floor muscle relaxation and manual therapy techniques to address a variety of pelvic pain conditions, including female sexual pain. However, sexual pain is a complex issue giving credence to the necessity of addressing all of the drivers of the pain experience- biological, psychological and social. This review aims to reconcile current pain science with a plan for integrating a biopsychosocial approach into the evaluation and subsequent treatment for female sexual pain for physical therapists. A literature review of the important components of skilled physical therapy interventions is presented including the physical examination, pain biology education, cognitive behavioral influences in treatment design, motivational interviewing as an adjunct to empathetic practice, and the integration of non-threatening movement and mindfulness into treatment. A single case study is used to demonstrate the biopsychosocial framework utilized in this approach. Appropriate measures for assessing psychosocial factors are readily available and inform a reasoned approach for physical therapy design that addresses both peripheral and central pain mechanisms. Decades of research support the integration of a biopsychosocial approach in the treatment of complex pain, including female sexual pain. It is reasonable for physical therapists to utilize evidence based strategies such as CBT, pain biology education, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), yoga and imagery based exercises to address the biopsychosocial components of female sexual pain. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine

  14. A systematic review of physical therapy interventions for patients with anorexia and bulemia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Vanderlinden, Johan; De Hert, Marc; Soundy, Andrew; Adámkova, Milena; Skjaerven, Liv Helvik; Catalán-Matamoros, Daniel; Lundvik Gyllensten, Amanda; Gómez-Conesa, Antonia; Probst, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to summarise the evidence from randomised controlled trials examining the effectiveness of physical therapy compared with care as usual or a wait-list condition on eating pathology and on physiological and psychological parameters in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. EMBASE, PsycINFO, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Physiotherapy Evidence Database and The Cochrane Library were searched from their inception until February, 2013. Articles were eligible if they utilised a randomised controlled trial design, compared physical therapy with a placebo condition, control intervention, or standard care and included patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. The methodological quality was assessed with the Jadad scale. Eight randomised controlled trials involving 213 patients (age range: 16-36 years) met all selection criteria. Three of the 8 included studies were of strong methodological quality (Jadad score≥3). Major methodological weaknesses were attrition and selection bias. The main results demonstrate that aerobic and resistance training result in significantly increased muscle strength, body mass index and body fat percentage in anorexia patients. In addition, aerobic exercise, yoga, massage and basic body awareness therapy significantly lowered scores of eating pathology and depressive symptoms in both anorexia and bulimia nervosa patients. No adverse effects were reported. The paucity and heterogeneity of available studies limits overall conclusions and highlights the need for further research. Implications for Rehabilitation Supervised physical therapy might increase weight in anorexia nervosa patients. Aerobic exercise, massage, basic body awareness therapy and yoga might reduce eating pathology in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Aerobic exercise, yoga and basic body awareness therapy might improve mental and physical quality of life in patients with an eating

  15. School-based physical therapy services and student functional performance at school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccoy, Sarah Westcott; Effgen, Susan K; Chiarello, Lisa A; Jeffries, Lynn M; Villasante Tezanos, Alejandro G

    2018-03-30

    We explored relationships of school-based physical therapy to standardized outcomes of students receiving physical therapy. Using a practice-based evidence research design, School Function Assessment (SFA) outcomes of 296 students with disabilities (mean age 7y 4mo [standard deviation 2y]; 166 males, 130 females), served by 109 physical therapists, were explored. After training, therapists completed 10 SFA scales on students at the beginning and end of the school year. Therapists collected detailed weekly data on services (activities, interventions, types, student participation) using the School-Physical Therapy Interventions for Pediatrics (S-PTIP) system. Stepwise linear regressions were used to investigate S-PTIP predictors of SFA outcomes. Predictors of SFA section outcomes varied in strength, with the coefficient of determination (R 2 ) for each outcome ranging from 0.107 to 0.326. Services that correlated positively with the SFA outcomes included mobility, sensory, motor learning, aerobic/conditioning, functional strengthening, playground access interventions, and higher student participation during therapy (standardized β=0.11-0.26). Services that correlated negatively with the SFA outcomes included providing services within student groups, within school activity, with students not in special education, during recreation activities, and with positioning, hands-on facilitation, sensory integration, orthoses, and equipment interventions (standardized β=-0.14 to -0.22). Consideration of outcomes is prudent to focus services. Overall results suggest we should emphasize active mobility practice by using motor learning interventions and engaging students within therapy sessions. No specific interventions predicted positively on all School Function Assessment (SFA) outcomes. Active movement practice seems related to overall better SFA outcomes. Active mobility practice improved SFA participation, mobility, recreation, and activities of daily living. Engaging

  16. Derivation of the blackbody radiation spectrum from the equivalence principle in classical physics with classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    A derivation of Planck's spectrum including zero-point radiation is given within classical physics from recent results involving the thermal effects of acceleration through classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation. A harmonic electric-dipole oscillator undergoing a uniform acceleration a through classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation responds as would the same oscillator in an inertial frame when not in zero-point radiation but in a different spectrum of random classical radiation. Since the equivalence principle tells us that the oscillator supported in a gravitational field g = -a will respond in the same way, we see that in a gravitational field we can construct a perpetual-motion machine based on this different spectrum unless the different spectrum corresponds to that of thermal equilibrium at a finite temperature. Therefore, assuming the absence of perpetual-motion machines of the first kind in a gravitational field, we conclude that the response of an oscillator accelerating through classical zero-point radiation must be that of a thermal system. This then determines the blackbody radiation spectrum in an inertial frame which turns out to be exactly Planck's spectrum including zero-point radiation

  17. [Modern approaches to the use of neurotropic physical therapy in arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhova, E M; Konchugova, T V; Kul'chitskaya, D B; Korchazhkina, N B; Egorova, L A; Chuich, N G

    2016-01-01

    The development and introduction into clinical practice of non-pharmacological methods for the prevention and treatment of arterial hypertension is a primary objective of modern physical therapy, especially as regards the neurotropic influences. This article was designed to report the results of the investigation into the hypotensive effect of transcerebral magnetic therapy obtained during the treatment of 60 patients presenting with arterial hypertension. The study included the comparative examination of two randomly formed groups containing 30 patients each. The patients of the main group received transcerebral magnetic therapy (to the frontal region) while those in the group of comparison were given magnetotherapy at the collar region. The study has demonstrated that transcerebral magnetic therapy given to the patients of the main group was a more efficient treatment than magnetotherapy at the collar region since it produced a more pronounced hypotensive effect irrespective of the initial hemodynamic type.

  18. Description of research design of articles published in four Brazilian physical therapy journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragiotto, Bruno T; Costa, Lucíola C M; Oliveira, Ronaldo F; Lopes, Alexandre D; Moseley, Anne M; Costa, Leonardo O P

    2014-01-01

    While the research design of articles published in medical journals and in some physical therapy journals has already been evaluated, this has not been investigated in Brazilian physical therapy journals. Objective : To describe the research design used in all articles published in Brazilian scientific journals that are freely available, have high Qualis rankings, and are relevant to physical therapy over a 7-year period. We extracted the bibliometric data, research design, research type (human or animal), and clinical area for all articles published. The articles were grouped into their level of evidence, and descriptive analyses were performed. We calculated the frequency, proportions of articles, and 95% confidence interval of these proportions with each research design in each journal. We cross-tabulated the clinical areas with research designs (expressed as number and percentages). A total of 1,458 articles from four Brazilian journals were found: Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia, Revista Fisioterapia em Movimento, Revista Fisioterapia e Pesquisa, and Revista Acta Fisiátrica. The majority of articles were classified as level II of evidence (60%), followed by level III (29%) and level I (10%). The most prevalent research designs were cross-sectional studies (38%), single-case or case-series studies, and narrative reviews. Most articles reported human research and were in the musculoskeletal, neurologic, and cardiothoracic areas. Most of the research published in Brazilian physical therapy journals used levels II and III of evidence. Increasing the publication rate of systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials would provide more high-quality evidence to guide evidence-based physical therapy practice.

  19. INTEGRATION BETWEEN MRI AND PHYSICAL THERAPY TO IMPROVE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Mohamed Elkhadir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder pain is the second most common musculoskeletal disorder treated by physical therapists. The cause for the shoulder pain is multifactorial. However, a specific diagnosis is crucial in the right management of shoulder dysfunction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of integrating the MRI for the accurate diagnosis and impact of this on rendering the effective physical therapy interventions in shoulder dysfunction patients. Methods: A retrospective study conducted on 14 patients who undergone an MRI with a 1.5 T unit MAGNETOM Symphony (Siemens, for their shoulder pain, where the diagnosis might be Muscle tears like, subscapularis, infraspinatus,supraspinatus and teres minor muscles; subacromial or subdeltoid bursitis and labral tears were included. All the subjects were then continued with usual physical therapy treatments for four weeks depending on their diagnosis which includes; advice, stretching, mobilization and strengthening exercises, manual therapy, massage, strapping, and electrotherapy . The outcome measures documented from the case sheet were; Visual Analogue Scale grade and passive range of motion of shoulder external / internal rotation and abduction. Results: Paired t test was used to compare the PROM between pre rehabilitation and post rehabilitation testing and the non parametric test, Mann Whitney U test was used for the comparison of VAS. All patients showed a significant improvement in VAS and PROM of abduction, internal and external rotation following physical therapy (P≤ 0.05. Conclusion: MRI is found to be a reliable method of diagnostic procedure for the shoulder pain and the integration of MRI and physical therapy to treat shoulder dysfunction leads to a better outcome.

