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Sample records for therapy imrt planning

  1. Atlas-guided prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning.

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    Sheng, Yang; Li, Taoran; Zhang, You; Lee, W Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Ge, Yaorong; Wu, Q Jackie

    2015-09-21

    An atlas-based IMRT planning technique for prostate cancer was developed and evaluated. A multi-dose atlas was built based on the anatomy patterns of the patients, more specifically, the percent distance to the prostate and the concaveness angle formed by the seminal vesicles relative to the anterior-posterior axis. A 70-case dataset was classified using a k-medoids clustering analysis to recognize anatomy pattern variations in the dataset. The best classification, defined by the number of classes or medoids, was determined by the largest value of the average silhouette width. Reference plans from each class formed a multi-dose atlas. The atlas-guided planning (AGP) technique started with matching the new case anatomy pattern to one of the reference cases in the atlas; then a deformable registration between the atlas and new case anatomies transferred the dose from the atlas to the new case to guide inverse planning with full automation. 20 additional clinical cases were re-planned to evaluate the AGP technique. Dosimetric properties between AGP and clinical plans were evaluated. The classification analysis determined that the 5-case atlas would best represent anatomy patterns for the patient cohort. AGP took approximately 1 min on average (corresponding to 70 iterations of optimization) for all cases. When dosimetric parameters were compared, the differences between AGP and clinical plans were less than 3.5%, albeit some statistical significances observed: homogeneity index (p  >  0.05), conformity index (p  Atlas-guided treatment planning is feasible and efficient. Atlas predicted dose can effectively guide the optimizer to achieve plan quality comparable to that of clinical plans.

  2. Stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and inverse treatment planning for advanced pleural mesothelioma. Feasibility and initial results

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    Muenter, M.W.; Thilmann, C.; Hof, H.; Debus, J. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, S.; Hoess, A.; Partridge, M. [Dept. of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Haering, P. [Dept. of Central Dosimetry, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Manegold, C. [Dept. of Medical Oncology/Internal Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg gGmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Wannenmacher, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-08-01

    Background and Purpose: Complex-shaped malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs) with challenging volumes are extremely difficult to treat by conventional radiotherapy due to tolerance doses of the surrounding normal tissue. In a feasibility study, we evaluated if inversely planned stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) could be applied in the treatment of MPM. Patients and Methods: Eight patients with unresectable lesions were treated after failure of chemotherapy. All patients were positioned using noninvasive patient fixation techniques which can be attached to the applied extracranial stereotactic system. Due to craniocaudal extension of the tumor, it was necessary to develop a special software attached to the inverse planning program KonRad, which can connect two inverse treatment plans and consider the applied dose of the first treatment plan in the area of the matchline of the second treatment plan. Results: Except for one patient, in whom radiotherapy was canceled due to abdominal metastasis, treatment could be completed in all patients and was well tolerated. Median survival after diagnosis was 20 months and after IMRT 6.5 months. Therefore, both the 1-year actuarial overall survival from the start of radiotherapy and the 2-year actuarial overall survival since diagnosis were 28%. IMRT did not result in clinically significant acute side effects. By using the described inverse planning software, over- or underdosage in the region of the field matchline could be prevented. Pure treatment time ranged between 10 and 21 min. Conclusion: This study showed that IMRT is feasible in advanced unresectable MPM. The presented possibilities of stereotactic IMRT in the treatment of MPM will justify the evaluation of IMRT in early-stage pleural mesothelioma combined with chemotherapy in a study protocol, in order to improve the outcome of these patients. Furthermore, dose escalation should be possible by using IMRT. (orig.)

  3. Automated IMRT planning with regional optimization using planning scripts.

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    Xhaferllari, Ilma; Wong, Eugene; Bzdusek, Karl; Lock, Michael; Chen, Jeff

    2013-01-07

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a standard technique in radiation therapy for treating different types of cancers. Various class solutions have been developed for simple cases (e.g., localized prostate, whole breast) to generate IMRT plans efficiently. However, for more complex cases (e.g., head and neck, pelvic nodes), it can be time-consuming for a planner to generate optimized IMRT plans. To generate optimal plans in these more complex cases which generally have multiple target volumes and organs at risk, it is often required to have additional IMRT optimization structures such as dose limiting ring structures, adjust beam geometry, select inverse planning objectives and associated weights, and additional IMRT objectives to reduce cold and hot spots in the dose distribution. These parameters are generally manually adjusted with a repeated trial and error approach during the optimization process. To improve IMRT planning efficiency in these more complex cases, an iterative method that incorporates some of these adjustment processes automatically in a planning script is designed, implemented, and validated. In particular, regional optimization has been implemented in an iterative way to reduce various hot or cold spots during the optimization process that begins with defining and automatic segmentation of hot and cold spots, introducing new objectives and their relative weights into inverse planning, and turn this into an iterative process with termination criteria. The method has been applied to three clinical sites: prostate with pelvic nodes, head and neck, and anal canal cancers, and has shown to reduce IMRT planning time significantly for clinical applications with improved plan quality. The IMRT planning scripts have been used for more than 500 clinical cases.

  4. Plan comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in anal canal cancer

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    Aillères Norbert

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare volumetric-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc plans with conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans in anal canal cancers. Methods Ten patients with anal canal carcinoma previously treated with IMRT in our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, three plans were generated with the planning CT scan: one using a fixed beam IMRT, and two plans using the RapidArc technique: a single (RA1 and a double (RA2 modulated arc therapy. The treatment plan was designed to deliver in one process with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB a dose of 59.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV2 based on the gross disease in a 1.8 Gy-daily fraction, 5 days a week. At the same time, the subclinical disease (PTV1 was planned to receive 49.5 Gy in a 1.5 Gy-daily fraction. Plans were normalized to 99% of the PTV2 that received 95% of the prescribed dose. Planning objectives were 95% of the PTV1 will receive 95% of the prescribed dose and no more than 2% of the PTV will receive more than 107%. Dose-volume histograms (DVH for the target volume and the organs at risk (bowel tract, bladder, iliac crests, femoral heads, genitalia/perineum, and healthy tissue were compared for these different techniques. Monitor units (MU and delivery treatment time were also reported. Results All plans achieved fulfilled objectives. Both IMRT and RA2 resulted in superior coverage of PTV than RA1 that was slightly inferior for conformity and homogeneity (p Conformity index (CI95% for the PTV2 was 1.15 ± 0.15 (RA2, 1.28 ± 0.22 (IMRT, and 1.79 ± 0.5 (RA1. Homogeneity (D5% - D95% for PTV2 was 3.21 ± 1.16 Gy (RA2, 2.98 ± 0.7 Gy (IMRT, and 4.3 ± 1.3 Gy (RA1. RapidArc showed to be superior to IMRT in terms of organ at risk sparing. For bowel tract, the mean dose was reduced of 4 Gy by RA2 compared to IMRT. Similar trends were observed for bladder, femoral heads, and genitalia. The DVH of iliac crests and healthy tissue resulted

  5. GPU-based ultrafast IMRT plan optimization.

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    Men, Chunhua; Gu, Xuejun; Choi, Dongju; Majumdar, Amitava; Zheng, Ziyi; Mueller, Klaus; Jiang, Steve B

    2009-11-07

    The widespread adoption of on-board volumetric imaging in cancer radiotherapy has stimulated research efforts to develop online adaptive radiotherapy techniques to handle the inter-fraction variation of the patient's geometry. Such efforts face major technical challenges to perform treatment planning in real time. To overcome this challenge, we are developing a supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). As part of the SCORE project, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization algorithm on graphics processing units (GPUs). We adopt a penalty-based quadratic optimization model, which is solved by using a gradient projection method with Armijo's line search rule. Our optimization algorithm has been implemented in CUDA for parallel GPU computing as well as in C for serial CPU computing for comparison purpose. A prostate IMRT case with various beamlet and voxel sizes was used to evaluate our implementation. On an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card, we have achieved speedup factors of 20-40 without losing accuracy, compared to the results from an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz CPU. For a specific nine-field prostate IMRT case with 5 x 5 mm(2) beamlet size and 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm(3) voxel size, our GPU implementation takes only 2.8 s to generate an optimal IMRT plan. Our work has therefore solved a major problem in developing online re-planning technologies for adaptive radiotherapy.

  6. TH-A-9A-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - 4D IMRT Planning Using Highly- Parallelizable Particle Swarm Optimization

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    Modiri, A; Gu, X; Sawant, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We present a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based 4D IMRT planning technique designed for dynamic MLC tracking delivery to lung tumors. The key idea is to utilize the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom rather than a constraint in order to achieve improved sparing of organs at risk (OARs). Methods: The target and normal structures were manually contoured on each of the ten phases of a 4DCT scan acquired from a lung SBRT patient who exhibited 1.5cm tumor motion despite the use of abdominal compression. Corresponding ten IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. These plans served as initial guess solutions for the PSO algorithm. Fluence weights were optimized over the entire solution space i.e., 10 phases × 12 beams × 166 control points. The size of the solution space motivated our choice of PSO, which is a highly parallelizable stochastic global optimization technique that is well-suited for such large problems. A summed fluence map was created using an in-house B-spline deformable image registration. Each plan was compared with a corresponding, internal target volume (ITV)-based IMRT plan. Results: The PSO 4D IMRT plan yielded comparable PTV coverage and significantly higher dose—sparing for parallel and serial OARs compared to the ITV-based plan. The dose-sparing achieved via PSO-4DIMRT was: lung Dmean = 28%; lung V20 = 90%; spinal cord Dmax = 23%; esophagus Dmax = 31%; heart Dmax = 51%; heart Dmean = 64%. Conclusion: Truly 4D IMRT that uses the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom can achieve significant dose sparing of serial and parallel OARs. Given the large solution space, PSO represents an attractive, parallelizable tool to achieve globally optimal solutions for such problems. This work was supported through funding from the National Institutes of Health and Varian Medical Systems. Amit Sawant has research funding from Varian Medical Systems, VisionRT Ltd. and Elekta.

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

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    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) uses linear accelerators ... and after this procedure? What is Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and how is it used? Intensity-modulated radiation ...

  8. SU-F-J-64: Comparison of Dosimetric Robustness Between Proton Therapy and IMRT Plans Following Tumor Regression for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

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    Teng, C; Ainsley, C; Teo, B; Burgdorf, B; Berman, A; Levin, W; Xiao, Y; Lin, L; Simone, C; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the light of tumor regression and normal tissue changes, dose distributions can deviate undesirably from what was planned. As a consequence, replanning is sometimes necessary during treatment to ensure continued tumor coverage or to avoid overdosing organs at risk (OARs). Proton plans are generally thought to be less robust than photon plans because of the proton beam’s higher sensitivity to changes in tissue composition, suggesting also a higher likely replanning rate due to tumor regression. The purpose of this study is to compare dosimetric deviations between forward-calculated double scattering (DS) proton plans with IMRT plans upon tumor regression, and assesses their impact on clinical replanning decisions. Methods: Ten consecutive locally advanced NSCLC patients whose tumors shrank > 50% in volume and who received four or more CT scans during radiotherapy were analyzed. All the patients received proton radiotherapy (6660 cGy, 180 cGy/fx). Dosimetric robustness during therapy was characterized by changes in the planning objective metrics as well as by point-by-point root-mean-squared differences for the entire PTV, ITV, and OARs (heart, cord, esophagus, brachial plexus and lungs) DVHs. Results: Sixty-four pairs of DVHs were reviewed by three clinicians, who requested a replanning rate of 16.7% and 18.6% for DS and IMRT plans, respectively, with a high agreement between providers. Robustness of clinical indicators was found to depend on the beam orientation and dose level on the DVH curve. Proton dose increased most in OARs distal to the PTV along the beam path, but these changes were primarily in the mid to low dose levels. In contrast, the variation in IMRT plans occurred primarily in the high dose region. Conclusion: Robustness of clinical indicators depends where on the DVH curves comparisons are made. Similar replanning rates were observed for DS and IMRT plans upon large tumor regression.

  9. Tangential intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the intact breast.

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    Dean, Jenna; Hansen, Carmen J; Westhuyzen, Justin; Waller, Brett; Turnbull, Kirsty; Wood, Maree; Last, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Inverse-planned intensity modulated radiation therapy (IP-IMRT) has potential benefits over other techniques for tangential intact breast radiotherapy. Possible benefits include increased homogeneity, faster planning time, less inter-planner variability and lower doses to organs at risk (OAR). We therefore conducted a pilot study of previously treated intact breast patients to compare the current forward-planned 'field-in-field' technique (FP-IMRT) with an IP-IMRT alternative. The IP-IMRT plans of 20 patients were generated from a template created for the planning system. All patients were prescribed adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy using a hypofractionated regimen of 40.05 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Plans were assessed based on visual inspection of coverage as well as statistical analysis and compared to the clinically acceptable FP-IMRT plans. Patients were planned retrospectively in Monaco 3.2(®) using a laterality-specific, tangential planning template. Minor adjustments were made as necessary to meet the planning criteria in the protocol. Dose coverage, maximums, homogeneity indices and doses to OAR were recorded. The IP-IMRT plans provided more consistent coverage (38.18 Gy vs. 36.08 Gy of D95; P = 0.005), a comparable though higher average maximum (D2 = 42.52 Gy vs. 42.08 Gy; P = 0.0001), more homogeneous plans (homogeneity index = 0.908 vs. 0.861; P = 0.01) and somewhat lower V20 heart and lung doses (0.11% vs. 0.89% for heart; 5.4% vs. 7.52% for lung) than FP-IMRT (P > 0.05). Clinically acceptable plans have been generated using the IP-IMRT templates in Monaco. Improvements in consistency and quality were seen when compared to the FP-IMRT plans. The template-based process is an efficient method to inversely plan IMRT for breast patients. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of

  10. Benchmarking of a treatment planning system for spot scanning proton therapy: Comparison and analysis of robustness to setup errors of photon IMRT and proton SFUD treatment plans of base of skull meningioma

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    Harding, R., E-mail: ruth.harding2@wales.nhs.uk [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Swansea SA2 8QA (United Kingdom); Trnková, P.; Lomax, A. J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Centre for Proton Therapy, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Weston, S. J.; Lilley, J.; Thompson, C. M.; Cosgrove, V. P. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Short, S. C. [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oncology and Clinical Research, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand St James’s Institute of Oncology, Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Loughrey, C. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Oncology, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [St James’s Institute of Oncology, Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds LS9 7TF, United Kingdomand Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Base of skull meningioma can be treated with both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and spot scanned proton therapy (PT). One of the main benefits of PT is better sparing of organs at risk, but due to the physical and dosimetric characteristics of protons, spot scanned PT can be more sensitive to the uncertainties encountered in the treatment process compared with photon treatment. Therefore, robustness analysis should be part of a comprehensive comparison between these two treatment methods in order to quantify and understand the sensitivity of the treatment techniques to uncertainties. The aim of this work was to benchmark a spot scanning treatment planning system for planning of base of skull meningioma and to compare the created plans and analyze their robustness to setup errors against the IMRT technique. Methods: Plans were produced for three base of skull meningioma cases: IMRT planned with a commercial TPS [Monaco (Elekta AB, Sweden)]; single field uniform dose (SFUD) spot scanning PT produced with an in-house TPS (PSI-plan); and SFUD spot scanning PT plan created with a commercial TPS [XiO (Elekta AB, Sweden)]. A tool for evaluating robustness to random setup errors was created and, for each plan, both a dosimetric evaluation and a robustness analysis to setup errors were performed. Results: It was possible to create clinically acceptable treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy of meningioma with a commercially available TPS. However, since each treatment planning system uses different methods, this comparison showed different dosimetric results as well as different sensitivities to setup uncertainties. The results confirmed the necessity of an analysis tool for assessing plan robustness to provide a fair comparison of photon and proton plans. Conclusions: Robustness analysis is a critical part of plan evaluation when comparing IMRT plans with spot scanned proton therapy plans.

  11. A retrospective planning analysis comparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using two optimization algorithms for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

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    Elith, Craig A [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada); School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Dempsey, Shane E; Warren-Forward, Helen M [School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2013-09-15

    The primary aim of this study is to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the radical treatment of prostate cancer using version 10.0 (v10.0) of Varian Medical Systems, RapidArc radiation oncology system. Particular focus was placed on plan quality and the implications on departmental resources. The secondary objective was to compare the results in v10.0 to the preceding version 8.6 (v8.6). Twenty prostate cancer cases were retrospectively planned using v10.0 of Varian's Eclipse and RapidArc software. Three planning techniques were performed: a 5-field IMRT, VMAT using one arc (VMAT-1A), and VMAT with two arcs (VMAT-2A). Plan quality was assessed by examining homogeneity, conformity, the number of monitor units (MUs) utilized, and dose to the organs at risk (OAR). Resource implications were assessed by examining planning and treatment times. The results obtained using v10.0 were also compared to those previously reported by our group for v8.6. In v10.0, each technique was able to produce a dose distribution that achieved the departmental planning guidelines. The IMRT plans were produced faster than VMAT plans and displayed improved homogeneity. The VMAT plans provided better conformity to the target volume, improved dose to the OAR, and required fewer MUs. Treatments using VMAT-1A were significantly faster than both IMRT and VMAT-2A. Comparison between versions 8.6 and 10.0 revealed that in the newer version, VMAT planning was significantly faster and the quality of the VMAT dose distributions produced were of a better quality. VMAT (v10.0) using one or two arcs provides an acceptable alternative to IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer. VMAT-1A has the greatest impact on reducing treatment time.

  12. Dosimetric Comparison of Combined Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Proton Therapy Versus IMRT Alone for Pelvic and Para-Aortic Radiotherapy in Gynecologic Malignancies

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    Berman Milby, Abigail [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Both, Stefan, E-mail: both@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ingram, Mark; Lin, Lilie L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT), and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to the para-aortic (PA) nodal region in women with locally advanced gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: The CT treatment planning scans of 10 consecutive patients treated with IMRT to the pelvis and PA nodes were identified. The clinical target volume was defined by the primary tumor for patients with cervical cancer and by the vagina and paravaginal tissues for patients with endometrial cancer, in addition to the regional lymph nodes. The IMRT, PSPT, and IMPT plans were generated using the Eclipse Treatment Planning System and were analyzed for various dosimetric endpoints. Two groups of treatment plans including proton radiotherapy were created: IMRT to pelvic nodes with PSPT to PA nodes (PSPT/IMRT), and IMRT to pelvic nodes with IMPT to PA nodes (IMPT/IMRT). The IMRT and proton RT plans were optimized to deliver 50.4 Gy or Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE)), respectively. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed for all of the organs at risk. The paired t test was used for all statistical comparison. Results: The small-bowel V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 35}, andV{sub 40} were reduced in PSPT/IMRT by 11%, 18%, 27%, and 43%, respectively (p < 0.01). Treatment with IMPT/IMRT demonstrated a 32% decrease in the small-bowel V{sub 20}. Treatment with PSPT/IMRT showed statistically significant reductions in the body V{sub 5-20}; IMPT/IMRT showed reductions in the body V{sub 5-15}. The dose received by half of both kidneys was reduced by PSPT/IMRT and by IMPT/IMRT. All plans maintained excellent coverage of the planning target volume. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT alone, PSPT/IMRT and IMPT/IMRT had a statistically significant decrease in dose to the small and large bowel and kidneys, while maintaining excellent planning target volume coverage. Further studies should be done to

  13. Institutional Patient-specific IMRT QA Does Not Predict Unacceptable Plan Delivery

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    Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Molineu, Andrea [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kerns, James R.; Faught, Austin M.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Pulliam, Kiley B.; Tonigan, Jackie [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Paola [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Stingo, Francesco [The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether in-house patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) results predict Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC)-Houston phantom results. Methods and Materials: IROC Houston's IMRT head and neck phantoms have been irradiated by numerous institutions as part of clinical trial credentialing. We retrospectively compared these phantom results with those of in-house IMRT QA (following the institution's clinical process) for 855 irradiations performed between 2003 and 2013. The sensitivity and specificity of IMRT QA to detect unacceptable or acceptable plans were determined relative to the IROC Houston phantom results. Additional analyses evaluated specific IMRT QA dosimeters and analysis methods. Results: IMRT QA universally showed poor sensitivity relative to the head and neck phantom, that is, poor ability to predict a failing IROC Houston phantom result. Depending on how the IMRT QA results were interpreted, overall sensitivity ranged from 2% to 18%. For different IMRT QA methods, sensitivity ranged from 3% to 54%. Although the observed sensitivity was particularly poor at clinical thresholds (eg 3% dose difference or 90% of pixels passing gamma), receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that no threshold showed good sensitivity and specificity for the devices evaluated. Conclusions: IMRT QA is not a reasonable replacement for a credentialing phantom. Moreover, the particularly poor agreement between IMRT QA and the IROC Houston phantoms highlights surprising inconsistency in the QA process.

  14. Benchmark IMRT evaluation of a Co-60 MRI-guided radiation therapy system.

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    Wooten, H Omar; Rodriguez, Vivian; Green, Olga; Kashani, Rojano; Santanam, Lakshmi; Tanderup, Kari; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H Harold

    2015-03-01

    A device for MRI-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) that uses cobalt-60 sources to deliver intensity modulated radiation therapy is now commercially available. We investigated the performance of the treatment planning and delivery system against the benchmark recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 119 for IMRT commissioning and demonstrated that the device plans and delivers IMRT treatments within recommended confidence limits and with similar accuracy as linac IMRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SU-E-T-460: Comparison of Proton and IMRT Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

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    Fontenla, S; Zhou, Y; Kowalski, A [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States); Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Leven, T [Procure Proton Therapy Cneter, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Cahlon, O [ProCure Proton Therapy, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Lee, N [Memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center, NY, NY (United States); Hunt, M [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, NY, NY (United States); Mechalakos, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study comparing proton and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer Methods: This study consists of six H and N cancer patients that underwent proton as well as IMRT planning. Patients analyzed had unilateral target volumes, one had prior RT. 3D-conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT) plans with multiple field uniform scanning were generated for delivery on the inclined beam line. IMRT was planned using fixed field sliding window. Final plan evaluations were performed by a radiation oncologist and a physicist. Metrics for comparison included tumor coverage, organ sparing with respect to spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, submandibulars, oral cavity, larynx, brachial plexus, cochleas, normal brain tissue, and skin using relevant indices for these structures. Dose volume histograms were generated as well as a qualitative comparison of isodose distributions between the two modalities. Planning and treatment delivery times were compared. Results: Results showed that IMRT plans offered better conformality in the high dose region as demonstrated by the conformality index for each plan. Ipsilateral cochlea, submandibular gland, and skin doses were lower with IMRT than proton therapy. There was significant sparing of larynx, oral cavity, and brainstem with proton therapy compared to IMRT. This translated into direct patient benefit with no evidence of hoarseness, mucositis, or nausea. Contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were equally spared. IMRT had shorter planning/parts fabrication and treatment times which needs to be taken into account when deciding modality. Conclusion: Sparing of clinically significant normal tissue structures such as oral cavity and larynx for unilateral H and N cancers was seen with 3D-CPT versus IMRT. However, this is at the expense of less conformality at the high dose region and higher skin dose. Future studies are needed with full gantry systems and pencil beam scanning as these

  16. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

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    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham [Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong Hospital, Geelong, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  17. PARETO: A novel evolutionary optimization approach to multiobjective IMRT planning.

