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Sample records for therapy patient tracking

  1. Adaptive radiation therapy for postprostatectomy patients using real-time electromagnetic target motion tracking during external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M; Gay, Hiram A; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J

    2013-03-15

    Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (Dmin) with the planned Dmin to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV Dmin is at least 95% of the planned CTV Dmin. Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: -0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Verification of Accuracy of CyberKnife Tumor-tracking Radiation Therapy Using Patient-specific Lung Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jinhong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Si Yeol, E-mail: coocoori@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang Min; Kwak, Jungwon; Yoon, KyoungJun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Wonsik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seong-Yun [Asan Institute for Life Science, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Kyung; Cho, Byungchul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of the CyberKnife Xsight Lung Tracking System (XLTS) compared with that of a fiducial-based target tracking system (FTTS) using patient-specific lung phantoms. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional printing technology was used to make individualized lung phantoms that closely mimicked the lung anatomy of actual patients. Based on planning computed tomographic data from 6 lung cancer patients who underwent stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using the CyberKnife, the volume above a certain Hounsfield unit (HU) was assigned as the structure to be filled uniformly with polylactic acid material by a 3-dimensional printer (3D Edison, Lokit, Korea). We evaluated the discrepancies between the measured and modeled target positions, representing the total tracking error, using 3 log files that were generated during each treatment for both the FTTS and the XLTS. We also analyzed the γ index between the film dose measured under the FTTS and XLTS. Results: The overall mean values and standard deviations of total tracking errors for the FTTS were 0.36 ± 0.39 mm, 0.15 ± 0.64 mm, and 0.15 ± 0.62 mm for the craniocaudal (CC), left–right (LR), and anteroposterior (AP) components, respectively. Those for the XLTS were 0.38 ± 0.54 mm, 0.13 ± 0.18 mm, and 0.14 ± 0.37 mm for the CC, LR, and AP components, respectively. The average of γ passing rates was 100% for the criteria of 3%, 3 mm; 99.6% for the criteria of 2%, 2 mm; and 86.8% for the criteria of 1%, 1 mm. Conclusions: The XLTS has segmentation accuracy comparable with that of the FTTS and small total tracking errors.

  3. Cone-beam computed tomography internal motion tracking should be used to validate 4-dimensional computed tomography for abdominal radiation therapy patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rankine, Leith; Wan, Hanlin; Parikh, Parag

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that fiducial tracking during pretreatment Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) can accurately measure tumor motion and that this method should be used to validate 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) margins before each treatment fraction. Methods and Materials For 31 patients with abdominal tumors and...

  4. Application of head-mounted devices with eye-tracking in virtual reality therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Otto Hans-Martin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Using eye-tracking to assess visual attention in head-mounted devices (HMD opens up many possibilities for virtual reality (VR-based therapy. Existing therapy concepts where attention plays a major role can be transferred to VR. Furthermore, they can be expanded to a precise real-time attention assessment, which can serve as a foundation for new therapy approaches. Utilizing HMDs and eye-tracking in a clinical environment is challenging because of hygiene issues and requirements of patients with heterogeneous cognitive and motor impairments. In this paper, we provide an overview of those challenges, discuss possible solutions and present preliminary results of a study with patients.

  5. Detection of Left Atrium Myopathy Using Two-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease on Dialysis Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanin, Noha; Alkemary, Alkhateeb

    2016-02-01

    Left atrium (LA) deformation analysis by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2DSTE) has recently been proposed to evaluate left ventricular (LV) filling pressure in dialysis patients. The purpose of this study was to study the LA function in dialysis patients using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography correlated to prevalence of atrial fibrillation, echocardiographically pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and right ventricle systolic pressure. Hundred adult patients aged 49.3 ± 13.9 years on regular hemodialysis and 40 healthy individuals were enrolled in the study. Left ventricular dimensions, ejection fraction, and mass index were studied. Left atrium volume index (LAVI) was calculated by dividing left atrium volumes by body surface area. Left ventricle filling pressure was evaluated according to E/E'. Left atrium global systolic strain (LASS) was studied using 2DSTE. Left atrium stiffness was calculated noninvasively based on the ratio of E/E' to LASS. Right ventricle systolic pressure was estimated with the Bernoulli equation formula. Left atrium diameter, left ventricle indexed mass, mitral (E/E'), and LA stiffness were increased in dialysis group 4.4 ± 0.2 cm, 126.5 ± 24.6 g/m(2) , 16.9 ± 4.4, and 0.5 ± 0.1, respectively, P dialysis patients (26.6 ± 1.9 vs. 33.7 ± 2.1%, P dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared to those without AF. Assessment of LA deformation parameters predicts LV diastolic dysfunction and right ventricle systolic pressure in dialysis patients. Left atrium function in dialysis patients was impaired before the occurrence of left atrium dilatation. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Relationship between two-dimensional speckle-tracking septal strain and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and left bundle branch block: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Guiot, Aurélie; Castel, Anne Laure; Guyomar, Yves; Semichon, Marc; Delelis, François; Heuls, Sebastien; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Graux, Pierre; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated variable patterns of longitudinal septal deformation in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and left bundle branch block. This prospective single center study was designed to assess the relationship between septal deformation patterns obtained by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). One hundred one patients with New York Heart Association class II to IV heart failure, LV ejection fractions ≤ 35%, and left bundle branch block underwent echocardiography before CRT. Longitudinal two-dimensional speckle-tracking strain analysis in the apical four-chamber view identified three patterns: double-peaked systolic shortening (pattern 1), early pre-ejection shortening peak followed by prominent systolic stretch (pattern 2), and pseudonormal shortening with a late systolic shortening peak and less pronounced end-systolic stretch (pattern 3). CRT response was defined as a relative reduction in LV end-systolic volume of ≥ 15% at 9-month follow-up. CRT super-response was defined as an absolute LV ejection fraction of ≥ 50% associated with a relative reduction in LV end-systolic volume of ≥ 15% and an improvement in New York Heart Association functional class. Cardiac death or hospitalization for heart failure during follow-up was systematically investigated. Ninety-two percent of patients with pattern 1 or 2 were responders to CRT compared with 59% with pattern 3 (P < .0001). Thirty-six percent of patients with pattern 1 were super-responders compared with 15% of those with pattern 2 and 12% of those with pattern 3 (P = .037). The improvement in LV volumes, LV ejection fraction, and global longitudinal strain after CRT was better in patients with pattern 1 or 2 compared with those with pattern 3 (P < .0001 for all). Eighteen-month outcomes were excellent in patients with pattern 1 or 2, with event-free survival of 95 ± 3% compared with 75 ± 7% in patients

  7. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy T; O'Brien, Ricky T

    2015-01-01

    collimator tracking was implemented for 15 patients in a prostate cancer radiation therapy trial; in total, 513 treatment fractions were delivered. During each treatment fraction, the prostate trajectory and treatment MLC positions were collected. These data were used as input for dose reconstruction......PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered dose compared with the dose without MLC tracking, in the setting of a prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy trial. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Multileaf...

  8. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Radiation Therapy with Fiducial-Free Tumor Tracking for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibault Jean-Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT for early-stage lung cancer can be achieved with several methods: respiratory gating, body frame, or real-time target and motion tracking. Two target tracking methods are currently available with the CyberKnife® System: the first one, fiducial tracking, requires the use of radio-opaque markers implanted near or inside the tumor, while the other, Xsight® Lung Tracking System, (XLTS is fiducial-free. With XLTS, targeting is synchronized directly with target motion, which occurs due to respiration. While the former method (fiducial tracking is well documented, the clinical relevance of the latter (tracking without fiducials has never been well described to this date. Patients and Methods A study was performed at our department for each patient treated for lung cancer with CyberKnife using XLTS. Selection criteria were: primary or recurring T1 or T2 stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC with 15–60 mm tumor size. Initial staging included CT-Scan and FDG-PET. Results Fifty-one patients not amenable to surgery were treated with XLTS. Median follow-up was 15 months (range, 5–30 months. Median tumor size was 24 mm (range, 15–60 mm. Median total dose was 60 Gy (36–60 Gy in three fractions. Actuarial overall survival was 85.5% (95% CI = 74.5–96% at 1 year and 79.4% (95% CI = 64–94.8% at 2 years. Actuarial local control rate was 92% (95% CI = 84–99% at one1 year and 86% (95% CI = 75–97% at 2 years. Conclusion Local control and overall survival rates were similar to previous reports that used fiducials for tumor tracking. Toxicity was lower than most studies since tumor tracking did not require fiducial implantion. This fiducial-free method for respiratory motion tracking is a valid option for the most fragile patients.

  9. Clinical utility of speckle-tracking echocardiography in cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitara G Khan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT can profoundly improve outcome in selected patients with heart failure; however, response is difficult to predict and can be absent in up to one in three patients. There has been a substantial amount of interest in the echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular dyssynchrony, with the ultimate aim of reliably identifying patients who will respond to CRT. The measurement of myocardial deformation (strain has conventionally been assessed using tissue Doppler imaging (TDI, which is limited by its angle dependence and ability to measure in a single plane. Two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography is a technique that provides measurements of strain in three planes, by tracking patterns of ultrasound interference (‘speckles’ in the myocardial wall throughout the cardiac cycle. Since its initial use over 15 years ago, it has emerged as a tool that provides more robust, reproducible and sensitive markers of dyssynchrony than TDI. This article reviews the use of two-dimensional and three-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in the assessment of dyssynchrony, including the identification of echocardiographic parameters that may hold predictive potential for the response to CRT. It also reviews the application of these techniques in guiding optimal LV lead placement pre-implant, with promising results in clinical improvement post-CRT.

  10. Design of a new tracking device for on-line dose monitor in ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Traini, Giacomo; Bollella, Angela; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Frallicciardi, Paola Maria; Mancini-Terracciano, Carlo; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Miraglia, Federico; Muraro, Silvia; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Senzacqua, Martina; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Charged Particle Therapy is a technique for cancer treatment that exploits hadron beams, mostly protons and carbons. A critical issue is the monitoring of the dose released by the beam to the tumor and to the surrounding tissues. We present the design of a new tracking device for monitoring on-line the dose in ion therapy through the detection of secondary charged particles produced by the beam interactions in the patient tissues. In fact, the charged particle emission shape can be correlated with the spatial dose release and the Bragg peak position. The detector uses the information provided by 12 layers of scintillating fibers followed by a plastic scintillator and a small calorimeter made of a pixelated Lutetium Fine Silicate crystal. Simulations have been performed to evaluate the achievable spatial resolution and a possible application of the device for the monitoring of the dose pro?le in a real treatment is presented.

  11. Ultrasound motion tracking for radiation therapy; Ultraschallbewegungstracking fuer die Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenne, J. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Bildgestuetzte Medizin MEVIS, Bremen (Germany); Mediri GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Schwaab, J. [Mediri GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    In modern radiotherapy the radiation dose can be applied with an accuracy in the range of 1-2 mm provided that the exact position of the target is known. If, however, the target (the tumor) is located in the lungs or the abdomen, respiration or peristalsis can cause substantial movement of the target. Various methods for intrafractional motion detection and compensation are currently under consideration or are already applied in clinical practice. Sonography is one promising option, which is now on the brink of clinical implementation. Ultrasound is particularly suited for this purpose due to the high soft tissue contrast, real-time capability, the absence of ionizing radiation and low acquisition costs. Ultrasound motion tracking is an image-based approach, i.e. the target volume or an adjacent structure is directly monitored and the motion is tracked automatically on the ultrasound image. Diverse algorithms are presently available that provide the real-time target coordinates from 2D as well as 3D images. Definition of a suitable sonographic window is not, however, trivial and a gold standard for positioning and mounting of the transducer has not yet been developed. Furthermore, processing of the coordinate information in the therapy unit and the dynamic adaptation of the radiation field are challenging tasks. It is not clear whether ultrasound motion tracking will become established in the clinical routine although all technical prerequisites can be considered as fulfilled, such that exciting progress in this field of research is still to be expected. (orig.) [German] In der modernen Strahlentherapie kann die Dosis mit einer Genauigkeit von 1-2 mm appliziert werden, sofern die Position der Zielstruktur genau bekannt ist. Liegt diese Zielstruktur (der Tumor) jedoch in der Lunge oder im Abdomen, koennen u. a. die Atmung oder die Peristaltik zu einer substanziellen Bewegung des Zielvolumens fuehren. Verschiedene Methoden zur intrafraktionellen Bewegungsdetektion

  12. Design of a new tracking device for on-line beam range monitor in carbon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Giacomo; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bollella, Angela; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Frallicciardi, Paola Maria; Mancini-Terracciano, Carlo; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Miraglia, Federico; Muraro, Silvia; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Senzacqua, Martina; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2017-02-01

    Charged particle therapy is a technique for cancer treatment that exploits hadron beams, mostly protons and carbon ions. A critical issue is the monitoring of the beam range so to check the correct dose deposition to the tumor and surrounding tissues. The design of a new tracking device for beam range real-time monitoring in pencil beam carbon ion therapy is presented. The proposed device tracks secondary charged particles produced by beam interactions in the patient tissue and exploits the correlation of the charged particle emission profile with the spatial dose deposition and the Bragg peak position. The detector, currently under construction, uses the information provided by 12 layers of scintillating fibers followed by a plastic scintillator and a pixelated Lutetium Fine Silicate (LFS) crystal calorimeter. An algorithm to account and correct for emission profile distortion due to charged secondaries absorption inside the patient tissue is also proposed. Finally detector reconstruction efficiency for charged particle emission profile is evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation considering a quasi-realistic case of a non-homogenous phantom. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient adherence with COPD therapy

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    C. S. Rand

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Although there are very few published studies on adherence to treatment regimens in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the evidence that exists suggests that, as with asthma therapy, adherence is poor. Patient beliefs about COPD, as well as their motivation and expectations about the likelihood of success of medical interventions, can influence adherence rates. Other critical factors include the patient's understanding of their illness and therapy, and the complexity of the prescribed treatment regimen. Incorrect inhaler technique is also a common failing. When prescribing in primary or specialist care, healthcare professionals should address adherence as a vital part of the patient consultation. Improved patient education may also increase adherence rates.

  14. Coding gaze tracking data with chromatic gradients for VR Exposure Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Grillon, Helena; De Heras Ciechomski, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a simple and intuitive way to represent the eye-tracking data gathered during immersive virtual reality exposure therapy sessions. Eye-tracking technology is used to observe gaze movements during vir- tual reality sessions and the gaze-map chromatic gradient coding allows...

  15. Skull registration for prone patient position using tracked ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Grace; Ungi, Tamas; Baum, Zachary; Lasso, Andras; Kronreif, Gernot; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Tracked navigation has become prevalent in neurosurgery. Problems with registration of a patient and a preoperative image arise when the patient is in a prone position. Surfaces accessible to optical tracking on the back of the head are unreliable for registration. We investigated the accuracy of surface-based registration using points accessible through tracked ultrasound. Using ultrasound allows access to bone surfaces that are not available through optical tracking. Tracked ultrasound could eliminate the need to work (i) under the table for registration and (ii) adjust the tracker between surgery and registration. In addition, tracked ultrasound could provide a non-invasive method in comparison to an alternative method of registration involving screw implantation. METHODS: A phantom study was performed to test the feasibility of tracked ultrasound for registration. An initial registration was performed to partially align the pre-operative computer tomography data and skull phantom. The initial registration was performed by an anatomical landmark registration. Surface points accessible by tracked ultrasound were collected and used to perform an Iterative Closest Point Algorithm. RESULTS: When the surface registration was compared to a ground truth landmark registration, the average TRE was found to be 1.6+/-0.1mm and the average distance of points off the skull surface was 0.6+/-0.1mm. CONCLUSION: The use of tracked ultrasound is feasible for registration of patients in prone position and eliminates the need to perform registration under the table. The translational component of error found was minimal. Therefore, the amount of TRE in registration is due to a rotational component of error.

  16. Physical therapy and manual physical therapy: Differences in patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, G.G.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  17. Physical Therapy and Manual Physical Therapy: Differences in Patient Characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M; Pool, Jan J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  18. Physical Therapy and Manual Physical Therapy: Differences in Patient Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G. M.; Pool, Jan J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  19. Do patients initiate therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thengilsdóttir, G; Pottegård, Anton; Linnet, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary non-adherence occurs when a drug has been prescribed but the patient fails to have it dispensed at the pharmacy. AIMS: To assess primary non-adherence to statins and antidepressants in Iceland, the association of demographic factors with primary non-adherence, and the time from...... when a prescription is issued until it is dispensed. METHODS: Data on patients receiving a new prescription for a statin or an antidepressant from the Primary Health Care database were linked with dispensing histories from The Icelandic Prescription Database. The proportion of patients who did not have...... their prescription dispensed within a year from issuing (primary non-adherent) was assessed, as well as the time from issue until dispensing. Associations between demographic factors and primary non-adherence were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS: The overall primary non-adherence was 6.3% and 8...

  20. Tracking HCV protease population diversity during transmission and susceptibility of founder populations to antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Tanvi; Todt, Daniel; Vercauteren, Koen; McClure, C Patrick; Verhoye, Lieven; Farhoudi, Ali; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Baumert, Thomas F; Steinmann, Eike; Meuleman, Philip; Pietschmann, Thomas; Brown, Richard J P

    2017-03-01

    Due to the highly restricted species-tropism of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) a limited number of animal models exist for pre-clinical evaluation of vaccines and antiviral compounds. The human-liver chimeric mouse model allows heterologous challenge with clinically relevant strains derived from patients. However, to date, the transmission and longitudinal evolution of founder viral populations in this model have not been characterized in-depth using state-of-the-art sequencing technologies. Focusing on NS3 protease encoding region of the viral genome, mutant spectra in a donor inoculum and individual recipient mice were determined via Illumina sequencing and compared, to determine the effects of transmission on founder viral population complexity. In all transmissions, a genetic bottleneck was observed, although diverse viral populations were transmitted in each case. A low frequency cloud of mutations ( 1% restricted to a subset of nucleotides. The population of SNVs >1% was reduced upon transmission while the low frequency SNV cloud remained stable. Fixation of multiple identical synonymous substitutions was apparent in independent transmissions, and no evidence for reversion of T-cell epitopes was observed. In addition, susceptibility of founder populations to antiviral therapy was assessed. Animals were treated with protease inhibitor (PI) monotherapy to track resistance associated substitution (RAS) emergence. Longitudinal analyses revealed a decline in population diversity under therapy, with no detectable RAS >1% prior to therapy commencement. Despite inoculation from a common source and identical therapeutic regimens, unique RAS emergence profiles were identified in different hosts prior to and during therapeutic failure, with complex mutational signatures at protease residues 155, 156 and 168 detected. Together these analyses track viral population complexity at high-resolution in the human-liver chimeric mouse model post-transmission and under therapeutic

  1. Getting TRAIL back on track for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, J; von Karstedt, S; Zinngrebe, J; Walczak, H

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other members of the TNF superfamily, the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, also known as Apo2L) possesses the unique capacity to induce apoptosis selectively in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This exciting discovery provided the basis for the development of TRAIL-receptor agonists (TRAs), which have demonstrated robust anticancer activity in a number of preclinical studies. Subsequently initiated clinical trials testing TRAs demonstrated, on the one hand, broad tolerability but revealed, on the other, that therapeutic benefit was rather limited. Several factors that are likely to account for TRAs' sobering clinical performance have since been identified. First, because of initial concerns over potential hepatotoxicity, TRAs with relatively weak agonistic activity were selected to enter clinical trials. Second, although TRAIL can induce apoptosis in several cancer cell lines, it has now emerged that many others, and importantly, most primary cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL monotherapy. Third, so far patients enrolled in TRA-employing clinical trials were not selected for likelihood of benefitting from a TRA-comprising therapy on the basis of a valid(ated) biomarker. This review summarizes and discusses the results achieved so far in TRA-employing clinical trials in the light of these three shortcomings. By integrating recent insight on apoptotic and non-apoptotic TRAIL signaling in cancer cells, we propose approaches to introduce novel, revised TRAIL-based therapeutic concepts into the cancer clinic. These include (i) the use of recently developed highly active TRAs, (ii) the addition of efficient, but cancer-cell-selective TRAIL-sensitizing agents to overcome TRAIL resistance and (iii) employing proteomic profiling to uncover resistance mechanisms. We envisage that this shall enable the design of effective TRA-comprising therapeutic concepts for individual cancer patients in the future. PMID:24948009

  2. A comparative study between the imaging system and the optical tracking system in proton therapy at CNAO

    CERN Document Server

    Desplanques, Maxime; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Riboldi, Marco; Fattori, Giovanni; Donno, Andrea; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The synergy between in-room imaging and optical tracking, in co-operation with highly accurate robotic patient handling represents a concept for patient-set-up which has been implemented at CNAO (Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica). In-room imaging is based on a double oblique X-ray projection system; optical tracking consists of the detection of the position of spherical markers placed directly on the patient’s skin or on the immobilization devices. These markers are used as external fiducials during patient positioning and dose delivery. This study reports the results of a comparative analysis between in-room imaging and optical tracking data for patient positioning within the framework of high-precision particle therapy. Differences between the optical tracking system (OTS) and the imaging system (IS) were on average within the expected localization accuracy. On the first 633 fractions for head and neck (H&N) set-up procedures, the corrections applied by the IS, after patient positioning usin...

  3. Patient-reported outcome after fast-track knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Hansen, Torben Bæk; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe patient-related functional outcomes after fast-track total knee arthroplasty and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Furthermore, we wanted to assess physical areas where an additional need for rehabilitation could be identified, and finally, we...

  4. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. This paper was presented at RSNA 2013 and was carried out at Kanazawa University, JAPAN.

  5. DMLC motion tracking of moving targets for intensity modulated arc therapy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmerman, Jens; Korreman, Stine; Persson, Gitte

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Intensity modulated arc therapy offers great advantages with the capability of delivering a fast and highly conformal treatment. However, moving targets represent a major challenge. By monitoring a moving target it is possible to make the beam follow the motion, shaped by a Dynamic MLC...... at state (0) "static, no tracking". Comparing measurements were made at state (1) "motion, no tracking" and state (2) "motion, tracking". RESULTS: Gamma analysis showed a significant improvement from measurements of state (1) to measurements of state (2) compared to the state (0) measurements: Lung plan...

  6. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech; Oddiraju, Swetha; Yang Deshan; Li, H. Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  7. High patient satisfaction in 445 patients who underwent fast-track hip or knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Kirsten; Kjaersgaard-Andersen, Per; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    comorbidity, or LOS. THR patients had shorter mean LOS than TKR patients, even though the median LOS was 2 days for both groups. THR patients were more satisfied than TKR patients in the first weeks after discharge. INTERPRETATION: Patient satisfaction is high following fast-track THR and TKR, with scores...... length of stay (LOS) and patient satisfaction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this follow-up study, a consecutive series of 445 patients undergoing THR and TKR completed a questionnaire 2 weeks after discharge. LOS and short-term patient satisfaction with the fast-track management were measured. Patient......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patient satisfaction is important in fast-track total hip and knee replacement (THR, TKR). We assessed: (1) how satisfied patients were with the treatment; (2) factors related to overall satisfaction; and (3) whether there was a difference between THR and TKR regarding...

  8. Benchmarking the research track record and level of appointment of Australian occupational therapy academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Kieran; Gray, Marion

    2017-10-01

    Academic faculty are active contributors to the evidence base of the profession. Little is known about the research productivity of Australian occupational therapy academics. A bibliographic analysis of Australian occupational therapy faculty websites and corresponding Scopus citation database profiles was conducted. A description of current research productivity benchmarks and relationships with holding a doctorate, academic appointment level and institutional characteristics were explored. The median H-index of Clinical and Associate Lecturers was 0, 1 for Lecturers, 4 for Senior Lecturers, 7.5 for Associate Professors and 13 for Professors. The number of publications and number of citing documents follows a Pareto tendency, where 20% of researchers are responsible for around 80% of the research track record of Australian occupational therapy academics. The findings provide a benchmark for Australian occupational therapy faculty research track records and associations with appointment levels. This benchmark differs across countries and disciplines. The results raise considerations for enhancing the overall research track record of occupational therapy academics. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  9. Tracking patient satisfaction at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, W; Lancaster, J

    1992-01-01

    Rising consumer expectations for convenient, quality health care is forcing many hospitals to focus increasing attention to measuring consumer perception and satisfaction with the care provided. At the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, getting in close touch with the consumer has assumed a strategic position. As one part of the evolving Marketing Information System, a patient satisfaction tracking system is being designed to illicit patient feedback and hospital responses to service issues, assess patient satisfaction with various services, serve as a benchmark for evaluating changes in satisfaction over time, and provide necessary information for medical center planning, marketing and evaluation.

  10. Psychomotoric therapy in patients with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Jitka Suchá; Iva Holmerová

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dementia syndrome is a significant psychosocial and public health problem with important societal impact. It is important for us to learn more about methods of dementia management. Objective: To discuss principles and basic measures of psychomotor therapy in patients with dementia as well as the implementation of movement therapy and the lifestyle of patients with dementia. Methods: This research presents experience with psychomotor therapy of patients with dementia ...

  11. A treatment planning study of the potential of geometrical tracking for intensity modulated proton therapy of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Aznar, Marianne C.; Nygaard, Ditte E.; Persson, Gitte F.; Korreman, Stine S.; Engelholm, Svend Aage (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital (Rigshospitalet), Copenhagen (Denmark)), E-mail: per.munck@rh.regionh.dk; Nystroem, Haakan (Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen Univ., Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    Background. Proton therapy of lung cancer holds the potential for a reduction of the volume of irradiated normal lung tissue. In this work we investigate the robustness of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to motion, and evaluate a geometrical tumour tracking method to compensate for tumour motion. Material and methods. Seven patients with a nine targets with 4DCT scans were selected. IMPT plans were made on the midventilation phase using a 3-field technique. The plans were transferred and calculated on the remaining nine phases of the 4DCT, and the combined dose distribution was summed using deformable image registration (DIR). An additional set of plans were made in which the proton beam was simply geometrically shifted to the centre of the gross tumour volume (GTV), i.e. simulating tracking of the tumour motion but without on-line adjustment of the proton energies. A possible interplay effect between the dynamics of the spot scanning delivery and the tumour motion has not been considered in this work. Results. Around 97-100% of the GTV was covered by 95% of the prescribed dose (V95) for a tumour displacement of less than about 1 cm with a static beam. For the remaining three of nine targets with a larger motion the tracking method studied provided a marked improvement over static beam; raising the GTV V95 from 95 to 100%, 82 to 98% and 51 to 97%, respectively. Conclusion. The possibility of performing DIR and summing the dose on the 4DCT data set was shown to be feasible. The fairly simplistic tracking method suggested here resulted in a marked improvement in GTV coverage for tumours with large intra-fractional motion (>1 cm displacement), indicating that on-line adjustment of the proton energies may be redundant.

  12. Development of system technology for radiation cancer therapy with the dexterous auto lesions tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungho; Jeong, Kyungmin; Jung, Seungho; Lee, Namho; and others

    2013-01-15

    The project objectives are to establish the fundamental core technologies for precise auto lesions tracking radiation cancer therapy and developing related system technology as well. Radiation cancer therapy apparatus should be domestically produced to reduce medical expenses, hence advanced technologies are suggested and developed to make cost down medical expenses and save expenditure for importing 10 million dollars/set from overseas. To achieve these targets, we have carried out reviewing of domestic and foreign technology trend. Based on review of state-of-the-art technology, radiation sensory system is studied. 3m high precise image processing technique and intelligent therapy planning software are developed. Also precedent study on the redundant robot for dexterous motion control system has been performed for developing of radiation cancel therapy robot system.

  13. SU-G-JeP3-08: Robotic System for Ultrasound Tracking in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlemann, I [University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Luebeck (Germany); Jauer, P; Schweikard, A; Ernst, F [University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For safe and accurate real-time tracking of tumors for IGRT using 4D ultrasound, it is necessary to make use of novel, high-end force-sensitive lightweight robots designed for human-machine interaction. Such a robot will be integrated into an existing robotized ultrasound system for non-invasive 4D live tracking, using a newly developed real-time control and communication framework. Methods: The new KUKA LWR iiwa robot is used for robotized ultrasound real-time tumor tracking. Besides more precise probe contact pressure detection, this robot provides an additional 7th link, enhancing the dexterity of the kinematic and the mounted transducer. Several integrated, certified safety features create a safe environment for the patients during treatment. However, to remotely control the robot for the ultrasound application, a real-time control and communication framework has to be developed. Based on a client/server concept, client-side control commands are received and processed by a central server unit and are implemented by a client module running directly on the robot’s controller. Several special functionalities for robotized ultrasound applications are integrated and the robot can now be used for real-time control of the image quality by adjusting the transducer position, and contact pressure. The framework was evaluated looking at overall real-time capability for communication and processing of three different standard commands. Results: Due to inherent, certified safety modules, the new robot ensures a safe environment for patients during tumor tracking. Furthermore, the developed framework shows overall real-time capability with a maximum average latency of 3.6 ms (Minimum 2.5 ms; 5000 trials). Conclusion: The novel KUKA LBR iiwa robot will advance the current robotized ultrasound tracking system with important features. With the developed framework, it is now possible to remotely control this robot and use it for robotized ultrasound tracking

  14. Automatic Prostate Tracking and Motion Assessment in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azcona, Juan Diego, E-mail: jdazcona@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305 (United States); Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Li, Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the prostate intrafraction motion in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments using cine megavoltage (MV) images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy using a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator equipped with an EPID for acquiring cine MV images during treatment. Cine MV images acquisition was scheduled for single or multiple treatment fractions (between 1 and 8). A novel automatic fiducial detection algorithm that can handle irregular multileaf collimator apertures, field edges, fast leaf and gantry movement, and MV image noise and artifacts in patient anatomy was used. All sets of images (approximately 25,000 images in total) were analyzed to measure the positioning accuracy of implanted fiducial markers and assess the prostate movement. Results: Prostate motion can vary greatly in magnitude among different patients. Different motion patterns were identified, showing its unpredictability. The mean displacement and standard deviation of the intrafraction motion was generally less than 2.0 ± 2.0 mm in each of the spatial directions. In certain patients, however, the percentage of the treatment time in which the prostate is displaced more than 5 mm from its planned position in at least 1 spatial direction was 10% or more. The maximum prostate displacement observed was 13.3 mm. Conclusion: Prostate tracking and motion assessment was performed with MV imaging and an EPID. The amount of prostate motion observed suggests that patients will benefit from its real-time monitoring. Megavoltage imaging can provide the basis for real-time prostate tracking using conventional linear accelerators.

  15. High patient satisfaction in 445 patients who underwent fast-track hip or knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Kirsten; Kjaersgaard-Andersen, Per; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patient satisfaction is important in fast-track total hip and knee replacement (THR, TKR). We assessed: (1) how satisfied patients were with the treatment; (2) factors related to overall satisfaction; and (3) whether there was a difference between THR and TKR regarding...... length of stay (LOS) and patient satisfaction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this follow-up study, a consecutive series of 445 patients undergoing THR and TKR completed a questionnaire 2 weeks after discharge. LOS and short-term patient satisfaction with the fast-track management were measured. Patient...... satisfaction was measured using a numerical rating scale (NRS; 0-10). RESULTS: For THR, the median satisfaction score was 9-10 and for TKR it was 8.5-10 in all parameters. Older THR patients had higher overall satisfaction. No association was found between overall satisfaction following THR or TKR and sex...

  16. A systematic review of patient tracking systems for use in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Ian; Doan, Quynh; Hung, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety is of great importance in the pediatric emergency department (PED). The combination of acutely and critically ill patients and high patient volumes creates a need for systems to support physicians in making accurate and timely diagnoses. Electronic patient tracking systems can potentially improve PED safety by reducing overcrowding and enhancing security. To enhance our understanding of current electronic tracking technologies, how they are implemented in a clinical setting, and resulting effect on patient care outcomes including patient safety. Nine databases were searched. Two independent reviewers identified articles that contained reference to patient tracking technologies in pediatrics or emergency medicine. Quantitative studies were assessed independently for methodological strength by two reviewers using an external assessment tool. Of 2292 initial articles, 22 were deemed relevant. Seventeen were qualitative, and the remaining five quantitative articles were assessed as being methodologically weak. Existing patient tracking systems in the ED included: infant monitoring/abduction prevention; barcode identification; radiofrequency identification (RFID)- or infrared (IR)-based patient tracking. Twenty articles supported the use of tracking technology to enhance patient safety or improve efficiency. One article failed to support the use of IR patient sensors due to study design flaws. Support exists for the use of barcode-, IR-, and RFID-based patient tracking systems to improve ED patient safety and efficiency. A lack of methodologically strong studies indicates a need for further evidence-based support for the implementation of patient tracking technology in a clinical or research setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of drug therapy problems among renal patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Drug therapy problems among renal patients were high. Inappropriate drug selection and drug interactions were the commonest drug therapy problems. The acceptance of pharmacists' interventions by prescribers was appreciable. Keywords: Drug therapy problems, Renal patients, Therapy, Intervention, ...

  18. Improving superficial target delineation in radiation therapy with endoscopic tracking and registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weersink, R. A.; Qiu, J.; Hope, A. J.; Daly, M. J.; Cho, B. C. J.; DaCosta, R. S.; Sharpe, M. B.; Breen, S. L.; Chan, H.; Jaffray, D. A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Target delineation within volumetric imaging is a critical step in the planning process of intensity modulated radiation therapy. In endoluminal cancers, endoscopy often reveals superficial areas of visible disease beyond what is seen on volumetric imaging. Quantitatively relating these findings to the volumetric imaging is prone to human error during the recall and contouring of the target. We have developed a method to improve target delineation in the radiation therapy planning process by quantitatively registering endoscopic findings contours traced on endoscopic images to volumetric imaging. Methods: Using electromagnetic sensors embedded in an endoscope, 2D endoscopic images were registered to computed tomography (CT) volumetric images by tracking the position and orientation of the endoscope relative to a CT image set. Regions-of-interest (ROI) in the 2D endoscopic view were delineated. A mesh created within the boundary of the ROI was projected onto the 3D image data, registering the ROI with the volumetric image. This 3D ROI was exported to clinical radiation treatment planning software. The precision and accuracy of the procedure was tested on two solid phantoms with superficial markings visible on both endoscopy and CT images. The first phantom was T-shaped tube with X-marks etched on the interior. The second phantom was an anatomically correct skull phantom with a phantom superficial lesion placed on the pharyngeal surface. Markings were contoured on the endoscope images and compared with contours delineated in the treatment planning system based on the CT images. Clinical feasibility was tested on three patients with early stage glottic cancer. Image-based rendering using manually identified landmarks was used to improve the registration. Results: Using the T-shaped phantom with X-markings, the 2D to 3D registration accuracy was 1.5-3.5 mm, depending on the endoscope position relative to the markings. Intraobserver standard variation was 0

  19. Comparison of Different Imaging Techniques for Tracking Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sarah J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of exciting animal and preclinical studies are beginning to reveal the immense potential in stem cell-based therapies, particularly in the area of treating cardiovascular diseases. However, in order to evaluate the efficacy of these treatments in clinical trials, the transplanted stem cells must be monitored quantitatively and qualitatively in vivo. To date, several non-invasive imaging approaches have been used to follow stem cell fate in vivo. Here we review the basic principles of the current techniques for cardiac stem cell tracking, compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of these imaging modalities, and discuss the future prospect of cardiac stem cell trafficking. PMID:18056330

  20. A treatment planning study of the potential of geometrical tracking for intensity modulated proton therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Aznar, Marianne; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy of lung cancer holds the potential for a reduction of the volume of irradiated normal lung tissue. In this work we investigate the robustness of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to motion, and evaluate a geometrical tumour tracking method to compensate for tumour...

  1. A treatment planning study of the potential of geometrical tracking for intensity modulated proton therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Aznar, Marianne C; Nygaard, Ditte E

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy of lung cancer holds the potential for a reduction of the volume of irradiated normal lung tissue. In this work we investigate the robustness of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to motion, and evaluate a geometrical tumour tracking method to compensate for tumour mot...

  2. Therapy choice - Therapy possibility in PCOS infertility patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mitrovic Jovanovic

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS constitutes the most common endocrinopathy of women of reproductive age. Infertility due to the PCOS is a complex and specific condition but the majority of the problem is the ovulatory dysfunction. Aims Evaluation of the therapy choice and reproductive therapy possibilities in PCOS infertility patients. Make it easier for clinicians. Methods Clinical experience based on review of the literature. Results The syndromes heterogeneity is reflected in the different response to the various ovulation inducting drugs. Management of anovulatory infertility associated with PCOS is based on the overall clinical picture. Lifestyle change programs, weight reduction diet and exercise, have been shown to be very effective in improving reproductive as well as metabolic characteristics of overweight and obese patients with PCOS. In women with anovulatory infertility, the first line of treatment for induction of ovulation is clomiphene citrate. Aromatase inhibitors have been suggested as an alternative treatment to clomiphene therapy. Gonadotropin treatment is effective, but there is a risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Surgery, such as laparoscopic ovarian drilling should be considered in some patients. Reconsider a use of metformin and supplements. Conclusion Understanding specific features and metabolic implications of different PCOS patients, may guide us to treat individuals optimally, as well as to develop effective prevention strategies to reduce the risk of long term complicationsconsequences and improve reproductive outcomes. Individual treatment modalities in PCOS patients are imperative for successful therapy.

  3. Appropriate antibiotic therapy in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Pieralli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients in and outside Intensive Care Units. Early hemodynamic and respiratory support, along with prompt appropriate antimicrobial therapy and source control of the infectious process are cornerstone management strategies to improve survival. Antimicrobial therapy should be as much appropriate as possible, since inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy is associated with poorer outcome in different clinical settings. When prescribing antibiotic therapy, drug’s characteristics, along with dosing, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic properties related to the drug and to the clinical scenario should be well kept in mind in order to achieve maximal success.

  4. Music Therapy for Post Operative Cardiac Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Karin

    Background This study is the first controlled research study undertaken in the early phase of rehabilitation after cardiac surgery investigating the effect of a receptive music therapy method. Various forms of music therapy interventions including both active and receptive methods were reported...... to be significantly more effective than music treatment with music medicine. Music listening and receptive music therapy (such as Guided Imagery and Music) have been proposed to help patients both before heart surgery and during the recovery phase. This study therefore intended to explore both a music therapy...... and a music medicine intervention. Guided Relaxation with Music was considered potentially helpful for post operative cardiac patients in order to induce relaxation and facilitate recovery involving listening to relaxing music as a background while systematically guiding patients through a process of bodily...

  5. Efficacy of Osteoporosis Therapies in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann V

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes is characterized by increased fracture risk and by reduced bone strength for a given density. Contributing factors may include lower bone turnover and accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts. There are concerns that the pharmacological therapies for osteoporosis, particularly anti-resorptive therapies that suppress bone turnover, may not be as effective in the setting of diabetes. This review considers clinical trials and observational studies that have assessed the efficacy of anti-resorptive and anabolic therapies in diabetic patients. Post hoc analyses of randomized trials indicate that raloxifene has similar efficacy for prevention of vertebral fractures in diabetic compared with non-diabetic patients. Evidence from randomized clinical trials is lacking for anti-fracture efficacy of other osteoporosis therapies in diabetes. However, observational studies suggest that bisphosphonates are effective in preventing fractures in diabetic patients. The great majority of diabetic patients in studies to date have been type 2, and efficacy of osteoporosis therapies in type 1 diabetic patients remains to be addressed. Further evaluation of the efficacy of osteoporosis therapies in the setting of diabetes is needed to provide optimal fracture prevention for this population.

  6. SIFT-based dense pixel tracking on 0.35 T cine-MR images acquired during image-guided radiation therapy with application to gating optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, Thomas R., E-mail: tmazur@radonc.wustl.edu, E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Wang, Yuhe; Yang, Deshan; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H. Harold, E-mail: tmazur@radonc.wustl.edu, E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, Campus Box 8224, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To first demonstrate the viability of applying an image processing technique for tracking regions on low-contrast cine-MR images acquired during image-guided radiation therapy, and then outline a scheme that uses tracking data for optimizing gating results in a patient-specific manner. Methods: A first-generation MR-IGRT system—treating patients since January 2014—integrates a 0.35 T MR scanner into an annular gantry consisting of three independent Co-60 sources. Obtaining adequate frame rates for capturing relevant patient motion across large fields-of-view currently requires coarse in-plane spatial resolution. This study initially (1) investigate the feasibility of rapidly tracking dense pixel correspondences across single, sagittal plane images (with both moderate signal-to-noise and spatial resolution) using a matching objective for highly descriptive vectors called scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) descriptors associated to all pixels that describe intensity gradients in local regions around each pixel. To more accurately track features, (2) harmonic analysis was then applied to all pixel trajectories within a region-of-interest across a short training period. In particular, the procedure adjusts the motion of outlying trajectories whose relative spectral power within a frequency bandwidth consistent with respiration (or another form of periodic motion) does not exceed a threshold value that is manually specified following the training period. To evaluate the tracking reliability after applying this correction, conventional metrics—including Dice similarity coefficients (DSCs), mean tracking errors (MTEs), and Hausdorff distances (HD)—were used to compare target segmentations obtained via tracking to manually delineated segmentations. Upon confirming the viability of this descriptor-based procedure for reliably tracking features, the study (3) outlines a scheme for optimizing gating parameters—including relative target position and a

  7. Systemic therapy for patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Per; Qvortrup, Camilla; Tabernero, Josep

    2015-01-01

    and 10–15 % in stage III. Targeted therapy is not recommended in the adjuvant setting. Treatment options in patients with non- resectable CRC are based on the extent of disease (resectable/potential resectable/non-resectable) and symptoms. Surgery fi rst or chemotherapy fi rst in patients...

  8. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Soylu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the structured but flexible psychosocial interventions that could be applied to patients with cancer. In many studies the positive effects of cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing psychological morbidity and improving the quality of life of cancer patients have been shown. In this article, the contents and techniques of adapted cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with cancer and its effectiveness in commonly seen psychiatric disorders have been reviewed. The aim of this article is to contribute positively to physicians and nurses in Turkey for early detection of psychological distress and referral to the therapist that would clearly increase the quality of life of cancer patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(3.000: 257-270

  9. Music therapy for coma patients: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J; Chen, W

    2015-04-01

    The application of quantitative EEG (δ+θ/α+β value) and GCS value to evaluate the role of music therapy for traumatic brain injury coma patients. Forty patients of traumatic brain injury coma were selected to meet the inclusion criteria. Twenty cases were selected for the rehabilitation, neurology and neurosurgery ward, whose families could actively cooperate with, and the patients could receive a long-term fixed nursing staff with formal music therapy (music group). Twenty cases were in the intensive care unit of the rehabilitation, neurology and neurosurgery ward. Their families members cooperated poorly, had often changing nursing staff, and without a formal music therapy (control group). After a one monthe follow up, the GCS value and quantitative EEG (δ+θ/α+β value) were compared between the two groups. Between the two groups, except for the presence or absence of formal music therapy, the rest of treatment had no significant difference and was matched by age, gender, and injury types. In 40 cases of traumatic brain injury patients, the GCS value increased in the music group after treatment when compared to the control group. The difference between the two groups was significant (p music therapy in patients with craniocerebral trauma coma has obviously an effect on promoting to regain consciousness. The quantitative EEG (δ+θ/α+β value) can be used as an objective index to evaluate the state of brain function.

  10. Fast cine-magnetic resonance imaging point tracking for prostate cancer radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, J.; Dang, K.; Fox, Chris D.; Chandra, S.; Gill, Suki; Kron, T.; Pham, D.; Foroudi, F.

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of intra-fraction organ motion is important for improving the precision of radiation therapy treatment delivery. One method to quantify this motion is for one or more observers to manually identify anatomic points of interest (POIs) on each slice of a cine-MRI sequence. However this is labour intensive and inter- and intra- observer variation can introduce uncertainty. In this paper a fast method for non-rigid registration based point tracking in cine-MRI sagittal and coronal series is described which identifies POIs in 0.98 seconds per sagittal slice and 1.35 seconds per coronal slice. The manual and automatic points were highly correlated (r>0.99, pmanual verification.

  11. Simultaneous tumor and surrogate motion tracking with dynamic MRI for radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoun; Farah, Rana; Shea, Steven M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hales, Russell; Lee, Junghoon

    2018-01-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is a major obstacle for achieving high-precision radiotherapy of cancers in the thoracic and abdominal regions. Surrogate-based estimation and tracking methods are commonly used in radiotherapy, but with limited understanding of quantified correlation to tumor motion. In this study, we propose a method to simultaneously track the lung tumor and external surrogates to evaluate their spatial correlation in a quantitative way using dynamic MRI, which allows real-time acquisition without ionizing radiation exposure. To capture the lung and whole tumor, four MRI-compatible fiducials are placed on the patient’s chest and upper abdomen. Two different types of acquisitions are performed in the sagittal orientation including multi-slice 2D cine MRIs to reconstruct 4D-MRI and two-slice 2D cine MRIs to simultaneously track the tumor and fiducials. A phase-binned 4D-MRI is first reconstructed from multi-slice MR images using body area as a respiratory surrogate and groupwise registration. The 4D-MRI provides 3D template volumes for different breathing phases. 3D tumor position is calculated by 3D–2D template matching in which 3D tumor templates in the 4D-MRI reconstruction and the 2D cine MRIs from the two-slice tracking dataset are registered. 3D trajectories of the external surrogates are derived via matching a 3D geometrical model of the fiducials to their segmentations on the 2D cine MRIs. We tested our method on ten lung cancer patients. Using a correlation analysis, the 3D tumor trajectory demonstrates a noticeable phase mismatch and significant cycle-to-cycle motion variation, while the external surrogate was not sensitive enough to capture such variations. Additionally, there was significant phase mismatch between surrogate signals obtained from the fiducials at different locations.

  12. Designing a model of patient tracking system for natural disaster in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Nahid; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Safdari, Reza; Keyvanara, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Disaster patient tracking consists of identifying and registering patients, recording data on their medical conditions, settings priorities for evacuation of scene, locating the patients from scene to health care centers and then till completion of treatment and discharge. AIM: The aim of this study was to design a model of patient tracking system for natural disaster in Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This applied study was conducted in two steps in 2016. First, data on disaster patient tracking systems used in selected countries were collected from library-printed and electronic references and then compared. Next, a preliminary model of disaster patient tracking system was provided using these systems and validated by Delphi technique and focus group. The data of the first step were analyzed by content analysis and those of the second step by descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Analysis of the comments of key information persons in three Delphi rounds, consisting of national experts, yielded three themes, i.e., content, function, and technology, ten subthemes, and 127 components, with consensus rate of over 75%, to provide a disaster patient tracking system for Iran. CONCLUSION: In Iran, there is no comprehensive process to manage the data on disaster patients. Offering a patient tracking system can be considered a humanitarian and effective measure to promote the process of identifying, caring for, evacuating, and transferring patients as well as documenting and following up their medical and location conditions from scene till completion of the treatment. PMID:28852666

  13. Acupuncture therapy for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most important parts of Traditional Chinese Medicine, has been used for more than 3000 years as prevention and treatment for various diseases in China as well as in adjacent regions, and is widely accepted in western countries in recent years. More and more clinical trials revealed that acupuncture shows positive effect in stroke, not only as a complementary and alternative medicine for poststroke rehabilitation but also as a preventive strategy which could induce cerebral ischemic tolerance, especially when combined with modern electrotherapy. Acupuncture has some unique characteristics, which include acupoint specificity and parameter-dependent effect. It also involves complicated mechanism to exert the beneficial effect on stroke. Series of clinical trials have shown that acupuncture primarily regulates the release of neurochemicals, hemorheology, cerebral microcirculation, metabolism, neuronal activity, and the function of specific brain region. Animal studies showed that the effects of acupuncture therapy on stroke were possibly via inhibition of postischemic inflammatory reaction, stimulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and influence on neural plasticity. Mechanisms for its preconditioning effect include activity enhancement of antioxidant, regulation of the endocannabinoid system, and inhibition of apoptosis. Although being controversial, acupuncture is a promising preventive and treatment strategy for stroke, but further high-quality clinical trials would be needed to provide more confirmative evidence. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. SU-G-BRA-15: Dosimetric Evaluation of Dynamic Tumor Tracking Radiation Therapy Using Digital Phantom: A Study On Margin and Desired Accuracy of Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, T; Osanai, M; Homma, N [Department of Radiological Imaging and Informatics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kadoya, N; Nakajima, Y; Jingu, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ichiji, K [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Takeda, K [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Takai, Y [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking radiation therapy can potentially reduce internal margin without prolongation of irradiation time. However, dynamic tumor tracking technique requires an extra margin (tracking margin, TM) for the uncertainty of tumor localization, prediction, and beam repositioning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a dosimetric impact caused by TM. Methods: We used 4D XCAT to create 9 digital phantom datasets of different tumor size and motion range: tumor diameter TD=(1, 3, 5) cm and motion range MR=(1, 2, 3) cm. For each dataset, respiratory gating (30%–70% phase) and tumor tracking treatment plans were created using 8-field 3D-CRT by 4D dose calculation implemented in RayStation. The dose constraint was based on RTOG0618. For the tracking plan, TMs of (0, 2.5, 5) mm were considered by surrounding a normal setup margin: SM=5 mm. We calculated V20 of normal lung to evaluate the dosimetric impact for each case, and estimated an equivalent TM that affects the same impact on V20 obtained by the gated plan. Results: The equivalent TMs for (TD=1 cm, MR=2 cm), (TD=1 cm, MR=3 cm), (TD=5 cm, MR=2 cm), and (TD=5 cm, MR=3 cm) were estimated as 1.47 mm, 3.95 mm, 1.04 mm, and 2.13 mm, respectively. The larger the tumor size, the equivalent TM became smaller. On the other hand, the larger the motion range, the equivalent TM was found to be increased. Conclusion: Our results showed the equivalent TM changes depending on tumor size and motion range. The tracking plan with TM less than the equivalent TM achieves a dosimetric impact better than the gated plan in less treatment time. This study was partially supported by JSPS Kakenhi and Varian Medical Systems.

  15. Implant therapy in irradiated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammartino, Gilberto; Marenzi, Gaetano; Cioffi, Iacopo; Teté, Stefano; Mortellaro, Carmen

    2011-03-01

    In this multicenter study, submerged implants were prospectively followed to evaluate their long-term prognosis in irradiated patients. In a total of 77 patients treated for oral or neck cancer, 188 implants were consecutively placed. After a healing period, the successfully integrated implants were restored with 69 removable and 38 fixed restorations. The implants cumulative survival and success rates were evaluated over a period of at least 36 months. In addition, cumulative success rates were calculated for implant subgroups divided per implant site (mandible or maxilla), radiation dosage, and the time interval between the last irradiation and implant placement. During the healing period, 20 implants did not successfully integrate, whereas 168 implants were classified as success (including both survival and success rates). The analysis of implant subgroups showed slightly more favorable cumulative success rate for mandibular implants (98.4%) compared with maxillary implants (57.1%) and clearly better success rate for a radiation dosage minor of 50-Gy doses. A time greater than 12 months as interval between last irradiation and implant placement seems not to promote better clinical results.

  16. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-01

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required with the

  17. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-21

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required

  18. Benefits of leptin therapy in HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin therapy in human recombinant form has recently been used in HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome on experimental basis in some small short-term clinical trials. It has shown its beneficial effects only in hypoleptinemic HIV-infected patients by causing definite improvement in their insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, lipid status, and truncal obesity. Leptin prevents lipotoxicity and activates insulin signaling pathways through several postulated mechanisms. Central leptin insufficiency with peripheral hyperleptinemia has come out to be a significant contributor to the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. In this article, we will review the basis of leptin therapy in HIV patients, with its promises. However, further larger clinical trials are needed to prove its long-term efficacy in the control of metabolic complications related to HIV therapy.

  19. The impact of leaf width and plan complexity on DMLC tracking of prostate intensity modulated arc therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias; Falk, Marianne; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is commonly used to treat prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of leaf width and plan complexity on dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking for prostate motion management during IMAT treatments.Methods: Prostate...

  20. Therapy of patients at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, F D

    1990-01-01

    This is an informal discussion of how the author manages fibrocystic breast disease. Cystic disease of the breast is common in premenopausal women, peaking at age 48. It usually follows a cyclic pattern, increasing premenstrually, and often developing during missed periods before menopause. Sometimes iatrogenic causes, such as premenopausal estrogen replacement or cimetidine, are responsible. 6% of women with cystic disease will progress to breast cancer by the age of 52. Patients are treated with excisional biopsy, and are followed up every 6 months. Disease can manifest on the range from benign fibroadenoma, to epitheliosis, to carcinoma in situ. It is advisable to discontinue birth control pills immediately in women with cyst disease. Estrogen replacement is especially contraindicated for these women because it will cause fibroadenosis in the upper outer quadrant, retard the process of fatty degeneration of breast tissue, and increase the woman's chances of more cysts, more biopsies, and more anxiety as future mammograms become increasingly difficult to interpret.

  1. [Shiatsu therapy for patients and caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouheret, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Shiatsu therapy is a manual discipline originating from traditional Chinese medicine. It is developing as an interesting form of support in the fight against stress and chronic fatigue. Shiatsu is used in some hospitals to support not only patients but also caregivers, to prevent burnout. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Physical therapy for patients with back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, R.W.A. van der; Dekker, J.; Baar, M.E. van

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the physical therapy diagnosis and treatment in patients with back pain. More specifically, the relationship between the duration of the complaint and the diagnosis and treatment was analysed. Data were used from a representative survey of physical therapeutic

  3. Psychomotoric therapy in patients with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Suchá

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dementia syndrome is a significant psychosocial and public health problem with important societal impact. It is important for us to learn more about methods of dementia management. Objective: To discuss principles and basic measures of psychomotor therapy in patients with dementia as well as the implementation of movement therapy and the lifestyle of patients with dementia. Methods: This research presents experience with psychomotor therapy of patients with dementia from the Centre of Gerontology - a day care unit for patients with dementia. Results: Physical activity is an important component in the management of dementia. Implementation of movement should be based on individual needs of persons with dementia and on their abilities. Individual programs and regular training have been pointed out as important principles in care and implementation of physical activity. Other physical activities could be included in the daily programme as well such as different sports and other movements if appropriate to the status of patients and advancement of the dementia syndrome. Conclusion: Regular structured physical activities should be a regular part of the daily programme in the care of patients with dementia.

  4. [QR-Code based patient tracking: a cost-effective option to improve patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M; Rybitskiy, D; Strauß, G; Dietz, A; Dressler, C R

    2013-03-01

    Hospitals are implementing a risk management system to avoid patient or surgery mix-ups. The trend is to use preoperative checklists. This work deals specifically with a type of patient identification, which is realized by storing patient data on a patient-fixed medium. In 127 ENT surgeries data relevant for patient identification were encrypted in a 2D-QR-Code. The code, as a separate document coming with the patient chart or as a patient wristband, has been decrypted in the OR and the patient data were presented visible for all persons. The decoding time, the compliance of the patient data, as well as the duration of the patient identification was compared with the traditional patient identification by inspection of the patient chart. A total of 125 QR codes were read. The time for the decrypting of QR-Code was 5.6 s, the time for the screen view for patient identification was 7.9 s, and for a comparison group of 75 operations traditional patient identification was 27.3 s. Overall, there were 6 relevant information errors in the two parts of the experiment. This represents a ratio of 0.6% for 8 relevant classes per each encrypted QR code. This work allows a cost effective way to technically support patient identification based on electronic patient data. It was shown that the use in the clinical routine is possible. The disadvantage is a potential misinformation from incorrect or missing information in the HIS, or due to changes of the data after the code was created. The QR-code-based patient tracking is seen as a useful complement to the already widely used identification wristband. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Registration of 3D tracked ultrasonic spinal images to segmented CT images for technology-guided therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Diane M.; Herring, Jeannette L.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    2000-04-01

    As a prerequisite to performing minimally-invasive spinal surgery (MISS) with technology-guided therapy (TGT), researchers at Vanderbilt University have proposed to mathematically align the physical space of the patient with preoperative images through a surface-based registration. In order to support closed-back spinal surgeries, we have selected a non-invasive, portable imaging modality for obtaining intra-operative images, namely ultrasound (U/S). The preliminary work for the application of TGT to spinal cases has been performed on a spine phantom, scanned with an optically-tracked U/S transducer. The lumbar vertebral surface was extracted from the U/S images, and the surface pixels were converted into 3D physical-space coordinates. This set of U/S surface points was divided into a test set and a target set to be used in registration and error measurement, respectively. The test set of U/S points was registered to segmented CT spinal images of the same phantom spine using a modification of the Besl-McKay Iterative Closest Point algorithm. In a qualitative analysis of the registration, the results look favorable. The U/S points closely align with the corresponding CT surface in every image slice. By incorporating TGT into minimally-invasive spinal surgeries, the procedures are expected to yield reduced injury to normal spinal tissue and hence quicker recovery time for the patient.

  6. Maintaining Unity - Relatives in older patient's fast-track treatment programmes. A Grounded theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Lindhardt, Tove; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To generate a substantive grounded theory of relatives' pattern of behaviour in older patients' fast-track treatment programmes during total hip or knee replacement. BACKGROUND: Fast-track treatment programmes are designed to make total hip and knee replacements more efficient through recovery...... improvements. The support of relatives during older patients' trajectory is important. However, knowledge is needed on the relatives' pattern of behaviour to strengthen their involvement in fast-track treatment programmes. DESIGN: We used a Glaserian grounded theory approach based on a systematic generation...

  7. Insulin therapy in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellahham, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia frequently occurs with acute medical illness, especially among patients with cardiovascular disease, and has been linked to increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Even patients who are normoglycemic can develop hyperglycemia in response to acute metabolic stress. An expanding body of literature describes the benefits of normalizing hyperglycemia with insulin therapy in hospitalized patients. As a result, both the American Diabetes Association and the American College of Endocrinology have developed guidelines for optimal control of hyperglycemia, specifically targeting critically ill, hospitalized patients. Conventional blood glucose values of 140–180 mg/dL are considered desirable and safely achievable in most patients. More aggressive control to insulin administration, which can then be transitioned to subcutaneous insulin therapy in those patients who require continued insulin maintenance. This article reviews the data establishing the link between hyperglycemia and its risks of morbidity and mortality, and describes strategies that have proven effective in maintaining glycemic control in high-risk hospitalized patients. PMID:21191429

  8. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of a fast-track surgery protocol on patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huaguang; Hu, Xu; Yu, Zaicheng; Zhang, Renquan; Zhang, Wei; Ge, Jianjun

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a fast-track surgery (FTS) protocol on patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy. We retrospectively analysed the clinical data of 80 eligible patients who underwent elective minimally invasive oesophagectomy in our department from January 2012 to April 2013 by the same surgical team. Two groups of these patients were compared. The control group comprised patients treated with traditional methods. Clinical parameters were compared. The study group was formed by patients treated with the fast-track concept, such as (i) a semi-liquid meal was administered up to 6 h before surgery and the patients were made to drink 200 ml of 10% glucose solution 3 h before surgery; (ii) no nasogastric tube, no abdominal drainage tube and no draining sinus in the neck; (iii) the chest tube and catheter were removed as early as possible; (iv) prevention of hypothermia therapy; (v) an attempt at bedside rehabilitation on postoperative day (POD) 2; and (vi) early postoperative enteral nutrition, restrictive intravenous fluids intraoperatively and postoperatively, and oral feeding initiated 48 h after surgery. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to age, sex, pathologic tumor-node-metastasis stage, tumour location, pathology, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, preoperative albumin level, 30-day readmission or complications (P >0.05). Compared with the conventional group, the FTS group had earlier first flatus [(3 (3-4) vs 6 (6-7) days], less fluid transfusion [2.1 (2.06-2.2) vs 2.8 (2.7-2.9) l] and shorter postoperative hospital stay [7 (6-9) days vs 12 (10-16.5) days] (P safe, feasible and efficient, and can accelerate postoperative rehabilitation. Compared with the conventional protocol, its advantages were limited to short-term follow-up. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery

  10. DISCHARGE PLANNING INCREASE THERAPY OBEDIENT OF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursalam Nursalam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discharge planning is a nurses learning  process of patients  hospitalized in  the hospital. Discharge planning  includes all treatments given to the patients  from the time of admission, during hospitalization, until the time of discharge. The aimed of this study was to evaluate  the patient’s  compliance for therapy (oral and injection medicine, nutrition and activities. Method: A quasy experimental purposive sampling design was used in this study. There were 14 respondents with DHF and GE who met to the inclusion criteria. The independent variable was Discharge planning and the dependent variable was patient’s  compliance for therapy.  Data were collected by using questionaire of medicine, nutrition and activity then analyzed by using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Mann Whitney U Test with significance level α≤0.05. Result: The result showed that discharge planning had significance influence to patient’s  compliance for therapy (p= 0.028. Discussion: It can be concluded that discharge planning has an effect to increase patient’s  compliance for therapy (oral and injection medicine, nutrition and activities.