  20. Physical therapy treatments for low back pain in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvo-Muñoz Inmaculada

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain (LBP in adolescents is associated with LBP in later years. In recent years treatments have been administered to adolescents for LBP, but it is not known which physical therapy treatment is the most efficacious. By means of a meta-analysis, the current study investigated the effectiveness of the physical therapy treatments for LBP in children and adolescents. Methods Studies in English, Spanish, French, Italian and Portuguese, and carried out by March 2011, were selected by electronic and manual search. Two independent researchers coded the moderator variables of the studies, and performed the effect size calculations. The mean effect size index used was the standardized mean change between the pretest and posttest, and it was applied separately for each combination of outcome measures, (pain, disability, flexibility, endurance and mental health and measurement type (self-reports, and clinician assessments. Results Eight articles that met the selection criteria enabled us to define 11 treatment groups and 5 control groups using the group as the unit of analysis. The 16 groups involved a total sample of 334 subjects at the posttest (221 in the treatment groups and 113 in the control groups. For all outcome measures, the average effect size of the treatment groups was statistically and clinically significant, whereas the control groups had negative average effect sizes that were not statistically significant. Conclusions Of all the physical therapy treatments for LBP in children and adolescents, the combination of therapeutic physical conditioning and manual therapy is the most effective. The low number of studies and control groups, and the methodological limitations in this meta-analysis prevent us from drawing definitive conclusions in relation to the efficacy of physical therapy treatments in LBP.

  1. Physical therapy 2.0: leveraging social media to engage patients in rehabilitation and health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Emily; Werstine, Robert J; Rasmussen-Pennington, Diane M; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Petrella, Robert J

    2015-03-01

    Care for chronic conditions and noncommunicable diseases is dominating health systems around the globe. For physical therapists, this strain presents a substantial opportunity for engaging patients in health promotion and disease management in the years to come. Examples of social media being used to engage consumers in the business landscape are pervasive, and research reports suggest that patients are ready for social media to be incorporated into the way health care systems deliver care. We propose that leveraging the power and utility of existing technologies, such as social media, could innovate the way physical therapists engage patients in rehabilitation and health promotion practices, thus contributing to the evolution of the profession: Physical Therapy 2.0. To continue to be relevant in the community, physical therapist practice must respond to patients' needs and expectations. Incorporating social media into how physical therapists are both designing and delivering care holds potential for enhancing patient engagement in prescribed health behaviors and improving treatment outcomes. This conceptual article presents the perspective that physical therapists can utilize social media to enhance care delivery and treatment outcomes. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  2. Physical therapies for Achilles tendinopathy: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common condition, causing considerable morbidity in athletes and non-athletes alike. Conservative or physical therapies are accepted as first-line management of AT; however, despite a growing volume of research, there remains a lack of high quality studies evaluating their efficacy. Previous systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence for non-surgical interventions for AT, but lack key quality components as outlined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) Statement. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis (where possible) of the evidence for physical therapies for AT management. Methods A comprehensive strategy was used to search 11 electronic databases from inception to September 2011. Search terms included Achilles, tendinopathy, pain, physical therapies, electrotherapy and exercise (English language full-text publications, human studies). Reference lists of eligible papers were hand-searched. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they evaluated at least one non-pharmacological, non-surgical intervention for AT using at least one outcome of pain and/or function. Two independent reviewers screened 2852 search results, identifying 23 suitable studies, and assessed methodological quality and risk of bias using a modified PEDro scale. Effect size calculation and meta-analyses were based on fixed and random effects models respectively. Results Methodological quality ranged from 2 to 12 (/14). Four studies were excluded due to high risk of bias, leaving 19 studies, the majority of which evaluated midportion AT. Effect sizes from individual RCTs support the use of eccentric exercise. Meta-analyses identified significant effects favouring the addition of laser therapy to eccentric exercise at 12 weeks (pain VAS: standardised mean difference −0.59, 95% confidence interval −1.11 to −0.07), as well as no differences in effect

  3. One-year evaluation of the effect of physical therapy for masticatory muscle pain : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craane, B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Stappaerts, K.; De Laat, A.

    Physical therapy is widely used to decrease pain and restore function in patients suffering from masticatory muscle pain. Controlled studies on its efficacy are scarce. This study evaluated the 1-year effect of a 6-week physical therapy programme in a single blind, randomized, controlled trial.

  4. Conservative treatment of lateral epicondylitis: brace versus physical therapy or a combination of both: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, P. A. A.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Assendelft, W. J. J.; van Dijk, C. N.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors evaluated the effectiveness of brace-only treatment, physical therapy, and the combination of these for patients with tennis elbow. METHODS: Patients were randomized over 3 groups: brace-only treatment, physical therapy, and the combination of these. Main outcome measures

  5. Physical Therapy Activities in Stroke, Knee Arthroplasty, and Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation: Their Variation, Similarities, and Association With Functional Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Hui; Putman, Koen; Smout, Randall J.; Horn, Susan D.; Tian, Wenqiang

    2011-01-01

    Background The mix of physical therapy services is thought to be different with different impairment groups. However, it is not clear how much variation there is across impairment groups. Furthermore, the extent to which the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional outcomes across different types of patients is unknown. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine similarities and differences in the mix of physical therapy activities used in rehabilitation among patients from different impairment groups and (2) to examine whether the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional improvement across impairment groups. Design This was a prospective observational cohort study. Methods The study was conducted in inpatient rehabilitation facilities. The participants were 433 patients with stroke, 429 patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and 207 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Measures used in this study included: (1) the Comprehensive Severity Index to measure the severity of each patient's medical condition, (2) the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) to measure function, and (3) point-of-care instruments to measure time spent in specific physical therapy activities. Results All 3 groups had similar admission motor FIM scores but varying cognitive FIM scores. Patients with TKA spent more time on exercise than the other 2 groups (average=31.7 versus 6.2 minutes per day). Patients with TKA received the most physical therapy (average=65.3 minutes per day), whereas the TBI group received the least physical therapy (average=38.3 minutes per day). Multivariate analysis showed that only 2 physical therapy activities (gait training and community mobility) were both positively associated with discharge motor FIM outcomes across all 3 groups. Three physical therapy activities (assessment time, bed mobility, and transfers) were negatively associated with discharge motor FIM outcome. Limitations The study

  6. Physical therapy activities in stroke, knee arthroplasty, and traumatic brain injury rehabilitation: their variation, similarities, and association with functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Gerben; Hsieh, Ching-Hui; Putman, Koen; Smout, Randall J; Horn, Susan D; Tian, Wenqiang

    2011-12-01

    The mix of physical therapy services is thought to be different with different impairment groups. However, it is not clear how much variation there is across impairment groups. Furthermore, the extent to which the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional outcomes across different types of patients is unknown. The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine similarities and differences in the mix of physical therapy activities used in rehabilitation among patients from different impairment groups and (2) to examine whether the same physical therapy activities are associated with functional improvement across impairment groups. This was a prospective observational cohort study. The study was conducted in inpatient rehabilitation facilities. The participants were 433 patients with stroke, 429 patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and 207 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Measures used in this study included: (1) the Comprehensive Severity Index to measure the severity of each patient's medical condition, (2) the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) to measure function, and (3) point-of-care instruments to measure time spent in specific physical therapy activities. All 3 groups had similar admission motor FIM scores but varying cognitive FIM scores. Patients with TKA spent more time on exercise than the other 2 groups (average=31.7 versus 6.2 minutes per day). Patients with TKA received the most physical therapy (average=65.3 minutes per day), whereas the TBI group received the least physical therapy (average=38.3 minutes per day). Multivariate analysis showed that only 2 physical therapy activities (gait training and community mobility) were both positively associated with discharge motor FIM outcomes across all 3 groups. Three physical therapy activities (assessment time, bed mobility, and transfers) were negatively associated with discharge motor FIM outcome. The study focused primarily on physical therapy without

  7. The Efficacy of Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies on Improving Physical Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, B Rhett; Grandjean, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the physical benefits of therapeutic horseback riding and hippotherapy and suggest directions for future research. Review of databases for peer-reviewed articles related to equine-assisted activities and therapies. Databases included MEDLINE via EBSCO, Web of Science, PubMed, Google Scholar, and Academic Search Complete. Articles were limited to those with full-text access published in English since 1987. Acute and residual improvements in physical benefits, such as gross motor function (e.g., walking, running, jumping), spasticity, muscle symmetry, posture, balance, and gait occur in adults and children with varying disabilities. The benefits appear to be greatest following multiweek interventions with one or more sessions per week. Modest acute cardiovascular responses are observed during equine-assisted activities and therapies with little or no evidence for training improvements in heart rate or blood pressure at rest or during riding. The present body of literature provides evidence that equine-assisted activities and therapies are an effective means of improving many measures of physical health. However, more controlled trials are urgently needed to strengthen the current knowledge base, establish dose-response characteristics of equine-assisted activities and therapies, and explore the physiologic basis for the promising results suggested from the literature.