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    Fiege, Jason; McCurdy, Boyd; Potrebko, Peter; Champion, Heather; Cull, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    In radiation therapy treatment planning, the clinical objectives of uniform high dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and low dose to the organs-at-risk (OARs) are invariably in conflict, often requiring compromises to be made between them when selecting the best treatment plan for a particular patient. In this work, the authors introduce Pareto-Aware Radiotherapy Evolutionary Treatment Optimization (pareto), a multiobjective optimization tool to solve for beam angles and fluence patterns in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. pareto is built around a powerful multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA), which allows us to treat the problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. We have employed a simple parameterized beam fluence representation with a realistic dose calculation approach, incorporating patient scatter effects, to demonstrate feasibility of the proposed approach on two phantoms. The first phantom is a simple cylindrical phantom containing a target surrounded by three OARs, while the second phantom is more complex and represents a paraspinal patient. pareto results in a large database of Pareto nondominated solutions that represent the necessary trade-offs between objectives. The solution quality was examined for several PTV and OAR fitness functions. The combination of a conformity-based PTV fitness function and a dose-volume histogram (DVH) or equivalent uniform dose (EUD) -based fitness function for the OAR produced relatively uniform and conformal PTV doses, with well-spaced beams. A penalty function added to the fitness functions eliminates hotspots. Comparison of resulting DVHs to those from treatment plans developed with a single-objective fluence optimizer (from a commercial treatment planning system) showed good correlation. Results also indicated that pareto shows promise in optimizing the number

  18. Evaluation of a commercial biologically based IMRT treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenenko, Vladimir A; Reitz, Bodo; Day, Ellen; Qi, X Sharon; Miften, Moyed; Li, X Allen

    2008-12-01

    A new inverse treatment planning system (TPS) for external beam radiation therapy with high energy photons is commercially available that utilizes both dose-volume-based cost functions and a selection of cost functions which are based on biological models. The purpose of this work is to evaluate quality of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans resulting from the use of biological cost functions in comparison to plans designed using a traditional TPS employing dose-volume-based optimization. Treatment planning was performed independently at two institutions. For six cancer patients, including head and neck (one case from each institution), prostate, brain, liver, and rectal cases, segmental multileaf collimator IMRT plans were designed using biological cost functions and compared with clinically used dose-based plans for the same patients. Dose-volume histograms and dosimetric indices, such as minimum, maximum, and mean dose, were extracted and compared between the two types of treatment plans. Comparisons of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (EUD), a previously proposed plan quality index (fEUD), target conformity and heterogeneity indices, and the number of segments and monitor units were also performed. The most prominent feature of the biologically based plans was better sparing of organs at risk (OARs). When all plans from both institutions were combined, the biologically based plans resulted in smaller EUD values for 26 out of 33 OARs by an average of 5.6 Gy (range 0.24 to 15 Gy). Owing to more efficient beam segmentation and leaf sequencing tools implemented in the biologically based TPS compared to the dose-based TPS, an estimated treatment delivery time was shorter in most (five out of six) cases with some plans showing up to 50% reduction. The biologically based plans were generally characterized by a smaller conformity index, but greater heterogeneity index compared to the dose-based plans. Overall, compared to plans based on dose

  19. Arc binary intensity modulated radiation therapy (AB IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun

    The state of the art Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) has been one of the most significant breakthroughs in the cancer treatment in the past 30 years. There are two types of IMRT systems. The first system is the binary-based tomotherapy, represented by the Peacock (Nomos Corp) and Tomo unit (TomoTherapy Inc.), adopting specific binary collimator leafs to deliver intensity modulated radiation fields in a serial or helical fashion. The other uses the conventional dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver intensity modulated fields through a number of gantry positions. The proposed Arc Binary IMRT attempts to deliver Tomo-like IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC and combines the advantages of the two types of IMRT techniques: (1) maximizing the number of pencil beams for better dose optimization, (2) enabling conventional linear accelerator with dynamic MLC to deliver Tomo-like IMRT. In order to deliver IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC in a binary fashion, the slice-by-slice treatment with limited slice thickness has been proposed in the thesis to accommodate the limited MLC traveling speed. Instead of moving the patient to subsequent treatment slices, the proposed method offsets MLC to carry out the whole treatment, slice by slice sequentially, thus avoid patient position error. By denoting one arc pencil beam set as a gene, genetic algorithm (GA) is used as the searching engine for the dose optimization process. The selection of GA parameters is a crucial step and has been studied in depth so that the optimization process will converge with reasonable speed. Several hypothetical and clinical cases have been tested with the proposed IMRT method. The comparison of the dose distribution with other commercially available IMRT systems demonstrates the clear advantage of the new method. The proposed Arc Binary Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy is not only theoretically sound but practically feasible. The implementation of this method would expand the

  20. Plan averaging for multicriteria navigation of sliding window IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, David, E-mail: dcraft@partners.org; Papp, Dávid; Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To describe a method for combining sliding window plans [intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)] for use in treatment plan averaging, which is needed for Pareto surface navigation based multicriteria treatment planning. Methods: The authors show that by taking an appropriately defined average of leaf trajectories of sliding window plans, the authors obtain a sliding window plan whose fluence map is the exact average of the fluence maps corresponding to the initial plans. In the case of static-beam IMRT, this also implies that the dose distribution of the averaged plan is the exact dosimetric average of the initial plans. In VMAT delivery, the dose distribution of the averaged plan is a close approximation of the dosimetric average of the initial plans. Results: The authors demonstrate the method on three Pareto optimal VMAT plans created for a demanding paraspinal case, where the tumor surrounds the spinal cord. The results show that the leaf averaged plans yield dose distributions that approximate the dosimetric averages of the precomputed Pareto optimal plans well. Conclusions: The proposed method enables the navigation of deliverable Pareto optimal plans directly, i.e., interactive multicriteria exploration of deliverable sliding window IMRT and VMAT plans, eliminating the need for a sequencing step after navigation and hence the dose degradation that is caused by such a sequencing step.

  1. A calibration method for patient specific IMRT QA using a single therapy verification film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arvind Kumar; Oinam, Arun S; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sandhu, I S; Sharma, S C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to develop and verify the single film calibration procedure used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance. Radiographic films have been regularly used in routine commissioning of treatment modalities and verification of treatment planning system (TPS). The radiation dosimetery based on radiographic films has ability to give absolute two-dimension dose distribution and prefer for the IMRT quality assurance. However, the single therapy verification film gives a quick and significant reliable method for IMRT verification. A single extended dose rate (EDR 2) film was used to generate the sensitometric curve of film optical density and radiation dose. EDR 2 film was exposed with nine 6 cm × 6 cm fields of 6 MV photon beam obtained from a medical linear accelerator at 5-cm depth in solid water phantom. The nine regions of single film were exposed with radiation doses raging from 10 to 362 cGy. The actual dose measurements inside the field regions were performed using 0.6 cm(3) ionization chamber. The exposed film was processed after irradiation using a VIDAR film scanner and the value of optical density was noted for each region. Ten IMRT plans of head and neck carcinoma were used for verification using a dynamic IMRT technique, and evaluated using the gamma index method with TPS calculated dose distribution. Sensitometric curve has been generated using a single film exposed at nine field region to check quantitative dose verifications of IMRT treatments. The radiation scattered factor was observed to decrease exponentially with the increase in the distance from the centre of each field region. The IMRT plans based on calibration curve were verified using the gamma index method and found to be within acceptable criteria. The single film method proved to be superior to the traditional calibration method and produce fast daily film calibration for highly accurate IMRT verification.

  2. Physically constrained voxel-based penalty adaptation for ultra-fast IMRT planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahl, Niklas; Bangert, Mark; Kamerling, Cornelis P.; Ziegenhein, Peter; Bol, GH|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/343084309; Raaymakers, Bas W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229639410; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Conventional treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a trial-and-error process that usually involves tedious tweaking of optimization parameters. Here, we present an algorithm that automates part of this process, in particular the adaptation of voxel-based penalties

  3. SU-E-T-309: Dosimetric Comparison of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Treatment Plan Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies (IMRTs), Dual Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (DA-VMAT) and Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (SA-VMAT) for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, R; Janardhan, N; Bhavani, P; Surendran, J; Saranganathan, B; Ibrahim, S; Jhonson, B; Madhuri, B [Omega Hospitals, Hyderabad, Telangana (India); Anuradha, C [Vit University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 in 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered

  4. SU-E-J-125: A Novel IMRT Planning Technique to Spare Sacral Bone Marrow in Pelvic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S; Bhatia, S; Sun, W; Menda, Y; Ponto, L; Gross, B; Buatti, J [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Develop an IMRT planning technique that can preferentially spare sacral bone marrow for pelvic cancer patients. Methods: Six pelvic cancer patients (two each with anal, cervical, and rectal cancer) were enrolled in an IRB approved protocol to obtain FLT PET images at simulation, during, and post chemoradiation therapy. Initially, conventional IMRT plans were created to maintain target coverage and reduce dose to OARs such as bladder, bowel, rectum, and femoral heads. Simulation FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans to spare bone marrow identified as regions with SUV of 2 or greater (IMRT-BMS) within the pelvic bones from top of L3 to 5mm below the greater trochanter without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing when compared to the initial IMRT plan. IMRT-BMS plans used 8–10 beam angles that surrounded the subject. These plans were used for treatment. Retrospectively, the same simulation FLT PET images were used to create IMRT plans that spared bone marrow located in the sacral pelvic bone region (IMRT-FAN) also without compromising PTV coverage or OAR sparing. IMRT-FAN plans used 16 beam angles every 12° anteriorly from 90° – 270°. Optimization objectives for the sacral bone marrow avoidance region were weighted to reduce ≥V10. Results: IMRT-FAN reduced dose to the sacral bone marrow for all six subjects. The average V5, V10, V20, and V30 differences from the IMRT-BMS plan were −2.2 ± 1.7%, −11.4 ± 3.6%, −17.6 ± 5.1%, and −19.1 ± 8.1% respectively. Average PTV coverage change was 0.5% ± 0.8% from the conventional IMRT plan. Conclusion: An IMRT planning technique that uses beams from the anterior and lateral directions reduced the volume of sacral bone marrow that receives ≤10Gy while maintaining PTV coverage and OAR sparing. Additionally, the volume of sacral bone marrow that received 20 or 30 Gy was also reduced.

  5. SU-F-T-391: Comparative Study of Treatment Planning Between IMRT and IMAT for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, J [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong province (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric differences between intensitymodulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients with regard to the sparing effect on organs at risk (OARs), plan quality, and delivery efficiency. Methods: Ten MPM patients were recruited in this study. To avoid the inter-operator variability, IMRT and IMAT plans for each patient were performed by one experienced dosimetrist. The treatment planning optimization process was carried out using the Eclipse 13.0 software. For a fair comparison, the planning target volume (PTV) coverage of the two plans was normalized to the same level. The treatment plans were evaluated on the following dosimetric variables: conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for PTV, OARs dose, and the delivery efficiency for each plan. Results: All plans satisfied clinical requirements. The IMAT plans gained better CI and HI. The IMRT plans performed better sparing for heart and lung. Less MUs and control points were found in the IMAT plans. IMAT shortened delivery time compared with IMRT. Conclusion: For MPM, IMAT gains better conformity and homogeneity for PTV with IMRT, but increases the irradiation dose for OARs. IMAT shows an advantage in delivery efficiency.

  6. Conversion of helical tomotherapy plans to step-and-shoot IMRT plans--Pareto front evaluation of plans from a new treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Kristoffer; Ceberg, Crister; Engström, Per; Benedek, Hunor; Nilsson, Per; Knöös, Tommy

    2011-06-01

    The resulting plans from a new type of treatment planning system called SharePlan have been studied. This software allows for the conversion of treatment plans generated in a TomoTherapy system for helical delivery, into plans deliverable on C-arm linear accelerators (linacs), which is of particular interest for clinics with a single TomoTherapy unit. The purpose of this work was to evaluate and compare the plans generated in the SharePlan system with the original TomoTherapy plans and with plans produced in our clinical treatment planning system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on C-arm linacs. In addition, we have analyzed how the agreement between SharePlan and TomoTherapy plans depends on the number of beams and the total number of segments used in the optimization. Optimized plans were generated for three prostate and three head-and-neck (H&N) cases in the TomoTherapy system, and in our clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) used for IMRT planning with step-and-shoot delivery. The TomoTherapy plans were converted into step-and-shoot IMRT plans in SharePlan. For each case, a large number of Pareto optimal plans were created to compare plans generated in SharePlan with plans generated in the Tomotherapy system and in the clinical TPS. In addition, plans were generated in SharePlan for the three head-and-neck cases to evaluate how the plan quality varied with the number of beams used. Plans were also generated with different number of beams and segments for other patient cases. This allowed for an evaluation of how to minimize the number of required segments in the converted IMRT plans without compromising the agreement between them and the original TomoTherapy plans. The plans made in SharePlan were as good as or better than plans from our clinical system, but they were not as good as the original TomoTherapy plans. This was true for both the head-and-neck and the prostate cases, although the differences between the plans for the latter were

  7. Evaluation of homogeneity and dose conformity in IMRT planning in prostate radiotherapy; Avaliacao da homogeneidade e conformidade de dose em planejamentos de IMRT de prostata em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Juliane S.; Leidens, Matheus; Estacio, Daniela R., E-mail: juliane.lopes@pucrs.br [Hospital Sao Lucas (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Razera, Ricardo A.Z.; Streck, Elaine E.; Silva, Ana M.M. da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica

    2015-12-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the dose distribution homogeneity and conformity of radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. Data from 34 treatment plans of Hospital Sao Lucas of PUCRS, where those plans were executed, were retrospectively analyzed. All of them were done with 6MV X-rays from a linear accelerator CLINAC IX, and the prescription doses varied between 60 and 74 Gy. Analyses showing the homogeneity and conformity indices for the dose distribution of those plans were made. During these analyses, some comparisons with the traditional radiation therapy planning technic, the 3D-CRT, were discussed. The results showed that there is no correlation between the prescribed dose and the homogeneity and conformity indices, indicating that IMRT works very well even for higher doses. Furthermore, a comparison between the results obtained and the recommendations of ICRU 83 was carried out. It has also been observed that the indices were really close to the ideal values. 82.4% of the cases showed a difference below 5% of the ideal value for the index of conformity, and 88.2% showed a difference below 10% for the homogeneity index. Concluding, it is possible to confirm the quality of the analyzed radiation therapy plans of prostate cancer using IMRT. (author)

  8. Modeling the dosimetry of organ-at-risk in head and neck IMRT planning: An intertechnique and interinstitutional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Jun, E-mail: jun-lian@med.unc.edu; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yuan, Lulin, E-mail: lulin.yuan@duke.edu; Yoo, David P.; Yin, FangFang; Wu, Q. Jackie, E-mail: jackie.wu@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Ge, Yaorong [Department of Software and Information Systems, The University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To build a statistical model to quantitatively correlate the anatomic features of structures and the corresponding dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head and neck (HN) Tomotherapy (Tomo) plans. To study if the model built upon one intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique (such as conventional Linac) can be used to predict anticipated organs-at-risk (OAR) DVH of patients treated with a different IMRT technique (such as Tomo). To study if the model built upon the clinical experience of one institution can be used to aid IMRT planning for another institution. Methods: Forty-four Tomotherapy intensity modulate radiotherapy plans of HN cases (Tomo-IMRT) from Institution A were included in the study. A different patient group of 53 HN fixed gantry IMRT (FG-IMRT) plans was selected from Institution B. The analyzed OARs included the parotid, larynx, spinal cord, brainstem, and submandibular gland. Two major groups of anatomical features were considered: the volumetric information and the spatial information. The volume information includes the volume of target, OAR, and overlapped volume between target and OAR. The spatial information of OARs relative to PTVs was represented by the distance-to-target histogram (DTH). Important anatomical and dosimetric features were extracted from DTH and DVH by principal component analysis. Two regression models, one for Tomotherapy plan and one for IMRT plan, were built independently. The accuracy of intratreatment-modality model prediction was validated by a leave one out cross-validation method. The intertechnique and interinstitution validations were performed by using the FG-IMRT model to predict the OAR dosimetry of Tomo-IMRT plans. The dosimetry of OARs, under the same and different institutional preferences, was analyzed to examine the correlation between the model prediction and planning protocol. Results: Significant patient anatomical factors contributing to OAR dose sparing in HN Tomotherapy plans have been

  9. A dose-volume-based tool for evaluating and ranking IMRT treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miften, Moyed M; Das, Shiva K; Su, Min; Marks, Lawrence B

    2004-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy is commonly used for patients with cancer. While tumor shrinkage and palliation are frequently achieved, local control and cure remain elusive for many cancers. With regard to local control, the fundamental problem is that radiotherapy-induced normal tissue injury limits the dose that can be delivered to the tumor. While intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows for the delivery of higher tumor doses and the sparing of proximal critical structures, multiple competing plans can be generated based on dosimetric and/or biological constraints that need to be considered/compared. In this work, an IMRT treatment plan evaluation and ranking tool, based on dosimetric criteria, is presented. The treatment plan with the highest uncomplicated target conformity index (TCI+) is ranked at the top. The TCI+ is a dose-volume-based index that considers both a target conformity index (TCI) and a normal tissue-sparing index (NTSI). TCI+ is designed to assist in the process of judging the merit of a clinical treatment plan. To demonstrate the utility of this tool, several competing lung and prostate IMRT treatment plans are compared. Results show that the plan with the highest TCI+ values accomplished the competing goals of tumor coverage and critical structures sparing best, among rival treatment plans for both treatment sites. The study demonstrates, first, that dose-volume-based indices, which summarize complex dose distributions through a single index, can be used to automatically select the optimal plan among competing plans, and second, that this dose-volume-based index may be appropriate for ranking IMRT dose distributions.

  10. Comparison of step and shoot IMRT treatment plans generated by three inverse treatment planning systems; Comparacion de tratamientos de IMRT estatica generados por tres sistemas de planificacion inversa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Moreno, J. M.; Zucca Aparicio, D.; Fernandez leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Minambres Moro, A.

    2011-07-01

    One of the most important issues of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments using the step-and-shoot technique is the number of segments and monitor units (MU) for treatment delivery. These parameters depend heavily on the inverse optimization module of the treatment planning system (TPS) used. Three commercial treatment planning systems: CMS XiO, iPlan and Prowess Panther have been evaluated. With each of them we have generated a treatment plan for the same group of patients, corresponding to clinical cases. Dosimetric results, MU calculated and number of segments were compared. Prowess treatment planning system generates plans with a number of segments significantly lower than other systems, while MU are less than a half. It implies important reductions in leakage radiation and delivery time. Degradation in the final dose calculation of dose is very small, because it directly optimizes positions of multileaf collimator (MLC). (Author) 13 refs.

  11. Dosimetric comparisons of IMRT planning using MCO and DMPO techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiongfei; Lang, Jinyi; Li, Ningshan; Wang, Pei; Li, Jie; Yang, Jack; Chen, Yazheng

    2017-07-20

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of multi-criteria optimization (MCO) in the planning and optimization of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Twenty (20) IMRT patients (ten (10) with prostate cancer and ten (10) with lung cancer) were randomly selected. The treatment plans for these patients were designed using direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). Based on these plans, new plans were designed using multi-criteria optimization (MCO), keeping the optimization objectives and constraints unchanged. Comparisons were made between the new plans, which were based on MCO and DMPO, including the dose distribution, dose volume histogram (DVH), the optimization time and the number of monitor units (MUs). The plan designed using both optimization approaches satisfied all clinical requirements. For similar or better target coverage, the rectum, bladder and small bowel were better protected using MCO than when using DMPO. Additionally, MCO reduced the time for optimization by 58% on average, whereas the MUs increased the time for optimization by 32% on average for prostate cancer. For lung cancer cases, the entire lung, heart and spinal cord were better protected using MCO compared to DMPO. Similarly, MCO reduced the time for optimization by 59% on average, whereas the MUs increased the time for optimization by 11% on average. Compared to DMPO, MCO reduces the dose of the organs at risk (OAR) and shortens the time required for optimization.

  12. GPU-Monte Carlo based fast IMRT plan optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbao Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT plan optimization needs pre-calculated beamlet dose distribution. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of high computation speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions, particularly in cases with high levels of inhomogeneity, may mislead optimization, hindering the resulting plan quality. It is desire to use Monte Carlo (MC methods for beamlet dose calculations. Yet, the long computational time from repeated dose calculations for a number of beamlets prevents this application. It is our objective to integrate a GPU-based MC dose engine in lung IMRT optimization using a novel two-steps workflow.Methods: A GPU-based MC code gDPM is used. Each particle is tagged with an index of a beamlet where the source particle is from. Deposit dose are stored separately for beamlets based on the index. Due to limited GPU memory size, a pyramid space is allocated for each beamlet, and dose outside the space is neglected. A two-steps optimization workflow is proposed for fast MC-based optimization. At first step, a rough dose calculation is conducted with only a few number of particle per beamlet. Plan optimization is followed to get an approximated fluence map. In the second step, more accurate beamlet doses are calculated, where sampled number of particles for a beamlet is proportional to the intensity determined previously. A second-round optimization is conducted, yielding the final result.Results: For a lung case with 5317 beamlets, 105 particles per beamlet in the first round, and 108 particles per beam in the second round are enough to get a good plan quality. The total simulation time is 96.4 sec.Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel two-step optimization workflow are developed. The high efficiency allows the use of MC for IMRT optimizations.--------------------------------Cite this article as: Li Y, Tian Z

  13. 3D conformal planning using low segment multi-criteria IMRT optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Fazal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate automated multicriteria optimization (MCO)-- designed for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), but invoked with limited segmentation -- to efficiently produce high quality 3D conformal treatment (3D-CRT) plans. Methods: Ten patients previously planned with 3D-CRT were replanned with a low-segment inverse multicriteria optimized technique. The MCO-3D plans used the same number of beams, beam geometry and machine parameters of the corresponding 3D plans, but were limited to an energy of 6 MV. The MCO-3D plans were optimized using a fluence-based MCO IMRT algorithm and then, after MCO navigation, segmented with a low number of segments. The 3D and MCO-3D plans were compared by evaluating mean doses to individual organs at risk (OARs), mean doses to combined OARs, homogeneity indexes (HI), monitor units (MUs), physician preference, and qualitative assessments of planning time and plan customizability. Results: The MCO-3D plans significantly reduced the OAR mean doses and monitor unit...