  11. An integrated model-driven method for in-treatment upper airway motion tracking using cine MRI in head and neck radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Dolly, Steven; Li, Harold; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James; Ruan, Su; Anastasio, Mark; Mazur, Thomas; Gach, Michael; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Rodriguez, Vivian; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-08-01

    For the first time, MRI-guided radiation therapy systems can acquire cine images to dynamically monitor in-treatment internal organ motion. However, the complex head and neck (H&N) structures and low-contrast/resolution of on-board cine MRI images make automatic motion tracking a very challenging task. In this study, the authors proposed an integrated model-driven method to automatically track the in-treatment motion of the H&N upper airway, a complex and highly deformable region wherein internal motion often occurs in an either voluntary or involuntary manner, from cine MRI images for the analysis of H&N motion patterns. Considering the complex H&N structures and ensuring automatic and robust upper airway motion tracking, the authors firstly built a set of linked statistical shapes (including face, face-jaw, and face-jaw-palate) using principal component analysis from clinically approved contours delineated on a set of training data. The linked statistical shapes integrate explicit landmarks and implicit shape representation. Then, a hierarchical model-fitting algorithm was developed to align the linked shapes on the first image frame of a to-be-tracked cine sequence and to localize the upper airway region. Finally, a multifeature level set contour propagation scheme was performed to identify the upper airway shape change, frame-by-frame, on the entire image sequence. The multifeature fitting energy, including the information of intensity variations, edge saliency, curve geometry, and temporal shape continuity, was minimized to capture the details of moving airway boundaries. Sagittal cine MR image sequences acquired from three H&N cancer patients were utilized to demonstrate the performance of the proposed motion tracking method. The tracking accuracy was validated by comparing the results to the average of two manual delineations in 50 randomly selected cine image frames from each patient. The resulting average dice similarity coefficient (93.28%  ±  1

  12. Planas direct tracks in young patients with Class II malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribel, Marcos Nadler; Gribel, Bruno Frazão

    2005-01-01

    In Brazil, Class II malocclusions affect approximately one-third of children in the primary dentition period, and approximately two-thirds of the adolescent population. According to many authors, this type of malocclusion worsens with time, due to facial growth during childhood, both in terms of quantity and quality, and the facial pattern is established at an early age. The application of the Planas Direct Tracks concept and technique may represent an interesting tool for the correction and prevention of Class II malocclusion in an early treatment approach, working 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, applying oral functions and muscle activity to correct the malocclusion.

  13. Are Patients Traveling for Intraoperative Radiation Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey E. Larson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. One benefit of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT is that it usually requires a single treatment, thus potentially eliminating distance as a barrier to receipt of whole breast irradiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distance traveled by IORT patients at our institution. Methods. Our institutional prospective registry was used to identify IORT patients from 10/2011 to 2/2017. Patient’s home zip code was compared to institution zip code to determine travel distance. Characteristics of local (100 miles patients were compared. Results. 150 were patients included with a median travel distance of 27 miles and mean travel distance of 121 miles. Most were local (68.7%, with the second largest group living faraway (20.0%. Subset analysis of local patients demonstrated 20.4% traveled 1000 miles. The local, regional, and faraway patients did not differ with respect to age, race, tumor characteristics, or whole breast irradiation. Conclusions. Breast cancer patients are traveling for IORT, with 63% traveling >20 miles for care. IORT is an excellent strategy to promote breast conservation in selected patients, particularly those who live remote from a radiation facility.

  14. Tracking the dose distribution in radiation therapy by accounting for variable anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaly, B [Radiation Treatment Program, London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Rd E, London, ON, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Kempe, J A [Department of Medical Biophysics, Medical Science Building, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5C1 (Canada); Bauman, G S [Radiation Treatment Program, London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Rd E, London, ON, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Battista, J J [Radiation Treatment Program, London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Rd E, London, ON, N6A 4L6 (Canada); Van Dyk, J [Radiation Treatment Program, London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Rd E, London, ON, N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2004-03-07

    The goal of this research is to calculate the daily and cumulative dose distribution received by the radiotherapy patient while accounting for variable anatomy, by tracking the dose distribution delivered to tissue elements (voxels) that move within the patient. Non-linear image registration techniques (i.e., thin-plate splines) are used along with a conventional treatment planning system to combine the dose distributions computed for each 3D computed tomography (CT) study taken during treatment. For a clinical prostate case, we demonstrate that there are significant localized dose differences due to systematic voxel motion in a single fraction as well as in 15 cumulative fractions. The largest positive dose differences in rectum, bladder and seminal vesicles were 29%, 2% and 24%, respectively, after the first fraction of radiation treatment compared to the planned dose. After 15 cumulative fractions, the largest positive dose differences in rectum, bladder and seminal vesicles were 23%, 32% and 18%, respectively, compared to the planned dose. A sensitivity analysis of control point placement is also presented. This method provides an important understanding of actual delivered doses and has the potential to provide quantitative information to use as a guide for adaptive radiation treatments.

  15. Effects of levodopa therapy on global left ventricular systolic function in patients with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günaydın, Zeki Yüksel; Bektaş, Osman; Karagöz, Ahmet; Özer, Fahriye Feriha

    2016-07-01

    Since levodopa was identified as an efficient therapeutic option in Parkinson disease (PD), great success has been achieved in the course and treatment of the disease. However, L‑dopa-related side effects limit the therapeutic use in some patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of L‑dopa therapy on left ventricular global systolic function via speckle tracking method. In this study, 55 patients with PD under L‑dopa/dopa decarboxylase inhibitor therapy were compared with 30 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Conventional transthoracic echocardiography was performed in the left lateral position by two experienced operators in accordance with generally accepted guidelines. Left ventricular systolic function was analyzed by speckle tracking method using global longitudinal strain (GLS) and global circumferential strain (GCS) imaging. Adequate echocardiographic imaging for the evaluation of global longitudinal strain and global circumferential strain could be achieved in 55 of the patients. LVEF (left ventricular ejection fraction), GLS and GCS values were found to be similar between the patients with PD under L‑dopa therapy and the control group (62 ± 3.5 % vs 61 ± 4 %, p therapy has no unfavorable effect on left ventricular systolic function in patients with PD.

  16. Group therapy for kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, D C

    1975-01-01

    A short-term, open membership group therapy program for kidney transplant patients and their families is described. The content and process of this group is related to the ten curative factors described by Yalom for psychiatric patients. The primary benefits for the patients seemed to be the opportunity to observe others cope with similar problems and to learn of the adaptive strategies used by others. The patients were able to offer advice to others, to overcome their tendency toward seclusion and in general, experience a feeling of hope for the future. The family members gained more from a sense of group cohesiveness than did the patients. Both family and patients utilized the meetings to ventilate their anger and frustrations associated with chronic illness and to learn more about transplantation. A more realistic expectation of the future was provided. The group did not seem long enough to measurably improve the interpersonal relations between patients and their families nor did the group members comment upon maladaptive behaviors exhibited between family members within the meetings.

  17. TREND OF BALKAN ENDEMIC NEPHROPATHY PATIENTS ON RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN BOSNIA FROM 2003 THROUGH 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Imamović, Goran; Zerem, Enver; Omerović, Safet

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate epidemiological status of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Bosnia from 2003 through 2005. Incidence and prevalence rates of BEN, diabetes mellitus (DM) and RRT population and proportion of BEN RRT population in total RRT population were tracked in renal units covering the entire BEN endemic region in Bosnia. BEN incidence and prevalence rates were 52; 34;48 and 262; 265, 292, respectively. DM incidence and pre...

  18. Enhanced Optical Head Tracking for Cranial Radiation Therapy: Supporting Surface Registration by Cutaneous Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissel, Tobias, E-mail: wissel@rob.uni-luebeck.de [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Stüber, Patrick; Wagner, Benjamin [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Bruder, Ralf [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Erdmann, Christian [Institute for Neuroradiology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Deutz, Christin-Sophie [Clinic for Oral and Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Sack, Benjamin [Department of Neurology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Manit, Jirapong [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); and others

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To support surface registration in cranial radiation therapy by structural information. The risk for spatial ambiguities is minimized by using tissue thickness variations predicted from backscattered near-infrared (NIR) light from the forehead. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study we recorded NIR surface scans by laser triangulation from 30 volunteers of different skin type. A ground truth for the soft-tissue thickness was segmented from MR scans. After initially matching the NIR scans to the MR reference, Gaussian processes were trained to predict tissue thicknesses from NIR backscatter. Moreover, motion starting from this initial registration was simulated by 5000 random transformations of the NIR scan away from the MR reference. Re-registration to the MR scan was compared with and without tissue thickness support. Results: By adding prior knowledge to the backscatter features, such as incident angle and neighborhood information in the scanning grid, we showed that tissue thickness can be predicted with mean errors of <0.2 mm, irrespective of the skin type. With this additional information, the average registration error improved from 3.4 mm to 0.48 mm by a factor of 7. Misalignments of more than 1 mm were almost thoroughly (98.9%) pushed below 1 mm. Conclusions: For almost all cases tissue-enhanced matching achieved better results than purely spatial registration. Ambiguities can be minimized if the cutaneous structures do not agree. This valuable support for surface registration increases tracking robustness and avoids misalignment of tumor targets far from the registration site.

  19. Tracking the patient journey by combining multiple hospital database systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andy; Kozan, Erhan; Sinnott, Michael; Spencer, Lyndall; Eley, Robert

    2014-06-01

    With new national targets for patient flow in public hospitals designed to increase efficiencies in patient care and resource use, better knowledge of events affecting length of stay will support improved bed management and scheduling of procedures. This paper presents a case study involving the integration of material from each of three databases in operation at one tertiary hospital and demonstrates it is possible to follow patient journeys from admission to discharge.

  20. TotalTrack video intubating laryngeal mask in super-obese patients – series of cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaszynski T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tomasz Gaszynski Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Background: Super-obese patients are at increased risk of difficult mask ventilation and difficult intubation. Therefore, devices that allow for simultaneous ventilation/oxygenation during attempts to visualize the entrance to the larynx, increase patient safety. TotalTrack video intubating laryngeal mask is a new device that allows for ventilation during intubation efforts. Patients and methods: Twenty-four super-obese patients (body mass index >50 kg/m2 were divided into two subgroups: intubation efforts using 1 TotalTrack and 2 Macintosh blade standard laryngoscope in induction of general anesthesia. Visualization and successful intubation was evaluated for both groups with ventilation and post-mask complications additionally evaluated for TotalTrack. Results: In all cases in the TotalTrack group, the Cormack-Lehane score was 1, ventilation and intubation was successful in 11/12 patients. No hypoxia during intubation efforts was recorded. No serious complications of use of TotalTrack were observed. In the Macintosh blade laryngoscope group, all patients were intubated, but the Cormack-Lehane score was 2 in four cases, and 3 in three cases. Conclusion: TotalTrack video intubating laryngeal mask is a device that allows for better visualization of the larynx compared to the standard Macintosh blade laryngoscope, it provides effective ventilation/oxygenation and intubation in super-obese patients. Keywords: super-obese, intubation, ventilation, laryngeal mask, standard laryngoscope, video laryngoscope 

  1. How much physical therapy for patients with stroke?

    OpenAIRE

    Brocklehurst, J C; Andrews, K; Richards, B; Laycock, P J

    1978-01-01

    The use of physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy for patients with stroke was investigated, and the three treatments were compared. Out of 135 patients with stroke surviving at two weeks, 107 received physiotherapy, but only 35 received occupational therapy and 19 speech therapy. Those who received most physiotherapy were the most severely disabled and had the worst prognosis, and, although almost no recovery occurred after six months, 30 patients continued with treatment be...

  2. Development and clinical evaluation of automatic fiducial detection for tumor tracking in cine megavoltage images during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azcona, Juan Diego [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Physics, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra 31008 (Spain); Li Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Real-time tracking of implanted fiducials in cine megavoltage (MV) imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery is complicated due to the inherent low contrast of MV images and potential blockage of dynamic leaves configurations. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically practical autodetection algorithm for motion management during VMAT. Methods: The expected field-specific segments and the planned fiducial position from the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system were projected onto the MV images. The fiducials were enhanced by applying a Laplacian of Gaussian filter in the spatial domain for each image, with a blob-shaped object as the impulse response. The search of implanted fiducials was then performed on a region of interest centered on the projection of the fiducial when it was within an open field including the case when it was close to the field edge or partially occluded by the leaves. A universal template formula was proposed for template matching and normalized cross correlation was employed for its simplicity and computational efficiency. The search region for every image was adaptively updated through a prediction model that employed the 3D position of the fiducial estimated from the localized positions in previous images. This prediction model allowed the actual fiducial position to be tracked dynamically and was used to initialize the search region. The artifacts caused by electronic interference during the acquisition were effectively removed. A score map was computed by combining both morphological information and image intensity. The pixel location with the highest score was selected as the detected fiducial position. The sets of cine MV images taken during treatment were analyzed with in-house developed software written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). Five prostate patients were analyzed to assess the algorithm performance by measuring their positioning

  3. Implementation of the fast track surgery in patients undergoing the colonic resection: own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morończyk, Daniel Antoni F; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2011-09-01

    A perioperative care in the colorectal surgery has been considerably changed recently. The fast track surgery decreases complications rate, shortens length of stay, improves quality of life and leads to cost reduction. It is achieved by: resignation of a mechanical bowel preparation before and a nasogastric tube insertion after operation, optimal pain and intravenous fluid management, an early rehabilitation, enteral nutrition and removal of a vesical catheter and abdominal drain if used.The aim of the study was to compare the results of an implementation the fast track surgery protocol with results achieving in the conventional care regimen.Material and methods. Two groups of patients undergoing colonic resection have been compared. The study group was formed by patients treated with fast track concept, the control group - by patients who were dealt with hitherto regimen. Procedures needed stoma performing, rectal and laparoscopic surgery were excluded. The perioperative period was investigated by telephone call to patient or his family.Results. Statistical significant reduction was reached in a favour of the fast track group in the following parameters: the length of hospital stay (2.5 days shorter), duration of an abdominal cavity and vesicle drainage (3 and 2 days shorter respectively), postoperative day on which oral diet was implemented (2,5 days faster) and finally extended (1.5 days faster). There were no statistical difference in mortality, morbidity neither reoperation rate between two groups.Conclusion. The fast track surgery is a safe strategy and may improve a perioperative care.

  4. Emergency Department Real Time Location System Patient and Equipment Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    study of the application throughout the hospital in the inpatient and peri-operative setting. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nothing listed 16. SECURITY ...accomplishments/Reportable Outcomes Patient Tagging: Getting staff to embrace the change in their workflow and apply the RFID tag and band as well as getting...goes on if a patient passes the exit with a RFID tag still on. We have received the device however the vendor is researching how best to utilize the

  5. Oral surgery in patients on anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Crispian; Wolff, Andy

    2002-07-01

    Surgery is the main oral healthcare hazard to the patient with a bleeding tendency, which is mostly caused by the use of anticoagulants. The traditional management entails the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for dental surgery to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Because this issue is still controversial, it is the aim of this paper to review the evidence, to highlight the areas of major concern, and to suggest management regimens for patients on the 3 main types of anticoagulants: coumarins, heparins, and aspirin. MATERIALS REVIEWED: The pertinent literature and clinical protocols of hospital dentistry departments have been extensively reviewed and discussed. Several evolving clinical practices in the last years have been detected: anticoagulant use is generally not discontinued; oral surgery is performed despite laboratory values showing significant bleeding tendency; new effective local methods are used to prevent bleeding; and patients at risk are referred to hospital-based clinics. The management of oral surgery procedures on patients treated with anticoagulants should be influenced by several factors: extent and urgency of surgery, laboratory values, treating physician's recommendation, available facilities, dentist expertise, and patient's oral, medical, and general condition.

  6. Planning 4D intensity-modulated arc therapy for tumor tracking with a multileaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ying; Betzel, Gregory T.; Yang, Xiaocheng; Gui, Minzhi; Parke, William C.; Yi, Byongyong; Yu, Cedric X.

    2017-02-01

    This study introduces a practical four-dimensional (4D) planning scheme of IMAT using 4D computed tomography (4D CT) for planning tumor tracking with dynamic multileaf beam collimation. We assume that patients can breathe regularly, i.e. the same way as during 4D CT with an unchanged period and amplitude, and that the start of 4D-IMAT delivery can be synchronized with a designated respiratory phase. Each control point of the IMAT-delivery process can be associated with an image set of 4D CT at a specified respiratory phase. Target is contoured at each respiratory phase without a motion-induced margin. A 3D-IMAT plan is first optimized on a reference-phase image set of 4D CT. Then, based on the projections of the planning target volume in the beam’s eye view at different respiratory phases, a 4D-IMAT plan is generated by transforming the segments of the optimized 3D plan by using a direct aperture deformation method. Compensation for both translational and deformable tumor motion is accomplished, and the smooth delivery of the transformed plan is ensured by forcing connectivity between adjacent angles (control points). It is envisioned that the resultant plans can be delivered accurately using the dose rate regulated tracking method which handles breathing irregularities (Yi et al 2008 Med. Phys. 35 3955-62).This planning process is straightforward and only adds a small step to current clinical 3D planning practice. Our 4D planning scheme was tested on three cases to evaluate dosimetric benefits. The created 4D-IMAT plans showed similar dose distributions as compared with the 3D-IMAT plans on a single static phase, indicating that our method is capable of eliminating the dosimetric effects of breathing induced target motion. Compared to the 3D-IMAT plans with large treatment margins encompassing respiratory motion, our 4D-IMAT plans reduced radiation doses to surrounding normal organs and tissues.

  7. Effect of an Emergency Department Fast Track on Press-Ganey Patient Satisfaction Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang, Calvin E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mandated patient surveys have become an integral part of Medicare remuneration, putting hundreds of millions of dollars in funding at risk. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS recently announced a patient experience survey for the emergency department (ED. Development of an ED Fast Track, where lower acuity patients are rapidly seen, has been shown to improve many of the metrics that CMS examines. This is the first study examining if ED Fast Track implementation affects Press-Ganey scores of patient satisfaction. Methods: We analyzed returned Press-Ganey questionnaires from all ESI 4 and 5 patients seen 11AM - 11PM, August-December 2011 (pre-fast track, and during the identical hours of fast track, August-December 2012. Raw ordinal scores were converted to continuous scores for paired student t-test analysis. We calculated an odds ratio with 100% satisfaction considered a positive response. Results: An academic ED with 52,000 annual visits had 140 pre-fast track and 85 fast track respondents. Implementation of a fast track significantly increased patient satisfaction with the following: wait times (68% satisfaction to 88%, OR 4.13, 95% CI [2.32-7.33], doctor courtesy (90% to 95%, OR 1.97, 95% CI [1.04-3.73], nurse courtesy (87% to 95%, OR 2.75, 95% CI [1.46-5.15], pain control (79% to 87%, OR 2.13, 95% CI [1.16-3.92], likelihood to recommend (81% to 90%, OR 2.62, 95% CI [1.42-4.83], staff caring (82% to 91%, OR 2.82, 95% CI [1.54-5.19], and staying informed about delays (66% to 83%, OR 3.00, 95% CI [1.65-5.44]. Conclusion: Implementation of an ED Fast Track more than doubled the odds of significant improvements in Press-Ganey patient satisfaction metrics and may play an important role in improving ED performance on CMS benchmarks. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:34–38.

  8. Exercise therapy and other types of physical therapy for patients with neuromuscular diseases: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cup, E.H.C.; Pieterse, A.J.; Broek-Pastoor, J.M. Ten; Munneke, M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Hendricks, H.T.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and critically appraise the available evidence on exercise therapy and other types of physical therapies for patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). DATA SOURCES: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, CINAHL,

  9. Tracking Patient Encounters and Clinical Skills to Determine Competency in Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounsbery, Jody L; Pereira, Chrystian R; Harris, Ila M; Moon, Jean Y; Westberg, Sarah M; Kolar, Claire

    2016-02-25

    To determine if the amount of exposure to patient encounters and clinical skills correlates to student clinical competency on ambulatory care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Students in ambulatory care APPEs tracked the number of patients encountered by medical condition and the number of patient care skills performed. At the end of the APPE, preceptors evaluated students' competency for each medical condition and skill, referencing the Dreyfus model for skill acquisition. Data was collected from September 2012 through August 2014. Forty-six responses from a student tracking tool were matched to preceptor ratings. Students rated as competent saw more patients and performed more skills overall. Preceptors noted minimal impact on workload. Increased exposure to patient encounters and skills performed had a positive association with higher Dreyfus stage, which may represent a starting point in the conversation for more thoughtful design of ambulatory care APPEs.

  10. Eye tracking as a debriefing mechanism in the simulated setting improves patient safety practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Elizabeth A; Cunningham, Helene; Fisher, Donald L; Plotkin, Karen; Nathanson, Brian H; Roche, Joan P; Marquard, Jenna L; Reilly, Cheryl A; Henneman, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    Human patient simulation has been widely adopted in healthcare education despite little research supporting its efficacy. The debriefing process is central to simulation education, yet alternative evaluation methods to support providing optimal feedback to students have not been well explored. Eye tracking technology is an innovative method for providing objective evaluative feedback to students after a simulation experience. The purpose of this study was to compare 3 forms of simulation-based student feedback (verbal debrief only, eye tracking only, and combined verbal debrief and eye tracking) to determine the most effective method for improving student knowledge and performance. An experimental study using a pretest-posttest design was used to compare the effectiveness of 3 types of feedback. The subjects were senior baccalaureate nursing students in their final semester enrolled at a large university in the northeast United States. Students were randomly assigned to 1 of the 3 intervention groups. All groups performed better in the posttest evaluation than in the pretest. Certain safety practices improved significantly in the eye tracking-only group. These criteria were those that required an auditory and visual comparison of 2 artifacts such as "Compares patient stated name with name on ID band." Eye tracking offers a unique opportunity to provide students with objective data about their behaviors during simulation experiences, particularly related to safety practices that involve the comparison of patient stated data to an artifact such as an ID band. Despite the limitations of current eye tracking technology, there is significant potential for the use of this technology as a method for the study and evaluation of patient safety practices.

  11. Fostering Bilateral Patient-Clinician Engagement in Active Self-Tracking of Subjective Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Christiansen, Thomas Blomseth; Eskelund, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    In this position paper we describe select aspects of our experience with health-related self-tracking, the data generated, and processes surrounding those. In particular we focus on how bilateral patient-clinician engagement may be fostered by the combination of technology and method. We exemplify...

  12. Patient-reported outcome after fast-track hip arthroplasty: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Hansen, Torben B; Søballe, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    A fast-track intervention with a short preoperative optimization period and short postoperative hospitalization has a potential for reduced convalescence and thereby a reduced need for postoperative rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to describe patient-related outcomes, the need for a...

  13. Patient-reported outcome after fast-track hip arthroplasty: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Hansen, Torben B; Søballe, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    A fast-track intervention with a short preoperative optimization period and short postoperative hospitalization has a potential for reduced convalescence and thereby a reduced need for postoperative rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to describe patient-related outcomes, the need...

  14. Impact of a Fast-track Esophagectomy Protocol on Esophageal Cancer Patient Outcomes and Hospital Charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shewale, Jitesh B; Correa, Arlene M; Baker, Carla M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a fast-track esophagectomy protocol (FTEP) on esophageal cancer patients' safety, length of hospital stay (LOS), and hospital charges. BACKGROUND: FTEP involved transferring patients to the telemetry unit instead of the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) after...... esophagectomy. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 708 consecutive patients who underwent esophagectomy for primary esophageal cancer during the 4 years before (group A; 322 patients) or 4 years after (group B; 386 patients) the institution of an FTEP. Postoperative morbidity and mortality, LOS, and hospital...

  15. A Framework for Tracking Former Patients in the Electronic Health Record Using an Educational Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Gregory E; Barnard, Cynthia; Tyler, Patrick D; Liebovitz, David M; Neely, Kathy Johnson

    2018-01-04

    One challenge of contemporary medical education is that shorter lengths of stay and time-limited clerkships often interrupt a student's relationship with a patient before a diagnosis is made or treatment is completed, limiting the learning experience. Medical students sometimes use electronic health records (EHRs) to overcome these limitations. EHRs provide access to patients' future medical records, enabling students to track former patients across care venues to audit their diagnostic impressions and observe outcomes. While this activity has potential to improve clinical training, there is a risk of unintended harm to patients through loss of privacy. Students need guidance on how to perform this activity appropriately. This article describes an ethical framework for tracking using an "educational registry," a list of former patients housed within the EHR that one follows longitudinally for educational purposes. Guiding principles include obtaining permission from patients, having legitimate educational intent, and restricting review of records to those essential for training. This framework could serve as a foundation for institutions seeking to develop a policy on tracking former patients, and may facilitate research on the use of EHRs to improve medical education, such as reducing diagnostic error and promoting self-directed learning.

  16. Evaluation of Patients' Knowledge on Warfarin Therapy Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of patient knowledge is the first step to improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy and patient care. This study assessed the level of patients' knowledge on warfarin therapy among outpatients who were receiving warfarin in Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. It was based on cross ...

  17. Most patients regain prefracture basic mobility after hip fracture surgery in a fast-track programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with hip fracture has improved over the past decade. Still, some patients do not regain independent mobility within their primary hospital stay even if they follow a multimodal fast-track surgical programme. The aim of the present article was to examine the validity of the p...... of the preliminary prefracture New Mobility Score (NMS), age and fracture type as independent predictors of in-hospital outcome after hip fracture surgery.......Treatment of patients with hip fracture has improved over the past decade. Still, some patients do not regain independent mobility within their primary hospital stay even if they follow a multimodal fast-track surgical programme. The aim of the present article was to examine the validity...

  18. [Ozone therapy for radiation reactions and skin lesions after neutron therapy in patients with malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikaya, V V; Gribova, O V; Musabaeva, L I; Startseva, Zh A; Simonov, K A; Aleinik, A N; Lisin, V A

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the problem of radiation complications from normal tissues in patients after therapy with fast neutrons of 6.3 MeV. The methods of treatment using ozone technologies in patients with radiation reactions and skin lesions on the areas of irradiation after neutron and neutron-photon therapy have been worked out. Ozone therapy showed its harmlessness and increased efficiency of complex treatment of these patients.

  19. Most patients regain prefracture basic mobility after hip fracture surgery in a fast-track programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with hip fracture has improved over the past decade. Still, some patients do not regain independent mobility within their primary hospital stay even if they follow a multimodal fast-track surgical programme. The aim of the present article was to examine the validity...... of the preliminary prefracture New Mobility Score (NMS), age and fracture type as independent predictors of in-hospital outcome after hip fracture surgery....

  20. Most patients regain prefracture basic mobility after hip fracture surgery in a fast-track programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with hip fracture has improved over the past decade. Still, some patients do not regain independent mobility within their primary hospital stay even if they follow a multimodal fast-track surgical programme. The aim of the present article was to examine the validity of the p...... of the preliminary prefracture New Mobility Score (NMS), age and fracture type as independent predictors of in-hospital outcome after hip fracture surgery....

  1. [Oral rehydration therapy before surgery in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Makoto

    2011-07-01

    Oral rehydration therapy before surgery may be useful for elderly patients in perioperative management especially induction of general anesthesia, as they cannot preserve water in the body sufficiently. In elderly patients oral rehydration therapy is favorable to intravenous hydration as in younger patients. However, if swallowing is impaired or there are risks for aspiration, gastric emptying rate is decreased; gastroesophageal reflux disease is pointed out; cognitive function is disordered; or delirium has appeared, oral rehydration therapy should be carefully considered. It may be necessary to provide preoperative oral rehydration therapy to high risk elderly patients when they are hospitalized and they should be watched for taking oral rehydration solution soon by hospital nurses.

  2. Oral surgery in patients under antithrombotic therapy. Narrative review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carrizo, Anggelo; Carrasco, David

    2015-01-01

    Population aging and the increasing rates of cardiovascular diseases have raised the number of patients receiving antithrombotic therapy in elective or emergency dental care, including surgical procedures...

  3. Massage therapy and exercise therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Rezaie, Solmaz; Goharpey, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    The primary aim was to investigate the comparative effects of massage therapy and exercise therapy on patients with multiple sclerosis. The secondary aim was to investigate whether combination of both massage and exercise has an additive effect. Randomized controlled pilot trial with repeated measurements and blinded assessments. Local Multiple Sclerosis Society. A total of 48 patients with multiple sclerosis were randomly assigned to four equal subgroups labelled as massage therapy, exercise therapy, combined massage-exercise therapy and control group. The treatment group received 15 sessions of supervised intervention for five weeks. The massage therapy group received a standard Swedish massage. The exercise therapy group was given a combined set of strength, stretch, endurance and balance exercises. Patients in the massage-exercise therapy received a combined set of massage and exercise treatments. Patients in the control group were asked to continue their standard medical care. Pain, fatigue, spasticity, balance, gait and quality of life were assessed before and after intervention. Massage therapy resulted in significantly larger improvement in pain reduction (mean change 2.75 points, P = 0.001), dynamic balance (mean change, 3.69 seconds, P = 0.009) and walking speed (mean change, 7.84 seconds, P = 0.007) than exercise therapy. Patients involved in the combined massage-exercise therapy showed significantly larger improvement in pain reduction than those in the exercise therapy (mean change, 1.67 points, P = 0.001). Massage therapy could be more effective than exercise therapy. Moreover, the combination of massage and exercise therapy may be a little more effective than exercise therapy alone.

  4. Spatial and rotational quality assurance of 6DOF patient tracking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Andrew H; Liu, Xinmin; Grelewicz, Zachary; Wiersma, Rodney D

    2016-06-01

    External tracking systems used for patient positioning and motion monitoring during radiotherapy are now capable of detecting both translations and rotations. In this work, the authors develop a novel technique to evaluate the 6 degree of freedom 6(DOF) (translations and rotations) performance of external motion tracking systems. The authors apply this methodology to an infrared marker tracking system and two 3D optical surface mapping systems in a common tumor 6DOF workspace. An in-house designed and built 6DOF parallel kinematics robotic motion phantom was used to perform motions with sub-millimeter and subdegree accuracy in a 6DOF workspace. An infrared marker tracking system was first used to validate a calibration algorithm which associates the motion phantom coordinate frame to the camera frame. The 6DOF positions of the mobile robotic system in this space were then tracked and recorded independently by an optical surface tracking system after a cranial phantom was rigidly fixed to the moveable platform of the robotic stage. The calibration methodology was first employed, followed by a comprehensive 6DOF trajectory evaluation, which spanned a full range of positions and orientations in a 20 × 20 × 16 mm and 5° × 5° × 5° workspace. The intended input motions were compared to the calibrated 6DOF measured points. The technique found the accuracy of the infrared (IR) marker tracking system to have maximal root-mean square error (RMSE) values of 0.18, 0.25, 0.07 mm, 0.05°, 0.05°, and 0.09° in left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively, comparing the intended 6DOF position and the measured position by the IR camera. Similarly, the 6DOF RSME discrepancy for the HD optical surface tracker yielded maximal values of 0.46, 0.60, 0.54 mm, 0.06°, 0.11°, and 0.08° in LR, SI, AP, pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively, over the same 6DOF evaluative workspace. An earlier generation 3D optical surface tracking

  5. SU-G-BRA-10: Marker Free Lung Tumor Motion Tracking by An Active Contour Model On Cone Beam CT Projections for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, M; Yuan, Y; Lo, Y [The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Wei, J [City College of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel strategy to extract the lung tumor motion from cone beam CT (CBCT) projections by an active contour model with interpolated respiration learned from diaphragm motion. Methods: Tumor tracking on CBCT projections was accomplished with the templates derived from planning CT (pCT). There are three major steps in the proposed algorithm: 1) The pCT was modified to form two CT sets: a tumor removed pCT and a tumor only pCT, the respective digitally reconstructed radiographs DRRtr and DRRto following the same geometry of the CBCT projections were generated correspondingly. 2) The DRRtr was rigidly registered with the CBCT projections on the frame-by-frame basis. Difference images between CBCT projections and the registered DRRtr were generated where the tumor visibility was appreciably enhanced. 3) An active contour method was applied to track the tumor motion on the tumor enhanced projections with DRRto as templates to initialize the tumor tracking while the respiratory motion was compensated for by interpolating the diaphragm motion estimated by our novel constrained linear regression approach. CBCT and pCT from five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy were included in addition to scans from a Quasar phantom programmed with known motion. Manual tumor tracking was performed on CBCT projections and was compared to the automatic tracking to evaluate the algorithm accuracy. Results: The phantom study showed that the error between the automatic tracking and the ground truth was within 0.2mm. For the patients the discrepancy between the calculation and the manual tracking was between 1.4 and 2.2 mm depending on the location and shape of the lung tumor. Similar patterns were observed in the frequency domain. Conclusion: The new algorithm demonstrated the feasibility to track the lung tumor from noisy CBCT projections, providing a potential solution to better motion management for lung radiation therapy.

  6. Real-Time Dynamic MLC Tracking for Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne

    Motion management of intra-fraction tumour motion during radiotherapy treatment can be a challenging task in order to achieve tumour control as well as minimizing the dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking is a novel method for intra-fraction...

  7. Maintaining Unity - relatives in older patients' fast-track treatment programmes. A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Lindhardt, Tove; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-12-01

    To generate a substantive grounded theory of relatives' pattern of behaviour in older patients' fast-track treatment programmes during total hip or knee replacement. Fast-track treatment programmes are designed to make total hip and knee replacements more efficient through recovery improvements. The support of relatives during older patients' trajectory is important. However, knowledge is needed on the relatives' pattern of behaviour to strengthen their involvement in fast-track treatment programmes. We used a Glaserian grounded theory approach based on a systematic generation of theory from data to explain the latent pattern of behaviour of relatives. Data were collected from 2010-2011 in orthopaedic wards at two Danish university hospitals and consisted of 14 non-participant observations, 14 postobservational interviews and five interviews. Seven relatives of patients over 70 years of age participated. The constant comparative method was the guiding principle for simultaneous data collection, data analysis and coding, while theoretically sampling and writing memos. Maintaining Unity emerged as the relatives' pattern of behaviour through which they resolved their main concern: preventing the patients from feeling alone. The relatives resolved their main concern through three interchangeable behavioural modes: Protecting Mode, by providing loving and respectful support; Substituting Mode, with practical and cognitive support; and an Adapting Mode, by trying to fit in with the patients' and health professionals' requirements. The substantive theory of Maintaining Unity offers knowledge of relatives' strong desire to provide compassionate and loving support for the older patients during fast-track treatment programmes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. changing therapy changing antiretroviral therapy in paediatric patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-11-01

    Nov 1, 2005 ... abacavir hypersensitivity reaction occurs, all ART should be stopped until the ... Historically children have always lagged behind adults in their (virological) response to antiretrovirals (ARVs).1-3. However, with ..... therapy in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Pediatr Infect Dis J ...

  9. changing therapy changing antiretroviral therapy in paediatric patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-11-01

    Nov 1, 2005 ... Historically children have always lagged behind adults in their (virological) response to antiretrovirals (ARVs).1-3. However ... children, response to therapy in children is now approximating that in adults.4-6 Nevertheless, it is inevitable that over time, for a variety of .... Don't add one drug to a failing regimen.

  10. Does Music Therapy Improve Anxiety and Depression in Alzheimer's Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rubia Ortí, José Enrique; García-Pardo, María Pilar; Iranzo, Carmen Cabañés; Madrigal, José Joaquin Cerón; Castillo, Sandra Sancho; Rochina, Mariano Julián; Gascó, Vicente Javier Prado

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of a short protocol of music therapy as a tool to reduce stress and improve the emotional state in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. A sample of 25 patients with mild Alzheimer's received therapy based on the application of a music therapy session lasting 60 min. Before and after the therapy, patient saliva was collected to quantify the level of salivary cortisol using the Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) immunoassay technique and a questionnaire was completed to measure anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). The results show that the application of this therapy lowers the level of stress and decreases significantly depression and anxiety, establishing a linear correlation between the variation of these variables and the variation of cortisol. A short protocol of music therapy can be an alternative medicine to improve emotional variables in Alzheimer patients.

  11. [Methods of heparin therapy in surgical patients with thrombohemorrhagic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, F D

    2012-01-01

    The results of comparative study of different heparin medications efficacy in patients with thrombohemorrhagic syndrome (THS) are presented. The study was conducted in 286 patients with THS as a result of peritonitis of various etiology (174 patients), massive hemorrhage, shock, microcirculation disorders (112 patients). Heparin therapy carried out in 249 patients (87.1%), 37 patients (12.9%) had no heparin therapy./ In "heparin" group 193 patients (77.5%) received low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), 56 patients (22.5%) took unfractionated heparin (UFH). LWMH demonstrated high efficiency with fewer hemorrhagic complications in comparison with UFH/.

  12. Music Therapy with Ethnic Music for Dementia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tanaka

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results revealed characteristic responses of dementia patients onto the Japanese music, and we expect our result provides an evidence for better music therapy for dementia patients with Japanese culture.

  13. Early insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to be aware of the importance of initiating insulin therapy early to prevent poor glycaemic control and the development of .... Patients with T2DM experience decline in beta cell function and, with time, need ... In patients who are elderly,.

  14. Online dose reconstruction for tracked volumetric arc therapy: Real-time implementation and offline quality assurance for prostate SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerling, Cornelis Ph; Fast, Martin F; Ziegenhein, Peter; Menten, Martin J; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-11-01

    Firstly, this study provides a real-time implementation of online dose reconstruction for tracked volumetric arc therapy (VMAT). Secondly, this study describes a novel offline quality assurance tool, based on commercial dose calculation algorithms. Online dose reconstruction for VMAT is a computationally challenging task in terms of computer memory usage and calculation speed. To potentially reduce the amount of memory used, we analyzed the impact of beam angle sampling for dose calculation on the accuracy of the dose distribution. To establish the performance of the method, we planned two single-arc VMAT prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy cases for delivery with dynamic MLC tracking. For quality assurance of our online dose reconstruction method we have also developed a stand-alone offline dose reconstruction tool, which utilizes the RayStation treatment planning system to calculate dose. For the online reconstructed dose distributions of the tracked deliveries, we could establish strong resemblance for 72 and 36 beam co-planar equidistant beam samples with less than 1.2% deviation for the assessed dose-volume indicators (clinical target volume D98 and D2, and rectum D2). We could achieve average runtimes of 28-31 ms per reported MLC aperture for both dose computation and accumulation, meeting our real-time requirement. To cross-validate the offline tool, we have compared the planned dose to the offline reconstructed dose for static deliveries and found excellent agreement (3%/3 mm global gamma passing rates of 99.8%-100%). Being able to reconstruct dose during delivery enables online quality assurance and online replanning strategies for VMAT. The offline quality assurance tool provides the means to validate novel online dose reconstruction applications using a commercial dose calculation engine. © 2017 The Authors. Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Effects of Music Therapy on Mood in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong Soo; Park, Yoon Ghil; Choi, Jung Hwa; Im, Sang-Hee; Jung, Kang Jae; Cha, Young A; Jung, Chul Oh; Yoon, Yeo Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of music therapy on depressive mood and anxiety in post-stroke patients and evaluate satisfaction levels of patients and caregivers. Materials and Methods Eighteen post-stroke patients, within six months of onset and mini mental status examination score of over 20, participated in this study. Patients were divided into music and control groups. The experimental group participated in the music therapy program for four weeks. Psychological status was evaluated...

  16. Using color therapy at the patients, engaged intensive brainwork

    OpenAIRE

    Bykodarov A.V.; Yeliseyev V.V.; Schumacher G.I.

    2012-01-01

    At 49 patients, engaged intensive brainwork, clinically and by heart rate variability method investigates a condition of vegetative nervous system. Initially at the majority of patients normal parameters were recorded. To 30 patients of the basic group has been followed a course of color therapy with the purpose to study infuence of a color therapy of a vegetative regulation at the given patients. Green, yellow, orange and red colors were used. 19 persons have made a check-group. The...

  17. MANAGEMENT OF A GUILLAIN BARRE SYNDROME PATIENT THROUGH THREE TRACK REASONING: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamima Islam Nipa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical reasoning is a thinking and decision making process which occur in clinical practice. It helps the health care providers to solve the clinical problem by using their reasoning process in an effective and efficient manner. Three track reasoning in one of the clinical reasoning process which includes the procedural, interactive and conditional reasoning to diagnose as well as ensure proper rehabilitation service according to patient and patient’s family members’ needs. Methods: A single case based study through the three track reasoning process. The purpose of this study was to explore the management strategies of a Gullian Barrie Syndrome (GBS patient through three track reasoning. We have tried to show how the basic idea behind the reasoning process helped to determine the reasoning process and diagnosis. However it has performed through theory and observation. We have also showed how we used the reasoning process through with the common sense reasoning. However it was the part of procedural reasoning in three track clinical reasoning. In three track reasoning, there is also interactive and procedural reasoning part through which we told patient story about his condition, identified his and his family members expectations and to establish hypothesis as GBS. So three track reasoning also supported us to do reasoning process rather than selecting another reasoning process. Results: After analyzing the reasoning process it was identified that to be strict in a single reasoning process is very difficult. Clinical reasoning is the clinician’s ability through which they can consider the interpretation of different clinical findings. An expert clinician must have critical thinking skill rather than ignoring any symptoms or overemphasize the symptoms. In addition, patient’s knowledge, believes and reasoning was found an important part of clinical reasoning process in this study. Conclusion: We have been practicing clinical

  18. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sabin, Noah D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Ogg, Robert J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Jane, John A. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  19. Current perspectives on dental patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, W W; Konzelman, J L; Sutley, S H

    1997-03-01

    Despite approximately 40 years of experience with oral anticoagulant drugs, controversy still exists about the safety of dental treatment in a patient receiving this therapy. The authors review the topic in depth and offer detailed recommendations for the dental management of patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy.

  20. Effect of levothyroxine therapy on dyslipidemia in hypothyroid patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of levothyroxine therapy on dyslipidemia in hypothyroid patients. ... Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL ... (both subclinical and overt hypothyroidism), its association with dyslipidemia and whether replacement therapy with thyroid hormone has an effect on plasma lipid profile of hypothyroid patients.

  1. Safety of supervised exercise therapy in patients with intermittent claudication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommans, Lindy N. M.; Fokkenrood, Hugo J. P.; van Dalen, Hendrika C. W.; Scheltinga, Marc R. M.; Teijink, Joep A. W.; Peters, Ron J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Supervised exercise therapy (SET) is recommended as the primary treatment for patients with intermittent claudication (IC). However, there is concern regarding the safety of performing SET because IC patients are at risk for untoward cardiovascular events. The Dutch physical therapy guideline

  2. Associations between therapy skills and patient experiences of change processes in cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittorf, Andreas; Jakobi-Malterre, Ute E; Beulen, Silke; Bechdolf, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard W; Sartory, Gudrun; Wagner, Michael; Wiedemann, Georg; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Herrlich, Jutta; Klingberg, Stefan

    2013-12-30

    Despite the promising findings in relation to the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis (CBTp), little attention has been paid to the therapy skills necessary to deliver CBTp and to the influence of such skills on processes underlying therapeutic change. Our study investigated the associations between general and technical therapy skills and patient experiences of change processes in CBTp. The study sample consisted of 79 patients with psychotic disorders who had undergone CBTp. We randomly selected one tape-recorded therapy session from each of the cases. General and technical therapy skills were assessed by the Cognitive Therapy Scale for Psychosis. The Bern Post Session Report for Patients was applied to measure patient experiences of general change processes in the sense of Grawe's psychological therapy. General skills, such as feedback and understanding, explained 23% of the variance of patients' self-esteem experience, but up to 10% of the variance of mastery, clarification, and contentment experiences. The technical skill of guided discovery consistently showed negative associations with patients' alliance, contentment, and control experiences. The study points to the importance of general therapy skills for patient experiences of change processes in CBTp. Some technical skills, however, could detrimentally affect the therapeutic relationship. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Healthy Start Renal Clinic: Benefits of Tracking and Early Intervention in Pre-End Stage Renal Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Ida; Lindberg, Jill; Filangeri, Judith; Anderson, Shannon; Szerlip, Marjorie; Best, Julie; Sadler, Rebecca; Savoie, Judy; Jackson, Dina; James, Carla; Husserl, Fred; Copely, J. Brian

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong association between the benefits of pre-end stage renal disease (ESRD) education and decreased length of hospital stay (LOS) and hospital charges, delay of renal replacement therapy (RRT), and a smooth transition to RRT. The Ochsner Healthy Start Renal Clinic (HSRC) is a multidisciplinary early education and tracking program for pre-ESRD patients and their families. We identified and educated pre-ESRD patients about kidney disease, allowing them to discuss and make informed decisions about their treatment and be better prepared to cope with the transition to RRT and the changes in their lives resulting from kidney failure. HSRC patients demonstrated a significant decrease in length of hospital stay (p = 0.05), a trend towards decreased hospital episodes and charges, decreased use of temporary venous access, and a smooth transition to RRT. The control group was made up of patients who had either refused the structured education or had been referred to HSRC late and received only conventional instruction by a social worker at the point where dialysis was imminent. We compared the number of episodes of hospitalization, LOS, and overall hospital charges for the period immediately surrounding initiation of chronic dialysis (2 months before and 1 month following onset) of all 36 patients who began chronic hemodialysis in our facility between November 1997 and November 1998. HSRC patients had LOS half as long (p=0.05), fewer hospital episodes, and hospital charges of $5,000 less per patient than the non-HSRC group. Initial data strongly suggest that early education and intervention through the coordination of a multidisciplinary team maximize the continuity of patient care. PMID:21845139

  4. Clinical effect of Fuzheng quyu therapy in patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: One hundred and twenty patients who underwent radiotherapy after cervical carcinoma ... breast cancer [1]. Currently, radiotherapy and surgical therapy are the standard treatments for patients with cervical carcinoma. However, some patients cannot tolerate ..... non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing.

  5. Cancer patients' interest and preferences for music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Debra S; Sledge, Renata B; Fuller, Leigh Ann; Daggy, Joanne K; Monahan, Patrick O

    2005-01-01

    The reason for lack of routine integration of music therapy into healthcare may be that patients are not comfortable being involved in a music therapy intervention. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine cancer patients' interest in and preferences for using 2 types of music therapy interventions, music-making and music listening. Sixty-five patients completed the Music Interest Survey in addition to standardized measures of coping, affect, anxiety, and fatigue. Results suggest adult cancer patients are interested in music therapy, especially music listening. Patient interest and preference were associated with negative affect, anxiety, age, perceived intervention-specific benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy. Findings highlight the need for a comprehensive assessment of patient needs and preferences prior to intervention.

  6. Tracking the progress of HIV: the impact of point-of-care tests on antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid SD

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Steven D Reid, Sarah J Fidler, Graham S Cooke Department of Infectious Diseases, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: It is now around 30 years since the discovery of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. More than 70 million people have been infected in that time and around 35 million have died. The majority of those currently living with HIV/AIDS are in low- and middle-income countries, with sub-Saharan Africa bearing a disproportionate burden of the global disease. In high-income countries, the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART has drastically reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV. Patients on ART are now predicted to have near-normal life expectancy and the role of treatment is increasingly recognized in preventing new infections. In low- and middle-income countries, treatment is now more widely available and around half of those who need ART are currently receiving it. Early diagnosis of HIV is essential if ART is to be optimally implemented. Lab-based diagnostics for screening, diagnosis, treatment initiation, and the monitoring of treatment efficacy are critical in managing the disease and reducing the number of new infections each year. The introduction of point-of-care HIV rapid tests has transformed the epidemic, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. For the first time, these point-of-care tests allow for the rapid identification of infected individuals outside the laboratory who can undergo counseling and treatment and, in the case of pregnant women, allow the timely initiation of ART to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. Although survival is markedly improved with ART even in the absence of laboratory monitoring, long-term management of people living with HIV on ART, and their partners, is essential to ensure successful viral suppression. The burden of disease in many resource-poor settings with high HIV prevalence has challenged the ability of local laboratories

  7. Feasibility of Stereo-Infrared Tracking to Monitor Patient Motion During Cardiac SPECT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard D; Pretorius, P Hendrik; Boening, Guido; Bruyant, Philippe P; Feng, Bing; Fulton, Roger R; Gennert, Michael A; Nadella, Suman; King, Michael A

    2004-10-01

    Patient motion during cardiac SPECT imaging can cause diagnostic imaging artifacts. We investigated the feasibility of monitoring patient motion using the Polaris motion-tracking system. This system uses passive infrared reflection from small spheres to provide real-time position data with vendor stated 0.35 mm accuracy and 0.2 mm repeatability. In our configuration, the Polaris system views through the SPECT gantry toward the patient's head. List-mode event data was temporally synchronized with motion-tracking data utilizing a modified LabVIEW virtual instrument that we have employed in previous optical motion-tracking investigations. Calibration of SPECT to Polaris coordinates was achieved by determining the transformation matrix necessary to align the position of four reflecting spheres as seen by Polaris, with the location of Tc-99m activity placed inside the sphere mounts as determined in SPECT reconstructions. We have successfully tracked targets placed on volunteers in simulated imaging positions on the table of our SPECT system. We obtained excellent correlation (R(2) > 0.998) between the change in location of the targets as measured by our SPECT system and the Polaris. We have also obtained excellent agreement between the recordings of the respiratory motion of four targets attached to an elastic band wrapped around the abdomen of volunteers and from a pneumatic bellows. We used the axial motion of point sources as determined by the Polaris to correct the motion in SPECT image acquisitions yielding virtually identical point source FWHM and FWTM values, and profiled maximum heart wall counts of cardiac phantom images, compared to the reconstructions with no motion.

  8. Molecular targeted therapies for patients with refractory thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chougnet, C; Brassard, M; Leboulleux, S; Baudin, E; Schlumberger, M

    2010-08-01

    The recent availability of molecular targeted therapies leads to reconsideration of the treatment strategy in patients with distant metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma who are resistant to radioiodine therapy, and in patients with metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma. In patients with progressive disease, treatment with kinase inhibitors should be offered, preferably in the context of a prospective trial. Copyright (c) 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety and efficacy of intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy in therapy refractory Crohn's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, S; Atreya, R; Englbrecht, M; Neurath, M F

    2017-02-01

    A major challenge in the management of persistently active Crohn's disease patient's refractory to treatment regimen following the current guidelines is the induction of remission, which is a prerequisite for subsequent maintenance therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate both the clinical and endoscopic benefit of intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy in patients with active and therapy refractory Crohn's disease. Nine patients with acute moderate to severe Crohn's disease, not responding to conventional as well as biological therapy regimen received 3 - 9 cycles of monthly treatments with intravenous cyclophosphamide (680 - 1000 mg) in an uncontrolled setting and were retrospectively analyzed. Eight of nine patients (88.9%) had a clinical response (measured by a decrease in the Harvey-Bradshaw index, HBI ≥ 3) and two of nine patients (22.2%) achieved clinical remission (HBI ≤ 4) at week 8 after two applications of intravenous cyclophosphamide therapy. These response and remission rates remained unchanged after individual completion of cyclophosphamide therapy. Median HBI decreased from 18 (7 - 25) at the beginning of therapy to 7 (3 - 18) at week 8. 5 of 9 patients (56%) showed endoscopic response (defined by a reduction of ulcers) and one patient (11%) reached endoscopic remission (defined by the absence of ulcers) after the last application of cyclophosphamide. Arthralgia, which was present in 4 of 9 (44%) patients, was unchanged in most patients after cyclophosphamide therapy, although one patient described a marked reduction in joint pain. Cyclophosphamide pulse therapy was well tolerated during the whole treatment course in all subjects. One patient with long-standing Crohn's disease was diagnosed with a high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia in the rectum and underwent surgical intervention, where the diagnosis of an early stage adenocarcinoma was made. We concluded that intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy was well tolerated by most

  10. Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy in Acute Stroke: Do Rural Patients Receive Less Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie Merchant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess whether acute stroke patients in rural hospitals receive less occupational therapy and physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. Design. Retrospective case-control study of health data in patients ≤10 days after stroke. Setting. Occupational therapy and physiotherapy services in four rural hospitals and one metropolitan hospital. Participants. Acute stroke patients admitted in one health district. Main Outcome Measures. Frequency and duration of face-to-face and indirect therapy sessions. Results. Rural hospitals admitted 363 patients and metropolitan hospital admitted 378 patients. Mean age was 73 years. Those in rural hospitals received more face-to-face (p>0.0014 and indirect (p=0.001 occupational therapy when compared to those in the metropolitan hospital. Face-to-face sessions lasted longer (p=0.001. Patients admitted to the metropolitan hospital received more face-to-face (p>0.000 and indirect (p>0.000 physiotherapy when compared to those admitted to rural hospitals. Face-to-face sessions were shorter (p>0.000. Almost all were seen within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions. Acute stroke patients in Australian rural hospital may receive more occupational therapy and less physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. The dose of therapy was lower than recommended, and the referral process may unnecessarily delay the time from admission to a patient’s first therapy session.

  11. Tumor tracking based on correlation models in scanned ion beam therapy: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregni, M.; Kaderka, R.; Fattori, G.; Riboldi, M.; Pella, A.; Constantinescu, A.; Saito, N.; Durante, M.; Cerveri, P.; Bert, C.; Baroni, G.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate dose delivery to extra-cranial lesions requires tumor motion compensation. An effective compensation can be achieved by real-time tracking of the target position, either measured in fluoroscopy or estimated through correlation models as a function of external surrogate motion. In this work, we integrated two internal/external correlation models (a state space model and an artificial neural network-based model) into a custom infra-red optical tracking system (OTS). Dedicated experiments were designed and conducted at GSI (Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung). A robotic breathing phantom was used to reproduce regular and irregular internal target motion as well as external thorax motion. The position of a set of markers placed on the phantom thorax was measured with the OTS and used by the correlation models to infer the internal target position in real-time. Finally, the estimated target position was provided as input for the dynamic steering of a carbon ion beam. Geometric results showed that the correlation models transversal (2D) targeting error was always lower than 1.3 mm (root mean square). A significant decrease of the dosimetric error with respect to the uncompensated irradiation was achieved in four out of six experiments, demonstrating that phase shifts are the most critical irregularity for external/internal correlation models.

  12. Effectiveness of medication / auricular therapy / phyto-therapy combination in the treatment of hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Martínez Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: hypertension is one of the main cardiovascular risk factors, so its control improves the life expectancy of patients.Objective: to assess the effects of a treatment combining medication with auricular therapy and phyto-therapy in hypertensive patients assisted at the health area of ”Romárico Oro” Polyclinic, in Puerto Padre, Las Tunas province.Methods: an intervention study was carried out in 68 hypertensive patients of the health area of “Romárico Oro” Polyclinic in Puerto Padre from April, 2013 to April, 2014. The patients were distributed at random into two equal groups; the first received medication combined with auricular therapy and phyto-therapy, while the second one received only medication. The statistical analysis was done by means of Statistic system, t-student and Chi-Square tests were used and p< or =0.05 was considered as level of statistical significance.Results: by the end of the intervention, 73, 53% of the patients of the group with the combination of drug treatment and auricular therapy and phyto-therapy were controlled. In this group, the diastolic filling pressure diminished to 2, 2 mm Hg and the systolic gradient to 3, 66 mm, regarding the group treated only with drugs. Only one patient, representing the 2, 94% showed adverse reaction to the natural and traditional treatment.Conclusions: the combination of medication with auricular therapy and phyto-therapy proved to be effective, corroborated by a significant decrease of quantity of crisis, diastolic and systolic filling pressure values and increase of number of patients with their disease controlled; the report of only one complication shows the innocuousness of the auricular therapy and phyto-therapy treatment.

  13. Evaluation of a fast-track programme for patients undergoing liver resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nicolai A.; Larsen, Peter Nørgaard; Klarskov, Birthe Michaelsen

    2013-01-01

    right or left hemihepatectomies had a median LOS of 5 days. The readmission rate was 6·0 per cent and 30-day mortality was zero. CONCLUSION: Fast-track principles for perioperative care were introduced successfully and are safe after liver resection. Routine discharge 2 days after laparoscopic resection...... complications. RESULTS: Median length of stay (LOS) for all patients was 5 days, with 2 days after laparoscopic versus 5 days following open resection (P ...BACKGROUND: Recent developments in perioperative pathophysiology and care have documented evidence-based, multimodal rehabilitation (fast-track) to hasten recovery and to decrease morbidity and hospital stay for several major surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect...