  8. Are family-centred principles, functional goal setting and transition planning evident in therapy services for children with cerebral palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, J; Wiart, L; Magill-Evans, J; Ray, L; Andersen, J

    2012-01-01

    Family-centred service, functional goal setting and co-ordination of a child's move between programmes are important concepts of rehabilitation services for children with cerebral palsy identified in the literature. We examined whether these three concepts could be objectively identified in programmes providing services to children with cerebral palsy in Alberta, Canada. Programme managers (n= 37) and occupational and physical therapists (n= 54) representing 59 programmes participated in individual 1-h semi-structured interviews. Thirty-nine parents participated in eleven focus groups or two individual interviews. Evidence of family-centred values in mission statements and advisory boards was evaluated. Therapists were asked to identify three concepts of family-centred service and to complete the Measures of Process of Care for Service Providers. Therapists also identified therapy goals for children based on clinical case scenarios. The goals were coded using the components of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health. Programme managers and therapists discussed the processes in their programmes for goal setting and for preparing children and their families for their transition to other programmes. Parents reflected on their experiences with their child's rehabilitation related to family-centredness, goal setting and co-ordination between programmes. All respondents expressed commitment to the three concepts, but objective indicators of family-centred processes were lacking in many programmes. In most programmes, the processes to implement the three concepts were informal rather than standardized. Both families and therapists reported limited access to general information regarding community supports. Lack of formal processes for delivery of family-centred service, goal-setting and co-ordination between children's programmes may result in inequitable opportunities for families to participate in their children's rehabilitation despite

  9. Management of Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Clinical Guidance Statement From the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avin, Keith G.; Hanke, Timothy A.; Kirk-Sanchez, Neva; McDonough, Christine M.; Shubert, Tiffany E.; Hartley, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls in older adults are a major public health concern due to high prevalence, impact on health outcomes and quality of life, and treatment costs. Physical therapists can play a major role in reducing fall risk for older adults; however, existing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) related to fall prevention and management are not targeted to physical therapists. Objective The purpose of this clinical guidance statement (CGS) is to provide recommendations to physical therapists to help improve outcomes in the identification and management of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults. Design and Methods The Subcommittee on Evidence-Based Documents of the Practice Committee of the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy developed this CGS. Existing CPGs were identified by systematic search and critically appraised using the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research, and Evaluation in Europe II (AGREE II) tool. Through this process, 3 CPGs were recommended for inclusion in the CGS and were synthesized and summarized. Results Screening recommendations include asking all older adults in contact with a health care provider whether they have fallen in the previous year or have concerns about balance or walking. Follow-up should include screening for balance and mobility impairments. Older adults who screen positive should have a targeted multifactorial assessment and targeted intervention. The components of this assessment and intervention are reviewed in this CGS, and barriers and issues related to implementation are discussed. Limitations A gap analysis supports the need for the development of a physical therapy–specific CPG to provide more precise recommendations for screening and assessment measures, exercise parameters, and delivery models. Conclusion This CGS provides recommendations to assist physical therapists in the identification and management of fall risk in older community-dwelling adults. PMID:25573760

  10. Los principios de la terapia neural desde los fundamentos del nervismo hasta la neurociencia actual The principles of neural therapy from the foundations of nervism to current neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faneth Toscano De La Torre

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La terapia neural es un tipo de medicina alternativa de origen relativamente reciente, por lo cual constituye un sistema médico complejo en construcción. Hasta el momento, no se ha realizado una síntesis conceptual que permita formular los principios teóricos que sustentan su corpus doctrinario como sistema médico complejo. Objetivo: Formular los principios teóricos que sustentan el corpus doctrinario de la terapia neural. Metodología: Se revisó la literatura de la escuela neurofisiológica inglesa, la escuela rusa pavloviana, además de trabajos de investigación en el área de terapia neural, para poder realizar la formulación de los principios con un carácter general y de este modo sustentarlos en premisas que de preferencia cumplieran con las características de inducción cualitativa, las cuales desde la lógica peirceana confieren un alto grado de veracidad y rigurosidad lógico-científica. Resultados: Se realizó una síntesis lógica de las inferencias, de las que se obtuvieron 7 enunciados con el estatuto final de principio. Conclusiones: La descripción de los principios realizada en este trabajo es un aporte para la construcción del corpus doctrinario de la terapia neural como sistema médico complejo. Salud UIS 2012; 44 (2:57-65Introduction: Neural therapy is a type of alternative medicine of relatively recent origin, so is a complex medical system under construction. So far, it has not made a conceptual synthesis that allows formulating the theoretical principles underpinning its doctrinal corpus as complex medical system. Objective: To develop the theoretical principles that underlines the doctrinal corpus of neural therapy. Methodology: Literature review neurophysiological school English Russian Pavlovian school, in addition to research in the area of neural therapy, in order to make the formulation of a general principles and thus sustain them in premises of preference comply with the qualitative

  11. The Physical Therapy and Society Summit (PASS) Meeting: observations and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigin, Colleen M; Rodgers, Mary M; Wolf, Steven L

    2010-11-01

    The construct of delivering high-quality and cost-effective health care is in flux, and the profession must strategically plan how to meet the needs of society. In 2006, the House of Delegates of the American Physical Therapy Association passed a motion to convene a summit on "how physical therapists can meet current, evolving, and future societal health care needs." The Physical Therapy and Society Summit (PASS) meeting on February 27-28, 2009, in Leesburg, Virginia, sent a clear message that for physical therapists to be effective and thrive in the health care environment of the future, a paradigm shift is required. During the PASS meeting, participants reframed our traditional focus on the physical therapist and the patient/client (consumer) to one in which physical therapists are an integral part of a collaborative, multidisciplinary health care team with the health care consumer as its focus. The PASS Steering Committee recognized that some of the opportunities that surfaced during the PASS meeting may be disruptive or may not be within the profession's present strategic or tactical plans. Thus, adopting a framework that helps to establish the need for change that is provocative and potentially disruptive to our present care delivery, yet prioritizes opportunities, is a critical and essential step. Each of us in the physical therapy profession must take on post-PASS roles and responsibilities to accomplish the systemic change that is so intimately intertwined with our destiny. This article offers a perspective of the dynamic dialogue and suggestions that emerged from the PASS event, providing further opportunities for discussion and action within our profession.

  12. Physical therapy methods in the treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucherova, T. Ya.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Tuzikov, S. A.; Vusik, M. V.; Doroshenko, A. V.; Velikaya, V. V.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of the effective use of magnetic laser therapy in the treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients were presented. The effect of magnetic-laser therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced reactions in the patients with head and neck cancer and in the patients with breast cancer was analyzed. High efficiency of lymphedema and lymphorrhea treatment in the postoperative period in the patients with breast cancer was proved. The results of rehabilitation of the patients with gastric cancer after surgical treatment were presented. These data indicate a high effectiveness of different physical methods of treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients.

  13. The effect of pelvic floor physical therapy on sexual function in women complaining dyspareunia

    OpenAIRE

    Parvin Bastani; Sakineh Hajebrahimi; Fariba Ghaderi; Zahra Vakilazad; Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dyspareunia is a pain that is occurs in the genital area before, during or after intercourse and is an important factor for sexual dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor physical therapy on sexual function and muscle strength and endurance of pelvic floor (as a non-invasive therapy) in women with dyspareunia. Methods: In this clinical trial study, 32 women in the age range of 20-50-year-old and sexually active with complaints of dyspareun...

  14. Sex and couples therapy: a method of treatment to enhance physical and emotional intimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L

    1990-01-01

    It has been well documented that couples presenting for sex therapy frequently have difficulties in resolving conflict and in expressing emotional as well as physical intimacy. Recent studies have shown that intimacy is an important variable in determining the health or pathology in the dyadic system. Furthermore, the level of intimacy is influenced by a capacity for self disclosure and an ability to consider the partner's opinion. This paper describes a method of treatment that combines well-known strategies to treat sexual problems with a new approach to couples therapy, which encourages self-disclosure to facilitate mutual understanding, decrease conflict, and increase intimacy.

  15. [The physical therapy undergraduate students' responses to the gross human anatomy subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anahara, Reiko; Kawashiro, Yukiko; Matsuno, Yoshiharu; Mori, Chisato; Kohno, Toshihiko

    2008-09-01

    Instruction in gross human anatomy is one of the important items in the subject for co-medical students of the physical therapist course. The physical therapy undergraduate students are required to have a solid understanding of the structure and formation of the human body. Therefore, their good-understanding of the course on the gross human anatomy and their experience of the gross human anatomy laboratory (observation practice) are acquired to improve their knowledge of the human body. To clarify the student responses to the gross human anatomy course including the gross human anatomy laboratory, several questionnaires were administered to the freshman physical therapy undergraduate student for two years. We found that more than 80% of the students, who felt a negative attitude for gross human anatomy before the course started, had a positive attitude about the gross human anatomy after going through the course. The experience of the gross human anatomy laboratory increased the students' activity of learning and they thought more about the dignity of being human after the course than before viewing. In addition, the results suggested that the multiple experiences of the gross human anatomy course are useful for the physical therapy undergraduate students to improve the quality of their understanding of the human body.

  16. Use of Tablet Computers to Promote Physical Therapy Students' Engagement in Knowledge Translation During Clinical Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Kathryn; Barbosa, Sabrina; Jiang, Fei; Lee, Karin T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Physical therapists strive to integrate research into daily practice. The tablet computer is a potentially transformational tool for accessing information within the clinical practice environment. The purpose of this study was to measure and describe patterns of tablet computer use among physical therapy students during clinical rotation experiences. Methods: Doctor of physical therapy students (n = 13 users) tracked their use of tablet computers (iPad), loaded with commercially available apps, during 16 clinical experiences (6-16 weeks in duration). Results: The tablets were used on 70% of 691 clinic days, averaging 1.3 uses per day. Information seeking represented 48% of uses; 33% of those were foreground searches for research articles and syntheses and 66% were for background medical information. Other common uses included patient education (19%), medical record documentation (13%), and professional communication (9%). The most frequently used app was Safari, the preloaded web browser (representing 281 [36.5%] incidents of use). Users accessed 56 total apps to support clinical practice. Discussion and Conclusions: Physical therapy students successfully integrated use of a tablet computer into their clinical experiences including regular activities of information seeking. Our findings suggest that the tablet computer represents a potentially transformational tool for promoting knowledge translation in the clinical practice environment. Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A127). PMID:26945431

  17. Cooperation project: medical physics in cancer diagnosis and therapy in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, Ulrich; Zakaria, Golam Abu; Hoever, Karl-Heinz; Ahmad, Gias uddin; Akhter, Shaheen