  14. Introduction to Radiotherapy with Photon and Electron Beams and Treatment Planning from Conformal Radiotherapy to IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Jan J.

    2007-11-01

    Besides surgery and chemotherapy, radiation therapy is one of the three main treatment options for cancer patients. This paper provides an introduction to the basic principles of radiotherapy with photons and electrons. It includes a brief summary of the physical properties for photon and electron beams as well as a description of treatment machines used to create these beams. The second part introduces the treatment planning process as it is commonly employed in radiotherapy. It covers dose calculation algorithms, conventional planning strategies for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and optimization techniques for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  15. 2. IMRT Symposion - IMRT in the light of new technical developments. Presentations, image gallery; 2. IMRT-Symposium - Die IMRT im Lichte neuer technischer Entwicklungen. Praesentationen, Bildergalerie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The volume covers the following presentations: Transition from conformal 3D planning to IM; experiences with IMRT for breast carcinomas; experiences with IMRT for head-neck carcinomas; IMRT for palliative irradiations; acute and late toxicity after IMRT of prostate carcinomas; first experiences with the patient topography laser system in Nordhausen; radiobiological fundamentals: secondary carcinomas after oncological therapy; quality assurance in IMRT; development of a quality management system for a nuclear clinic with IMRT; status of the automatic contour recognition in irradiation planning; intergration of CT, MR PET-CT data in for the irradiation planning in IMRT; dose painting: simultaneous integrated boost; relief of the heart by IMRT; intensity modulated brachytherapy of the localized prostate carcinoma; IMRT in radiotherapeutics: possibilities and limitations; IMRT with tomotherapy in comparison with IMRT with LINAC; image guidance for optimization of cranial and extracranial IMRT; volumetric modulated ARC therapy; lung relief by respiration triggered irradiation; patient positioning with cone-beam-CT; SIB-IMRT for head-neck carcinomas: risks; first experiences with IMRT with IGRT support.

  16. A non-voxel-based broad-beam (NVBB) framework for IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiguo

    2010-12-07

    We present a novel framework that enables very large scale intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning in limited computation resources with improvements in cost, plan quality and planning throughput. Current IMRT optimization uses a voxel-based beamlet superposition (VBS) framework that requires pre-calculation and storage of a large amount of beamlet data, resulting in large temporal and spatial complexity. We developed a non-voxel-based broad-beam (NVBB) framework for IMRT capable of direct treatment parameter optimization (DTPO). In this framework, both objective function and derivative are evaluated based on the continuous viewpoint, abandoning 'voxel' and 'beamlet' representations. Thus pre-calculation and storage of beamlets are no longer needed. The NVBB framework has linear complexities (O(N(3))) in both space and time. The low memory, full computation and data parallelization nature of the framework render its efficient implementation on the graphic processing unit (GPU). We implemented the NVBB framework and incorporated it with the TomoTherapy treatment planning system (TPS). The new TPS runs on a single workstation with one GPU card (NVBB-GPU). Extensive verification/validation tests were performed in house and via third parties. Benchmarks on dose accuracy, plan quality and throughput were compared with the commercial TomoTherapy TPS that is based on the VBS framework and uses a computer cluster with 14 nodes (VBS-cluster). For all tests, the dose accuracy of these two TPSs is comparable (within 1%). Plan qualities were comparable with no clinically significant difference for most cases except that superior target uniformity was seen in the NVBB-GPU for some cases. However, the planning time using the NVBB-GPU was reduced many folds over the VBS-cluster. In conclusion, we developed a novel NVBB framework for IMRT optimization. The continuous viewpoint and DTPO nature of the algorithm eliminate the need for beamlets and lead to better plan

  17. A conceptual model integrating spatial information to assess target volume coverage for IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, K S Clifford; Blanco, Angel I; Dempsey, James F

    2003-08-01

    We propose a model that integrates the spatial location of each voxel within a clinical target volume (CTV) to differentiate the merit of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans with similar dose-volume histogram (DVH). This conceptual model is based on the hypothesis that various subregions within a given CTV that may carry different degree of risk in containing microscopic disease. We hypothesize that a correlation between the probability of microscopic tumor extension and the risk of lymph node metastasis of a particular voxel point within CTV can be inferred based on its distance from the surface of radiographically evident gross disease. A preliminary observation was gathered from existing clinicopathologic data, and, based on these observations, a conceptual model for exponential-decay microscopic-extension probability function around primary tumor and linear function parameters relating the likelihood of lymph node metastasis to the distance from primary tumor was proposed. This model was generated to provide scoring functions to examine the merit of IMRT plans. To test the feasibility of this model, we generated two IMRT plans with similar and clinically acceptable DVH-based CTV coverage. Planning data were transferred to a data analysis software package (Matlab, The Mathworks Inc.). A 3D scoring function was calculated for each voxel inside the CTV. The adequacy of target coverage was evaluated by several novel approaches: 2D dose-volume scoring-function histograms (DVSH), the integral probability of relative residual tumor burden (RRTB), and tumor control probabilities (TCP) employing the scoring function as a pseudo-clonogen density distribution. Incorporating parameters for the risk of containing microscopic disease in each voxel into the scoring function algorithm, 2D DVSHs, RRTBs, integral RRTBs, and TCPs were computed. On each axial image, an RRTB map could locate the regions at greatest risk. These scoring functions were able to

  18. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment planning with IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Claus A; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming; Sapru, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    The study was undertaken in order to compare dose plans for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) dose plans in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Clinical data from 20 consecutive patients treated with IMRT are presented. For 11 patients 3D...

  19. Prostate Dose Escalation by a Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Lei

    2008-01-01

    ...) Developed a voxel-specific penalty scheme for TRV-based inverse planning; (iv) Established a cine-EPID image retrospective dose reconstruction in IMRT dose delivery for adaptive planning and IMRT dose verification. These works are both timely and important and should lead to widespread impact on prostate cancer management.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in total scalp irradiation: a single institutional experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostheimer, Christian; Huebsch, Patrick; Janich, Martin; Gerlach, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Total scalp irradiation (TSI) is a rare but challenging indication. We previously reported that non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was superior to coplanar IMRT in organ-at-risk (OAR) protection and target dose distribution. This consecutive treatment planning study compared IMRT with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). A retrospective treatment plan databank search was performed and 5 patient cases were randomly selected. Cranial imaging was restored from the initial planning computed tomography (CT) and target volumes and OAR were redelineated. For each patients, three treatment plans were calculated (coplanar/non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT; prescribed dose 50 Gy, single dose 2 Gy). Conformity, homogeneity and dose volume histograms were used for plan. VMAT featured the lowest monitor units and the sharpest dose gradient (1.6 Gy/mm). Planning target volume (PTV) coverage and homogeneity was better in VMAT (coverage, 0.95; homogeneity index [HI], 0.118) compared to IMRT (coverage, 0.94; HI, 0.119) but coplanar IMRT produced the most conformal plans (conformity index [CI], 0.43). Minimum PTV dose range was 66.8% –88.4% in coplanar, 77.5%–88.2% in non-coplanar IMRT and 82.8%–90.3% in VMAT. Mean dose to the brain, brain stem, optic system (maximum dose) and lenses were 18.6, 13.2, 9.1, and 5.2 Gy for VMAT, 21.9, 13.4, 14.5, and 6.3 Gy for non-coplanar and 22.8, 16.5, 11.5, and 5.9 Gy for coplanar IMRT. Maximum optic chiasm dose was 7.7, 8.4, and 11.1 Gy (non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT, and coplanar IMRT). Target coverage, homogeneity and OAR protection, was slightly superior in VMAT plans which also produced the sharpest dose gradient towards healthy tissue.

  1. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT: differences in target volumes and improvement in clinically relevant doses to small bowel in rectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delclos Marc E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong dose-volume relationship exists between the amount of small bowel receiving low- to intermediate-doses of radiation and the rates of acute, severe gastrointestinal toxicity, principally diarrhea. There is considerable interest in the application of highly conformal treatment approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, to reduce dose to adjacent organs-at-risk in the treatment of carcinoma of the rectum. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive dosimetric evaluation of IMRT compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in standard, preoperative treatment for rectal cancer. Methods Using RTOG consensus anorectal contouring guidelines, treatment volumes were generated for ten patients treated preoperatively at our institution for rectal carcinoma, with IMRT plans compared to plans derived from classic anatomic landmarks, as well as 3DCRT plans treating the RTOG consensus volume. The patients were all T3, were node-negative (N = 1 or node-positive (N = 9, and were planned to a total dose of 45-Gy. Pairwise comparisons were made between IMRT and 3DCRT plans with respect to dose-volume histogram parameters. Results IMRT plans had superior PTV coverage, dose homogeneity, and conformality in treatment of the gross disease and at-risk nodal volume, in comparison to 3DCRT. Additionally, in comparison to the 3DCRT plans, IMRT achieved a concomitant reduction in doses to the bowel (small bowel mean dose: 18.6-Gy IMRT versus 25.2-Gy 3DCRT; p = 0.005, bladder (V40Gy: 56.8% IMRT versus 75.4% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, pelvic bones (V40Gy: 47.0% IMRT versus 56.9% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, and femoral heads (V40Gy: 3.4% IMRT versus 9.1% 3DCRT; p = 0.005, with an improvement in absolute volumes of small bowel receiving dose levels known to induce clinically-relevant acute toxicity (small bowel V15Gy: 138-cc IMRT versus 157-cc 3DCRT; p = 0.005. We found that the IMRT treatment volumes were typically larger than that

  2. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Handorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  3. A planning and delivery study of a rotational IMRT technique with burst delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainz, Kristofer; Chen, Guang-Pei; Chang, Yu-Wen; Prah, Douglas; Sharon Qi, X.; Shukla, Himanshu P.; Stahl, Johannes; Allen Li, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Siemens Oncology Care Systems, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: A novel rotational IMRT (rIMRT) technique using burst delivery (continuous gantry rotation with beam off during MLC repositioning) is investigated. The authors evaluate the plan quality and delivery efficiency and accuracy of this dynamic technique with a conventional flat 6 MV photon beam. Methods: Burst-delivery rIMRT was implemented in a planning system and delivered with a 160-MLC linac. Ten rIMRT plans were generated for five anonymized patient cases encompassing head and neck, brain, prostate, and prone breast. All plans were analyzed retrospectively and not used for treatment. Among the varied plan parameters were the number of optimization points, number of arcs, gantry speed, and gantry angle range (alpha) over which the beam is turned on at each optimization point. Combined rotational/step-and-shoot rIMRT plans were also created by superimposing multiple-segment static fields at several optimization points. The rIMRT trial plans were compared with each other and with plans generated using helical tomotherapy and VMAT. Burst-mode rotational IMRT plans were delivered and verified using a diode array, ionization chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and film. Results: Burst-mode rIMRT can achieve plan quality comparable to helical tomotherapy, while the former may lead to slightly better OAR sparing for certain cases and the latter generally achieves slightly lower hot spots. Few instances were found in which increasing the number of optimization points above 36, or superimposing step-and-shoot IMRT segments, led to statistically significant improvements in OAR sparing. Using an additional rIMRT partial arc yielded substantial OAR dose improvements for the brain case. Measured doses from the rIMRT plan delivery were within 4% of the plan calculation in low dose gradient regions. Delivery time range was 228-375 s for single-arc rIMRT 200-cGy prescription with a 300 MU/min dose rate, comparable to tomotherapy and VMAT. Conclusions: Rotational IMRT

  4. IMRT dose delivery effects in radiotherapy treatment planning using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Neelam

    Inter- and intra-leaf transmission and head scatter can play significant roles in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)-based treatment deliveries. In order to accurately calculate the dose in the IMRT planning process, it is therefore important that the detailed geometry of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC), in addition to other components in the accelerator treatment head be accurately modeled. In this thesis Monte Carlo (MC) methods have been used to model the treatment head of a Varian linear accelerator. A comprehensive model of the Varian 120-leaf MLC has been developed within the DPM MC code and has been verified against measurements in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantom geometries under different IMRT delivery circumstances. Accuracy of the MLC model in simulating details in the leaf geometry has been established over a range of arbitrarily shaped fields and IMRT fields. A sensitivity analysis of the effect of the electron-on-target parameters and the structure of the flattening filter on the accuracy of calculated dose distributions has been conducted. Adjustment of the electron-on-target parameters resulting in optimal agreement with measurements was an iterative process, with the final parameters representing a tradeoff between small (3x3 cm2) and large (40x40 cm2) field sizes. A novel method based on adaptive kernel density estimation, in the phase space simulation process is also presented as an alternative to particle recycling. Using this model dosimetric differences between MLC-based static (SMLC) and dynamic (DMLC) deliveries have been investigated. Differences between SMLC and DMLC, possibly related to fluence and/or spectral changes, appear to vary systematically with the density of the medium. The effect of fluence modulation due to leaf sequencing shows differences, up to 10% between plans developed with 1% and 10% fluence intervals for both SMLC and DMLC-delivered sequences. Dose differences between planned and delivered leaf sequences

  5. SU-E-T-503: Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Versus Intensity Modulated X-Ray Therapy (IMRT) for Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Dosimetric Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, H; Zhao, L; Prabhu, K; Rana, S; Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose This study compares the dosimetric parameters in treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma between intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and intensity modulated x-ray radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We studied four patients treated at our institution. All patients were simulated supine with 4D-CT using a GE light speed simulator with a maximum slice thickness of 3mm. The average CT and an internal target volume to account for respiration motion were used for planning. Both IMRT and IMPT plans were created using Elekta’s CMSXiO treatment planning system (TPS). The prescription dose was 58.05 CGE in 15 fractions. The IMRT plans had five beams with combination of co-planar and non-co-planar. The IMPT plans had 2 to 3 beams. Dose comparison was performed based on the averaged results of the four patients. Results The mean dose and V95% to PTV were 58.24CGE, 98.57% for IMPT, versus 57.34CGE and 96.68% for IMRT, respectively. The V10, V20, V30 and mean dose of the normal liver for IMPT were 23.10%, 18.61%, 13.75% and 9.78 CGE; and 47.19%, 37.55%, 22.73% and 17.12CGE for IMRT. The spinal cord didn’t receive any dose in IMPT technique, but received a maximum of 18.77CGE for IMRT. The IMPT gave lower maximum dose to the stomach as compared to IMRT (19.26 vs 26.35CGE). V14 for left and right kidney was 0% and 2.32% for IMPT and 3.89% and 29.54% for IMRT. The mean dose, V35, V40 and V45 for small bowl were similar in both techniques, 0.74CGE, 6.27cc, 4.85cc and 3.53 cc for IMPT, 3.47CGE, 9.73cc, 7.61cc 5.35cc for IMRT. Conclusion Based on this study, IMPT plans gave less dose to the critical structures such as normal liver, kidney, stomach and spinal cord as compared to IMRT plans, potentially leading to less toxicity and providing better quality of life for patients.

  6. The Quality Control of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT for ONCOR Siemens Linear Accelerators Using Film Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Jabbari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT has made a significant progress in radiation therapy centers in recent years. In this method, each radiation beam is divided into many subfields that create a field with a modulated intensity. Considering the complexity of this method, the quality control for IMRT is a topic of interest for researchers. This article is about the various steps of planning and quality control of Siemens linear accelerators for IMRT, using film dosimetry. This article in addition to review of the techniques, discusses the details of experiments and possible sources of errors which are not mentioned in the protocols and other references. Materials and Methods This project was carried out in Isfahan Milad hospital which has two Siemens ONCOR linear accelerators. Both accelerators are equipped with Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC which enables us to perform IMRT delivery in the step-and-shoot method. The quality control consists of various experiments related to the sections of radiation therapy. In these experiments, the accuracy of some components such as treatment planning system, imaging device (CT, MLC, control system of accelerator, and stability of the output are evaluated. The dose verification is performed using film dosimetry method. The films were KODAK-EDR2, which were calibrated before the experiments. One of the important steps is the comparison of the calculated dose with planning system and the measured dose in experiments. Results The results of the experiments in various steps have been acceptable according to the standard protocols. The calibration of MLC and evaluation of the leakage through the leaves of MLC was performed by using the film dosimetry and visual check. In comparison with calculated and measured dose, more that 80% of the points have to be in agreement within 3% of the value. In our experiments, between 85 and 90% of the points had such an agreement with IMRT delivery. Conclusion

  7. American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartford, Alan C; Galvin, James M; Beyer, David C; Eichler, Thomas J; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Kavanagh, Brian; Schultz, Christopher J; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2012-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a complex technique for the delivery of radiation therapy preferentially to target structures while minimizing doses to adjacent normal critical structures. It is widely utilized in the treatment of a variety of clinical indications in radiation oncology, including tumors of the central nervous system, head and neck, breast, prostate, gastrointestinal tract, and gynecologic organs, as well as in situations where previous radiation therapy has been delivered, and has allowed for significant therapeutic advances in many clinical areas. IMRT treatment planning and delivery is a complex process. Safe and reliable delivery of IMRT requires appropriate process design and adherence to quality assurance (QA) standards. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for IMRT. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist. Factors with respect to the QA of the treatment planning system, treatment-planning process, and treatment-delivery process are discussed, as are issues related to the utilization of volumetric modulated arc therapy. Patient-specific QA procedures are presented. Successful IMRT programs involve integration of many processes: patient selection, patient positioning/immobilization, target definition, treatment plan development, and accurate treatment delivery. Appropriate QA procedures, including patient-specific QA procedures, are essential to ensure quality in an IMRT program and to assure patient safety.

  8. Pre-segmented 2-Step IMRT with subsequent direct machine parameter optimisation - a planning study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratengeier, Klaus; Meyer, Jürgen; Flentje, Michael

    2008-11-06

    Modern intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) mostly uses iterative optimisation methods. The integration of machine parameters into the optimisation process of step and shoot leaf positions has been shown to be successful. For IMRT segmentation algorithms based on the analysis of the geometrical structure of the planning target volumes (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR), the potential of such procedures has not yet been fully explored. In this work, 2-Step IMRT was combined with subsequent direct machine parameter optimisation (DMPO-Raysearch Laboratories, Sweden) to investigate this potential. In a planning study DMPO on a commercial planning system was compared with manual primary 2-Step IMRT segment generation followed by DMPO optimisation. 15 clinical cases and the ESTRO Quasimodo phantom were employed. Both the same number of optimisation steps and the same set of objective values were used. The plans were compared with a clinical DMPO reference plan and a traditional IMRT plan based on fluence optimisation and consequent segmentation. The composite objective value (the weighted sum of quadratic deviations of the objective values and the related points in the dose volume histogram) was used as a measure for the plan quality. Additionally, a more extended set of parameters was used for the breast cases to compare the plans. The plans with segments pre-defined with 2-Step IMRT were slightly superior to DMPO alone in the majority of cases. The composite objective value tended to be even lower for a smaller number of segments. The total number of monitor units was slightly higher than for the DMPO-plans. Traditional IMRT fluence optimisation with subsequent segmentation could not compete. 2-Step IMRT segmentation is suitable as starting point for further DMPO optimisation and, in general, results in less complex plans which are equal or superior to plans generated by DMPO alone.

  9. Pre-segmented 2-Step IMRT with subsequent direct machine parameter optimisation – a planning study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flentje Michael

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT mostly uses iterative optimisation methods. The integration of machine parameters into the optimisation process of step and shoot leaf positions has been shown to be successful. For IMRT segmentation algorithms based on the analysis of the geometrical structure of the planning target volumes (PTV and the organs at risk (OAR, the potential of such procedures has not yet been fully explored. In this work, 2-Step IMRT was combined with subsequent direct machine parameter optimisation (DMPO-Raysearch Laboratories, Sweden to investigate this potential. Methods In a planning study DMPO on a commercial planning system was compared with manual primary 2-Step IMRT segment generation followed by DMPO optimisation. 15 clinical cases and the ESTRO Quasimodo phantom were employed. Both the same number of optimisation steps and the same set of objective values were used. The plans were compared with a clinical DMPO reference plan and a traditional IMRT plan based on fluence optimisation and consequent segmentation. The composite objective value (the weighted sum of quadratic deviations of the objective values and the related points in the dose volume histogram was used as a measure for the plan quality. Additionally, a more extended set of parameters was used for the breast cases to compare the plans. Results The plans with segments pre-defined with 2-Step IMRT were slightly superior to DMPO alone in the majority of cases. The composite objective value tended to be even lower for a smaller number of segments. The total number of monitor units was slightly higher than for the DMPO-plans. Traditional IMRT fluence optimisation with subsequent segmentation could not compete. Conclusion 2-Step IMRT segmentation is suitable as starting point for further DMPO optimisation and, in general, results in less complex plans which are equal or superior to plans generated by DMPO alone.

  10. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC: A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Rübe, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels.