  14. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of VEGFR-2 in Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tracks Disease Response to Antiangiogenic and Notch-Inhibition Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Juan D; Lin, Fanglue; Chiang, Yun-Chen; Chytil, Anna; Chong, Diana C; Bautch, Victoria L; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Dayton, Paul A

    2018-01-01

    Metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) affects thousands of patients worldwide each year. Antiangiogenic therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects initially, but resistance is eventually developed. Therefore, it is important to accurately track the response of cancer to different therapeutics in order to appropriately adjust the therapy to maximize efficacy. Change in tumor volume is the current gold standard for determining efficacy of treatment. However, functional variations can occur much earlier than measurable volume changes. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an important tool for assessing tumor progression and response to therapy, since it can monitor functional changes in the physiology. In this study, we demonstrate how ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) can accurately track the evolution of the disease and molecular response to treatment. Methods A cohort of NSG (NOD/scid/gamma) mice was injected with ccRCC cells and treated with either the VEGF inhibitor SU (Sunitinib malate, Selleckchem, TX, USA) or the Notch pathway inhibitor GSI (Gamma secretase inhibitor, PF-03084014, Pfizer, New York, NY, USA), or started on SU and later switched to GSI (Switch group). The therapies used in the study focus on disrupting angiogenesis and proper vessel development. SU inhibits signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is responsible for the sprouting of new vasculature, and GSI inhibits the Notch pathway, which is a key factor in the correct maturation of newly formed vasculature. Microbubble contrast agents targeted to VEGFR-2 (VEGF Receptor) were delivered as a bolus, and the bound agents were imaged in 3D after the free-flowing contrast was cleared from the body. Additionally, the tumors were harvested at the end of the study and stained for CD31. Results The results show that MI can detect changes in VEGFR-2 expression in the group treated with SU within a week of the start of treatment, while differences in volume

  15. [Benefits of cognitive behavior therapy and acupressure therapy in obese patients: a randomized clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, V; Castro Sánchez, A Ma; Matarán Peñarocha, G A; Lara Palomo, I; Aguilar Ferrándiz, Ma E; Moreno Lorenzo, C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze change of lifestyle in obese patients with cognitive behavior therapy and acupressure. An experimental study was performed with placebo control group. Forty patients were randomly assigned to intervention group (cognitive behaviour therapy + acupressure) and control group (information session). Outcome measure was a questionnaire for the assessment and quantification of obesity related lifestyles. Measures were performed at baseline and, after 3-months intervention. After 3 months of treatment, the intervention group showed significant differences (pobese patient, cognitive behavior therapy and acupressure, it has lost at least three kilograms over three months and has changed lifestyles related to obesity.

  16. Effects of music therapy on mood in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Park, Yoon Ghil; Choi, Jung Hwa; Im, Sang-Hee; Jung, Kang Jae; Cha, Young A; Jung, Chul Oh; Yoon, Yeo Hoon

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the effects of music therapy on depressive mood and anxiety in post-stroke patients and evaluate satisfaction levels of patients and caregivers. Eighteen post-stroke patients, within six months of onset and mini mental status examination score of over 20, participated in this study. Patients were divided into music and control groups. The experimental group participated in the music therapy program for four weeks. Psychological status was evaluated with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) before and after music therapy. Satisfaction with music therapy was evaluated by a questionnaire. BAI and BDI scores showed a greater decrease in the music group than the control group after music therapy, but only the decrease of BDI scores were statistically significant (p=0.048). Music therapy satisfaction in patients and caregivers was affirmative. Music therapy has a positive effect on mood in post-stroke patients and may be beneficial for mood improvement with stroke. These results are encouraging, but further studies are needed in this field.

  17. [Rectal ozone therapy for patients with pulmonary emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calunga, José Luis; Paz, Yuleidys; Menéndez, Silvia; Martínez, Alfredo; Hernández, Aparicio

    2011-04-01

    Ozone therapy may stimulate antioxidant systems and protect against free radicals. It has not been used formerly in patients with pulmonary emphysema. To assess the effects of rectal ozone therapy in patients with pulmonary emphysema. Sixty four patients with pulmonary emphysema, aged between 40 and 69 years, were randomly assigned to receive rectal ozone in 20 daily sessions, rectal medicinal oxygen or no treatment. Treatments were repeated three months later in the first two groups. At baseline and at the end of the study, spirometry and a clinical assessment were performed. fifty patients completed the protocol, 20 receiving ozone therapy, 20 receiving rectal oxygen and 10 not receiving any therapy. At baseline, patients on ozone therapy had significantly lower values of forced expiratory volume in the first second (fEV1) and fEV1/forced vital capacity. At the end of the treatment period, these parameters were similar in the three treatment groups, therefore they only improved significantly in the group on ozone therapy. No differences were observed in other spirometric parameters. Rectal ozone therapy may be useful in patients with pulmonary emphysema.

  18. Effects of Music Therapy on Mood in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Choi, Jung Hwa; Im, Sang-Hee; Jung, Kang Jae; Cha, Young A; Jung, Chul Oh; Yoon, Yeo Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of music therapy on depressive mood and anxiety in post-stroke patients and evaluate satisfaction levels of patients and caregivers. Materials and Methods Eighteen post-stroke patients, within six months of onset and mini mental status examination score of over 20, participated in this study. Patients were divided into music and control groups. The experimental group participated in the music therapy program for four weeks. Psychological status was evaluated with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) before and after music therapy. Satisfaction with music therapy was evaluated by a questionnaire. Results BAI and BDI scores showed a greater decrease in the music group than the control group after music therapy, but only the decrease of BDI scores were statistically significant (p=0.048). Music therapy satisfaction in patients and caregivers was affirmative. Conclusion Music therapy has a positive effect on mood in post-stroke patients and may be beneficial for mood improvement with stroke. These results are encouraging, but further studies are needed in this field. PMID:22028163

  19. MaLT - Combined Motor and Language Therapy Tool for Brain Injury Patients Using Kinect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wairagkar, Maitreyee; McCrindle, Rachel; Robson, Holly; Meteyard, Lotte; Sperrin, Malcom; Smith, Andy; Pugh, Moyra

    2017-03-23

    The functional connectivity and structural proximity of elements of the language and motor systems result in frequent co-morbidity post brain injury. Although rehabilitation services are becoming increasingly multidisciplinary and "integrated", treatment for language and motor functions often occurs in isolation. Thus, behavioural therapies which promote neural reorganisation do not reflect the high intersystem connectivity of the neurologically intact brain. As such, there is a pressing need for rehabilitation tools which better reflect and target the impaired cognitive networks. The objective of this research is to develop a combined high dosage therapy tool for language and motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation therapy tool developed, MaLT (Motor and Language Therapy), comprises a suite of computer games targeting both language and motor therapy that use the Kinect sensor as an interaction device. The games developed are intended for use in the home environment over prolonged periods of time. In order to track patients' engagement with the games and their rehabilitation progress, the game records patient performance data for the therapist to interrogate. MaLT incorporates Kinect-based games, a database of objects and language parameters, and a reporting tool for therapists. Games have been developed that target four major language therapy tasks involving single word comprehension, initial phoneme identification, rhyme identification and a naming task. These tasks have 8 levels each increasing in difficulty. A database of 750 objects is used to programmatically generate appropriate questions for the game, providing both targeted therapy and unique gameplay every time. The design of the games has been informed by therapists and by discussions with a Public Patient Involvement (PPI) group. Pilot MaLT trials have been conducted with three stroke survivors for the duration of 6 to 8 weeks. Patients' performance is monitored through MaLT's reporting facility

  20. [Snoezelen and animal-assisted therapy in dementia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javelot, Hervé; Antoine-Bernard, Emilie; Garat, Jennifer; Javelot, Thierry; Weiner, Luisa; Mervelay, Véroníque

    2012-01-01

    A number of non medication-based methods of nursing care for geriatric patients have been developed over recent decades to treat non cognitive symptoms associated with dementia. Among these, Snoezelen rooms for multisensory behavioural therapy and animal-assisted therapy emerge as innovative strategies which could potentially complement other more frequently developed methods such as physical activity.

  1. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T. (Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry)

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  2. Clinical effect of Fuzheng quyu therapy in patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the clinical effect of Fuzheng Quyu therapy in patients undergoing radiotherapy after cervical carcinoma ... Conclusion: Herbal therapy designed to nourish vital energy and eliminates blood stasis relieves high- level blood coagulation ..... improves immunity, regulates neural and endocrine functions ...

  3. Gestalt Therapy with the Dying Patient: Integrative Work Using Clay, Poetry Therapy, and Creative Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Hilarion G.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the use of death therapy with a cancer patient. Gestalt therapy and creative media were used to facilitate an integration of life and a sense of balance with life. Suggests that counseling the dying means walking along a stretch of the path together. (Author)

  4. Power to the patient: care tracks and empowerment a recipe for improving rehabilitation for hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Susanne; Hedström, Margareta; Ekström, Wilhelmina; Lindberg, Lene; Flodin, Lena; Ryd, Leif

    2015-09-01

    New surgical procedures, early operation and medical optimisation in patients with hip fracture have shown positive results on length of hospital stay. Our aims were to investigate whether patient empowerment along with an individually designed, postoperative rehabilitation programme could reduce length of hospital stay and whether the patients would have better chances to return to their previous living. Patients were recruited during a 12-month period 2009-2010, with an intervention group treated with an individually designed, postoperative rehabilitation programme and a control group treated in a traditional way according to the hospitals routines. Final assessment was performed 4 month after surgery. The postoperative programme for the intervention group consisted of four standardised care tracks adapted individually for the patients. Assessments of Activity of Daily Living, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification of medical disease status and Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire and living conditions were used to determine which care track was most appropriate. The patients were cared for with focus of empowerment in their rehabilitation. The study involved 503 hip fracture patients, 285 patients in the intervention group and 218 patients in the control group. The mean length of stay was 4 days shorter in the intervention group than in the control group (p = 0.04). Varied only to a small extent between the age groups in the intervention group and was greater between the age groups in the control. Patients in the intervention group returned to their previous living in 90% compared with 80% in the control group (p rehabilitation programme may be of benefit in helping patients to a shorter hospital stay and to return to their previous living. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  5. Gold nanorods as photothermal agents and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death during plasmonic photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Chiew, Geraldine Giap Ying; Luo, Kathy Qian; Liu, Quan

    2015-07-01

    The transverse and longitudinal plasmon resonance in gold nanorods can be exploited to localize the photothermal therapy and influence the fluorescence to monitor the treatment outcome at the same time. While the longitudinal plasmon peak contributes to the photothermal effect, the transverse peak can enhance fluorescence. After cells take in PEGylated nanorods through endocytosis, autofluorescence from endogenous fluorophores such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in the mitochondria is enhanced two times, which is a good indicator of the respiratory status of the cell. When cells are illuminated continuously with near infrared laser, the temperature reaches the hyperthermic region within the first four minutes, which demonstrates the efficiency of gold nanorods in photothermal therapy. The cell viability test and autofluorescence intensity show good correlation indicating the progress of cell death over time.

  6. Atorvastatin/trimetazidine combination therapy in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the outcomes and safety of atorvastatin/trimetazidine combination therapy in patients with chronic cardiac failure. Methods: A total of 144 patients with chronic cardiac failure were divided into test group (n = 72) and control group (n = 72). In addition to conventional anti-heart failure treatment, all patients ...

  7. Eye-tracking controlled cognitive function tests in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a controlled proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jürgen; Gorges, Martin; Horn, Hannah T; Aho-Özhan, Helena E A; Pinkhardt, Elmar H; Uttner, Ingo; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C; Lulé, Dorothée

    2015-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) primarily affects motor and speech abilities. In addition, cognitive functions are impaired in a subset of patients. There is a need to establish an eye movement-based method of neuropsychological assessment suitable for severely physically impaired patients with ALS. Forty-eight ALS patients and thirty-two healthy controls matched for age, sex and education performed a hand and speech motor-free version of the Raven's coloured progressive matrices (CPM) and the D2-test which had been especially adapted for eye-tracking control. Data were compared to a classical motor-dependent paper-pencil version. The association of parameters of the eye-tracking and the paper-pencil version of the tests and the differences between and within groups were studied. Subjects presented similar results in the eye-tracking and the corresponding paper-pencil versions of the CPM and D2-test: a correlation between performance accuracy for the CPM was observed for ALS patients (p eye-tracking (p = 0.053) and the paper-pencil version (p = 0.042). Most importantly, eye-tracking versions of the CPM (p Eye-tracking-based neuropsychological testing is a promising approach for assessing cognitive deficits in patients who are unable to speak or write such as patients with severe ALS.

  8. Melanoma patient imaging in the era of effective systemic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodell, M; Thompson, J F; Emmett, L; Uren, R F; Kapoor, R; Saw, R P M

    2017-08-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the current multi-disciplinary management of patients with melanoma. It is used for primary disease staging, surgical planning, and surveillance in high-risk patients, and for monitoring the effects of systemic or loco-regional therapies. Several different imaging modalities have been utilised in the past. Contemporary imaging practises vary geographically depending on clinical guidelines, physician preferences, availability and cost. Targeted therapies and immunotherapies have revolutionised the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma over the last few years. With this have come new patterns of disease that were not observed after conventional therapies, and new criteria to assess therapeutic responses. In this article we review the role of imaging for patients with melanoma in the era of effective systemic therapies and discuss likely future developments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  9. Body awareness therapy for patients with fibromyalgia and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Gunvor

    2005-06-17

    There are several therapies designed to increase body awareness. They are commonly known as body awareness therapies (BAT) and include Basic BAT, Mensendieck and Feldenkrais therapy. A focus on emotions is important in all these therapies. In this article the aim and development of Basic BAT is described together with evaluations of treatments including Basic BAT. Multidisciplinary studies have shown that Basic BAT can increase health-related quality of life and cost-effectiveness. However Basic BAT needs to be further studied in relation to patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and chronic pain. Studies so far indicate that Basic BAT has positive effects.

  10. Kundalini yoga as a support therapy for cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kröneck, Mia

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to describe cancer patient’s experience of kundalini yoga and its effect on their internal coping resources. The intention of this study is to put forward kundalini yoga as a support therapy for cancer patients for improving their wellbeing during active cancer treatment. This is a descriptive study. An academic literature review was conducted for cancer, cancer treatment, internal coping resources and yoga as therapy topics. Four voluntary female cancer patients (...

  11. Patients With Brain Tumors: Who Receives Postacute Occupational Therapy Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincy; Xiong, Chen; Colantonio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data on the utilization of occupational therapy among patients with brain tumors have been limited to those with malignant tumors and small samples of patients outside North America in specialized palliative care settings. We built on this research by examining the characteristics of patients with brain tumors who received postacute occupational therapy services in Ontario, Canada, using health care administrative data. Between fiscal years 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, 3,199 patients with brain tumors received occupational therapy services in the home care setting after hospital discharge; 12.4% had benign brain tumors, 78.2% had malignant brain tumors, and 9.4% had unspecified brain tumors. However, patients with benign brain tumors were older (mean age=63.3 yr), and a higher percentage were female (65.2%). More than 90% of patients received in-home occupational therapy services. Additional research is needed to examine the significance of these differences and to identify factors that influence access to occupational therapy services in the home care setting. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  12. using antiretroviral therapy in patients with tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Snared or overlapping roxicity is common and leads ro difficult managemenr decisions if the roxicity warranrs stopping therapy. The commonest shared toxicities are peripheral neuropathy, nausea, rash and hepatitis. Peripheral neuropathy due to isoniazid can be prevenred wirh pyridoxine, and it is prudent ro give this to all ...

  13. Psychological benefits of virtual reality for patients in rehabilitation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Jeng, Ming-Chang; Fung, Chin-Ping; Doong, Ji-Liang; Chuang, Tien-Yow

    2009-05-01

    Whether virtual rehabilitation is beneficial has not been determined. To investigate the psychological benefits of virtual reality in rehabilitation. An experimental group underwent therapy with a virtual-reality-based exercise bike, and a control group underwent the therapy without virtual-reality equipment. Hospital laboratory. 30 patients suffering from spinal-cord injury. A designed rehabilitation therapy. Endurance, Borg's rating-of-perceived-exertion scale, the Activation-Deactivation Adjective Check List (AD-ACL), and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire. The differences between the experimental and control groups were significant for AD-ACL calmness and tension. A virtual-reality-based rehabilitation program can ease patients' tension and induce calm.

  14. Application of fast track surgery in routine nursing for patient with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongrui Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the clinical effect of fast track surgery (FTS in perioperative nursing of colorectal cancer surgery. Background: In recent years, many complicated surgery began to develop in the direction of low invasion and short hospital time, which provides an unprecedented opportunity for the development of fast track surgery (FTS. Methods: According to different nursing measures, 156 cases of colorectal cancer patients treated in our hospital were divided into FTS nursing group (86 cases and traditional nursing group (70 cases. FTS nursing care and traditional nursing care were respectively employed to analyze and compare postoperative recovery and complications of the two groups. Results: FTS nursing group was significantly shorter than the traditional care group in terms of the first postoperative exhaust time, the first defecation time, the first eating time, ambulation time and postoperative hospital time, with statistical significance (P < .05; compared with the conventional nursing group, FTS group significantly had lower incidence of postoperative intestinal obstruction, lower limb vein thrombus formation and gastrointestinal discomfort, with statistical significance (P < .05; FTS group has less situations of nausea and vomiting, incision infection, pulmonary infection, urinary tract infection and anastomotic leakage compared to the conventional nursing group. Conclusion: FTS nursing can effectively promote the postoperative recovery of intestinal function for patients with colorectal cancer and reduce the occurrence of postoperative complications, which will relieve postoperative pain and shorten the length of stay, giving patients increased rehabilitation quality.

  15. Dental extraction for patients on oral anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinowitz, U; Mazar, A L; Taicher, S; Varon, D; Gitel, S N; Ramot, B; Rakocz, M

    1990-09-01

    Dental extraction in patients receiving long-term oral anticoagulant therapy is a controversial issue. Continuation of anticoagulation exposes the patient to serious hemorrhage, whereas cessation of therapy increases the risk of thromboembolism. Forty patients treated by coumarin underwent 63 tooth extractions, without a change in the therapeutic protocol of anticoagulation. The biologic adhesive Beriplast was used successfully to achieve local hemostasis at the site of the surgical wound. Apart from one patient who had mild oozing, there were no incidences of postsurgical hemorrhage.

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in spontaneous brain abscess patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Jakola, Asgeir S; Skyrman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need to improve outcome in patients with brain abscesses and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a promising treatment modality. The objective of this study was to evaluate HBOT in the treatment of intracranial abscesses. METHOD: This population-based, comparative cohort...... study included 40 consecutive adult patients with spontaneous brain abscess treated surgically between January 2003 and May 2014 at our institution. Twenty patients received standard therapy with surgery and antibiotics (non-HBOT group), while the remaining 20 patients also received adjuvant HBOT (HBOT...

  17. An Investigation of an RFID-based Patient-tracking and Mobile Alert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. Yeung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the modern era, patient health is no longer the only concern for hospitals. Hospitals have to bear the responsibility of the patient safety and the patient comfort. However, due to the overcrowded and understaffed clinical areas with complex workflow patterns, there are different forms of medical care errors arisen in the healthcare system. According to recent statistic from World Health Organization, ten of milions of patient around the world are injured or dead every yearas a result of incorrect medical care. Rroughly 10% patients admitted to hospital in developed countries suffered some forms of medical care errors or medical adverse events. It is about 1.4 million of world population.In order to enhance the patient safety and patient comfort in the current medical service system, an RFID‐based Patient Tracking and Mobile Alert System integrated with information communications technology was designed and developed. Apart from identifying different patient’s whereabouts, instant alerts are generated through mobile devices so as to enhance patients’ safety and comfort. With a view of investigating the feasibility of RFID and mobile technology in the healthcare environment, a pilot study was conducted in Mindset Club in the Castle Peak Hospital in Hong Kong.

  18. [Hand Therapy in the Treatment of Patients with CRPS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körbler, C; Pfau, M; Becker, F; Koester, U; Werdin, F

    2015-06-01

    In the modern treatment of CRPS a multidisciplinary concept is firmly established (MMPT, multimodal pain therapy). Besides medical therapy and psychotherapy, physio- and occupational therapy count as basic treatment options. Although physio- and occupational therapy (in the following called hand therapy) are the most important basic treatments, the therapy is hardly standardised and there are few scientific investigations concerning their application. Therefore the purpose of this paper is to present the applied hand therapeutic techniques with regard to function/performance, application and effectiveness, and to derive a suitable treatment algorithm. The techniques used in hand therapy are presented and reviewed in regard to their effectiveness by means of a literature search. It turns out that exercise therapy, manual therapy, graded motor imaging, CO2 baths and occupational therapy have a proven benefit for the patients. Although for many of the treatments reliable evidence-based data are lacking a treatment algorithm was established but there is a strong need for further investigations concerning the therapeutic effectiveness in the treatment of CRPS. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Patient predictors of response to cognitive behaviour therapy and schema therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Janet D; McIntosh, Virginia Vw; Jordan, Jennifer; Porter, Richard J; Douglas, Katie; Frampton, Christopher M; Joyce, Peter R

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have examined differential predictors of response to psychotherapy for depression. Greater understanding about the factors associated with therapeutic response may better enable therapists to optimise response by targeting therapy for the individual. The aim of the current exploratory study was to examine patient characteristics associated with response to cognitive behaviour therapy and schema therapy for depression. Participants were 100 outpatients in a clinical trial randomised to either cognitive behaviour therapy or schema therapy. Potential predictors of response examined included demographic, clinical, functioning, cognitive, personality and neuropsychological variables. Individuals with chronic depression and increased levels of pre-treatment negative automatic thoughts had a poorer response to both cognitive behaviour therapy and schema therapy. A treatment type interaction was found for verbal learning and memory. Lower levels of verbal learning and memory impairment markedly impacted on response to schema therapy. This was not the case for cognitive behaviour therapy, which was more impacted if verbal learning and memory was in the moderate range. Study findings are consistent with the Capitalisation Model suggesting that therapy that focuses on the person's strengths is more likely to contribute to a better outcome. Limitations were that participants were outpatients in a randomised controlled trial and may not be representative of other depressed samples. Examination of a variety of potential predictors was exploratory and requires replication.

  20. An improved optical flow tracking technique for real-time MR-guided beam therapies in moving organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, C.; Papadakis, N.; Ries, M.; Moonen, C.; de Senneville, B. Denis

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) guided high intensity focused ultrasound and external beam radiotherapy interventions, which we shall refer to as beam therapies/interventions, are promising techniques for the non-invasive ablation of tumours in abdominal organs. However, therapeutic energy delivery in these areas becomes challenging due to the continuous displacement of the organs with respiration. Previous studies have addressed this problem by coupling high-framerate MR-imaging with a tracking technique based on the algorithm proposed by Horn and Schunck (H and S), which was chosen due to its fast convergence rate and highly parallelisable numerical scheme. Such characteristics were shown to be indispensable for the real-time guidance of beam therapies. In its original form, however, the algorithm is sensitive to local grey-level intensity variations not attributed to motion such as those that occur, for example, in the proximity of pulsating arteries. In this study, an improved motion estimation strategy which reduces the impact of such effects is proposed. Displacements are estimated through the minimisation of a variation of the H and S functional for which the quadratic data fidelity term was replaced with a term based on the linear L1norm, resulting in what we have called an L2-L1 functional. The proposed method was tested in the livers and kidneys of two healthy volunteers under free-breathing conditions, on a data set comprising 3000 images equally divided between the volunteers. The results show that, compared to the existing approaches, our method demonstrates a greater robustness to local grey-level intensity variations introduced by arterial pulsations. Additionally, the computational time required by our implementation make it compatible with the work-flow of real-time MR-guided beam interventions. To the best of our knowledge this study was the first to analyse the behaviour of an L1-based optical flow functional in an applicative context: real-time MR

  1. Neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive nephrectomy as an independent option in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC cannot be considered as the only effective method, with rare exception, of a few patients with solitary metastases. Cytoreductive nephrectomy is now part of a multimodal approach encompassing surgical treatment and systemic drug therapy. Many retrospective and two prospective studies have demonstrated that it is expedient to perform cytoreductive nephrectomy. Immunotherapy should not be used as preoperatively in the era of cytokine therapy for mRCC due to that fact that it has no impact on primary tumor. In the current targeted therapy era, many investigators have concentrated attentionon the role of neoadjuvant targeted therapy for the treatment of patients with both localized and locally advanced mRCC. The potential benefits of neoadjuvant therapy for localized and locally advanced RCC include to make surgery easier and to increase the possibility of organsparing treatment, by decreasing the stage of primary tumor and the size of tumors. The possible potential advantages of neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with mRCC include prompt initiation of necessary systemic therapy; identification of patients with primary refractory tumors; and a preoperative reduction in the stage of primary tumor. Numerous retrospective and some prospective phase II studies have shown that neoadjuvant targeted therapy in patients with localized and locally advanced RCC is possible and tolerable and surgical treatment after neoadjuvant targeted therapy is safe and executable with a low incidence of complications. If neoadjuvant therapy is to be performed, it should be done within 2–4 months before surgery. Sorafenib and sunitinib are now most tested and suitable for neoadjuvant targeted therapy. Sorafenib is a more preferred drug due to its shorter half-life and accordingly to the possibility of discontinuing the drug immediately prior to

  2. Schizophrenia and personality disorder patients' adherence to music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Niels; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Hestbæk, Trine; Sørensen, Torben Egelund; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2012-12-01

    Music therapy is used in psychiatric treatment of severe psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, depression and personality disorder. To investigate adherence and predictors for adherence to music therapy treatment in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or personality disorder. Demographic, psychiatric and therapeutic data were collected for 27 patients receiving music therapy treatment over a 1-year observation period and a 1-year follow-up period. Predictors for adherence to music therapeutic treatment were determined by means of regression analysis. Drop-out from treatment was low (11.5%) and none of the variables significantly predicted adherence. Lack of significance may be because of type 2 error. Patients with severe mental disorder may adhere to music therapy treatment.

  3. Group art therapy as adjunct therapy for the treatment of schizophrenic patients in day hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajić, Gordana Mandić

    2013-11-01

    The schizophrenics are frequently disinterested and resistant to standard care. We presented clinical observations of group art therapy of two schizophrenic patients during integrative therapy in Day Hospital. We modified the original "Synallactic collective image technique" (Vassiliou G, Vassiliou V.). The group is open, heterogeneous, meets once a week and discusses on exhibited drawings, drawn by free associations. The patients' drawings and group protocols showed clinical improvement by lowering depressive themes, more human figures and self-confidence. The obvious severity of markedly impairment on Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scales on admission with minimal improvement at discharge was rated. Group art therapy enables visual expression of emotions, perceptions and cognitions, develops creative potentials and support within the group, thus facilitating the integrative therapeutic process of schizophrenics. It may be useful adjunctive therapy for schizoprenic patients.

  4. Group art therapy as adjunct therapy for the treatment of schizophrenic patients in day hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The schizophrenics are frequently disinterested and resistant to standard care. Case report. We presented clinical observations of group art therapy of two schizophrenic patients during integrative therapy in Day Hospital. We modified the original “Synallactic collective image technique” (Vassiliou G, Vassiliou V.. The group is open, heterogeneous, meets once a week and discusses on exhibited drawings, drawn by free associations. The patients' drawings and group protocols showed clinical improvement by lowering depressive themes, more human figures and self-confidence. The obvious severity of markedly impairment on Clinical Global Impression (CGI and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scales on admission with minimal improvement at discharge was rated. Conclusion. Group art therapy enables visual expression of emotions, perceptions and cognitions, develops creative potentials and support within the group, thus facilitating the integrative therapeutic process of schizophrenics. It may be useful adjunctive therapy for schizoprenic patients.

  5. Art therapy with cancer patients during chemotherapy sessions: an analysis of the patients' perception of helpfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzoni, Silvia; Perez, Michela; Martignetti, Angelo; Crispino, Sergio

    2010-03-01

    Art therapy has been shown to be helpful to cancer patients at different stages in the course of their illness, especially during isolation for bone marrow transplantation, during radiotherapy treatment, and after treatment. The aim of this study is twofold: (1) to assess whether patients during chemotherapy sessions perceive art therapy as helpful and (2) to outline in which way art therapy is perceived as helpful. 157 cancer patients attending an Oncology Day Hospital (Siena, Italy) met the art therapist during their chemotherapy sessions. The art therapist used the same art therapy technique with each patient during the first encounter ("free collage"); afterward the relationship would evolve in different ways according to the patients' needs. A psychologist interviewed a randomized group of 54 patients after the chemotherapy treatment using a semistructured questionnaire. Out of the 54 patients, 3 found art therapy "not helpful" ("childish," "just a chat," "not interesting"). The other 51 patients described their art therapy experience as "helpful." From patients' statements, three main groups emerged: (1) art therapy was perceived as generally helpful (e.g., "relaxing," "creative"; 37.3%), (2) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the dyadic relationship (e.g., "talking about oneself and feeling listened to"; 33.3%), and (3) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the triadic relationship, patient-image-art therapist (e.g., "expressing emotions and searching for meanings"; 29.4%). These data have clinical implications, as they show that art therapy may be useful to support patients during the stressful time of chemotherapy treatment. Different patients use it to fulfil their own different needs, whether it is a need to relax (improved mood) or to talk (self-narrative) or to visually express and elaborate emotions (discovering new meanings). Some illustrations of patients using the art therapy process to fulfill these three different needs are

  6. Tracking Functional Brain Changes in Patients with Depression under Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Using Individualized Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiswede, Daniel; Taubner, Svenja; Buchheim, Anna; Münte, Thomas F.; Stasch, Michael; Cierpka, Manfred; Kächele, Horst; Roth, Gerhard; Erhard, Peter; Kessler, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neurobiological models of depression posit limbic hyperactivity that should normalize after successful treatment. For psychotherapy, though, brain changes in patients with depression show substantial variability. Two critical issues in relevant studies concern the use of unspecific stimulation experiments and relatively short treatment protocols. Therefore changes in brain reactions to individualized stimuli were studied in patients with depression after eight months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Methods 18 unmedicated patients with recurrent major depressive disorder were confronted with individualized and clinically derived content in a functional MRI experiment before (T1) and after eight months (T2) of psychodynamic therapy. A control group of 17 healthy subjects was also tested twice without intervention. The experimental stimuli were sentences describing each participant's dysfunctional interpersonal relationship patterns derived from clinical interviews based on Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostics (OPD). Results At T1 patients showed enhanced activation compared to controls in several limbic and subcortical regions, including amygdala and basal ganglia, when confronted with OPD sentences. At T2 the differences in brain activity between patients and controls were no longer apparent. Concurrently, patients had improved significantly in depression scores. Conclusions Using ecologically valid stimuli, this study supports the model of limbic hyperactivity in depression that normalizes after treatment. Without a control group of untreated patients measured twice, though, changes in patients' brain activity could also be attributed to other factors than psychodynamic therapy. PMID:25275317

  7. Improving Patient Acceptance of Insulin Therapy by Improving Needle Design

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, James J.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Improved needle designs could increase patient compliance with insulin therapy. In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Hirsch and colleagues assessed patient pain and preference for a 5-bevel needle design among diabetes patients. A blinded comparison with traditional 3-bevel needles yielded no significant difference, but patients preferred the 5-bevel needle in unblinded home injection and clinical insertion studies. This suggests that important subjective/contextual fa...

  8. Patient Preferences for Surgical Versus Medical Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewtra, Meenakshi; Kilambi, Vikram; Fairchild, Angelyn O.; Siegel, Corey A.; Lewis, James D.; Johnson, F. Reed

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapy options for mesalamine-refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) include immunosuppressive medications or surgery. Chronic immunosuppressive therapy increases risks of infection and cancer, whereas surgery produces a permanent change in bowel function. We sought to quantify the willingness of patients with UC to accept the risks of chronic immunosuppression to avoid colectomy. Methods We conducted a state-of-the-art discrete-choice experiment among 293 patients with UC who were offered a choice of medication or surgical treatments with different features. Random parameters logit was used to estimate patients’ willingness to accept trade-offs among treatment features in selecting surgery versus medical treatment. Results A desire to avoid surgery and the surgery type (ostomy versus J-pouch) influenced patients’ choices more than a specified range of 10-year mortality risks from lymphoma or infection, or disease activity (mild versus remission). To avoid an ostomy, patients were willing to accept a >5% 10-year risk of dying from lymphoma or infection from medical therapy, regardless of medication efficacy. However, data on patients’ stated choice indicated perceived equivalence between J-pouch surgery and incompletely effective medical therapy. Patient characteristics and disease history influenced patients’ preferences regarding surgery versus medical therapy. Conclusions Patients with UC are willing to accept relatively high risks of fatal complications from medical therapy to avoid a permanent ostomy and to achieve durable clinical remission. However, patients view J-pouch surgery, but not permanent ileostomy, as an acceptable therapy for refractory UC in which medical therapy is unable to induce a durable remission. PMID:24280881

  9. Transforming the patient experience in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, J Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Healthcare providers are paying more attention to behavioral neuroscience research that confirms what patients intuitively know: physical environments deeply influence one's sense of well being. Recognizing the importance of comforting environments, healthcare providers have been working with architects to design new facilities around the patient's experience. This doesn't mean that functional and technical considerations are unimportant; it's just that the patient's experience comes first. The patient is the most important user of a healthcare facility, and yet is the only user not sitting at the table during design meetings. For this reason, some healthcare providers work with their architects to develop the conceptual design from the patient's standpoint before seeking detailed staff input. Many indignities experienced by patients may be unwittingly imposed by caring and dedicated professional staff. Medical clutter, waste containers, water coolers, coffee makers, personal displays and decorations add up to create a distressing level of visual chaos. Departments are required to eliminate clutter and maintain a calm, pleasing environment. Employees appreciate a well-designed physical environment, too. Facilities that reduce stress for patients have the same impact on staff, alleviating tension as they care for patients. Putting the patient's experience first need not add capital construction cost to a project. Rearranging spaces for the sake of the patient adds no more to floor area. Added windows, skylights and interior finishes can add cost, but the incremental cost of these amenities is small in proportion to the total project cost. Facilities project powerful visual dues about an institution's values. Providers who carefully plan for a positive patient experience traditionally enjoy strong reputations and exceptional customer loyalty. These providers know that good design is not simply wrapping a pretty facade around a building or decorating the lobby. Good

  10. [Our experience with hormonal therapy in transsexual patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Vladimír; Weiss, Petr; Fifková, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Hormonal therapy in transsexual patients (TS) includes sexagens administration: androgens in female-to-male transsexual patients (FtM) and oestrogens and antiandrogens in male-to-female transsexual patients (MtF). Duration of hormonal therapy should continue at least 1 year before gender reassignment surgery. Hormonal therapy supresses former gender and induces partially new gender changes. Hormonal therapy continues subsequently after surgery during life. Hormonal therapy in MtF TS includes oestrogens and antiandrogens application. In very young persons in both groups blocking gonadoliberin analogues can be used. In FtM TS testosterone oneself is given (orally and/or parenterally). Authors describe their own experiences with hormonal treatment in 282 TS (163 FtM and 119 MtF). During hormonal therapy statistically significant weight increasing was found in both groups. Total cholesterol increased in FtM. In MtF during hormonal therapy average prolactin level increased from 350.1 to 570.5 mU/l without clinical significance. Total average hormonal therapy duration was 6.73 years in FtM and 4.64 years in MtF and so overall therapy safety assessment is not possible. Any endocrinopathy occurence in the beginning of surveillance was found in 35 persons (12.4 %): simple goiter, autoimmune thyreoiditis, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, gynecomastia, DM type 1, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), Klinefelter syndrome and nonfunctional pituitary adenoma. It is appropriate as well as in other rare medicine conditions to manage diagnosing and therapy in centers with experience with these issues.

  11. [Metronome therapy in patients with Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzensberger, W; Oberländer, U; Stecker, K

    1997-12-01

    We studied 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and 12 patients with Parkinson-plus-syndrome, trying to improve patients' gait by application of various external rhythmic stimuli, including metronome stimulation (96 beats per minute = middle andante). The test course of the patients was 4 x 10 meters and 3 U-turns. The patients' gait quality under stimulation was compared with their free walk (velocity, number of steps, number of freezing episodes). Metronome stimulation significantly reduced the time and number of steps needed for the test course and also diminished the number of freezing episodes. March music stimulation was less effective and tactile stimulation (rhythmically tapping on the patient's shoulder) even produced negative results. The positive effect of metronome stimulation was also found, when the tests were not performed inside the hospital building, but outside in the hospital parc. Metronome stimulation was comparably effective in both patient sub-groups examined in this study (M. Parkinson, Parkinson-plus-syndrome) and seems to be an important additional help in the treatment of these patients. Electronical metronomes are not expensive, easy in handling, and portable. A theoretical explanation of metronome stimulation effectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease still needs to be elucidated.

  12. The Effect of Patellar Thickness on Intraoperative Knee Flexion and Patellar Tracking in Patients With Arthrofibrosis Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Abraham D; Shah, Vivek M; Scott, Richard D

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the intraoperative effect of patellar thickness on intraoperative passive knee flexion and patellar tracking during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with preoperative arthrofibrosis and compared them to patients with normal preoperative range of motion (ROM) documented in a prior study. Routine posterior cruciate ligament-retaining TKA was performed in a total of 34 knees, 23 with normal ROM and 11 with arthrofibrosis, defined as ≤100° of passive knee flexion against gravity under anesthesia. Once clinical balance and congruent patellar tracking were established, custom trial patellar components thicker than the standard trial by 2-mm increments (2-8 mm) were sequentially placed and trialed. Passive flexion against gravity was recorded using digital photograph goniometry. Gross mechanics of patellofemoral tracking were visually assessed. On average, passive knee flexion decreased 2° for every 2-mm increment of patellar thickness (P thickness had no gross effect on patellar subluxation and tilt in patients with arthrofibrosis as well as those with normal ROM. Patellar thickness had a modest effect on intraoperative passive flexion and no effect on patellar tracking in patients with arthrofibrosis undergoing TKA. There was no marked difference in intraoperative flexion and patellar tracking between patients with arthrofibrosis and patients with normal preoperative ROM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Complementary Therapies for Symptom Management in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Aanchal; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2017-01-01

    Cancer patients are often poly-symptomatic which distressingly affects their quality of lives (QOLs). Alhough, conventional management provides adequate symptom control, yet is coupled with some limitations. Complementary therapies (CTs) have shown beneficial effects in cancer patients for symptomatic relief. The aim of this article is to provide evidence-based review of commonly used CTs for symptom management in cancer care. Hypnosis has promising evidence to be used for managing symptoms such as pain, chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, distress, fatigue, and hot flashes. Guided imagery increases comfort and can be used as a psycho-supportive therapy. Meditation substantially improves psychological function, mental health, and QOL. Cognitive behavioral therapies effectively reduce pain, distress, fatigue, anxiety, and depression; and improve subjective sleep outcomes along with mood and QOL. Yoga has short term beneficial effects for anxiety, depression, fatigue, perceived stress, QOL, and well-being. T'ai Chi and qigong are beneficial adjunctive therapies for supportive cancer care, but their role in reducing cancer pain is not well proven. Acupuncture is effective for reducing treatment related side-effects, pain and fatigue. Other therapies such as massage techniques, energy therapies, and spiritual interventions have also demonstrated positive role in managing cancer-related symptoms and improve overall well-being. However, the clinical effectiveness of these therapies for symptom management in cancer patients cannot be concluded due to poor strength of evidence. Nonetheless, these are relatively free from risks and hence can be given along with conventional treatments. Only by tailoring these therapies as per patient's beliefs and preferences, optimal patient-centered holistic care can be provided.

  14. Complementary therapies for symptom management in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aanchal Satija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients are often poly-symptomatic which distressingly affects their quality of lives (QOLs. Alhough, conventional management provides adequate symptom control, yet is coupled with some limitations. Complementary therapies (CTs have shown beneficial effects in cancer patients for symptomatic relief. The aim of this article is to provide evidence-based review of commonly used CTs for symptom management in cancer care. Hypnosis has promising evidence to be used for managing symptoms such as pain, chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, distress, fatigue, and hot flashes. Guided imagery increases comfort and can be used as a psycho-supportive therapy. Meditation substantially improves psychological function, mental health, and QOL. Cognitive behavioral therapies effectively reduce pain, distress, fatigue, anxiety, and depression; and improve subjective sleep outcomes along with mood and QOL. Yoga has short term beneficial effects for anxiety, depression, fatigue, perceived stress, QOL, and well-being. T'ai Chi and qigong are beneficial adjunctive therapies for supportive cancer care, but their role in reducing cancer pain is not well proven. Acupuncture is effective for reducing treatment related side-effects, pain and fatigue. Other therapies such as massage techniques, energy therapies, and spiritual interventions have also demonstrated positive role in managing cancer-related symptoms and improve overall well-being. However, the clinical effectiveness of these therapies for symptom management in cancer patients cannot be concluded due to poor strength of evidence. Nonetheless, these are relatively free from risks and hence can be given along with conventional treatments. Only by tailoring these therapies as per patient's beliefs and preferences, optimal patient-centered holistic care can be provided.

  15. Malarial infection among HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malarial infection among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) attending Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State was investigated between April and August 2008 to determine the level of malaria infection in HIV/AIDS patients on ART and those not on ART with respect to CD4+ counts, age and gender. A total of ...

  16. Herbal therapies used by hypertensive patients in Turkey | Bahar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine herbal therapies used by the patients for regulation of blood pressure. This descriptive study was conducted in three districts of Izmir, Turkey. The study group included 193 patients with hypertension diagnosis who admitted to a primary care center and accepted to participate in ...

  17. Effects of music therapy under general anesthesia in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-13

    Dec 13, 2016 ... Background: Music therapy, an innovative approach that has proven effectiveness in many medical conditions, seems beneficial also in managing surgical patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate its effects, under general anesthesia, on perioperative patient satisfaction, stress, pain, and awareness.

  18. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizek, David; Cvijić, Marta; Zupan, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic light chain amyloidosis carries poor prognosis. Amyloid deposition in the myocardium can alter regional left ventricular contraction and cause dyssynchrony. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced heart failure and echocardiographic dyssynchrony. We report a clinical and echocardiographic response of a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy, treated with a combination of chemotherapy and CRT.

  19. Palliative nephrectomy until targeted therapy of disseminated kidney cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Klimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the role of palliative nephrectomy in disseminated kidney cancer patients planned to undergo targeted antiangiogenic treatment.Subjects and methods. The investigation included data on 83 patients with T1-4N0 / +M1 disseminated renal cell carcinoma (RCC who had received at least 2 targeted therapy cycles in 2009 to 2011. In 48 (57.8 % patients, the treatment was preceded by palliative nephrectomy that was not carried out in 35 (42.2 %. Before starting targeted therapy, all the cases were confirmed to be diagnosed with clear cell RCC, with a sarcomatoid component being in 7 (8.4 % patients. The median follow-up of all the patients was 21 (12–36 months.Results. The unremoved affected kidney in disseminated kidney cancer patients receiving targeted antiangiogenic therapy is an independent factor for the poor prognosis of progression-free (odds ratio (OR, 2.4; 95 % confidence interval (CI, 1.2–4.7 and overall (OR, 2.8; 95 % CI, 1.3–6.3 survival. Palliative nephrectomy does not improve the prognosis in patients with a low somatic status, the N+ category, and metastases into the bones and nonregional lymph nodes.Conclusion. Palliative nephrectomy in the selected patients with disseminated kidney cancer on targeted antiangiogenic therapy increases progression-free and overall survival.

  20. Health status in patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Angélique A; Denollet, Johan; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment in chronic heart failure (CHF). However, a subgroup of patients still report impaired health status, cardiac symptoms, and feelings of disability following CRT. The aims of this study were to examine (1) whether CHF patients treated...

  1. HIFU therapy for patients with high risk prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovov, V. A.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.; Matysh, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Objectives. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) combined with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or ADT alone. The widely accepted definition of high-risk prostate was first proposed by D'Amico based on a pretreatment Gleason score of ≥8, clinical stage T3, PSA level ≥20 ng/mL. There is no trial that compares traditional methods of treatment of such patients with HIFU therapy. Here we explored the effectiveness of the HIFU in multimodal treatment for patients with high risk prostate cancer. Materials & Methods. 701 patients with high risk prostate cancer were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2013. Gleason score were 8-10, stage T3N0M0, age 69 (58-86) years, mean PSA before treatment 43.3 (22.1-92.9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume - 59.3 (38-123) cc. 248 patients were treated by HIFU. We compare this group of patients with patients who undertook EBRT: number 196, and ADT: number 257. Mean follow-up time 58 months (6-72). Results. The 5-year overall survival rates in patients after HIFU were 73.8 %, after EBRT - 63.0 % and after ADT - 18.1%. Conclusions. Our experience showed that HIFU therapy in combined treatment were successful for high risk prostate cancer.

  2. Interleukin-2 therapy in patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, D; Lévy, Y; Losso, M H

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-2 in HIV-Infected Patients with Low CD4+ Counts under Active Antiretroviral Therapy (SILCAAT) study and the Evaluation of Subcutaneous Proleukin in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT). In each, patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who had CD4+ cell counts of either...

  3. Effects of music therapy under general anesthesia in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Music therapy, an innovative approach that has proven effectiveness in many medical conditions, seems beneficial also in managing surgical patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate its effects, under general anesthesia, on perioperative patient satisfaction, stress, pain, and awareness. Methods: This is a ...

  4. Patient QA systems for rotational radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredh, Anna; Scherman, J.B.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors.......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of commercial patient quality assurance (QA) systems to detect linear accelerator-related errors....

  5. ANTIDEPRESSANT THERAPY IN HIGH-RISK PATIENTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prolonged half-life in this population.16 The plasma concentrations of nefazodone were not altered in patients .... Sertraline'" i. T-wave flattening; QT prolongation (2 patients). Moclobernide==' i. iJ. i.l.. Avoid excessive amounts of thyramine-rich foods. Venlafaxine"'-" ii .I. See Table IV. Nefazodone". Apparently no significant.

  6. Transfusion therapy in paediatric trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrup, Kristin Brønnum; Stensballe, Jakob; Bøttger, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhage is a leading cause of death in paediatric trauma patients. Predefined massive transfusion protocols (MTP) have the potential to significantly reduce mortality by treating haemorrhagic shock and coagulopathy, in adhering to the principles of haemostatic resuscitation with rapid...... in paediatric trauma patients is challenging, and the optimal blood product ratio that will increase survival in massively bleeding paediatric trauma patients has yet to be determined. To date, only a few small descriptive studies and case reports have investigated the use of predefined MTP in paediatric trauma...... patients.MTP with increased FFP or PLT to RBC ratios combined with viscoelastic haemostatic assay (VHA) guided haemostatic resuscitation have not yet been tested in paediatric populations but based on results from adult trauma patients, this therapeutic approach seems promising.Considering the high...

  7. An Investigation of Horizontal Combined Eye-Head Tracking in Patients with Abnormal Vestibular and Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, William P.; Leigh, R. John; Seidman, Scott H.; Billian, Carl

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of smooth ocular pursuit (SP) and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during horizontal, combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) in patients with abnormalities of either the VOR or SP movements. Our strategy was to apply transient stimuli that capitalized on the different latencies to onset of SP and the VOR. During CEHT of a target moving at 15 deg/sec, normal subjects and patients with VOR deficits all tracked the target with a gain close to 1.O. When the heads of normal subjects were suddenly and unexpectedly braked to a halt during CEHT, the eye promptly began to move in the orbit to track the target, but eye-in-orbit velocity transiently fell to about 60-70% of target velocity. In patients with deficient labyrinthine function, following the onset of the head brake, eye movements to track the target were absent, and SP movements were not generated until about 100 msec later. In patients with deficient SP, CEHT was superior to SP tracking with the head stationary; after the onset of the head brake, tracking eye movements were initiated promptly, but eye velocity was less than 50% of target velocity and increased only slightly thereafter. These results indicate that at least two mechanisms operate to overcome the VOR and allow gaze to track the target during CEHT: (1) the SP system provides a signal to cancel a normally-operating VOR (this cancellation signal is not needed by labyrinthine-deficient patients who have no VOR to cancel), and (2) a reduction of the gain of the VOR is achieved, an ability that is preserved even in patients with cerebral lesions that impair SP.

  8. Therapy processes, progress, and outcomes for 2 therapies for gynecological cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon L; Myers-Virtue, Shannon; Kashy, Deborah A; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Heckman, Carolyn; Morgan, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Although a number of effective psychotherapies have been identified for cancer patients, little is known about therapy processes, as they unfold the course of treatment and the role of therapy processes in treatment outcome. We used growth curve modeling to evaluate the associations between therapy processes and outcomes among gynecological cancer patients participating in 2 types of therapy. Two hundred twenty five women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancer were randomly assigned to receive 8 sessions of a coping and communication intervention or a client-centered supportive therapy. Participants completed measures of preintervention and postintervention depression, working alliance after Session 2, and postsession progress and depressive symptoms after each session. Therapists completed measures of perceived patient progress. Both patients and therapists reported a steady increase in session progress and patients reported a steady decrease in depressive symptoms over the course of both the coping and communication intervention and client-centered supportive sessions. Perceived progress in one session predicted progress in the subsequent session. Early working alliance predicted improved session progress and reductions in postsession depressive symptoms over sessions. Working alliance did not predict prepost treatment changes in depression. Patient-rated session progress predicted greater reductions in pretreatment to posttreatment depression, but therapist-rated progress did not. For 2 types of treatment delivered to women diagnosed with gynecological cancer, patient-rated session progress and depressive symptoms rated over therapy sessions may serve as a yardstick that can be useful to therapists to gauge patient's response to treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy: reality or myth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemij HG

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hans G Lemij,1 Juliette GMM Hoevenaars,2 Cees van der Windt,3 Christophe Baudouin4 On behalf of the GOAL Study Investigators 1Glaucoma Service, Rotterdam Eye Hospital, Rotterdam, 2VieCuri Medisch Centrum, Venlo, 3Ziekenhuis Rivierenland, Tiel, the Netherlands; 4Quinze-Vingts National Hospital and Vision Institute, Paris, France Abstract: While safe and effective treatments for glaucoma exist, their effectiveness is compromised by poor compliance. Patients who have problems with their topical glaucoma medication are acknowledged to be at higher risk for poor compliance, frequent medication switching, and surgery. Patient satisfaction with therapy and its associated benefits have until recently taken second place to efficacy. The present study is a transverse cross-sectional epidemiological survey among glaucoma patients receiving therapy with prostaglandin analogs. The primary objective was to determine and characterize patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy, and the secondary objective was to identify factors that may contribute to poor patient satisfaction. Ophthalmologists in the Netherlands included 199 patients and 164 were analyzed. Patients were predominantly elderly with early, primary, open angle glaucoma. Eighty-nine percent of them stated they were satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. However, signs of ocular surface disorder on ophthalmological examination were evident in 44% of patients, corneal fluorescein staining was positive in 28% of patients, and 38% of patients were using tear substitutes. The prevalence of blepharitis/meibomian gland dysfunction and dry eye was more than twice as high after the commencement of therapy compared with before therapy. Univariate analysis revealed that patient dissatisfaction with their glaucoma therapy was statistically significantly (P<0.001 associated with the presence of ocular surface disease, hyperemia, ocular signs, symptoms upon and between instillation, and the use of

  10. Predictors of length of stay and patient satisfaction after hip and knee replacement surgery: fast-track experience in 712 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Holm, Gitte; Jacobsen, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    after total hip and knee replacement surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between September 2003 and December 2005, 712 consecutive, unselected patients (440 women) with a mean age of 69 (31-91) years were admitted for hip and knee replacement surgery at our specialized fast-track joint replacement unit......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Very few studies have focused on patient characteristics that influence length of stay (LOS) in fast-track total hip (THR) and knee arthroplasty (TKR). The aim of this prospective study was to identify patient characteristics associated with LOS and patient satisfaction...... characteristics that influence postoperative outcome, LOS, and patient satisfaction in our series of consecutive fast-track joint replacement patients, enabling further attention to be paid to certain aspects of surgery and rehabilitation....

  11. Implant therapy on patients treated with oral bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Petros Tripodakis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bisphosphonates represent a group of drugs with a significant effect on bone structure preventing bone remodelling. They can be administered for the treatment of osteoporosis, Paget’s disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, osteopenia and bone metastases. The aim of this study was to discuss the necessary precautions for successful implant therapy on patients treated with per os bisphosphonates. Case reports: Two female patients, both in the seventh decade of life, requested implant therapy. Their medical history was significant for osteoporosis, managed with per os bisphosphonates (Risedronate and Alendronate, respectively, without other risk factors for osteonecrosis. The duration of bisphosphonate administration was 4 years and 2 months respectively. After consultation with the treating physician, the patients stopped the bisphosphonates 3 months before and 3 months after the placement of the implants. The patients received antibiotic coverage for the surgical interventions. The treatment plan was completed uneventfully with placement of fixed prostheses without complications during a 2-year follow-up period. Conclusion: The greatest dental treatment-related risk for patients on bisphosphonate therapy is bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis, which presents with exposure of avascular bone of the jaws and, according to the clinical stage, pain, inflammation, fractures and/or extensive osteolysis. Most of reported cases of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis consist of patients on intravenous drug therapy who had undergone dentoalveolar surgery. Patients on per os bisphosphonates may undergo all types of dentoalveolar surgery, including implant placement, as long as the necessary precautions (bisphosphonate discontinuation, antibiotic coverage, meticulous oral hygiene are taken.

  12. REHABILITATION THERAPY VERSUS DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISC DEGENERATION

    OpenAIRE

    BROSCATEAN, Emanuela-Flavia; DOGARU Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar disc degeneration is a disorder whose clinical manifestations are represented by episodic pain in the lumbar spine, without lumbar blockage and minor muscle contraction. Because lumbalgia caused by lumbar disc degeneration is not always very high intensity pain, the easiest to apply treatment is drug therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential role of rehabilitation treatment in the recovery of patients and the prevention of complications compared to drug therapy alone....

  13. An assessment of the accuracy and availability of data in electronic patient tracking systems for patients receiving HIV treatment in central Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambdin Barrot H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART programs in sub-Saharan Africa, electronic patient tracking systems (EPTS have been deployed to respond to the growing demand for program monitoring, evaluation and reporting to governments and donors. These routinely collected data are often used in epidemiologic and operations research studies intended to improve programs. To ensure accurate reporting and good quality for research, the reliability and completeness of data systems need to be assessed and reported. We assessed the completeness and reliability of EPTS used in 16 HIV care and treatment clinics in Manica and Sofala provinces of Mozambique. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to assess the completeness and reliability of key variables in the electronic data system for patients enrolling in 16 public sector HIV treatment clinics between 1 July 2004 and 30 June 2008. Data from the electronic database was compared with data abstracted from a stratified random sample of 520 patient charts. Percent agreement, kappa scores and concordance correlation coefficients were calculated for specified variables. Percentile bootstrap confidence intervals were calculated to account for the stratified nature of our sampling. Results A total of 16,149 patients with a median age of 33 years and a median CD4 count of 151 enrolled in these 16 clinics between 1 July 2004 and 30 June 2008. The level of completeness was high for most variables with height (18.6% and weight (11.5% having the highest amount of missing data. The level of agreement for available data was also high with reliability statistics of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.92-0.98 for gender, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.80-1.00 for pre-ART CD4 value and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.99 for patient retention. Conclusions Electronic patient tracking systems have been deployed to respond to the growing monitoring, evaluation and reporting requirements. In our cross-sectional study of clinics in

  14. Using Eye Tracking to Assess Reading Performance in Patients with Glaucoma: A Within-Person Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. Smith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reading is often cited as a demanding task for patients with glaucomatous visual field (VF loss, yet reading speed varies widely between patients and does not appear to be predicted by standard visual function measures. This within-person study aimed to investigate reading duration and eye movements when reading short passages of text in a patient’s worse eye (most VF damage when compared to their better eye (least VF damage. Reading duration and saccade rate were significantly different on average in the worse eye when compared to the better eye (P<0.001 in 14 patients with glaucoma that had median (interquartile range between-eye difference in mean deviation (MD; a standard clinical measure for VF loss of 9.8 (8.3 to 14.8 dB; differences were not related to the size of the difference in MD between eyes. Patients with a more pronounced effect of longer reading duration on their worse eye made a larger proportion of “regressions” (backward saccades and “unknown” EMs (not adhering to expected reading patterns when reading with the worse eye when compared to the better eye. A between-eye study in patients with asymmetric disease, coupled with eye tracking, provides a useful experimental design for exploring reading performance in glaucoma.

  15. A high-definition fiber tracking report for patients with traumatic brain injury and their doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, Jon; Presson, Nora; Benso, Steven; Puccio, Ava M; Fissel, Katherine; Hachey, Rebecca; Braun, Emily; Okonkwo, David O; Schneider, Walter

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a tablet-based application, the High-Definition Fiber Tracking Report App, to enable clinicians and patients in research studies to see and understand damage from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) by viewing 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional images of their brain, with a focus on white matter tracts with quantitative metrics. The goal is to visualize white matter fiber tract injury like bone fractures; that is, to make the "invisible wounds of TBI" understandable for patients. Using mobile computing technology (iPad), imaging data for individual patients can be downloaded remotely within hours of a magnetic resonance imaging brain scan. Clinicians and patients can view the data in the form of images of each tract, rotating animations of the tracts, 3-dimensional models, and graphics. A growing number of tracts can be examined for asymmetry, gaps in streamline coverage, reduced arborization (branching), streamline volume, and standard quantitative metrics (e.g., Fractional Anisotropy (FA)). Novice users can learn to effectively navigate and interact with the application (explain the figures and graphs representing normal and injured brain tracts) within 15 minutes of simple orientation with high accuracy (96%). The architecture supports extensive graphics, configurable reports, provides an easy-to-use, attractive interface with a smooth user experience, and allows for securely serving cases from a database. Patients and clinicians have described the application as providing dramatic benefits in understanding their TBI and improving their lives. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. Bridge Therapy Outcomes in Patients With Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delate, Thomas; Meisinger, Stephanie M; Witt, Daniel M; Jenkins, Daniel; Douketis, James D; Clark, Nathan P

    2017-11-01

    Bridge therapy is associated with an increased risk of major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism (TE) without a corresponding reduction in TE. The benefits of bridge therapy in patients with mechanical heart valve (MHV) prostheses interrupting warfarin for invasive procedures are not well described. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at an integrated health-care delivery system. Anticoagulated patients with MHV interrupting warfarin for invasive diagnostic or surgical procedures between January 1, 2006, and March 31, 2012, were identified. Patients were categorized according to exposure to bridge therapy during the periprocedural period and TE risk (low, medium, and high). Outcomes validated via manual chart review included clinically relevant bleeding, TE, and all-cause mortality in the 30 days following the procedure. There were 547 procedures in 355 patients meeting inclusion criteria. Mean cohort age was 65.2 years, and 38% were female. Bridge therapy was utilized in 466 (85.2%) procedures (95.2%, 77.3%, and 65.8% of high, medium, and low TE risk category procedures, respectively). The 30-day rate of clinically relevant bleeding was numerically higher in bridged (5.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.9%-8.3%) versus not bridged procedures (1.2%; 95% CI, <0.1%-6.7%; P = .102). No TEs or deaths were identified. The use of bridge therapy is common among patients with MHV and may be associated with increased bleeding risk. Further research is needed to determine whether bridge therapy reduces TE in patients with MHV interrupting warfarin for invasive procedures.

  17. Which patient characteristics influence length of hospital stay after primary total hip arthroplasty in a 'fast-track' setting?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Y.M. den; Mathijssen, N.M.C.; Hannink, G.J.; Vehmeijer, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    After implementation of a 'fast-track' rehabilitation protocol in our hospital, mean length of hospital stay for primary total hip arthroplasty decreased from 4.6 to 2.9 nights for unselected patients. However, despite this reduction there was still a wide range across the patients' hospital

  18. IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL INDEPENDENCE OF PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS BY PHYSICAL THERAPY AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Ticărat

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with multiple sclerosis can have a normal life despite of their real or possible disability and of the progressive nature of it. Scope. Patients who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy will have an increased quality of life and a greater functional independence.Methods. The randomized study was made on 7 patients with multiple sclerosis, from Oradea Day Centre, 3 times/week, ages between 35 – 55 years, functional level between mild and sever. Assessment and rehabilitation methods: inspection, BARTHEL Index. Frenkel method, brething exercises, weights exercises, gait exercises, writind exercises and games were used in the rehabilitation process. Group therapies: sociotherapy, arttherapy, music therapy. Results analysis consisted of the comparison of baseline and final means.Results. By analizing baseline and final means for Barthel Index for each functon separately, it was shown a mild improvement of functional independence for almost assessed functions, with at least 1-1,5 points.Conclusions. Persons with multiple sclerosis who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy presents a better functional independence after the treatment.