    1999-01-01

    Bangladesh requires 200 radiotherapy facilities, 4 are in use; 400 medical physicists are needed, 3 are employed. On a private basis, a DGMP working group started in 1996, annual workshops on medical physics in cancer diagnosis and treatment, joined by many working physicists interested to become medical physicists. Basic topics were the principles, applications, acceptance, dosimetry and planning of 60 Co radiotherapy. In 1998, the Bangladesh association of physicists in medicine (BMPA) was founded, a young scientific society requiring international co-operation. The long experience in Medical Physics in India, its neighbouring country, could be very helpful in providing excellent medical physics courses. To absorb new technology and science, it is necessary to change the education policy; creativity and innovativeness must be valued more than the old knowledge, being replaced quickly by new knowledge and new technologies. (author)

  18. Radiation exposure and image quality in X-ray diagnostic radiology. Physical principles and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saebel, Manfred; Aichinger, Horst; Dierker, Joachim; Joite-Barfuss, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic X-rays are the largest contributor to radiation exposure to the general population, and protecting the patient from radiation damage is a major aim of modern health policy. Once the decision has been taken to use ionising radiation for imaging in a particular patient, it is necessary to optimize the image acquisition process taking into account the diagnostic quality of the images and the radiation dose to the patient. Both image quality and radiation dose are affected by a number of parameters, knowledge of which permits scientifically based decision making. The authors of this second edition of Radiation Exposure and Image Quality in X-ray Diagnostic Radiology have spent many years studying the optimization of radiological imaging. In this book they present in detail the basic physical principles of diagnostic radiology and their application to clinical problems. Particular attention is devoted to evaluation of the dose to the patient, the influence of scattered radiation on image quality, the use of antiscatter grids, and optimization of image quality and dose. The final section is a supplement containing tables of data and graphical depictions of X-ray spectra, interaction coefficients, characteristics of X-ray beams, and other aspects relevant to patient dose calculations. In addition, a complementary CD-ROM contains a user-friendly Excel file database covering these aspects that can be used in the reader's own programs. Since the first edition, the text, figures, tables, and references have all been thoroughly updated, and more detailed attention is now paid to image quality and radiation exposure when using digital imaging and computed tomography. This book will be an invaluable aid to medical physicists when performing calculations relating to patient dose and image quality, and will also prove useful for diagnostic radiologists and engineers. (orig.)

  19. What makes a reach movement effortful? Physical effort discounting supports common minimization principles in decision making and motor control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Morel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available When deciding between alternative options, a rational agent chooses on the basis of the desirability of each outcome, including associated costs. As different options typically result in different actions, the effort associated with each action is an essential cost parameter. How do humans discount physical effort when deciding between movements? We used an action-selection task to characterize how subjective effort depends on the parameters of arm transport movements and controlled for potential confounding factors such as delay discounting and performance. First, by repeatedly asking subjects to choose between 2 arm movements of different amplitudes or durations, performed against different levels of force, we identified parameter combinations that subjects experienced as identical in effort (isoeffort curves. Movements with a long duration were judged more effortful than short-duration movements against the same force, while movement amplitudes did not influence effort. Biomechanics of the movements also affected effort, as movements towards the body midline were preferred to movements away from it. Second, by introducing movement repetitions, we further determined that the cost function for choosing between effortful movements had a quadratic relationship with force, while choices were made on the basis of the logarithm of these costs. Our results show that effort-based action selection during reaching cannot easily be explained by metabolic costs. Instead, force-loaded reaches, a widely occurring natural behavior, imposed an effort cost for decision making similar to cost functions in motor control. Our results thereby support the idea that motor control and economic choice are governed by partly overlapping optimization principles.

  20. Empirical Comparison of Three Treatments for Adolescent Males with Physical and Sexual Aggression: Mode Deactivation Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Social Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Jennings, Jerry L.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Hunter, Linda A.; Siv, Alexander M.

    2005-01-01

    This research study compared the efficacy of three treatment methodologies for adolescent males in residential treatment with conduct disorders and/or personality dysfunctions and documented problems with physical and sexual aggression. The results showed that Mode Deactivation Therapy, an advanced form of cognitive behavioral therapy based on…

  1. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Jasper D; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G M; Staal, J Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2018-03-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of published systematic reviews.During the intake, the patient is screened for serious pathologies and corresponding patterns. Patients with cervical radiculopathy can be included or excluded through corresponding signs and symptoms and possibly diagnostic tests (Spurling test, traction/distraction test, and Upper Limb Tension Test). History taking is done to gather information about patients' limitations, course of pain, and prognostic factors (eg, coping style) and answers to health-related questions.In case of a normal recovery (treatment profile A), management should be hands-off, and patients should receive advice from the physical therapist and possibly some simple exercises to supplement "acting as usual."In case of a delayed/deviant recovery (treatment profile B), the physical therapist is advised to use, in addition to the recommendations for treatment profile A, forms of mobilization and/or manipulation in combination with exercise therapy. Other interventions may also be considered. The physical therapist is advised not to use dry needling, low-level laser, electrotherapy, ultrasound, traction, and/or a cervical collar.In case of a delayed/deviant recovery with clear and/or dominant psychosocial prognostic factors (treatment profile C), these factors should first be addressed by the physical therapist, when possible, or the patient should be referred to a specialist, when necessary.In case of neck pain grade III (treatment profile D), the therapy resembles that for profile B, but the use of a cervical collar for pain reduction may be considered. The advice is to use it sparingly: only for a short period per day and only for a few weeks.

  2. [Physical treatment methods for acne. Light, laser, photodynamic therapy and peeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, C; Korting, H C

    2010-02-01

    The medical treatment of acne is generally sufficient to meet the expectations of acne patients. However, in a number of situations additional therapeutic approaches may be advisable. There are a wide variety of useful physical methods. They range from electromagnetic waves, usually light, to peeling and manual therapy. Phototherapy of acne includes not just visible light but also laser and flash lamp therapy. The present review provides an overview on the evidence. Visible light, in particular blue light, provides an effective option for treatment of inflammatory acne. Photodynamic therapy also is efficacious; however, it should not be used because of an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. UV treatment of acne is obsolete. Newer studies on the use of a variety of laser systems and flash lamps have demonstrated in part rewarding results.

  3. Clinical Case Reporting in the Peer-Reviewed Physical Therapy Literature: Time to Move Toward Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Todd E

    2015-12-01

    Physical therapists increasingly are contributing clinical case reports to the health literature, which form the basis for higher quality evidence that has been incorporated into clinical practice guidelines. Yet, few resources exist to assist physical therapists with the basic mechanics and quality standards of producing a clinical case report. This situation is further complicated by the absence of uniform standards for quality in case reporting. The importance of including a concise yet comprehensive description of patient functioning in all physical therapy case reports suggest the potential appropriateness of basing quality guidelines on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) model. The purpose of this paper is to assist physical therapists in creating high-quality clinical case reports for the peer-reviewed literature using the ICF model as a guiding framework. Along these lines, current recommendations related to the basic mechanics of writing a successful clinical case report are reviewed, as well and a proposal for uniform clinical case reporting requirements is introduced with the aim to improve the quality and feasibility of clinical case reporting in physical therapy that are informed by the ICF model. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Our Journal Unites Us: Global Responsibilities and Possibilities for Pediatric Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sant, Ann F

    2018-04-01

    This article was designed to describe personal and social responsibilities for strengthening the science of pediatric physical therapy and effective international research collaboration and communication. Common flaws in research design and analysis are reviewed with recommendations for developing research students' design and analytical skills. Our social responsibility to be informed by global knowledge is highlighted. Barriers to scientific collaboration and communication including international disparities in scientific development and language barriers are presented. Suggestions to reduce these barriers are outlined. The importance of free access to scientific literature in developing countries is reviewed. The journal should assume a leadership role in building a strong science of pediatric physical therapy through encouraging personal and social responsibility in research and serving as a model of international collaboration and communication. Treatment for children with movement disorders will be improved by stronger science, international collaboration, and communication.

  5. Development and preliminary validation of an interactive remote physical therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anup K; Skubic, Marjorie; Abbott, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an interactive physical therapy system (IPTS) for remote quantitative assessment of clients in the home. The system consists of two different interactive interfaces connected through a network, for a real-time low latency video conference using audio, video, skeletal, and depth data streams from a Microsoft Kinect. To test the potential of IPTS, experiments were conducted with 5 independent living senior subjects in Kansas City, MO. Also, experiments were conducted in the lab to validate the real-time biomechanical measures calculated using the skeletal data from the Microsoft Xbox 360 Kinect and Microsoft Xbox One Kinect, with ground truth data from a Vicon motion capture system. Good agreements were found in the validation tests. The results show potential capabilities of the IPTS system to provide remote physical therapy to clients, especially older adults, who may find it difficult to visit the clinic.

  6. Effect of Payment Model on Patient Outcomes in Outpatient Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Derek; Boyd, Sylvester; Heckert, Logan; Lake, Austin; Petersen, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Although the literature has well recognized the effectiveness of physical therapy for treating musculoskeletal injuries, reimbursement is evolving towards value-based or alternative payment models and away from procedure orientated, fee-for-service in the outpatient setting. Alternative models include cased-based clinics, pay-for-performance, out-of-network services, accountable care organizations, and concierge practices. There is the possibility that alternative payment models could produce different and even superior patient outcomes. Physical therapists should be alert to this possibility, and research is warranted in this area to conclude if outcomes in patient care are related to method of reimbursement.