  11. Sci-Thur AM: Planning - 09: Assessing dynamic IMRT field modulation in prostate plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambasco, M; Nygren, I; Villarreal-Barajas, J E

    2012-07-01

    In a previous study, the variogram fractal dimension (FD) method was found to be very accurate at identifying planned head and neck IMRT fields that are overly-modulated. In the current study, the authors used MATLAB® to develop FracMod, a graphical user interface (GUI) and variogram FD analysis tool to assess modulation complexity of dynamic IMRT fields designed for treatments of the prostate alone and prostate plus pelvic nodes. A set of 5 prostate plans (25 fields) and 5 prostate plus pelvic node plans (35 fields) were used to choose FD cut-points that ensure no false positives (100% specificity) in distinguishing between moderate field modulation (typical modulation used clinically at the authors' institution) and high modulation. Field modulation was controlled by adjusting fluence smoothing parameters in the Eclipse™ treatment planning system. The area under the curve (AUC) from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to quantitatively compare the ability of FD and the number of monitor units (MUs) for distinguishing between the moderate and high modulation fields. The variogram FD method gave AUCs of 0.96 (almost perfect classification) and 1.00 (perfect classification) for the prostate alone and the prostate plus pelvic node fields, respectively. The variogram FD method is an accurate metric; performing better than the number of MUs at identifying high modulation IMRT fields planned for the treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Hence, FracMod will enable Radiotherapy Physicists to easily and accurately quantify the degree of modulation of IMRT fields and adjust overly-modulated fields at the treatment planning stage. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible. Minimized risk profile following Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, G.; Huguenin, P.; Luetolf, U.M.; Glanzmann, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Studer, S.P.; Zwahlen, R.A.; Graetz, K.W. [Dept. of Craniomaxillofacial Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-05-15

    Background and purpose: osteoradionecrosis (ON) of the mandible is a serious late complication of high-dose radiation therapy for tumors of the oropharynx and oral cavity. After doses between 60 and 72 Gy using standard fractionation, an incidence of ON between 5% and 15% is reported in a review from 1989, whereas in more recent publications using moderately accelerated or hyperfractionated irradiation and doses between 69 and 81 Gy, the incidence of ON is between < 1% and {proportional_to} 6%. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is expected to translate into a further important reduction of ON. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess absolute and relative bone volumes exposed to high IMRT doses, related to observed bone tolerance. Patients and methods: between December 2001 and November 2004, 73 of 123 patients treated with IMRT were identified as subgroup ''at risk'' for ON (> 60 Gy for oropharyngeal or oral cavity cancer). 21/73 patients were treated in a postoperative setting, 52 patients underwent primary definitive irradiation. In 56 patients concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy was applied. Mean follow-up time was 22 months (12-46 months). Oral cavity including the mandible bone outside the planning target volume was contoured and dose-volume constraints were defined in order to spare bone tissue. Dose-volume histograms were obtained from contoured mandible in each patient and were analyzed and related to clinical mandible bone tolerance. Results: using IMRT with doses between 60 and 75 Gy (mean 67 Gy), on average 7.8, 4.8, 0.9, and 0.3 cm{sup 3} were exposed to doses > 60, 65, 70, and 75 Gy, respectively. These values are substantially lower than when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The difference has been approximately quantified by comparison with a historic series. Additional ON risk factors of the patients were also analyzed. Only one grade 3 ON of the lingual horizontal branch, treated with

  13. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) following forward planned field-in field IMRT: results from the Cambridge Breast IMRT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukesh, Mukesh B; Qian, Wendi; Wilkinson, Jennifer S; Dorling, Leila; Barnett, Gillian C; Moody, Anne M; Wilson, Charles; Twyman, Nicola; Burnet, Neil G; Wishart, Gordon C; Coles, Charlotte E

    2014-05-01

    The use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in breast cancer reduces clinician-assessed breast tissue toxicity including fibrosis, telangectasia and sub-optimal cosmesis. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are also important as they provide the patient's perspective. This longitudinal study reports on (a) the effect of forward planned field-in-field IMRT (∼simple IMRT) on PROMs compared to standard RT at 5 years after RT, (b) factors affecting PROMs at 5years after RT and (c) the trend of PROMs over 5 years of follow up. PROMs were assessed at baseline (pre-RT), 6, 24 and 60 months after completion of RT using global health (EORTC QLQ C30) and 4 breast symptom questions (BR23). Also, 4 breast RT-specific questions were included at 6, 24 and 60 months: change in skin appearance, firmness to touch, reduction in breast size and overall change in breast appearance since RT. The benefits of simple IMRT over standard RT at 5 years after RT were assessed using standard t-test for global health and logistic regression analysis for breast symptom questions and breast RT-specific questions. Clinical factors affecting PROMs at 5 years were investigated using a multivariate analysis. A repeated mixed model was applied to explore the trend over time for each of PROMs. (89%) 727/815, 84%, 81% and 61% patients completed questionnaires at baseline, 6, 24 and 60 months respectively. Patients reported worse toxicity for all four BR23 breast symptoms at 6 months, which then improved over time (pappearance and breast hardness over time (pappearance (p=0.13). At 5years, PROMs assessments did not demonstrate a benefit for simple IMRT over standard radiotherapy. Large breast volume, young age, baseline surgical cosmesis and post-operative infection were the most important variables to affect PROMs. This study was unable to demonstrate the benefits of IMRT on PROMs at 5years. PROMs are influenced by non-radiotherapy factors and surgical factors should be optimised to

  14. SU-E-T-617: A Feasibility Study of Navigation Based Multi Criteria Optimization for Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study aims to validate multi-criteria optimization (MCO) against standard intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization for advanced cervical cancer in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden). Methods: 10 advanced cervical cancer patients IMRT plans were randomly selected, these plans were designed with step and shoot optimization, new plans were then designed with MCO based on these plans,while keeping optimization conditions unchanged,comparison was made between both kinds of plans including the dose volume histogram parameters of PTV and OAR,and were analysed by pairing-t test. Results: We normalize the plan so that 95% volume of PTV achieved the prescribed dose(50Gy). The volume of radiation 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy of the rectum were reduced by 14.7%,26.8%,21.1%,10.5% respectively(P≥0.05). The mean dose of rectum were reduced by 7.2Gy(P≤0.05). There were no significant differences for the dosimetric parameters for the bladder. Conclusion: In comparision with standard IMRT optimization, MCO reduces the dose of organs at risk with the same PTV coverage,but the result needs further clinical evalution.

  15. Impact of machines on plan quality: volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, S; Cozzolino, M; Oliviero, C; Fiorentino, A; Chiumento, C; Fusco, V

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of different machines on plan quality using both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. Eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx were selected at random. Plans were computed for IMRT and VMAT Smart Arc, using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta (IMRT-E, VMAT-E) and Varian linac (IMRT-V, VMAT-V). A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70, 63 and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high- and low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units (MU), and delivery time. VMAT-E plans resulted slightly MU efficient (-24 % p < 0.05) compared to VMAT-V while IMRT-V shortened delivery time (-19 % p < 0.05) compared to IMRT-E. All the delivery techniques resulted in equivalent target coverage in terms of D(98) % and D(2) %. For VMAT technique, a significant improvement of 7 % in homogeneity index (HI) for PTV58.1 was observed for Varian machine. A slight improvement in OARs sparing was observed with Elekta machine both for IMRT and VMAT techniques. Similar plan quality was observed for Elekta and Varian linacs, significant differences were observed in delivery efficiency, as MU number and delivery times, in favor of Elekta and Varian, respectively.

  16. Does IMRT increase the peripheral radiation dose? A comparison of treatment plans 2000 and 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salz, Henning; Eichner, Regina; Wiezorek, Tilo [Jena Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-07-01

    It has been reported in several papers and textbooks that IMRT treatments increase the peripheral dose in comparison with non-IMRT fields. But in clinical practice not only open fields have been used in the pre-IMRT era, but also fields with physical wedges or composed fields. The aim of this work is to test the hypothesis of increased peripheral dose when IMRT is used compared to standard conformal radiotherapy. Furthermore, the importance of the measured dose differences in clinical practice is discussed and compared with other new technologies for the cases where an increase of the peripheral dose was observed. For cancers of the head and neck, the cervix, the rectum and for the brain irradiation due to acute leukaemia, one to four plans have been calculated with IMRT or conformal standard technique (non-IMRT). In an anthropomorphic phantom the dose at a distance of 30 cm in cranio-caudal direction from the target edge was measured with TLDs using a linear accelerator Oncor {sup registered} (Siemens) for both techniques. IMRT was performed using step-and-shoot technique (7 to 11 beams), non-IMRT plans with different techniques. The results depended on the site of irradiation. For head and neck cancers IMRT resulted in an increase of 0.05 - 0.09% of the prescribed total dose (Dptv) or 40 - 70 mGy (Dptv = 65 Gy), compared to non-IMRT technique without wedges or a decrease of 0.16% (approx. 100 mGy) of the prescribed total dose compared to non-IMRT techniques with wedges. For the cervical cancer IMRT resulted in an increased dose in the periphery (+ 0.07% - 0.15% of Dptv or 30 - 70 mGy at Dptv = 45 Gy), for the rectal cancer in a dose reduction (0.21 - 0.26% of Dptv or 100 - 130 mGy at Dptv = 50 Gy) and for the brain irradiation in an increase dose (+ 0.05% of Dptv = 18 Gy or 9 mSv). In summary IMRT does not uniformly cause increased radiation dose in the periphery in the model used. It can be stated that these dose values are smaller than reported in earlier

  17. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [German] Das Potenzial der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) soll im Rahmen der FDG-PET basierten Bestrahlungsplanung des lokal fortgeschrittenen nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (LA-NSCLC) fuer 2 Zielvolumenansaetze (Involved-Field-Bestrahlung, IF) sowie elektive Nodalbestrahlung (ENI) geprueft und mit der 3-D-konformalen Strahlentherapie (3-D

  18. Efficient IMRT inverse planning with a new L1-solver: template for first-order conic solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojin; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lee, Rena; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2012-07-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) inverse planning using total-variation (TV) regularization has been proposed to reduce the complexity of fluence maps and facilitate dose delivery. Conventionally, the optimization problem with L-1 norm is solved with quadratic programming (QP), which is time consuming and memory expensive due to the second-order Newton update. This study proposes to use a new algorithm, template for first-order conic solver (TFOCS), for fast and memory-efficient optimization in IMRT inverse planning. The TFOCS utilizes dual-variable updates and first-order approaches for TV minimization without the need to compute and store the enlarged Hessian matrix required for Newton update in the QP technique. To evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method, two clinical cases were used for IMRT inverse planning: a head and neck case and a prostate case. For comparison, the conventional QP-based method for the TV form was adopted to solve the fluence map optimization problem in the above two cases. The convergence criteria and algorithm parameters were selected to achieve similar dose conformity for a fair comparison between the two methods. Compared with conventional QP-based approach, the proposed TFOCS-based method shows a remarkable improvement in computational efficiency for fluence map optimization, while maintaining the conformal dose distribution. Compared with QP-based algorithms, the computational speed using TFOCS for fluence optimization is increased by a factor of 4 to 6, and at the same time the memory requirement is reduced by a factor of 3 to 4. Therefore, TFOCS provides an effective, fast and memory-efficient method for IMRT inverse planning. The unique features of the approach should be particularly important in inverse planning involving a large number of beams, such as in VMAT and dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated radiation therapy (DASSIM-RT).

  19. Software-based evaluation of a class solution for prostate IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sarah; Goodworth, Josie; Westhuyzen, Justin; Chick, Brendan; Hoffmann, Matthew; Pacey, Jacqueline; Greenham, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    To use plan analysis software to evaluate a class solution for prostate intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning. Class solutions for radiotherapy planning are increasingly being considered for streamlining planning. Plan analysis software provides an objective approach to evaluating radiotherapy plans. Three iterations of a class solution for prostate IMRT planning (T1, T2 and Tfinal) were compared to the clinical plan of 74 prostate patients using radiotherapy plan analysis software (Plan IQ™, Sun Nuclear Corporation). A set of institution-specific plan quality metrics (scores) were established, based on best practice guidelines. For CTV coverage, Tfinal was not significantly different to the clinical plan. With the exception of 95% PTV coverage, Tfinal metrics were significantly better than the clinical plan for PTV coverage. In the scoring analysis, mean dose, 95% and 107% isodose coverage scores were similar for all the templates and clinical plan. 100% coverage of the CTV clinical plan was similar to Tfinal but scored higher than T1 and T2. There were no significant differences between Tfinal and the clinical plan for the metrics and scores associated with organs at risk. The total plan score was similar for Tfinal and the clinical plan, although the scores for volume receiving total dose outside the PTV were higher for Tfinal than for the clinical plan (P plan analysis software was useful for evaluating a class solution for prostate IMRT planning and provided evidence that the class solution produced clinically acceptable plans for these patients.

  20. Comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy vs. intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a stomach cancer treatment;Comparacion dosimetrica de radioterapia conformal 3D versus radioterapia de intensidad modulada (IMRT) de un tratamiento de cancer de estomago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernui de V, Maria Giselle; Cardenas, Augusto; Vargas, Carlos [Hospital Nacional Carlos Alberto Seguin Escobedo (ESSALUD), Arequipa (Peru). Servicio de Radioterapia

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the dosimetry in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in a treatment of stomach cancer. For this comparison we selected a patient who underwent subtotal gastrectomy and D2 dissection for a T3N3 adenocarcinoma Mx ECIIIB receiving treatment under the scheme Quimio INT 0116 - in adjuvant radiotherapy. In the treatment plan was contouring the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV) was generated from the expansion of 1cm of the CTV, the risky organs contouring were: the liver, kidneys and spinal cord, according to the consensus definition of volumes in gastric cancer. The 3D Conformal Radiotherapy planning is carried out using 6 half beams following the Leong Trevol technique; for the IMRT plan was used 8 fields, the delivery technique is step-and-shoot. In both cases the fields were coplanar, isocentric and the energy used was 18 MV. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), in this case has proved to be a good treatment alternative to the technique of 3D Conformal Radiotherapy; the dose distributions with IMRT have better coverage of PTV and positions of the hot spots, as well as the kidneys volume that received higher doses to 2000 cGy is lower, but the decrease in dose to the kidneys is at the expense of increased dose in other organs like the liver. (author)

  1. Evaluation of IMRT plans for prostate treatment using energies of 6 MV and 15 MV; Avaliacao de planejamentos de IMRT para tratamento de prostata utilizando energias de 6 MV e 15 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lucas Francisco C.; Silva, Murilo C. da; Silveira, Paula J.; Flosi, Adriana A.; Boccaletti, Karina W., E-mail: mcollete@gmail.com [A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-08-15

    This study aims to evaluate and compare radiotherapy plans with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer treatments optimized for photon energies of 6 MV and 15 MV. We retrospectively evaluated 29 patients with prostate cancer, planned with IMRT technique with prescribed dose of 78 Gy. The initial plan was done for the two photon energies, keeping the same optimization parameters and comparing maximum, minimum and modal PTV doses, conformity and homogeneity indexes, dose gradients, isodoses volumes of 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 Gy, and the total number of monitor units. It was found that the plans are equivalent regarding higher isodose volumes, conformity and homogeneity indexes, maximum, minimum and modal PTV doses. However, for 6 MV plans there was a considerable increase in both number of monitor units and volume lower isodose volumes, especially the 30 Gy. (author)

  2. Experience on IMRT treatment for prostate cancer. Planning, dosimetry and quality assurance; Experiencia en el tratamiento de IMRT en cancer de prostata. Planificacion, dosimetria y garantia de calidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Fernandez Bedoya, V.; Zapatero Laborda, A.; Fernandez, I.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Perez Gonzalez, L.; Torres Escobar, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    In this study a revision concerning the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is performed. Planning and verification of treatments involving dose calculations and image positioning are considered. A set of 110 patients is analysed concerning dosimetry and 92 considering image verification. Dose calculation is verified both experimentally and by means of a monitor unit (MU) calculation system. Positioning control of the prostate is achieved using intraprostatic fiducial markers and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) as well as a home-made software. All patients studied were consistent with the specifications of the treatment protocol regarding dose prescription in planning target volume (PTV), organ at risk (OAR) dose limitations, dosimetric quality assurance and positioning control. The procedure includes a learning curve considering every aspect of the treatment. The MU calculation system itself has been proved as an effective and functional tool for treatment verification. (Author) 12 refs.

  3. Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the γ passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were −4.5 cGy/−0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and −19.7 cGy/−0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was −13.3 cGy/−0.32%, to esophagus was −63.4 cGy/−0.89%, and to spinal cord was −16.3 cGy/−0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2–161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median γ passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.9654–0.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by

  4. MRI-based IMRT planning for MR-linac: comparison between CT- and MRI-based plans for pancreatic and prostate cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Phil; Chen, Xinfeng; Botros, Maikel; Paulson, Eric S.; Lawton, Colleen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2016-05-01

    The treatment planning in radiation therapy (RT) can be arranged to combine benefits of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together to maintain dose calculation accuracy and improved target delineation. Our aim is study the dosimetric impact of uniform relative electron density assignment on IMRT treatment planning with additional consideration given to the effect of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field (TMF) in MR-Linac. A series of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) plans were generated for two representative tumor sites, pancreas and prostate, using CT and MRI datasets. Representative CT-based IMRT plans were generated to assess the impact of different electron density (ED) assignment on plan quality using CT without the presence of a 1.5 T TMF. The relative ED (rED) values used were taken from the ICRU report 46. Four types of rED assignment in the organs at risk (OARs), the planning target volumes (PTV) and in the non-specified tissue (NST) were considered. Dose was recalculated (no optimization) using a Monaco 5.09.07a research planning system employing Monte Carlo calculations with an option to include TMF. To investigate the dosimetric effect of different rED assignment, the dose-volume parameters (DVPs) obtained from these specific rED plans were compared to those obtained from the original plans based on CT. Overall, we found that uniform rED assignment results in differences in DVPs within 3% for the PTV and 5% for OAR. The presence of 1.5 T TMF on IMRT DVPs resulted in differences that were generally within 3% of the Gold St for both the pancreas and prostate. The combination of uniform rED assignment and TMF produced differences in DVPs that were within 4-5% of the Gold St. Larger differences in DVPs were observed for OARs on T2-based plans. The effects of using different rED assignments and the presence of 1.5 T TMF for pancreas and prostate IMRT plans are generally within 3% and 5% of PTV and OAR Gold St values. There are

  5. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment planning with IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, Claus A.; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming; Sapru, Wendy; Berthelsen, Anne K.; Loft, Annika; Specht, Lena [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-03-15

    The study was undertaken in order to compare dose plans for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) dose plans in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Clinical data from 20 consecutive patients treated with IMRT are presented. For 11 patients 3D-CRT plans were made and compared to the IMRT plans with respect to doses to the planning target volumes (PTVs) and to organs at risk (OARs). For comparison of the conformation of dose to defined target volumes the conformity index (CI) was used. Target volume coverage and critical organ protection were significantly improved with IMRT compared to 3D-CRT. One-year loco-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 79%, 72%, and 80%. Two patients have had recurrence in the clinical target volume (CTV) only and seven patients have relapsed in distant organs and/or in head-and-neck areas outside the target areas. The study confirms that IMRT is superior to 3D-CRT in the treatment of NPC. As locoregional control of NPC improves we are facing an increasing number of recurrences outside the irradiated area.

  6. Clinical Implementation of an Online Adaptive Plan-of-the-Day Protocol for Nonrigid Motion Management in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijkoop, Sabrina T., E-mail: s.heijkoop@erasmusmc.nl; Langerak, Thomas R.; Quint, Sandra; Bondar, Luiza; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implementation of an online adaptive plan-of-the-day protocol for nonrigid target motion management in locally advanced cervical cancer intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Each of the 64 patients had four markers implanted in the vaginal fornix to verify the position of the cervix during treatment. Full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired prior to treatment to build a bladder volume-dependent cervix-uterus motion model for establishment of the plan library. In the first phase of clinical implementation, the library consisted of one IMRT plan based on a single model-predicted internal target volume (mpITV), covering the target for the whole pretreatment observed bladder volume range, and a 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) motion-robust backup plan based on the same mpITV. The planning target volume (PTV) combined the ITV and nodal clinical target volume (CTV), expanded with a 1-cm margin. In the second phase, for patients showing >2.5-cm bladder-induced cervix-uterus motion during planning, two IMRT plans were constructed, based on mpITVs for empty-to-half-full and half-full-to-full bladder. In both phases, a daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired to first position the patient based on bony anatomy and nodal targets and then select the appropriate plan. Daily post-treatment CBCT was used to verify plan selection. Results: Twenty-four and 40 patients were included in the first and second phase, respectively. In the second phase, 11 patients had two IMRT plans. Overall, an IMRT plan was used in 82.4% of fractions. The main reasons for selecting the motion-robust backup plan were uterus outside the PTV (27.5%) and markers outside their margin (21.3%). In patients with two IMRT plans, the half-full-to-full bladder plan was selected on average in 45% of the first 12 fractions, which was reduced to 35% in the last treatment fractions. Conclusions: The implemented

  7. Cerebral cortex dose sparing for glioblastoma patients: IMRT versus robust treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeli, Ann-Katrin; Kellner, Daniel; Exeli, Lukas; Steininger, Phil; Wolf, Frank; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz

    2018-02-06

    To date, patients with glioblastoma still have a bad median overall survival rate despite radiation dose-escalation and combined modality treatment. Neurocognitive decline is a crucial adverse event which may be linked to high doses to the cortex. In a planning study, we investigated the impact of dose constraints to the cerebral cortex and its relation to the organs at risk for glioblastoma patients. Cortical sparing was implemented into the optimization process for two planning approaches: classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and robust treatment planning. The plans with and without objectives for cortex sparing where compared based on dose-volume histograms (DVH) data of the main organs at risk. Additionally the cortex volume above a critical threshold of 28.6 Gy was elaborated. Furthermore, IMRT plans were compared with robust treatment plans regarding potential cortex sparing. Cortical dose constraints result in a statistically significant reduced cerebral cortex volume above 28.6 Gy without negative effects to the surrounding organs at risk independently of the optimization technique. For IMRT we found a mean volume reduction of doses beyond the threshold of 19%, and 16% for robust treatment planning, respectively. Robust plans delivered sharper dose gradients around the target volume in an order of 3 - 6%. Aside from that the integration of cortical sparing into the optimization process has the potential to reduce the dose around the target volume (4 - 8%). We were able to show that dose to the cerebral cortex can be significantly reduced both with robust treatment planning and IMRT while maintaining clinically adequate target coverage and without corrupting any organ at risk. Robust treatment plans delivered more conformal plans compared to IMRT and were superior in regards to cortical sparing.

  8. Prostate Dose Escalation by Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    L. Xing, W. Xiong, K. Stuhr and F. Newman, Validation of a 4D Monte Carlo Treatment Planning Tool Using an Image Interpolation Model ° International...Gustafsson A, Brahme A. 1993. The clinical value of different treatment objectives and degrees of freedom in radiation therapy optimization...radiotherapy: A dosimetric analysis 50. Brahme , A. Individualizing cancer treatment: Biological optimi- using active breathing control. Int. J. Radial. Oncol

  9. Comparison of two different IMRT planning techniques in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Effect on parotid gland radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzel, E.K. [Sisli Etfal Teaching and Research Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Karacam, S. [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). Medical Physics; Elicin, O.; Uzel, Oe [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). Radiation Oncology

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the effect of two different intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning techniques on parotid gland doses in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Patients and methods: Radiotherapy for 10 NPC patients referred to the University of Istanbul Cerrahpasa Medical School was planned with arc- and static seven-field IMRT. The simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique was used to deliver 70 Gy (2.12 Gy per fraction) to the primary tumor and involved nodes; 60 Gy (1.81 Gy per fraction) to the entire nasopharynx and 54 Gy (1.63 Gy per fraction) to elective lymph nodes in 33 fractions. Plans also aimed to keep the mean parotid dose below 26 Gy and limit the maximum doses to the spinal cord and brain stem to 45 and 54 Gy, respectively. Mean parotid gland doses for the two planning techniques were compared using a paired t-test. Target coverage and dose inhomogeneity were evaluated by calculating conformity- (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) values. Results: Target coverage and dose homogeneity were identical and good for both planning techniques: CI = 1.05 {+-} 0.08 and 1.05 {+-} 0.08; HI = 1.08 {+-} 0.02 and 1.07 {+-} 0.01 for arc- and static field IMRT, respectively. Mean doses to contralateral parotid glands were 25.73 {+-} 4.27 and 27.73 {+-} 3.5 Gy(p = 0.008) for arc- and static field IMRT plans, respectively, whereas mean ipsilateral parotid doses were 30.65 {+-} 6.25 and 32.55 {+-} 5.93 Gy (non-significant p-value), respectively. Mean monitor units (MU) per fraction for the 10 patients were considerably lower for arc- than for static field treatments - 540.5 {+-} 130.39 versus 1288.4 {+-} 197.28 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Normal tissues - particularly the parotid glands - are better spared with the arc technique in patients with NPC. MU and treatment times are considerably reduced in arc IMRT plans. (orig.)