  19. Use of animal-assisted therapy with psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Jeanette; King, Camille

    2010-11-01

    The use of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) as an adjunct treatment approach in psychiatric settings has received much attention in the literature. This article explores the use of AAT with psychiatric patients. The authors performed a literature review and found that AAT can have a significant effect on the improvement of psychiatric patients' socialization and provides a variety of psychological benefits. Nurses can benefit from learning about the potential benefits of AAT for psychiatric patients.

  20. Proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients with severe cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, M.; Tokuuye, K.; Fukumitsu, N.; Hashimoto, T.; Akine, Y. [Proton Medical Research Center, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Nemoto, K.; Ohara, K. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Matsuzaki, Y. [Dept. of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    Background and purpose: hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with severe cirrhosis are usually treated with supportive care because of their poor prognosis. However, the survival of severe cirrhotic patients has recently improved due to advanced treatments. The aim of this study was to define the role of proton beam therapy for HCC patients with severe cirrhosis. Patients and methods: 19 HCC patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis received proton beam therapy. The hepatic tumors were solitary in 14 patients and multiple in five, and the tumor size was 25-80 mm (median 40 mm) in maximum diameter. No patient had regional lymph node or distant metastasis. Total doses of 50-84 Gy (median 72 Gy) in ten to 24 fractions (median 16) were delivered to the tumors. Results: of the 19 patients, six, eight and four died of cancer, liver failure and intercurrent diseases, respectively, during the follow-up period of 3-63 months (median 17 months) after treatment. A remaining patient was alive with no evidence of disease 33 months after treatment. All but one of irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Ten patients had new intrahepatic tumors outside the irradiated volume. The overall and progression-free survival rates were 53% and 47% at 1 year, respectively, and 42% each at 2 years. Performance status and Child-Pugh score were significant prognostic factors for survival. Therapy-related toxicity of grade 3 or more was not observed. Conclusion: proton beam therapy for HCC patients with severe cirrhosis was tolerable. It may improve survival for patients with relatively good general condition and liver function. (orig.)

  1. Gene delivery to carcinoma cells via novel non-viral vectors: nanoparticle tracking analysis and suicide gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremedhin, Senait; Singh, Aruna; Koons, Stephen; Bernt, William; Konopka, Krystyna; Duzgunes, Nejat

    2014-08-18

    Suicide gene therapy of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) may be a viable approach to the treatment of this cancer. However, human OSCC cells are relatively resistant to efficient transfection by non-viral vectors. To identify an optimal vector for gene delivery, we compared the transfection activities and efficiencies of Glycofect, Metafectene, Metafectene Pro, Metafectene Easy and FuGENE HD, using the OSCC cell line, HSC-3, and the cervical carcinoma cell line, HeLa. The size distribution and ζ-potential of the complexes of these vectors with plasmid DNA were assessed by nanoparticle tracking analysis and electrophoretic mobility measurements, respectively. Metafectene Easy and FuGENE HD mediated the highest transfection activity (measured as luciferase expression) and efficiency (measured as the percentage of cells transfected with ß-galactosidase). These vectors were used to deliver a plasmid encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, followed by ganciclovir treatment. By day 9, HeLa cell viability was 22±3% of controls with FuGENE HD and 26±3% with Metafectene Easy. The viability of HSC-3 cells was 42±25% with FuGENE HD, and 58±28% with Metafectene Easy. The reduction in viability was statistically significant in both cases (p⩽0.005; average of 3 independent experiments), although there was considerable variability between experiments with the HSC-3 cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Shockwave therapy in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Notarnicola, Angela; Scicchitano, Pietro; Sassara, Marco; Carbonara, Santa; Maiorano, Mariagrazia; Moretti, Biagio

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies support the fact that extracorporeal shockwave (SW) induces angiogenesis and improves symptoms in patients affected by limb ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of SW therapy in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Twenty-two patients were enrolled in this study and were randomly assigned into two groups: SW treatment (12 patients, 67 ± 9 years) and control (10 patients, 68 ± 12 years). The inclusion criteria were the following: age over 40 years, PAD diagnosis, optimal medical therapy, and ankle-brachial index less than 0.9. SW therapy was administered using the Minilith® SL1 litotriptor with an ultrasound guide able to detect the target area using a B-mode technique and a 7.5 MHz convex probe emitting 2,000 impulses with an energy flux density of 0.03 mJ/mm(2). The variation in the degree of stenosis before and after treatment was statistically significant between the groups (-9% ± -10% vs. 0% ± 0%; P = 0.001). In addition, a significantly higher number of treated patients than controls showed a reduction in the Fontaine stage (12 [63%] vs. 0 [0%]; P < 0.001). This result was confirmed by analyzing the difference in patients' pain-free walking distance before and after SW therapy (76 ± 46 m vs. 0 ± 0 m for treated patients vs. controls; P < 0.001) and the difference in pain severity (measured on a pain scale; -1.4 ± 0.5 in the treated patients vs. -0.2 ± 0.4 in the controls; P < 0.001). On the basis of these results the authors hypothesized a direct effect of SW on the ultrastructural composition of the vessel walls, inducing a reduction in artery stenosis. These data support the application of SW therapy as a new medical tool to improve the natural clinical course of PAD.

  3. Patients' satisfaction with therapy methods of advanced chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudek, Jerzy; Mikosiński, Jacek; Kobielski, Andrzej; Hering, Artur; Aleksiejew-Kleszczyński, Tomasz; Umiński, Jacek; Zubilewicz, Tomasz; Kobusiewicz, Wojciech; Iłżecki, Marek; Wojtak, Andrzej; Stec, Janusz; Urbanek, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    To assess patients' satisfaction from the therapy of advanced chronic venous disorders (CVD) in everyday clinical practice in Poland, and to compare the efficacy of various venoactive drugs (VADs) in venous ulcers healing process. Seven hundred and eighty unselected adult patients with active (N.=441) or healed (N.=339) venous ulcers participated in the non-interventional observational 6-week study. Compression therapy and VADs were utilized by 81.5% and 89.2% of patients respectively: 31.2% of all patients underwent surgical procedures for vein incompetence, 61.3% were satisfied with surgical methods, 43% with compression therapy, and 32.6% with VADs ‑ with highest rate of satisfied patients in the group taking Ruscus aculeatus and HMC and ascorbic acid (51.4%). Of 377 patients with active venous ulcers smaller than 200 cm2, adherent to VADs, 18.0% have been cured, and 66.6% have improved during 6-week period of observation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the compression therapy (OR=2.74), the size of ulcer ≤10 cm2 (OR=2.70) were increasing the change of ulcer healing. No VADs was better than another in the healing process. 1) Compression therapy and VADs are highly utilized by patients with advanced CVD. 2) Patients are more satisfied with surgical than conservative treatment of advanced CVD. 3) More than half of the patients with the advanced stage CVD taking Ruscus aculeatus and HMC and ascorbic acid is satisfied with the obtained improvement. 4) Ruscus aculeatus and HMC and ascorbic acid is similarly effective as other frequently used VADs in venous ulcer healing. 5) Ruscus aculeatus and HMC and ascorbic acid exerting effects on veins, capillaries and lymphatic vessels may explain the positive results observed in this study.

  4. [Internet therapy for ICD-patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, S M; Pauli, P

    2011-09-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) are increasingly used for the prevention of potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias due to their confirmed superior medical efficiency. Nevertheless, ICD-patients often suffer from psychosocial problems, e.g., anxiety and depression. These issues are rarely addressed in routine medical follow-up care. Due to the limited mobility of many ICD-patients, Internet-based care may be ideal for delivering psychosocial care to patients in their homes. Our pilot study and case studies illustrate prospects and challenges of this approach. We developed icd-forum.de, a 6-week internet-based prevention program that provides a platform for information, a virtual self-help group, and a professionally moderated chat room in order to help decrease anxiety and to improve quality of life. A critical evaluation in the context of other published studies on the subject allows recommendations for the implementation of future internet-based psychosocial programs for ICD-patients to be deduced. It is the authors' opinion that such programs offer advantages specifically for heart failure patients and they recommend their broader use. Prior to this, conclusive evaluation studies are needed.

  5. Characteristics of patients who receive electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, A K

    1988-11-01

    Case records of all non-forensic psychiatric admissions (n = 5,729), over a three year period, to all the inpatient psychiatric facilities, within one geographic area were studied on a number of demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics. Patients who had received E.C.T. were compared with those who did not receive tis treatment. The results showed that a high proportion (21%) had received E.C.T. In comparison with patients not receiving E.C.T., E.C.T. recipients were significantly older, more often female, had greater number of previous admissions, greater incidence of violent behaviour, and longer stays in hospital. E.C.T. patients did not differ from others on social class, education, and marital status, nor was E.C.T. prescribed more often to patients who had demonstrated suicidal behaviour, even if they had a diagnosis of depression. E.C.T. and non E.C.T. patients received an equal number of psychotropic drugs.

  6. Understanding patient preferences and willingness to pay for hemophilia therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaugule SS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Shraddha S Chaugule,1 Joel W Hay,1 Guy Young2 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy, University of Southern California, 2Hemostasis and Thrombosis Center, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA Background: Despite clearly improved clinical outcomes for prophylaxis compared to on-demand therapy, on average only 56% of patients diagnosed with severe hemophilia receive prophylactic factor replacement therapy in the US. Prophylaxis rates generally drop as patients transition from childhood to adulthood, partly due to patients becoming less adherent when they reach adulthood. Assessment of patient preferences is important because these are likely to translate into increased treatment satisfaction and adherence. In this study, we assessed preferences and willingness to pay (WTP for on-demand, prophylaxis, and longer acting prophylaxis therapies in a sample of US hemophilia patients.Methods: Adult US hemophilia patients and caregivers (N=79 completed a discrete-choice survey that presented a series of trade-off questions, each including a pair of hypothetical treatment profiles. Using a mixed logit model for analysis, we compared the relative importance of five treatment characteristics: 1 out-of-pocket treatment costs (paid by patients, 2 factor dose adjustment, 3 treatment side effects, 4 availability of premixed factor, and 5 treatment effectiveness and dosing frequency. Based on these attribute estimates, we calculated patients’ WTP.Results: Out-of-pocket treatment costs (P<0.001, side effects (P<0.001, and treatment effectiveness and dosing frequency (P<0.001 were found to be statistically significant in the model. Patients were willing to pay US $410 (95% confidence interval: $164–$656 out of pocket per month for thrice-weekly prophylaxis therapy compared to on-demand therapy and $360 (95% confidence interval: $145–$575 for a switch

  7. Effectiveness of Music Therapy in Alzheimer Patients: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Lok

    Full Text Available The incidence of Alzheimers disease increases with advancing age. This increase cause significant economic and emotional burden on family and national health care system which makes Alzheimers disease a national issue to be considered. Music therapy could be an alternative treatment approach in Alzheimer's disease. Especially in the second stage of Alzheimers disease, growth and expansion of amyloid plaques results in anger and aggression among patients. Calming effects of music might be beneficial in management of patients during this period. This study is a systematic review of researches conducted to determine the effects of music therapy in Alzheimer's diseases. In sum results have supported possible positive effects of music therapy on Alzheimer patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(3.000: 266-274

  8. Photon and proton therapy planning comparison for malignant glioma based on CT, FDG-PET, DTI-MRI and fiber tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Engelholm, Silke; Ohlhues, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare treatment plans generated using fixed beam Intensity Modulated photon Radiation Therapy (IMRT), inversely optimized arc therapy (RapidArc(R), RA) with spot-scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for high-grade glioma patients. Plans were compared...

  9. Photon and proton therapy planning comparison for malignant glioma based on CT, FDG-PET, DTI-MRI and fiber tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Engelholm, Silke; Ohlhues, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare treatment plans generated using fixed beam Intensity Modulated photon Radiation Therapy (IMRT), inversely optimized arc therapy (RapidArc(R), RA) with spot-scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for high-grade glioma patients. Plans were compare...

  10. Effects of Intensive Statin Therapy on Left Ventricular Function in Patients with Myocardial Infarction and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auscher, Søren; Løgstrup, Brian Bridal; Møller, Jacob Eifer

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Abnormal glucose tolerance in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is associated with greater mortality and adverse cardiovascular effects. As statins possess a range of beneficial pleiotropic effects on the cardiovascular system, we sought to assess the cardioprotective...... statin therapy. Patients were assessed with an oral glucose tolerance test and their left ventricular (LV) function was assessed with speckle-tracking echocardiography measuring regional longitudinal systolic strain (RLSS) in the infarct area. RESULTS: Overall RLSS in the infarct area improved by a mean...... effects of statins on left ventricular function in patients with AMI in relation to glycometabolic state. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized trial, 140 patients with AMI were randomized to intensive statin therapy receiving statin loading with 80 mg of rosuvastatin followed by 40 mg daily or standard...

  11. ANTIDEPRESSANT THERAPY IN HIGH-RISK PATIENTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'The term depressed mood refers to negative affective arousal, variously described as depressed, ... Diagnosis of major depression has been made in 5 - 22% of patients suffering from renal disease.'" Renal ... less of the normal dose, depending on liver function evaluation.36 For this reason the non-sedative serotonin re-.

  12. Therapy and prophylaxis in newborn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Manzoni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluconazole is the most used drug for antifungal prophylaxis in neonatal population. Despite its effectiveness, sometimes fungal infections occur also in newborn patients undergoing fluconazole prophylaxis: this is mainly due both to biofilm formation in patients who carry a central venous catheter (CVC, a common condi­tion among premature babies, and to the occurrence of an infection by a Candida subspecies with intrinsic resistance to fluconazole (e.g.: C. glabrata and C. krusei. A number of antifungal agents are approved for pediatric use, and their limits and advantages are analyzed in this article, but only micafungin is authorized for use in neonatal patients. Further trials are required in order to assess whether additional drugs could have a similar indication for neonatal use. A big issue is the correct identification of the most effective dosing regimen, because the drug pharmacokinetics is peculiar and somewhat unpredictable in newborn patients. In addition to fluconazole prophylaxis, other measures could be taken to prevent fungal infections in at-risk neonates, such as increasing hygienic measures, encouraging breast-feeding, removing CVCs, using probiotics, and decreasing or avoiding the use of drugs promoting the development of systemic mycoses.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i1S.858

  13. Comparison between target margins derived from 4DCT scans and real-time tumor motion tracking: Insights from lung tumor patients treated with robotic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descovich, Martina, E-mail: mdescovich@radonc.ucsf.edu; McGuinness, Christopher; Kannarunimit, Danita; Chen, Josephine; Pinnaduwage, Dilini; Pouliot, Jean; Kased, Norbert; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Yom, Sue S. [UCSF Department of Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: A unique capability of the CyberKnife system is dynamic target tracking. However, not all patients are eligible for this approach. Rather, their tumors are tracked statically using the vertebral column for alignment. When using static tracking, the internal target volume (ITV) is delineated on the four-dimensional (4D) CT scan and an additional margin is added to account for setup uncertainty [planning target volume (PTV)]. Treatment margins are difficult to estimate due to unpredictable variations in tumor motion and respiratory pattern during the course of treatment. The inability to track the target and detect changes in respiratory characteristics might result in geographic misses and local tumor recurrences. The purpose of this study is to develop a method to evaluate the adequacy of ITV-to-PTV margins for patients treated in this manner. Methods: Data from 24 patients with lesions in the upper lobe (n = 12), middle lobe (n = 3), and lower lobe (n = 9) were included in this study. Each patient was treated with dynamic tracking and underwent 4DCT scanning at the time of simulation. Data including the 3D coordinates of the target over the course of treatment were extracted from the treatment log files and used to determine actual target motion in the superior–inferior (S–I), anterior–posterior (A–P), and left–right (L–R) directions. Different approaches were used to calculate anisotropic and isotropic margins, assuming that the tumor moves as a rigid body. Anisotropic margins were calculated by separating target motion in the three anatomical directions, and a uniform margin was calculated by shifting the gross tumor volume contours in the 3D space and by computing the percentage of overlap with the PTV. The analysis was validated by means of a theoretical formulation. Results: The three methods provided consistent results. A uniform margin of 4.5 mm around the ITV was necessary to assure 95% target coverage for 95% of the fractions included

  14. Reconstructive surgery in immunocompromised patients: evaluation and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunda, Sebastian E.; Bozkurt, Ahmet; Pallua, Norbert; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of patients undergoing reconstructive surgery are immunocompromised due to different reasons and different medical treatments. Some of the used immunosuppressive drugs may affect the process of wound healing and thereby, impair the long-term success of surgical treatment. Therefore, this retrospective analysis aimed at the evaluation of the perioperative treatment and surgical outcome of immunocompromised patients undergoing different reconstructive procedures. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 8 immunocompromised patients with different primary diseases who needed reconstructive surgery: 2 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with an acute myeloid leukemia, 1 patient with colitis ulcerosa, 1 patient with liver cirrhosis, 1 patient with chronic polyarthritis, and 2 patients with malignant melanoma. Results: In 7 of our 8 presented cases, multiple operations with wound debridements have been necessary to optimize the granulation of the wound bed before reconstructive surgery. 3 out of these 7 patients required further operations due to wound dehiscence or necrosis, with 2 of them as a result of increased immunosuppressive therapy. 5 out of 8 patients needed no further surgical treatment. Conclusions: Both the perioperative drug therapy and the reconstructive surgery concept need to be determined carefully in each individual case of the immunocompromised patients. Thus, the appropriate point in time of operation to achieve the best possible wound healing as well as the complexity of the procedure will require the consideration of a ‘less is more’ strategy in selected cases. PMID:26734539

  15. Reconstructive surgery in immunocompromised patients: evaluation and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunda, Sebastian E.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increasing number of patients undergoing reconstructive surgery are immunocompromised due to different reasons and different medical treatments. Some of the used immunosuppressive drugs may affect the process of wound healing and thereby, impair the long-term success of surgical treatment. Therefore, this retrospective analysis aimed at the evaluation of the perioperative treatment and surgical outcome of immunocompromised patients undergoing different reconstructive procedures.Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 8 immunocompromised patients with different primary diseases who needed reconstructive surgery: 2 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with an acute myeloid leukemia, 1 patient with colitis ulcerosa, 1 patient with liver cirrhosis, 1 patient with chronic polyarthritis, and 2 patients with malignant melanoma.Results: In 7 of our 8 presented cases, multiple operations with wound debridements have been necessary to optimize the granulation of the wound bed before reconstructive surgery. 3 out of these 7 patients required further operations due to wound dehiscence or necrosis, with 2 of them as a result of increased immunosuppressive therapy. 5 out of 8 patients needed no further surgical treatment.Conclusions: Both the perioperative drug therapy and the reconstructive surgery concept need to be determined carefully in each individual case of the immunocompromised patients. Thus, the appropriate point in time of operation to achieve the best possible wound healing as well as the complexity of the procedure will require the consideration of a ‘less is more’ strategy in selected cases.

  16. INTERMITTENT HORMONE THERAPY WITH ELIGARD IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most burning problems of modern urologic oncology, which is attributable to the fact that the incidence of this pathology remains high. Hormone therapy (HT is a basic treatment in patients with metastatic PC. Intermittent HT (IHT is an effective and safe method for hormonal exposure in PC patients, as supported by the results of many trials. IHT may be recommended in the therapy of patients with PC in different clinical situations, including in patients with distant metastases. Eligard is recognized to be an effective and safe medicament to treat this category of patients. Its injection formulation once three or six months is easy-to-use for IHT.

  17. INTERMITTENT HORMONE THERAPY WITH ELIGARD IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most burning problems of modern urologic oncology, which is attributable to the fact that the incidence of this pathology remains high. Hormone therapy (HT is a basic treatment in patients with metastatic PC. Intermittent HT (IHT is an effective and safe method for hormonal exposure in PC patients, as supported by the results of many trials. IHT may be recommended in the therapy of patients with PC in different clinical situations, including in patients with distant metastases. Eligard is recognized to be an effective and safe medicament to treat this category of patients. Its injection formulation once three or six months is easy-to-use for IHT.

  18. Speckle tracking echocardiography to assess regional ventricular function in patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccheri, María Cristina; Cianciulli, Tomás Francisco; Morita, Luis Alberto; Méndez, Ricardo José; Beck, Martín Alejandro; Guerra, Juan Enrique; Cozzarin, Alberto; Puente, Luciana Jimena; Balletti, Lorena Romina; Lax, Jorge Alberto

    2017-01-01

    AIM To explore regional systolic strain of midwall and endocardial segments using speckle tracking echocardiography in patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). METHODS We prospectively assessed 20 patients (mean age 53 ± 16 years, range: 18-81 years, 10 were male), with apical HCM. We measured global longitudinal peak systolic strain (GLPSS) in the midwall and endocardium of the left ventricle. RESULTS The diastolic thickness of the 4 apical segments was 16.25 ± 2.75 mm. All patients had a normal global systolic function with a fractional shortening of 50% ± 8%. In spite of supernormal left ventricular (LV) systolic function, midwall GLPSS was decreased in all patients, more in the apical (-7.3% ± -8.8%) than in basal segments (-15.5% ± -6.93%), while endocardial GLPPS was significantly greater and reached normal values (apical: -22.8% ± -7.8%, basal: -17.9% ± -7.5%). CONCLUSION This study shows that two-dimensional strain was decreased mainly confined to the mesocardium, while endocardium myocardial deformation was preserved in HCM and allowed to identify subclinical LV dysfunction. This transmural heterogeneity in systolic strain had not been previously described in HCM and could be explained by the distribution of myofibrillar disarray in deep myocardial areas. The clinical application of this novel finding may help further understanding of the pathophysiology of HCM. PMID:28515855

  19. TRACTION-EXTENDED THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DEGENERATIVE DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Zhirnov; D. P. Krest'yanov; A. K. Vasil'kin

    2013-01-01

    Based on the survey of 148 patients with an lumbar degenerative disease, there have been studied immediate and medium-term results of the comprehensive conservative treatment of the patients with and without application of traction exposure on the spine. It was found out that the traction of the spine leads to a quicker and more durable relief of symptoms in comparison with the control groups where traction therapy wasn't carried out. Application of the traction-extended therapy in three plan...

  20. Cognitive decline tracks motor progression and not disease duration in Parkinson patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BD Riggeal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BD Riggeal1, GP Crucian1, P Seignourel2, CE Jacobson IV1, MS Okun1, RL Rodriguez1, Hubert H Fernandez11Department of Neurology; 2Department of Community Health and Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: We performed an analysis of prospectively-acquired cross sectional data on 106 Parkinson disease (PD patients who underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing and the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS motor scale. A significant correlation between the UPDRS motor and neuropsychological tests in all cognitive domains except for general intelligence and visuo-spatial function was seen. In this study, cognitive decline within this PD cohort correlated with motor impairment but not disease duration. Our findings suggest that overall cognitive impairment (except visuospatial dysfunction may track motor progression in PD more than duration of disease. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm our results.Keywords: Parkinson, dementia, cognition, visual-spatial dysfunction

  1. Topical therapy in patients with microbial eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakulev A.L.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The study aimed to display that clinical and microbiologic research of patients with microbial eczema. The study revealed that the usage of co — formulated medication Supirocin — B was rather effcient, it promotes statistically authentic reduction of eczematous foci with pathogenic St.aureus and Str.spp. Besides, it has strong anti — infammatory effect and reduces eczematous process.

  2. Online model checking for monitoring surrogate-based respiratory motion tracking in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Sven-Thomas; Rinast, Jonas; Ma, Xintao; Schupp, Sibylle; Schlaefer, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Correlation between internal and external motion is critical for respiratory motion compensation in radiosurgery. Artifacts like coughing, sneezing or yawning or changes in the breathing pattern can lead to misalignment between beam and tumor and need to be detected to interrupt the treatment. We propose online model checking (OMC), a model-based verification approach from the field of formal methods, to verify that the breathing motion is regular and the correlation holds. We demonstrate that OMC may be more suitable for artifact detection than the prediction error. We established a sinusoidal model to apply OMC to the verification of respiratory motion. The method was parameterized to detect deviations from typical breathing motion. We analyzed the performance on synthetic data and on clinical episodes showing large correlation error. In comparison, we considered the prediction error of different state-of-the-art methods based on least mean squares (LMS; normalized LMS, nLMS; wavelet-based multiscale autoregression, wLMS), recursive least squares (RLSpred) and support vector regression (SVRpred). On synthetic data, OMC outperformed wLMS by at least 30 % and SVRpred by at least 141 %, detecting 70 % of transitions. No artifacts were detected by nLMS and RLSpred. On patient data, OMC detected 23-49 % of the episodes correctly, outperforming nLMS, wLMS, RLSpred and SVRpred by up to 544, 491, 408 and 258 %, respectively. On selected episodes, OMC detected up to 94 % of all events. OMC is able to detect changes in breathing as well as artifacts which previously would have gone undetected, outperforming prediction error-based detection. Synthetic data analysis supports the assumption that prediction is very insensitive to specific changes in breathing. We suggest using OMC as an additional safety measure ensuring reliable and fast stopping of irradiation.

  3. Evaluating Silent Reading Performance with an Eye Tracking System in Patients with Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Noriaki; Miyamoto, Daiki; Togano, Tetsuya; Fukuchi, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between silent reading performance and visual field defects in patients with glaucoma using an eye tracking system. Fifty glaucoma patients (Group G; mean age, 52.2 years, standard deviation: 11.4 years) and 20 normal controls (Group N; mean age, 46.9 years; standard deviation: 17.2 years) were included in the study. All participants in Group G had early to advanced glaucomatous visual field defects but better than 20/20 visual acuity in both eyes. Participants silently read Japanese articles written horizontally while the eye tracking system monitored and calculated reading duration per 100 characters, number of fixations per 100 characters, and mean fixation duration, which were compared with mean deviation and visual field index values from Humphrey visual field testing (24-2 and 10-2 Swedish interactive threshold algorithm standard) of the right versus left eye and the better versus worse eye. There was a statistically significant difference between Groups G and N in mean fixation duration (G, 233.4 msec; N, 215.7 msec; P = 0.010). Within Group G, significant correlations were observed between reading duration and 24-2 right mean deviation (rs = -0.280, P = 0.049), 24-2 right visual field index (rs = -0.306, P = 0.030), 24-2 worse visual field index (rs = -0.304, P = 0.032), and 10-2 worse mean deviation (rs = -0.326, P = 0.025). Significant correlations were observed between mean fixation duration and 10-2 left mean deviation (rs = -0.294, P = 0.045) and 10-2 worse mean deviation (rs = -0.306, P = 0.037), respectively. The severity of visual field defects may influence some aspects of reading performance. At least concerning silent reading, the visual field of the worse eye is an essential element of smoothness of reading.

  4. Combination therapy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tršinar

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of observational program of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS because of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH (LUTS/BPH was to acquire additional pharmaco-epidemiological data on the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with finasteride and tamsulosin.Methods: Observational program of men with BPH was conducted in urological outpatient clinics in Slovenia from April 2004 until November 2005. In open-label, non-interventional program 1173 patients were observed, who had been treated because of LUTS/BPH with combination therapy with finasteride and tamsulosin, in the framework of common treatment. At baseline and after six months of treatment for each patient the International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS questionnaire and assessment of quality of life (QL were filled in. In addition, urinary flow rate and prostate volume were determined. Adverse effects of drugs were reported spontaneously. For statistical analysis the Student’s t-test was performed.Results: Combination therapy with finasteride and tamsulosin was well tolerated. 89 (7.6 % patients discontinued with medication because of lack of efficacy or because of adverse effects of drugs. Symptom score, assessment of quality of patients’ lives and volume of prostates were significantly lower (p < 0.0001, while urinary flow rate was significantly higher (p < 0.0001 after six months of treatment with finasteride and tamsulosin.Conclusions: Combination therapy of patients with LUTS/BPH with finasteride and tamsulosin is effective and safe.

  5. Oral complications and management strategies for patients undergoing cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hai Ming

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given.

  6. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  7. "You Get Reminded You're a Sick Person": Personal Data Tracking and Patients With Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancker, Jessica S; Witteman, Holly O; Hafeez, Baria; Provencher, Thierry; Van de Graaf, Mary; Wei, Esther

    2015-08-19

    Consumer health information technologies (HIT) that encourage self-tracking, such as diet and fitness tracking apps and disease journals, are attracting widespread interest among technology-oriented consumers (such as "quantified self" advocates), entrepreneurs, and the health care industry. Such electronic technologies could potentially benefit the growing population of patients with multiple chronic conditions (MCC). However, MCC is predominantly a condition of the elderly and disproportionately affects the less affluent, so it also seems possible that the barriers to use of consumer HIT would be particularly severe for this patient population. Our aim was to explore the perspectives of individuals with MCC using a semistructured interview study. Our research questions were (1) How do individuals with MCC track their own health and medical data? and (2) How do patients and providers perceive and use patient-tracked data? We used semistructured interviews with patients with multiple chronic diseases and providers with experience caring for such patients, as well as participation in a diabetes education group to triangulate emerging themes. Data were analyzed using grounded theory and thematic analysis. Recruitment and analysis took place iteratively until thematic saturation was reached. Interviews were conducted with 22 patients and 7 health care providers. The patients had an average of 3.5 chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, chronic pain, and depression, and had regular relationships with an average of 5 providers. Four major themes arose from the interviews: (1) tracking this data feels like work for many patients, (2) personal medical data for individuals with chronic conditions are not simply objective facts, but instead provoke strong positive and negative emotions, value judgments, and diverse interpretations, (3) patients track for different purposes, ranging from sense-making to self-management to reporting to the doctor, and (4

  8. Mirror therapy enhances upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirela Cristina, Luca; Matei, Daniela; Ignat, Bogdan; Popescu, Cristian Dinu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy program in addition with physical therapy methods on upper limb recovery in patients with subacute ischemic stroke. 15 subjects followed a comprehensive rehabilitative treatment, 8 subjects received only control therapy (CT) and 7 subjects received mirror therapy (MT) for 30 min every day, five times a week, for 6 weeks in addition to the conventional therapy. Brunnstrom stages, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (upper extremity), the Ashworth Scale, and Bhakta Test (finger flexion scale) were used to assess changes in upper limb motor recovery and motor function after intervention. After 6 weeks of treatment, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in the variables measured. Patients who received MT showed greater improvements compared to the CT group. The MT treatment results included: improvement of motor functions, manual skills and activities of daily living. The best results were obtained when the treatment was started soon after the stroke. MT is an easy and low-cost method to improve motor recovery of the upper limb.

  9. “You Get Reminded You’re a Sick Person”: Personal Data Tracking and Patients With Multiple Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witteman, Holly O; Hafeez, Baria; Provencher, Thierry; Van de Graaf, Mary; Wei, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background Consumer health information technologies (HIT) that encourage self-tracking, such as diet and fitness tracking apps and disease journals, are attracting widespread interest among technology-oriented consumers (such as “quantified self” advocates), entrepreneurs, and the health care industry. Such electronic technologies could potentially benefit the growing population of patients with multiple chronic conditions (MCC). However, MCC is predominantly a condition of the elderly and disproportionately affects the less affluent, so it also seems possible that the barriers to use of consumer HIT would be particularly severe for this patient population. Objective Our aim was to explore the perspectives of individuals with MCC using a semistructured interview study. Our research questions were (1) How do individuals with MCC track their own health and medical data? and (2) How do patients and providers perceive and use patient-tracked data? Methods We used semistructured interviews with patients with multiple chronic diseases and providers with experience caring for such patients, as well as participation in a diabetes education group to triangulate emerging themes. Data were analyzed using grounded theory and thematic analysis. Recruitment and analysis took place iteratively until thematic saturation was reached. Results Interviews were conducted with 22 patients and 7 health care providers. The patients had an average of 3.5 chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, chronic pain, and depression, and had regular relationships with an average of 5 providers. Four major themes arose from the interviews: (1) tracking this data feels like work for many patients, (2) personal medical data for individuals with chronic conditions are not simply objective facts, but instead provoke strong positive and negative emotions, value judgments, and diverse interpretations, (3) patients track for different purposes, ranging from sense-making to self

  10. Long term three dimensional tracking of orthodontic patients using registered cone beam CT and photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Pierre; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Ramirez, Juan F; Mesa, Elizabeth; Branch, John W

    2009-01-01

    The measurements from registered images obtained from Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and a photogrammetric sensor are used to track three-dimensional shape variations of orthodontic patients before and after their treatments. The methodology consists of five main steps: (1) the patient's bone and skin shapes are measured in 3D using the fusion of images from a CBCT and a photogrammetric sensor. (2) The bone shape is extracted from the CBCT data using a standard marching cube algorithm. (3) The bone and skin shape measurements are registered using titanium targets located on the head of the patient. (4) Using a manual segmentation technique the head and lower jaw geometry are extracted separately to deal with jaw motion at the different record visits. (5) Using natural features of the upper head the two datasets are then registered with each other and then compared to evaluate bone, teeth, and skin displacements before and after treatments. This procedure is now used at the University of Alberta orthodontic clinic.

  11. Photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis in organ transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basset-Seguin, N; Baumann Conzett, K; Gerritsen, M J P

    2013-01-01

    of the immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional therapies for AK, using curettage, cryotherapy, surgical excision, topical therapies and photodynamic therapy (PDT), are often less effective, and may be inappropriate, for treating the greater numbers and extent of lesions in OTRs. Moreover, there are no specific protocols...... for treating this patient population that take into account the need for more frequent treatment and the increased pain associated with treating larger areas. Objectives Recently, a pan-European group of dermatologists with expertise in this area met to share current best practice in PDT for the treatment...... of AK in OTRs. Methods The group identified areas where PDT currently is not meeting the needs of these patients and discussed how these gaps might be addressed. Results/Conclusions This position article summarizes those discussions and makes recommendations concerning a standardized protocol...

  12. Radiographic features of bisphosphonate therapy in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grissom, L.E.; Theodore Harcke, H. [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Nemours Children' s Clinic, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Background: Pediatric patients are being treated with bisphosphonates for low bone mineral density. Skeletal radiographic findings have been described with bisphosphonates given orally and intravenously. Objective: To determine and describe the radiographic findings of cyclic intravenous bisphosphonate therapy in the growing skeleton. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of radiographs of 32 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta or cerebral palsy treated with intravenous bisphosphonates on a quarterly schedule. Results: Principal observations were metaphyseal bands and increased bone mineral density. The bands varied in spacing according to the age of the patient, rate of growth, and the location of the metaphysis. Fractures continued to be seen in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. Conclusion: Cyclic bisphosphonate therapy results in distinctive radiographic findings in the growing skeleton. (orig.)

  13. TRACTION-EXTENDED THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DEGENERATIVE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zhirnov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the survey of 148 patients with an lumbar degenerative disease, there have been studied immediate and medium-term results of the comprehensive conservative treatment of the patients with and without application of traction exposure on the spine. It was found out that the traction of the spine leads to a quicker and more durable relief of symptoms in comparison with the control groups where traction therapy wasn't carried out. Application of the traction-extended therapy in three planes with a usage of robotized set for dry skeletal traction of a new generation KinetracKNX-7000 is proved to increase the effectiveness of treatment for the patients with stated pathology, fasten regress of the pain syndrome and clinical symptomatology, lead to more durable and lasting remission of the desease, in comparison with the patients that had traction of the spine in one plane only during the treatment.

  14. Effects of smoking in patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Laura; Xhaferi, Brunilda; Chiostri, Marco; Pieragnoli, Paolo; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Ricceri, Ilaria; Biria, Mazda; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjay; Valleggi, Alessandro; Emdin, Michele; Michelotti, Federica; Mascioli, Giosuè; Pandozi, Angela; Santini, Massimo; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-04-01

    Smoking is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in cardiac patients. However, data on the prognostic impact of smoking in heart failure (HF) patients on cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) are absent. We investigated the effects of smoking on all-cause mortality and on a composite endpoint (all-cause death/appropriate device therapy), appropriate and inappropriate device therapy, in 649 patients with HF who underwent CRT-D between January 2003 and October 2011 in 6 Centers (4 in Italy and 2 in USA). 68 patients were current smokers, 396 previous-smokers (patients who had smoked in the past but who had quit before the CRT-D implant), and 185 had never smoked. The risk of each endpoint by smoking status was evaluated with both Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional-hazard analysis. After adjusting for age, left ventricular ejection fraction, QRS width and ischemic etiology, both current and previous smoking were independent predictors of all-cause death [HR = 5.07 (95 % CI 2.68-9.58), p therapy compared to never smokers [HR = 21.74 (4.53-104.25), p = 0.005]. Our study indicates that in patients with HF who received a CRT-D device, current and previous smoking increase the event rate per person-time of death and of appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapy more than other known negative prognostic factors such as age, left ventricular dysfunction, prolonged QRS duration and ischemic etiology.

  15. [Dental surgery in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutzbauer, Till S; Imfeld, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    It has long been a standard procedure to replace coumarin by heparin if a patient using this oral anticoagulant had to undergo dental surgery. The Quick-Value had then to exceed a certain limit before surgery could be safely performed. Today this procedure has changed in that a switch to heparin is only made for invasive and large area surgery. Simple dental extractions, small biopsies and periodontal treatments are performed under continuous oral anticoagulation and local hemostyptic measures are applied. It has been shown that the likelihood of postoperative bleeding complications after adequate local hemostasis during dental surgery is much lower than is the risk of thrombosis or embolic complication following cessation of anticoagulant medication before surgery.

  16. Music Therapy with Ethnic Music for Dementia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Yuki; Nogawa, Hiroki; TANAKA, HIROSHI

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dementia is already critical issues in the world when the society experiences super-aging. This situation requires establishment of rehabilitation methods for relieving symptoms of the patients. We have done research based on our assumption that most effective music therapy differs from culture, because music is dependent on cultural context. Here, we propose a hypothesis that the Japanese music gives better effects to Japanese patients than Classical music. Methods: In this st...

  17. ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY AMONG ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshimi Borgohain; Deepak Chaudhury; Mahibul Islam Mollah; Subhankar Paul

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) among adolescent psychiatric patient is rarely used and studies in this regard are also rare, while its need is of great importance. Aim of this study was to study the prevalence of ECT in common psychiatric illnesses among adolescent age group, where it is indicated and outcome of ECT in those psychiatric patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS All data were collected retrospectively from the chart review for those adolescents aged betwee...

  18. Music therapy as part of the alternative-complementary therapy in cancer patients in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Efstratios Athanassakis; Savvato Karavassiliadou

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is one of the modern health problems of people living in developed countries. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches to cancer patients is constantly updated with new data. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the international literature referred to the application of music therapy in the treatment for pediatric and adult patients with cancer. Method and materials: The method of this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature on MEDLI...

  19. Patient with intractable delirium successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Eske; Hageman, Ida

    2014-01-01

    and in this situation electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be a quick and efficient treatment. In this case report of a 26-year-old man a post-operative intractable delirium persisting for three weeks was efficiently and swiftly relieved by three consecutive ECTs. The patient was discharged without need for further...

  20. Nurses' perceptions about Botswana patients' anti-retroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-retroviral drugs(ARVs) are supplied free of charge in Botswana. Lifelong adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is vital to improve the patient's state of well-being ... weerstand bied teen anti-retrovirale behandeling (ARB). Persone met ARB-weerstandbiedende MIV stamme kan dit versprei na ander mense toe, wat ...

  1. Adherence to nicotine replacement patch therapy in cardiovascular patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, Louise C. W.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; Oort, Frans J.; Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Vermeulen, Hester; van Loenen, Lucas B. M.; Peters, Ron J. G.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Legemate, Dink A.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) is the most frequently used pharmacological intervention for smoking cessation. Research on the effect of NRT showed serious nonadherence among users. We investigated adherence to NRT in cardiovascular patients. A number of 174 outpatients (N = 174), who smoked > 5

  2. Evaluation of drug therapy problems among renal patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of drug therapy problems (DTPs), identify the types of DTPs and assess outcomes of DTP interventions among renal patients receiving care in three Nigerian tertiary hospitals. Methods: This prospective descriptive study was conducted in nephrology units of three tertiary hospitals in ...

  3. Clinical effect of Fuzheng quyu therapy in patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical effect of Fuzheng quyu therapy in patients undergoing radiotherapy after cervical carcinoma surgery. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... only, whereas those in the study group received treatment designed to nourish healthy vital energy and eliminate blood stasis in addition to radiotherapy. Changes ...

  4. Early insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Clinical inertia' in T2DM, defined as lack of initiation or intensification of therapy when clinically indicated, is common among clinicians. Patients are exposed to hyperglycaemia for a long time resulting in glucotoxicity to beta cells, leading to further beta cell deterioration. The traditional approach to the management of T2DM ...

  5. Assessment of patients' knowledge of their drug therapy in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' knowledge of their medications is an important factor in ensuring adherence. Medication adherence is essential for rational drug use and derivation of optimal therapy. This study was conducted to assess knowledge of outpatients regarding their medications. A well structured questionnaire was administered to 200 ...

  6. Cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of primary care patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of primary care patients presenting with psychological disorders. B Khoury, J Ammar. Abstract. Mental disorders affect a great number of people worldwide. Four out of the 10 leading causes of disability in the world are mental disorders. Because of the scarcity of specialists around ...

  7. Patients' perceptions of a rural decentralised anti-retroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' perceptions of a rural decentralised anti-retroviral therapy management and its impact on direct out-of-pocket spending. Monique Lines, Fatima Suleman. Abstract. Background: Geographical and financial barriers hamper accessibility to HIV services for rural communities. The government has introduced the nurse ...

  8. Weight gain in patients after therapy for hyperthyroidism | Brunova ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of obesity following therapy for hyperthyroidism and to assess the contributing factors associated with an undesirable weight gain. Design. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of clinical records for 160 hyperthyroid patients attending an endocrine clinic in Bloemfontein (1994 ...

  9. Factors associated with therapy noncompliance in type-2 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ronquillo Lizbeth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the frequency and factors associated with therapy noncompliance in type-2 diabetes mellitus patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 79 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus seen in major hospitals of Mexico City. Patients were visited at home, from March 1998 to August 1999, to measure compliance with prescribed therapy. Complying patients were defined as those taking at least 80% of their pills or 80% of their corresponding insulin dose. The degree of compliance with therapy components (diet, amount of exercise, and keeping appointments was measured. RESULTS: The average age of study subjects was 59 years (SD 11 years; 73% (n=58 were female subjects. The overall frequency of noncompliance was 39%. Noncompliance rates were: 62% for dietary recommendations, 85% for exercise, 17% for intake of oral hypoglycemic medication, 13% for insulin application, and 3% for appointment keeping. Hypertension plus obesity was the only factor significantly associated with noncompliance (OR 4.58, CI 95% 1.0, 22.4, p=0.02. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of therapy noncompliance was very high, especially for diet and exercise.

  10. [Which anticoagulation therapy in old atrial fibrillation patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Jérôme

    2013-06-01

    ESC recommends treating all AF patients over 75 years old with Vitamin K antagonist or new oral anticoagulation treatments because of the benefit on ischemic events. The challenge is to deal with hemorrhagic risk which should be carefully evaluated. It increases in case of renal disturbance and low weight, especially with new oral anticoagulation therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast-track access to urologic care for patients with macroscopic haematuria is efficient and cost-effective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liedberg, Fredrik; Gerdtham, Ulf; Gralén, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    : In all 275 patients who called 'the Red Phone' hotline were investigated, and 47 of them (17%) were diagnosed with cancer and 36 of those had bladder cancer. Median time from patient-reported haematuria to diagnosis was 29 (interquartile range (IQR) 14-104) days and 50 (IQR 27-165) days......BACKGROUND: The delay between onset of macroscopic haematuria and diagnosis of bladder cancer is often long. METHODS: We evaluated timely diagnosis and health-care costs for patients with macroscopic haematuria given fast-track access to diagnostics. During a 15-month period, a telephone hotline...... for fast-track diagnostics was provided in nine Swedish municipalities for patients aged ⩾50 years with macroscopic haematuria. The control group comprised 101 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer in the same catchment area with macroscopic haematuria who underwent regular diagnostic process. RESULTS...

  12. Patient Reported Outcome Assessment of Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Elbe; Varghese, N.O.; Anju, P

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) are now regarded as a fundamental measure of therapeutic success. Patient’s opinion regarding the impact of disease and its treatment is assessed using scales such as Oral Health Related Quality Of Life (OHRQoL) tools. Patient centred outcome assessment is now being considered as a primary outcome measure in clinical trials. Aim To evaluate whether treatment of periodontal disease could influence OHRQoL based on available literature. Materials and Methods An electronic search was done in Google, Google Scholar and Pubmed for articles in English language using the terms Quality of Life or ORHQoL or PROs or patient centered outcome and periodontal therapy. The search commenced on 1st September 2016 and ended on 15th December 2016. Studies that employed one or more than one multi-item OHRQoL instrument to assess PROs related to either non-surgical or surgical periodontal therapy were reviewed. Results Initially 423 relevant articles were obtained, from which based on screening titles and abstracts 396 were excluded. Full text of remaining 27 articles were retrieved. Nineteen clinical studies with 1345 participants and 2 systematic reviews were included after the full text review. Conclusion Both surgical and Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy (NSPT) significantly influenced the OHRQoL scores. However the change in scores after surgical therapy when compared to nonsurgical therapy was not statistically significant. There is a need for a specific PROs scale that could potentially tap the entire dimension of the change in patients’ perception brought about by periodontal therapy. PMID:28969266

  13. Towards reducing thrombogenicity of LVAD therapy: optimizing surgical and patient management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivukula, Venkat Keshav; Lafzi, Ali; Mokadam, Nahush; Beckman, Jennifer; Mahr, Claudius; Aliseda, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    Unfavourable hemodynamics in heart failure patients implanted with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD), due to non-optimal surgical configurations and patient management, strongly influence thrombogenicity. This is consistent with the increase in devastating thromboembolic complications (specifically thrombosis and stroke) in patients, even as the risk of thrombosis inside the device decreases with modern designs. Inflow cannula and outflow graft surgical configurations have been optimized via patient-specific modeling that computes the thrombogenic potential with a combination of Eulerian (endothelial) wall shear stress and Lagrangian (platelet shear history) tracking. Using this view of hemodynamics, the benefits of intermittent aortic valve opening (promoting washout and reducing stagnant flow in the aortic valve region) have been assessed in managing the patient's residual native cardiac output. The use of this methodology to understand the contribution of the hemodynamics in the flow surrounding the LVAD itself to thrombogenesis show promise in developing holistic patient-specific management strategies to minimize stroke risk and enhance efficacy of LVAD therapy. Funded in part by an AHA postdoctoral fellowship 16POST30520004.

  14. Dance therapy improves self-body image among obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Pinget, Solange; Carrard, Isabelle; Ybarra, Juan; Golay, Alain

    2012-12-01

    Obesity and disturbed eating behaviors are both associated with low self-esteem and distorted body images. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of a dance therapy program on the evolution of mental representations linked to body image among obese patients. Changes in body image were evaluated in terms of four parameters: physical, psychological, cognitive, and social. In total, 18 obese patients were enrolled in a longitudinal dance therapy workshop (DTW) program lasting 36 weeks. Patients danced for 2h per week and were evaluated three times: at baseline, after 18 weeks, and at the end of the study (36 weeks). Evaluation was performed using questionnaires addressing health-related quality of life, sensorial-motor perception, and mental representations linked to body schema and self-body image. Obese patients enrolled in the DTW displayed a significant improvement in health-related quality of life (pconsciousness (pconsciousness of their body image. Patients are usually reluctant to practice physical activity. Dance therapy improves not only body image, but also psycho-social aspects of their personality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metrics for Performance Evaluation of Patient Exercises during Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakanski, Aleksandar; Ferguson, Jake M; Lee, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    The article proposes a set of metrics for evaluation of patient performance in physical therapy exercises. Taxonomy is employed that classifies the metrics into quantitative and qualitative categories, based on the level of abstraction of the captured motion sequences. Further, the quantitative metrics are classified into model-less and model-based metrics, in reference to whether the evaluation employs the raw measurements of patient performed motions, or whether the evaluation is based on a mathematical model of the motions. The reviewed metrics include root-mean square distance, Kullback Leibler divergence, log-likelihood, heuristic consistency, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and similar. The metrics are evaluated for a set of five human motions captured with a Kinect sensor. The metrics can potentially be integrated into a system that employs machine learning for modelling and assessment of the consistency of patient performance in home-based therapy setting. Automated performance evaluation can overcome the inherent subjectivity in human performed therapy assessment, and it can increase the adherence to prescribed therapy plans, and reduce healthcare costs.

  16. Use of alternative therapy among pediatric oncology patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C H; Tsai, J L; Li, W; Chen, H M; Lee, S C; Lin, C F; Yang, C P

    2000-01-01

    Both alternative medicine and western medicine have been commonly used to treat pediatric cancer patients in Taiwan. Each has its own intrinsic strengths and weaknesses and they can be complementary. Little is known about medical help-seeking behaviors of parents of pediatric cancer patients, especially those related to alternative therapies. This study investigated the extent and parental expectations on use of alternative therapies. All primary caregivers of 63 eligible patients were interviewed. Use of alternative therapies, regardless of education level or social status of their families, is prevalent (n = 46, 73%) in Taiwan. Commonly used alternative therapies included, in order of popularity, formulated functional food (n = 22, 48%), temple worship/shamanism (n = 19, 40%), traditional Chinese medicine (n = 9, 20%), secret recipes/herbs (n = 13, 28%), and diet supplements (n = 9, 19%). Such practices generally occur without medical guidance from oncologists, largely because of poor interactions between parents and oncologists. Future efforts should be made to encourage both parents and oncologists to discuss this issue. Nurses may serve as mediators by developing mutual trust and a sharing relationship between these groups.

  17. Modern approaches to parodontitis therapy in HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuldyakov A.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine the clinical pathogenetic efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy of periodontitis in patients with subclinical stage of HIV-infection. Medical examination and treatment of 40 patients has been carried out. It is established that use of liniment Cycloferon in the combined treatment of patients with subclinical stage of HIV-infection allows to accelerate process of normalization of lipid peroxidation parameters and antioxidant potential of blood and to decrease infection (herpes symplex virus I, Candida albicans, staphylococcus aureus in par-odontal recess and evidence of local inflammation. The considered method of therapy has been proved to improve convalescence period and to decrease frequency of parodontitis recurrences

  18. Experiences of wake and light therapy in patients with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Mette; Møller, Dorthe Norden; Schultz Wihlborg, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    with the treatment was positive. Some experienced a remarkable and rapid antidepressant effect, whereas others described more long-term benefits (e.g. improved sleep and diurnal rhythm). Yet recovery was fragile, and patients were only cautiously optimistic. Social support was important for maintaining......Wake therapy can reduce depressive symptoms within days, and response rates are high. To sustain the effect, it is often combined with light therapy. Few studies have focussed on factors related to patients' adherence to the regime, and none has used qualitative methods to examine their experience...... week, 30 min of daily light treatment for the entire 9 weeks, and ongoing psychoeducation regarding good sleep hygiene. Patients kept a diary, and individual semistructured interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The participants' overall experience...

  19. Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients with Prosthetic Heart Valves

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    Mohamed HA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with mechanical valve prostheses require a lifelong anticoagulant treatment. The combined use of Warfarin and low-dose aspirin appears to reduce the risk of valve thrombosis and systemic embolism at a low risk of bleeding. The management of women with prosthetic heart valves during pregnancy poses a particular challenge, as there are no available controlled clinical trials to provide guidelines for effective antithrombotic therapy. Oral anticoagulants, such as Warfarin, cause foetal embryopathy; unfractionated heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin have been reported to be ineffective in preventing thromboembolic complications.This article discusses the available data and the most recent guidelines in the antithrombotic management of patients with prosthetic valves, and antithrombotic therapy in various clinical situations such as pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves, and patients with prosthetic heart valves undergoing noncardiac surgery.

  20. Bromocriptine augmentation therapy in a patient with Cotard's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shuko; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Eguchi, Takuya; Oyama, Takanobu; Wada, Tadashi; Otani, Koichi

    2003-06-01

    A 72-year-old female with bipolar I disorder developed Cotard's syndrome, i.e., various delusions of negation accompanied by severe depressive symptoms. She responded neither to the combination of antipsychotic drug and antidepressant nor to the lithium augmentation therapy. However, the delusions and depressive symptoms improved dramatically after the addition of bromocriptine 2.5-5 mg/day to the combination of clomipramine and lithium. This report suggests that bromocriptine augmentation therapy might be effective at least for some patients with Cotard's syndrome in mood disorders.

  1. [Can music therapy for patients with neurological disorders?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myskja, Audun

    2004-12-16

    Recent developments in brain research and in the field of music therapy have led to the development of music-based methods specifically aimed at relieving symptoms of Parkinson's disease and other neurologic disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation uses external rhythmic auditory cues from song, music or metronome to aid patients improving their walking functioning and has been shown to be effective both within sessions and as a result of training over time. Melodic intonation therapy and related vocal techniques can improve expressive dysphasia and aid rehabilitation of neurologic disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease, stroke and developmental disorders.

  2. Efficacy of Olanzapine Combined Therapy for Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy Resistant to Standard Antiemetic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masakazu; Kasamatsu, Yuka; Kado, Nobuhiro; Kuji, Shiho; Tanaka, Aki; Takahashi, Nobutaka; Takekuma, Munetaka; Hirashima, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Olanzapine is proved to be effective for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). But its efficacy in combination with standard antiemetic therapy is unknown. The purpose of this study is to prove the preventive effect of olanzapine for the prevention of CINV caused by highly emetogenic chemotherapy when used with standard antiemetic therapy. Gynecologic cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy who had grade 2 or 3 nausea in overall phase (0-120 h after chemotherapy) despite standard therapy were assigned to this study. From the next cycles to cycles in which patients developed grade 2 or 3 nausea, they received olanzapine with standard therapy. 5 mg oral olanzapine was administered for 7 days from the day before chemotherapy. The effectiveness of preventive administration of olanzapine was evaluated retrospectively. The primary endpoint was nausea control rate (grade 0 or 1) with olanzapine. Fifty patients were evaluable. The nausea control rate with olanzapine was improved from 58% to 98% in acute phase (0-24 h after chemotherapy) and 2% to 94% in delayed phase (24-120 h after chemotherapy). In overall phase, the nausea control rate improved from 0% to 92%, and it was statistically significant (P improvement in control of refractory nausea.

  3. Electronic Tracking of Patients in an Outpatient Ophthalmology Clinic to Improve Efficient Flow: A Feasibility Analysis and Benchmarking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singman, Eric L; Haberman, Chantal V; Appelbaum, Jeffrey; Tian, Jing; Shafer, Karen; Toerper, Matthew; Katz, Susanne; Kelsay, Maureen; Boland, Michael V; Greenbaum, Milton; Adelman, Rebecca; Thomas, Richard C; Vakili, Sharif

    2015-01-01

    Real-time location systems (RTLS) and Lean management approaches have been employed to improve patient flow in clinical settings. This study explored the feasibility of using these methodologies in an outpatient resident ophthalmology clinic. Patients, providers, and staff in Wilmer Eye Institute General Eye Services Clinic were provided RTLS tags to track their movement throughout the clinic after observational studies modeling flow were conducted. Tracking data guided changes for clinic processes based on Lean management approaches, including reorganization of the reception desk, consolidation of forms, creation of task sheets to improve communication, installation of door flags on examination rooms, and training the staff in service excellence. Tracking was repeated after changes were implemented. A patient satisfaction survey was also conducted prior to and after the changes. After intervention, significant increases were measured in the average time patients spent in the clinic (99.3 minutes vs 112.8 minutes). Significant decreases were seen in the times patients spent with the optometrists (15.4 minutes vs 12.1 minutes), testing (24.7 minutes vs 23.0 minutes), and together with both the attending and the resident (8.3 minutes vs 5.8 minutes). The patient satisfaction survey indicated improvements in patients' perception of the helpfulness/friendliness of the staff, the length of time patients perceived they waited, and overall clinic experience. Both RTLS and Lean management approaches may be feasible ways to track and improve patient flow and satisfaction if certain limitations can be overcome. This is the first published report describing these approaches applied to an academic ophthalmology clinic in the United States.

  4. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernani Pinto de Lemos Júnior

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT has emerged as the predominant electrical treatment strategy for patients on pharmacological therapy who present heart failure with wide QRS and low ejection fraction. The objective of this study was to investigate whether cardiac resynchronization therapy improved mortality and morbidity among patients with heart failure. METHODS: This was a systematic review using the Cochrane Collaboration's methodology. The online search strategy included the Cochrane Library, Medline (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde and cardiology congresses from 1990 to 2006. The criteria for considering studies for this review were as follows:-types of studies: randomized controlled trials; types of interventions: cardiac resynchronization therapy compared with other therapies; types of participants: patients with heart failure with low ejection fraction and wide QRS; outcomes: death or hospitalization. RESULTS: Seven trials met the selection criteria. The risk of death due to congestive heart failure was nonsignificant: relative risk (RR, 0.79; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.60 to 1.03. There was an absolute risk reduction of 4% in all-cause mortality for the experimental group #&091;RR 0.70; CI: 0.60 to 0.83; number needed to treat (NNT 25#&093;; sudden cardiac death showed a statistically significant difference favoring the experimental group, with absolute risk reduction of 1% (CI: 0.46 to 0.96; RR 0.67; NNT 100. There was an absolute risk reduction of 9% for hospitalization due to heart failure (RR 0.64; CI: 0.50 to 0.80; NNT 11 in the experimental group. CONCLUSIONS: Patients receiving CRT had a significantly lower risk of hospitalization due to heart failure, but death rates due to heart failure were similar.

  5. Addison disease in patients treated with glucocorticoid therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Acute adrenal crisis in patients with unrecognized chronic adrenocortical failure is difficult to diagnose and potentially fatal. We describe 2 patients with acute adrenal crisis whose diagnoses were hindered because of concomitant glucocorticoid treatment. Acute adrenal insufficiency is primarily a state of mineralocorticoid deficiency. Prednisolone and prednisone, the most frequently prescribed anti-inflammatory corticosteroid agents, have minimal mineralocorticoid activity. Several conditions that may be treated with pharmacological glucocorticoids are associated with an increased risk of Addison disease. An acute adrenal crisis, against which concurrent glucocorticoid therapy does not confer adequate protection, may develop in such patients.