  7. Does multi-modal cervical physical therapy improve tinnitus in patients with cervicogenic somatic tinnitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, S; Van de Heyning, P; Truijen, S; Hallemans, A; De Hertogh, W

    2016-12-01

    Tinnitus can be related to many different aetiologies such as hearing loss or a noise trauma, but it can also be related to the somatosensory system of the cervical spine, called cervicogenic somatic tinnitus (CST). Case studies suggest a positive effect of cervical spine treatment on tinnitus complaints in patients with CST, but no experimental studies are available. To investigate the effect of a multimodal cervical physical therapy treatment on tinnitus complaints in patients with CST. Randomized controlled trial. Patients with a combination of severe subjective tinnitus (Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI): 25-90 points) and neck complaints (Neck Bournemouth Questionnaire (NBQ) > 14 points). All patients received cervical physical therapy for 6 weeks (12 sessions). Patients were randomized in an immediate-start therapy group (n = 19) and a 6-week delayed-start therapy group (n = 19). TFI and NBQ-scores were documented at baseline, after the wait-and-see period in the delayed-start group, after treatment and after 6 weeks follow-up. The Global Perceived Effect (GPE) was documented at all measuring moments, except at baseline. In all patients (n = 38) TFI and NBQ-scores decreased significantly after treatment (p = 0.04 and p tinnitus. This effect was maintained in 24% of patients after follow-up at six weeks. Cervical physical therapy can have a positive effect on subjective tinnitus complaints in patients with a combination of tinnitus and neck complaints. Larger studies, using more responsive outcome measures, are however necessary to prove this effect. NCT02016313. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Healthy kids out of school: using mixed methods to develop principles for promoting healthy eating and physical activity in out-of-school settings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Sarah A; Sharma, Shanti; Dietz, William H; Dolan, Peter R; Nelson, Miriam E; Newman, Molly B; Rockeymoore, Maya; Economos, Christina D

    2014-12-31

    Widespread practices supporting availability of healthful foods, beverages, and physical activity in out-of-school-time (OST) settings would further obesity prevention efforts. The objective of this article was to describe principles to guide policy development in support of healthy eating and physical activity practices in out-of-school settings to promote obesity prevention. The Institute of Medicine's L.E.A.D. framework (Locate Evidence, Evaluate it, Assemble it, and Inform Decisions) was used to identify practices relevant to children's healthful eating in most OST settings: 1) locate and evaluate information from a national survey of children's perceptions of healthful-food access; published research, reports, policies and guidelines; and roundtables with OST organizations' administrators; 2) assemble information to prioritize actionable practices; and 3) inform programmatic direction. Three evidence-informed guiding principles for short-duration OST resulted: 1) drink right: choose water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages; 2) move more: boost movement and physical activity in all programs; and 3) snack smart: fuel up on fruits and vegetables. Healthy Kids Out of School was launched to support the dissemination and implementation of these guiding principles in short-duration OST settings, complementing efforts in other OST settings to shift norms around eating and physical activity.

  9. Primed Physical Therapy Enhances Recovery of Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerley, Suzanne J; Byblow, Winston D; Barber, P Alan; MacDonald, Hayley; McIntyre-Robinson, Andrew; Stinear, Cathy M

    2016-05-01

    Recovery of upper limb function is important for regaining independence after stroke. To test the effects of priming upper limb physical therapy with intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a form of noninvasive brain stimulation. Eighteen adults with first-ever chronic monohemispheric subcortical stroke participated in this randomized, controlled, triple-blinded trial. Intervention consisted of priming with real or sham iTBS to the ipsilesional primary motor cortex immediately before 45 minutes of upper limb physical therapy, daily for 10 days. Changes in upper limb function (Action Research Arm Test [ARAT]), upper limb impairment (Fugl-Meyer Scale), and corticomotor excitability, were assessed before, during, and immediately, 1 month and 3 months after the intervention. Functional magnetic resonance images were acquired before and at one month after the intervention. Improvements in ARAT were observed after the intervention period when therapy was primed with real iTBS, but not sham, and were maintained at 1 month. These improvements were not apparent halfway through the intervention, indicating a dose effect. Improvements in ARAT at 1 month were related to balancing of corticomotor excitability and an increase in ipsilesional premotor cortex activation during paretic hand grip. Two weeks of iTBS-primed therapy improves upper limb function at the chronic stage of stroke, for at least 1 month postintervention, whereas therapy alone may not be sufficient to alter function. This indicates a potential role for iTBS as an adjuvant to therapy delivered at the chronic stage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COMBINED PHYSICAL THERAPY AND BALNEOTHERAPY TREATMENT ON CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    KARACA, Şahika Burcu; ÖZYEĞEN ASLAN, Sevgi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Low back pain is the mostcommonly reported individual complaint of musculoskeletal origin. It isgenerally repetitive, and leads to important socioeconomic outcomes. The aim ofthis study is toinvestigate the effects of physical therapy involving hot pack (HP), transcutaneouselectrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and therapeutic ultrasound (US) combinedwith balneotherapy on patients hospitalized due to chronic low back pain.Material and Methods: The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) sc...

  11. Design of Tangible Games for Children Undergoing Occupational and Physical Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Delden , Robby ,; Aarts , Pauline; Dijk , Betsy ,

    2012-01-01

    Part 6: Serious Games (Health and Social); International audience; Games can offer an entertaining alternative to repetitive tasks. In this paper, we propose the use of tangible interactive games for the repetitive training of upper limbs in the therapy of children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). We obtained promising results. The total of four created games succeeded in triggering all the to-be-trained movements properly and in a motivating and entertaining way. A physical quiz game was especially...

  12. Comparing conventional physical therapy rehabilitation with neuromuscular electrical stimulation after TKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael; McElroy, Karen; Stakich, Valerie; Cicco, Jodie

    2013-03-01

    Rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a costly, cumbersome, and often painful process. Physical therapy contributes to the successful outcome of TKA but can be expensive. Alternative methods of obtaining good functional results that help minimize costs are desirable. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a potential option. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation has been shown to increase quadriceps muscle strength and activation following TKA. Functional scores also improve following TKA when NMES is added to conventional therapy protocols vs therapy alone. The authors hypothesized that rehabilitation managed by a physical therapist would not result in a functional advantage for patients undergoing TKA when compared with NMES and an unsupervised at-home range of motion exercise program and that patient satisfaction would not differ between the 2 groups. Seventy patients were randomized into a postoperative protocol of conventional physical therapy with a licensed therapist, including range of motion exercises and strengthening exercises, or into a program of NMES and range of motion exercises performed at home without therapist supervision. Noninferiority of the NMES program was obtained 6 weeks postoperatively (Knee Society pain/function scores, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, flexion). Noninferiority was shown 6 months postoperatively for all parameters. The results suggest that rehabilitation managed by a physical therapist results in no functional advantage or difference in patient satisfaction when compared with NMES and an unsupervised at-home range of motion program. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation and unsupervised at-home range of motion exercises may provide an option for reducing the cost of the postoperative TKA recovery process without compromising quadriceps strength or patient satisfaction. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Comparison of the effect of pre- and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of pre-operative and post-operative physical therapy versus post-operative physical therapy alone on pain and recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty patients (18 males and 32 females) ranging in age from 48 to 80?years (mean 63.28, SD 9.44) participated in a 6-week two-arm randomized rater-blinded trial. One group received pre- and post-operative physical therapy whereas the other group ...

  14. Effects of intensive physical therapy on the motor function of a child with spastic hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Serrano-Gómez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physical therapy is a health profession whose object of study is the movement of the human body, therefore, it is responsible for cases involving motor development problems, as in the case presented here. Objective: To describe the short-term effect caused by intensive physical therapy treatment, performed with Therasuit, on motor function of a child with spastic right hemiparesis. Materials and methods: Descriptive qualitative research conducted based on the case study methodology with an observation period of two years. Results: The results include, besides the detection and diagnosis of the case, the analysis of information based on the application of the methodology and the observation of results in clinical trials to assess movement, design and implementation of a treatment plan using the Therasuit method. Conclusions: This case study makes possible to observe how the presence of a physical therapy program at a clinical practice institution allowed Therasuit method treatment to a four-year-old child diagnosed with right spastic hemiparesis sequelae, which improved gait and motor function.

  15. Physical therapy approaches to reduce fall and fracture risk among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karinkanta, Saija; Piirtola, Maarit; Sievänen, Harri; Uusi-Rasi, Kirsti; Kannus, Pekka

    2010-07-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries, such as fractures, are a growing problem among older adults, often causing longstanding pain, functional impairments, reduced quality of life and excess health-care costs and mortality. These problems have led to a variety of single component or multicomponent intervention strategies to prevent falls and subsequent injuries. The most effective physical therapy approach for the prevention of falls and fractures in community-dwelling older adults is regular multicomponent exercise; a combination of balance and strength training has shown the most success. Home-hazard assessment and modification, as well as assistive devices, such as canes and walkers, might be useful for older people at a high risk of falls. Hip protectors are effective in nursing home residents and potentially among other high-risk individuals. In addition, use of anti-slip shoe devices in icy conditions seems beneficial for older people walking outdoors. To be effective, multifactorial preventive programs should include an exercise component accompanied by individually tailored measures focused on high-risk populations. In this Review, we focus on evidence-based physical therapy approaches, including exercise, vibration training and improvements of safety at home and during periods of mobility. Additionally, the benefits of multifaceted interventions, which include risk factor assessment, dietary supplements, elements of physical therapy and exercise, are addressed.

  16. Physical therapy treatment in incontinent women provided by a Public Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela D'Attilio Toledo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Urinary incontinence affects more than 50 million people worldwide, it has a great impact on quality of life by affecting social, domestic, occupational and sex life, regardless of age. Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of physical therapy treatment in women attending the Urogynecology service of Hospital and Maternity Leonor Mendes de Barros. METHOD: We retrospectively assessed 65 records of patients with diagnosis of urinary incontinence treated between November 2005 and November 2006. In order to have their data analyzed, patients were divided into two groups; group MF, which underwent medical treatment and physiotherapy, and group M, which had only medical treatment. In order to compare both groups' quantitative data, the analysis was performed in Statistica® software using Mann Whitney's non-parametric test. The analysis of association between the quantitative variables was performed through the Chi-Square test at 5% (p > 0.05 significance level. RESULTS: We observed that 60.6% of patients who underwent physical therapy treatment and medical treatment had the urinary incontinence symptoms decreased or completely cured, while 80% of women belonging to the medical treatmen only-group underwent surgery. CONCLUSION: Thus, we conclude that physical therapy is essential in treatment protocols of urinary incontinence outpatient clinics and to prevent surgery.