  10. Predicting objective function weights from patient anatomy in prostate IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taewoo; Hammad, Muhannad; Chan, Timothy C Y; Craig, Tim; Sharpe, Michael B

    2013-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning typically combines multiple criteria into a single objective function by taking a weighted sum. The authors propose a statistical model that predicts objective function weights from patient anatomy for prostate IMRT treatment planning. This study provides a proof of concept for geometry-driven weight determination. A previously developed inverse optimization method (IOM) was used to generate optimal objective function weights for 24 patients using their historical treatment plans (i.e., dose distributions). These IOM weights were around 1% for each of the femoral heads, while bladder and rectum weights varied greatly between patients. A regression model was developed to predict a patient's rectum weight using the ratio of the overlap volume of the rectum and bladder with the planning target volume at a 1 cm expansion as the independent variable. The femoral head weights were fixed to 1% each and the bladder weight was calculated as one minus the rectum and femoral head weights. The model was validated using leave-one-out cross validation. Objective values and dose distributions generated through inverse planning using the predicted weights were compared to those generated using the original IOM weights, as well as an average of the IOM weights across all patients. The IOM weight vectors were on average six times closer to the predicted weight vectors than to the average weight vector, using l2 distance. Likewise, the bladder and rectum objective values achieved by the predicted weights were more similar to the objective values achieved by the IOM weights. The difference in objective value performance between the predicted and average weights was statistically significant according to a one-sided sign test. For all patients, the difference in rectum V54.3 Gy, rectum V70.0 Gy, bladder V54.3 Gy, and bladder V70.0 Gy values between the dose distributions generated by the predicted weights and IOM weights

  11. Rotational IMRT techniques compared to fixed gantry IMRT and Tomotherapy: multi-institutional planning study for head-and-neck cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutters Gerd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments enable to deliver rotational IMRT with standard C-arm gantry based linear accelerators. This upcoming treatment technique was benchmarked in a multi-center treatment planning study against static gantry IMRT and rotational IMRT based on a ring gantry for a complex parotid gland sparing head-and-neck technique. Methods Treatment plans were created for 10 patients with head-and-neck tumours (oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx using the following treatment planning systems (TPS for rotational IMRT: Monaco (ELEKTA VMAT solution, Eclipse (Varian RapidArc solution and HiArt for the helical tomotherapy (Tomotherapy. Planning of static gantry IMRT was performed with KonRad, Pinnacle and Panther DAO based on step&shoot IMRT delivery and Eclipse for sliding window IMRT. The prescribed doses for the high dose PTVs were 65.1Gy or 60.9Gy and for the low dose PTVs 55.8Gy or 52.5Gy dependend on resection status. Plan evaluation was based on target coverage, conformity and homogeneity, DVHs of OARs and the volume of normal tissue receiving more than 5Gy (V5Gy. Additionally, the cumulative monitor units (MUs and treatment times of the different technologies were compared. All evaluation parameters were averaged over all 10 patients for each technique and planning modality. Results Depending on IMRT technique and TPS, the mean CI values of all patients ranged from 1.17 to 2.82; and mean HI values varied from 0.05 to 0.10. The mean values of the median doses of the spared parotid were 26.5Gy for RapidArc and 23Gy for VMAT, 14.1Gy for Tomo. For fixed gantry techniques 21Gy was achieved for step&shoot+KonRad, 17.0Gy for step&shoot+Panther DAO, 23.3Gy for step&shoot+Pinnacle and 18.6Gy for sliding window. V5Gy values were lowest for the sliding window IMRT technique (3499 ccm and largest for RapidArc (5480 ccm. The lowest mean MU value of 408 was achieved by Panther DAO, compared to 1140 for sliding window IMRT. Conclusions All

  12. Comparative study between IMRT planning and RapidArc® sliding window for head and neck tumors; Estudo comparativo de planejamento entre IMRT sliding window e RapidArc® para tumores de cabeca e pescoco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirani, Luiz F.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Lima, Marilia B.; Bittencourt, Guilherme R.; Ferreira, Anne Caroline M.; Batista, Delano V.S., E-mail: nando_lfp@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    This study aims to evaluate the RapidArc (RA) technique in the treatment of head and neck tumors and compare the results of treatments with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the National Cancer Institute (INCA). Head and neck carcinomas have a natural history with relative expansion to others regions, especially in advanced levels. Faster treatments, with better coverage of the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and sparing more risks organs (ROs) are necessary and bring a better clinical impact. Ten patients with head and neck cancer, planned with IMRT technique were replanned using the RA technique. Some dosimetric indexes were calculated for both techniques, with the intention of verifying which of them, at the same time, would promote greater coverage of the PTV and preserve more healthy tissue. In terms of coverage, both indexes were similar. The RA technique was more efficient for delivered doses to ROs. The number of monitor units (MU), number of fields and treatments time estimated were lower than IMRT technique. Finally, the results have showed that the RA technique clearly reduces the treatment time, reducing the average and maximum dose to ROs and conforming the target as IMRT technique. (author)

  13. Treatment plan complexity metrics for predicting IMRT pre-treatment quality assurance results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, S B; Kairn, T; Kenny, J; Knight, R T; Hill, B; Langton, C M; Trapp, J V

    2014-09-01

    The planning of IMRT treatments requires a compromise between dose conformity (complexity) and deliverability. This study investigates established and novel treatment complexity metrics for 122 IMRT beams from prostate treatment plans. The Treatment and Dose Assessor software was used to extract the necessary data from exported treatment plan files and calculate the metrics. For most of the metrics, there was strong overlap between the calculated values for plans that passed and failed their quality assurance (QA) tests. However, statistically significant variation between plans that passed and failed QA measurements was found for the established modulation index and for a novel metric describing the proportion of small apertures in each beam. The 'small aperture score' provided threshold values which successfully distinguished deliverable treatment plans from plans that did not pass QA, with a low false negative rate.

  14. Commissioning of modulator-based IMRT with XiO treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Hiroshi; Obata, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the procedures for correction of the modulator thickness and commissioning of the XiO treatment planning system (TPS) for modulator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (M-IMRT). This modulator manufacturing system adopts a method in which the modulator is milled using a floor-type computer-aided numerical control milling machine (CNC-mill) with modulator data calculated by XiO TPS. XiO TPS uses only effective attenuation coefficients (EAC) for modulator thickness calculation. This article describes a modified method for assessing modulator thickness. A two-dimensional linear attenuation array was used to correct the modulator thickness calculated by XiO. Narrow-beam geometry was used for measuring the linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) at off-axis positions (OAP) for varying brass thicknesses. An equation for the two-dimensional LAC ratio (2D-LACR) can be used to calculate the corrected modulator thickness. It is assumed that the broad beam EAC of a small field varies with the brass thickness and the OAP distance in the same way as that of LACR, so the two-dimensional EAC (2D-EAC) is equal to the EAC corrected using the LACR. The dose distribution was evaluated for three geometric patterns and one clinical case on low energy x ray (4 MV) with a large field size (20 x 20 cm2). The results using the proposed correction method of modulator thickness showed a good agreement between the measured dose distributions and the dose distributions calculated by TPS with the correction. Hence, the method is effective to improve the accuracy of M-IMRT in XiO TPS. An important problem for the brass modulator is the milling condition, such as the drill diameter and the cutting pitch size. It is necessary to improve the accuracy of M-IMRT for the "softening" and "hardening" effects of the beam to be considered in dose calculation in patients and the modulator profile design.

  15. Pareto navigation: algorithmic foundation of interactive multi-criteria IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monz, M; Küfer, K H; Bortfeld, T R; Thieke, C

    2008-02-21

    Inherently, IMRT treatment planning involves compromising between different planning goals. Multi-criteria IMRT planning directly addresses this compromising and thus makes it more systematic. Usually, several plans are computed from which the planner selects the most promising following a certain procedure. Applying Pareto navigation for this selection step simultaneously increases the variety of planning options and eases the identification of the most promising plan. Pareto navigation is an interactive multi-criteria optimization method that consists of the two navigation mechanisms 'selection' and 'restriction'. The former allows the formulation of wishes whereas the latter allows the exclusion of unwanted plans. They are realized as optimization problems on the so-called plan bundle -- a set constructed from pre-computed plans. They can be approximately reformulated so that their solution time is a small fraction of a second. Thus, the user can be provided with immediate feedback regarding his or her decisions. Pareto navigation was implemented in the MIRA navigator software and allows real-time manipulation of the current plan and the set of considered plans. The changes are triggered by simple mouse operations on the so-called navigation star and lead to real-time updates of the navigation star and the dose visualizations. Since any Pareto-optimal plan in the plan bundle can be found with just a few navigation operations the MIRA navigator allows a fast and directed plan determination. Besides, the concept allows for a refinement of the plan bundle, thus offering a middle course between single plan computation and multi-criteria optimization. Pareto navigation offers so far unmatched real-time interactions, ease of use and plan variety, setting it apart from the multi-criteria IMRT planning methods proposed so far.

  16. The impact of direct aperture optimization on plan quality and efficiency in complex head and neck IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabatino Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional step&shoot intensity modulated radio therapy (IMRT approaches potentially lead to treatment plans with high numbers of segments and monitor units (MU and, therefore, could be time consuming at the linear accelerator. Direct optimization methods are able to reduce the complexity without degrading the quality of the plan. The aim of this study is the evaluation of different IMRT approaches at standardized conditions for head and neck tumors. Method For 27 patients with carcinomas in the head and neck region a planning study with a 2-step-IMRT system (KonRad, a direct optimization system (Panther DAO and a mixture of both approaches (MasterPlan DSS was created. In order to avoid different prescription doses for boost volumes a simple standardization was realized. The dose was downscaled to 50 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV which included the primary tumor as well as the bilateral lymphatic drainage (cervical and supraclavicular. Dose restrictions for the organs at risk (OAR were downscaled to this prescription from high dose concepts up to 72 Gy. Those limits were defined as planning objectives while reaching definable PTV coverage with a standardized field setup. The parameters were evaluated from the corresponding dose volume histogram (DVH. Special attention was paid to the efficiency of the method, measured by means of calculated MU and required segments. Statistical tests of significance were applied to quantify the differences between the evaluated systems. Results PTV coverage for all systems in terms of V90% and V95% fell short of the requested 100% and 95%, respectively, but were still acceptable (range: 98.7% to 99.1% and 94.2% to 94.7%. Overall for OAR sparing and the burden of healthy tissue with low doses no technique was superior for all evaluated parameters. Differences were found for the number of segments where the direct optimization systems generated less segments. Lowest average numbers of

  17. A Prospective Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Incorporating a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Prostate Cancer: Long-term Outcomes Compared With Standard Image Guided IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, Michael H. [Midwestern University, Glendale, Arizona (United States); Schild, Steven E., E-mail: sschild@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Wong, William W.; Vora, Sujay A.; Keole, Sameer R.; Vargas, Carlos E.; Daniels, Thomas B.; Ezzell, Gary A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Nguyen, Ba D.; Roarke, Michael C. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: This report describes the long-term outcomes of a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), integrating a {sup 111}In capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan-directed simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients with T1N0M0 to T4N0M0 prostate cancer were enrolled, and their ProstaScint and pelvic computed tomography scans were coregistered for treatment planning. The entire prostate received 75.6 Gy in 42 fractions with IMRT, whereas regions of increased uptake on ProstaScint scans received 82 Gy as an SIB. Patients with intermediate- and high-risk disease also received 6 months and 12 months of adjuvant hormonal therapy, respectively. Results: The study enrolled 31 low-, 30 intermediate-, and 10 high-risk patients. The median follow-up was 120 months (range, 24-150 months). The 10-year biochemical control rates were 85% for the entire cohort and 84%, 84%, and 90% for patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease, respectively. The 10-year survival rate of the entire cohort was 69%. Pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >10 ng/mL and boost volume of >10% of the prostate volume were significantly associated with poorer biochemical control and survival. The outcomes were compared with those of a cohort of 302 patients treated similarly but without the SIB and followed up for a median of 91 months (range, 6-138 months). The 5- and 10-year biochemical control rates were 86% and 61%, respectively, in patients without the SIB compared with 94% and 85%, respectively, in patients in this trial who received the SIB (P=.02). The cohort that received an SIB did not have increased toxicity. Conclusions: The described IMRT strategy, integrating multiple imaging modalities to administer 75.6 Gy to the entire prostate with a boost dose of 82 Gy, was feasible. The addition of the SIB was associated with greater biochemical control but not toxicity. Modern

  18. Acceptance for clinical use of a treatment planning system with IMRT and VMAT techniques; Aceptacion para uso clinico de un sistema de planificacion de tratamientos con tecnicas de IMRT y VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, A.; Puchades, V.; Mata, F.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: In this work the set of measurements and results to test the reliability of the calculated absorbed dose by our treatment planning system (Tps) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (Imr) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (Vat) is reported. Method: A set of measures was performed, both point and planar absorbed dose, selecting a set of conventional and Imr and Vat treatment fields. A gamma criteria 3 mm distance to agreement and 3% dose difference (referred to the maximum dose) was used for the planar distribution analysis, using a 10% of maximum dose as threshold. Based on this set of measures the confidence limits were calculated for the Imr and VMAT plans, and compared with the reference values given in AAPM TG119 document. Results: The average percentage deviation of point dose measures was lower than 0.5% for conventional fields and lower than 1% for IMRT and VMAT fields. Calculated confidence limits were 3.6% and 4.6% for point dose and almost zero for planar dose distributions, for IMRT and VMAT respectively. Conclusions: Our confidence levels improve significantly the AAPM TG119 reference levels both for point and planar doses, thus ensuring the reliability of the TPS performing IMRT and VMAT dose calculations. (Author) 17 refs.

  19. CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT treatment plans are comparable to SPECT ventilation functional image-based plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Satoshi; Bal, Matthieu; Kabus, Sven; Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Shan, Xin; Loo, Billy W; Keall, Paul J; Yamamoto, Tokihiro

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans designed to avoid irradiating highly-functional lung regions are comparable to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation functional image-based plans. Three IMRT plans were created for eight thoracic cancer patients using: (1) CT ventilation functional images, (2) SPECT ventilation functional images, and (3) anatomic images (no functional images). CT ventilation images were created by deformable image registration of 4D-CT image data sets and quantitative analysis. The resulting plans were analyzed for the relationship between the deviations of CT-functional plan metrics from anatomic plan metrics (ΔCT-anatomic) and those of SPECT-functional plans (ΔSPECT-anatomic), and moreover for agreements of various metrics between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plans. The relationship between ΔCT-anatomic and ΔSPECT-anatomic was strong (e.g., R=0.94; linear regression slope 0.71). The average differences and 95% limits of agreement between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plan metrics (except for monitor units) for various structures were mostly less than 1% and 2%, respectively. This study demonstrated a reasonable agreement between the CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans and SPECT-functional plans, suggesting the potential for CT ventilation imaging to serve as a surrogate for SPECT ventilation in functional image-guided radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical applications of image guided-intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for conformal avoidance of normal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Alonso Navar

    2007-12-01

    Recent improvements in imaging technology and radiation delivery have led to the development of advanced treatment techniques in radiotherapy which have opened the door for novel therapeutic approaches to improve the efficacy of radiation cancer treatments. Among these advances is image-guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT), in which imaging is incorporated to aid in inter-/intra-fractional target localization and to ensure accurate delivery of precise and highly conformal dose distributions. In principle, clinical implementation of IG-IMRT should improve normal tissue sparing and permit effective biological dose escalation thus widening the radiation therapeutic window and lead to increases in survival through improved local control of primary neoplastic diseases. Details of the development of three clinical applications made possible solely with IG-IMRT radiation delivery techniques are presented: (1) Laparoscopically implanted tissue expander radiotherapy (LITE-RT) has been developed to enhance conformal avoidance of normal tissue during the treatment of intra-abdominopelvic cancers. LITE-RT functions by geometrically displacing surrounding normal tissue and isolating the target volume through the interfractional inflation of a custom-shaped tissue expander throughout the course of treatment. (2) The unique delivery geometry of helical tomotherapy, a novel form of IG-IMRT, enables the delivery of composite treatment plan m which whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with hippocampal avoidance, hypothesized to reduce the risk of memory function decline and improve the patient's quality of life, and simultaneously integrated boost to multiple brain metastases to improve intracranial tumor control is achieved. (3) Escalation of biological dose to targets through integrated, selective subvolume boosts have been shown to efficiently increase tumor dose without significantly increasing normal tissue dose. Helical tomotherapy was used to investigate the

  1. Evaluation of DVH-based treatment plan verification in addition to gamma passing rates for head and neck IMRT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Ruurd; Wauben, David J. L.; de Groot, Martijn; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; Bijl, Henk P.; Godart, Jeremy; van t Veld, Aart; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    Background and purpose: Treatment plan verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is generally performed with the gamma index (GI) evaluation method, which is difficult to extrapolate to clinical implications. Incorporating Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) information can compensate for

  2. Dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment plans at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ); Dosimetrische Verifikation von IMRT-Gesamtplaenen am Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhein, B.; Haering, P.; Debus, J.; Schlegel, W. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The present paper describes a method for the individual dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment plans. The German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum; DKFZ) has implemented the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) since 1997. So far, 246 patients with head and neck cancer, cancer of the prostate, breast, and vertebral column, as well as mesothelioma of the pleura have been treated. Every IMRT plan is transferred into a special IMRT verification phantom, recalculated, and dosimetrically verified. Absolute dose distributions are measured with Kodak EDR films and compared with the results of the dose calculation. After correction of the optical density in relationship to the dose, EDR films are able to measure the absolute dose with an accuracy of {+-}2% compared to an ionization chamber. A Visual C{sup ++} software tool has been developed to correlate and evaluate the film dose distributions with the corresponding slices of the 3D dose cube. Beside the overlay of absolute or relative isodoses and dose profiles, the median dose within correlated regions of interest (ROIs) is also included in the quantitative dose evaluation. The deviation between EDR film dosimetry and dose calculation is {delta}D=-0.3%{+-}2.3%. After introduction of the verification software, the total verification time (including handling, correlation, evaluation, and documentation of the data), could be reduced to less than 2 hours. (orig.) [German] In dieser Arbeit wird eine Methode zur individuellen dosimetrischen Ueberpruefung von IMRT-Bestrahlungsplaenen beschrieben. Am Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) wird die intensitaetsmodulierte Strahlentherapie (IMRT) seit 1997 durchgefuehrt. 246 Patienten mit Tumoren im Kopf-Hals Bereich, der Wirbelsaeule, der Prostata, der weiblichen Brust und Pleuramesotheliome wurden bisher bestrahlt. Jeder IMRT-Bestrahlungsplan wird in ein spezielles Verifikationsphantom uebertragen, dort neu berechnet und dosimetrisch verifiziert

  3. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M. [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas, 77030 (United States); Balter, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Stingo, Francesco C. [Department of Biostatistics, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Jones, Jimmy [Porter Adventist Hospital, Denver, Colorado 80210 (United States); Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core at Houston and Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of several patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) dosimeters in terms of their ability to correctly identify dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable IMRT patient plans, as determined by an in-house-designed multiple ion chamber phantom used as the gold standard. A further goal was to examine optimal threshold criteria that were consistent and based on the same criteria among the various dosimeters. Methods: The authors used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of (1) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with field-by-field evaluation, (2) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with composite evaluation, (3) a 2D diode array using planned irradiation angles with composite evaluation, (4) a helical diode array, (5) radiographic film, and (6) an ion chamber. This was done with a variety of evaluation criteria for a set of 15 dosimetrically unacceptable and 9 acceptable clinical IMRT patient plans, where acceptability was defined on the basis of multiple ion chamber measurements using independent ion chambers and a phantom. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC curves was used to compare dosimeter performance across all thresholds. Optimal threshold values were obtained from the ROC curves while incorporating considerations for cost and prevalence of unacceptable plans. Results: Using common clinical acceptance thresholds, most devices performed very poorly in terms of identifying unacceptable plans. Grouping the detector performance based on AUC showed two significantly different groups. The ion chamber, radiographic film, helical diode array, and anterior-delivered composite 2D diode array were in the better-performing group, whereas the anterior-delivered field-by-field and planned gantry angle delivery using the 2D diode array performed less well. Additionally, based on the AUCs, there

  4. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S; Kry, Stephen F

    2014-12-01

    The authors investigated the performance of several patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) dosimeters in terms of their ability to correctly identify dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable IMRT patient plans, as determined by an in-house-designed multiple ion chamber phantom used as the gold standard. A further goal was to examine optimal threshold criteria that were consistent and based on the same criteria among the various dosimeters. The authors used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of (1) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with field-by-field evaluation, (2) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with composite evaluation, (3) a 2D diode array using planned irradiation angles with composite evaluation, (4) a helical diode array, (5) radiographic film, and (6) an ion chamber. This was done with a variety of evaluation criteria for a set of 15 dosimetrically unacceptable and 9 acceptable clinical IMRT patient plans, where acceptability was defined on the basis of multiple ion chamber measurements using independent ion chambers and a phantom. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC curves was used to compare dosimeter performance across all thresholds. Optimal threshold values were obtained from the ROC curves while incorporating considerations for cost and prevalence of unacceptable plans. Using common clinical acceptance thresholds, most devices performed very poorly in terms of identifying unacceptable plans. Grouping the detector performance based on AUC showed two significantly different groups. The ion chamber, radiographic film, helical diode array, and anterior-delivered composite 2D diode array were in the better-performing group, whereas the anterior-delivered field-by-field and planned gantry angle delivery using the 2D diode array performed less well. Additionally, based on the AUCs, there was no significant difference

  5. Clinical comparison of head and neck and prostate IMRT plans using absorbed dose to medium and absorbed dose to water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, N.; Siebers, J. V.; Keall, P. J.