  6. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease and the effects of prior carbimazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyampudi, Arun; Hamide, Abdoul; Halanaik, Dhanapathi; Sahoo, Jaya Prakash; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2014-09-01

    The use of radioiodine as the first line of treatment in Graves' disease is restricted in India because of its limited availability and an unrealistic risk perception associated with it. Additionally, the effectiveness of radioiodine ablation in Graves' disease is influenced by many factors. Prior medical antithyroid therapy is one such important factor. To analyze the efficacy of low dose radioiodine therapy (5 mCi) in treatment of naive patients of Graves' disease in comparison to that in which it was already primed with an antithyroid drug, carbimazole. A non-randomized, interventional study conducted in the Department of Medicine and Endocrinology of a tertiary care institute in South India. The study had two groups; Group A (36 treatment naive, uncomplicated Graves' disease patients) and B (34 Graves' disease patients on carbimazole prior to radioiodine therapy). Both groups had baseline clinical, biochemical evaluation and were reassessed at 3 and 6 months for evaluating the clinical status for possible documentation of cure. The cure rate was 61.1% in drug naive group and 58.8% in pretreated group at 6 months following radioiodine (P = 0.845). Higher baseline 999m technicium (99m Tc) uptake, male gender, BMI and higher baseline free thyroxine (fT4) level predicted treatment failure following radioiodine therapy. Administration of carbimazole prior to low dose radioiodine therapy does not alter the efficacy of radioiodine. Low fixed dose (5 mCi) of radioactive iodine may be a safe and effective primary therapeutic option in Graves' disease patients pretreated with antithyroid drugs.

  7. Improving Patient Acceptance of Insulin Therapy by Improving Needle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, James J.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Improved needle designs could increase patient compliance with insulin therapy. In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Hirsch and colleagues assessed patient pain and preference for a 5-bevel needle design among diabetes patients. A blinded comparison with traditional 3-bevel needles yielded no significant difference, but patients preferred the 5-bevel needle in unblinded home injection and clinical insertion studies. This suggests that important subjective/contextual factors contribute to preference in conjunction with the fundamental needle design change. While 5-bevel needles may increase patient acceptance, more dramatic changes of needle design, such as microneedles, could enable still greater patient acceptance through reduced pain as well as improved insulin pharmacokinetics. PMID:22538143

  8. [Radiofrequency catheter ablation therapy in elderly patients with supraventricular tachycardia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, A; Yamagata, T; Tatsuno, H; Esato, M; Ueyama, T; Hayano, T; Oomura, M; Tamura, K; Matsuzaki, M

    1998-06-01

    138 patients with Wolf-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome (n = 96), atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT; n = 27) and the other supraventricular tachycardia (n = 15), were divided into two groups, a control group (less than 65 years old; n = 108) and an elderly group (more than 66 years old; n = 30). We then estimated the success rate and safety of radiofrequency ablation for supraventricular tachycardia in elderly patients. For WPW syndrome, there were 76 (97%) successes and 9 (13%) recurrences in the control group (n = 78). In the elderly group of WPW patients, the number of successes was 18 (100%) and the number of recurrences one (63%). In 27 patients with AVNRT, the number of successes was 26 (96%) and there were no recurrences. In 15 patients with some other supraventricular tachycardia, there were 11 patients (73%) successes and one recurrence (11%). Major complications consisted of cardiac tamponade in 2 patients, dissecting aneurysm in one patient and cerebral embolism in one patients. All major complications occurred in patients with WPW syndrome. The cause of the complications, except the cerebral embolism was manipulation of the electrical or ablation catheter. Three of four patients with major complications belonged to the control group. It is possible that radiofrequency catheter ablation for supraventricular tachycardia in elderly patients is safe and highly effective. However, it is still invasive therapy. Ablation on a left accessory pathway by the transaortic valve approach especially needs meticulous care.

  9. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Patients' Satisfaction with Their Dialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al Eissa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the degree of satisfaction among hemodialysis patients and the factors influencing this satisfaction. Methods. Patients were recruited from 3 Saudi dialysis centers. Demographic data was collected. Using 1 to 10 Likert scale, the patients were asked to rate the overall satisfaction with, and the overall impact of, their dialysis therapy on their lives and to rate the effect of the dialysis therapy on 15 qualities of life domains. Results. 322 patients were recruited (72.6% of the total eligible patients. The mean age was 51.7 years (±15.4; 58% have been on dialysis for >3 years. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index was 3.2 (±2, and Kt/V was 1.3 (±0.44. The mean satisfaction score was (7.41 ± 2.75 and the mean score of the impact of the dialysis on the patients' lives was 5.32 ± 2.55. Male patients reported worse effect of dialysis on family life, social life, energy, and appetite. Longer period since the commencement of dialysis was associated with adverse effect on finances and energy. Lower level of education was associated with worse dialysis effect on stress, overall health, sexual life, hobbies, and exercise ability. Conclusion. The level of satisfaction is affected by gender, duration on dialysis, educational level, and standard of care given.

  10. Occlusion splint therapy in patients with craniomandibular disorders (CMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinović, Vitomir S; Lazić, Vojkan

    2006-05-01

    The etiology of craniomandibular disorders (CMD) is multi-factorial and the treatment should be selected with recognition of the different factors. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of occlusion splint therapy (Michigan splint), physical exercises and transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) on CMD symptomatology. At the Clinic of Maxillofacial Surgery in Belgrade, in the period from May, 2001-December, 2003, 168 patients were examined by the CMD working group. This group, comprised of different specialties (maxillofacial surgeon, prosthodontist, orthodontist, neurologist, psychiatrist and physiatrician), enabled multidisciplinary treatment of CMD patients according to the guidelines given by American Academy for Craniomandibular Dysfunctions. In all, a total of 30 patients with prevalent muscular tensions among other CMD symptoms were included in this study. The examination form according to Fricton and Shiffman for Craniomandibular Index (CMI) was used in order to evaluate the function of Craniomandibular system before and after therapy.A statistically significant difference (t = 8,735; P CMD symptoms and signs) in over than 80% of patients and could be considered as a method of choice in reversible occlusal therapy.

  11. Improvement of herpetic stomatitis therapy in patients with chronic tonsillitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepilin А.V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine the clinical and pathogenetic efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy in patients with herpetic stomatitis accompanied by chronic tonsillitis. Materials and methods: Medical examination and treatment of 60 patients have been carried out. The marker of endogenous intoxication, infectious severity and immunity has been investigated. Results. It has been established that use of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy in patients with herpetic stomatitis accompanied by chronic tonsillitis has allowed to decrease infectious severity in par-odontal recess and evidence of local inflammation, to normalize immunity indices and reduce the level of endogenous intoxication that has been liable for acceleration of recuperation processes and lowering of frequency of stomatitis recurrences. Conclusion. The clinical efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the therapy in patients with herpetic stomatitis accompanied by chronic tonsillitis conditioned by the decreasing of activity of local inflammatory process according to the reducing of level pro-inflammatory cytokines, infectious burden of the mouth cavity, endogenous intoxication

  12. Effect of levothyroxine therapy on hypertension in hypothyroid patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe whether levothyroxine replacement therapy has an effect on hypertension in patients of hypothyroidism. This prospective study included all newly diagnosed cases of hypothyroidism (overt or subclinical with hypertension, of either sex between 21-70 years of age. Levothyroxine replacement therapy was administered continuously during study period. Patients were clinically assessed for blood pressure before and every 3-4 monthly on levothyroxine therapy. Statistical analysis was carried out using a paired Student’s t-test. During one year study period, out of 180 newly diagnosed hypothyroid cases enrolled, 88 had overt hypothyroidism (OH and 92 subclinical hypothyroidism (SH. Male: female ratio was 1: 6.5. Of these, hypertension was present in 51 (28.33% patients (33 OH and 18 SH. Only diastolic blood pressure was raised in 28(54.9% cases, systolic in 12 (23.53% and both systolic and diastolic in 11 (21.57% cases. Incidence of only diastolic hypertension was comparatively more in overt hypothyroidism (57.57% than subclinical hypothyroidism (50%. Complete reversal of hypertension was observed in 8 out of 17 SH and 18 out of 29 OH cases while partial reversal was noted in one case in each category. A statistically significant decrease in mean values of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in patients of SH as well as OH. Hypertension is fairly common in patients of hypothyroidism. Replacement therapy with levothyroxine is quite helpful in reversing hypertension, a potential cardiovascular risk factor.

  13. Reliability and validity of pendulum test measures of spasticity obtained with the Polhemus tracking system from patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Richard W; Harrison, Steven; Kinsella-Shaw, Jeffrey

    2009-07-30

    Spasticity is a common impairment accompanying stroke. Spasticity of the quadriceps femoris muscle can be quantified using the pendulum test. The measurement properties of pendular kinematics captured using a magnetic tracking system has not been studied among patients who have experienced a stroke. Therefore, this study describes the test-retest reliability and known groups and convergent validity of the pendulum test measures obtained with the Polhemus tracking system. Eight patients with chronic stroke underwent pendulum tests with their affected and unaffected lower limbs, with and without the addition of a 2.2 kg cuff weight at the ankle, using the Polhemus magnetic tracking system. Also measured bilaterally were knee resting angles, Ashworth scores (grades 0-4) of quadriceps femoris muscles, patellar tendon (knee jerk) reflexes (grades 0-4), and isometric knee extension force. Three measures obtained from pendular traces of the affected side were reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient > or = .844). Known groups validity was confirmed by demonstration of a significant difference in the measurements between sides. Convergent validity was supported by correlations > or = .57 between pendulum test measures and other measures reflective of spasticity. Pendulum test measures obtained with the Polhemus tracking system from the affected side of patients with stroke have good test-retest reliability and both known groups and convergent validity.

  14. Characteristics of myocardial postsystolic shortening in patients with symptomatic hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy before and half a year after alcohol septal ablation assessed by speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansong Yuan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Postsystolic shortening (PSS has been proposed as a marker of myocardial dysfunction. Percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA is an alternative therapy for patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM that results in sustained improvements in atrial structure and function. We investigated the effects of PTSMA on PSS in HOCM patients using speckle tracking imaging. METHODS: Conventional echocardiographic and PSS parameters were obtained in 18 healthy controls and 30 HOCM patients before and half a year after PTSMA. RESULTS: Compared with the healthy controls, the number of segments having PSS and the average value of PSS were significantly increased in the HOCM patients. At 6 months after PTSMA, both the number of segments having PSS (10.5±2.8 vs. 13.2±2.6; P<0.001 and the average value of PSS (-1.24±0.57 vs. -1.55±0.56; P = 0.009 were significantly reduced. Moreover, the reductions in the average value of PSS correlated well with the reductions in the E-to-Ea ratio (r = 0.705, P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Both the number of segments having PSS and the average value of PSS were significantly increased in the HOCM patients. PTSMA has a favourable effect on PSS, which may partly account for the persistent improvement in LV diastolic function in HOCM patients after PTSMA.

  15. Evaluation of patients' engagement in radiation therapy safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, A; Mollo, V; Bibault, J-E; Giraud, P

    2016-12-01

    Treatment safety has become a priority in health policies after several incidents occurred around the world in radiation oncology departments. The aim of this study was to analyse the patients' contribution in that field and to understand which actions empower the patient in that regard. Several methods were used in a general hospital and in a comprehensive cancer centre to analyse the activities of the radiation therapists and the patients and the interactions between them: treatment session observations, semidirective interviews with radiation therapists and patients, self and alloconfrontation with radiation therapists and explanatory interviews with patients. Cooperation of the patients in treatment safety acts as an additional step that contributes to safer treatments. Radiation therapy sessions are a creative opportunity for the patient to observe, learn and analyse what is happening. Changes between treatment sessions are a source of anxiety for the patients. This study highlights the factors that favour the patients' participation. A trusting relationship and support from the health professionals can be leveraged in that manner. There is a common will shared between the patients and the health professionals towards better treatment safety. The cooperation is still not well-known and underused. This empowerment of the patient cannot be mandatory but should be promoted and developed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  16. Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis in patients on renal replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis is an unusual and potentially fatal condition characterised by small-vessel calcification and ischaemic skin necrosis. It mainly affects patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD on haemodialysis, but may rarely occur in the absence of ESRD in conditions such as primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, alcoholic liver disease and connective tissue disease. Methods. We reviewed the records of all patients diagnosed with calciphylaxis while on renal replacement therapy at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, between 1990 and 2014, to describe its presentation, course and final outcome. Results. Nineteen patients developed calciphylaxis over this period. Their median age was 34 years and 13 (68.4% were female. Fifteen (78.9% had received a kidney transplant. All patients had painful skin lesions that rapidly progressed to infarction. Small-vessel calcification was seen on skin biopsy in 13 patients. Twelve patients had hyperparathyroidism. Several of the transplanted patients had been treated for graft rejection in the year preceding the diagnosis. Treatment consisted of good wound care and efforts to normalise serum calcium and phosphate levels. Five patients received an urgent parathyroidectomy. The outcome was fatal in 17 patients, with sepsis being the main cause of death. Conclusions. In our patients, calciphylaxis carried a worse prognosis than previously reported internationally. It should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of painful skin lesions in the dialysis or transplant patient.

  17. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Susan Crump

    2011-08-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances, particularly insomnia, are among the most prevalent and distressing symptoms experienced by patients with cancer. As a result of extensive interdisciplinary research conducted since 2000, cognitive-behavioral therapy now is considered the standard of care for the treatment of insomnia in the general population and also has been upgraded to "likely to be effective" in the Oncology Nursing Society Putting Evidence Into Practice weight of evidence category. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a multicomponent psychological and behavioral treatment designed to eliminate the perpetuating factors of insomnia. The most frequently used strategies are stimulus control, sleep restriction and relaxation therapies, paradoxical intention, sleep hygiene, and cognitive restructuring. Although this insomnia treatment recommendation has been well publicized, the nursing literature has not effectively translated the theories and principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy into practical guidelines or considerations for use by oncology staff nurses and advanced practitioners. This article attempts to demystify cognitive-behavioral therapy and provide nurses at different levels of practice a foundation from which to evaluate and potentially deliver this promising insomnia intervention.

  18. DUAL THERAPY WITH BIOLOGICALS IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

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    A. A. Mesnyankina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the efficiency of dual anti-B cell therapy in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE.Subjects and methods. The clinic of the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology followed up three patients with significant SLE, who took rituximab (RTM at a dose of 500–1000 mg, three months after completion of RTM infusions they received belimumab (BLM calculated with reference to 10 mg/kg once monthly, a total of 8 infusions. The follow-up lasted 1 year. The efficiency and tolerability of the therapy and the concentrations of autoantibodies, complement, and B-lymphocyte subpopulations were estimated at baseline and then every 3 months.Results and discussion. During dual anti-B cell therapy, there was considerable clinical improvement, no signs of recurrent SLE throughout the follow-up period, as well as normalization of laboratory markers for disease activity (the concentrations of antibodies against native DNA and complement components C3 and CD4 and persistent depletion of autoreactive B lymphocytes, plasma cells in particular. In all patients, the dose of glucocorticoids (GC could be decreased to 7.5 mg/day calculated with reference to prednisolone at 2 months after the therapy was completed.Conclusion. Dual anti-B cell therapy is a novel promising treatment for active SLE. This treatment regimen contributes to rapid suppression of disease activity, to long-term persistence of the obtained effect, and to reduced risk of severe irreversible organ damages, by minimizing the dose of GCs.

  19. Statin therapy reduces inappropriate shock in non-ischemic patients with mild heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Anne-Christine H.; Zareba, Wojciech; Jons, Christian

    2013-01-01

    therapy in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus was associated with lower risk of inappropriate therapy but higher risk of appropriate therapy. Appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapy was associated with increased mortality in diabetic patients. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL......: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. UNIQUE IDENTIFIER: NCT00947310....

  20. APPROACHES TO ANTITHROMBOTIC THERAPY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Ushkalova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced age is the most important and independent risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation (AF. The proportion of patients with AF at the age of 65-85 years reaches 70%, and average age of patients with AF is 75 years. Antithrombotic therapy of AF in the elderly is challenging for several reasons. On the one hand, elderly patients are at an increased risk of systemic embolism and stroke and fatal outcomes of stroke are higher in the elderly compared with these in the younger patients. On the other hand, elderlies are at an increased risk of bleeding. In addition, they have important comorbidities and are treated with drugs that can interact with antithrombotic agents. The article discusses tools used to assess risks of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications and general approaches to antithrombotic treatment of elderly patients.

  1. Clinical aspects of patients with sarcoglycanopathies under steroids therapy

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    Marco A. V. Albuquerque

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with sarcoglycanopathies, which comprise four subtypes of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies, usually present with progressive weakness leading to early loss of ambulation and premature death, and no effective treatment is currently available. Objective To present clinical aspects and outcomes of six children with sarcoglycanopathies treated with steroids for at least one year. Method Patient files were retrospectively analyzed for steroid use. Results Stabilization of muscle strength was noted in one patient, a slight improvement in two, and a slight worsening in three. In addition, variable responses of forced vital capacity and cardiac function were observed. Conclusions No overt clinical improvement was observed in patients with sarcoglycanopathies under steroid therapy. Prospective controlled studies including a larger number of patients are necessary to determine the effects of steroids for sarcoglycanopathies.

  2. Comparison of Predictable Smooth Ocular and Combined Eye-Head Tracking Behaviour in Patients with Lesions Affecting the Brainstem and Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Michael P.; Leigh, R. John; Seidman, Scott H.; Riley, David E.; Hanna, Joseph P.

    1992-01-01

    We compared the ability of eight normal subjects and 15 patients with brainstem or cerebellar disease to follow a moving visual stimulus smoothly with either the eyes alone or with combined eye-head tracking. The visual stimulus was either a laser spot (horizontal and vertical planes) or a large rotating disc (torsional plane), which moved at one sinusoidal frequency for each subject. The visually enhanced Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) was also measured in each plane. In the horizontal and vertical planes, we found that if tracking gain (gaze velocity/target velocity) for smooth pursuit was close to 1, the gain of combined eye-hand tracking was similar. If the tracking gain during smooth pursuit was less than about 0.7, combined eye-head tracking was usually superior. Most patients, irrespective of diagnosis, showed combined eye-head tracking that was superior to smooth pursuit; only two patients showed the converse. In the torsional plane, in which optokinetic responses were weak, combined eye-head tracking was much superior, and this was the case in both subjects and patients. We found that a linear model, in which an internal ocular tracking signal cancelled the VOR, could account for our findings in most normal subjects in the horizontal and vertical planes, but not in the torsional plane. The model failed to account for tracking behaviour in most patients in any plane, and suggested that the brain may use additional mechanisms to reduce the internal gain of the VOR during combined eye-head tracking. Our results confirm that certain patients who show impairment of smooth-pursuit eye movements preserve their ability to smoothly track a moving target with combined eye-head tracking.

  3. [Peripherally inserted central catheter antibiotic therapy for cystic fibrosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betegnie, A-L; Cracowski, C; Bedouch, P; Segond, C; Robein-Dobremez, M-J; Pin, I; Allenet, B

    2014-11-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are more and more used for intravenous antibiotic infusions in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in the Grenoble area (France). The aim of this study was to assess the use of this technique in this indication. 1. Retrospective evaluation of 102 consecutive PICC insertions over 3years and the incidence of adverse events during the therapy. 2. Prospective evaluation of 12 patient's satisfaction and their nurses over a 3-month period. 3. Comparative analysis of single domiciliary treatment costs using PICC versus peripheral catheter (PC). 102 PICC insertions were attempted in 31 patients. Seven failures and 7 complications occurred during the treatment requiring removal of the PICC, i.e. an overall success rate of 86.2% (88/102). Pain during PICC introduction was 4.2/10 (visual analogical scale). Mean satisfaction levels during therapy were 9.3/10 for patients and 8.7/10 for nurses. Compared with PC, all the patients said that PICC was "more comfortable". Differential costs of treatment with PC and with PICC at home were estimated at 57.15€ and 590.16€ respectively. PICC is an alternative to CP for intravenous antibiotherapy in CF patients, providing better safety and comfort. PICC use should be promoted in this indication. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Music therapy in relief of pain in oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Franco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the perception of oncology patients with chronic pain as to the effects of music in alleviating pain, to identify if there are changes in the vital signs of these patients before and after the musicotherapy session, and to identify whether the intensity of pain is diminished after the music session as per an analogic scale of pain. Methods: This level II, descriptive-exploratory and cross-sectional study used a quantitative and qualitative approach. The sample consisted of ten oncology patients with chronic pain. Rresults: There was a reduction in vital signs and in intensity of pain in ten patients of the sample; after the music sessions, the patients reported a sensation of relief of pain, relaxation, and a belief in the power of music as a supplementary therapy. Cconclusions: Music showed an influence in reducing vital signs and pain intensity, and the patients perceived a reduction of pain and anxiety, and began to believe in music as a form of therapy.

  5. What happens to patients on antiretroviral therapy who transfer out to another facility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kwong-Leung Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long term retention of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Africa's rapidly expanding programmes is said to be 60% at 2 years. Many reports from African ART programmes make little mention of patients who are transferred out to another facility, yet Malawi's national figures show a transfer out of 9%. There is no published information about what happens to patients who transfer-out, but this is important because if they transfer-in and stay alive in these other facilities then national retention figures will be better than previously reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of all patients started on ART over a three year period in Mzuzu Central Hospital, North Region, Malawi, those who transferred out were identified from the ART register and master cards. Clinic staff attempted to trace these patients to determine whether they had transferred in to a new ART facility and their outcome status. There were 805 patients (19% of the total cohort who transferred out, of whom 737 (92% were traced as having transferred in to a new ART facility, with a median time of 1.3 months between transferring-out and transferring-in. Survival probability was superior and deaths were lower in the transfer-out patients compared with those who did not transfer. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In Mzuzu Central Hospital, patients who transfer-out constitute a large proportion of patients not retained on ART at their original clinic of registration. Good documentation of transfer-outs and transfer-ins are needed to keep track of national outcomes. Furthermore, the current practice of regarding transfer-outs as being double counted in national cohorts and subtracting this number from the total national registrations to get the number of new patients started on ART is correct.

  6. The balance effect of acupuncture therapy among stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Yang, Tsung-Hsien; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chen, Guan-Yu; Lin, Li-Fong

    2014-08-01

    To analyze how acupuncture therapy affects balance in patients experiencing their first stroke and to identify the stroke group with greatest improvement in balance after acupuncture intervention. Retrospective case-control study. Ward of a medical university hospital. A total of 629 stroke patients were enrolled initially; 345 patients met the study criteria and 132 were analyzed (66 each in the study and control groups). The study group received physiotherapy combined with acupuncture and the control group received only physiotherapy. The Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke patients (PASS) was used to evaluate balance. This balance scale system can be subdivided into static balance (PASS-MP, maintain posture) and dynamic balance (PASS-CP, change posture). This study revealed no statistically significant improvement of balance in the study group (t test). When patients with high Brunnstrom stage (Br stage) and low Br stage were analyzed separately, once again no statistical difference was detected between the study and control groups of those with high Br stage. However, among low-Br stage patients, the study group showed significant improvement in static balance (mean PASS-MP score±standard deviation: 4.7±3.7) compared with the control group (PASS-MP score: 2.8±2.7) (pstroke patients with a low Br stage, acupuncture therapy can improve static balance during rehabilitation. However, the effect on balance was limited among high-Br stage patients. This study provides information valuable to patients with hemiplegic stroke because it suggests that acupuncture can be used to improve balance. A prospective double-blind, randomized, controlled study design is recommended for future studies in patients with hemiplegic stroke.

  7. Prevalence of complementary and alternative therapy use by cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Grace V; Aherne, Noel J; Horsley, Patrick J; Benjamin, Linus C; McLachlan, Craig S; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) in oncology patients is increasing in incidence, with calls to routinely screen for their use. We introduced a screening tool as part of clinical care to identify CAT use. We evaluated all patients who attended the radiation oncology outpatient clinic between December 2011 and July 2012, who had filled out the CAT screening tool, and evaluated types of CAT use, reasons for use and predictors of CAT usage. A total of 639 patients completed the CAT screening tool, which was 75% of eligible patients. There were 464 (72.6%) men and 175 (27.4%) women, with a mean age of 69.9 years (range 27-94 years). Prostate cancer was the predominant diagnosis (53.1%), followed by breast cancer (17.5%) and skin cancer (14.7%). Of these, 530 patients (82.9%) had used at least one therapy. Of the 530 patients using CAT, the most quoted reasons for use were to improve quality of life (42.6%), to boost the immune system and general health (33.6%), to increase energy levels (32.6%) and to live longer (28.9%). Of the 530 users, only 112 patients (21.1%) took CAT to help cure their cancer. Women were significantly more likely to use CAT, as were patients with breast cancer. The use of CAT in patients with cancer is prevalent and more frequent in our population than in other published studies. Few patients use CAT to improve their cancer cure, but rather use CAT for other reasons. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    -blind placebo-controlled trials could not confirm the initial high efficacy of either the growth factor protein or the gene therapy approaches observed in earlier small trials. The clinical studies so far have all been without any gene-related serious adverse events. Future trials will focus on whether...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...

  9. Cardiac shockwave therapy in patients with chronic refractory angina pectoris

    OpenAIRE

    Vainer, J.; Habets, J. H. M.; Schalla, S.; Lousberg, A. H. P.; de Pont, C. D. J. M.; V??, S. A.; Brans, B. T.; Hoorntje, J. C. A.; Waltenberger, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac shockwave therapy (CSWT) might improve symptoms and decrease ischaemia burden by stimulating collateral growth in chronic ischaemic myocardium. This prospective study was performed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of CSWT. Methods We included 33 patients (mean age 70???7 years, mean left ventricular ejection fraction 55???12?%) with end-stage coronary artery disease, chronic angina pectoris and reversible ischaemia on myocardial scintigraphy. CSWT was applied to the i...

  10. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Ming Wong

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one’s overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The ...

  11. Efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturkenboom, I.H.W.M.; Graff, M.J.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Veenhuizen, Y.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is insufficient evidence to support use of occupational therapy interventions for patients with Parkinson's disease. We aimed to assess the efficacy of occupational therapy in improving daily activities of patients with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: We did a multicentre,

  12. Lymphedema Therapy Reduces the Volume of Edema and Pain in Patients with Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamner, John B; Fleming, Martin D

    2007-01-01

    .... This study examines the results of a protocol of therapy for lymphedema in breast cancer patients.A total of 135 patients with lymphedema after breast cancer treatment were provided a protocol of complete decongestive therapy (CDT...

  13. 'Ins' and 'outs' of triple therapy: Optimal antiplatelet therapy in patients on chronic oral anticoagulation who need coronary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewilde, W; Verheugt, F W A; Breet, N; Koolen, J J; Ten Berg, J M

    2010-09-01

    Chronic oral anticoagulant treatment is obligatory in patients (class I) with mechanical heart valves and in patients with atrial fibrillation with CHADS2 score >1. When these patients undergo percutaneous coronary intervention with placement of a stent, there is also an indication for treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel. Unfortunately, triple therapy is known to increase the bleeding risk. For this group of patients, the bottom line is to find the ideal therapy in patients with indications for both chronic anticoagulation therapy and percutaneous intervention to prevent thromboembolic complications such as stent thrombosis without increasing the risk of bleeding. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:444-50.).

  14. Intricate Assessment and Evaluation of Dental Implants in Patients on Bisphosphonate Therapy: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Suraj; Dutt, Poonam; Misra, Animesh; Usmani, Nausheen; Singh, Abhishek; Suvarna, Chandini

    2016-05-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the prevalent side effects of bisphosphonate (BP) therapy in oral cancer patients. In case of patients with various oncologic lesions, standard guidelines contraindicate the use of dental implants if the patients are on BP therapy. Literature also quotes studies that emphasize on the safety of dental implants in patients on BP therapy. Hence, this study aimed to retrospectively evaluate the clinical outcome of dental implants in patients on BP therapy. In this retrospective analysis, a total of 140 dental implants in 112 patients were included. Inclusion criteria included only those patients who were on or had history of BP therapy. Calculation of implant failure and survival rate was done. Ten cases of implant failure occurred, giving a success rate of above 92%, which was comparable to the results found in previous studies in patients who were not on BP therapy. No significant risk of implant failure is seen in patients on BP therapy compared with other patients.

  15. Efficacy of Folic Acid Therapy in Patients with Hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huizi; Tian, Dandan; Zhang, Chengda; Wang, Wenhua; Wang, Lianke; Ge, Mengying; Hou, Quanliang; Zhang, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Increased plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels are a risk factor for stroke and can be reduced with folic acid therapy. Therefore, it is extremely important for patients with hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) to obtain the normal level of Hcy after folate intervention. Thus far, few studies have reported the effective rate defined as percentage of patients who achieved normal plasma Hcy levels after folic acid therapy. The present study aimed to investigate the effective rate of folic acid for the treatment of HHcy and the impact of plasma baseline Hcy levels and the compliance of oral folic acid on the efficacy. A total of 858 patients with HHcy were treated with oral folic acid (5 mg/d) for 3 months. Fasting blood samples collected at baseline and at the end of treatment were assayed for plasma Hcy levels. After 3 months of treatment, the plasma Hcy levels of 484 patients were reduced to below the normal levels (15 μmol/L), corresponding to an effective rate of 56.41%. The average of Hcy levels decreased by 28.05%. The effective rates of folic acid therapy in a mild Hcy elevated group and an intermediate Hcy elevated group were 61.34% and 27.78%, respectively (p = 0.000). The effective rates among patients with good and poor compliance of oral folic acid were 65.29% and 35.18%, respectively (p = 0.000). More than 40% patients with HHcy failed to reach the normal range (5-15 μmol/L) after 3 months of folic acid supplementation. Further prospective studies are warranted to explore the reasons for failure.

  16. Thiamine Levels During Intensive Insulin Therapy in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Snippenburg, Wouter; Reijnders, Mariet G J; Hofhuis, Jose G M; de Vos, Rien; Kamphuis, Stephan; Spronk, Peter E

    2017-10-01

    Thiamine is an essential cofactor in carbohydrate metabolism, and deficiency can therefore cause various organ dysfunctions. Little is known about the prevalence and possible worsening of thiamine deficiency in critically ill patients. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of thiamine deficiency at admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and hypothesized that intensive insulin therapy, aimed at regulating glucose levels, increases thiamine utilization and therefore might cause or worsen deficiency in patients with limited thiamine stores. An observational prospective cohort study was carried out in a medical-surgical ICU in a general teaching hospital in Apeldoorn, the Netherlands. All adults who were treated during that time with intensive insulin therapy were included. Deficiency was defined as a thiamine level Intensive insulin therapy does not appear to cause or worsen thiamine deficiency. However, based on the high prevalence of deficiency at admission, it might be warranted to supplement thiamine in all patients admitted to the ICU, especially when there is an underlying gastrointestinal disease or recent surgery.

  17. Patient with intractable delirium successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Eske; Hageman, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a frequent and serious condition often seen in hospitalized patients, especially the elderly. Treatment of the somatic illness causing the delirium, and antipsychotic medication will usually resolve the condition. Sometimes, however, the condition is refractory towards medical treatment...... and in this situation electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be a quick and efficient treatment. In this case report of a 26-year-old man a post-operative intractable delirium persisting for three weeks was efficiently and swiftly relieved by three consecutive ECTs. The patient was discharged without need for further...

  18. Outcomes of Proton Therapy for Patients With Functional Pituitary Adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattson, Daniel A.; Tanguturi, Shyam K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spiegel, Daphna Y. [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biller, Beverly M.K.; Nachtigall, Lisa B. [Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussière, Marc R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Swearingen, Brooke; Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of proton therapy for functional pituitary adenomas (FPAs). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 165 patients with FPAs who were treated at a single institution with proton therapy between 1992 and 2012 and had at least 6 months of follow-up. All but 3 patients underwent prior resection, and 14 received prior photon irradiation. Proton stereotactic radiosurgery was used for 92% of patients, with a median dose of 20 Gy(RBE). The remainder received fractionated stereotactic proton therapy. Time to biochemical complete response (CR, defined as ≥3 months of normal laboratory values with no medical treatment), local control, and adverse effects are reported. Results: With a median follow-up time of 4.3 years (range, 0.5-20.6 years) for 144 evaluable patients, the actuarial 3-year CR rate and the median time to CR were 54% and 32 months among 74 patients with Cushing disease (CD), 63% and 27 months among 8 patients with Nelson syndrome (NS), 26% and 62 months among 50 patients with acromegaly, and 22% and 60 months among 9 patients with prolactinomas, respectively. One of 3 patients with thyroid stimulating hormone—secreting tumors achieved CR. Actuarial time to CR was significantly shorter for corticotroph FPAs (CD/NS) compared with other subtypes (P=.001). At a median imaging follow-up time of 43 months, tumor control was 98% among 140 patients. The actuarial 3-year and 5-year rates of development of new hypopituitarism were 45% and 62%, and the median time to deficiency was 40 months. Larger radiosurgery target volume as a continuous variable was a significant predictor of hypopituitarism (adjusted hazard ratio 1.3, P=.004). Four patients had new-onset postradiosurgery seizures suspected to be related to generously defined target volumes. There were no radiation-induced tumors. Conclusions: Proton irradiation is an effective treatment for FPAs, and hypopituitarism remains the primary

  19. Sodium bicarbonate therapy in patients with metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeva-Andany, María M; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Mouriño-Bayolo, David; Castro-Quintela, Elvira; Domínguez-Montero, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc interval prolongation. The potential impact of regular sodium bicarbonate therapy on worsening vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease has been insufficiently investigated.

  20. Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy in Patients with Metabolic Acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Mouriño-Bayolo, David; Castro-Quintela, Elvira; Domínguez-Montero, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc interval prolongation. The potential impact of regular sodium bicarbonate therapy on worsening vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease has been insufficiently investigated. PMID:25405229

  1. Adjunctive therapies in severe pneumonia in critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzovaras, N; Karvouniaris, M; Makris, D; Zakynthinos, E

    2011-08-01

    To review available evidence for the role of adjunctive therapies in severe pneumonia. We focused on therapies that have attracted recently interest such as glucocorticosteroids (GCs), statins and recombinant activated protein-C. Experimental animal and human studies showed that GCs are able to modulate the inflammatory response and may offer a benefit in patients with severe sepsis. Randomized trials in pneumonia are few, mostly limited in septic shock and ARDS patients. Recombinant activated protein C is a potent anticoagulant and profibrinolytic enzyme which can inhibit the systemic inflammatory response. Available data, although limited, showed that activated protein C can reduce mortality in severe sepsis, especially in severe pneumonia due to S. Pneumoniae. Statins have pleiotropic properties which can affect the inflammatory cascade. The use of statins has been found to be associated with decreased mortality in some studies with pneumina whereas the use of statins was associated with increased risk of death in others. However, data come from observational or retrospective studies. Treatment with GCs may modulate the inflammatory response in critically ill patients with pneumonia but a clear effect of steroids on survival is debatable. The administration of GCs should be considered in patients with severe pneumonia when vasopressor dependent septic shock. Activated protein-C may be considered in patients with severe CAP or HAP and sepsis or organ failure. The role of statins in the management of severe pneumonia remains controversial until data from clinical trails will be available.

  2. [Comprehensive physical antiedematous therapy in treatment of patients with lymphedema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiskhanov, A K; Maksimov, A V

    Presented in the article is retrospective analysis of the results of treatment of patients with lymphedema. We treated a total of 33 patients with primary (n=6) and secondary (n=27) lymphedema. Stage II lymphedema was diagnosed in 18 (54.5%) patients, stage III lymphedema in 15 (45.5%) patients. The 33 patients had a total of 44 affected limbs (9 hands and 35 legs). All patients were subjected to comprehensive physical antiedematous therapy including: manual lymph drainage massage, formation of compression bandage, selection of individual class 3 plain stitch compression knitwear, special complex of therapeutic exercises, care of the skin of the affected limb. A positive effect was achieved in all cases. In patients with upper limb lesions the volume of the extremity decreased averagely by 1'235.0±283.7 cm3 (22.6% of the baseline volume, ptreatment of patients with limb lymphedema, making it possible to attain regression of trophic disorders and to improve patients' quality of life.

  3. Patient adherence to antihypertensive therapy and its individual psychological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Trachuk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the treatment of chronic, especially asymptomatic pathology one of the main problem is the adherence to therapy. Patients with arterial hypertension need long-term, often lifelong medication, and how strictly they adhere to prescriptions often determines the course of the disease and the medical measures effectiveness. According to statistics, more than half of patients with hypertension are characterized by low compliance, which leads to complications of this disease. The objective of the research is to identify and analize the individual psychological factors that determine patient adherence to antihypertensive therapy. Methods and materials. This study was conducted during 2011-2013 at the cardiology departments of the Kyiv Alexander Hospital, polyclinics number 2 Shevchenko district in Kyiv, Desnyanskiy clinic №3 district in Kyiv, medical center "Adonis plus". We examined 203 patients with arterial hypertension (average age 53,5 ± 4,5 years. Methods: socio-demographic, clinical, clinical and psychological, psychodiagnostical, mathematical and statistical methods. Psychodiagnostical method included: 8-item Morisky medical adherence scale (Morisky D. E., 2008; self-assessment anxiety scale Charles D. Spielberger – Y.L Hanin (A.V. Batarshev, 2005; the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory questionnaire (MMRI (F.B. Berezin, 1994; "The level of subjective control" (A.A. Rean, 2001; "Index of attitudes to health" (S.D. Deryabo, VA Yasvin, 2000. Results. According to the results of 8-item Morisky medical adherence scale patients were divided into 3 groups according to the level of compliance - with high (26.11%, average (24.14% and low (49.75% levels of adherence to antihypertensive therapy. The individual-psychological predictors of poor adherence to antihypertensive therapy include the following personal characteristics of patients: a low level of intensity of attitude to health, internal type of subjective control, a

  4. [Functional insulin therapy courses adapted to the patient's reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J; Morel, D; Andrey, M; Masciotra, D

    2011-06-08

    Therapeutic education was initially developed in the field of diabetology. In this chronic disease, it is the patient who is the major decision-maker. R. K. Bernstein is probably the first patient to have practised self glucose monitoring. He developed the basal-bolus technique for himself, which prompted the creation of functional insulin therapy courses by European physicians. This experiential approach has been adapted and simplified for patients in order to facilitate their management of uncertainty. The ASKAR method offers a frame of reference for the development of teaching-learning sequences. The acronym ASKAR refers to the five components of a person's experience: Action, Situation, Knowledge, Attitude and Resource. Working on these five components is a way for patients to improve their management of uncertainty.

  5. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-08-16

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into "a training package", based on the patient's functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients.

  6. Therapy for fibrocystic breast disease in patients with uterine myoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kulagina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Examination of 112 patients with uterine myoma revealed the high rate of concomitance of uterine and breast hyperplastic processes due to the commonness of the pathogenesis of these processes. Different forms of fibrocystic disease (FCD were identified in 76.8% of the patients with uterine myoma; diffuse FCD with a predominance of a fibrous component was more common (54.7%. The efficacy of Indinol in the treatment of FCD was evaluated in the patients with uterine myoma. The clinical symptoms of mastodynia were relieved in 63.4% of the patients; 33.7% of the women had positive X-ray changes a year after start of therapy, as evidenced by mammography.

  7. Effectiveness of Biofield Therapy for Patients Diagnosed With Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Fernando; Tanaka, Hideaki; Cordeiro, Eduarda; Suzuki, Kiyoshi

    2017-10-02

    Context • Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder with an unknown etiology; symptoms include physical and psychological stress, widespread chronic pain, insomnia, and depression. Mind-body medicine and aerobic exercise have shown positive effects for symptom control. Several studies have reported positive effects for biofield therapy for FM, but when other studies have compared the treatment with a sham control, they have not found those beneficial effects. Objective • The study intended to examine the effects of a biofield therapy called Okada purifying therapy on patients' FM symptoms. Design • An open-label, self-controlled study was conducted with 2 groups of FM patients. Setting • The study was conducted at an integrative medicine clinic in Portugal. Participants • Twelve patients, aged 25 to 59 y, with symptoms of FM for the 3 mo before the study, participated. Participants agreed not to receive any new treatment other than the intervention throughout the study as a condition for participation. Intervention • Participants received 50 min of biofield therapy 2 ×/wk for 3 mo, either during the first half of the 6-mo study for group A or the second half for group B. The second half of the study was designated as a sham control for group A, and the first half of the study was designated as a sham control for group B. Outcome Measures • Measures included the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), the tender point index (TPI), and changes in the dosage of prescribed medication. Results • A significant change was observed for scores in the FIQ (P = .027), BDI (P = .027), and TPI (P = .027) in the second group of patients who received the intervention in the second half of the 6-mo study. Seven of 11 participants taking prescribed medications reduced their dosage. Conclusion • Biofield therapy may help reduce symptoms of depression, chronic widespread pain, and tenderness among patients suffering from FM. Larger

  8. Rituximab as a rescue therapy in patients with glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ziad Souqiyyeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the use of rituximab in the treatment of severe glomerulonephritis (GN in order to prevent progression of kidney disease toward the end stage, we designed a multicenter, retrospective study in Saudi Arabia about the efficacy and safety of the use of "off label" rituximab in a variety of severe refractory GN to conventional treatment and the progression of kidney disease for at least one year of follow-up. All the patients had kidney biopsies before treatment with rituximab, and proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate (GFR were followed-up for the period of the study. The immediate side-effect at the time of administration of rituximab included itching in three patients, hypotension in one patient and anaphylaxis in one patient (dropped out from the study. After the administration of rituximab in 42 patients and during the first six months of therapy, 16 (38% patients had complete remission (CR, 13 (31% patients had partial remission (PR and 13 (31% patients had no remission. The mean follow-up period for the patients was 19.0 ± 6.97 months (median 18.0 months. The long-term follow-up during the study period disclosed a good hospitalization record for almost all of the patients. Membranous GN (MGN was the largest group in the cohort (58% of the patients, and we observed CR and PR in 40% and 28% of them, respectively, which was comparable with the previous experience with rituximab in MGN patients with more CR than PR in our cohort. We conclude that our study suggests the safety and efficacy of the use of rituximab in patients with refractory GN and that larger and long-term prospective studies are required to define the role of rituximab in the different categories of these diseases.

  9. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  10. 21 CFR 892.5770 - Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly. 892.5770 Section 892.5770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... therapy patient support assembly. (a) Identification. A powered radiation therapy patient support assembly...

  11. Renal replacement therapy should be tailored to the patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Paul A; Aisling, E Courtney

    2014-02-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) describes loss of kidney function which is both substantial and irreversible. It is associated with acute life-threatening complications such as hyperkalaemia and pulmonary oedema, and chronic metabolic derangements that cannot be sustained in the long-term. Patient education is paramount in ESRD management. The form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) instituted should primarily be based on patient preference subsequent to an individually tailored education programme from specialist staff. This programme needs to take into account the patient's comorbidities and any contraindications to specific modalities of RRT. Transplantation replicates normal renal physiology much more closely than either dialysis modality. Assessment for transplantation requires consideration of the patient's suitability for general anaesthetic and surgery. Patients need to have an adequate blood supply and urinary drainage, and space for a kidney. They must also be suitable candidates for long-term immunosuppression. Ideally patients with ESRD should have a pre-emptive transplant before they require dialysis. Ninety per cent of recipients of a live donor transplant in the UK in 1999-2001 were alive ten years later, compared with 74% of deceased donor recipients. There is no conclusive evidence that either dialysis modality is superior, and unless there are obvious reasons why one therapy is unsuitable, patient preference is usually the deciding factor. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) does not provide the same level of fluid and toxin removal as haemodialysis (HD) and many patients will be forced to transfer to HD within two to three years as PD gradually loses effectiveness. For those who will be suitable for transplantation, optimum management of diabetes, smoking cessation, weight loss, and general fitness is crucial in facilitating this.

  12. [Art therapy in psychosocial rehabilitation of patients with mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apotsos, P

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of art therapy in various psychiatric structures and articles supporting its application, in recent years very few data grounded on primary research have been published. Given the complexity of psychiatric disorders the number of people who suffer from them, and the fact that the primary treatment in psychiatric disorders remains pharmacotherapy, questions about the effectiveness of art therapy (as a complimentary treatment) remain open. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of art therapy in psychosocial rehabilitation of people with psychiatric disorders. A search of the literature and electronic databases using indexing words was conducted. The criteria for inclusion of articles were: a. studies had to be "outcome-intervention" studies, b. studies should concern only intervention in adults, and c. studies had to include patients with diagnoses according to the DSM of the American Psychiatric Association. Finally, only five articles were included in this systematic review. There is evidence for the effectiveness of art therapy in areas related to the psychosocial rehabilitation of persons suffering from psychiatric disorders, usually in combination with pharmacotherapy. The findings of the surveys reviewed are encouraging and justify the conduct of additional primary research.

  13. Position and orientation tracking in a ubiquitous monitoring system for Parkinson disease patients with freezing of gait symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takač, Boris; Català, Andreu; Rodríguez Martín, Daniel; van der Aa, Nico; Chen, Wei; Rauterberg, Matthias

    2013-07-15

    Freezing of gait (FoG) is one of the most disturbing and least understood symptoms in Parkinson disease (PD). Although the majority of existing assistive systems assume accurate detections of FoG episodes, the detection itself is still an open problem. The specificity of FoG is its dependency on the context of a patient, such as the current location or activity. Knowing the patient's context might improve FoG detection. One of the main technical challenges that needs to be solved in order to start using contextual information for FoG detection is accurate estimation of the patient's position and orientation toward key elements of his or her indoor environment. The objectives of this paper are to (1) present the concept of the monitoring system, based on wearable and ambient sensors, which is designed to detect FoG using the spatial context of the user, (2) establish a set of requirements for the application of position and orientation tracking in FoG detection, (3) evaluate the accuracy of the position estimation for the tracking system, and (4) evaluate two different methods for human orientation estimation. We developed a prototype system to localize humans and track their orientation, as an important prerequisite for a context-based FoG monitoring system. To setup the system for experiments with real PD patients, the accuracy of the position and orientation tracking was assessed under laboratory conditions in 12 participants. To collect the data, the participants were asked to wear a smartphone, with and without known orientation around the waist, while walking over a predefined path in the marked area captured by two Kinect cameras with non-overlapping fields of view. We used the root mean square error (RMSE) as the main performance measure. The vision based position tracking algorithm achieved RMSE = 0.16 m in position estimation for upright standing people. The experimental results for the proposed human orientation estimation methods demonstrated the

  14. Can acupuncture therapy help patients with retinitis-pigmentosa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouzeh Fereydouni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of acupuncture therapy on visual function of patients with retinitis-pigmentosa (RP. Methods: In a prospective study, 23 RP subjects received ten sessions of body-acupuncture. Pre and post-treatment evaluations included best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA, near visual acuity (NVA, and static 30-2 perimetry. Results: UCVA, BCVA, and NVA improvements after acupuncture therapy were statistically and clinically significant (P = 0.048, P = 0.0005, P = 0.002, respectively. The changes of mean foveal threshold (MFT and mean deviation (MD were statistically significant (P = 0.031, P = 0.02. There were no statistically significant difference between different age group and genders. Subjective symptoms of improvement were seen in most of cases. Conclusion: Future studies are needed to show the effect of acupuncture therapy on visual function of patients with RP. Keywords: Retina, Retinitis pigmentosa, Acupuncture, Chinese medicine

  15. Diagnostic pure transgastric NOTES in an intensive therapy unit patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Michalik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES is a natural consequence of evolution in minimally invasivesurgery. It allows one to reduce surgical trauma and the number of complications and to improve cosmetic outcomes.It also shortens the patient’s recovery time. So far there have been only nine NOTES procedures performed in Polandand around 200 NOTES interventions performed worldwide. In this paper a transgastric diagnostic NOTES procedurein a critically ill patient is described. A 60-year-old male patient with multi-organ failure (circulatory, respiratory andrenal insufficiency, with co-morbid hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus hospitalized in the intensive therapy unit(ITU with unknown cause of his condition was qualified for transgastric diagnostic NOTES procedure. This interventionrevealed the diagnosis of metastatic neoplastic disease and allowed persistent therapy to be avoided. DiagnosticNOTES in selected patients seems to be a very useful. It provides fast diagnosis with relatively small perioperativetrauma. It is an easy procedure that requires a regular or operative endoscope, one surgeon and an endoscopic nurse.It can be done anywhere, including at the patient’s bedside. It provides specimens for histopathology and speeds updiagnostics and decision making, especially in terminally ill patients.

  16. Are HIV positive patients resistant to statin therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett Matthew T

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with HIV are subject to development of HIV metabolic syndrome characterized by dyslipidemia, lipodystrophy and insulin resistance secondary to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Rosuvastatin is a highly potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. Rosuvastatin is effective at lowering LDL and poses a low risk for drug-drug interaction as it does not share the same metabolic pathway as HAART drugs. This study sought to determine the efficacy of rosuvastatin on lipid parameters in HIV positive patients with HIV metabolic syndrome. Results Mean TC decreased from 6.54 to 4.89 mmol/L (25.0% reduction, p Conclusion This study found that rosuvastatin is effective at improving potentially atherogenic lipid parameters in HIV-positive patients. The lipid changes we observed were of a smaller magnitude compared to non-HIV subjects. Our results are further supported by a small, pilot trial examining rosuvastatin effectiveness in HIV who reported similar median changes from baseline of -21.7% (TC, -22.4% (LDL-C, -30.1% (TG with the exception of a 28.5% median increase in HDL. In light of the results revealed by this pilot study, clinicians may want to consider a possible resistance to statin therapy when treating patients with HIV metabolic syndrome.

  17. Alopecia With Endocrine Therapies in Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Vishal; Wu, Shenhong; Dickler, Maura N.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Whereas the frequency of alopecia to cytotoxic chemotherapies has been well described, the incidence of alopecia during endocrine therapies (i.e., anti-estrogens, aromatase inhibitors) has not been investigated. Endocrine agents are widely used in the treatment and prevention of many solid tumors, principally those of the breast and prostate. Adherence to these therapies is suboptimal, in part because of toxicities. We performed a systematic analysis of the literature to ascertain the incidence and risk for alopecia in patients receiving endocrine therapies. Methods. An independent search of citations was conducted using the PubMed database for all literature as of February 2013. Phase II–III studies using the terms “tamoxifen,” “toremifene,” “raloxifene,” “anastrozole,” “letrozole,” “exemestane,” “fulvestrant,” “leuprolide,” “flutamide,” “bicalutamide,” “nilutamide,” “fluoxymesterone,” “estradiol,” “octreotide,” “megestrol,” “medroxyprogesterone acetate,” “enzalutamide,” and “abiraterone” were searched. Results. Data from 19,430 patients in 35 clinical trials were available for analysis. Of these, 13,415 patients had received endocrine treatments and 6,015 patients served as controls. The incidence of all-grade alopecia ranged from 0% to 25%, with an overall incidence of 4.4% (95% confidence interval: 3.3%–5.9%). The highest incidence of all-grade alopecia was observed in patients treated with tamoxifen in a phase II trial (25.4%); similarly, the overall incidence of grade 2 alopecia by meta-analysis was highest with tamoxifen (6.4%). The overall relative risk of alopecia in comparison with placebo was 12.88 (p Alopecia is a common yet underreported adverse event of endocrine-based cancer therapies. Their long-term use heightens the importance of this condition on patients' quality of life. These findings are critical for pretherapy counseling, the identification of risk

  18. Loco-regional therapies for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation: Selecting an optimal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Thomas J; Rakela, Jorge

    2016-06-24

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common, increasingly prevalent malignancy. For all but the smallest lesions, surgical removal of cancer via resection or liver transplantation (LT) is considered the most feasible pathway to cure. Resection - even with favorable survival - is associated with a fairly high rate of recurrence, perhaps since most HCCs occur in the setting of cirrhosis. LT offers the advantage of removing not only the cancer but the diseased liver from which the cancer has arisen, and LT outperforms resection for survival with selected patients. Since time waiting for LT is time during which HCC can progress, loco-regional therapy (LRT) is widely employed by transplant centers. The purpose of LRT is either to bridge patients to LT by preventing progression and waitlist dropout, or to downstage patients who slightly exceed standard eligibility criteria initially but can fall within it after treatment. Transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation have been the most widely utilized LRTs to date, with favorable efficacy and safety as a bridge to LT (and for the former, as a downstaging modality). The list of potentially effective LRTs has expanded in recent years, and includes transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads, radioembolization and novel forms of extracorporal therapy. Herein we appraise the various LRT modalities for HCC, and their potential roles in specific clinical scenarios in patients awaiting LT.

  19. Dapsone therapy for hidradenitis suppurativa: a series of 24 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanyar, Shiva; Boer, Jurr; Ingvarsson, Gisli; Szepietowski, Jacek C; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2011-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is an inflammatory skin disease with a chronic intermittent course. HS is difficult to treat, and the evidence for the effect of most treatments consists of smaller open studies. The use of dapsone in the treatment of HS is based on a few published cases successfully treated. To evaluate the potential of dapsone treatment for HS in an open case series. An exploratory and retrospective review of case notes from HS patients treated with dapsone was performed. Patients were included irrespective of treatment outcome. Prior to the treatment the level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the blood was tested for all patients. A total of 24 HS patients were included and treated with dapsone. Improvement was seen in 9 out of 24 (38%) treated patients, whereas 15 out of 24 (62%) did not experience any improvement. None of the 4 cases with severe disease experienced improvement. Side effects leading to discontinuation of the treatment occurred in 2 of 24 patients (8%). Recurrence of disease at the cessation of treatment was described as rapid. The study is limited by lacking a control group. Therapy with dapsone for patients with HS is possible, particularly in milder cases. The effect may be due to either antibacterial or anti-inflammatory effects of the drug, or both. Rapid recurrence after stopping treatment however suggests that anti-inflammatory effects may predominate. The effect appears to be smaller than that reported with combination therapy using clindamycin and rifampicin. To clarify the true effect of dapsone future randomized controlled trials are necessary. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Tracking Central Hypovolemia with ECG in Humans: Cautions for the Use of Heart Period Variability in Patient Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    measurement of electrocardiogram and beat-by-beat finger arterial blood pressure. Stroke volume (SV) was estimated from the arterial pulse wave and...central blood volume from changes in pulse waveforms measured by the Finometer. Stroke volume estimation via ap- plication of infrared...suggested for use in medical monitoring of trauma patients. This study sought to ascertain the use of various HPV metrics in tracking central blood volume

  1. Dual Antiplatelet Therapy (DAPT versus No Antiplatelet Therapy and Incidence of Major Bleeding in Patients on Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid L Staudacher

    Full Text Available Bleeding is a frequent complication in patients on venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO. An indication for dual antiplatelet therapy due to coronary stent implantation is present in a considerable number of these patients. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate if dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT significantly increases the high intrinsic bleeding risk in patients on VA-ECMO.A total of 93 patients were treated with VA-ECMO between October 2010 and October 2013. Average time on VA-ECMO was 58.9 ± 1.7 hours. Dual antiplatelet therapy was given to 51.6% of all patients. Any bleeding was recorded in 60.2% of all patients. There was no difference in bleeding incidence in patients on DAPT when compared to those without any antiplatelet therapy including any bleeding (66.7% vs. 57.1%, p = 0.35, BARC3 bleeding (43.8% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.31 or pulmonary bleeding (16.7% vs. 19.0%, p = 0.77. This holds true after adjustment for confounders. Rate of transfusion of red blood cells were similar in patients with or without DAPT (35.4% vs. 28.6%, p = 0.488.Bleeding on VA-ECMO is frequent. This registry recorded no statistical difference in bleeding in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy when compared to no antiplatelet therapy. When indicated, DAPT should not be withheld from VA ECMO patients.

  2. Case Study of Cancer Patients Treated with Herbal Acupuncture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Seung Yoo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was aimed to validate the Herbal Acupuncture Therapies(HAT for cancer patients. Patients and methods : This retrospective study was performed on 8 patients who were diagnosed as cancer in Korea and treated with HAT in the oriental hospital of Daejeon University, from January 2003 to January 2004. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 8 patients for improvement of symptoms, toxic effects of liver and kidney, myelosupression and changes of Quality of Life(QOL. Results : Analysis of change of chief complaints showed that 75% patients replied moderate relief and 25% replied complete relief in Likert scale. Analysis of Liver Function Test(LFT, Renal Function Test(RFT level showed that HAT does not have toxic effects on liver and kidney. Analysis of Complete Blood Count(CBC level showed that HAT does not have myelosuppression effects on bone marrow. Analysis of QOL showed that 100% patients replied improvement in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status(ECOG status. Conclusion : Our findings suggest that HAT offer potential benefits for cancer patients.

  3. Relaxation therapy reduces anxiety in child and adolescent psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platania-Solazzo, A; Field, T M; Blank, J; Seligman, F; Kuhn, C; Schanberg, S; Saab, P

    1992-01-01

    The immediate effects of relaxation therapy (RT) were assessed in 40 hospitalized children and adolescents with diagnoses of adjustment disorder and depression. These effects were assessed using a within subjects pre-test/post-test design and by comparison with a control group of 20 depressed and adjustment disorder patients who watched a 1-h relaxing videotape. The 1-h RT class consisted of yoga exercise, a brief massage and progressive muscle relaxation. Decreases were noted in both self-reported anxiety and in anxious behavior and fidgeting as well as increases in positive affect in the RT but not the video group. In addition, adjustment disorder patients and a third of the depressed patients showed decreases in cortisol levels following RT, while no changes were noted in the video group. Thus, both diagnostic groups appeared to benefit from the RT class.

  4. Adverse reactions of biological therapies in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Sârbu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder characterized by well demarcated, erythematous plaques covered by thick, silvery-white scales, most often located on the knees, elbows, sacral area and scalp. It has a significant impact on the patient's quality of life. Biological therapies revolutionized the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris but there has been concern regarding the use of those agents due to severe adverse reactions reported in patients receiving TNF-α inhibitors for various inflammatory diseases. The aim of this paper is to review the most important adverse reactions reported in patients receiving biological treatments. The most common and severe side effects associated with biologicals are infections, cardiac adverse reactions, neurologic adverse reactions, lymphomas, non-melanoma skin cancers and hepatobiliary disease.

  5. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Not all patients with severe coronary artery disease can be treated satisfactorily with current recommended medications and revascularization techniques. Various vascular growth factors have the potential to induce angiogenesis in ischemic tissue. Clinical trials have only evaluated the effect...... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....

  6. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into “a training package”, based on the patient’s functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  7. Sequential Antibiotic Therapy: Effective Cost Management and Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel A Mandell

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating costs associated with antimicrobial chemotherapy have become of increasing concern to physicians, pharmacists and patients alike. A number of strategies have been developed to address this problem. This article focuses specifically on sequential antibiotic therapy (sat, which is the strategy of converting patients from intravenous to oral medication regardless of whether the same or a different class of drug is used. Advantages of sat include economic benefits, patient benefits and benefits to the health care provider. Potential disadvantages are cost to the consumer and the risk of therapeutic failure. A critical review of the published literature shows that evidence from randomized controlled trials supports the role of sat. However, it is also clear that further studies are necessary to determine the optimal time for intravenous to oral changeover and to identify the variables that may interfere with the use of oral drugs. Procedures necessary for the implementation of a sat program in the hospital setting are also discussed.