  17. Effects of physical therapy in older women with urinary incontinence: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa S. Pereira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI is one of the most common public health problems among older women. Despite conservative treatment being recommended as the first treatment option, the effects of physical therapy in older women with UI is unclear. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to systematically review the evidence about the effects of physical therapy on urinary symptoms in older women with UI. METHOD: The literature search for studies evaluating conservative treatment for incontinent in elderly women was conducted on Pubmed/Medline, Lilacs, Scielo, ISI Web of Knowledge and PEDro. We selected clinical trials published in English and Portuguese after the year 2000. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the PEDro scale. The results were analyzed using a critical review method. RESULTS: Six studies were reviewed in full revealing that pelvic floor muscle training was the treatment option in most studies. Five of the six selected studies were classified as having high methodological quality. There was significant improvement in urinary symptoms after treatment in five of the six selected studies. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that physical therapy treatment seems to be effective to decrease urinary incontinence symptoms in older women. However, the small number of studies and the use of concurrent interventions limit the conclusions on this issue.

  18. Cosmological principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    The Cosmological Principle states: the universe looks the same to all observers regardless of where they are located. To most astronomers today the Cosmological Principle means the universe looks the same to all observers because density of the galaxies is the same in all places. A new Cosmological Principle is proposed. It is called the Dimensional Cosmological Principle. It uses the properties of matter in the universe: density (rho), pressure (p), and mass (m) within some region of space of length (l). The laws of physics require incorporation of constants for gravity (G) and the speed of light (C). After combining the six parameters into dimensionless numbers, the best choices are: 8πGl 2 rho/c 2 , 8πGl 2 rho/c 4 , and 2 Gm/c 2 l (the Schwarzchild factor). The Dimensional Cosmological Principal came about because old ideas conflicted with the rapidly-growing body of observational evidence indicating that galaxies in the universe have a clumpy rather than uniform distribution

  19. Future of medical physics: Real-time MRI-guided proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oborn, Bradley M; Dowdell, Stephen; Metcalfe, Peter E; Crozier, Stuart; Mohan, Radhe; Keall, Paul J

    2017-08-01

    With the recent clinical implementation of real-time MRI-guided x-ray beam therapy (MRXT), attention is turning to the concept of combining real-time MRI guidance with proton beam therapy; MRI-guided proton beam therapy (MRPT). MRI guidance for proton beam therapy is expected to offer a compelling improvement to the current treatment workflow which is warranted arguably more than for x-ray beam therapy. This argument is born out of the fact that proton therapy toxicity outcomes are similar to that of the most advanced IMRT treatments, despite being a fundamentally superior particle for cancer treatment. In this Future of Medical Physics article, we describe the various software and hardware aspects of potential MRPT systems and the corresponding treatment workflow. Significant software developments, particularly focused around adaptive MRI-based planning will be required. The magnetic interaction between the MRI and the proton beamline components will be a key area of focus. For example, the modeling and potential redesign of a magnetically compatible gantry to allow for beam delivery from multiple angles towards a patient located within the bore of an MRI scanner. Further to this, the accuracy of pencil beam scanning and beam monitoring in the presence of an MRI fringe field will require modeling, testing, and potential further development to ensure that the highly targeted radiotherapy is maintained. Looking forward we envisage a clear and accelerated path for hardware development, leveraging from lessons learnt from MRXT development. Within few years, simple prototype systems will likely exist, and in a decade, we could envisage coupled systems with integrated gantries. Such milestones will be key in the development of a more efficient, more accurate, and more successful form of proton beam therapy for many common cancer sites. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Mechanism-based classification of pain for physical therapy management in palliative care: A clinical commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain relief is a major goal for palliative care in India so much that most palliative care interventions necessarily begin first with pain relief. Physical therapists play an important role in palliative care and they are regarded as highly proficient members of a multidisciplinary healthcare team towards management of chronic pain. Pain necessarily involves three different levels of classification-based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Mechanism-based treatments are most likely to succeed compared to symptomatic treatments or diagnosis-based treatments. The objective of this clinical commentary is to update the physical therapists working in palliative care, on the mechanism-based classification of pain and its interpretation, with available therapeutic evidence for providing optimal patient care using physical therapy. The paper describes the evolution of mechanism-based classification of pain, the five mechanisms (central sensitization, peripheral neuropathic, nociceptive, sympathetically maintained pain and cognitive-affective are explained with recent evidence for physical therapy treatments for each of the mechanisms.

  1. Job satisfaction among academic coordinators of clinical education in physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M J; Fogel, M; Blacconiere, M

    1987-06-01

    The Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education is the physical therapy faculty member who is responsible for the clinical component of the curriculum. The responsibilities involved in the ACCE's job are such that ACCEs seem to be at risk for job dissatisfaction and burnout. The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the levels and patterns of job satisfaction among ACCEs in physical therapy. A questionnaire, including a 32-item job satisfaction inventory, was sent to the ACCE at each accredited entry-level education program for physical therapists and physical therapist assistants (N = 169). One hundred twelve (66.3%) responses were received and analyzed. Demographic characteristics of the respondents are reported. The results of the study showed that ACCEs, in general, expressed low levels of occupational dissatisfaction and burnout. Satisfaction with the aspects of the job involving self-esteem, achievement, and creativity seems to outweight dissatisfaction with the time available, the work load, and organizational efficiency. Those ACCEs with doctoral degrees expressed the highest levels of dissatisfaction and burnout. Those ACCEs working in entry-level master's degree programs expressed the lowest level of dissatisfaction; those in tenure-track positions expressed the lowest level of burnout. Factors contributing to job satisfaction and dissatisfaction are discussed.

  2. The Associations Between Physical Therapy and Long-Term Outcomes for Individuals with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in the SPORT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julie M.; Lurie, Jon D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Whitman, Julie M.; Delitto, Anthony; Brennan, Gerard P.; Weinstein, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context A period of non-surgical management is advocated prior to surgical treatment for most patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Currently, little evidence is available to define optimal non-surgical management. Physical therapy is often used, however its use and effectiveness relative to other non-surgical strategies has not been adequately explored. Purpose Describe the utilization of physical therapy and other non-surgical interventions by patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and examine the relationship between physical therapy and long-term prognosis. Study Design Secondary analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) combining data from randomized and observational studies. Setting 13 spine clinics in 11 states in the United States. Patient Sample Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis receiving non-surgical management including those who did or did not receive physical therapy within 6 weeks of enrollment. Outcome Measures Primary outcome measures included cross-over to surgery, the bodily pain and physical function scales changes from the Survey Short Form 36 (SF-36), and the modified Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome measures were patient satisfaction and the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index. Methods Baseline characteristics and rates of cross-over to surgery were compared between patients who did or did not receive physical therapy. Baseline factors predictive of receiving physical therapy were examined with logistic regression. Mixed effects models were used to compare outcomes between groups at 3 and 6 months, and 1 year after enrollment adjusted for baseline severity and patient characteristics. Results Physical therapy was used in the first 6 weeks by 90 of 244 patients (37%) and was predicted by the absence of radiating pain and being single instead of married. Physical therapy was associated with a reduced likelihood of cross-over to surgery after 1 year (21% vs 33%, p=0.045), and greater reductions on the SF-36

  3. Comparison between massage and routine physical therapy in women with sub acute and chronic nonspecific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Fahimeh; Panahi, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi, Samaneh; Abbasi, Leila

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the comparison of massage therapy and routine physical therapy on patients with sub acute and chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty volunteer female subjects with a sub acute or chronic nonspecific low back pain were randomly enrolled in two groups, massage therapy and routine physical therapy. After massage application, the hamstring and paravertebral muscles stretching and also stabilizing exercises were prescribed. In the routine physical therapy group, TENS, US and vibrator were used besides exercises. Pain intensity according to Numerical Rating Scale, functional disability level in accordance to Oswestry Disability Index, and modified Schober test, for measurement of flexion range of motion, before and after ten sessions of treatment were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Pain intensity, Oswestry Disability Index and flexion range of motion had shown significant differences before and after intervention in both groups (ppain intensity and Oswestry Disability Index compared to routine physical therapy (p=0.015, p=0.013 respectively), but the range of motion changes were not significant between two groups (p=1.00). It can be concluded that both massage therapy and routine physical therapy are useful for sub acute and chronic nonspecific low back pain treatment especially if accompanied with exercise. However, massage is more effective than other electrotherapy modalities, and it can be used alone or with electrotherapy for the treatment of patients with low back pain.

  4. Combination of brain-computer interface training and goal-directed physical therapy in chronic stroke: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broetz, Doris; Braun, Christoph; Weber, Cornelia; Soekadar, Surjo R; Caria, Andrea; Birbaumer, Niels

    2010-09-01

    There is no accepted and efficient rehabilitation strategy to reduce focal impairments for patients with chronic stroke who lack residual movements. A 67-year-old hemiplegic patient with no active finger extension was trained with a brain-computer interface (BCI) combined with a specific daily life-oriented physiotherapy. The BCI used electrical brain activity (EEG) and magnetic brain activity (MEG) to drive an orthosis and a robot affixed to the patient's affected upper extremity, which enabled him to move the paralyzed arm and hand driven by voluntary modulation of micro-rhythm activity. In addition, the patient practiced goal-directed physiotherapy training. Over 1 year, he completed 3 training blocks. Arm motor function, gait capacities (using Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Wolf Motor Function Test, Modified Ashworth Scale, 10-m walk speed, and goal attainment score), and brain reorganization (functional MRI, MEG) were repeatedly assessed. The ability of hand and arm movements as well as speed and safety of gait improved significantly (mean 46.6%). Improvement of motor function was associated with increased micro-oscillations in the ipsilesional motor cortex. This proof-of-principle study suggests that the combination of BCI training with goal-directed, active physical therapy may improve the motor abilities of chronic stroke patients despite apparent initial paralysis.