    2006-10-01

    Conventional photon radiation therapy dose-calculation algorithms typically compute and report the absorbed dose to water (Dw). Monte Carlo (MC) dose-calculation algorithms, however, generally compute and report the absorbed dose to the material (Dm). As MC-calculation algorithms are being introduced into routine clinical usage, the question as to whether there is a clinically significant difference between Dw and Dm remains. The goal of the current study is to assess the differences between dose-volume indices for Dm and Dw MC-calculated IMRT plans. Ten head-and-neck (H&N) and ten prostate cancer patients were selected for this study. MC calculations were performed using an EGS4-based system. Converting Dm to Dw for MC-based calculations was accomplished as a post-MC calculation process. Dw and Dm results for target and critical structures were evaluated using the dose-volume-based indices. For H&N IMRT plans, systematic differences between dose-volume indices computed with Dw and Dm were up to 2.9% for the PTV prescription dose (D98), up to 5.8% for maximum (D2) dose to the PTV and up to 2.7% for the critical structure dose indices. For prostate IMRT plans, the systematic differences between Dw- and Dm-based computed indices were up to 3.5% for the prescription dose (D98) to the PTVs, up to 2.0% for the maximum (D2) dose to the PTVs and up to 8% for the femoral heads due to their higher water/bone mass stopping power ratio. This study showed that converting Dm to Dw in MC-calculated IMRT treatment plans introduces a systematic error in target and critical structure DVHs. In some cases, this systematic error may reach up to 5.8% for H&N and 8.0% for prostate cases when the hard-bone-containing structures such as femoral heads are present. Ignoring differences between Dm and Dw will result in systematic dose errors ranging from 0% to 8%.

  6. Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatment Planning for Stage III Lung Cancer: How Does It Compare With Intensity-Modulated Radio Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quan, Enzhuo M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xia Tingyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beijing 301 Hospital, Beijing (China); Yuan Zhiyong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Tianjin (China); Liu Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan University Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiaoqiang; Wages, Cody A.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans generated by an automated inverse planning system with that of dosimetrist-generated IMRT treatment plans for patients with stage III lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Two groups of 8 patients with stage III lung cancer were randomly selected. For group 1, the dosimetrists spent their best effort in designing IMRT plans to compete with the automated inverse planning system (mdaccAutoPlan); for group 2, the dosimetrists were not in competition and spent their regular effort. Five experienced radiation oncologists independently blind-reviewed and ranked the three plans for each patient: a rank of 1 was the best and 3 was the worst. Dosimetric measures were also performed to quantitatively evaluate the three types of plans. Results: Blind rankings from different oncologists were generally consistent. For group 1, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.6, 2.13, and 2.18, respectively. The auto-VMAT plans in group 1 had 10% higher planning tumor volume (PTV) conformality and 24% lower esophagus V70 (the volume receiving 70 Gy or more) than the manual IMRT plans; they also resulted in more than 20% higher complication-free tumor control probability (P+) than either type of IMRT plans. The auto- and manual IMRT plans in this group yielded generally comparable dosimetric measures. For group 2, the auto-VMAT, auto-IMRT, and manual IMRT plans received average ranks of 1.55, 1.75, and 2.75, respectively. Compared to the manual IMRT plans in this group, the auto-VMAT plans and auto-IMRT plans showed, respectively, 17% and 14% higher PTV dose conformality, 8% and 17% lower mean lung dose, 17% and 26% lower mean heart dose, and 36% and 23% higher P+. Conclusions: mdaccAutoPlan is capable of generating high-quality VMAT and IMRT treatment plans for stage III lung cancer. Manual IMRT plans could achieve quality

  7. Poster - Thur Eve - 30: Comparison of treatment planning and delivery performance of VMAT versus IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, A; Vollans, E; Duzenli, C

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether VMAT (Varian RapidArc ™) treatment planning and delivery performance is in compliance with accepted quality assurance tolerances developed for sliding window IMRT. We present an analysis of data for over 1300 patients treated with VMAT and IMRT over a period of three years. Data was acquired on 6 dosimetrically matched linacs for sites including head and neck, brain, gynaecological, and a variety of other cancer cases treated with 6 MV. We have demonstrated that it is possible to dosimetrically match multiple Varian iX linacs with the millennium series MLC using a sliding gap and intercept test. QA is performed by Monte Carlo simulation and ion chamber measurement comparisons with Varian Eclipse TPS as well as linac log file analysis of MLC positions, gantry angles and monitor units on each patient. Point dose and 3D gamma analysis indicate that agreement between Eclipse and measurement or Monte Carlo calculation is site specific, with the dosimetric leaf gap parameter in Eclipse optimized for the most frequently treated site Point dose agreement within 2% and gamma pass rate of > 95% (3%/ 3 mm) is achievable for all sites for both IMRT and VMAT. Linac log file analysis indicates that planned MLC positions are achieved within 2 mm >99.7% of the time for both sliding window IMRT and VMAT. Planned gantry angles are achieved within 0.6 mm 99.8% of the time and planned MU's within 0.1 mm are achieved 99.8% of the time for VMAT. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Dose planning objectives in anal canal cancer IMRT: the TROG ANROTAT experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth@mebrown.net [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Cray, Alison [Peter MacCallum Cancer Cancer Centre, Box Hill, Victoria (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Peter MacCallum Cancer Cancer Centre, Box Hill, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Chander, Sarat [Peter MacCallum Cancer Cancer Centre, Box Hill, Victoria (Australia); Lin, Robert [Medica Oncology, Hurstville, New South Wales (Australia); Subramanian, Brindha; Ng, Michael [Radiation Oncology Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is ideal for anal canal cancer (ACC), delivering high doses to irregular tumour volumes whilst minimising dose to surrounding normal tissues. Establishing achievable dose objectives is a challenge. The purpose of this paper was to utilise data collected in the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Treatments and Technologies (ANROTAT) project to evaluate the feasibility of ACC IMRT dose planning objectives employed in the Australian situation. Ten Australian centres were randomly allocated three data sets from 15 non-identifiable computed tomography data sets representing a range of disease stages and gender. Each data set was planned by two different centres, producing 30 plans. All tumour and organ at risk (OAR) contours, prescription and dose constraint details were provided. Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for each plan were analysed to evaluate the feasibility of dose planning objectives provided. All dose planning objectives for the bone marrow (BM) and femoral heads were achieved. Median planned doses exceeded one or more objectives for bowel, external genitalia and bladder. This reached statistical significance for bowel V30 (P = 0.04), V45 (P < 0.001), V50 (P < 0.001), external genitalia V20 (P < 0.001) and bladder V35 (P < 0.001), V40 (P = 0.01). Gender was found to be the only significant factor in the likelihood of achieving the bowel V50 (P = 0.03) and BM V30 constraints (P = 0.04). The dose planning objectives used in the ANROTAT project provide a good starting point for ACC IMRT planning. To facilitate clinical implementation, it is important to prioritise OAR objectives and recognise factors that affect the achievability of these objectives.

  9. Analysis of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Proton and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for Reducing Perioperative Cardiopulmonary Complications in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Ted C.; Slater, Jerry M.; Nookala, Prashanth; Mifflin, Rachel; Grove, Roger; Ly, Anh M.; Patyal, Baldev; Slater, Jerry D.; Yang, Gary Y., E-mail: gyang@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, A875, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Background. While neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy has improved outcomes for esophageal cancer patients, surgical complication rates remain high. The most frequent perioperative complications after trimodality therapy were cardiopulmonary in nature. The radiation modality utilized can be a strong mitigating factor of perioperative complications given the location of the esophagus and its proximity to the heart and lungs. The purpose of this study is to make a dosimetric comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), proton and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with regard to reducing perioperative cardiopulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients. Materials. Ten patients with esophageal cancer treated between 2010 and 2013 were evaluated in this study. All patients were simulated with contrast-enhanced CT imaging. Separate treatment plans using proton radiotherapy, IMRT, and 3D-CRT modalities were created for each patient. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and analyzed to compare plans between the three modalities. The organs at risk (OAR) being evaluated in this study are the heart, lungs, and spinal cord. To determine statistical significance, ANOVA and two-tailed paired t-tests were performed for all data parameters. Results. The proton plans showed decreased dose to various volumes of the heart and lungs in comparison to both the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans. There was no difference between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans in dose delivered to the lung or heart. This finding was seen consistently across the parameters analyzed in this study. Conclusions. In patients receiving radiation therapy for esophageal cancer, proton plans are technically feasible while achieving adequate coverage with lower doses delivered to the lungs and cardiac structures. This may result in decreased cardiopulmonary toxicity and less morbidity to esophageal cancer patients.

  10. Analysis of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT, Proton and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT for Reducing Perioperative Cardiopulmonary Complications in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted C. Ling

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. While neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy has improved outcomes for esophageal cancer patients, surgical complication rates remain high. The most frequent perioperative complications after trimodality therapy were cardiopulmonary in nature. The radiation modality utilized can be a strong mitigating factor of perioperative complications given the location of the esophagus and its proximity to the heart and lungs. The purpose of this study is to make a dosimetric comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT, proton and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with regard to reducing perioperative cardiopulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients. Materials. Ten patients with esophageal cancer treated between 2010 and 2013 were evaluated in this study. All patients were simulated with contrast-enhanced CT imaging. Separate treatment plans using proton radiotherapy, IMRT, and 3D-CRT modalities were created for each patient. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and analyzed to compare plans between the three modalities. The organs at risk (OAR being evaluated in this study are the heart, lungs, and spinal cord. To determine statistical significance, ANOVA and two-tailed paired t-tests were performed for all data parameters. Results. The proton plans showed decreased dose to various volumes of the heart and lungs in comparison to both the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans. There was no difference between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans in dose delivered to the lung or heart. This finding was seen consistently across the parameters analyzed in this study. Conclusions. In patients receiving radiation therapy for esophageal cancer, proton plans are technically feasible while achieving adequate coverage with lower doses delivered to the lungs and cardiac structures. This may result in decreased cardiopulmonary toxicity and less morbidity to esophageal cancer patients.

  11. IMRT and radiation protection in the prostate cancer therapy; IMRT e a protecao radiologica no tratamento do cancer de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Helena C.; Silva, Andre R.M.; Oliveira, Claudia F.M., E-mail: andrerichard88@bol.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to specify the technological advances that IMRT presents relative to other traditional radiotherapy, particularly to conformal radiotherapy three dimensional (3D-TCR) and benefits compared to the side effects caused by from treatment of radiotherapy.

  12. Modeling plan-related clinical complications using machine learning tools in a multiplan IMRT framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao H; D'Souza, Warren D; Shi, Leyuan; Meyer, Robert R

    2009-08-01

    To predict organ-at-risk (OAR) complications as a function of dose-volume (DV) constraint settings without explicit plan computation in a multiplan intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) framework. Several plans were generated by varying the DV constraints (input features) on the OARs (multiplan framework), and the DV levels achieved by the OARs in the plans (plan properties) were modeled as a function of the imposed DV constraint settings. OAR complications were then predicted for each of the plans by using the imposed DV constraints alone (features) or in combination with modeled DV levels (plan properties) as input to machine learning (ML) algorithms. These ML approaches were used to model two OAR complications after head-and-neck and prostate IMRT: xerostomia, and Grade 2 rectal bleeding. Two-fold cross-validation was used for model verification and mean errors are reported. Errors for modeling the achieved DV values as a function of constraint settings were 0-6%. In the head-and-neck case, the mean absolute prediction error of the saliva flow rate normalized to the pretreatment saliva flow rate was 0.42% with a 95% confidence interval of (0.41-0.43%). In the prostate case, an average prediction accuracy of 97.04% with a 95% confidence interval of (96.67-97.41%) was achieved for Grade 2 rectal bleeding complications. ML can be used for predicting OAR complications during treatment planning allowing for alternative DV constraint settings to be assessed within the planning framework.

  13. Application programming in C# environment with recorded user software interactions and its application in autopilot of VMAT/IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Xing, Lei

    2016-11-08

    An autopilot scheme of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)/intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning with the guidance of prior knowl-edge is established with recorded interactions between a planner and a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Microsoft (MS) Visual Studio Coded UI is applied to record some common planner-TPS interactions as subroutines. The TPS used in this study is a Windows-based Eclipse system. The interactions of our application program with Eclipse TPS are realized through a series of subrou-tines obtained by prerecording the mouse clicks or keyboard strokes of a planner in operating the TPS. A strategy to autopilot Eclipse VMAT/IMRT plan selection process is developed as a specific example of the proposed "scripting" method. The autopiloted planning is navigated by a decision function constructed with a reference plan that has the same prescription and similar anatomy with the case at hand. The calculation proceeds by alternating between the Eclipse optimization and the outer-loop optimization independent of the Eclipse. In the C# program, the dosimetric characteristics of a reference treatment plan are used to assess and modify the Eclipse planning parameters and to guide the search for a clinically sensible treatment plan. The approach is applied to plan a head and neck (HN) VMAT case and a prostate IMRT case. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of application programming method in C# environment with recorded interactions of planner-TPS. The process mimics a planner's planning process and automatically provides clinically sensible treatment plans that would otherwise require a large amount of manual trial and error of a planner. The proposed technique enables us to harness a commercial TPS by application programming via the use of recorded human computer interactions and provides an effective tool to greatly facilitate the treatment planning process. © 2016 The Authors.

  14. Efficacy and toxicity of rectal cancer reirradiation using IMRT for patients who have received prior pelvic radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fady F. Youssef, MS

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: Rectal cancer reirradiation using IMRT is well-tolerated in the setting of prior pelvic radiation therapy. Given significant risk of local progression, further dose escalation may be warranted for patients with life expectancy exceeding 1 year.

  15. Intensity modulated radiation therapy planning for patients with a metal hip prosthesis based on class solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Est, Henrie; Prins, Paulette; Heijmen, Ben J M; Dirkx, Maarten L P

    2012-01-01

    With the aging of the population, an increasing number of patients with metallic hip implants are referred for radiotherapy treatment. Class solutions for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning are generally not applicable for these patients due to the required avoidance of dose delivery through prostheses. In this work a new approach for IMRT planning is presented, allowing the use of a default beam setup. For IMRT planning, Monaco (Elekta; CMS Software, Maryland Heights, MO) was used. In addition to the target and organs at risk, so-called prosthesis avoidance volumes (PAVs) were delineated in the beam's eye view projection for beams in which the prosthesis was partially in front of the target. By putting strict constraints on these virtual organs at risk, entrance dose delivery through a prosthesis is avoided while exit dose delivery is allowed. In this way, uncertainties in the dose delivery to the target and organs at risk, as derived by the treatment planning system, are largely minimized. To show the advantages of this IMRT-PAV technique, for 2 prostate cancer patients, 1 with bilateral and the other with unilateral metallic hip prostheses, obtained IMRT plans were compared with conventional IMRT plans using a prosthesis-avoiding beam setup. For both IMRT techniques a similar planning target volume coverage was achieved, but with the IMRT-PAV technique the mean doses to the bladder and the rectum were reduced by up to 25%. While the IMRT-PAV technique required more time for delineation, the time for treatment planning reduced because the default beam setup could be applied. The number of segments needed for dose delivery was comparable for both techniques. With the new IMRT-PAV technique IMRT class solutions can safely be applied for cancer patients with metallic hip prostheses, generally yielding a reduced dose delivery to organs at risk or improved target coverage. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Radiation Oncology

  16. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  17. IMRT, IGRT, SBRT - Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, JL

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 4 years, IMRT, IGRT, SBRT: Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy has become a standard reference in the field. During this time, however, significant progress in high-precision technologies for the planning and delivery of radiotherapy in cancer treatment has called for a second edition to include these new developments. Thoroughly updated and extended, this new edition offers a comprehensive guide and overview of these new technologies and the many clinical treatment programs that bring them into practical use. Advances in intensity-modulated radiothera

  18. Incorrect dosimetric leaf separation in IMRT and VMAT treatment planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjölin, Maria; Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Dynamic treatment planning algorithms use a dosimetric leaf separation (DLS) parameter to model the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) characteristics. Here, we quantify the dosimetric impact of an incorrect DLS parameter and investigate whether common pretreatment quality assurance (QA) methods...

  19. Application of a new plan quality index to complement insensitivity due to the acceptance criteria in IMRT delivery QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Su; Kang, Seong Hee; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyun; Shin, Min Seok; Suh, Tae Suk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si Yong [Virginia Commonwealth University, VA (United States); Park, So Hyun [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In IMRT QA, plan quality evaluation is made based on pass rate under preset acceptance criteria, mostly using gamma-valuess. This method is convenient but, its result highly depends on what the acceptance criteria are and suffers from the lack of sensitivity in judging how good the plan is. In this study, we introduced a simple but effective plan quality index of IMRT QA based on dose difference only to supplement such shortcomings, and investigated its validity. IMRT plan quality can be evaluated quantitatively by the proposed index. It is considered that the proposed index would provide useful information for better judging the level of goodness of each plan and its result is independent of the acceptance criteria.

  20. Wide Variation in the Diffusion of a New Technology: Practice-Based Trends in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Use in the State of Michigan, With Implications for IMRT Use Nationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway, Dean A; Griffith, Kent A; Pierce, Lori J; Feng, Mary; Moran, Jean M; Stenmark, Matthew H; Jagsi, Reshma; Hayman, James A

    2015-05-01

    To characterize the adoption and variation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) use in the state of Michigan. As a certificate-of-need state, Michigan requires every radiation oncology facility to report the number of external-beam and IMRT treatments delivered annually. We examined the percentage of treatments delivered using IMRT across centers from 2005 to 2012. We constructed a repeated-measures longitudinal linear regression model to evaluate bivariable and multiple variable associations with IMRT use. The median proportion of treatments delivered with IMRT rose from 16% in 2005 to 42% in 2012. All treatment centers in the state of Michigan possessed the capacity to deliver IMRT as of 2009. The fraction of treatments delivered with IMRT varied between 23% and 96% (standard deviation, 19%) in the lowest- and highest-use centers in 2012. Higher IMRT use was significantly associated with freestanding facilities and year of treatment, with a trend toward higher IMRT use in academic centers and low-volume facilities. IMRT use grew significantly across the state of Michigan over time, with four-fold variability among centers, which was related to facility characteristics. These data provide no indication of an ideal or appropriate level of IMRT use. Rather, the wide variation in IMRT use among centers indicates a lack of consensus regarding the situations in which IMRT provides significant clinical benefit. This supports further research and interventions to ensure that patients receive appropriate care, regardless of where they are treated. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Intensity-modulated proton beam therapy (IMPT) versus intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT) for patients with oropharynx cancer - A case matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Pierre; Garden, Adam S; Gunn, G Brandon; Rosenthal, David I; Morrison, William H; Hernandez, Mike; Crutison, Joseph; Lee, Jack J; Ye, Rong; Fuller, C David; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Hutcheson, Kate A; Holliday, Emma B; Thaker, Nikhil G; Sturgis, Erich M; Kies, Merrill S; Zhu, X Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Frank, Steven J

    2016-07-01

    Owing to its physical properties, intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) used for patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma has the ability to reduce the dose to organs at risk compared to intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) while maintaining adequate tumor coverage. Our aim was to compare the clinical outcomes of these two treatment modalities. We performed a 1:2 matching of IMPT to IMRT patients. Our study cohort consisted of IMPT patients from a prospective quality of life study and consecutive IMRT patients treated at a single institution during the period 2010-2014. Patients were matched on unilateral/bilateral treatment, disease site, human papillomavirus status, T and N status, smoking status, and receipt of concomitant chemotherapy. Survival analyzes were performed using a Cox model and binary toxicity endpoints using a logistic regression analysis. Fifty IMPT and 100 IMRT patients were included. The median follow-up time was 32months. There were no imbalances in patient/tumor characteristics except for age (mean age 56.8years for IMRT patients and 61.1years for IMPT patients, p-value=0.010). Statistically significant differences were not observed in overall survival (hazard ratio (HR)=0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12-2.50, p-value=0.44) or in progression-free survival (HR=1.02; 95% CI: 0.41-2.54; p-value=0.96). The age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for the presence of a gastrostomy (G)-tube during treatment for IMPT vs IMRT were OR=0.53; 95% CI: 0.24-1.15; p-value=0.11 and OR=0.43; 95% CI: 0.16-1.17; p-value=0.10 at 3months after treatment. When considering the pre-planned composite endpoint of grade 3 weight loss or G-tube presence, the ORs were OR=0.44; 95% CI: 0.19-1.0; p-value=0.05 at 3months after treatment and OR=0.23; 95% CI: 0.07-0.73; p-value=0.01 at 1year after treatment. Our results suggest that IMPT is associated with reduced rates of feeding tube dependency and severe weight loss without jeopardizing outcome. Prospective multicenter

  2. General strategy for the protection of organs at risk in IMRT therapy of a moving body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolfath, Ramin M.; Papiez, Lech [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We investigated protection strategies of organs at risk (OARs) in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These strategies apply to delivery of IMRT to moving body anatomies that show relative displacement of OAR in close proximity to a tumor target. We formulated an efficient genetic algorithm which makes it possible to search for global minima in a complex landscape of multiple irradiation strategies delivering a given, predetermined intensity map to a target. The optimal strategy was investigated with respect to minimizing the dose delivered to the OAR. The optimization procedure developed relies on variability of all parameters available for control of radiation delivery in modern linear accelerators, including adaptation of leaf trajectories and simultaneous modification of beam dose rate during irradiation. We showed that the optimization algorithms lead to a significant reduction in the dose delivered to OAR in cases where organs at risk move relative to a treatment target.

  3. SU-E-J-239: IMRT Planning of Prostate Cancer for a MRI-Linac Based On MRI Only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X; Prior, P; Paulson, E; Lawton, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: : To investigate dosimetric differences between MRI- and CT-based IMRT planning for prostate cancer, the impact of a magnetic field in a MRI-Linac, and to explore the feasibility of IMRT planning based on MRI alone. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on CT and MRI images acquired on two representative prostate-cancer patients using clinical dose volume constraints. A research planning system (Monaco, Elekta), which employs a Monte Carlo dose engine and includes a perpendicular magnetic field of 1.5T from an MRI-Linac, was used. Bulk electron density assignments based on organ-specific values from ICRU 46 were used to convert MRI (T2) to pseudo CT. With the same beam configuration as in the original CT plan, 5 additional plans were generated based on CT or MRI, with or without optimization (i.e., just recalculation) and with or without the magnetic field. The plan quality in terms of commonly used dose volume (DV) parameters for all plans was compared. The statistical uncertainty on dose was < 1%. Results: For plans with the same contour set but without re-optimization, the DV parameters were different from those for the original CT plan, mostly less than 5% with a few exceptions. These differences were reduced to mostly less than 3% when the plans were re-optimized. For plans with contours from MRI, the differences in the DV parameters varied depending on the difference in the contours as compared to CT. For the optimized plans with contours from MR, the differences for PTV were less than 3%. Conclusion: The prostate IMRT plans based on MRI-only for a MR-Linac were practically similar as compared to the CT plan under the same beam and optimization configuration if the difference on the structure delineation is excluded, indicating the feasibility of using MRI-only for prostate IMRT.