  8. Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Therapy in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeng Jin; Na, Yeon Kyung; Hong, Hae Sook

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMRT) on cortisol level, the Stress Arousal Checklist (SACL) score, blood pressure, and heart rate in colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Forty-six patients were divided into control and experimental groups. Cortisol levels, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured before surgery and between 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. on the first, third, and fifth days after surgery. SACL score was measured before surgery and on the fifth day after surgery at the same time points. PMRT was performed twice a day for 5 days. Analyses of covariance with advanced covariate levels and t tests showed that PMRT helps colorectal cancer patients achieve a lower stress response and provides an important basis for stress control. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Stereotype threat and social function in opioid substitution therapy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hippel, Courtney; Henry, Julie D; Terrett, Gill; Mercuri, Kimberly; McAlear, Karen; Rendell, Peter G

    2017-06-01

    People with a history of substance abuse are subject to widespread stigmatization. It seems likely that this societal disapproval will result in feelings of stereotype threat, or the belief that one is the target of demeaning stereotypes. If so, stereotype threat has the potential to contribute to functional difficulties including poor social outcomes. Eighty drug users on opioid substitution therapy and 84 demographically matched controls completed measures of mental health and social function. The opioid substitution therapy group were additionally asked to complete a measure that focused on their feelings of stereotype threat in relation to their drug use history. Bivariate correlations and hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to establish the magnitude and specificity of the relationship between stereotype threat and social functioning. Relative to controls, the opioid substitution therapy group reported higher levels of negative affect and schizotypy, and poorer social functioning, with all three of these indices significantly correlated with their feelings of stereotype threat. The results also showed that stereotype threat contributed significant unique variance to social functioning in the opioid substitution therapy group, even after taking into account other background, clinical, and mental health variables. Social functioning is an important aspect of recovery, yet these data indicate that people with a history of drug abuse who believe they are the target of stereotypical attitudes have poorer social functioning. This relationship holds after controlling for the impact of other variables on social functioning, including mental health. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. Concerns about being stereotyped can shape the social experiences of opioid substitution therapy patients. Opioid substitution therapy patients who feel negatively stereotyped experience greater social function deficits, and this

  10. Intensive Therapy of Patients with Acetic Acid Poisoning Complicated by Shock

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Stopnitsky; R. N. Akalaev

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of the elaborated intensive therapy policy for acute acetic acid poisoning complicated by exotoxic shock.Subjects and methods. The results of treatment were analyzed in 72 patients admitted in 2008—2012 with severe acute acetic acid poisoning complicated by exotoxic shock. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) combination therapy added by an improved intensive therapy complex; 2) conventional therapy. All the patients underwent comprehensive clinica...

  11. [Effect of combined application of ozone therapy and gravitational therapy on the remote results of complex treatment of geriatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, I V; Shchukin, Yu V; Lukashova, A V

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the remote results of treatment of an obliterating atherosclerosis of arteries of the lower extremities of the II stage at patients of advanced and senile age after the combined use of ozone therapy and gravitational therapy. We performed a prospective randomized study in three parallel groups (139 patients). The 1st group (n=57) received standard medical therapy in combination with ozone therapy; the group was divided into two subgroups: for patients of subgroup 1a (n=28) - intravenous ozonized physiological solution was performed, for patients of subgroup 1b (n=29) - major ozonized autohemotherapy. For patients of the 2nd group (n=62) - a comprehensive treatment, including gravitational therapy in addition to medical ozone, was carried out. In this group were also identified two subgroups: subgroup 2a (n=31) - patients received standard medical therapy in combination with ozonized physiological solution and gravitational therapy, subgroup 2b (n=31) - standard medical therapy in conjunction with major ozonized autohemotherapy and gravitational therapy. The 3rd control group (n=20) included patients, who received only standard medical therapy. Dynamics of changes of a stage of a disease and the number of surgeries in the remote period was estimated (up to 7 years). After 6 months of follow-on stages of the distribution of the disease patients significantly (p>0,05) did not differ from the initial amount. Analysis of survival and probable risk at 7 years of follow-Cox regression method revealed a maximum efficiency in the subgroup 2a where the risk of probability of surgeries and also increases in a stage of a disease effectively decreased.

  12. Trends and Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Patient Monitoring Practices in Kenya and Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Dansereau

    Full Text Available Patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART require routine monitoring to track response to treatment and assess for treatment failure. This study aims to identify gaps in monitoring practices in Kenya and Uganda.We conducted a systematic retrospective chart review of adults who initiated ART between 2007 and 2012. We assessed the availability of baseline measurements (CD4 count, weight, and WHO stage and ongoing CD4 and weight monitoring according to national guidelines in place at the time. Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to analyze facility and patient factors associated with meeting monitoring guidelines.From 2007 to 2012, at least 88% of patients per year in Uganda had a recorded weight at initiation, while in Kenya there was a notable increase from 69% to 90%. Patients with a documented baseline CD4 count increased from 69% to about 80% in both countries. In 2012, 83% and 86% of established patients received the recommended quarterly weight monitoring in Kenya and Uganda, respectively, while semiannual CD4 monitoring was less common (49% in Kenya and 38% in Uganda. Initiating at a more advanced WHO stage was associated with a lower odds of baseline CD4 testing. On-site CD4 analysis capacity was associated with increased odds of CD4 testing at baseline and in the future.Substantial gaps were noted in ongoing CD4 monitoring of patients on ART. Although guidelines have since changed, limited laboratory capacity is likely to remain a significant issue in monitoring patients on ART, with important implications for ensuring quality care.

  13. Different people respond differently to therapy: A demonstration using patient profiling and risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo, Jaime; Moreea, Omar; Lutz, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify patient characteristics associated with poor outcomes in psychological therapy, and to develop a patient profiling method. Clinical assessment data for 1347 outpatients was analysed. Final treatment outcome was based on reliable and clinically significant improvement (RCSI) in depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-7) measures. Thirteen patient characteristics were explored as potential outcome predictors using logistic regression in a cross-validation design. Disability, employment status, age, functional impairment, baseline depression and outcome expectancy predicted post-treatment RCSI. Regression coefficients for these factors were used to derive a weighting scheme called Leeds Risk Index (LRI), used to assign risk scores to individual cases. After stratifying cases into three levels of LRI scores, we found significant differences in RCSI and treatment completion rates. Furthermore, LRI scores were significantly correlated with the proportion of treatment sessions classified as 'not on track'. The LRI tool can identify cases at risk of poor progress to inform personalized treatment recommendations for low and high intensity psychological interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bone turnover markers in epileptic patients under chronic valproate therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effects of chronic valproic acid administration on bone health have been a matter of concern and controversy. In this study, the bone status following valproate intake was assessed by using several bone-related biochemical markers. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 62 epileptic patients and 40 age- and gender-matched controls were enrolled. The patients had been under chronic valproate therapy (758 ± 29 mg/day for at least the past 6 months, without any vitamin D/or calcium supplementation. Serum markers of bone turnover (carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase [BALP], calcium, phosphorus, total alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone levels were measured in both groups. Results: The markers of bone turnover as well as other measured bone biochemical parameters did not statistically differ between the two groups. Conclusion: Valproate therapy at the mentioned doses does not seem to change bone turnover in adult epileptic patients.

  15. Patient values and preferences for antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation. A Narrative Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter S; Ji, Angela Tianshu; Kapanen, Anita; McClean, Alison

    2017-06-02

    Guidelines recommend that patients' values and preferences should be considered when selecting stroke prevention therapy for atrial fibrillation (SPAF). However, doing so is difficult, and tools to assist clinicians are sparse. We performed a narrative systematic review to provide clinicians with insights into the values and preferences of AF patients for SPAF antithrombotic therapy. Narrative systematic review of published literature from database inception. 1) What are patients' AF and SPAF therapy values and preferences? 2) How are SPAF therapy values and preferences affected by patient factors? 3) How does conveying risk information affect SPAF therapy preferences? and 4) What is known about patient values and preferences regarding novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for SPAF? Twenty-five studies were included. Overall study quality was moderate. Severe stroke was associated with the greatest disutility among AF outcomes and most patients value the stroke prevention efficacy of therapy more than other attributes. Utilities, values, and preferences about other outcomes and attributes of therapy are heterogeneous and unpredictable. Patients' therapy preferences usually align with their values when individualised risk information is presented, although divergence from this is common. Patients value the attributes of NOACs but frequently do not prefer NOACs over warfarin when all therapy-related attributes are considered. In conclusion, patients' values and preferences for SPAF antithrombotic therapy are heterogeneous and there is no substitute for directly clarifying patients' individual values and preferences. Research using choice modelling and tools to help clinicians and patients clarify their SPAF therapy values and preferences are needed.

  16. Evaluating complementary and alternative therapies for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassileth, B R

    1999-01-01

    "Complementary and alternative" therapies are actually a vast collection of disparate, unrelated regimens and products, ranging from adjunctive modalities that effectively enhance quality of life and promising antitumor herbal remedies now under investigation, to bogus therapies that claim to cure cancer and that harm not only directly, but also indirectly by encouraging patients to avoid or postpone effective cancer care. Complementary therapies such as music and massage, herbal teas to aid digestion and relieve nausea, yoga, tai chi, meditation, and the many other well-documented techniques that relieve stress and enhance well-being should be made available to patients to augment and ease the experience of cancer treatment and recovery. Many time-tested herbal and diet-based remedies are now being studied for their abilities to induce or extend remission without toxicity. At the same time, lack of government regulatory authority leaves consumers at the mercy of those who promote unproved remedies, scores of which the grocery store and pharmacy shelves. Many of these over-the-counter products contain harmful ingredients. Herb-drug interactions, only some of which are documented, occur with frequency and are sufficiently problematic to require that patients stop taking herbal remedies prior to surgery (to prevent interactions with anesthetics and anticoagulant effects); before radiation (due to potential for increased photosensitivity); and during courses of chemotherapy (to prevent product-drug interactions). Moreover, both good information and misinformation that appear in printed materials and on the Internet appeal to better educated consumers, who are, in fact, the most likely to try complementary and alternative methods.

  17. Dyslipidemia in AIDS patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Weyler Nery

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART reduces AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, however it has been associated with metabolic abnormalities. This study estimated the prevalence of lipid abnormalities and related factors among patients on HAART. A cross-sectional study was conducted on adult patients, in central Brazil. Patients were interviewed, and blood obtained for lipids measurement. Dyslipidemia was defined as total cholesterol (TC > 240 mg/dL, low-density lipoprotein (LDL > 160 mg/dL, triglycerides (TG > 200 and/or high-density lipoprotein (HDL < 40 mg/dL. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed (SPSS 13.0. One hundred and thirteen patients were recruited. Mean age was 39.3 years; 68.1% were males; 50.4% were on nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI in combination with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI, while 42.5% were on NRTI in combination with protease inhibitors (PIs. The prevalence of dyslipidemia was 66.7%. Low HDL was the most frequent abnormality (53.5%, followed by high TG (36.1%. Patients on a PI regimen had a 5.2-fold higher risk (95% CI: 1.8-14.8 of dyslipidemia, even after adjusting for sex, age, and duration of HIV infection/AIDS. The study discloses a high prevalence rate of dyslipidemia and points out a need for intervention programs to reduce future cardiovascular events in patients, on HAART.

  18. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Polycythemia in HIV-infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkas, Charles Kyriakos; Vaamonde, Carlos M.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to assess testosterone use as a primary risk factor for polycythemia in 21 HIV-infected men. Any testosterone use within two months of first elevated hemoglobin was associated with polycythemia (matched odds ratio 6.55; 95% CI 1.83-23.4; P=0.004) and intramuscular administration demonstrated a stronger association than topical use. No adverse cardiovascular or thrombotic events were observed. HIV-infected patients taking testosterone should undergo routine hematologic monitoring with adjustment of therapy when appropriate. PMID:22008652

  19. [Anti-hypertensive therapies in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Komei; Minamino, Tohru

    2015-11-01

    Abstract Hypertension is the major cause of cardiovascular disease. Persistent hypertension leads to cardiovascular remodeling and resulted in heart diseases such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, and arrhythmia. The presence of hypertension could also be a precipitating factor of heart diseases and form vicious cycle. Therefore, perfect blood pressure control is essential for the prevention of cardiovascular events. Additionally, it is ideal to choose anti-hypertensive agents, which have cardiovascular-protective effects as well as strong blood pressure-lowering effects. We herein describe anti-hypertensive therapies in patients with heart disease in accordance with JSH2014 and JCS guidelines.

  20. Adjuvant therapy of patients with chronic dermatoses using Bedan cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.F. Kutasevych

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problem of treatment of chronic dermatopathies. There are demonstrated the data of study of therapeutic efficiency and tolerance of Bedan cream I patients with dermatopathies. Bedan cream used in a complex therapy of chronic dermatopathies was shown to lead to earlier reduction of objective and subjective signs of chronic dermatosis and clinical regression. It was found a good tolerance of Bedan cream: its application was not associated with deterioration of general condition of skin, its irritation and allergization.

  1. Uremic myopathy and calcitriol therapy in CAPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, M; Luisetto, G; Arcuti, V; Urso, M

    1991-01-01

    During 7 months of calcitriol treatment in eight CAPD patients, significant increases in serum creatinine and daily excretion of this substance in dialysis fluid were observed, but there was a significant decrease in creatinine in the urinary daily output. When therapy was stopped, creatinine levels fell to baseline in serum and peritoneal fluid, and urine values continued to decrease as previously observed. Dynamometric performance showed a significant increase during treatment, which remained after drug withdrawal. These findings suggest that the transient increase of serum creatinine during calcitriol treatment may be a result of an increased production and release of this metabolite from muscle.

  2. Chronic antithrombotic therapy in post-myocardial infarction patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarakanti, Rangadham; Sodhi, Sandeep; Lee, Robert; Ezekowitz, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Because 1.1 million myocardial infarctions occur in the United States alone each year, and 450,000 of them are recurrent infarctions, which carry an inherently greater risk of death and disability than first events, the importance of secondary prevention strategies that can be implemented widely is unparalleled in health care. Antithrombotic therapies, both antiplatelet and anticoagulant, have become the mainstays of these strategies. This article covers the use of chronic antiplatelet and anticoagulation agents after myocardial infarction. It does not include the management of these patients in the acute phase.

  3. Slab track

    OpenAIRE

    Golob, Tina

    2014-01-01

    The last 160 years has been mostly used conventional track with ballasted bed, sleepers and steel rail. Ensuring the high speed rail traffic, increasing railway track capacities, providing comfortable and safe ride as well as high reliability and availability railway track, has led to development of innovative systems for railway track. The so-called slab track was first built in 1972 and since then, they have developed many different slab track systems around the world. Slab track was also b...

  4. ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY AMONG ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshimi Borgohain

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT among adolescent psychiatric patient is rarely used and studies in this regard are also rare, while its need is of great importance. Aim of this study was to study the prevalence of ECT in common psychiatric illnesses among adolescent age group, where it is indicated and outcome of ECT in those psychiatric patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS All data were collected retrospectively from the chart review for those adolescents aged between 12 to 18 years who received ECT during the period of 2008 - 2012. During the study period a total of 554 patients received ECT, among whom 104 were adolescents. RESULTS Adolescent patients were 18.77% in the whole ECT sample; the average age of the adolescents was 16.33 years and number of patients were more with older age. Among all the patients, 48.08% had positive family history of mental illness and 81.73% were from lower Socioeconomic Class. The use of ECT was more with schizophrenia (n= 63, 60.57% and acute and transient psychotic disorder (n= 30, 28.85%. The most common indication was agitation and aggression (n= 29, 27.88% followed by poor medication response (n= 19, 18.27%. Good response is found in most of the cases (n= 88, 84.62%, only a few percentage of cases showed minor and transient adverse event. CONCLUSION The result of our study suggests that prevalence of ECT among adolescent psychiatric patients is quite high and ECT is a safe and effective method of treatment in the adolescent psychiatric patients, especially those patients who are severely ill and poorly responding to medication.

  5. Drug therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson`s disease (PD is a progressive, disabling neurodegenerative disorder with onset of motor and non-motor features. Both reduce quality of life of PD patients and cause caregiver burden. This review aims to provide a survey of possible therapeutic options for treatment of motor and non motor symptoms of PD and to discuss their relation to each other. MAO-B-Inhibitors, NMDA antagonists, dopamine agonists and levodopa with its various application modes mainly improve the dopamine associated motor symptoms in PD. This armentarium of PD drugs only partially influences the onset and occurrence of non motor symptoms. These PD features predominantly result from non dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Autonomic features, such as seborrhea, hyperhidrosis, orthostatic syndrome, salivation, bladder dysfunction, gastrointestinal disturbances, and neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression, sleep disorders, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction with impaired execution and impulse control may appear. Drug therapy of these non motor symptoms complicates long-term PD drug therapy due to possible occurrence of drug interactions, - side effects, and altered pharmacokinetic behaviour of applied compounds. Dopamine substituting compounds themselves may contribute to onset of these non motor symptoms. This complicates the differentiation from the disease process itself and influences therapeutic options, which are often limited because of additional morbidity with necessary concomitant drug therapy.

  6. Additional effective dose by patients undergoing NAI-131 capsules therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlic, M.; Jovanovic, M.; Spasic Jokic, V.; Cuknic, O.; Ilic, Z.; Vranjes Djuric, S. [VINCA - Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2006-07-01

    Capsules or solutions containing Na{sup 131}I are indicated for the therapy of some thyroid carcinomas such as functioning metastatic papillary or follicular carcinoma of the thyroid; and for the treatment of hyperthyroidism (diffuse toxic goiter and single or multiple toxic nodular goiter). The recommended dosage ranges of Na{sup 131}I capsules or solution for the therapy of the average patient (70 kg) are: (3.7-5.55) GBq for ablation of normal thyroid tissue; (3.7-7.4) GBq for subsequent treatments; a (148-370) MBq for hyperthyroidism. The purpose of this paper is to calculate effective dose as a result of iodine-131 capsules remaining in stomach before absorption starts. This result can determine the disadvantage of capsule versus solution containing sodium iodine-131 (Na{sup 131}I) in radionuclide therapy application from radiation protection point of view. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4b was used to model transport of gamma and beta particles emitted by radionuclide {sup 131}I treated as a point source at the bottom of stomach. Absorbed energy per unit transformation in stomach and surrounding organs has been calculated. (authors)

  7. Predictors of overall satisfaction of cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker-Schiebe M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Martina Becker-Schiebe,1,2 Uwe Pinkert,1 Tahera Ahmad,1 Christof Schäfer,3 Wolfgang Hoffmann,1 Heiko Franz4 1Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Städtisches Klinikum Braunschweig gGmbH, Braunschweig, 2Radiation Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, 3Radiation Oncology Straubing, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, 4Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Städtisches Klinikum Braunschweig gGmbH, Braunschweig, Germany Background: Reporting the experiences and satisfaction of patients, as well as their quality of care scores is an emerging recommendation in health care systems. Many aspects of patients’ experience determine their overall satisfaction. The aim of this evaluation was to define the main factors contributing to the satisfaction of patients undergoing radiotherapy in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods: A total of 1,710 patients with a histologically proven cancer, who were treated in our department between 2012 and 2014, were recruited for this prospective evaluation. At the end of therapy, each patient was asked to grade the skills and the care provided by radiation therapists, physicians, and physician’s assistants, as well as the overall satisfaction during therapy. Statistical analysis was performed to determine which parameters had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction. Results: Overall satisfaction with the provided care was high with a mean satisfaction score of 1.4. Significant correlations were found between overall satisfaction and each of the following survey items: courtesy, protection of privacy, professional skills and care provided by the radiation therapists and physicians, accuracy of provided information, and cleanliness. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that courteous behavior and the protection of privacy were the strongest predictors for overall satisfaction (P<0.001, followed by care and skills of physicians and radiation therapists. Patients suffering from head

  8. Real-Time Tumor Tracking in the Lung Using an Electromagnetic Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Amish P., E-mail: Amish.Shah@orlandohealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A.; Waghorn, Benjamin J.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Rineer, Justin M.; Mañon, Rafael R.; Vollenweider, Mark A.; Meeks, Sanford L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To describe the first use of the commercially available Calypso 4D Localization System in the lung. Methods and Materials: Under an institutional review board-approved protocol and an investigational device exemption from the US Food and Drug Administration, the Calypso system was used with nonclinical methods to acquire real-time 4-dimensional lung tumor tracks for 7 lung cancer patients. The aims of the study were to investigate (1) the potential for bronchoscopic implantation; (2) the stability of smooth-surface beacon transponders (transponders) after implantation; and (3) the ability to acquire tracking information within the lung. Electromagnetic tracking was not used for any clinical decision making and could only be performed before any radiation delivery in a research setting. All motion tracks for each patient were reviewed, and values of the average displacement, amplitude of motion, period, and associated correlation to a sinusoidal model (R{sup 2}) were tabulated for all 42 tracks. Results: For all 7 patients at least 1 transponder was successfully implanted. To assist in securing the transponder at the tumor site, it was necessary to implant a secondary fiducial for most transponders owing to the transponder's smooth surface. For 3 patients, insertion into the lung proved difficult, with only 1 transponder remaining fixed during implantation. One patient developed a pneumothorax after implantation of the secondary fiducial. Once implanted, 13 of 14 transponders remained stable within the lung and were successfully tracked with the tracking system. Conclusions: Our initial experience with electromagnetic guidance within the lung demonstrates that transponder implantation and tracking is achievable though not clinically available. This research investigation proved that lung tumor motion exhibits large variations from fraction to fraction within a single patient and that improvements to both transponder and tracking system are still

  9. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Current management of patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kenji [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The best management for small mucosal esophageal cancer is generally endoscopic mucosal resection. However, for submucosal cancer and extensive mucosal caner, either radical surgery or radiation seems to be an equally efficacious option. Radiation therapy concurrent with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone for patients with unresectable esophageal cancer. The key drugs are cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. However, for patients with poor performance status or for aged patients, radiation therapy alone is still a choice of treatment. Surgery has generally been indicated for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. However, outcomes of concurrent chemoradiation therapy may be comparable with those of surgery. Therefore, a prospective randomized study should be performed to determine the best management for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The usefulness of intra-cavitary irradiation for esophageal cancer has not been clarified. A prospective randomized trial with a large number of patients is necessary to determine the effectiveness of intra-cavitary irradiation. The best management for patients with loco-regionally recurrent esophageal cancer after surgery has not been determined. Intensive therapy should be considered if the site of recurrence is limited and the time interval from surgery to recurrence is long. Chemotherapy is essential in the management of patients with small cell esophageal cancer. However, the best local therapy has not been determined. (author)

  10. Long-term tracking of neurological complications of encephalopathy and myopathy in a patient with nephropathic cystinosis: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcus

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cystinosis is a hereditary storage disease resulting in intracellular accumulation of cystine and crystal formation that causes deterioration of the function of many organs. The major clinical symptom is renal failure, which progresses and necessitates renal transplantation at the beginning of the second decade of life. Encephalopathy and distal myopathy are important neurological long-term complications with a major impact on the quality of life of these patients. Application of cysteamine is the only specific therapy available; it decreases the intracellular cystine level and delays or may even prevent the failure of organ functions. Case presentation We present the case of a 38-year-old woman with cystinosis and the long-term tracking of her neurological symptoms under cysteamine treatment. Conclusion This case report describes a long observation period of neurological complications in a person with cystinosis who had strikingly different courses of encephalopathy and myopathy while on cysteamine treatment. Although encephalopathy was initially suspected, this did not develop, but distal myopathy progressed continuously despite specific therapy.

  11. The therapeutic effect of neurologic music therapy and speech language therapy in post-stroke aphasic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kil-Byung; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Hong-Jae; Yoo, Jeehyun; Hwang, Ji Youn; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Sung-Kyun

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of neurologic music therapy (NMT) and speech language therapy (SLT) through improvement of the aphasia quotient (AQ) in post-stroke aphasic patients. Twenty-one post-stroke, nonfluent aphasia patients who had ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke on radiologic evaluation were divided into the NMT and SLT groups. They received NMT and SLT for 1 month. Language function was assessed by Korean version-Western Aphasia Battery before and after therapy. NMT consisted of therapeutic singing and melodic intonation therapy, and SLT consisted of language-oriented therapy. Significant improvements were revealed in AQ, repetition, and naming after therapy in the NMT group and improvements in repetition in the SLT group of chronic stroke patients (p<0.05). There were significant improvements in language ability in the NMT group of subacute stroke patients. However, there was no significant improvement in the SLT group of subacute stroke patients. We concluded that the two therapies are effective treatments in the chronic stage of stroke and NMT is effective in subacute post-stroke aphasic patients.

  12. A prospective study of quality of life in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canhua Xiao, PhD, RN

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Radiation therapy did not worsen QOL in breast cancer patients. However, pre-radiation therapy patient characteristics including BMI and perceived stress may be used to identify women who may experience decreased physical and mental function during and up to 1 year after radiation therapy.

  13. The effect of cognitive behavior therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaimaat, F. W.; Brons, M. R.; Geenen, R.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    In order to examine the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) three patients groups were studied: a cognitive behavioral therapy group (CBT), an occupational therapy group (OT), and a waiting-list control group. The CBT received a comprehensive,

  14. Music therapy: decreasing anxiety in the ventilated patient: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Theresa; Jones, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Increased anxiety levels are a common problem for mechanically ventilated patients. Heightened anxiety and lack of effective treatment options result in negative patient outcomes. Music therapy has been documented as an effective nursing intervention to manage anxiety in ventilator-dependent patients. Seven studies examining the effectiveness of music therapy in ventilator-dependent patients are reviewed in this literature review.

  15. A renal colic fast track pathway to improve waiting times and outcomes for patients presenting to the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Kadhi O

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Omar Al Kadhi,1 Kate Manley,1 Madhavi Natarajan,1 Valmiki Lutchmedial,2 Abbi Forsyth,2 Kate Tabrett,2 Jonathan Betteridge,2 William Finch,3 Heinrich Hollis4 1Department of Urology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 2Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, 3Department of Urology, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, UK Introduction: Renal colic is commonly encountered in the emergency department (ED. We validated a fast track renal colic (FTRC initiative to decrease patient waiting times and streamline patient flow.Method: The FTRC pathway was devised according to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical summary criteria for the management of patients with suspected renal colic. ED triage nurses use the pathway to identify patients with likely renal colic suitable for fast track to analgesia, investigation and management. Investigations, diagnosis and patient demographics were recorded for 1157 consecutive patients coded as renal colic at a single-center ED over 12 months.Results: Three hundred and two patients were suitable for the FTRC pathway (26.1%, while 855 were seen by the ED clinicians prior to onward referral. Also, 83.9% of patients underwent computed tomography scan. In the FTRC group, 57.3% of patients had radiologically confirmed calculi versus 53.8% in the non-FTRC group (p=0.31. Alternative diagnoses among FTRC patients (2.6% included ovarian pathology (n=1, diverticulitis (n=2 and incidental renal cell carcinoma (n=2, while 26.1% had no identifiable pathology. No immediately life-threatening diagnoses were identified on imaging. Computed tomography scans performed in the non-FTRC group identified two ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms and alternative diagnoses (2.57% including ovarian pathology (n=7, cholecystitis (n=2, incidental renal cell carcinoma (n=3 and inflammatory bowel

  16. Therapy for memory and attention impairments in young patients

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    Elena Glebovna Filatova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the efficacy and tolerance of tanakan in the treatment of mild cognitive impairment in young patients. Patients and methods. The study enrolled 30 patients whose mean age was 33.5±7.5 years. It used clinical neurological examination; a test for rating general condition, activity, and mood; studies to evaluate aural short-term and verbal short-term memories and to estimate the level of attention using Schulte's tables, and questionnaires for the rating of autonomic disorders and nocturnal sleep quality, those for the patient subjective assessment of treatment efficiency and for the recording of adverse reactions. Results. Tanakan therapy led to the normalized emotional status in the patients, improved nocturnal sleep, and reduced autonomic disorders. There was a tendency towards improvement of all characteristics of attention. Aural and verbal memories became better. Conclusion. Tanakan is an effective and safe drug to treat cognitive impairment at any age.

  17. [Paradoxical reaction following antituberculosis therapy in immunocompetent patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacha, S; Khemiri, M; Racil, H; Hantous, S; Chaouch, N; Cheikhrouhou, S; Chabbou, A; Megdiche, M L

    2016-12-01

    The features of paradoxical reactions (PR) that occurred in non-HIV infected patients are rare and not well known. The authors reported the case of a 21years old, non-immunocompromised, and HIV negative patient treated for disseminated tuberculosis. PR occurred after 8months after initiation of antituberculous treatment. PR presented as left cervical lymphadenopathy, pulmonary, pleural, costal and spinal location of the tuberculosis. The antituberculous drugs were prolonged. Patient's clinical symptoms improved initially. However, left inguinal lymphadenopathy appeared after 20months of antituberculous therapy. Inguinal lymph node biopsy revealed tuberculous lymphadenitis. The patient has a good compliance to the treatment. The patient was continued on same antituberculous treatment for a total of 28months. The cervical and inguinal lymphadenopathy disappeared and CT scan showed regression of thoracic, abdominal, costal and spinal lesions. PR during antituberculous treatment must be considered after exclusion of other causes. No consensus on the therapeutic management of this entity has been developed to date. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell Therapy in Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Compagna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical limb ischemia (CLI represents the most advanced stage of peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD with a severe obstruction of the arteries which markedly reduces blood flow to the extremities and has progressed to the point of severe rest pain and/or even tissue loss. Recent therapeutic strategies have focused on restoring this balance in favor of tissue survival using exogenous molecular and cellular agents to promote regeneration of the vasculature. These are based on stimulation of angiogenesis by extracellular and cellular components. This review article carries out a systematic analysis of the most recent scientific literature on the application of stem cells in patients with CLI. The results obtained from the detailed analysis of the recent literature data have confirmed the beneficial role of cell therapy in reducing the rate of major amputations in patients with CLI and improving their quality of life.

  19. Effects of music therapy on pain, discomfort, and depression for patients with leg fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, In Sook; Kim, Jungnam; Park, Kyung Min

    2006-06-01

    To determine the effects of music therapy on pain, discomfort, and depression for patients with leg fractures. Data were collected from 40 patients admitted in an orthopedic surgery care unit. The subjects included 20 intervention group members and 20 control group members. Music therapy was offered to intervention group members once a day for 3 days for 30-60 minutes per day. Pain was measured with a numeric rating scale and by measuring vital signs. Discomfort and depression were measured with self-administered questionnaires. Patients who received music therapy had a lower degree of pain than patients who did not receive music therapy as measured by the numeric pain score (pmusic therapy also had a lower degree of discomfort than patients who were not provided with this therapy (pmusic therapy is an effective method for decreasing pain and dis-comfort for patients with leg fractures.

  20. The Use of Motion Tracking Technologies in Serious Games to Enhance Rehabilitation in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Andrew M.; Liu, Hao; Battersby, Steven; Brown, David; Sherkat, Nasser; Standen, Penny; Walker, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the main cause of long term disability worldwide. Of those surviving, more than half will fail to regain functional usage of their impaired upper limb. Typically stroke upper limb rehabilitation exercises consist of repeated movements, which when tracked can form the basis of inputs to games. This paper discusses two systems utilizing…

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance feature tracking: a novel method to assess myocardial strain. Comparison with echocardiographic speckle tracking in healthy volunteers and in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwat, Stefan; Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Bauerschmitz, Pia; Bunck, Alexander Ch; Maintz, David; Radke, Robert M; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular longitudinal strain (LV-LS) and strain rate (SR) are sensitive markers of early systolic dysfunction. To evaluate the feasibility of a novel, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) based method known as feature tracking (FT) for the assessment of strain and SR, and to compare the CMR based results to those obtained on standard transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in healthy volunteers and in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy cardiomyopathy (HCM). Overall, 20 healthy volunteers (ten male, mean age 24 ± 3 years) and 20 consecutive patients with HCM (12 male, mean age 47 ± 19 years) were included. Longitudinal and circumferential strain and SR of the left ventricle were measured on CMR at 1.5 Tesla and TTE and interobserver variability was assessed. FT measurements were feasible in all subjects. A good agreement between global LV-LS measured on CMR (controls: 20.8 ± 3.0; HCM: 17.6 ± 3.8) and TTE (controls: 19.4 ± 2.1; HCM: 16.6 ± 2.9) was found, while the agreement was worse for circumferential strain and all SR measurements. For the left and right ventricles, interobserver reproducibility was higher for strain measurements compared to SR. Coefficients of variation were lowest for LV-LS (13.2%) by CMR. FT analysis is a novel CMR based method for the analysis of myocardial strain and SR that is simple and correlates well with the echocardiographic measurements. Since CMR is unaffected by inadequate acoustic windows, FT may represent an attractive alternative to echocardiography in assessing the increasingly important parameters of myocardial deformation.

  2. Respiratory Function Under Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy in Patients With Spastic Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishima, Haruhiko; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Goto, Yuko; Oshino, Satoru; Maruo, Tomoyuki; Tani, Naoki; Khoo, Hui Ming; Hosomi, Koichi; Hirata, Masayuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-08-01

    Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy is an effective treatment for patients with severe spasticity. However, the effect of ITB therapy on respiratory function has not been reported in detail. In this study we quantitatively analyzed the effects of ITB on the respiratory function of patients with spastic tetraplegia. We retrospectively reviewed 23 patients who were administrated ITB therapy from January 2009 to December 2012. Six of these 23 patients, who had spastic tetraplegia and were able to undergo spirometric testing, were included this study. The spasticity derived from cervical spinal cord injury in four patients and cerebral palsy (CP) in two patients. Patients' Ashworth Scale scores and spirometer measurements obtained before and 1-6 months after the start of ITB therapy were evaluated and compared. Before ITB therapy, %FVC of all six patients was below 80%, and a restrictive respiratory disorder was diagnosed in five patients and a combined respiratory disorder in one patient. Ashworth Scale scores for both the lower and upper extremities improved significantly with ITB therapy. Forced vital capacity (FVC), %FVC, and forced expiratory volume at one sec also improved significantly with ITB therapy. Respiratory disorders were indeed present in our SCI and CP patients with spastic tetraplegia, and the respiratory function of these patients improved with ITB therapy. Our results suggest that ITB therapy is safe and efficacious in patients with spastic tetraplegia and respiratory dysfunction. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  3. Mood disorders and outcome in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Alaa; Brumberg, Genevieve; El-Saed, Aiman; Saba, Samir

    2012-03-01

    Mood disorders (MD) have been demonstrated to influence outcome in cardiac disease in general and specifically in chronic heart failure (HF). Little is known about their possible effect on response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). To evaluate the influence of MD on CRT response. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all cardiac CRT-D (CRT defibrillator) recipients (N = 153) at the Veterans Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System from beginning of 2004 through end of 2006. All-cause death and HF-related hospitalizations (HFH), individually and combined, were sought through 2009. During a mean follow-up time of 31.4 ± 14.7 months, there were 48 (31.4%) deaths and 55 (35.9%) HFHs in HF patients having New York Heart Association class of 2.9 ± 0.3, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 25.8 ± 9.1%, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) of 61.6 ± 11.6 mm, and QRS of 152 ± 30.5 ms . A total of 65 (42.5%) patients had MD (depression, anxiety, or posttraumatic stress disorder). Compared to others, patients in the MD group were at a significantly higher risk of HFH alone (47.7% vs 27.3%, P = 0.009) or when combined with death (58.5% vs 39.8%, P = 0.022) but not death alone (35.4% vs 28.4%, P = 0.36). The significant predictive effect of MD on HFH alone and when combined with death shown in univariate analysis was not attenuated after adjustment for age, ejection fraction, etiology of cardiomyopathy, cumulative number of any shocks, smoking, and evidence of postimplantation echocardiographic improvement. MD in patients with advanced but stable HF receiving CRT-D therapy was a predictor of HFH alone or when combined with death but not mortality alone. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Acupuncture effectiveness as a complementary therapy in functional dyspepsia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Flávia Altaf da Rocha; Ferreira, Lincoln Eduardo Villela Vieira de Castro; Pace, Fábio Heleno de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Functional dyspepsia represents a frequent gastrointestinal disorder in clinical practice. According to the Roma III criteria, functional dyspepsia can be classified into two types as the predominant symptom: epigastric pain and postprandial discomfort. Even though the pathophysiology is still uncertain, the functional dyspepsia seems to be related to multiple mechanisms, among them visceral hypersensitivity, changes in the gastroduodenal motility and gastric accommodation and psychological factors. Evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture as a complementary to conventional treatment in functional dyspepsia patients. Randomized clinical trial in which were enrolled patients with functional dyspepsia patients in according with Rome III criteria. One group was submitted to drug therapy and specific acupuncture (GI) and the other to drug therapy and non-specific acupuncture (GII). The gastrointestinal symptoms, presence of psychiatric disorders and quality of life were evaluated, at the end and three months after treatment. After 4 weeks of treatment there was improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms in Group I (55 ± 12 vs 29 ± 8.8; P = 0.001) and Group II (50.5 ± 10.2 vs 46 ± 10.5; P = 0.001). Quality of life was significantly better in Group I than group II (93.4 ± 7.3 vs 102.4 ± 5.1; P = 0.001). Anxiety (93.3% vs 0%; P = 0.001) and depression (46.7% vs 0%; P = 0.004) were significantly lower in Group I than group II. When comparing the two groups after 4 weeks of treatment, gastrointestinal symptoms (29 ± 8.8 vs 46 ± 10.5; Pacupuncture treatment is superior to conventional treatment. Further studies with more patients are needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

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    Ojeh VB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs, and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV- infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH. Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3% patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10 years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%, unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1% and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%. Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%, rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%, change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%, and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%. A total of 389 (93% out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212 of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89 were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49. However, 7.5% (30 prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21 were not dispensed, and 3% (12 were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors.

  6. Cytomegalovirus retinitis in a seronegative patient with systemic lupus erythematosus on immunosuppressive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kelkar, Aditya; Kelkar, Jai; Kelkar, Shreekant; Bhirud, Shilpa; Biswas, Jyotirmoy

    2011-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study is to report a rare case of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in a seronegative patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) on immunosuppressive therapy. Methods A seronegative patient with SLE who was on immunosuppressive therapy developed CMV retinitis. The immunosuppressive therapy was tapered, and the patient was given intravitreal ganciclovir and foscarnet in addition to systemic ganciclovir. The follow-up visits were documented. Result The patient respond...

  7. Favored subjects and psychosocial needs in music therapy in terminally ill cancer patients: a content analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Preissler, Pia; Kordovan, Sarah; Ullrich, Anneke; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Oechsle, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Research has shown positive effects of music therapy on the physical and mental well-being of terminally ill patients. This study aimed to identify favored subjects and psychosocial needs of terminally ill cancer patients during music therapy and associated factors. Methods Forty-one Patients receiving specialized inpatient palliative care prospectively performed a music therapy intervention consisting of at least two sessions (total number of sessions: 166; per patient average: 4,...

  8. REHABILITATION THERAPY VERSUS DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISC DEGENERATION

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    BROSCATEAN, Emanuela-Flavia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc degeneration is a disorder whose clinical manifestations are represented by episodic pain in the lumbar spine, without lumbar blockage and minor muscle contraction. Because lumbalgia caused by lumbar disc degeneration is not always very high intensity pain, the easiest to apply treatment is drug therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential role of rehabilitation treatment in the recovery of patients and the prevention of complications compared to drug therapy alone. The study included 28 patients (17 women and 11 men aged between 23-60 years, assigned to two groups: 20 patients who received rehabilitation treatment (consisting of massage, kinesiotherapy, hydrokinesiotherapy, electrotherapy and medication and 8 patients who received drug treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs. The treatment duration was 10 days. For the evaluation of pain, the visual analogue scale was used, for the degree of disability, the Oswestry questionnaire, and for joint mobility and muscle strength, articular and muscular testing. At the end of treatment, the study group compared to the control group had a statistically significant result for pain (p=0.001, as well as for the Oswestry score (p=0.030. The mean age of the patients was 35.51±3.026, which shows an increased incidence among young adults. A possible connection between the development of the disease in women and age less than 45 years was also investigated, but the result was not statistically significant, p=0.22. Our data suggest the fact that rehabilitation treatment plays an important role in the reduction of pain and the improvement of the quality of life of patients with lumbar disc degeneration by decreasing the degree of disability. In the future, it can be proposed to monitor patients with lumbar disc degeneration over a longer time period in order to see the effects of kinetic rehabilitation programs in relation to the delay of chronicization. As

  9. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy and DMARD therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients reduces inflammatory gene expression in whole blood compared to DMARD therapy alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl K Edwards

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodic assessment of gene expression for diagnosis and monitoring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA may provide a readily available and useful method to detect subclinical disease progression and follow responses to therapy with disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs or anti-TNF-α therapy. We used quantitative real-time PCR to compare peripheral blood gene expression profiles in active ("unstable" RA patients on DMARDs, stable RA patients on DMARDs, and stable RA patients treated with a combination of a DMARD and an anti-TNF-α agent (infliximab or etanercept to healthy human controls. The expression of 48 inflammatory genes were compared between healthy controls (N=122, unstable DMARD patients (N=18, stable DMARD patients (N=26, and stable patients on combination therapy (N=20. Expression of 13 genes was very low or undetectable in all study groups. Compared to healthy controls, patients with unstable RA on DMARDs exhibited increased expression of 25 genes, stable DMARD patients exhibited increased expression of 14 genes and decreased expression of five genes, and combined therapy patients exhibited increased expression of six genes and decreased expression of 10 genes. These findings demonstrate that active RA is associated with increased expression of circulating inflammatory markers whereas increases in inflammatory gene expression are diminished in patients with stable disease on either DMARD or anti-TNF-α therapy. Furthermore, combination DMARD and anti-TNF-α therapy is associated with greater reductions in circulating inflammatory gene expression compared to DMARD therapy alone. These results suggest that assessment of peripheral blood gene expression may prove useful to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  10. Darunavir-based dual therapy in HIV experienced patients

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    Gaetana Sterrantino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We assessed the virological response of DRV/r-based dual therapy in drug-experienced patients included in the Italian antiretroviral resistance database (ARCA. Materials and Methods: Patients included in the study were treated with DRV/r in association with raltegravir (RAL, etravirine (ETV or maraviroc (MAR following treatment failure(s and with a resistance test and at least one follow-up visit available. Observation was censored at last visit under dual therapy and survival analysis and proportional hazard models were used, taking virological failure (confirmed >50 c/mL HIV-RNA as the end-point. Results: Of the total 221 patients included, 149 (67.4% started DRV/r with RAL, 45 (20.4% with ETV, 27 (12.2% with MAR. Patients characteristics at the start of dual regimen were as follows: mean number of previous regimens, nine (IQR: 5–13; non-B subtype, 17 (7.7%; median CD4 count, 347 (IQR: 246–544; undetectable viral load, 74 (33.5%. Full DRV/r resistance was detected in one (0.5%, HIV-DB interpretation system, 13 (5.9%, ANRS and 17 patients (7.7%, Rega. 69 virological failures (31.2% were observed during follow-up. At survival analysis, the overall proportion of failure was 29.2% at one year and 33.8% at two years. The proportion of failure was lower in patients starting with undetectable versus detectable viral load (13.3% and 25.2% versus 37.4% and 38.8% at one and two years, respectively, p=0.001 for both analyses and in patients treated with DRV 600 BID versus 800 QD (HR: 0, 56; 95% CI 0.31–0.99; p<0.05. By regimen, patients treated with DRV/r-RAL showed a non-significant lower proportion of failure (27.7% at one year, 32.0% at two years if compared with DRV/r-MAR (35.9%, 47.1% and DRV/r-ETV (34.1%, 34.1% at one and two years. In the adjusted proportional model, no significant difference among the three regimens was detected. A significant lower risk of failure was associated with higher overall GSS (HIV-DB HR: 0.53, 95% CI

  11. [Antithrombotic therapy in patients with atrial flutter before planned cardioversion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    М'якінькова, Людмила О; Тесленко, Юрій В; Пустовойт, Ганна Л; Ярмола, Тетяна І; Циганенко, Ірина В

    atrium flutter and fibrillation are the heart rhythm disorders that increase the risk of life-dangerous complications, e.g. cardioembolic stroke, pulmonary embolism. Recommendations for managing patients with atrial fibrillation - atrial flutter, with paroxysm duration over 48 hours, demand anticoagulant therapy. Oral anticoagulants, which are the antagonists of K vitamin (Varpharin) and the new oral anticoagulants (Rivaroxaban), are used during the per-manipulative procedure of patients with atrial flutter before restoring the sinus rhythm with transesophageal cardiac pacing. the present investigation aims to compare efficiency and safety of Varpharin and Rivaaroxaban in treatment patients with atrial flutter before planned cardioversion with transesophageal heart pacing. Varpharin (control group) - in doses equivalent for reaching the target МНВ - or Rivaroxaban (research group), 20 mg., were prescribed to 42 patients with coronary heart disease, concomitant arterial hypertension, and non-valvular paroxysm of atrial flutter with more than 48-hour duration, divided into two groups. There was held the general clinical, echocardioscopy examination. Thrombotic Risk Factor Assessment was made according to the CHA2DS2-VASc scale, Hemorrhagic Risk Factor Assessment was performed according to the HAS-BLED scale, and clinical symptoms assessment was made according to the EHRA scale. The heart rhythm was restored with the transesophageal heart pacing. the per-manipulative procedure of the patients of research group (21 days were suggested according to the guidelines) shortened, unlike the patients of control group (the period of target МНВ selection had made 30,76±0,62days), the reduction of the symptoms severity by EHRA was considered in dynamics. According to the results of transesophageal heart pacing, the heart rhythm of 15 research group patients restored, and 6 research group patients had atrial fibrillation. Among the patients of the control group, 6 had

  12. Neural correlates of eye tracking deficits in first-degree relatives of schizophrenic patients: a positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, G A; Benkelfat, C; Florencio, P S; Wolff, A L; Joober, R; Lal, S; Evans, A C

    1999-12-01

    Schizophrenia is thought to arise from the interaction of genetically mediated and environmentally triggered abnormalities in brain function. Reduced frontal activation, reported in schizophrenic patients, may be one expression of genetic risk. The present study investigated whether frontal activation in relatives of schizophrenic patients would be related to eye tracking deficits (ETD), which are considered a behavioral marker of risk for schizophrenia. Subjects were first-degree relatives of schizophrenic patients (n = 17) and controls (n = 11). Relatives were divided into those with normal and abnormal pursuit based on qualitative ratings. Subjects were scanned using positron emission tomography and the H(2)15O bolus subtraction technique while performing smooth pursuit and fixation. Brain areas more active in pursuit than fixation were identified in the 3 groups. Correlations were used to investigate the relationship between activation of pursuit regions and pursuit gain in the relatives. Controls significantly activated frontal eye fields (FEFs) and posterior areas, including the motion processing area, V5, and cuneus. The 2 groups of relatives activated the same posterior regions as controls, but differed from each other in activation of FEFs. Relatives with normal tracking activated right dorsal FEFs while relatives with ETD did not. Individual subtractions revealed that 90% of controls and 100% of the relatives with normal tracking activated FEFs during pursuit compared with 42% of relatives with ETD (P = .009). Pursuit gain was significantly and selectively associated with percent activation of right dorsal FEFs (r = 0.74). Subtle frontal dysfunction seems to be a pathophysiological substrate of ETD in relatives of schizophrenic patients, and may be one aspect of genetically mediated differences in brain function relevant to schizophrenia.

  13. Adjuvant neutron therapy in complex treatment of patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisin, V. A.; Velikaya, V. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Popova, N. O.; Goldberg, V. E.

    2017-09-01

    The study included 128 patients with stage T2-4N0-3M0 locally advanced breast cancer. All patients were divided into two groups. Group I (study group) consisted of 68 patients, who received neutron therapy, and group II (control group) comprised 60 patients, who received electron beam therapy. Neutron therapy was well tolerated by the patients and 1-2 grade radiation skin reactions were the most common. Neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of the patients with locally advanced breast cancer. The 8-year recurrence-free survival rate in the patients with locally advanced breast cancer was 94.5 ± 4.1% after neutron therapy and 81.4 ± 5.9% after electron beam therapy (p = 0.05).

  14. Predictors of length of stay and patient satisfaction after hip and knee replacement surgery: fast-track experience in 712 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Holm, Gitte; Jacobsen, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    . Epidemiological, physical, and perioperative parameters were registered and correlated to LOS and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: 92% of the patients were discharged directly to their homes within 5 days, and 41% were discharged within 3 days. Age, sex, marital status, co-morbidity, preoperative use of walking......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Very few studies have focused on patient characteristics that influence length of stay (LOS) in fast-track total hip (THR) and knee arthroplasty (TKR). The aim of this prospective study was to identify patient characteristics associated with LOS and patient satisfaction...... aids, pre- and postoperative hemoglobin levels, the need for blood transfusion, ASA score, and time between surgery and mobilization, were all found to influence postoperative outcome in general, and LOS and patient satisfaction in particular. INTERPRETATION: We identified several patient...

  15. [Enteropathogens relating to diarrhea in HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupulin, Aurea Regina Telles; Carvalho, Paula Galdino; Nishi, Letícia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Guilherme, Ana Lucia Falavigna

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of the diarrheic process in AIDS may be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa or helminths, as well as HIV itself. This study evaluated enteropathogens relating to diarrhea in HIV patients who were on antiretroviral therapy. The parasitological methods used were Faust, Hoffmann and Kinyoun. Isolation and culturing of fungi were carried out in accordance with the methodology recommended by the NCCLS M27-A standard. The yeast species were identified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Bacteria were isolated on MacConkey and SS agar and the species were identified using Enterokit B (Probac do Brasil) and biochemical methods. Forty-nine patients were evaluated: 44.89% presented enteroparasites and 48.1% presented Candida sp, of which 61.5% were Candida albicans, 7.6% were Candida sp and 30.7% were Candida non-albicans. Bacteria were isolated from 72% of the patients, of which 49% were Escherichia coli, 13% Salmonella parathyphi, Klebsiella sp or Proteus and 6% Citrobacter freundii or Yersinia sp. There was high prevalence of Candida sp in HIV patients with diarrhea and non-albicans species were isolated. Their presence could be taken to mean that they were accomplices in or causes of the infection.

  16. Barriers to retrieving patient information from electronic health record data: failure analysis from the TREC Medical Records Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Tracy; Cohen, Aaron M; Bedrick, Steven; Ambert, Kyle; Hersh, William

    2012-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data relies on the ability to retrieve accurate and complete information about desired patient populations. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) 2011 Medical Records Track was a challenge evaluation allowing comparison of systems and algorithms to retrieve patients eligible for clinical studies from a corpus of de-identified medical records, grouped by patient visit. Participants retrieved cohorts of patients relevant to 35 different clinical topics, and visits were judged for relevance to each topic. This study identified the most common barriers to identifying specific clinic populations in the test collection. Using the runs from track participants and judged visits, we analyzed the five non-relevant visits most often retrieved and the five relevant visits most often overlooked. Categories were developed iteratively to group the reasons for incorrect retrieval for each of the 35 topics. Reasons fell into nine categories for non-relevant visits and five categories for relevant visits. Non-relevant visits were most often retrieved because they contained a non-relevant reference to the topic terms. Relevant visits were most often infrequently retrieved because they used a synonym for a topic term. This failure analysis provides insight into areas for future improvement in EHR-based retrieval with techniques such as more widespread and complete use of standardized terminology in retrieval and data entry systems.

  17. Evaluation of the influence of pulmonary hypertension in ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery

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    Paulo Sérgio da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the influence of pulmonary hypertension in the ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult cardiac surgery. Methods: A retrospective study. They were included 40 patients divided into two groups: GI (without pulmonary hypertension and GII (with pulmonary hypertension. Based on data obtained by transthoracic echocardiography. We considered as the absence of pulmonary hypertension: a pulmonary artery systolic pressure (sPAP 40 mmHg associated with additional echocardiographic signs of PH. It was established as influence of pulmonary hypertension: the impossibility of extubation in the operating room, the increase in the time interval for extubation and reintubation the first 24 hours postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate analyzes were performed when necessary. Considered significant a P value <0.05. Results: The GI was composed of 21 patients and GII for 19. All patients (100% were extubated in the operating room in a medium time interval of 17.58±8.06 min with a median of 18 min in GII and 17 min in GI. PH did not increase the time interval for extubation (P=0.397. It required reintubation of 2 patients in GII (5% of the total, without statistically significant as compared to GI (P=0.488. Conclusion: In this study, pulmonary hypertension did not influence on ultra-fast-track anesthesia in adult cardiac surgery.

  18. Evaluation of the Effects of Radio-Frequency Identification Technology on Patient Tracking in Hospitals: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Fahimeh; Nabovati, Ehsan; Hasibian, Mohammad Reza; Eslami, Saeid

    2017-12-15

    The aim of this study was to systematically review all studies that evaluated the effects of using radio-frequency identification (RFID) for tracking patients in hospitals. The PubMed and Embase databases were searched (to August 2015) for relevant English language studies, and those that evaluated the effects of a real-time locating systems with RFID for patient tracking in hospitals were identified and extracted. Of the 652 studies found, the 17 relevant studies were extracted for inclusion. Five of the extracted studies used RFID systems in operating theaters, two in emergency departments, one in a magnetic resonance imaging department, one in a radiology room, and the remaining eight studies were in other wards. In these studies, features such as the feasibility, accuracy, precision, reliability, security, level of satisfaction, cost of care, and time efficiency of the RFID systems were reported. Of all the extracted studies, seven evaluated the accuracy of the systems in crowded and unattended areas, and five of these were satisfied with their accuracy. Six evaluated the reliability of the systems, and all of these found the systems to be reliable. Six evaluated time-savings, and all of them reported the systems to be time effective. Two focused on the cost of care, and both of these reported the systems to be cost effective. Although most studies reported a positive impact on the accuracy and precision of patient identification, there is insufficient good evidence to show that RFID systems can accurately localize patients in crowded settings.

  19. A proposal of Occupational Therapy service to hospitalized elderly patients

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    Mariana Boaro Fernandez Canon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association between chronic diseases, functional dependency, and hospitalization represents a high risk for the elderly, because it contributes to decreased functional capacity. Objectives: This study aimed to describe an action protocol of Occupational Therapy with hospitalized elderly patients with diagnosis of chronic diseases, approaching sensory, cognitive, psychomotor and functional aspects, and to analyze whether this protocol maximizes the independence for the feeding activity. Methodology: Patients hospitalized in a Geriatric Ward, between December 2011 and February 2012, were selected according to inclusion criteria. After conduction of the intervention protocol, a functional evaluation, Functional Independence Measurement (FIM – motor part, was performed approaching sensory, cognitive, psychomotor and functional aspects. There were 10 sessions with average duration of 30 minutes, the first and the last ones for the assessment and orientation. Six (6 hospitalized elderly patients were selected: 5 females and 1 male, mean age of 88.8, 5.3 years of schooling. Results: The scoreboard mean for the feeding item of the FIM before hospitalization was 2.7 points, it dropped to 1.5 points in the first days of hospitalization, and then increased to 3.8 points after the intervention of Occupational Therapy. The scoreboard means for the motor part of the FIM before hospitalization, during the first days, and after the intervention were: 26.8, 16 and 23.2 points, respectively. Conclusions: All the elderly benefited from this protocol and started to perform more independently not only the activity of feeding, but also the other basic activities of daily living, when compared to the first days of hospitalization.

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy in catatonic patients: Efficacy and predictors of response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchini, Federica; Medda, Pierpaolo; Mariani, Michela Giorgi; Mauri, Mauro; Toni, Cristina; Perugi, Giulio

    2015-06-22

    Recent evidence favors the view of catatonia as an autonomous syndrome, frequently associated with mood disorders, but also observed in neurological, neurodevelopmental, physical and toxic conditions. From our systematic literature review, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) results effective in all forms of catatonia, even after pharmacotherapy with benzodiazepines has failed. Response rate ranges from 80% to 100% and results superior to those of any other therapy in psychiatry. ECT should be considered first-line treatment in patients with malignant catatonia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, delirious mania or severe catatonic excitement, and in general in all catatonic patients that are refractory or partially responsive to benzodiazepines. Early intervention with ECT is encouraged to avoid undue deterioration of the patient's medical condition. Little is known about the long-term treatment outcomes following administration of ECT for catatonia. The presence of a concomitant chronic neurologic disease or extrapyramidal deficit seems to be related to ECT non-response. On the contrary, the presence of acute, severe and psychotic mood disorder is associated with good response. Severe psychotic features in responders may be related with a prominent GABAergic mediated deficit in orbitofrontal cortex, whereas non-responders may be characterized by a prevalent dopaminergic mediated extrapyramidal deficit. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that ECT is more effective in "top-down" variant of catatonia, in which the psychomotor syndrome may be sustained by a dysregulation of the orbitofrontal cortex, than in "bottom-up" variant, in which an extrapyramidal dysregulation may be prevalent. Future research should focus on ECT response in different subtype of catatonia and on efficacy of maintenance ECT in long-term prevention of recurrent catatonia. Further research on mechanism of action of ECT in catatonia may also contribute to the development of other

  1. THE EVALUATION OF COMPLIANCE TO ANTIHYPERTENSIVE THERAPY IN PATIENTS AFTER STROKE AND POSTSTROKE DEPRESSION DURING ANTIDEPRESSANT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Fishman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of the antidepressant paroxetine on the compliance to antihypertensive therapy in patients with arterial hypertension (HT and post-stroke depression.Material and methods. Patients (n=24 aged 55-73 with controlled HT (blood pressure, BP<140/90 mm Hg and with subclinical poststroke depression after rehabilitation course were included into the study. Patients were split into two groups. Patients of group 1 (n=12 received adequate antihypertensive therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine. Patients of group 2 (n=12 received antihypertensive therapy only. The study duration was 16 weeks. Patient compliance to antihypertensive therapy, BP and severity of depressive disorders, motor and intellectual functions was evaluated initially and after 16 weeks.Results. BP>140/80 mmHg after 16 weeks was found in 10 (41.6% patients. Clinical post-stroke depression was found in 7 (30.4% patients, 5 (41.6% of them were from group 2 (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.12-0.78. High treatment compliance was in 15 (65.2% patients, and 9 (81.8% of them were from group 1. Nine (39.1% patients did not receive an adequate antihypertensive therapy, 5 (41.6% of them were from group 2 and could not explain their refusal from medication. General index of intellectual function was higher in patients of group 1 (p=0.034 than this in group 2; index of motor function did not change significantly (p>0.05.Conclusion. Reduction of compliance to antihypertensive therapy and rehabilitation in hypertensive patients after stroke is associated with unmotivated refusal from treatment because of clinical post-stroke depression.

  2. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  3. [Role of procalcitonin in monitoring the antibiotic therapy in septic surgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundiche, M; Sârbu, V; Unc, O D; Grasa, C; Martinescu, A; Bădărău, V; Durbală, I; Sapte, E; Pasăre, R; Voineagu, L; Iordache, I; Vâncă, A; Adam, A

    2012-01-01

    antibacterial therapy which can reduce mortality and morbidity in surgical septic patients remains to be fully evaluated by future studies, but we can say that the determination of this biomarker could be introduced in the dynamically protocol of tracking the clinical course of septic patients.

  4. Resource-oriented music therapy for psychiatric patients with low therapy motivation: Protocol for a randomised controlled trial [NCT00137189

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarre Trond

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown positive effects of music therapy for people with schizophrenia and other mental disorders. In clinical practice, music therapy is often offered to psychiatric patients with low therapy motivation, but little research exists about this population. The aim of this study is to examine whether resource-oriented music therapy helps psychiatric patients with low therapy motivation to improve negative symptoms and other health-related outcomes. An additional aim of the study is to examine the mechanisms of change through music therapy. Methods 144 adults with a non-organic mental disorder (ICD-10: F1 to F6 who have low therapy motivation and a willingness to work with music will be randomly assigned to an experimental or a control condition. All participants will receive standard care, and the experimental group will in addition be offered biweekly sessions of music therapy over a period of three months. Outcomes will be measured by a blind assessor before and 1, 3, and 9 months after randomisation. Discussion The findings to be expected from this study will fill an important gap in the knowledge of treatment effects for a patient group that does not easily benefit from treatment. The study's close link to clinical practice, as well as its size and comprehensiveness, will make its results well generalisable to clinical practice.