  5. Manual Physical Therapy Following Immobilization for Stable Ankle Fracture: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Elizabeth E; Deyle, Gail D; Allen, Christopher; Petersen, Evan J; Croy, Theodore; Rivera, Kenneth P

    2015-09-01

    Case series. Ankle fractures commonly result in persistent pain, stiffness, and functional impairments. There is insufficient evidence to favor any particular rehabilitation approach after ankle fracture. The purpose of this case series was to describe an impairment-based manual physical therapy approach to treating patients with conservatively managed ankle fractures. Patients with stable ankle fractures postimmobilization were treated with manual physical therapy and exercise targeted at associated impairments in the lower limb. The primary outcome measure was the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Secondary outcome measures included the ankle lunge test, numeric pain-rating scale, and global rating of change. Outcome measures were collected at baseline (performed within 7 days of immobilization removal) and at 4 and 12 weeks postbaseline. Eleven patients (mean age, 39.6 years; range, 18-64 years; 2 male), after ankle fracture-related immobilization (mean duration, 48 days; range, 21-75 days), were treated for an average of 6.6 sessions (range, 3-10 sessions) over a mean of 46.1 days (range, 13-81 days). Compared to baseline, statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements were observed in Lower Extremity Functional Scale score (P = .001; mean change, 21.9 points; 95% confidence interval: 10.4, 33.4) and in the ankle lunge test (P = .001; mean change, 7.8 cm; 95% confidence interval: 3.9, 11.7) at 4 weeks. These changes persisted at 12 weeks. Statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in self-reported function and ankle range of motion were observed at 4 and 12 weeks following treatment with impairment-based manual physical therapy. All patients tolerated treatment well. Results suggest that this approach may have efficacy in this population. Therapy, level 4.

  6. The effect of biofeedback physical therapy in men with Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornel, Erik B; van Haarst, Ernst P; Schaarsberg, Ria W M Browning-Groote; Geels, Jenet

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the symptoms of chronic non-bacterial prostatitis (CP) or Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS) may be due to or associated with pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. Therapies aimed to improve relaxation and proper use of the pelvic floor muscles such as biofeedback physical therapy and pelvic floor re-education are expected to give symptom improvement. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of biofeedback physical therapy on the symptoms of men with CPPS. Between March 2000 to March 2004, 33 consecutive men were diagnosed with CP/CPPS based on history including the NIH-CPSI questionnaire and physical examination including pelvic floor muscle tonus, urinalysis, uroflowmetry with residual urine measurement and transrectal ultrasonography of the prostate. All patients participated in a pelvic floor biofeedback re-educating program. A rectal EMG probe was used to measure resting tone of the pelvic floor muscles and was helpful for instruction pelvic floor muscles contraction and relaxation. Two of the 33 men dropped out. In the remaining 31 men, mean age 43.9 years (range 23-70), the mean total Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) changed from 23.6 (range 11-34) at baseline to 11.4 (range 1-25) after treatment (ppelvic floor muscle tonus was 4.9 at diagnosis (range 2.0-10.0) and decreased to 1.7 (range 0.5-2.8) after treatment (pphysical therapy and pelvic floor re-education for CP/CPPS patients, leading to a significant improvement of the symptom score. The correlation between the pelvic muscle tonus results with NIH-CPSI score is highly suggestive that the pelvic floor plays an important role in the pathophysiology of CP/CPPS.

  7. Effects of functional restoration versus 3 hours per week physical therapy: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Nathalie; Fanello, Serge; Bontoux, Luc; Dubus, Valérie; Billabert, Colette; Vielle, Bruno; Roquelaure, Yves; Penneau-Fontbonne, Dominique; Richard, Isabelle

    2004-03-01

    Randomized parallel-group comparative trial with a 6-month follow-up period. To compare, in chronic low back pain patients, the effectiveness of a functional restoration program, including intensive physical training, occupational therapy, and psychological support to an active individual therapy consisting of 3 hours physical therapy per week during 5 weeks. Controlled studies conducted in the United States showed a benefit of functional restoration in patients with low back pain, especially on return to work. Randomized Canadian and European trials had less favorable results. In France, there has been up to now no randomized study. Controlled studies suggested a positive effect of functional restoration programs. Eighty-six patients with low back pain were randomized to either the functional restoration (44 patients) or the active individual therapy (42 patients) program. One person in each group never started the program. Two patients did not complete the functional restoration program, and one was lost to follow-up at 6 months. The mean number of sick-leave days in the 2 previous years was 6 months. After adjustment on the variable "workplace enrolled in an ergonomic program", the mean number of sick-leave days was significantly lower in the functional restoration group. Physical criteria and treatment appreciation were also better. There was no significant difference in the intensity of pain, the quality of life and functional indexes, the psychological characteristics, the number of contacts with the medical system, and the drug intake. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a functional restoration program on important outcome measures, such as sick leave, in a country that has a social system that protects people facing difficulties at work.

  8. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. Method: One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath–neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. Results: After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone. PMID:25931655

  9. Tailored cognitive-behavioural therapy and exercise training improves the physical fitness of patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Koulil, S; van Lankveld, W; Kraaimaat, F W; van Helmond, T; Vedder, A; van Hoorn, H; Donders, A R T; Wirken, L; Cats, H; van Riel, P L C M; Evers, A W M

    2011-12-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia have diminished levels of physical fitness, which may lead to functional disability and exacerbating complaints. Multidisciplinary treatment comprising cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and exercise training has been shown to be effective in improving physical fitness. However, due to the high drop-out rates and large variability in patients' functioning, it was proposed that a tailored treatment approach might yield more promising treatment outcomes. High-risk fibromyalgia patients were randomly assigned to a waiting list control group (WLC) or a treatment condition (TC), with the treatment consisting of 16 twice-weekly sessions of CBT and exercise training tailored to the patient's cognitive-behavioural pattern. Physical fitness was assessed with two physical tests before and 3 months after treatment and at corresponding intervals in the WLC. Treatment effects were evaluated using linear mixed models. The level of physical fitness had improved significantly in the TC compared with the WLC. Attrition rates were low, effect sizes large and reliable change indices indicated a clinically relevant improvement among the TC. A tailored multidisciplinary treatment approach for fibromyalgia consisting of CBT and exercise training is well tolerated, yields clinically relevant changes, and appears a promising approach to improve patients' physical fitness. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT00268606.

  10. Comparing Physical Therapy Accompanying Exercise with Only Exercise Treatments in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Yılmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigating and comparing the effects of exercise and physical therapy accompanying exercise treatments in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and Methods: Twenty three patients with mechanical type low back existing more than 3 months were included one of the exercise or the physical therapy+exercise groups according to their application sequence. Both of the groups performed lumbar flexion and extension exercises, strengthening of the lumbar and abdominal muscle exercises and iliopsoas, hamstring and quadriceps stretching exercises two times a day for 14 days. The physical therapy group was given hot pack+therapeutic ultrasound+ interferential current for 10 days additionally. Degree of the low back pain was evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS, range of joint motion was evaluated with hand finger floor distance (HFFD and Modified Schober test, functional status was evaluated with Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale and quality of life was evaluated with Short form-36 (SF-36 before and a month after the treatments. Results: In both groups (exercise group: average age 59 years, 21 females, 2 males; physical therapy group: average age 60 years, 20 females, 3 males pain intensity and HFFD decreased and Modified Schober increased, functionality recovered, pain and physical functions of SF-36 improved after the treatments. SF-36-physical role difficulty also improved in the exercise group. Decrease in pain, increase in HFFD andimproving of the functional status were all significantly more in the physical therapy group. There were no difference between the groups in terms of Modified Schober measurement and changes of the quality of life. Conclusions: Exercises and exercise+physical therapy are both effective in chronic low back pain. Successful results can be taken by addition of the physical therapy in patients who do not benefit sufficiently from exercise therapy. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2015;21: 73-8

  11. Fundamental principles of an anti-VEGF treatment regimen: optimal application of intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy of macular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzetta, Paolo; Loewenstein, Anat

    2017-07-01

    Intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy is now considered the gold standard for the treatment of various retinal disorders. As therapy has evolved, so too have the treatment regimens employed by physicians in clinical practice; however, visual outcomes observed in the real world have typically not reflected those reported in clinical trials. Possible reasons for this include a lack of consensus on treatment regimens and a lack of clarity about what the aims of treatment should be. The Vision Academy Steering Committee met to discuss the principles of an ideal treatment regimen, using evidence from the literature to substantiate each point. Literature searches were performed using the MEDLINE/PubMed database (cut-off date: March 2016) and restricted to English-language publications. Studies with fewer than ten patients were excluded from this review. The Steering Committee identified the following four key principles for the ideal treatment regimen for anti-VEGF management of retinal diseases: 1. Maximize and maintain visual acuity (VA) benefits for all patients 2. Decide when to treat next, rather than whether to treat now 3. Titrate the treatment intervals to match patients' needs 4. Treat at each monitoring visit. It is proposed that the adoption of a proactive and more personalized approach in the clinic such as a treat-and-extend regimen will lead to benefits for both the patient and the physician, through a reduction in the associated treatment burden and better utilization of clinic resources. Implementation of the four principles should also lead to better VA outcomes for each patient, with a minimized risk of vision loss.