  4. Dynamic optical modulation of an electron beam on a photocathode RF gun: Toward intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, Takafumi [Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: t-kondo@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kashima, Hiroaki; Yang, Jinfeng; Yoshida, Yoichi; Tagawa, Seiichi [Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the aim is to deliver reduced doses of radiation to normal tissue. As a step toward IMRT, we examined dynamic optical modulation of an electron beam produced by a photocathode RF gun. Images on photomasks were transferred onto a photocathode by relay imaging. The resulting beam was controlled by a remote mirror. The modulated electron beam maintained its shape on acceleration, had a fine spatial resolution, and could be moved dynamically by optical methods.

  5. SU-E-T-278: Realization of Dose Verification Tool for IMRT Plan Based On DPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jinfeng; Cao, Ruifen; Dai, Yumei; Pei, Xi; Hu, Liqin [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); LIN, Hui [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); School of Electronic Science and Application Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui (China); Zhang, Jun [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To build a Monte Carlo dose verification tool for IMRT Plan by implementing a irradiation source model into DPM code. Extend the ability of DPM to calculate any incident angles and irregular-inhomogeneous fields. Methods: With the virtual source and the energy spectrum which unfolded from the accelerator measurement data,combined with optimized intensity maps to calculate the dose distribution of the irradiation irregular-inhomogeneous field. The irradiation source model of accelerator was substituted by a grid-based surface source. The contour and the intensity distribution of the surface source were optimized by ARTS (Accurate/Advanced Radiotherapy System) optimization module based on the tumor configuration. The weight of the emitter was decided by the grid intensity. The direction of the emitter was decided by the combination of the virtual source and the emitter emitting position. The photon energy spectrum unfolded from the accelerator measurement data was adjusted by compensating the contaminated electron source. For verification, measured data and realistic clinical IMRT plan were compared with DPM dose calculation. Results: The regular field was verified by comparing with the measured data. It was illustrated that the differences were acceptable (<2% inside the field, 2–3mm in the penumbra). The dose calculation of irregular field by DPM simulation was also compared with that of FSPB (Finite Size Pencil Beam) and the passing rate of gamma analysis was 95.1% for peripheral lung cancer. The regular field and the irregular rotational field were all within the range of permitting error. The computing time of regular fields were less than 2h, and the test of peripheral lung cancer was 160min. Through parallel processing, the adapted DPM could complete the calculation of IMRT plan within half an hour. Conclusion: The adapted parallelized DPM code with irradiation source model is faster than classic Monte Carlo codes. Its computational accuracy and

  6. The use of spatial dose gradients and probability density function to evaluate the effect of internal organ motion for prostate IMRT treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Runqing; Barnett, Rob B; Chow, James C L; Chen, Jeff Z Y

    2007-03-07

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of internal organ motion on IMRT treatment planning of prostate patients using a spatial dose gradient and probability density function. Spatial dose distributions were generated from a Pinnacle3 planning system using a co-planar, five-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. Five plans were created for each patient using equally spaced beams but shifting the angular displacement of the beam by 15 degree increments. Dose profiles taken through the isocentre in anterior-posterior (A-P), right-left (R-L) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions for IMRT plans were analysed by exporting RTOG file data from Pinnacle. The convolution of the 'static' dose distribution D0(x, y, z) and probability density function (PDF), denoted as P(x, y, z), was used to analyse the combined effect of repositioning error and internal organ motion. Organ motion leads to an enlarged beam penumbra. The amount of percentage mean dose deviation (PMDD) depends on the dose gradient and organ motion probability density function. Organ motion dose sensitivity was defined by the rate of change in PMDD with standard deviation of motion PDF and was found to increase with the maximum dose gradient in anterior, posterior, left and right directions. Due to common inferior and superior field borders of the field segments, the sharpest dose gradient will occur in the inferior or both superior and inferior penumbrae. Thus, prostate motion in the S-I direction produces the highest dose difference. The PMDD is within 2.5% when standard deviation is less than 5 mm, but the PMDD is over 2.5% in the inferior direction when standard deviation is higher than 5 mm in the inferior direction. Verification of prostate organ motion in the inferior directions is essential. The margin of the planning target volume (PTV) significantly impacts on the confidence of tumour control probability (TCP) and level of normal tissue complication probability

  7. TU-C-17A-09: Multi-Case Knowledge-Based IMRT Treatment Planning in Head and Neck Cancer: Are Six Heads Better Than One?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzetic, S; Lutzky, C; Das, S; Lo, J [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: HNC IMRT treatment planning is a challenging process that relies heavily on the planner’s experience. Previously, we used the single, best match from a library of manually planned cases to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for a new patient. The current multi-case Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy (MC-KBRT) study utilized different matching cases for each of six individual organs-at-risk (OARs), then combined those six cases to create the new treatment plan. Methods: From a database of 103 patient plans created by experienced planners, MC-KBRT plans were created for 40 (17 unilateral and 23 bilateral) HNC “query” patients. For each case, 2D beam’s-eye-view images were used to find similar geometric “match” patients separately for each of 6 OARs. Dose distributions for each OAR from the 6 matching cases were combined and then warped to suit the query case’s geometry. The dose-volume constraints were used to create the new query treatment plan without the need for human decision-making throughout the IMRT optimization. The optimized MC-KBRT plans were compared against the clinically approved plans and Version 1 (original KBRT) using the dose metrics: mean, median, and maximum (brainstem and cord+5mm) doses. Results: Compared to Version 1, MC-KBRT had no significant reduction of the dose to any of the OARs in either unilateral/bilateral cases. Compared to the manually-planned unilateral cases, there was significant reduction of the oral cavity mean/median dose (>2Gy) at the expense of the contralateral parotid. Compared to the manually-planned bilateral cases, reduction of dose was significant in the ipsilateral parotid, larynx, and oral cavity (>3Gy mean/median) while maintaining PTV coverage. Conclusion: MC-KBRT planning in head and neck cancer generates IMRT plans with equivalent dose sparing to manually created plans. MC-KBRT using multiple case matches does not show significant dose reduction compared to using a single match case with

  8. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a (60)Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. METHODS AND MATERIALS...

  9. The risk of radiation-induced second cancers in the high to medium dose region: a comparison between passive and scanned proton therapy, IMRT and VMAT for pediatric patients with brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Yock, Torunn I.; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of second malignant tumors is a clinically observed adverse late effect of radiation therapy, especially in organs close to the treatment site, receiving medium to high doses (>2.5 Gy). For pediatric patients, choosing the least toxic radiation modality is of utmost importance, due to their high radiosensitivity and small size. This study aims to evaluate the risk of second cancer incidence in the vicinity of the primary radiation field, for pediatric patients with brain/head and neck tumors and compare four treatment modalities: passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PPT and PBS), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For a cohort of six pediatric patients originally treated with PPT, additional PBS, IMRT and VMAT plans were created. Dose distributions from these plans were used to calculate the excess absolute risk (EAR) and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for developing a second tumor in soft tissue and skull. A widely used risk assessment formalism was employed and compared with a linear model based on recent clinical findings. In general, LAR was found to range between 0.01%-2.8% for PPT/PBS and 0.04%-4.9% for IMRT/VMAT. PBS was associated with the lowest risk for most patients using carcinoma and sarcoma models, whereas IMRT and VMAT risks were comparable and the highest among all modalities. The LAR for IMRT/VMAT relative to PPT ranged from 1.3-4.6 for soft tissue and from 3.5-9.5 for skull. Larger absolute LAR was observed for younger patients and using linear risk models. The number of fields used in proton therapy and IMRT had minimal effect on the risk. When planning treatments and deciding on the treatment modality, the probability of second cancer incidence should be carefully examined and weighed against the possibility of developing acute side effects for each patient individually.

  10. Trade-off bounds for the Pareto surface approximation in multi-criteria IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, J I; Monz, M; Küfer, K H; Thieke, C

    2009-10-21

    One approach to multi-criteria IMRT planning is to automatically calculate a data set of Pareto-optimal plans for a given planning problem in a first phase, and then interactively explore the solution space and decide on the clinically best treatment plan in a second phase. The challenge of computing the plan data set is to ensure that all clinically meaningful plans are covered and that as many clinically irrelevant plans as possible are excluded to keep computation times within reasonable limits. In this work, we focus on the approximation of the clinically relevant part of the Pareto surface, the process that constitutes the first phase. It is possible that two plans on the Pareto surface have a small, clinically insignificant difference in one criterion and a significant difference in another criterion. For such cases, only the plan that is clinically clearly superior should be included into the data set. To achieve this during the Pareto surface approximation, we propose to introduce bounds that restrict the relative quality between plans, the so-called trade-off bounds. We show how to integrate these trade-off bounds into the approximation scheme and study their effects. The proposed scheme is applied to two artificial cases and one clinical case of a paraspinal tumor. For all cases, the quality of the Pareto surface approximation is measured with respect to the number of computed plans, and the range of values occurring in the approximation for different criteria is compared. Through enforcing trade-off bounds, the scheme disregards clinically irrelevant plans during the approximation. Thereby, the number of plans necessary to achieve a good approximation quality can be significantly reduced. Thus, trade-off bounds are an effective tool to focus the planning and to reduce computation time.

  11. Evaluation of treatment plan quality of IMRT and VMAT with and without flattening filter using Pareto optimal fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Kragl, Gabriele; Georg, Dietmar

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the differences in treatment plan quality of IMRT and VMAT with and without flattening filter using Pareto optimal fronts, for two treatment sites of different anatomic complexity. Pareto optimal fronts (POFs) were generated for six prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients by stepwise reduction of the constraint (during the optimization process) of the primary organ-at-risk (OAR). 9-static field IMRT and 360°-single-arc VMAT plans with flattening filter (FF) and without flattening filter (FFF) were compared. The volume receiving 5 Gy or more (V5 Gy) was used to estimate the low dose exposure. Furthermore, the number of monitor units (MUs) and measurements of the delivery time (T) were used to assess the efficiency of the treatment plans. A significant increase in MUs was found when using FFF-beams while the treatment plan quality was at least equivalent to the FF-beams. T was decreased by 18% for prostate for IMRT with FFF-beams and by 4% for head-and-neck cases, but increased by 22% and 16% for VMAT. A reduction of up to 5% of V5 Gy was found for IMRT prostate cases with FFF-beams. The evaluation of the POFs showed an at least comparable treatment plan quality of FFF-beams compared to FF-beams for both treatment sites and modalities. For smaller targets the advantageous characteristics of FFF-beams could be better exploited. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [68Ga]-DOTATOC-PET/CT for meningioma IMRT treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamberg Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The observation that human meningioma cells strongly express somatostatin receptor (SSTR 2 was the rationale to analyze retrospectively in how far DOTATOC PET/CT is helpful to improve target volume delineation for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Patients and Methods In 26 consecutive patients with preferentially skull base meningioma, diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and planning-computed tomography (CT was complemented with data from [68Ga]-DOTA-D Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (DOTATOC-PET/CT. Image fusion of PET/CT, diagnostic computed tomography, MRI and radiotherapy planning CT as well as target volume delineation was performed with OTP-Masterplan®. Initial gross tumor volume (GTV definition was based on MRI data only and was secondarily complemented with DOTATOC-PET information. Irradiation was performed as EUD based IMRT, using the Hyperion Software package. Results The integration of the DOTATOC data led to additional information concerning tumor extension in 17 of 26 patients (65%. There were major changes of the clinical target volume (CTV which modify the PTV in 14 patients, minor changes were realized in 3 patients. Overall the GTV-MRI/CT was larger than the GTV-PET in 10 patients (38%, smaller in 13 patients (50% and almost the same in 3 patients (12%. Most of the adaptations were performed in close vicinity to bony skull base structures or after complex surgery. Median GTV based on MRI was 18.1 cc, based on PET 25.3 cc and subsequently the CTV was 37.4 cc. Radiation planning and treatment of the DOTATOC-adapted volumes was feasible. Conclusion DOTATOC-PET/CT information may strongly complement patho-anatomical data from MRI and CT in cases with complex meningioma and is thus helpful for improved target volume delineation especially for skull base manifestations and recurrent disease after surgery.

  13. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yartsev Slav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. Methods 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. Results When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p dose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p Conclusion dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies.

  14. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  15. Skin dose for head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy(IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hsiao-Ju; Li, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Chang, Chih-Chia; Tsang, Yuk-Wah

    2017-11-01

    The reliability of thermoluminescent dosimeters (ultrathin TLD) and ISP Gafchromic EBT2 film to measure the surface dose in phantom and the skin dose in head-and-neck patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique(IMRT) is the research focus. Seven-field treatment plans with prescribed dose of 180 cGy were performed on Eclipse treatment planning system which utilized pencil beam calculation algorithm(PBC). In calibration tests, the variance coefficient of the ultrathin TLDs were within 3%. The points on the calibration curve of the Gafchromic film was within 1% variation. Five measurements were taken on phantom using ultrathin TLD and EBT2 film respectively. The measured mean surface doses between ultrathin TLD or EBT2 film were within 5% deviation. Skin doses of 6 patients were measured for initial 5 fractions and the mean dose per-fraction was calculated. If the extrapolated doses for 30 fractions were below 4000 cGy, the skin reaction grading observed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) was either grade 1 or grade 2. If surface dose exceeded 5000 cGy in 32 fractions, then grade 3 skin reactions were observed.

  16. SU-E-J-36: Combining CBCT Dose Into IMRT Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grelewicz, Z; Wiersma, R [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) is increasingly used in patient setup for IMRT. Daily CBCT may provide effective localization, however, it introduces concern over excessive imaging dose. Previous studies investigated the calculation of excess CBCT dose, however, no study has yet treated this dose as a source of therapeutic radiation, optimized in consideration of PTV and OARs constrains. Here we present a novel combined MV+kV inverse optimization engine to weave the CBCT and MV dose together such that CBCT dose is used for both imaging and therapeutic purposes. This may mitigate some of the excess imaging dose effects of daily CBCT and allow complete evaluation of the CBCT dose prior to treatment. Methods: The EGSnrc Monte Carlo system was used to model a Varian Trilogy CBCT system and 6 MV treatment beam. Using the model, the dose to patient from treatment beam and imaging beam was calculated for ten patients. The standard IMRT objective function was modified to include CBCT dose. Treatment plan optimization using the MOSEK optimization tool was performed retrospectively with and without assuming kV radiation dose from CBCT, assuming one CBCT per fraction. Results: Across ten patients, the CBCT delivered peaks of between .4% and 3.0% of the prescription dose to the PTV, with average CBCT dose to the PTV between .3% and .8%. By including CBCT dose to skin as a constraint during optimization, peak skin dose is reduced by between 1.9% and 7.4%, and average skin dose is reduced by .2% to 3.3%. Conclusions: Pre-treatment CBCT may deliver a substantial amount of radiation dose to the target volume. By considering CBCT dose to skin at the point of treatment planning, it is possible to reduce patient skin dose from current clinical levels, and to provide patient treatment with the improved accuracy that daily CBCT provides.

  17. A computational method for estimating the dosimetric effect of intra-fraction motion on step-and-shoot IMRT and compensator plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waghorn, Ben J; Shah, Amish P; Ngwa, Wilfred; Meeks, Sanford L; Langen, Katja M [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, 1400 South Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32806 (United States); Moore, Joseph A; Siebers, Jeffrey V, E-mail: benjamin.waghorn@orlandohealth.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 College Street, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States)

    2010-07-21

    Intra-fraction organ motion during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment can cause differences between the planned and the delivered dose distribution. To investigate the extent of these dosimetric changes, a computational model was developed and validated. The computational method allows for calculation of the rigid motion perturbed three-dimensional dose distribution in the CT volume and therefore a dose volume histogram-based assessment of the dosimetric impact of intra-fraction motion on a rigidly moving body. The method was developed and validated for both step-and-shoot IMRT and solid compensator IMRT treatment plans. For each segment (or beam), fluence maps were exported from the treatment planning system. Fluence maps were shifted according to the target position deduced from a motion track. These shifted, motion-encoded fluence maps were then re-imported into the treatment planning system and were used to calculate the motion-encoded dose distribution. To validate the accuracy of the motion-encoded dose distribution the treatment plan was delivered to a moving cylindrical phantom using a programmed four-dimensional motion phantom. Extended dose response (EDR-2) film was used to measure a planar dose distribution for comparison with the calculated motion-encoded distribution using a gamma index analysis (3% dose difference, 3 mm distance-to-agreement). A series of motion tracks incorporating both inter-beam step-function shifts and continuous sinusoidal motion were tested. The method was shown to accurately predict the film's dose distribution for all of the tested motion tracks, both for the step-and-shoot IMRT and compensator plans. The average gamma analysis pass rate for the measured dose distribution with respect to the calculated motion-encoded distribution was 98.3 {+-} 0.7%. For static delivery the average film-to-calculation pass rate was 98.7 {+-} 0.2%. In summary, a computational technique has been developed to calculate the

  18. The use of a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm to increase flexibility in the search for better IMRT plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clay; Kim, Minsun; Liao, Jay; Phillips, Mark

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate how a more flexible and thorough multiobjective search of feasible IMRT plans affects performance in IMRT optimization. A multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) was used as a tool to investigate how expanding the search space to include a wider range of penalty functions affects the quality of the set of IMRT plans produced. The MOEA uses a population of IMRT plans to generate new IMRT plans through deterministic minimization of recombined penalty functions that are weighted sums of multiple, tissue-specific objective functions. The quality of the generated plans are judged by an independent set of nonconvex, clinically relevant decision criteria, and all dominated plans are eliminated. As this process repeats itself, better plans are produced so that the population of IMRT plans will approach the Pareto front. Three different approaches were used to explore the effects of expanding the search space. First, the evolutionary algorithm used genetic optimization principles to search by simultaneously optimizing both the weights and tissue-specific dose parameters in penalty functions. Second, penalty function parameters were individually optimized for each voxel in all organs at risk (OARs) in the MOEA. Finally, a heuristic voxel-specific improvement (VSI) algorithm that can be used on any IMRT plan was developed that incrementally improves voxel-specific penalty function parameters for all structures (OARs and targets). Different approaches were compared using the concept of domination comparison applied to the sets of plans obtained by multiobjective optimization. MOEA optimizations that simultaneously searched both importance weights and dose parameters generated sets of IMRT plans that were superior to sets of plans produced when either type of parameter was fixed for four example prostate plans. The amount of improvement increased with greater overlap between OARs and targets. Allowing the MOEA to search for voxel-specific penalty functions

  19. Dosimetric difference amongst 3 techniques: TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Francis Kar-ho; Yip, Celia Wai-yi; Cheung, Frankie Chun-hung; Leung, Alex Kwok-cheung; Chau, Ricky Ming-chun; Ngan, Roger Kai-cheong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric difference amongst TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten patients with late-stage (Stage III or IV) NPC treated with TomoTherapy or IMRT were selected for the study. Treatment plans with these 3 techniques were devised according to departmental protocol. Dosimetric parameters for organ at risk and treatment targets were compared between TomoTherapy and IMRT, TomoTherapy and RapidArc, and IMRT and RapidArc. Comparison amongst the techniques was done by statistical tests on the dosimetric parameters, total monitor unit (MU), and expected delivery time. All 3 techniques achieved similar target dose coverage. TomoTherapy achieved significantly lower doses in lens and mandible amongst the techniques. It also achieved significantly better dose conformity to the treatment targets. RapidArc achieved significantly lower dose to the eye and normal tissue, lower total MU, and less delivery time. The dosimetric advantages of the 3 techniques were identified in the treatment of late-stage NPC. This may serve as a guideline for selection of the proper technique for different clinical cases. © 2013 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists Published by American Association of Medical Dosimetrists All rights reserved.

  20. SU-F-T-336: A Quick Auto-Planning (QAP) Method for Patient Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, J; Zhang, Z; Wang, J; Xie, J; Lu, S; Zhao, J; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop a quick auto-planning system that permits fast patient IMRT planning with conformal dose to the target without manual field alignment and time-consuming dose distribution optimization. Methods: The planning target volume (PTV) of the source and the target patient were projected to the iso-center plane in certain beameye- view directions to derive the 2D projected shapes. Assuming the target interior was isotropic for each beam direction boundary analysis under polar coordinate was performed to map the source shape boundary to the target shape boundary to derive the source-to-target shape mapping function. The derived shape mapping function was used to morph the source beam aperture to the target beam aperture over all segments in each beam direction. The target beam weights were re-calculated to deliver the same dose to the reference point (iso-center) as the source beam did in the source plan. The approach was tested on two rectum patients (one source patient and one target patient). Results: The IMRT planning time by QAP was 5 seconds on a laptop computer. The dose volume histograms and the dose distribution showed the target patient had the similar PTV dose coverage and OAR dose sparing with the source patient. Conclusion: The QAP system can instantly and automatically finish the IMRT planning without dose optimization.

  1. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy, step-and-shoot, and sliding window IMRT for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnell, Erich; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Young, Julie; Hildebrand, Kim; Algan, Ozer; Syzek, Elizabeth; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center 800 N.E. 10th St., OKCC L100, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study aims to evaluate treatment plans generated by Step-and-Shoot (SS), Sliding Window (SW) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) in order to assess the differences in dose volume histograms of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR), conformity indices, radiobiological evaluations, and plan quality for prostate cancer cases. Six prostate cancer patients treated in our center were selected for this retrospective study. Treatment plans were generated with Eclipse version 8.9 using 10 MV photon beams. For VMAT, Varian Rapid Arc with 1 or 2 arcs, and for SS and SW IMRT, 7-9 fields were used. Each plan had three PTVs with prescription doses of 81, 59.4, and 45 Gy to prostate, to prostate and lymph nodes, and to pelvis, respectively. Doses to PTV and OAR and the conformal indices (COIN) were compared among three techniques. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated and compared. The mean doses to the PTV prostate on average were 83 Gy and the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 0.28. For bladder and rectum, the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 2.2. The COIN did not favour any particular delivery method over the other. The TCP was higher with SS and SW for four patients and higher with VMAT for two patients. The NTCP for the rectum was the lowest with VMAT in five out of the six patients. The results show similar target coverage in general.