  5. Darunavir-based dual therapy in HIV experienced patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrantino, Gaetana; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Di Biagio, Antonio; Rosi, Andrea; Bruzzone, Bianca; Cicconi, Paola; Carli, Tiziana; Biondi, Maria Luisa; Antinori, Andrea; Bartolozzi, Dario; Penco, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the virological response of DRV/r-based dual therapy in drug-experienced patients included in the Italian antiretroviral resistance database (ARCA). Patients included in the study were treated with DRV/r in association with raltegravir (RAL), etravirine (ETV) or maraviroc (MAR) following treatment failure(s) and with a resistance test and at least one follow-up visit available. Observation was censored at last visit under dual therapy and survival analysis and proportional hazard models were used, taking virological failure (confirmed >50 c/mL HIV-RNA) as the end-point. Of the total 221 patients included, 149 (67.4%) started DRV/r with RAL, 45 (20.4%) with ETV, 27 (12.2%) with MAR. Patients characteristics at the start of dual regimen were as follows: mean number of previous regimens, nine (IQR: 5-13); non-B subtype, 17 (7.7%); median CD4 count, 347 (IQR: 246-544); undetectable viral load, 74 (33.5%). Full DRV/r resistance was detected in one (0.5%, HIV-DB interpretation system), 13 (5.9%, ANRS) and 17 patients (7.7%, Rega). 69 virological failures (31.2%) were observed during follow-up. At survival analysis, the overall proportion of failure was 29.2% at one year and 33.8% at two years. The proportion of failure was lower in patients starting with undetectable versus detectable viral load (13.3% and 25.2% versus 37.4% and 38.8% at one and two years, respectively, p=0.001 for both analyses) and in patients treated with DRV 600 BID versus 800 QD (HR: 0, 56; 95% CI 0.31-0.99; pfailure (27.7% at one year, 32.0% at two years) if compared with DRV/r-MAR (35.9%, 47.1%) and DRV/r-ETV (34.1%, 34.1% at one and two years). In the adjusted proportional model, no significant difference among the three regimens was detected. A significant lower risk of failure was associated with higher overall GSS (HIV-DB HR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.32-0.88, p=0.014; Rega 0.60, 0.40-0.88, pfailure was associated with detectable HIV-RNA (3.02, 1.70-5.72, p<0.001). Among experienced patients

  6. Patient preferences for timing and access to radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivotto, I A; Soo, J; Olson, R A; Rowe, L; French, J; Jensen, B; Pastuch, A; Halperin, R; Truong, P T

    2015-08-01

    Patient preferences for radiation therapy (rt) access were investigated. Patients completing a course of rt at 6 centres received a 17-item survey that rated preferences for time of day; day of week; actual, ideal, and reasonable travel times for rt; and actual, ideal, and reasonable times between referral and first oncologic consultation. Patients receiving single-fraction rt or brachytherapy alone were excluded. Of the respondents who returned surveys (n = 1053), 54% were women, and 74% had received more than 15 rt fractions. With respect to appointment times, 88% agreed or strongly agreed that rt between 08h00 and 16h30 was preferred; 14%-15% preferred 07h30-08h00 or 16h30-17h00; 10% preferred 17h00-18h00; and 6% or fewer preferred times before 07h30 or after 18h00. A preference not to receive rt before 07h30 or after 18h00 was expressed by 30% or more of the respondents. When days of the week were considered, 18% and 11% would have preferred to receive rt on a Saturday or Sunday respectively; 52% and 55% would have preferred not to receive rt on those days. A travel time of 1 hour or less for rt was reported by 82%, but 61% felt that a travel time of 1 hour or more was reasonable. A first consultation within 2 weeks of referral was felt to be ideal or reasonable by 88% and 73% of patients respectively. An rt service designed to meet patient preferences would make most capacity available between 08h00 and 16h30 on weekdays and provide 10%-20% of rt capacity on weekends and during 07h30-08h00 and 16h30-18h00 on weekdays. Approximately 80%, but not all, of the responding patients preferred a 2-week or shorter interval between referral and first oncologic consultation.

  7. Efficacy of Adoptive Immune-cell Therapy in Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takimoto, Rishu; Kamigaki, Takashi; Okada, Sachiko; Matsuda, Eriko; Ibe, Hiroshi; Oguma, Eri; Naitoh, Keiko; Makita, Kaori; Goto, Shigenori

    2017-07-01

    Conventional therapy for advanced gastric cancer (GC) has limited survival benefits. In this retrospective study, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of immune-cell therapy, using in vitro-activated T-lymphocytes with and without dendritic cells (DCs), in combination with standard therapies in terms of the survival of patients with advanced GC. A total of 242 patients who were diagnosed as having stage-IV GC were enrolled in this study to receive immune-cell therapy with or without standard therapies, such as chemotherapy, surgery, or radiation therapy. Overall survival was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier with log-rank test and Cox regression methods. Immune-cell therapy increased median survival time (21.5 months) in patients with advanced GC. The patients who underwent surgery with or without chemotherapy as a prior treatment showed better prognosis than those who received other therapies (pimmune-cell therapy had a better prognosis than those with progressive disease (pimmune-cell therapy, and prior treatment were independent prognostic factors for patients with GC. No serious adverse event was reported in immune-cell therapy. Immune-cell therapy might extend the survival of patients with advanced GC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Intermittent high-dose vitamin C therapy in patients with HTLV-I associated myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, A; Imai, H; Inayoshi, S; Tsuda, T

    1993-11-01

    The efficacy of intermittent high-dose vitamin C therapy was evaluated in seven patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM). All HAM patients responded well to this therapy without serious side effects. Grade of disability score improved at 9.7 (SD 5.8) months after the therapy from 7.1 (3.3) to 3.6 (2.0) (p < 0.01). Serum immunosuppressive acidic protein was elevated before and decreased after the therapy from 747 (316) to 398 (86) micrograms/ml (p < 0.05), suggesting favourable immunomodulatory action of vitamin C therapy in HAM patients.

  9. Significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Aquiléia Helena; Roecker, Simone; Salvagioni, Denise Albieri Jodas; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin

    2014-01-01

    To understand the significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital. Qualitative, descriptive and exploratory research, undertaken with 16 patients in a day hospital in Londrina, in the state of Parana, Brazil, who participated in seven clay therapy sessions. Data collection took place from January to July 2012 through interviews guided by a semi structured questionnaire and the data were submitted to content analysis. Three themes emerged: Becoming familiar with clay art therapy; Feeling clay therapy; and Realizing the effect of clay therapy. The use of clay as a therapeutic method by psychiatric patients promoted creativity, self-consciousness, and benefited those who sought anxiety relief.

  10. Evaluation of right atrial function by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with right ventricular myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourian, Saeed; Hosseinsabet, Ali; Jalali, Arash; Mohseni-Badalabadi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Right ventricular myocardial infarction (RVMI) damages the systolic and diastolic functions of the RV, so the right atrium interacts with the RV with an acutely altered function. The aim of our study was to compare right atrial function as evaluated by 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography (2DSTE) between patients with inferior wall myocardial infarction (INFMI) and patients affected by both inferior myocardial infarction and right ventricular myocardial infarction (INFMI + RVMI). Our study recruited 70 consecutive patients with INFMI (43 patients without RVMI and 27 patients with RVMI). Right atrial function was evaluated by 2DSTE. Early diastolic strain, systolic strain rate, absolute value of early diastolic strain rate, expansion index, and diastolic emptying index of the right atrium were reduced in the patients with INFMI + RVMI compared to the patients with INFMI. The area under the curve for early diastolic strain for INFMI diagnosis was 0.682 (p value = 0.011, 95 % CI 0.550-0.815). Right atrial early diastolic longitudinal strain right atrial reservoir and conduit functions were impaired in the patients with INFMI + RVMI compared with the patients with INFMI.

  11. Comparison Between Sequential Therapy and Modified Bismuth-Included Quadruple Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Chinese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuhong; Tan, Pengsheng; Song, Lianying; Lu, Zhanying

    To compare the efficacy and safety of sequential therapy and modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy as a first-line Helicobacter pylori eradication in China. The patients were randomized to receive sequential therapy [n = 90; rabeprazole (20 mg twice daily) and amoxicillin (1 g twice daily) for 5 days, followed by rabeprazole (20 mg twice daily), tinidazole (500 mg twice daily) plus clarithromycin (500 mg twice daily) for another 5 days] or modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy [n = 109; rabeprazole (20 mg twice daily), levofloxacin hydrochloride (400 mg twice daily), clarithromycin (500 mg twice daily), and colloidal bismuth pectin (200 mg 3 times a day) for 7 days]. A follow-up urea breath test was applied 4 weeks later. A total of 199 patients were diagnosed with H. pylori infection. The intention-to-treat and per-protocol (PP) eradication rates were 91.7% and 92.6%, respectively, in the modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy group, and 74.4% and 76.1%, respectively, in the sequential therapy group. The eradication rates were significantly higher in the modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy group, compared with the sequential therapy group (P = 0.001 for intention to treat and P = 0.001 for PP). Adverse effects were reported by patients from both groups, but the difference did not reach significant level (P = 0.280). The modified bismuth-included quadruple therapy seemed to be superior to the sequential therapy as the first-line regimen for H. pylori eradication in Chinese patients.

  12. ACUPUNCTURE EFFECTIVENESS AS A COMPLEMENTARY THERAPY IN FUNCTIONAL DYSPEPSIA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Altaf da Rocha LIMA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Functional dyspepsia represents a frequent gastrointestinal disorder in clinical practice. According to the Roma III criteria, functional dyspepsia can be classified into two types as the predominant sympton: epigastric pain and postprandial discomfort. Even though the pathophysiology is still uncertain, the functional dyspepsia seems to be related to multiple mechanisms, among them visceral hypersensitivity, changes in the gastroduodenal motility and gastric accommodation and psychological factors. Objective Evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture as a complementary to conventional treatment in functional dyspepsia patients. Methods Randomized clinical trial in which were enrolled patients with functional dyspepsia patients in according with Rome III criteria. One group was submitted to drug therapy and specific acupuncture (GI and the other to drug therapy and non-specific acupuncture (GII. The gastrointestinal symptoms, presence of psychiatric disorders and quality of life were evaluated, at the end and three months after treatment. Results After 4 weeks of treatment there was improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms in Group I (55 ± 12 vs 29 ± 8.8; P = 0.001 and Group II (50.5 ± 10.2 vs 46 ± 10.5; P = 0.001. Quality of life was significantly better in Group I than group II (93.4 ± 7.3 vs 102.4 ± 5.1; P = 0.001. Anxiety (93.3% vs 0%; P = 0.001 and depression (46.7% vs 0%; P = 0.004 were significantly lower in Group I than group II. When comparing the two groups after 4 weeks of treatment, gastrointestinal symptoms (29 ± 8.8 vs 46 ± 10.5; P<0.001 and quality of life (102.4 ± 5.1 vs 96 ± 6.1; P = 0.021 were significantly better in Group I than group II. Three months after the treatment, gastrointestinal symptoms remained better only in Group I, when compared to the pre-treatment values (38 ± 11.3 vs 55 ± 12; P = 0.001. Conclusion In patients with functional dyspepsia the complementary acupuncture treatment is superior to

  13. [Anesthetic Management of an Adrenoleukodystrophy Patient for Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Takahashi, Kei; Yamamoto, Yuko; Ogata, Tokiko; Arai, Takero; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    A 34-year-old man with adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) was scheduled for pump system insertion of intrathecal baclofen therapy under general anesthesia. ALD, a rare genetic disorder, is associated with a total body increase in long chain fatty acids caused by defective degradation, and includes various nervous system abnormalities, muscular weakness, in addition to adrenal insufficiency. He had contracture of the both legs, and muscular weakness of the left hand, and Mallampati class III, but no respiratory disability. In the operating room, we administered hydrocortisone 100 mg for steroid coverage, and low-dose midazolam, and fentanyl. As spontaneous breathing remained, we could easily see epiglottis and arytenoid cartilage by McGRATH. Therefore we selected rapid-induction of anesthesia with thiamylal, and rocuronium 40 mg, under cricoid pressure. We avoided propofol. Anesthsia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil, monitoring BIS and train of four. No more rocuronium was administered, and anesthesia was uneventful. Intrathecal baclofen therapy is given to patients who have severe contracture. When we selected general anesthesia, we should be aware of the possibility of muscular weakness, and cannot intubate cannot ventilate scenario.

  14. Insulin Therapy for the Management of Hyperglycemia in Hospitalized Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Marie E.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    It has long been established that hyperglycemia with or without a prior diagnosis of diabetes increases both mortality and disease-specific morbidity in hospitalized patients1–4 and that goal-directed insulin therapy can improve outcomes.5–9 During the past decade, since the widespread institutional adoption of intensified insulin protocols after the publication of a landmark trial,5,10 the pendulum in the inpatient diabetes literature has swung away from achieving intensive glucose control and toward more moderate and individualized glycemic targets.11,12 This change in clinical practice is the result of several factors, including challenges faced by hospitals to coordinate glycemic control across all levels of care,13,14 publication of negative prospective trials,15,16 revised recommendations from professional organizations,17,18 and increasing evidence on the deleterious effect of hypoglycemia.19–22 This article reviews the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia during illness, the mechanisms for increased complications and mortality due to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, beneficial mechanistic effects of insulin therapy and provides updated recommendations for the inpatient management of diabetes in the critical care setting and in the general medicine and surgical settings.23,24 PMID:22575413

  15. Behaviors of providers of traditional korean medicine therapy and complementary and alternative medicine therapy for the treatment of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun-Sang; Kim, Chun-Bae; Kim, Ki-Kyong; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Min-Young

    2015-03-01

    In Korea, cancer is one of the most important causes of death. Cancer patients have sought alternative methods, like complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) together with Western medicine, to treat cancer. Also, there are many kinds of providers of CAM therapy, including providers of Korean oriental medicine therapy. The purpose of this study is to identify the behaviors of Korean oriental medicine therapy and CAM therapy providers who treat cancer patients and to provide background knowledge for establishing a new policy with the management and quality control of CAM. Structured and well organized questionnaires were made, and 350 persons were surveyed concerning the providers of CAM or Korean oriental medicine. The questionnaires were collected and analyzed. The questionnaires (182) were collected. The questionnaires identified a total of 73 known providers, such as medicinal professionals or other providers of CAM suppliers, 35.6% of whom had had experience with treating cancer patients (52.6% vs. 29.6%). The treatment methods were a little different: alternative therapy and nutritional therapy being preferred by medicinal professionals and mind body modulation therapy and alternative therapy being preferred by other CAM providers. Four patients (7.4%) experienced side effects, and 6 patients (12.5%) experienced legal problems. As the method for managing the therapy, CAM providers, medicinal professionals, and other CAM providers had different viewpoints. For example, some CAM providers stated that both legislation and an official education on CAM or a national examination were needed as a first step to establish the provider's qualifications and that as a second step, a license test was needed for quality control. To the contrary, medicinal professionals stated that a license test was needed before legislation. Adequate management and quality control of CAM providers is thought to involve both education and legislation.

  16. Behaviors of Providers of Traditional Korean Medicine Therapy and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy for the Treatment of Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Sang Yu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In Korea, cancer is one of the most important causes of death. Cancer patients have sought alternative methods, like complementary and alternative medicine (CAM together with Western medicine, to treat cancer. Also, there are many kinds of providers of CAM therapy, including providers of Korean oriental medicine therapy. The purpose of this study is to identify the behaviors of Korean oriental medicine therapy and CAM therapy providers who treat cancer patients and to provide background knowledge for establishing a new policy with the management and quality control of CAM. Methods: Structured and well organized questionnaires were made, and 350 persons were surveyed concerning the providers of CAM or Korean oriental medicine. The questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Results: The questionnaires (182 were collected. The questionnaires identified a total of 73 known providers, such as medicinal professionals or other providers of CAM suppliers, 35.6% of whom had had experience with treating cancer patients (52.6% vs. 29.6%. The treatment methods were a little different: alternative therapy and nutritional therapy being preferred by medicinal professionals and mind body modulation therapy and alternative therapy being preferred by other CAM providers. Four patients (7.4% experienced side effects, and 6 patients (12.5% experienced legal problems. As the method for managing the therapy, CAM providers, medicinal professionals, and other CAM providers had different viewpoints. For example, some CAM providers stated that both legislation and an official education on CAM or a national examination were needed as a first step to establish the provider’s qualifications and that as a second step, a license test was needed for quality control. To the contrary, medicinal professionals stated that a license test was needed before legislation. Conclusion: Adequate management and quality control of CAM providers is thought to involve both

  17. Group Metacognitive Therapy vs. Mindfulness Meditation Therapy in a Transdiagnostic Patient Sample: A Randomised Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, Lora; Reeves, David; Morrison, Anthony P; Wells, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    Two transdiagnostic therapies for treating psychological disorder are Metacognitive Therapy (MCT) and Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). These two approaches have yet to be compared and therefore the current study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a study of group MCT and MBSR in treating anxiety and depression. A feasibility trial with 40 participants (aged 19-56) was conducted. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either eight weeks of group MCT or MBSR. The primary outcome was feasibility which included recruitment rates, retention and treatment acceptability. The primary symptom outcome was the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) total score, which provided an overall measure of distress. Both treatments were found to be acceptable with low attrition and similar ratings of acceptability. Changes in outcomes were analyzed based on the intention-to-treat principle using mixed effect models. Preliminary analyses revealed that MCT was more effective in treating anxiety and depression in comparison to MBSR, and in reducing both positive and negative metacognitive beliefs. Reliable improvement rates favoured MCT at post-treatment and 6-month follow up. Both treatments appeared to be feasible and acceptable in treating transdiagnostic samples; however, a larger, definitive trial is required. The limitations and directions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Singing Therapy Can Be Effective for a Patient with Severe Nonfluent Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Akanuma, Kyoko; Hatayama, Yuka; Otera, Masako; Meguro, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe aphasia are rarely treated using speech therapy. We used music therapy to continue to treat a 79-year-old patient with chronic severe aphasia. Interventions 1, 2, and 3 were to practice singing a song that the patient knew, to practice singing a song with a therapist, and to practice saying a greeting using a song with lyrics,…

  19. A checklist to assess patient education in physical therapy practice: development and reliability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Patient education in physical therapy is gaining attention because it can contribute to patient compliance and prevention. This article describes the development of an assessment tool for investigating patient education in physical therapy. A checklist of 65 educational activity items was

  20. Barriers to initiating insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Doctor, patient, and system barriers to initiating insulin therapy were identified. Doctors\\' barriers include lack of knowledge, lack of experience with and use of guidelines related to insulin therapy, language barriers between doctor and patients, and fear of hypoglycaemia. Patient barriers were mistaken beliefs ...

  1. Patient satisfaction with single-tooth implant therapy in the esthetic zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, Laurens; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Santing, Hendrik J.; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2014-01-01

    This prospective study assessed patient satisfaction before and after single-tooth implant therapy in the esthetic zone. Before implant therapy, patients wore an acrylic resin tissue-supported removable partial denture (RPD). A total of 153 patients were included. Self-administered questionnaires

  2. Continuing education: preparing patients to choose a renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, Tony; Bagnis Isnard, Corinne; Crepaldi, Carlo; Dean, Jessica; Melander, Stefan; Mooney, Andrew; Prieto-Velasco, Mario; Trujillo, Carmen; Zambon, Roberto; Nilsson, Eva-Lena

    2015-03-01

    Patients with progressive chronic kidney disease face a series of treatment decisions that will impact the quality of life of themselves and their family. Renal replacement therapy option education (RRTOE), generally provided by nurses, is recommended by international guidelines To provide nurses with advice and guidance on running RRTOE. A consensus conference. Four nurses, 5 nephrologists and 1 clinical psychologist (9 renal units; 6 European countries) from units that had extensive experience in RRTOE or were performing research in this field. Experts brainstormed and discussed quality standards for the education team, processes, content/topics, media/material/funding and quality measurements for RRTOE. Conclusions and recommendations from these discussions that are particularly pertinent to nurses are presented in this paper. Through careful planning and smooth interdisciplinary cooperation, it is possible to implement an education and support programme that helps patients choose a form of RRT that is most suited to their needs. This may result in benefits in quality of life and clinical outcomes. There are large differences between renal units in terms of resources available and the demographics of the catchment area. Therefore, nurses should carefully consider how best to adapt the advice offered here to their own situation. Throughout this process, it is crucial to keep in mind the ultimate goal - providing patients with the knowledge and skill to make a modality choice that will enhance their quality of life to the greatest degree. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  3. Intraoperative radiation therapy for breast cancer patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta SW

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sunil W Dutta,1 Shayna L Showalter,2 Timothy N Showalter,1 Bruce Libby,1 Daniel M Trifiletti1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI provides an attractive alternative to whole breast irradiation (WBI through normal tissue radiation exposure and reduced treatment duration. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT is a form of APBI with the shortest time interval, as it delivers the entirety of a planned radiation course at the time of breast surgery. However, faster is not always better, and IORT has been met with healthy skepticism. Patients treated with IORT have an increased compliance and overall satisfaction when compared to patients treated with WBI. However, early randomized trial results demonstrated an increased rate of recurrence after IORT, slowing its widespread adoption. Despite these controversies, IORT utilization is increasing nationally and several novel developments are aimed at continuing to minimize the risk of recurrence and treatment-related toxicity while maximizing the patient experience. Keywords: IORT, lumpectomy, breast conservation, electron, photon, evidence

  4. Online Learning of Safe Patient Transfers in Occupational Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Hayden D. H. Ed., OTR/L, CHT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Online higher education is steadily increasing. For programs in allied health to be offered effectively in an elearning format, clinical psychomotor skills need to be addressed. The aim of this research was to design, implement, and evaluate an online safe patient transfers module for occupational therapy assistant (OTAstudents. The efficacy of teaching safe patient transfers in an e-learning environment was appraised using both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The applied research project was completed at a Tennessee community college. A convenience sample of eighteen students participated in the pilot study. Twenty-five studentsparticipated in the subsequent study. The instructional design of the course was based on Mager’s CriterionReferenced Instruction model. Streaming video was used as the delivery method for course material. A pretest/posttest evaluated the students’ cognitive knowledge of safe patient transfers. A behavioral transferscompetency checklist was used to rate videotapes of students’ performance of assisted stand pivot and dependent sliding board transfers. Research findings indicated students were able to learn this psychomotor clinical skill online with beginning proficiency. A paired t-test showed marked improvement of cognitive knowledge. A student learning survey revealed the majority of students preferred at least one hands-on classroom session where instructor feedback and interaction with classmates confirmed safe and effectiveclinical technique.

  5. Effects of high intensity laser therapy on pain and function of patients with chronic back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeun-Woo; Lee, Jongmin; Lee, Sangyong; Choi, Jioun; Lee, Kwansub; Kim, Byung-Kon; Kim, Gook-Joo

    2017-06-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of High Intensity Laser Therapy on pain and function of patients with chronic back pain. [Subjects and Methods] This study evenly divided a total of 20 patients with chronic back pain into a conservative physical therapy group that received conservative physical therapy, and a high intensity laser therapy group that received High Intensity Laser Therapy after conservative physical therapy. All patients received the therapy three times a week for four weeks. For the high intensity laser therapy group, treatment was applied to the L1-L5 and S1 regions for 10 minutes by using a high intensity laser device while vertically maintaining the separation distance from handpiece to skin at approximately 1 cm. A visual analog scale was used to measure the pain and Oswestry Disability Index was used for functional evaluation. [Results] In a within-group comparison of the conservative physical therapy and high intensity laser therapy groups, both the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index significantly decreased. In a between-group comparison after treatment, the high intensity laser therapy group showed a significantly lower visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index than the conservative physical therapy group. [Conclusion] High Intensity Laser Therapy can be an effective nonsurgical intervention method for reducing pain and helping the performance of daily routines of patients who have chronic back pain.

  6. The effect of mindfulness-based therapy for cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piet, Jacob

    Objective: The use of mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) in oncology settings has become increasingly popular, and research in the field has rapidly expanded. The objective was by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the current evidence for the effect of MBT on symptoms...... of anxiety and depression in adult cancer patients and survivors. Method: Electronic databases were searched, and researchers were contacted for further relevant studies. Twenty-two independent studies with a total of 1,403 participants were included. Studies were coded for quality (range: 0–4), and overall......) and 0.44 for symptoms of depression (p .001). These effect sizes appeared robust. Furthermore, in RCTs, MBT significantly improved mindfulness skills (Hedges’s g0.39). Conclusion: While the overall quality of existing clinical trials varies considerably, there appears to be some positive evidence from...

  7. State of the Art Antiemetic Therapy for Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Thomas K H; Yip, Claudia H W; Yeo, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common in cancer patients. The most common cause of nausea and vomiting is the administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Apart from chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), biological agents may also cause these symptoms. In this review, discussion will be focused on management of nausea and vomiting due to antineoplastic therapies. The cornerstone of effective management of nausea and vomiting secondary to these antineoplastic drugs is the prevention with the use of appropriate guideline-directed combination antiemetic regimen. Type 3 serotonin receptor antagonists (5HT3RAs), neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists (NK1RAs), and dexamethasone are the backbone antiemetic drugs. In recent years, newer drugs and preparations have been introduced for clinical use and include second-generation 5HT3RA, palonosetron; granisetron transdermal patch; the recently introduced NK1RA rolapitant; and the novel oral combined drug NEPA (netupitant plus palonosetron); and last but not least, the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine.

  8. ACCOMPANYING THERAPY IN PATIENTS AFTER ENDOSCOPIC LARYNGEAL SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Novozhilova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the experience with accompanying therapy in patients after endoscopic laryngeal surgery, which has been gained at the Unit of Head and Neck Tumors, Moscow City Cancer Hospital Sixty-Two. Endolaryngeal operations have been performed using robotic CO2 laser and alternative modes of mechanical ventilation. Methods for abolishing laser-induced reactive tissue changes with different groups of pharmaceuticals are considered. Both the possible side effects of some drugs and their potential interaction are taken into account. The high efficacy of current inhalation systems (PARI delivering the required doses of medicaments over a short period of time and with minimal losses and regulating their dispersion in relation to the drug used is noted.

  9. Use of case-based reasoning to enhance intensive management of patients on insulin pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Frank L; Shubrook, Jay H; Marling, Cynthia R

    2008-07-01

    This study was conducted to develop case-based decision support software to improve glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on insulin pump therapy. While the benefits of good glucose control are well known, achieving and maintaining good glucose control remains a difficult task. Case-based decision support software may assist by recalling past problems in glucose control and their associated therapeutic adjustments. Twenty patients with T1DM on insulin pumps were enrolled in a 6-week study. Subjects performed self-glucose monitoring and provided daily logs via the Internet, tracking insulin dosages, work, sleep, exercise, meals, stress, illness, menstrual cycles, infusion set changes, pump problems, hypoglycemic episodes, and other events. Subjects wore a continuous glucose monitoring system at weeks 1, 3, and 6. Clinical data were interpreted by physicians, who explained the relationship between life events and observed glucose patterns as well as treatment rationales to knowledge engineers. Knowledge engineers built a prototypical system that contained cases of problems in glucose control together with their associated solutions. Twelve patients completed the study. Fifty cases of clinical problems and solutions were developed and stored in a case base. The prototypical system detected 12 distinct types of clinical problems. It displayed the stored problems that are most similar to the problems detected, and offered learned solutions as decision support to the physician. This software can screen large volumes of clinical data and glucose levels from patients with T1DM, identify clinical problems, and offer solutions. It has potential application in managing all forms of diabetes.

  10. Low Level Laser Therapy for chronic knee joint pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoru; Ohkuni, Ikuko; Izukura, Hideaki; Harada, Takashi; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Ohshiro, Toshio; Musha, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Kubota, Ayako

    2014-12-27

    Chronic knee joint pain is one of the most frequent complaints which is seen in the outpatient clinic in our medical institute. In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic pain in the shoulder joints, elbow, hand, finger and the lower back. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic knee joint pain. Over the past 5 years, 35 subjects visited the outpatient clinic with complaints of chronic knee joint pain caused by the knee osteoarthritis-induced degenerative meniscal tear. They received low level laser therapy. A 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device was used to deliver 20.1 J/cm(2) per point in continuous wave at 830nm, and four points were irradiated per session (1 treatment) twice a week for 4 weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for the chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (p<0.001). After treatment, no significant differences were observed in the knee joint range of motion. Discussions with the patients revealed that it was important for them to learn how to avoid postures that would cause them knee pain in everyday life in order to have continuous benefits from the treatment. The present study demonstrated that 830 nm LLLT was an effective form of treatment for chronic knee pain caused by knee osteoarthritis. Patients were advised to undertake training involving gentle flexion and extension of the knee.

  11. An improved optical flow tracking technique for real-time MR-guided beam therapies in moving organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zachiu, C.; Papadakis, N.; Ries, M.; Moonen, C.; de Senneville, B. Denis

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) guided high intensity focused ultrasound and external beam radiotherapy interventions, which we shall refer to as beam therapies/interventions, are promising techniques for the non-invasive ablation of tumours in abdominal organs. However, therapeutic energy delivery in these

  12. Manual Therapy, Exercise, and Traction for Patients With Cervical Radiculopathy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ian A. Young; Lori A. Michener; Joshua A. Cleland; Arnold J. Aguilera; Alison R. Snyder

    2009-01-01

    .... Preliminary evidence suggests that a multimodal treatment program consisting of manual therapy, exercise, and cervical traction may result in positive outcomes for patients with cervical radiculopathy...

  13. Systemic therapy in younger and elderly patients with advanced biliary cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNamara, Mairéad Geraldine; Bridgewater, John; Lopes, Andre

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outcomes in younger (elderly (≥70 years) patients with advanced biliary cancer (ABC) receiving palliative chemotherapy are unclear. This study assessed outcomes in those receiving monotherapy or combination therapy in thirteen prospective systemic-therapy trials. METHODS...... = 0.58, P = 0.66) or OS (P = 0.18, P = 0.75). CONCLUSIONS: In ABC, younger patients are rare, and survival in elderly patients in receipt of systemic therapy for advanced disease, whether monotherapy or combination therapy, is similar to that of non-elderly patients, therefore age alone should...

  14. Outcomes of Music Therapy Interventions on Symptom Management in Palliative Medicine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Lisa M; Lagman, Ruth; Rybicki, Lisa

    2018-02-01

    Evidence has demonstrated the positive effects of music therapy on symptom management for palliative medicine patients. Previous studies have addressed patient needs, with limited discussion involving the relationship between interventions utilized to improve symptoms. The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of music therapy sessions; identify common music therapy goals and interventions and assess their effect; and investigate the effects of gender, age, and type of cancer on symptoms in patients who experienced music therapy. This was a retrospective study of data collected during music therapy sessions. Patients scored their symptoms (pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, and mood) before and after sessions. Data collected from over 1500 patients included symptom evaluation, goals, interventions, music used, patient/family reactions, and narratives. Among 293 patients who met all study inclusion criteria, significant improvement in pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, mood, facial expression, and vocalization scores was noted. In addition, 96% of patients had positive responses to participating in music therapy. Vocal and emotional were the 2 most effective interventions in improving symptoms. All 5 patient-reported symptoms improved when the therapist focused on these symptoms as goals. Age, gender, and diagnosis had no impact on symptom improvement. This study demonstrated the importance of music therapy for addressing symptoms and behaviors of palliative medicine patients. Statistically and clinically significant effects were noted. The most effective interventions were identified. More research needs to be conducted to better understand the benefits of music therapy for palliative medicine patients.

  15. Couch height–based patient setup for abdominal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohira, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan); Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan); Nishiyama, Kinji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yao Municipal Hospital, Yao (Japan); Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Isono, Masaru; Tsujii, Katsutomo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan); Kawanabe, Kiyoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima-te@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    There are 2 methods commonly used for patient positioning in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction: one is the skin mark patient setup method (SMPS) and the other is the couch height–based patient setup method (CHPS). This study compared the setup accuracy of these 2 methods for abdominal radiation therapy. The enrollment for this study comprised 23 patients with pancreatic cancer. For treatments (539 sessions), patients were set up by using isocenter skin marks and thereafter treatment couch was shifted so that the distance between the isocenter and the upper side of the treatment couch was equal to that indicated on the computed tomographic (CT) image. Setup deviation in the A-P direction for CHPS was measured by matching the spine of the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of a lateral beam at simulation with that of the corresponding time-integrated electronic portal image. For SMPS with no correction (SMPS/NC), setup deviation was calculated based on the couch-level difference between SMPS and CHPS. SMPS/NC was corrected using 2 off-line correction protocols: no action level (SMPS/NAL) and extended NAL (SMPS/eNAL) protocols. Margins to compensate for deviations were calculated using the Stroom formula. A-P deviation > 5 mm was observed in 17% of SMPS/NC, 4% of SMPS/NAL, and 4% of SMPS/eNAL sessions but only in one CHPS session. For SMPS/NC, 7 patients (30%) showed deviations at an increasing rate of > 0.1 mm/fraction, but for CHPS, no such trend was observed. The standard deviations (SDs) of systematic error (Σ) were 2.6, 1.4, 0.6, and 0.8 mm and the root mean squares of random error (σ) were 2.1, 2.6, 2.7, and 0.9 mm for SMPS/NC, SMPS/NAL, SMPS/eNAL, and CHPS, respectively. Margins to compensate for the deviations were wide for SMPS/NC (6.7 mm), smaller for SMPS/NAL (4.6 mm) and SMPS/eNAL (3.1 mm), and smallest for CHPS (2.2 mm). Achieving better setup with smaller margins, CHPS appears to be a reproducible method for abdominal patient setup.

  16. Hypocalcemia after alendronate therapy in a patient with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Shon E; Nix, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    To describe a patient with osteoporosis who was treated with alendronate and developed hypocalcemia, which ultimately led to the diagnosis of celiac sprue. We present the clinical and laboratory findings in a patient with osteoporosis, in whom hypocalcemia developed after treatment with alendronate. This patient was subsequently diagnosed with celiac sprue. The pertinent literature regarding orally administered bisphosphonate-induced hypocalcemia is reviewed. A 79-year-old man who was diagnosed with osteoporosis was treated with alendronate. He was subsequently found to have asymptomatic hypocalcemia (serum calcium concentration, 8.3 mg/dL), which resolved after alendronate therapy was discontinued. He was then treated with calcium, vitamin D, and calcitonin nasal spray, which did not cause hypocalcemia. Because of his reduced bone density, however, he was subsequently referred for endocrine consultation. Evaluation at that time showed normal levels of serum calcium, phosphorus, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, thyrotropin, and parathyroid hormone as well as 24-hour urine calcium excretion. An endomysial antibody titer was dramatically elevated. Upper endoscopy showed villous atrophy, and small bowel biopsy confirmed the presence of villous blunting and chronic inflammation, consistent with celiac sprue. He was treated with a gluten-free diet and then subsequently treated with orally administered risedronate, which he tolerated well without evidence of hypocalcemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of orally administered bisphosphonate-induced hypocalcemia, which subsequently led to the diagnosis of previously unrecognized, otherwise asymptomatic celiac sprue. Patients with unexplained hypocalcemia should be screened for celiac sprue, even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.

  17. Towards an in-plane methodology to track breast lesions using mammograms and patient-specific finite-element simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapuebla-Ferri, Andrés; Cegoñino-Banzo, José; Jiménez-Mocholí, Antonio-José; Pérez del Palomar, Amaya

    2017-11-01

    In breast cancer screening or diagnosis, it is usual to combine different images in order to locate a lesion as accurately as possible. These images are generated using a single or several imaging techniques. As x-ray-based mammography is widely used, a breast lesion is located in the same plane of the image (mammogram), but tracking it across mammograms corresponding to different views is a challenging task for medical physicians. Accordingly, simulation tools and methodologies that use patient-specific numerical models can facilitate the task of fusing information from different images. Additionally, these tools need to be as straightforward as possible to facilitate their translation to the clinical area. This paper presents a patient-specific, finite-element-based and semi-automated simulation methodology to track breast lesions across mammograms. A realistic three-dimensional computer model of a patient’s breast was generated from magnetic resonance imaging to simulate mammographic compressions in cranio-caudal (CC, head-to-toe) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO, shoulder-to-opposite hip) directions. For each compression being simulated, a virtual mammogram was obtained and posteriorly superimposed to the corresponding real mammogram, by sharing the nipple as a common feature. Two-dimensional rigid-body transformations were applied, and the error distance measured between the centroids of the tumors previously located on each image was 3.84 mm and 2.41 mm for CC and MLO compression, respectively. Considering that the scope of this work is to conceive a methodology translatable to clinical practice, the results indicate that it could be helpful in supporting the tracking of breast lesions.

  18. Role of epidural anesthesia in a fast track liver resection protocol for cirrhotic patients - results after three years of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Bardi, Tommaso; Laici, Cristiana; Gamberini, Elisa; Francorsi, Letizia; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-09-18

    To evaluate the potential benefits and risks of the use of epidural anaesthesia within an enhanced recovery protocol in this specific subpopulation. A retrospective review was conducted, including all cirrhotic patients who underwent open liver resection between January 2013 and December 2015 at Bologna University Hospital. Patients with an abnormal coagulation profile contraindicating the placement of an epidural catheter were excluded from the analysis. The control group was composed by patients refusing epidural anaesthesia. Of the 183 cirrhotic patients undergoing open liver resections, 57 had contraindications to the placement of an epidural catheter; of the remaining 126, 86 patients received general anaesthesia and 40 combined anaesthesia. The two groups presented homogeneous characteristics. Intraoperatively the metabolic data did not differ between the two groups, whilst the epidural group had a lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.041) and received more colloid infusions (P = 0.007). Postoperative liver and kidney function did not differ significantly. Length of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003) and hospital stay (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the epidural group. No complications related to the epidural catheter placement or removal was recorded. The use of Epidural Anaesthesia within a fast track protocol for cirrhotic patients undergoing liver resections had a positive impact on the patient's outcomes and comfort as demonstrated by a significantly lower length of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay in the epidural group. The technique appears to be safely manageable in this fragile population even though these results need confirmation in larger studies.

  19. [Importance of timing of music therapy in chemotherapy of cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Allmen, G; Escher, H; Wasem, Ch; Fischer, J

    2004-08-18

    Neither the measured stress-hormones, nor Beta-Endorphin have been influenced by music therapy. Music therapy should be initiated before the beginning of chemotherapy, preferably shortly after the operation. The greatest profit of an accompanying music therapy is between the chemotherapy courses, because the whole energy of the patient during chemotherapy is directed to questions, worries and practical aspects.

  20. Interleukin-2 therapy in patients with HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrams, D.; Lévy, Y.; Losso, M. H.; Babiker, A.; Collins, G.; Cooper, D. A.; Darbyshire, J.; Emery, S.; Fox, L.; Gordin, F.; Lane, H. C.; Lundgren, J. D.; Mitsuyasu, R.; Neaton, J. D.; Phillips, A.; Routy, J. P.; Tambussi, G.; Wentworth, D.; Aagaard, B.; Aragon, E.; Arnaiz, J.; Borup, L.; Clotet, B.; Dragsted, U.; Fau, A.; Gey, D.; Grarup, J.; Hengge, U.; Herrero, P.; Jansson, P.; Jensen, B.; Jensen, K.; Juncher, H.; Lopez, P.; Lundgren, J.; Matthews, C.; Mollerup, D.; Pearson, M.; Reilev, S.; Tillmann, K.; Varea, S.; Angus, B.; Cordwell, B.; Dodds, W.; Fleck, S.; Horton, J.; Hudson, F.; Moraes, Y.; Pacciarini, F.; Palfreeman, A.; Paton, N.; Smith, N.; van Hooff, F.; Bebchuk, J.; Denning, E.; DuChene, A.; Fosdick, L.; Harrison, M.; Herman-Lamin, K.; Krum, E.; Larson, G.; Neaton, J.; Nelson, R.; Quan, K.; Quan, S.; Schultz, T.; Thompson, G.; Wyman, N.; Carey, C.; Chan, F.; Cooper, D.; Courtney-Rodgers, D.; Drummond, F.; Harrod, M.; Jacoby, S.; Kearney, L.; Law, M.; Lin, E.; Pett, S.; Robson, R.; Seneviratne, N.; Stewart, M.; Watts, E.; Finley, E.; Sánchez, A.; Standridge, B.; Vjecha, M.; Belloso, W.; Davey, R.; Duprez, D.; Gatell, J.; Hoy, J.; Lifson, A.; Pederson, C.; Perez, G.; Price, R.; Prineas, R.; Rhame, F.; Sampson, J.; Worley, J.; Modlin, J.; Beral, V.; Chaisson, R.; Fleming, T.; Hill, C.; Kim, K.; Murray, B.; Pick, B.; Seligmann, M.; Weller, I.; Cahill, K.; Luzar, M.; Martinez, A.; McNay, L.; Pierson, J.; Tierney, J.; Vogel, S.; Costas, V.; Eckstrand, J.; Brown, S.; Abusamra, L.; Angel, E.; Aquilia, S.; Benetucci, J.; Bittar, V.; Bogdanowicz, E.; Cahn, P.; Casiro, A.; Contarelli, J.; Corral, J.; Daciuk, L.; David, D.; Dobrzanski, W.; Duran, A.; Ebenrstejin, J.; Ferrari, I.; Fridman, D.; Galache, V.; Guaragna, G.; Ivalo, S.; Krolewiecki, A.; Lanusse, I.; Laplume, H.; Lasala, M.; Lattes, R.; Lazovski, J.; Lopardo, G.; Losso, M.; Lourtau, L.; Lupo, S.; Maranzana, A.; Marson, C.; Massera, L.; Moscatello, G.; Olivia, S.; Otegui, I.; Palacios, L.; Parlante, A.; Salomon, H.; Sanchez, M.; Somenzini, C.; Suarez, C.; Tocci, M.; Toibaro, J.; Zala, C.; Agrawal, S.; Ambrose, P.; Anderson, C.; Anderson, J.; Baker, D.; Beileiter, K.; Blavius, K.; Bloch, M.; Boyle, M.; Bradford, D.; Britton, P.; Brown, P.; Busic, T.; Cain, A.; Carrall, L.; Carson, S.; Chenoweth, I.; Chuah, J.; Clark, F.; Clemons, J.; Clezy, K.; Cortissos, P.; Cunningham, N.; Curry, M.; Daly, L.; D'Arcy-Evans, C.; del Rosario, R.; Dinning, S.; Dobson, P.; Donohue, W.; Doong, N.; Downs, C.; Edwards, E.; Edwards, S.; Egan, C.; Ferguson, W.; Finlayson, R.; Forsdyke, C.; Foy, L.; Franic, T.; Frater, A.; French, M.; Gleeson, D.; Gold, J.; Habel, P.; Haig, K.; Hardy, S.; Holland, R.; Hudson, J.; Hutchison, R.; Hyland, N.; James, R.; Johnston, C.; Kelly, M.; King, M.; Kunkel, K.; Lau, H.; Leamy, J.; Lester, D.; Leung, J.; Lohmeyer, A.; Lowe, K.; MacRae, K.; Magness, C.; Martinez, O.; Maruszak, H.; Medland, N.; Miller, S.; Murray, J.; Negus, P.; Newman, R.; Ngieng, M.; Nowlan, C.; Oddy, J.; Orford, N.; Orth, D.; Patching, J.; Plummer, M.; Price, S.; Primrose, R.; Prone, I.; Ree, H.; Remington, C.; Richardson, R.; Robinson, S.; Rogers, G.; Roney, J.; Roth, N.; Russell, D.; Ryan, S.; Sarangapany, J.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, K.; Shields, C.; Silberberg, C.; Shaw, D.; Skett, J.; Smith, D.; Soo, T. Meng; Sowden, D.; Street, A.; tee, B. Kiem; Thomson, J. I.; Topaz, S.; Vale, R.; Villella, C.; Walker, A.; Watson, A.; Wendt, N.; Williams, L.; Youds, D.; Aichelburg, A.; Cichon, P.; Gemeinhart, B.; Rieger, A.; Schmied, B.; Touzeau-Romer, V.; Vetter, N.; Colebunders, R.; Clumeck, N.; DeRoo, A.; Kabeya, K.; O'Doherty, E.; de Wit, S.; Amorim, C. De Salles; Basso, C.; Flint, S.; Kallas, E.; Levi, G.; Lewi, D.; Pereira, L.; da Silva, M.; Souza, T.; Toscano, A.; Angel, J.; Arsenault, M.; Bast, M.; Beckthold, B.; Bouchard, P.; Chabot, I.; Clarke, R.; Cohen, J.; Coté, P.; Ellis, M.; Gagne, C.; Gill, J.; Houde, M.; Johnston, B.; Jubinville, N.; Kato, C.; Lamoureux, N.; Latendre-Paquette, J.; Lindemulder, A.; McNeil, A.; McFarland, N.; Montaner, J.; Morrisseau, C.; O'Neill, R.; Page, G.; Piche, A.; Pongracz, B.; Preziosi, H.; Puri, L.; Rachlis, A.; Ralph, E.; Raymond, I.; Rouleau, D.; Sandre, R.; Seddon, T.; Shafran, S.; Sikora, C.; Smaill, F.; Stromberg, D.; Trottier, S.; Walmsley, S.; Weiss, K.; Williams, K.; Zarowny, D.; Baadegaard, B.; Andersen, A. Bengaard; Boedker, K.; Collins, P.; Gerstoft, J.; Jensen, L.; Moller, H.; Andersen, P. Lehm; Loftheim, I.; Mathiesen, L.; Nielsen, H.; Obel, N.; Pedersen, C.; Petersen, D.; Jensen, L. Pors; Black, F. Trunk; Aboulker, J. P.; Aouba, A.; Bensalem, M.; Berthe, H.; Blanc, C.; Bornarel, D.; Bouchaud, O.; Boue, F.; Bouvet, E.; Brancon, C.; Breaud, S.; Brosseau, D.; Brunet, A.; Capitant, C.; Ceppi, C.; Chakvetadze, C.; Cheneau, C.; Chennebault, J. M.; de Truchis, P.; Delavalle, A. M.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Dellamonica, P.; Dumont, C.; Edeb, N.; Fabre, G.; Ferrando, S.; Foltzer, A.; Foubert, V.; Gastaut, J. A.; Gerbe, J.; Girard, P. M.; Goujard, C.; Hoen, B.; Honore, P.; Hue, H.; Hynh, T.; Jung, C.; Kahi, S.; Katlama, C.; Lang, J. M.; Le Baut, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Leturque, N.; Loison, J.; Maddi, G.; Maignan, A.; Majerholc, C.; de Boever, C.; Meynard, J. L.; Michelet, C.; Michon, C.; Mole, M.; Netzer, E.; Pialoux, G.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Raffi, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Ravaux, I.; Reynes, J.; Salmon-Ceron, D.; Sebire, M.; Simon, A.; Tegna, L.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Tramoni, C.; Viard, J. P.; Vidal, M.; Viet-Peaucelle, C.; Weiss, L.; Zeng, A.; Zucman, D.; Adam, A.; Arastéh, K.; Behrens, G.; Bergmann, F.; Bickel, M.; Bittner, D.; Bogner, J.; Brockmeyer, N.; Darrelmann, N.; Deja, M.; Doerler, M.; Esser, S.; Faetkenheuer, G.; Fenske, S.; Gajetzki, S.; Goebel, F.; Gorriahn, D.; Harrer, E.; Harrer, T.; Hartl, H.; Hartmann, M.; Heesch, S.; Jakob, W.; Jäger, H.; Klinker, H.; Kremer, G.; Ludwig, C.; Mantzsch, K.; Mauss, S.; Meurer, A.; Niedermeier, A.; Pittack, N.; Plettenberg, A.; Potthoff, A.; Probst, M.; Rittweger, M.; Rockstroh, J.; Ross, B.; Rotty, J.; Rund, E.; Ruzicka, T.; Schmidt, R. T.; Schmutz, G.; Schnaitmann, E.; Schuster, D.; Sehr, T.; Spaeth, B.; Staszewski, S.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Stephan, C.; Stockey, T.; Stoehr, A.; Trein, A.; Vaeth, T.; Vogel, M.; Wasmuth, J.; Wengenroth, C.; Winzer, R.; Wolf, E.; Mulcahy, F.; Reidy, D. I.; Cohen, Y.; Drora, G.; Eliezer, I.; Godo, O.; Kedem, E.; Magen, E.; Mamorsky, M.; Pollack, S.; Sthoeger, Z.; Vered, H.; Yust, I.; Aiuti, F.; Bechi, M.; Bergamasco, A.; Bertelli, D.; Bruno, R.; Butini, L.; Cagliuso, M.; Carosi, G.; Casari, S.; Chrysoula, V.; Cologni, G.; Conti, V.; Costantini, A.; Corpolongo, A.; D'Offizi, G.; Gaiottino, F.; Di Pietro, M.; Esposito, R.; Filice, G.; Francesco, M.; Gianelli, E.; Graziella, C.; Magenta, L.; Martellotta, F.; Maserati, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Murdaca, G.; Nardini, G.; Nozza, S.; Puppo, F.; Pogliaghi, M.; Ripamonti, D.; Ronchetti, C.; Rusconi, S.; Rusconi, V.; Sacchi, P.; Silvia, N.; Suter, F.; Uglietti, A.; Vechi, M.; Vergani, B.; Vichi, F.; Vitiello, P.; Iwamoto, A.; Kikuchi, Y.; Miyazaki, N.; Mori, M.; Nakamura, T.; Odawara, T.; Oka, S.; Shirasaka, T.; Tabata, M.; Takano, M.; Ueta, C.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, Y.; Erradey, I.; Himmich, H.; El Filali, K. Marhoum; Blok, W.; van Boxtel, R.; Doevelaar, K. Brinkman H.; van Eeden, A.; Grijsen, M.; Groot, M.; Juttmann, J.; Kuipers, M.; Ligthart, S.; van der Meulen, P.; Lange, J.; Langebeek, N.; Reiss, P.; Richter, C.; Schoemaker, M.; Schrijnders-Gudde, L.; Septer-Bijleveld, E.; Sprenger, H.; Vermeulen, J.; ten Kate, R.; van de Ven, B.; Bruun, J.; Kvale, D.; Maeland, A.; Bakowska, E.; Beniowski, M.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Gasiorowski, J.; Horban, A.; Inglot, M.; Knysz, B.; Mularska, E.; Parczewski, M.; Pynka, M.; Rymer, W.; Szymczak, A.; Aldir, M.; Antunes, F.; Baptista, C.; Vera, J. da Conceicao; Doroana, M.; Mansinho, K.; dos Santos, C. Raquel A.; Valadas, E.; Pinto, I. Vaz; Chia, E.; Foo, E.; Karim, F.; Lim, P. L.; Panchalingam, A.; Quek, A.; Alcázar-Caballero, R.; Arrizabalaga, J.; de Barron, X.; Blanco, F.; Bouza, E.; Bravo, I.; Calvo, S.; Carbonero, L.; Carpena, I.; Castro, M.; Cortes, L.; del Toro, M.; Domingo, P.; Elias, M.; Espinosa, J.; Estrada, V.; Fernandez-Cruz, E.; Fernández, P.; Freud, H.; Fuster, M.; Garcia, A.; Garcia, G.; Garrido, R.; Gijón, P.; Gonzalez-García, J.; Gil, I.; González, A.; González-Lahoz, J.; López Grosso, P.; Gutierrez, M.; Guzmán, E.; Iribarren, J.; Jiménez, M.; Jou, A.; Juega, J.; Lopez, J.; Lozano, F.; Martín-Carbonero, L.; Mata, R.; Mateo, G.; Menasalvas, A.; Mirelles, C.; de Miguel Prieto, J.; Montes, M.; Moreno, A.; Moreno, J.; Moreno, V.; Muñoz, R.; Ocampo, A.; Ortega, E.; Ortiz, L.; Padilla, B.; Parras, A.; Paster, A.; Pedreira, J.; Peña, J.; Perea, R.; Portas, B.; Puig, J.; Pulido, F.; Rebollar, M.; de Rivera, J.; Roca, V.; Rodríguez- Arrondo, F.; Rubio, R.; Santos, J.; Sanz, J.; Sebastian, G.; Segovia, M.; Soriano, V.; Tamargo, L.; Viciana, P.; von Wichmann, M.; Bratt, G.; Hollander, A.; Pehrson, P. Olov; Petz, I.; Sandstrom, E.; Sönnerborg, A.; Bernasconi, E.; Gurtner, V.; Ampunpong, U.; Auchieng, C.; Bowonwatanuwong, C.; Chanchai, P.; Chetchotisakd, P.; Chuenyan, T.; Duncombe, C.; Horsakulthai, M.; Kantipong, P.; Laohajinda, K.; Phanuphak, P.; Pongsurachet, V.; Pradapmook, S.; Ruxruntham, K.; Seekaew, S.; Sonjai, A.; Suwanagool, S.; Techasathit, W.; Ubolyam, S.; Wankoon, J.; Alexander, I.; Dockrell, D.; Easterbrook, P.; Edwards, B.; Evans, E.; Fisher, M.; Fox, R.; Gazzard, B.; Gilleran, G.; Hand, J.; Heald, L.; Higgs, C.; Jeakumar, S.; Jendrulek, I.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, S.; Kinghorn, G.; Kuldanek, K.; Leen, C.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; McLean, L.; Morris, S.; Murphy, M.; O'Farrell, S.; Ong, E.; Peters, B.; Stroud, C.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.; Weber, J.; White, D.; Williams, I.; Wiselka, M.; Yee, T.; Adams, S.; Allegra, D.; Andrews, L.; Aneja, B.; Anstead, G.; Arduino, R.; Artz, R.; Bailowitz, J.; Banks, S.; Baxter, J.; Baum, J.; Benator, D.; Black, D.; Boh, D.; Bonam, T.; Brito, M.; Brockelman, J.; Bruzzese, V.; Burnside, A.; Cafaro, V.; Casey, K.; Cason, L.; Childress, G.; Clark, C. I.; Clifford, D.; Climo, M.; Cohn, D.; Couey, P.; Cuervo, H.; Deeks, S.; Dennis, M.; Diaz-Linares, M.; Dickerson, D.; Diez, M.; Di Puppo, J.; Dodson, P.; Dupre, D.; Elion, R.; Elliott, K.; El-Sadr, W.; Estes, M.; Fabre, J.; Farrough, M.; Flamm, J.; Follansbee, S.; Foster, C.; Frank, C.; Franz, J.; Frechette, G.; Freidland, G.; Frische, J.; Fuentes, L.; Funk, C.; Geisler, C.; Genther, K.; Giles, M.; Goetz, M.; Gonzalez, M.; Graeber, C.; Graziano, F.; Grice, D.; Hahn, B.; Hamilton, C.; Hassler, S.; Henson, A.; Hopper, S.; John, M.; Johnson, L.; Johnson, R.; Jones, R.; Kahn, J.; Klimas, N.; Kolber, M.; Koletar, S.; Labriola, A.; Larsen, R.; Lasseter, F.; Lederman, M.; Ling, T.; Lusch, T.; MacArthur, R.; Machado, C.; Makohon, L.; Mandelke, J.; Mannheimer, S.; Markowitz, N.; Martínez, M.; Martinez, N.; Mass, M.; Masur, H.; McGregor, D.; McIntyre, D.; McKee, J.; McMullen, D.; Mettinger, M.; Middleton, S.; Mieras, J.; Mildvan, D.; Miller, P.; Miller, T.; Mitchell, V.; Moanna, A.; Mogridge, C.; Moran, F.; Murphy, R.; Mushatt, D.; Nahass, R.; Nixon, D.; O'Brien, S.; Ojeda, J.; Okhuysen, P.; Olson, M.; Osterberger, J.; Owen, W.; Pablovich, S.; Patel, S.; Pierone, G.; Poblete, R.; Potter, A.; Preston, E.; Rappoport, C.; Regevik, N.; Reyelt, M.; Riney, L.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rodriguez, J.; Roland, R.; Rosmarin-DeStefano, C.; Rossen, W.; Rouff, J.; Saag, M.; Santiago, S.; Sarria, J.; Wirtz, S.; Schmidt, U.; Scott, C.; Sheridan, A.; Shin, A.; Shrader, S.; Simon, G.; Slowinski, D.; Smith, K.; Spotkov, J.; Sprague, C.; States, D.; Suh, C.; Sullivan, J.; Summers, K.; Sweeton, B.; Tan, V.; Tanner, T.; Tedaldi, E.; Temesgen, Z.; Thomas, D.; Thompson, M.; Tobin, C.; Toro, N.; Towner, W.; Upton, K.; Uy, J.; Valenti, S.; van der Horst, C.; Vita, J.; Voell, J.; Walker, J.; Walton, T.; Wason, K.; Watson, V.; Wellons, A.; Weise, J.; White, M.; Whitman, T.; Williams, B.; Williams, N.; Windham, J.; Witt, M.; Workowski, K.; Wortmann, G.; Wright, T.; Zelasky, C.; Zwickl, B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Used in combination with antiretroviral therapy, subcutaneous recombinant interleukin-2 raises CD4+ cell counts more than does antiretroviral therapy alone. The clinical implication of these increases is not known. METHODS: We conducted two trials: the Subcutaneous Recombinant, Human

  1. Prodrug enzymes and their applications in image-guided therapy of cancer: tracking prodrug enzymes to minimize collateral damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Chen, Zhihang; Li, Cong; Winnard, Paul T; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2012-02-01

    Many cytotoxic therapies are available to kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, these also inflict significant damage on normal cells. Identifying highly effective cancer treatments that have minimal or no side effects continues to be a major challenge. One of the strategies to minimize damage to normal tissue is to deliver an activating enzyme that localizes only in the tumor and converts a nontoxic prodrug to a cytotoxic agent locally in the tumor. Such strategies have been previously tested but with limited success due in large part to the uncertainty in the delivery and distribution of the enzyme. Imaging the delivery of the enzyme to optimize timing of the prodrug administration to achieve image-guided prodrug therapy would be of immense benefit for this strategy. Here, we have reviewed advances in the incorporation of image guidance in the applications of prodrug enzymes in cancer treatment. These advances demonstrate the feasibility of using clinically translatable imaging in these prodrug enzyme strategies.

  2. Schema Therapy for Personality Disorders: a Qualitative Study of Patients' and Therapists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Klerk, Noor; Abma, Tineke A; Bamelis, Lotte L M; Arntz, Arnoud

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have evaluated the (cost) effectiveness of schema therapy for personality disorders, but little research has been done on the perspectives of patients and therapists. The present study aims to explore patients' and therapists' perspectives on schema therapy. Qualitative data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 15 patients and a focus group of 8 therapists. A thematic analysis was performed. Most patients and therapists agreed that helpful aspects in schema therapy were the highly committed therapeutic relationship, the transparent and clear theoretical model, and the specific schema therapy techniques. About unhelpful aspects, several patients and some therapists shared the opinion that 50 sessions was not enough. Furthermore, patients lacked clear advance information about the possibility that they might temporarily experience stronger emotions during therapy and the possibility of having telephone contact outside session hours. They missed practical goals in the later stage of therapy. With regard to imagery, patients experienced time pressure and they missed a proper link between the past and the present. For therapists, it was hard to manage the therapeutic relation, to get used to a new kind of therapy and to keep the treatment focused on personality problems. Patients and therapists found some aspects of the schema therapy protocol helpful. Their views about which aspects are unhelpful and their recommendations need to be taken into consideration when adjusting the protocol and implementing schema therapy.