  12. Use of a radiation therapy treatment planning computer in a hospital health physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    An onsite treatment planning computer has become state of the art in the care of radiation therapy patients, but in most installations the computer is used for therapy planning a diminutive amount of the day. At St. Mary's Hospital, arrangements have been negotiated for part time use of the treatment planning computer for health physics purposes. Computerized Medical Systems, Inc. (CMS) produces the Modulex radiotherapy planning system which is programmed in MUMPS, a user oriented language specially adapted for handling text string information. St. Mary's Hospital's CMS computer has currently been programmed to assist in data collection and write-up of diagnostic x-ray surveys, meter calibrations, and wipe/leak tests. The computer is setup to provide timely reminders of tests and surveys, and billing for consultation work. Programs are currently being developed for radionuclide inventories. Use of a therapy planning computer for health physics purposes can enhance the radiation safety program and provide additional grounds for the acquisition of such a computer system

  13. Use of physical therapy in a dog with bilateral severe plantigrade stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, Jennifer; Hayashi, Kei; Woelz, Jacqueline; Kim, Sun Young

    2015-01-01

    A 3.5 yr old spayed female Staffordshire terrier weighing 25.5 kg was presented with a 7 wk history of bilateral plantigrade stance in the pelvic limbs directly following an ovariohysterectomy procedure. Upon presentation, the dog had bilateral atrophy of the distal pelvic limb muscles, enlarged popliteal lymph nodes, and ulcerative wounds on the dorsa of her rear paws. Orthopedic examination revealed intact calcaneal tendons bilaterally and neurologic examination localized the lesion to the distal sciatic nerve. A diagnosis of compressive and stretch neuropathy was made affecting the distal sciatic nerve branches. Physical therapy modalities included neuromuscular electrical stimulation, ultrasound, and low-level laser therapy. Other therapeutic modalities included the use of orthotics and progressive wound care. The dog had increased muscle mass, return of segmental reflexes, return of nociception, and the ability to walk on pelvic limbs with higher carriage of the hock 15 mo following presentation. The use of custom orthotics greatly increased the quality of life and other physical therapy modalities may have improved the prognosis in this dog with severe bilateral plantigrade stance due to neuropathy.

  14. Botox combined with myofascial release physical therapy as a treatment for myofascial pelvic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lauren; Wyman, Allison; Mora, Nelsi; Miladinovic, Branko; Bassaly, Renee; Hoyte, Lennox

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report the effects of combined onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) injections and myofascial release physical therapy on myofascial pelvic pain (MFPP) by comparing pre- and posttreatment average pelvic pain scores, trigger points, and patient self-reported pelvic pain. Secondary outcomes were to examine posttreatment complications and determine demographic differences between patients with/without an improvement in pain. Materials and Methods This was an Institutional Review Board approved retrospective case series on women over 18 years with MFPP who received Botox and physical therapy between July 2006 and November 2014. Presence of trigger points and pelvic pain scores were determined by digital palpation of the iliococcygeus, puborectalis, obturator internus, and rectus muscles. Average pelvic pain scores (0–10) reflected an average of the scores obtained from palpation of each muscle. Self-reported improvement in pain was recorded as yes/no. Results Fifty women met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Posttreatment, patients had lower average pelvic pain scores (3.7±4.0 vs. 6.4±1.8, p=0.005), and fewer trigger points (44% vs. 100%, pphysical therapy under anesthesia can be effective in treating women with chronic pelvic pain secondary to MFPP. PMID:28261683

  15. Radionuclide assessment of the effects of chest physical therapy on ventilation in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeCesare, J.A.; Babchyck, B.M.; Colten, H.R.; Treves, S.

    1982-01-01

    This study assesses the use of /sup 81m/Kr scintigraphy as a measurement tool in evaluating the effectiveness of bronchial drainage with percussion and vibration on peripheral ventilation in patients with cystic fibrosis. Ten patients with cystic fibrosis participated. Each patient underwent a /sup 81m/Kr ventilation study and traditional pulmonary function tests. Forty-five minutes later, these studies were repeated before and after a chest physical therapy treatment. Each patient acted as his own control. All /sup 81m/Kr scintiscans were recorded and analyzed visually and numerically using a digital computer to assess distribution of ventilation. Visual analysis of the scintiscans indicated individual variation in treatment response: in some patients ventilation improved with therapy; in others, no change was noted; still others had changes independent of treatment. Numerical data derived from the scintiscans and pulmonary function tests showed no important differences among the three studies of each patient. Airway abnormalities characteristic of cystic fibrosis, progression of the disease, sputum production, or a combination of these factors may account for the individual variation in response to treatment. /sup 81m/Kr scintigraphy is a reliable measure of regional ventilation and should be useful for assessing the efficacy of chest physical therapy because of the consistent, high quality visual data retrieved

  16. Core domain and outcome measurement sets for shoulder pain trials are needed: Systematic review of physical therapy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Page (Matthew J.); J.E. McKenzie (Joanne E.); S.E. Green (Sally E.); D.E. Beaton (Dorcas E.); N.B. Jain (Nitin B.); M. Lenza (Mario); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); S. Surace (Stephen); J. Deitch (Jessica); R. Buchbinder (Rachelle)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To explore the outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in published randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions for shoulder pain (rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, or nonspecific shoulder pain). Study Design and Setting We included

  17. Basic principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Some basic explanations are given of the principles underlying the nuclear fuel cycle, starting with the physics of atomic and nuclear structure and continuing with nuclear energy and reactors, fuel and waste management and finally a discussion of economics and the future. An important aspect of the fuel cycle concerns the possibility of ''closing the back end'' i.e. reprocessing the waste or unused fuel in order to re-use it in reactors of various kinds. The alternative, the ''oncethrough'' cycle, discards the discharged fuel completely. An interim measure involves the prolonged storage of highly radioactive waste fuel. (UK)

  18. Holistic Medicine IV: Principles of Existential Holistic Group Therapy and the Holistic Process of Healing in a Group Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In existential holistic group therapy, the whole person heals in accordance with the holistic process theory and the life mission theory. Existential group psychotherapy addresses the emotional aspect of the human mind related to death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness, while existential holistic group therapy addresses the state of the person�s wholeness. This includes the body, the person�s philosophy of life, and often also love, purpose of life, and the spiritual dimension, to the same extent as it addresses the emotional psyche and sexuality, and it is thus much broader than traditional psychotherapy.Where existential psychotherapy is rather depressing concerning the fundamental human condition, existential holistic therapy conceives life to be basically good. The fundamentals in existential holistic therapy are that everybody has the potential for healing themselves to become loving, joyful, sexually attractive, strong, and gifted, which is a message that most patients welcome. While the patient is suffering and fighting to get through life, the most important job for the holistic therapist is to keep a positive perspective of life. In accordance with these fundamentals, many participants in holistic group therapy will have positive emotional experiences, often of an unknown intensity, and these experiences appear to transform their lives within only a few days or weeks of therapy.An important idea of the course is Bohm�s concept of �holo-movement� in the group, resulting from intense coherence between the group members. When the group comes together, the individual will be linked to the totality and the great movement forward towards love, consciousness, and happiness will happen collectively � if it happens at all. This gives the individual the feeling that everything that happens is right, important, and valuable for all the participants at the same time. Native Americans and other premodern people refer to this

  19. Holistic medicine IV: principles of existential holistic group therapy and the holistic process of healing in a group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2003-12-23

    In existential holistic group therapy, the whole person heals in accordance with the holistic process theory and the life mission theory. Existential group psychotherapy addresses the emotional aspect of the human mind related to death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness, while existential holistic group therapy addresses the state of the person"s wholeness. This includes the body, the person's philosophy of life, and often also love, purpose of life, and the spiritual dimension, to the same extent as it addresses the emotional psyche and sexuality, and it is thus much broader than traditional psychotherapy. Where existential psychotherapy is rather depressing concerning the fundamental human condition, existential holistic therapy conceives life to be basically good. The fundamentals in existential holistic therapy are that everybody has the potential for healing themselves to become loving, joyful, sexually attractive, strong, and gifted, which is a message that most patients welcome. While the patient is suffering and fighting to get through life, the most important job for the holistic therapist is to keep a positive perspective of life. In accordance with these fundamentals, many participants in holistic group therapy will have positive emotional experiences, often of an unknown intensity, and these experiences appear to transform their lives within only a few days or weeks of therapy. An important idea of the course is Bohm's concept of "holo-movement" in the group, resulting from intense coherence between the group members. When the group comes together, the individual will be linked to the totality and the great movement forward towards love, consciousness, and happiness will happen collectively--if it happens at all. This gives the individual the feeling that everything that happens is right, important, and valuable for all the participants at the same time. Native Americans and other premodern people refer to this experience as "the spiritual design

  20. Occupational, Physical, and Speech Therapy Treatment Activities During Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Cynthia L; Dijkers, Marcel P; Barrett, Ryan S; Horn, Susan D; Giuffrida, Clare G; Timpson, Misti L; Carroll, Deborah M; Smout, Randy J; Hammond, Flora M

    2015-08-01

    To describe the use of occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), and speech therapy (ST) treatment activities throughout the acute rehabilitation stay of patients with traumatic brain injury. Multisite prospective observational cohort study. Inpatient rehabilitation settings. Patients (N=2130) admitted for initial acute rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury. Patients were categorized on the basis of admission FIM cognitive scores, resulting in 5 fairly homogeneous cognitive groups. Not applicable. Percentage of patients engaged in specific activities and mean time patients engaged in these activities for each 10-hour block of time for OT, PT, and ST combined. Therapy activities in OT, PT, and ST across all 5 cognitive groups had a primary focus on basic activities. Although advanced activities occurred in each discipline and within each cognitive group, these advanced activities occurred with fewer patients and usually only toward the end of the rehabilitation stay. The pattern of activities engaged in was both similar to and different from patterns seen in previous practice-based evidence studies with different rehabilitation diagnostic groups. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.