  3. [Safety of oral rehydration therapy in endoscopic surgery patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yasuyoshi; Uchida, Michiko; Mimura, Fumiaki

    2014-06-01

    To test safety and efficacy of ORT (oral rehydration therapy), we compared an ORT group with an intravenous infusion (i.v.) group by gastric fluid (volume and pH) obtained by endoscope and gastric ultrasonography examination. Twenty six patients scheduled for endoscopic surgery were assigned to an ORT group or an i.v. group by standardized clinical path. After gastric ultrasonography examinations to calculate CSA (cross sectional area) of gastric antrum, general anesthesia was induced. Immediately after anesthesia induction, gastric fluid was obtained by endoscopy, and its volume and pH were measured. Fifteen and eleven patients were assigned to ORT group and iv group, respectively. In ORT group, CSA was median 1.9 cm2 (95% CI:1.8-2.6 cm2), gastric volume was median 11 ml (95% CI: 8-18 ml) and pH was median 3.6 (range: 1.2-8.8), and in i.v. group CSA was median 1.8 cm2 (95% CI: 1.6-2.7 cm2), gastric volume was median 4 ml (95% CI: 3-12 ml), and pH was median 3.1 (range: 1.2-7.2). There was no significance between the two groups. Gastric volume in ORS group was not smaller compared with that in i.v. group, and there was no significant difference in pH between the groups.

  4. Proton therapy for prostate cancer online: patient education or marketing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Daniel J; Ellimoottil, Chandy S; Tejwani, Ajay; Gorbonos, Alex

    2013-12-01

    Proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer is an expensive treatment with limited evidence of benefit over conventional radiotherapy. We sought to study whether online information on PT for prostate cancer was balanced and whether the website source influenced the content presented. We applied a systematic search process to identify 270 weblinks associated with PT for prostate cancer, categorized the websites by source, and filtered the results to 50 websites using predetermined criteria. We then used a customized version of the DISCERN instrument, a validated tool for assessing the quality of consumer health information, to evaluate the remaining websites for balance of content and description of risks, benefits and uncertainty. Depending on the search engine and key word used, proton center websites (PCWs) made up 10%-47% of the first 30 encountered links. In comparison, websites from academic and nonacademic medical centers without ownership stake in proton centers appeared much less frequently as a search result (0%-3%). PCWs scored lower on DISCERN questions compared to other sources for being balanced/unbiased (p online information regarding PT for prostate cancer may represent marketing by proton centers rather than comprehensive and unbiased patient education. An awareness of these results will also better prepare clinicians to address the potential biases of patients with prostate cancer who search the Internet for health information.

  5. Patients' perspective on homework assignments in cognitive-behavioural therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehm, Lydia; Mrose, Jana

    2008-01-01

    Homework assignments are an indispensable part of cognitive-behavioural therapy. During the past two decades, a growing number of studies have shed light on its characteristics and effects. However, most studies primarily consider the therapists' view, and little is known about the use of supportive strategies to implement homework assignments in psychotherapy and about patients' attitudes towards regular assignments. To fill this gap, we assessed the attitudes towards homework assignments of 80 outpatients. In addition, those who had received a task during the past session (75%) were asked to report characteristics of their task as well as therapists' behaviour strategies during the assignment of the task. One week later, therapists rated the extent of completion of the task. Results showed that the patients generally had a positive attitude towards homework and that they accomplished most of the tasks. With regard to the therapists' behaviour during the assignment of the task, there seems to be room for improvement. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Outcome of Patients With Cardiac Sarcoidosis Who Received Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: Comparison With Dilated Cardiomyopathy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yufu, Kunio; Kondo, Hidekazu; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Kawano, Kyoko; Ishii, Yumi; Miyoshi, Miho; Imamura, Takaaki; Saito, Shotaro; Okada, Norihiro; Akioka, Hidefumi; Teshima, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Takahashi, Naohiko

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been shown to be effective for patients with chronic heart failure; however, the efficacy of CRT in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) has not been established. We compared the outcomes of patients with CS who received CRT to patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The incidence of major adverse cerebral and cardiovascular events (MACCE) in 11 consecutive CS patients (8 females; mean age, 66 ± 8.0 years) who received CRT were compared with 29 DCM patients (9 females; mean age, 70 ± 8.9 years). Females and patients with previous right ventricular pacing were largely included in the comparison of CS and DCM patients (P < 0.05 and P < 0.0001, respectively). During the mean follow-up period (465 ± 383 days for CS and 729 ± 393 days for DCM), MACCE were evident in 9 patients (23%); specifically, 5 CS and 4 DCM patients developed MACCE (45% vs. 14%, P < 0.05), respectively. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that CS patients had a higher prevalence of MACCE than DCM patients (log rank = 6.306, P = 0.0120; and Wilcoxon = 7.1333, P = 0.0076). Based on univariate analysis, the etiology of CS was associated with MACCE. Our results suggest that the long-term outcome of CRT in patients with CS was very poor compared with DCM patients. Thus, caution should be exercised regarding the indication of CRT in patients with CS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Validation of T-Track® CMV to assess the functionality of cytomegalovirus-reactive cell-mediated immunity in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Bernhard; Böger, Carsten A; Lückhoff, Gerhard; Krüger, Bernd; Barabas, Sascha; Batzilla, Julia; Schemmerer, Mathias; Köstler, Josef; Bendfeldt, Hanna; Rascle, Anne; Wagner, Ralf; Deml, Ludwig; Leicht, Joachim; Krämer, Bernhard K

    2017-03-07

    Uncontrolled cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication in immunocompromised solid-organ transplant recipients is a clinically relevant issue and an indication of impaired CMV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Primary aim of this study was to assess the suitability of the immune monitoring tool T-Track® CMV to determine CMV-reactive CMI in a cohort of hemodialysis patients representative of patients eligible for renal transplantation. Positive and negative agreement of T-Track® CMV with CMV serology was examined in 124 hemodialysis patients, of whom 67 (54%) revealed a positive CMV serostatus. Secondary aim of the study was to evaluate T-Track® CMV performance against two unrelated CMV-specific CMI monitoring assays, QuantiFERON®-CMV and a cocktail of six class I iTAg™ MHC Tetramers. Positive T-Track® CMV results were obtained in 90% (60/67) of CMV-seropositive hemodialysis patients. In comparison, 73% (45/62) and 77% (40/52) positive agreement with CMV serology was achieved using QuantiFERON®-CMV and iTAg™ MHC Tetramer. Positive T-Track® CMV responses in CMV-seropositive patients were dominated by pp65-reactive cells (58/67 [87%]), while IE-1-responsive cells contributed to an improved (87% to 90%) positive agreement of T-Track® CMV with CMV serology. Interestingly, T-Track® CMV, QuantiFERON®-CMV and iTAg™ MHC Tetramers showed 79% (45/57), 87% (48/55) and 93% (42/45) negative agreement with serology, respectively, and a strong inter-assay variability. Notably, T-Track® CMV was able to detect IE-1-reactive cells in blood samples of patients with a negative CMV serology, suggesting either a previous exposure to CMV that yielded a cellular but no humoral immune response, or TCR cross-reactivity with foreign antigens, both suggesting a possible protective immunity against CMV in these patients. T-Track® CMV is a highly sensitive assay, enabling the functional assessment of CMV-responsive cells in hemodialysis patients prior to renal transplantation. T-Track

  8. [Successful treatment of neuroaspergillosis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: role of surgery, systemic antifungal therapy and intracavitary therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Tülay; Ozkalemkaş, Fahir; Kocaeli, Hasan; Altundal, Yildiz; Ener, Beyza; Ali, Ridvan; Ozkocaman, Vildan; Hakyemez, Bahattin; Tunali, Ahmet

    2009-07-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare condition that generally exhibits a poor response to conventional antifungal drugs. We report here a case of cerebral aspergillosis in a 34-years-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who was successfully treated with a combination of aggressive neurosurgery, intracavitary instillation of amphotericin B and voriconazole. We aimed to emphazise the roles of surgery, intracavitary therapy and antifungal therapy in the management of neuroaspergillosis. Under amphotericin-B therapy, the patient developed dysarthria and paralysis of the right side of his body. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a lesion in the left parieto-occipital region, measuring 7 cm in the greatest dimension. Diagnostic surgery was interrupted due to abundant bleeding. The culture of the aspirate from the lesion yielded Aspergillus flavus. The therapy was switched to voriconazole and caspofungin combination. Due to disease progression during combination therapy, the patient had a second surgical resection resulting in a 75% reduction in lesion size. Following surgical intervention, intracavitary instillation of amphotericin B (0.3 mg/day for 15 days) was performed alongside with combination therapy (voriconazole and caspofungin). Caspofungin was stopped after 42 days, whereas the patient was continued on voriconazole for a total of 100 days. At this point, his brain lesion resolved almost completely. However, leukemia relapsed. The patient died during his treatment course because of neutropenic typhilitis occurring in the aplastic phase. It is stated that in patients with neuroaspergillosis radical neurosurgery leads to better outcomes if performed at an earlier stage. Antifungal treatment of cerebral aspergillosis requires that the drug must cross the blood brain barrier. Voriconazole has the ability to cross the blood brain barrier. The therapy should be prolonged beyond the resolution of all lesions and until reversal of the underlying

  9. Stress hormones during flooding therapy and their relationship to therapy outcome in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Anja; Köster, Luisa; Meves, Anna M; Plag, Jens; Stoy, Meline; Ströhle, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    In spite of excessive fear during a panic attack, studies have found no or little evidence for an activation of cortisol during natural panic attacks. Whether this phenomenon is related to psychopathology or outcome of psychotherapy is unknown. In this study, 10 patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia were treated with cognitive behavioural therapy including 3 in-vivo exposures (flooding) to individual phobic situations. Before, during and after exposure, the level of subjective fear was assessed and blood was collected simultaneously. Cortisol and ACTH were analysed from plasma. Ten matched healthy control subjects went through the same procedure. Fear and stress hormones during exposure were compared in patients and controls as well as related to therapy outcome at the end of therapy and 2 follow-ups in patients. Results showed that the concentrations of cortisol and ACTH did not significantly increase during exposure. Patients' cortisol concentrations were higher than those of controls at baseline and during exposure, while ACTH concentrations were comparable before and during exposure, and even lower than those of controls at recovery. Cortisol concentrations were moderately but consistently correlated to therapy outcome, i.e. patients with least cortisol release during exposure profited least from therapy. The study showed that a lack of stimulation of the HPA system at repeated confrontation with the phobic situation was related to therapeutic outcome. Mechanisms of action via the influence of cortisol on extinction learning or the inhibition of central excitatory neurotransmission are conceivable. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Relatives in older patients' fast-track treatment programme during total hip or knee replacement. A grounded theory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher

    The aim of this Ph.D.-dissertation was to generate grounded theories of relatives, patients, and health professionals’ pattern of behaviour, respectively, in relation to the relatives of older patients’ fast-track treatment programmes during total hip or knee replacement. The dissertation includes...... three classic grounded theory studies discovered through Glaser’s theoretical and methodological framework. The constant comparative method was the guiding principle of simultaneous data collection, data analysis, and substantive and theoretical coding, while theoretical sampling and writing memos. Data...... was collected between 2010 and 2011 in the orthopaedic wards of two Copenhagen university hospitals, and guided by theoretical sampling. Study I: Seven relatives of patients over 70 years of age participated. Data consisted of 14 non-participant observations, 14 post-observational interviews, and five formal...

  11. [A questionnaire survey on current status of anti-diabetic therapy for diabetic patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Takaya; Yajima, Ken; Sumitomo, Hidetaka; Shigeta, Masayuki; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Shirabe, Shinichiro; Sakai, Masashi; Katayama, Takashi; Kanno, Kazuo; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Nakano, Tadasumi; Kitaoka, Masafumi; Ueki, Akio

    2013-01-01

    It is important to establish treatment goals and optimal anti-diabetic therapy for diabetic patients with dementia. However, there are currently no established treatment guidelines. Recently, the West Tokyo Diabetes Association has established the Diabetes and Dementia Study Group to investigate the status of anti-diabetic therapy for diabetic patients with dementia. Here, we assessed the current status of such patients by a questionnaire survey. In November 2011, we conducted a mailed survey to the clinics and hospitals affiliated with Kita-Tama, Hachioji and Tachikawa Medical Associations in Tokyo, Japan. The survey evaluated the most suitable anti-diabetic therapy for elderly diabetic patients or diabetic patients with dementia, combined anti-diabetic therapy, insulin therapy for elderly diabetic patients and diabetic patients with dementia, combination therapy of insulin and oral anti-diabetic agents for diabetic patients with dementia, factors that make it difficult for diabetic patients with dementia to continue insulin therapy, and selection of treatment or care for diabetic patients with dementia. The responses indicated that the anti-diabetic agents appropriate for diabetic patients with dementia are dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Those inappropriate for the same patients are metformin and insulin. Family support was a major factor for insulin therapy continuation for diabetic patients with dementia. Moreover, anti-diabetic agents for these patients are selected according to their ease of use and compatibility with available familial and social resources. Our survey results can be utilized for the creation of new guidelines and educational resources for the anti-diabetic therapy of diabetic patients with dementia.

  12. Cytomegalovirus retinitis in a seronegative patient with systemic lupus erythematosus on immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Aditya; Kelkar, Jai; Kelkar, Shreekant; Bhirud, Shilpa; Biswas, Jyotirmoy

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a rare case of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in a seronegative patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) on immunosuppressive therapy. A seronegative patient with SLE who was on immunosuppressive therapy developed CMV retinitis. The immunosuppressive therapy was tapered, and the patient was given intravitreal ganciclovir and foscarnet in addition to systemic ganciclovir. The follow-up visits were documented. The patient responded to the treatment and there was complete resolution. CMV retinitis is a rapidly progressive condition and patients on immunosuppressive therapy should be referred to an ophthalmologist for periodic check-up for early diagnosis and treatment of this devastating ophthalmic condition. For clinically resistant CMV retinitis in seronegative patients with SLE, a combination therapy of intravitreal foscarnet with oral and intravenous ganciclovir is useful.

  13. Fast-track surgery protocol in elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Guozheng Liu,1 Fengguo Jian,2 Xiuqin Wang,2 Lin Chen1 1Department of General Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Second Department of General Surgery, Changyi People’s Hospital, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Aim: To study the efficacy of the fast-track surgery (FTS program combined with laparoscopic radical gastrectomy for elderly gastric cancer (GC patients.Methods: Eighty-four elderly patients diagnosed with GC between September 2014 and August 2015 were recruited to participate in this study and were divided into four groups randomly based on the random number table as follows: FTS + laparoscopic group (Group A, n=21, FTS + laparotomy group (Group B, n=21, conventional perioperative care (CC + laparoscopic group (Group C, n=21, and CC + laparotomy group (Group D, n=21. Observation indicators include intrasurgery indicators, postoperative recovery indicators, nutritional status indicators, and systemic stress response indicators.Results: Preoperative and intraoperative baseline characteristics showed no significant differences between patients in each group (P>0.05. There were no significant differences between each group in nausea and vomiting, intestinal obstruction, urinary retention, incision infection, pulmonary infection, and urinary tract infection after operation (P>0.05. Time of first flatus and postoperative hospital stay time of FTS Group A were the shortest, and total medical cost of this group was the lowest. For all groups, serum albumin, prealbumin, and transferrin significantly decreased, while CRP and interleukin 6 were significantly increased postoperative day 1. From postoperative day 4–7, all indicators of the four groups gradually recovered, but compared with other three groups, those of Group A recovered fastest.Conclusion: FTS combined with laparoscopic surgery can promote faster postoperative recovery, improve early postoperative nutritional status, and more

  14. Assessment of Postoperative Tendon Quality in Patients With Achilles Tendon Rupture Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Tendon Fiber Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarman, Hakan; Atmaca, Halil; Cakir, Ozgur; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Anik, Yonca; Memisoglu, Kaya; Baran, Tuncay; Isik, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Although pre- and postoperative imaging of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) has been well documented, radiographic evaluations of postoperative intratendinous healing and microstructure are still lacking. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an innovative technique that offers a noninvasive method for describing the microstructure characteristics and organization of tissues. DTI was used in the present study for quantitative assessment of fiber continuity postoperatively in patients with acute ATR. The data from 16 patients with ATR from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The microstructure of ART was evaluated using tendon fiber tracking, tendon continuity, fractional anisotropy, and apparent diffusion coefficient values by way of DTI. The distal and proximal portions were measured separately in both the ruptured and the healthy extremities of each patient. The mean patient age was 41.56 ± 8.49 (range 26 to 56) years. The median duration of follow-up was 21 (range 6 to 80) months. The tendon fractional anisotropy values of the ruptured Achilles tendon were significantly lower statistically than those of the normal side (p = .001). However, none of the differences between the 2 groups with respect to the distal and proximal apparent diffusion coefficient were statistically significant (p = .358 and p = .899, respectively). In addition, the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient measurements were not significantly different in the proximal and distal regions of the ruptured tendons compared with the healthy tendons. The present study used DTI and fiber tracking to demonstrate the radiologic properties of postoperative Achilles tendons with respect to trajectory and tendinous fiber continuity. Quantifying DTI and fiber tractography offers an innovative and effective tool that might be able to detect microstructural abnormalities not appreciable using conventional radiologic techniques. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle

  15. Supportive care with art therapy, for patients in isolation during stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnese, Alessandra; Lamparelli, Teresa; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Luzzatto, Paola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the art therapy study was twofold: 1) to identify the specific factors of the art therapy experience perceived as helpful by patients undergoing an allogenic hemopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT); and 2) to establish an appropriate criterion for referral to art therapy among this population. Between 2006 and 2010, a dedicated art therapist met all the patients who were referred to her by the hematologist. The art therapy approach and techniques are described. Outcome was evaluated by self-assessment, based on written questionnaires that were given to the patients before discharge. Seventy-four patients followed the weekly individual sessions during isolation and filled out the questionnaire. All of them defined the art therapy experience as "helpful" and specified in which way it had been helpful. Through a thematic analysis of the patients' written comments, three specific aspects of art therapy, which the patients found most helpful, were identified: (1) being able to calm down from anxiety, through the use of art therapy techniques (77.02%); (2) feeling free to express and share difficult feelings, which they had not communicated verbally (75.67%); and (3) establishing meaningful connections with their loved ones, through images made in art therapy (36.48%). Case illustrations are provided. The results suggest that referral to art therapy from the team might be helpful and appropriate: (1) when patients are anxious; (2) when they are uncommunicative and hide their feelings; and (3) when they feel disconnected from their loved ones at home.

  16. Drug dosing during intermittent hemodialysis and continuous renal replacement therapy : special considerations in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Michael A; Neu, Alicia M; Fivush, Barbara A; Parekh, Rulan S; Furth, Susan L

    2004-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is, fortunately, an unusual occurrence in children; however, many children with various underlying illnesses develop acute renal failure, and transiently require renal replacement therapy - peritoneal dialysis, intermittent hemodialysis (IHD), or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). As children with acute and chronic renal failure often have multiple comorbid conditions requiring drug therapy, generalists, intensivists, nephrologists, and pharmacists need to be aware of the issues surrounding the management of drug therapy in pediatric patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. This article summarizes the pharmacokinetics and dosing of many drugs commonly prescribed for pediatric patients, and focuses on the management of drug therapy in pediatric patients undergoing IHD and CRRT in the intensive care unit setting. Peritoneal dialysis is not considered in this review. Finally, a summary table with recommended initial dosages for drugs commonly encountered in pediatric patients requiring IHD or CRRT is presented.

  17. Long-term effects of electrical neurostimulation in patients with unstable angina : Refractory to conventional therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Jessica; DeJongste, Mike J. L.; Zijlstra, Felix; Staal, Michiel

    2007-01-01

    Background. Patients with unstable angina pectoris may become refractory to conventional therapies. Electrical neurostimulation with transcutaneous electrical stimulation and/or spinal cord stimulation has been shown to be effective for patients with refractory unstable angina pectoris in hospital

  18. Risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in patients starting nevirapine-containing antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesselring, Anouk M.; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Sabin, Caroline A.; Lundgren, Jens D.; Gill, M. John; Gatell, Jose M.; Rauch, Andri; Montaner, Julio S.; de Wolf, Frank; Reiss, Peter; Mocroft, Amanda; Bronsveld, W.; Hillebrand-Haverkort, M. E.; Prins, J. M.; Bos, J. C.; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J. K. M.; Geerlings, S. E.; Godfried, M. H.; Lange, J. M. A.; van Leth, F. C.; Lowe, S. H.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Pogány, K.; van der Poll, T.; Ruys, T. A.; Sankatsing, Raaj R.; Steingrover, R.; vanTwillert, G.; van der Valk, M.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; van Vugt, M.; van Eeden, A.; ten Veen, J. H.; van Dam, P. S.; Roos, J. C.; Brinkman, K.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Weigel, H. M.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Meenhorst, P. L.; Mairuhu, A. T. A.; Veenstra, J.; Danner, S. A.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Claessen, F. A. P.; Perenboom, R. M.; Rijkeboer, A.; van Vonderen, M.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J.; van Leusen, R.; Vriesendorp, R.; Jeurissen, F. J. F.; Kauffman, R. H.; Koger, E. L. W.; HAGA, A. N.; Bravenboer, B.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Sprenger, H. G.; Miesen, W. M. A. J.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; ten Kate, R. W.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Polee, M.; Kroon, F. P.; van den Broek, A. N.; van Dissel, J. T.; Schippers, E. F.; Schreij, G.; van de Geest, S.; Verbon, A.; Koopmans, P. P.; Keuter, M.; Post, F.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; van der Ende, M. E.; Gyssens, I. C.; van der Feltz, M.; den Hollander, J. G.; de Marie, S.; Nouwen, J. L.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; de Vries, T. E. M. S.; Juttmann, J. R.; van de Heul, C.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Bonten, M. J. M.; Borleffs, J. C. C.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Schouten, I.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Blok, W. L.; Tanis, A. A.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alexander, Chris; Barrios, Rolando; Braitstein, Paula; Brumme, Zabrina; Chan, Keith; Cote, Helen; Gataric, Nada; Geller, Josie; Guillemi, Silvia; Richard Harrigan, P.; Harris, Marrianne; Hogg, Robert; Joy, Ruth; Levy, Adrian; Montaner, Julio; Montessori, Val; Palepu, Anita; Phillips, Elizabeth; Phillips, Peter; Press, Natasha; Tyndall, Mark; Wood, Evan; Yip, Benita; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; de Wit, S.; Delforge, M.; Clumeck, N.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Rozsypal, H.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Pedersen, C.; Oestergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Girard, J.-P.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Staszewski, S.; Bogner, J.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Maayan, S.; Chiesi, A.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Arici, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Chirianni, A.; Montesarchio, E.; Gargiulo, M.; Antonucci, G.; Iacomi, F.; Narciso, P.; Vlassi, C.; Zaccarelli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Finazzi, R.; Galli, M.; Ridolfo, A.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Rozentale, B.; Aldins, P.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Bruun, J.; Maeland, A.; Ormaasen, V.; Knysz, B.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Prokopowicz, D.; Flisiak, R.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Antunes, F.; Valadas, E.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Babes, Victor; Rakhmanova, A.; Vinogradova, A.; Buzunova, S.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokrás, M.; Staneková, D.; Tomazic, J.; González-Lahoz, J.; Soriano, V.; Martin-Carbonero, L.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miró, J. M.; Domingo, P.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Sambeat, M. A.; Karlsson, A.; Persson, P. O.; Flamholc, L.; Ledergerber, B.; Weber, R.; Francioli, P.; Cavassini, M.; Hirschel, B.; Boffi, E.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Kutsyna, G.; Servitskiy, S.; Antoniak, S.; Krasnov, M.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Phillips, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Gatell, J.; Gazzard, B.; D'Arminio Montforte, A.; Lundgren, J.; Kirk, O.; Mocroft, A.; Friis-Møller, N.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Bannister, W.; Ellefson, M.; Borch, A.; Podlekareva, D.; Kjaer, J.; Peters, L.; Reekie, J.; Kowalska, J.; Perez, Iñaki; Gatell, Jose; Gill, John; Read, Ron; Krentz, Hartmut; Beckthold, Brenda; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Bürgisser, Ph; Calmy, A.; Cattacin, S.; Dubs, R.; Egger, M.; Erb, P.; Fischer, M.; Flepp, M.; Fontana, A.; Fux, C.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Hirsch, H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, Ch; Kaiser, L.; Karrer, U.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, Th; Martinetti, G.; Martinez, B.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Opravil, M.; Paccaud, F.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Yerly, S.; Phillips, Andrew N.; Gilson, Richard; Easterbrook, Philippa; Fisher, Martin; Gazzard, Brian; Johnson, Margaret; Walsh, John; Leen, Clifford; Orkin, Chloe; Anderson, Jane; Pillay, Deenan; Delpech, Valerie; Schwenk, Achim; Dunn, David; Gompels, Mark; Hill, Teresa; Porter, Kholoud; Babiker, Abdel; Sabin, Caroline; Bansi, Loveleen; Phillips, Andrews; Sheehan, Stephen; Waters, Anele; Crates, Dorian; Mohamed-Saad, Siti; Perry, Nick; Pullin, Anthony; Churchill, Duncan; Harris, Wendy; Bulbeck, Steve; Mandalia, Sundhiya; Clarke, Jemima; Dodds, Julie; Rider, Andy; Williams, Ian; Youle, Mike; Lampe, Fiona; Smith, Colette; Gumley, Helen; Chaloner, Clinton; Puradiredja, Dewi Ismajani; Weber, Jonathan; Cashin, Shane; Kemble, Christian; Mackie, Nicky; Winston, Alan; Thomas, Rachel; Jones, Kevin; Gann, Selina; Wilson, Alan; Ainsworth, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This collaboration of seven observational clinical cohorts investigated risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in both antiretroviral-naive and experienced patients starting nevirapine-based combination antiretroviral therapy (NVPc). METHODS: Patients starting NVPc after 1

  19. [Rational therapy of patients with essential hypertension and abdominal obesity with concomitant subclinical hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pligovka, V M

    2014-11-01

    It was determined the characteristics of lipid status of patients with essential hypertension, abdominal obesity with concomitant subclinical hypothyroidism--mostly increased levels of total and LDL cholesterol. In assessing the effectiveness of statin therapy in combination with levothyroxine replacement therapy compared with statin monotherapy, combination therapy showed the best result in terms of achievement of target levels of both total cholesterol and LDL. The obtained results allow us to recommend the use of combination therapy for patients with hypertension, abdominal obesity with concomitant subclinical hypothyroidism in order to achieve the target values of LDL and thus to reduce the cardiovascular risk of these patients.

  20. REACTIONAL STATES IN MULTIBACILLARY HANSEN DISEASE PATIENTS DURING MULTIDRUG THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A.C. NERY

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that reactions are commonplace occurrences during the course of leprosy disease. Stigmatization may even be attributable to reactions which are also responsible for the worsening of neural lesions. A cohort of 162 newly-diagnosed baciloscopically positive patients from the Leprosy Care Outpatient Clinic of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ was selected for this study. While 46% of the multibacillary (MB patients submitted to the 24 fixed-dose multidrug therapy (MDT regimen suffered reactions during treatment, it was found that all MBs were susceptible and that constant attention and care were required at all times. Fourteen per cent were classified as BB, 52% as BL, and 33% as LL. None of the variables under study, such as, sex, age, clinical form, length of illness, length of dermatological lesions, baciloscopic index (BI, or degree of disability proved to be associate with reaction among the patients studied. Reversal Reaction (RR occurred in 45%, and Erythema Nodosum Leprosum (ENL occurred in 55%. Among BB patients who developed reactions (15 patients, 93% presented RR; while among the LL patients who developed reactions (34 patients, 91% presented ENL. Likewise, ENL was very frequent among those with disseminate lesions, while RR was most often observed in patients with segmentary lesions. RR was also most likely to occur during the initial months of treatment. It was demonstrated that the recurrence rate of ENL was significantly higher than that of RR. Neither grade of disability nor BI was shown to be associated with RR and ENL reaction. However, the RR rate was significantly higher among patients showing BI 3.Reações são ocorrências comuns no curso da hanseníase e são responsáveis pelo agravamento das lesões neurais. Uma coorte de 162 pacientes recém-diagnosticados, baciloscopicamente positivos, em acompanhamento no Ambulatório de Hanseníase da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ foi selecionada para estudo

  1. Dual functions of gold nanorods as photothermal agent and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death during plasmonic photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Chiew, Geraldine Giap Ying; Luo, Kathy Qian; Liu, Quan

    2015-02-01

    Gold nanorods have the potential to localize the treatment procedure by hyperthermia and influence the fluorescence. The longitudinal plasmon peak contributes to the photothermal effect by converting light to heat. When these nanorods are PEGylated, it not only makes it biocompatible but also acts as a spacer layer during fluorescence enhancement. When the PEGylated nanorods are internalized inside the cells through endocytosis, the transverse plasmonic peak combined with the enhanced absorption and scattering properties of the nanorods can enhance the autofluorescence emission intensity from the cell. The autofluorescence from the mitochondria inside cells which reflects the respiratory status of the cell was enhanced two times by the presence of nanorods within the cell. At four minutes, the nanorods incubated cells reached the hyperthermic temperature when illuminated continuously with near infrared laser. The cell viability test and autofluorescence intensity curve showed a similar trend indicating the progress of cell death over time. This is the first report to the best of our knowledge to suggest the potential of exploiting the dual capabilities of gold nanorods as photothermal agents and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Perioperative glucose and insulin administration while maintaining normoglycemia (GIN therapy) in patients undergoing major liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroaki; Lattermann, Ralph; Carvalho, George; Sato, Tamaki; Metrakos, Peter; Hassanain, Mazen; Matsukawa, Takashi; Schricker, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Although hyperglycemia is a well-recognized risk factor in the context of cardiac surgery, the relevance of perioperative glycemic control for patients undergoing major noncardiac operations has received little attention. We designed this study to assess the hyperglycemic response to liver resection, and to test the hypothesis that perioperative glucose and insulin administration while maintaining normoglycemia (GIN therapy) provides glycemic control superior to that achieved by the conventional use of insulin. Patients were randomly assigned to GIN therapy or standard therapy (control group). In the GIN therapy group, insulin was administered at 2 mU . kg(-1) . min(-1) during surgery. At the end of surgery, the insulin infusion was decreased to 1 mU . kg(-1) . min(-1) and continued for 24 hours. Dextrose 20% was infused at a rate adjusted to maintain blood glucose within the target range of 3.5 to 6.1 mmol . L(-1) (63-110 mg . dL(-1)). Patients in the standard therapy group received a conventional insulin sliding scale during and after surgery. The mean and SD of blood glucose as well as the percentage of blood glucose values within the target range were calculated. To evaluate intrasubject variability, the coefficient of variability (CV) of blood glucose was calculated for each patient. Episodes of severe hypoglycemia, i.e., blood glucose GIN therapy always remained within the target range. The blood glucose levels were lower in the GIN therapy group than in the standard therapy group (during surgery, P GIN therapy (n = 19), target glycemia was achieved in 90.1% of the blood glucose measurements during surgery and in 77.8% of the measurements after surgery. In diabetic patients receiving GIN therapy (n = 7), target glycemia was achieved in 81.2% of the blood glucose measurements during surgery and in 70.5% of the measurements after surgery. In nondiabetic patients receiving standard therapy (n = 19), target glycemia was achieved in 37.4% of the blood glucose

  3. Left Atrial Systolic and Diastolic Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Constrictive Pericarditis: A Study Using Speckle Tracking and Conventional Echocardiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liu

    Full Text Available Left atrial (LA function plays an important role in the maintenance of cardiac output, however, in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP, whether pericardial restriction and adhesion can lead to LA dysfunction, and the characteristics of LA function remain unclear. The aim of the study is to compare the left atrial (LA function of patients with CP to that of healthy study participants using speckle tracking echocardiography (STE and conventional echocardiography.Thirty patients with CP and 30 healthy volunteers (controls were enrolled in the study. The underlying cause of CP was viral pericarditis in 24 (80% patients and unknown in 6 (20% patients. The LA maximum volume (Vmax, LA minimal volume (Vmin, and LA volume before atrial contraction (Vpre-a were measured using biplane modified Simpson's method. The LA expansion index (LA reservoir function was determined as follows: ([LAVmax - LAVmin]/LAVmin ×100. The passive emptying index (LA conduit function was calculated as follows: ([LAVmax - LAVpre-a]/LAVmax ×100, and the active emptying index (booster pump function was calculated as follows: ([LAVpre-a - LAVmin]/LAVpre-a ×100. All the patients underwent two-dimensional STE. The LA global systolic strain (S, systolic strain rate (SrS, early diastolic strain rate (SrE and late diastolic strain rate (SrA were measured. The LA expansion index, passive emptying index, the active emptying index and the LA global S, SrS, SrE, SrA were found to be significantly lower in patients with CP than in the control participants (P <0.001. LA function was correlated with the early diastolic velocity of the lateral mitral annulus (P <0.05.Although left ventricular systolic function was preserved in patients with CP, the LA reservoir, conduit, and booster functions were impaired. Pericardial restriction and impairment of the LA myocardium may play an important role in the reduction of LA function in patients with CP.

  4. Short Term Intensive Insulin Therapy Improves Insulin Secretion Significantly in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ogo, Astushi; Hiramatsu, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Akimasa; Asano, Tamotsu; Yoshizumi, Hideyuki

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the effects of short-term(1 week)intensive insulin therapy, on glycemic control, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic patients, an open prospective study was conducted in sixteen type 2 diabetic patients receiving diet therapy alone or treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents. Of the study subjects, 8 patients were treated with insulin, the remaining 8 patients served as the control group. The metabolic parameters were evaluated once before treatment and...

  5. Metallic Taste in Cancer Patients Treated with Systemic Therapy : A Questionnaire-based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJpma, Irene; Timmermans, Erik R.; Renken, Remco J.; Horst, ter Gert; Reyners, Anna K. L.

    2017-01-01

    A metallic taste is reported by cancer patients as a side effect of systemic therapy. Despite the high prevalence, this taste alteration has received limited attention. The present study investigated: 1) the prevalence of metallic taste in cancer patients treated with systemic therapy; 2) possible

  6. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in subgroups of patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, van den C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS: The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  7. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in specific subgroups of patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. METHODS: The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  8. Manual therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: outcome in subgroups of patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Breedveld, F.C.; van den Ende, C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether manual therapy has particular benefit in subgroups of patients defined on the basis of hip function, range of joint motion, pain and radiological deterioration. Methods. The study was performed in the out-patient clinic of physical therapy of a large hospital. Data

  9. DAS-driven therapy versus routine care in patients with recent-onset active rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goekoop-Ruiterman, Y. P. M.; de Vries-Bouwstra, J. K.; Kerstens, P. J. S. M.; Nielen, M. M. J.; Vos, K.; van Schaardenburg, D.; Speyer, I.; Seys, P. E. H.; Breedveld, F. C.; Allaart, C. F.; Dijkmans, B. A. C.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of Disease Activity Score (DAS)-driven therapy and routine care in patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis receiving traditional antirheumatic therapy from either the BeSt study, a randomised controlled trial comparing

  10. Malignancies in Wegener's granulomatosis: incidence and relation to cyclophosphamide therapy in a cohort of 293 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M.; Sorensen, I.J.; Mellemkjaer, L.

    2008-01-01

    To describe the incidence of malignancies in a cohort of Danish patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and to investigate the cancer risk associated with cyclophosphamide (CYC) -therapy in WG.......To describe the incidence of malignancies in a cohort of Danish patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and to investigate the cancer risk associated with cyclophosphamide (CYC) -therapy in WG....

  11. Combined spa-exercise therapy is effective in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tubergen, A.; Landewé, R.; van der Heijde, D.; Hidding, A.; Wolter, N.; Asscher, M.; Falkenbach, A.; Genth, E.; Thè, H. G.; van der Linden, S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of combined spa-exercise therapy in addition to standard treatment with drugs and weekly group physical therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 120 Dutch outpatients with AS were randomly allocated into 3 groups of 40 patients each. Group 1 (mean

  12. Art Therapy with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Helping Normal Children Cope with Abnormal Circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Councill, Tracy

    1993-01-01

    Notes that art therapy with pediatric cancer patients addresses emotional and developmental needs of normal population under extreme stress. Reviews literature on the problems likely to be encountered by pediatric cancer patient and presents case examples to illustrate the emergence of these issues and their management in art therapy. (Author/NB)

  13. Schema Therapy for Personality Disorders : A Qualitative Study of Patients' and Therapists' Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, N.; Abma, T.A.; Bamelis, L.L.M.; Arntz, A.

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have evaluated the (cost) effectiveness of schema therapy for personality disorders, but little research has been done on the perspectives of patients and therapists. AIM: The present study aims to explore patients' and therapists' perspectives on schema therapy. METHOD:

  14. Development, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new out-patient Breathlessness Support Service: study protocol of a phase III fast-track randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bausewein Claudia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breathlessness is a common and distressing symptom affecting many patients with advanced disease both from malignant and non-malignant origin. A combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures is necessary to treat this symptom successfully. Breathlessness services in various compositions aim to provide comprehensive care for patients and their carers by a multiprofessional team but their effectiveness and cost-effectiveness have not yet been proven. The Breathlessness Support Service (BSS is a newly created multiprofessional and interdisciplinary outpatient service at a large university hospital in South East London. The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of this multidisciplinary out–patient BSS for the palliation of breathlessness, in advanced malignant and non-malignant disease. Methods The BSS was modelled based on the results of qualitative and quantitative studies, and systematic literature reviews. A randomised controlled fast track trial (RCT comprising two groups: 1 intervention (immediate access to BSS in addition to standard care; 2 control group (standard best practice and access to BSS after a waiting time of six weeks. Patients are included if suffering from breathlessness on exertion or at rest due to advanced disease such as cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, chronic heart failure (CHF, interstitial lung disease (ILD or motor neurone disease (MND that is refractory to maximal optimised medical management. Both quantitative and qualitative outcomes are assessed in face to-face interviews at baseline, after 6 and 12 weeks. The primary outcome is patients' improvement of mastery of breathlessness after six weeks assessed on the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ. Secondary outcomes for patients include breathlessness severity, symptom burden, palliative care needs, service use, and respiratory measures (spirometry

  15. Barriers Prevent Patient Access to Personalized Therapies Identified by Molecular Tumor Profiling of Gynecologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tyler Hillman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of commercial molecular tumor profiling to discover actionable mutations and to identify barriers that might prevent patient access to personalized therapies. Methods. We conducted an IRB-approved retrospective review of 26 patients with gynecologic malignancies who underwent commercial tumor profiling at our institution during the first 18 months of test availability. Tumor profiles reported targeted therapies and clinical trials matched to patient-specific mutations. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results. Most patients who underwent tumor profiling had serous epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma (46%. Patients underwent profiling after undergoing a median of two systemic therapies (range 0 to 13. A median of one targeted therapy was suggested per patient profile. Tumor profiling identified no clinically actionable mutations for seven patients (27%. Six patients sought insurance approval for a targeted therapy and two were declined (33%. One patient (4% received a targeted therapy and this was discontinued due to tumor progression. Conclusions. There are formidable barriers to targeted therapy for patients with gynecologic malignancies. These barriers include a dearth of FDA-approved targeted agents for gynecologic malignancies, lack of third party insurance coverage and limited geographic availability of clinical trials.

  16. Evaluation of Helicobacter Pylori eradication in pediatric patients by triple therapy plus lactoferrin and probiotics compared to triple therapy alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolone Salvatore

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate whether the addition of a probiotic could improve Helicobacter pylori (H.P. eradication rates and reduce the side effects of treatment in children. Methods Between July 2008 and July 2011 all patients with a clinical, laboratory and endoscopic diagnosis of H.P. positive gastritis referred to our Unit were included in the study. Patients suffering from allergy to any of drugs used in the study, with previous attempts to eradicate H.P. and those who received antibiotics, PPIs or probiotics within 4 weeks were excluded from the present study. Patients were randomized into two therapy regimens (group A and B: both groups received standard triple treatment (omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin while only group B patients were also given a probiotic (Probinul - Cadigroup. Patients compliance was evaluated at the end of the treatment. Successful eradication was defined as a negative 13 C-urea breath test (C13-ubt result four weeks after therapy discontinuation. Results A total of 68 histopathologically proven H.P.-infection children (32 male and 36 females were included in the study. All of the patients in both groups used more than 90% of the therapies and no patients were lost at follow up. All side effects were selflimiting and disappeared once the therapy was terminated. Epigastric pain was observed in 6 (17.6% group A vs 2 (5.8% group B patients (P Conclusion The addition of a probiotic formula to triple therapy significantly decreased the frequency of epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

  17. Feasibility of the Helping Alliance Questionnaire – II (HAq- II) in psychiatric patients receiving music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels Jørgensen; Licht, Rasmus Wentzer; Rodrigo, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: High adherence to music therapy in psychiatry may indicate the forming of a helping alliance. However, no prior attempts have been made to measure the alliance during music therapy. Objective: To evaluate the applicability of the Helping Alliance Questionnaire – II (HAq-II) in patients...... receiving music therapy. Internal consistency and associations between patient variables and HAq-II scores were also examined. Methods: Between October 2013 and April 2014, psychiatric patients receiving music therapy were invited to fill out the HAq-II. Clinical data were collected from the patient records...... predictors of interest w ere found. Conclusions: The HAq-II was applicable to the majority of a group of psychiatric patients receiving music therapy. An acceptable internal consistency of the questionnaire was found. Relatively high HAq-II scores suggest a high degree of therapeutic alliance...

  18. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  19. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-11-15

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia.

  20. [The enzyme therapy within a complex treatment of hemophthalmos in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, G S; Andzhelova, D V; Kiseleva, T N

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency of the enzyme therapy was studied in patients with hemophthalmos concurrent with diabetes mellitus of different types. Sixty-eight patients received parabulbar injections of the hemase and collelizin enzymes and another 25 patients underwent the routine therapy comprising injections of dicynone, emoxipin and heparinum. The method of ultrasound B-scanning was used to determine the area of hemorrhage spread into the vitreous body. A high efficiency of the enzyme therapy, as used within the complex treatment of hemophthalmos in patients with diabetes mellitus, was demonstrated. Ultrasound B-scanning is a highly informative technique in evaluating the enzyme-therapy efficiency. The enzyme therapy can be recommended as the most effective method for the treatment of hemophthalmos in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  1. Low Level Laser Therapy for Patients with Cervical Disk Hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Okuni, Ikuko; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Harada, Takashi; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Ohshiro, Toshio; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Musya, Yoshiro

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic shoulder joint pain, elbow, hand and finger pain, and low back pain. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic neck pain. Materials and Methods: Over a 3 year period, 26 rehabilitation department outpatients with chronic neck pain, diagnosed as being caused by cervical disk hernia, underwent treatment applied to the painful area with a 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device delivering at 830 nm in continuous wave, 20.1 J/cm2/point, and three shots were given per session (1 treatment) with twice a week for 4 weeks. Results: 1. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (p<0.001). 2. After treatment, no significant differences in cervical spine range of motion were observed. 3. Discussions with the patients revealed that in order to receive continued benefits from treatment, it was important for them to be taught how to avoid postures that would cause them neck pain in everyday life. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that LLLT was an effective form of treatment for neck and back pain caused by cervical disk hernia, reinforced by postural training. PMID:24511189

  2. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... and SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  3. Identifying Patients for Clinical Studies from Electronic Health Records: TREC 2012 Medical Records Track at OHSU

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    patients as possible candidates for clinical studies based on diagnosis , age, and other attributes. For TREC 2012, the Oregon Health & Science University...infNDCG, and P@10. Of particular note was topic 179 ("Patients taking atypical antipsychotics without a diagnosis schizophrenia or bipolar depression... cardiomyopathy report_text:"post-partum" OR report_text:"post partum" OR report_text:postpartum 147 Patients with left lower quadrant abdominal pain

  4. Sequencing bilateral robot-assisted arm therapy and constraint-induced therapy improves reach to press and trunk kinematics in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-wei; Liing, Rong-jiuan; Lin, Keh-chung; Wu, Ching-yi; Liou, Tsan-hon; Lin, Jui-chi; Hung, Jen-wen

    2016-03-22

    The combination of robot-assisted therapy (RT) and a modified form of constraint-induced therapy (mCIT) shows promise for improving motor function of patients with stroke. However, whether the changes of motor control strategies are concomitant with the improvements in motor function after combination of RT and mCIT (RT + mCIT) is unclear. This study investigated the effects of the sequential combination of RT + mCIT compared with RT alone on the strategies of motor control measured by kinematic analysis and on motor function and daily performance measured by clinical scales. The study enrolled 34 patients with chronic stroke. The data were derived from part of a single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Participants in the RT + mCIT and RT groups received 20 therapy sessions (90 to 105 min/day, 5 days for 4 weeks). Patients in the RT + mCIT group received 10 RT sessions for first 2 weeks and 10 mCIT sessions for the next 2 weeks. The Bi-Manu-Track was used in RT sessions to provide bilateral practice of wrist and forearm movements. The primary outcome was kinematic variables in a task of reaching to press a desk bell. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Wolf Motor Function Test, Functional Independence Measure, and Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living. All outcome measures were administered before and after intervention. RT + mCIT and RT demonstrated different benefits on motor control strategies. RT + mCIT uniquely improved motor control strategies by reducing shoulder abduction, increasing elbow extension, and decreasing trunk compensatory movement during the reaching task. Motor function and quality of the affected limb was improved, and patients achieved greater independence in instrumental activities of daily living. Force generation at movement initiation was improved in the patients who received RT. A combination of RT and mCIT could be an effective approach to improve stroke rehabilitation outcomes, achieving

  5. Assessment of left atrial deformation properties by speckle tracking in patients with systolic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud K. Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: In patients with SHF, LA function is significantly reduced. Moreover, LA reservoir & booster pump function correlate negatively with heart failure symptoms and positively with LV global strain.

  6. INCOMING!--A web tracking application for PACU and post-surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mark A; Sokal, Suzanne M; Sandberg, Warren; Chang, Yuchiao; Daily, Bethany; Berger, David L

    2006-05-15

    Capacity constraints necessitate improving hospital efficiency. An integrated real time system facilitating patient flow between the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) and surgical ward would ease PACU workload by reducing the effort of discharging patients. We developed INCOMING!, a web-based platform that monitors patient progress from the operating room to the PACU. INCOMING! integrates available data, automatically determining when a patient enters the PACU. An automated paging system alerts clinical unit managers to 'pull' their patients from the PACU after a set recovery period. General surgery patients were included in the INCOMING! system in late 2004 with paging added in mid-March 2005. Mean PACU length of stay was calculated for the intervention group (general surgery patients with INCOMING!) and compared to a control group (general surgery patients without INCOMING!) and an orthopedic surgery group before and after paging. The system successfully gathers data and generates automated pages when events occur. After paging, there was a significant difference between the orthopedic surgery control group and the general surgery intervention group (235 min versus 185 min, P = 0.001). The mean PACU LOS decreased in the INCOMING! intervention group by 26 min while the mean LOS increased by 28 min in the general surgery control group (P = 0.27). Pilot implementation demonstrates that INCOMING! performs the desired integration and automatic notification. Given the minimal cost and potential large gains from a wider deployment, we plan to implement the system for all PACU patients and all post-PACU care units.

  7. Need for improvements in clinical practice to retain patients in pre-antiretroviral therapy care: Data from rural clinics in North West Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilvydis, Jennifer M; Steward, Wayne T; Saberi, Parya; Tumbo, John; Sumitani, Jeri; Barnhart, Scott; Lippman, Sheri A

    2015-01-01

    We examined current challenges with patient engagement in HIV prevention and care in South Africa by assessing the procedures of eight public health clinics in the North West Province. Procedures consisted of (1) an inventory/audit of the HIV Counseling and Testing, pre-antiretroviral therapy (pre-ART), and antiretroviral therapy (ART) patient registers; (2) extraction of data from a convenience sample of 39 HIV-positive patient files; and (3) 13 key informant interviews with clinic staff to characterize retention and re-engagement practices for patients. Incomplete registers revealed little evidence of follow-up services, particularly for pre-ART patients. The more detailed examination of patient files indicated substantial disparities in the proportion of pre-ART versus ART patients retained in care. Key informant interviews contextualized the data, with providers describing multiple procedures for tracking and ensuring service delivery for ART patients and fewer procedures to retain pre-ART patients. These findings suggest that enhanced strategies are needed for ensuring continued engagement in HIV care, with a particular emphasis on improving the retention of pre-ART patients. The preventive benefits of ART scale-up may not be achieved if improvements are not made in the proportion of earlier-stage HIV-positive patients who are successfully engaged in care.

  8. [Comparing the effects of drug therapy, physical therapy, and exercise on pain, disability, and depression in patients with chronic low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ja Kyung

    2007-08-01

    This research was conducted to compare the effects of drug therapy, physical therapy, and exercise on pain, disability, and depression in patients with chronic low back pain. The research design of this study was a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. The subjects of this study were 28 patients for the drug therapy & physical therapy, 24 patients for the drug therapy & exercise, and 22 patients for the physical therapy & exercise. Data was collected by MVAS, Oswestry disability questionnaires, and questionnaires of depression. It was analyzed by paired t-test for effectiveness, ANOVA, and Scheffe for comparison of the effects of the 3 experimental treatments, using SPSS/WIN 12.0. There were no effects of drug therapy & physical therapy on pain, disability, and depression. However, there were effects of drug therapy & exercise and the physical therapy & exercise on pain, disability, and depression. The effects of physical therapy & exercise on pain, disability, and depression were the greatest, but there was no statistically significant differences between the drug therapy & exercise and the physical therapy & exercise. Exercise is regarded as a more effective and easily accessible nursing intervention to apply alone than drug therapy or physical therapy simultaneously in reducing pain, disability and depression.

  9. Racial disparities in survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the targeted therapy era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Tracy L; Deal, Allison M; Krishnan, Bhavani; Nielsen, Matthew E; Smith, Angela B; Kim, William Y; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2016-10-01

    Historically, African American (AA) patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have had inferior survival compared with Caucasian patients. Recent studies suggest that the survival disparity between races may be worsening since the advent of targeted therapies for RCC. In this study, survival rates among AA and Caucasian patients with advanced RCC are examined over time to determine whether a disparity in survival persists in the targeted therapy era. The authors identified patients with stage IV RCC in the National Cancer Data Base and compared survival between AA and Caucasian patients during the periods before (1998-2004) and after (2006-2011) the advent of targeted therapy. In total, 48,846 patients were identified, and 10% were AA. Three-year survival among both AA and Caucasian patients improved between the 2 periods (P therapy era, which was unchanged from the pretargeted therapy era (adjusted HR, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.15). The adjusted HR was similar when the analysis was restricted to those who received systemic therapy. Both AA and Caucasian patients with advanced RCC have had a significant improvement in survival since the advent of targeted therapy. However, AA patients maintain a survival disadvantage compared with Caucasians independent of treatment received, potentially related to unmeasured comorbidities, disease burden, or tumor biology. Cancer 2016;122:2988-2995. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  10. PHYSICAL THERAPY INTERVENTION STRATEGIES FOR PATIENTS WITH PROLONGED MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY SYMPTOMS: A CASE SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugentobler, Jason A; Vegh, Meredith; Janiszewski, Barbara; Quatman-Yates, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    Although most patients recover from a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) within 7-14 days, 10-30% of people will experience prolonged mTBI symptoms. Currently, there are no standardized treatment protocols to guide physical therapy interventions for this population. The purpose of this case series was to describe the unique, multimodal evaluation and treatment approaches for each of the patients with post-concussion syndrome (PCS). Six pediatric athletes with PCS who had participated in physical therapy and fit the inclusion criteria for review were retrospectively chosen for analysis. Patients received a cervical evaluation, an aerobic activity assessment, an oculomotor screen, and postural control assessment. Each patient participated in an individualized physical therapy treatment plan-of-care based on their presentation during the evaluation. Patients were treated for a mean of 6.8 treatment sessions over 9.8 weeks. Four of six patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity while two returned to modified activity upon completion of physical therapy. Improvements were observed in symptom scores, gaze stability, balance and postural control measures, and patient self-management of symptoms. All patients demonstrated adequate self-management of symptoms upon discharge from physical therapy. Physical therapy interventions for pediatric athletes with PCS may facilitate recovery and improve function. Further research is needed to validate effective tools for assessment of patients who experience prolonged concussion symptoms as well as to establish support for specific post-mTBI physical therapy interventions. Level 4.

  11. Maintenance hormonal therapy after treatment with medroxyprogesterone acetate for patients with atypical polypoid adenomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Hidetaka; Sugiyama, Yuko; Tanigawa, Terumi; Matoda, Maki; Okamoto, Sanshiro; Omatsu, Kohei; Kanao, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuyoshi; Utsugi, Kuniko; Takeshima, Nobuhiro

    2018-01-17

    As atypical polypoid adenomyoma (APA) has been reported to be a hormone-related tumor, we aimed to analyze the efficacy and safety of maintenance hormonal therapy after fertility-preserving treatment of these patients with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Data were retrospectively analyzed from patients with APA who were treated with a fertility-preserving regimen including MPA between October 2001 and December 2011. Eighteen patients were treated with MPA and 14 (77.8%) achieved either a complete or a partial response after the planned treatment. Five patients took progestin for maintenance therapy. Eighteen patients were treated for a mean observation period of 96.7 months. While taking the maintenance therapy, no patient had APA relapse. One patient developed well-differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma 18 months after she stopped taking maintenance progestin. Eleven patients without maintenance therapy underwent hysterectomy, andnine of them developed well-differentiated endometrial cancer. Through univariate analysis, there was a significant difference in time to hysterectomy between patients with and without maintenance therapy (P = 0.015). Through multivariate analysis, body mass index (BMI), menstrual status before protocol therapy, maintenance treatment, and pregnancy were found to be significantly associated with a lower risk of hysterectomy. No patient had a recurrence of APA after hysterectomy during the observation period (median, 54 months; range, 2-148 months). No patient showed progression while receiving hormonal therapy, including initial protocol therapy. Maintenance hormonal therapy after treatment with MPA was highly effective and safe, particularly in patients with BMI ≧24 kg/m2 and irregular menstruation cycle.

  12. Risk factors for developing hyponatremia in thyroid cancer patients undergoing radioactive iodine therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Eun Lee

    Full Text Available Due to the alarming increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer worldwide, more patients are receiving postoperative radioactive iodine (RAI therapy and these patients are given a low-iodine diet along with levothyroxine withdrawal to induce a hypothyroid state to maximize the uptake of RAI by thyroid tissues. Recently, the reported cases of patients suffering from life-threatening severe hyponatremia following postoperative RAI therapy have increased. This study aimed to systematically assess risk factors for developing hyponatremia following RAI therapy in post-thyroidectomy patients.We reviewed the medical records of all thyroid cancer patients who underwent thyroidectomy and postoperative RAI therapy from July 2009 to February 2012. Demographic and biochemical parameters including serum sodium and thyroid function tests were assessed along with medication history.A total of 2229 patients (47.0±11.0 years, female 76.3% were enrolled in the analysis. Three hundred seven patients (13.8% of all patients developed hyponatremia; 44 patients (2.0% developed moderate to severe hyponatremia (serum Na+≤130 mEq/L and another 263 (11.8% patients showed mild hyponatremia (130 mEq/Ltherapy were significantly associated with hyponatremia in patients undergoing RAI therapy after total thyroidectomy. Multivariate analysis showed that old age, female sex, use of thiazide diuretics, and hyponatremia at the initiation of RAI therapy were independent risk factors for the development of hyponatremia.Our data suggest that age greater than 60 years, female sex, use of thiazide, and hyponatremia at the initiation of RAI therapy are important

  13. Patient preferences on the integration of complementary therapy with conventional cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas, Peter; Robertson, Amanda; Beatty, Lisa; Hookings, Emily; McGee, Margaret; Marker, Julie; McCaleb, Belle; Bowen, Joanne; Richards, Alison; Koczwara, Bogda

    2016-06-01

    Complementary therapy use by patients with cancer is highly prevalent, although little is known about the optimal model of integration with conventional care. This study explored patient preferences regarding integration in an Australian context. Cancer patients participated in focus groups conducted by an experienced facilitator. Transcripts of discussions were subjected to thematic analysis. Fourteen female and four male patients took part in eight focus groups. Eleven had received conventional cancer treatment for early-stage disease, and seven for advanced stage. Participants had sound understanding of the distinction between complementary and alternative medicines. There were differing views on whether complementary therapy and conventional cancer services should be colocated. Some participants described colocation as discordant with their reasons for using complementary therapy. Participants valued guidance from oncology health professionals regarding complementary therapy that was tailored to their individual needs. In addition to medical oncologists, nursing staff and affiliated complementary therapists were considered to be appropriate sources for guidance. Additional themes identified in the analysis were also informative: patients achieve autonomy and self-expression through complementary therapies; the knowledge and attitudes of health professionals and limited consultation time are barriers to integration; self-funding of complementary therapies is acceptable to participants. The study findings suggest that while patients have diverse views regarding the optimal integration model, there is no strong preference for geographic colocation of complementary therapy with conventional cancer care. Patients valued personalized information and guidance regarding complementary therapy from health professionals involved in their cancer care. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Online Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for other purposes, such as research, measurement, and fraud prevention. Mobile browsers work much like traditional web ... users’ Do Not Track preferences. Can I block online tracking? Consumers can learn about tracker-blocking browser ...

  15. Internet Searches About Therapies Do Not Impact Willingness to Accept Prescribed Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feathers, Alexandra; Yen, Tommy; Yun, Laura; Strizich, Garrett; Swaminath, Arun

    2016-04-01

    A significant majority of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) search the Internet for information about their disease. While patients who search the Internet for disease or treatment information are believed to be more resistant to accepting medical therapy, no studies have tested this hypothesis. All IBD patients over a 3-month period across three gastroenterology practices were surveyed about their disease, treatments, websites visited, attitudes toward medications, and their willingness to accept prescribed therapies after disease-related Internet searches. Of 142 total patients, 91 % of respondents searched the Internet for IBD information. The vast majority (82 %) reported taking medication upon their doctor's recommendation and cited the desire to acquire additional information about their disease and prescribed therapies as their most important search motivator (77 %). Internet usage did not affect the willingness of 52 % of our cohort to accept prescribed medication. The majority of IBD patients who searched the Internet for disease and treatment-related information were not affected in their willingness to accept prescribed medical therapy.

  16. Accumulation of protease mutations among patients failing second-line antiretroviral therapy and response to salvage therapy in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly E Rawizza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines and programs in resource-limited settings (RLS have focused on 1(st- and 2(nd-line (2 L therapy. As programs approach a decade of implementation, policy regarding access to 3(rd-line (3 L ART is needed. We aimed to examine the impact of maintaining patients on failing 2 L ART on