  2. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated Arc therapy, step-and-shoot, and sliding window IMRT for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Erich; Herman, Tania De La Fuente; Young, Julie; Hildebrand, Kim; Algan, Ozer; Syzek, Elizabeth; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate treatment plans generated by Step-and-Shoot (SS), Sliding Window (SW) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) in order to assess the differences in dose volume histograms of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR), conformity indices, radiobiological evaluations, and plan quality for prostate cancer cases. Six prostate cancer patients treated in our center were selected for this retrospective study. Treatment plans were generated with Eclipse version 8.9 using 10 MV photon beams. For VMAT, Varian Rapid Arc with 1 or 2 arcs, and for SS and SW IMRT, 7-9 fields were used. Each plan had three PTVs with prescription doses of 81, 59.4, and 45 Gy to prostate, to prostate and lymph nodes, and to pelvis, respectively. Doses to PTV and OAR and the conformal indices (COIN) were compared among three techniques. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD), tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were calculated and compared. The mean doses to the PTV prostate on average were 83 Gy and the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 0.28. For bladder and rectum, the percent differences of mean dose among all techniques were below 2.2. The COIN did not favour any particular delivery method over the other. The TCP was higher with SS and SW for four patients and higher with VMAT for two patients. The NTCP for the rectum was the lowest with VMAT in five out of the six patients. The results show similar target coverage in general.

  3. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a ⁶⁰Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create (60)Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The (60)Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. All (60)Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for (60)Co was within 20 Gy. The mean doses for all (60)Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. A commercial (60)Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SU-E-T-597: Influence of Smoothing Parameters on Dynamic IMRT Plan Quality and Deliverability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigandan, D; Sharma, S; Gandhi, A; Subramani, V; Sharma, D; Kumar, P; Julka, P; Rath, G

    2012-06-01

    To study the impact of different smoothing parameters on IMRT plan quality and deliverabilityMethods: Five previously treated patients of carcinoma cervix were chosen. Planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR) i.e. bladder and rectum were contoured. In each case, five different dynamic IMRT plans with 6MV photon beam were created in eclipse TPS for Varian 2300C/D linear accelerator. During optimization, dose volume constraints and priorities were kept constant and smoothing parameters were varied as follows: 10/5, 40/30 (TPS default value), 80/60, 100/80 and 200/150 in x/y direction. Total dose was 5040cGy in 28 fractions and prescribed at 95% isodose. Plan quality was analyzed by means of coverage index (CI=PTV covered by prescription dose/PTV), OAR mean doses and total monitor units (MUs) required to deliver a plan. In each case, deliverability of treatment plans were verified with I'matriXX ion-chamber array and compared with TPS dose-plane using gamma index of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement criteria. The CI values were 0.9435±0.032, 0.9418±0.034, 0.9380±0.041, 0.9330±0.047 and 0.8681±0.072 for 10/5, 40/30, 80/60, 100/80 and 200/150 in x/y direction. PTV dose maximum decreases with the increase of smoothing parameters and values were 5724.38±106.08 5723.30±131.60, 5708.44±1 16.74, 5697.92±116.82 and 5587.50±189.50cGy. The bladder mean doses were 4027.46±630.40, 3821.62±420.62, 3819.58±427.08, 3813.42±435.02 and 3814.78±438.0cGy. Rectum mean doses were 3839.88±466.02, 3835.52±473.18, 3837.52±472.88, 3839.10±471.20 and 3918.94±469.76cGy. Similarly, Total MUs were 1588±205, 1573±214, 1513±274, 1456±335 and 1219±68. Gamma pass rate increases with the increase of smoothing parameters and values were 99.16±0.21%, 99.07±0.19%, 99.24±0.28%, 99.29±0.29% and 99.75±0.15%. When smoothing parameters decreased below TPS default value, plan quality increases, but deliverability decreases. If smoothing parameters

  5. SU-E-T-16: A Hybrid VMAT/IMRT Technique for the Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, N; Yang, R; Wang, J [Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate a Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique which combines volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 2 full arcs VMAT, 9-field IMRT and Hybrid VMAT/IMRT plans were created for 10 patients with NPC. The Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique consisted of 1 full VMAT arc and 7 IMRT fields. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for Hybrid VMAT/IMRT was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) were also evaluated. Results: The Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved target dose homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT for PTV70 and PTV54. For PTV70 and PTV60, the Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved target dose conformity compared with IMRT (0.62 vs 0.47; p<0.05 and 0.64 vs 0.58; p<0.05, respectively) and VMAT (0.62 vs 0.43; p<0.05 and 0.64 vs 0.6; p<0.05, respectively). The near maximum dose (D2%) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), temporal lobe and mandible for Hybrid plans were 5.5%, 7.9% and 5.2% lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean dose of TMJ, temporal lobe, mandible and unspecified tissue for Hybrid plans were 12.8%, 11.4%, 4.2% and 4.1% lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean dose of right parotid, mandible and unspecified tissue for Hybrid plans were 3.3%, 2.4% and 3.1% lower than VMAT plans (p<0.05). The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT and Hybrid plans were 2256, 507 and 1394, respectively. Conclusion: Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved the target dose homogeneity and conformity compared with IMRT and VMAT and reduced the dose of OARs and unspecified tissue compared with IMRT with fewer MUs. Compared with VMAT, Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique can better protect parotid gland, mandible and unspecified tissue. Ruijie Yang was funded by the grant project: National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237). Other authors have no competing interest for this work.

  6. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a {sup 60}Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H. Omar, E-mail: hwooten@radonc.wustl.edu; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating {sup 60}Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create {sup 60}Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The {sup 60}Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All {sup 60}Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for {sup 60}Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all {sup 60}Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial {sup 60}Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system.

  7. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assenholt, Marianne S.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Nielsen, Soeren K.; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Tanderup, Kari (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Purpose. Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Material and methods. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gyx25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gyx4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Results. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. Conclusion. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy

  8. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenholt, Marianne S; Petersen, Jørgen B; Nielsen, Søren K; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gy x 25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gy x 4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy.

  9. The radiobiological effect of intra-fraction dose-rate modulation in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewes, J. M.; Suchowerska, N.; Jackson, M.; Zhang, M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2008-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) achieves optimal dose conformity to the tumor through the use of spatially and temporally modulated radiation fields. In particular, average dose rate and instantaneous dose rate (pulse amplitude) are highly variable within a single IMRT fraction. In this study we isolate these variables and determine their impact on cell survival. Survival was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Two cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were examined: melanoma (MM576) and non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460). The survival fraction was observed to be independent of instantaneous dose rate. A statistically significant trend to increased survival was observed as the average dose rate was decreased, for a constant total dose. The results are relevant to IMRT practice, where average treatment times can be significantly extended to allow for movement of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Our in vitro study adds to the pool of theoretical evidence for the consequences of protracted treatments. We find that extended delivery times can substantially increase the cell survival. This also suggests that regional variation in the dose-rate history across a tumor, which is inherent to IMRT, will affect radiation dose efficacy.

  10. The radiobiological effect of intra-fraction dose-rate modulation in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bewes, J M; Suchowerska, N; McKenzie, D R [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Jackson, M; Zhang, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Camperdown 2050, NSW (Australia)], E-mail: jbewes@physics.usyd.edu.au

    2008-07-07

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) achieves optimal dose conformity to the tumor through the use of spatially and temporally modulated radiation fields. In particular, average dose rate and instantaneous dose rate (pulse amplitude) are highly variable within a single IMRT fraction. In this study we isolate these variables and determine their impact on cell survival. Survival was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Two cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were examined: melanoma (MM576) and non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460). The survival fraction was observed to be independent of instantaneous dose rate. A statistically significant trend to increased survival was observed as the average dose rate was decreased, for a constant total dose. The results are relevant to IMRT practice, where average treatment times can be significantly extended to allow for movement of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Our in vitro study adds to the pool of theoretical evidence for the consequences of protracted treatments. We find that extended delivery times can substantially increase the cell survival. This also suggests that regional variation in the dose-rate history across a tumor, which is inherent to IMRT, will affect radiation dose efficacy.

  11. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandula, Shravan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, Xiaorong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 50} values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life.

  12. Statistical process control analysis for patient-specific IMRT and VMAT QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Srisatit, Somyot; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-05-01

    This work applied statistical process control to establish the control limits of the % gamma pass of patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA), and to evaluate the efficiency of the QA process by using the process capability index (Cpml). A total of 278 IMRT QA plans in nasopharyngeal carcinoma were measured with MapCHECK, while 159 VMAT QA plans were undertaken with ArcCHECK. Six megavolts with nine fields were used for the IMRT plan and 2.5 arcs were used to generate the VMAT plans. The gamma (3%/3 mm) criteria were used to evaluate the QA plans. The % gamma passes were plotted on a control chart. The first 50 data points were employed to calculate the control limits. The Cpml was calculated to evaluate the capability of the IMRT/VMAT QA process. The results showed higher systematic errors in IMRT QA than VMAT QA due to the more complicated setup used in IMRT QA. The variation of random errors was also larger in IMRT QA than VMAT QA because the VMAT plan has more continuity of dose distribution. The average % gamma pass was 93.7% ± 3.7% for IMRT and 96.7% ± 2.2% for VMAT. The Cpml value of IMRT QA was 1.60 and VMAT QA was 1.99, which implied that the VMAT QA process was more accurate than the IMRT QA process. Our lower control limit for % gamma pass of IMRT is 85.0%, while the limit for VMAT is 90%. Both the IMRT and VMAT QA processes are good quality because Cpml values are higher than 1.0.

  13. Comparative analysis of Pareto surfaces in multi-criteria IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, K; Süss, P; Serna, J I; Monz, M; Küfer, K H; Thieke, C

    2011-06-21

    In the multi-criteria optimization approach to IMRT planning, a given dose distribution is evaluated by a number of convex objective functions that measure tumor coverage and sparing of the different organs at risk. Within this context optimizing the intensity profiles for any fixed set of beams yields a convex Pareto set in the objective space. However, if the number of beam directions and irradiation angles are included as free parameters in the formulation of the optimization problem, the resulting Pareto set becomes more intricate. In this work, a method is presented that allows for the comparison of two convex Pareto sets emerging from two distinct beam configuration choices. For the two competing beam settings, the non-dominated and the dominated points of the corresponding Pareto sets are identified and the distance between the two sets in the objective space is calculated and subsequently plotted. The obtained information enables the planner to decide if, for a given compromise, the current beam setup is optimal. He may then re-adjust his choice accordingly during navigation. The method is applied to an artificial case and two clinical head neck cases. In all cases no configuration is dominating its competitor over the whole Pareto set. For example, in one of the head neck cases a seven-beam configuration turns out to be superior to a nine-beam configuration if the highest priority is the sparing of the spinal cord. The presented method of comparing Pareto sets is not restricted to comparing different beam angle configurations, but will allow for more comprehensive comparisons of competing treatment techniques (e.g., photons versus protons) than with the classical method of comparing single treatment plans.

  14. Comparative analysis of Pareto surfaces in multi-criteria IMRT planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, K; Süss, P; Serna, J I; Monz, M; Küfer, K H; Thieke, C

    2011-01-01

    In the multi-criteria optimization approach to IMRT planning, a given dose distribution is evaluated by a number of convex objective functions that measure tumor coverage and sparing of the different organs at risk. Within this context optimizing the intensity profiles for any fixed set of beams yields a convex Pareto set in the objective space. However, if the number of beam directions and irradiation angles are included as free parameters in the formulation of the optimization problem, the resulting Pareto set becomes more intricate. In this work, a method is presented that allows for the comparison of two convex Pareto sets emerging from two distinct beam configuration choices. For the two competing beam settings, the non-dominated and the dominated points of the corresponding Pareto sets are identified and the distance between the two sets in the objective space is calculated and subsequently plotted. The obtained information enables the planner to decide if, for a given compromise, the current beam setup is optimal. He may then re-adjust his choice accordingly during navigation. The method is applied to an artificial case and two clinical head neck cases. In all cases no configuration is dominating its competitor over the whole Pareto set. For example, in one of the head neck cases a seven-beam configuration turns out to be superior to a nine-beam configuration if the highest priority is the sparing of the spinal cord. The presented method of comparing Pareto sets is not restricted to comparing different beam angle configurations, but will allow for more comprehensive comparisons of competing treatment techniques (e.g. photons versus protons) than with the classical method of comparing single treatment plans. PMID:21610294

  15. Pancreatic cancer planning: Complex conformal vs modulated therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Katherine L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Witek, Matthew E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Chen, Hongyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Bar-Ad, Voichita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Harrison, Amy S., E-mail: amy.harrison@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    To compare the roles of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric- modulated arc therapy (VMAT) therapy as compared to simple and complex 3-dimensional chemoradiotherpy (3DCRT) planning for resectable and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. In all, 12 patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (8) or neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (4) were evaluated retrospectively. Radiotherapy planning was performed for 4 treatment techniques: simple 4-field box, complex 5-field 3DCRT, 5 to 6-field IMRT, and single-arc VMAT. All volumes were approved by a single observer in accordance with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Pancreas Contouring Atlas. Plans included tumor/tumor bed and regional lymph nodes to 45 Gy; with tumor/tumor bed boosted to 50.4 Gy, at least 95% of planning target volume (PTV) received the prescription dose. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for multiple end points, treatment planning, and delivery time were assessed. Complex 3DCRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans significantly (p < 0.05) decreased mean kidney dose, mean liver dose, liver (V{sub 30}, V{sub 35}), stomach (D{sub 10}%), stomach (V{sub 45}), mean right kidney dose, and right kidney (V{sub 15}) as compared with the simple 4-field plans that are most commonly reported in the literature. IMRT plans resulted in decreased mean liver dose, liver (V{sub 35}), and left kidney (V{sub 15}, V{sub 18}, V{sub 20}). VMAT plans decreased small bowel (D{sub 10}%, D{sub 15}%), small bowel (V{sub 35}, V{sub 45}), stomach (D{sub 10}%, D{sub 15}%), stomach (V{sub 35}, V{sub 45}), mean liver dose, liver (V{sub 35}), left kidney (V{sub 15}, V{sub 18}, V{sub 20}), and right kidney (V{sub 18}, V{sub 20}). VMAT plans significantly decreased small bowel (D{sub 10}%, D{sub 15}%), left kidney (V{sub 20}), and stomach (V{sub 45}) as compared with IMRT plans. Treatment planning and delivery times were most efficient for simple 4-field box and VMAT. Excluding patient setup and imaging, average

  16. Dosimetric comparison of IMRT and modulated arc-therapy techniques in the treatment of cervical cancers; Comparaison dosimetrique des techniques de RCMI et d'arctherapie modulee dans le traitement des cancers du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard-Oldrini, S.; Charra-Brunaud, C.; Tournier-Rangeard, L.; Huger, S.; Marchesi, V.; Bouziz, D.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the dosimetric comparison of two techniques used for the treatment of cervical cancers: the intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) with static beams and modulated arc-therapy with RapidArc. The treatment plans of 15 patients have been compared. The clinical target volume (CTV) comprises the gross target volume, the cervix, the upper third of the vagina, and ganglionary areas. The previsional target volume comprises the clinical target volume and a one centimetre margin. Organs at risk are rectum, bladder, intestine and bone marrow. Arc-therapy seems to provide a better sparing of intestine that IMRT, while maintaining a good coverage of the previsional target volume and decreasing treatment duration. Short communication

  17. Simultaneous navigation of multiple Pareto surfaces, with an application to multicriteria IMRT planning with multiple beam angle configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, David; Monz, Michael

    2010-02-01

    To introduce a method to simultaneously explore a collection of Pareto surfaces. The method will allow radiotherapy treatment planners to interactively explore treatment plans for different beam angle configurations as well as different treatment modalities. The authors assume a convex optimization setting and represent the Pareto surface for each modality or given beam set by a set of discrete points on the surface. Weighted averages of these discrete points produce a continuous representation of each Pareto surface. The authors calculate a set of Pareto surfaces and use linear programming to navigate across the individual surfaces, allowing switches between surfaces. The switches are organized such that the plan profits in the requested way, while trying to keep the change in dose as small as possible. The system is demonstrated on a phantom pancreas IMRT case using 100 different five beam configurations and a multicriteria formulation with six objectives. The system has intuitive behavior and is easy to control. Also, because the underlying linear programs are small, the system is fast enough to offer real-time exploration for the Pareto surfaces of the given beam configurations. The system presented offers a sound starting point for building clinical systems for multicriteria exploration of different modalities and offers a controllable way to explore hundreds of beam angle configurations in IMRT planning, allowing the users to focus their attention on the dose distribution and treatment planning objectives instead of spending excessive time on the technicalities of delivery.

  18. SU-E-T-393: Evaluation of Large Field IMRT Versus RapidArc Planning for Carcinoma Cervix with Para-Aotic Node Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, S Kothanda; Girigesh, Y; MISHRA, M; Lalit, K [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, New Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to evaluate and compare Large field IMRT and RapidArc planning for Carcinoma Cervix and Para-aotic node irradiation. Methods: In this study, ten patients of Cervix with para-aotic node have been selected with PTV length 35+2cm. All plans were generated in Eclipse TPS V10.0 with Dynamic IMRT and RapidArc technique using 6MV photon energy. In IMRT planning, 7 fields were chosen to get optimal plan and in RapidArc, double Full arc clockwise and counter clockwise were used for planning. All the plans were generated with single isocenter and calculated using AAA dose algorithm. For all the cases the prescribed dose to PTV was same and the plan acceptance criteria is; 95% of the PTV volume should receive 100% prescribed dose. The tolerance doses for the OAR’s is also taken in to account. The evaluation criteria used for analysis are; 1) Homogeneity Index, 2) Conformity Index, 3) Mean Dose to OAR’s, 4)Total monitor units delivered. Results: DVH analysis were performed for both IMRT and RapidArc planning. In both the plans, 95% of PTV volume receives prescribed dose and maximum dose are less than 107%. The conformity index are same in both the techniques. The mean Homogeneity index are 1.036 and 1.053 for IMRT and RapidArc plan. The mean (mean + SD) dose of bladder and rectum in IMRT is 44.2+1.55, 42.05+2.52 and RapidArc is 46.66+1.6, 44.2+2.75 respectively. There is no significant difference found in Right Femoral head, Left Femoral head and Kidney doses. It is found that total MU’s are more in IMRT compared with RapidArc planning. Conclusion: In the case of cervix with Para-arotic node single isocenter irradiation, IMRT planning in large-field is better compared to RapidArc planning in terms of Homogeneity Index and mean dose of Bladder and Rectum.

  19. Photon and proton therapy planning comparison for malignant glioma based on CT, FDG-PET, DTI-MRI and fiber tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Engelholm, Silke; Ohlhues, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare treatment plans generated using fixed beam Intensity Modulated photon Radiation Therapy (IMRT), inversely optimized arc therapy (RapidArc(R), RA) with spot-scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for high-grade glioma patients. Plans were compared...

  20. Photon and proton therapy planning comparison for malignant glioma based on CT, FDG-PET, DTI-MRI and fiber tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Engelholm, Silke; Ohlhues, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare treatment plans generated using fixed beam Intensity Modulated photon Radiation Therapy (IMRT), inversely optimized arc therapy (RapidArc(R), RA) with spot-scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for high-grade glioma patients. Plans were compare...

  1. Reduced Toxicity With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT): An Update on the Whole Abdominopelvic Radiation Therapy (WAP-RT) Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Neil B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stein, Nicholas F. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); LaQuaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Magnan, Heather M. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy typically involving the peritoneum in young men. Whole abdominopelvic radiation therapy (WAP-RT) using conventional 2-dimensional (2D) radiation therapy (RT) is used to address local recurrence but has been limited by toxicity. Our objectives were to assess the benefit of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on toxicity and to update the largest series on radiation for DSRCT. Methods and Materials: The records of 31 patients with DSRCT treated with WAP-RT (22 with 2D-RT and 9 with IMRT) between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. All received multi-agent chemotherapy and maximal surgical debulking followed by 30 Gy of WAP-RT. A further focal boost of 12 to 24 Gy was used in 12 cases. Boost RT and autologous stem cell transplantation were nearly exclusive to patients treated with 2D-RT. Toxicities were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Dosimetric analysis compared IMRT and simulated 2D-RT dose distributions. Results: Of 31 patients, 30 completed WAP-RT, with a median follow-up after RT of 19 months. Acute toxicity was reduced with IMRT versus 2D-RT: P=.04 for gastrointestinal toxicity of grade 2 or higher (33% vs 77%); P=.02 for grade 4 hematologic toxicity (33% vs 86%); P=.01 for rates of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; and P=.04 for rates of platelet transfusion. Post treatment red blood cell and platelet transfusion rates were also reduced (P=.01). IMRT improved target homogeneity ([D05-D95]/D05 of 21% vs 46%) and resulted in a 21% mean bone dose reduction. Small bowel obstruction was the most common late toxicity (23% overall). Updated 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 50% and 24%, respectively. Overall survival was associated with distant metastasis at diagnosis on multivariate analysis. Most failures remained intraperitoneal (88%). Conclusions: IMRT for consolidative WAP-RT in DSRCT improves

  2. Semiautomated head-and-neck IMRT planning using dose warping and scaling to robustly adapt plans in a knowledge database containing potentially suboptimal plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Matthew, E-mail: matthew.schmidt@varian.com; Grzetic, Shelby [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Lutzky, Carly [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Das, Shiva K. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Prior work by the authors and other groups has studied the creation of automated intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans of equivalent quality to those in a patient database of manually created clinical plans; those database plans provided guidance on the achievable sparing to organs-at-risk (OARs). However, in certain sites, such as head-and-neck, the clinical plans may not be sufficiently optimized because of anatomical complexity and clinical time constraints. This could lead to automated plans that suboptimally exploit OAR sparing. This work investigates a novel dose warping and scaling scheme that attempts to reduce effects of suboptimal sparing in clinical database plans, thus improving the quality of semiautomated head-and-neck cancer (HNC) plans. Methods: Knowledge-based radiotherapy (KBRT) plans for each of ten “query” patients were semiautomatically generated by identifying the most similar “match” patient in a database of 103 clinical manually created patient plans. The match patient’s plans were adapted to the query case by: (1) deforming the match beam fluences to suit the query target volume and (2) warping the match primary/boost dose distribution to suit the query geometry and using the warped distribution to generate query primary/boost optimization dose-volume constraints. Item (2) included a distance scaling factor to improve query OAR dose sparing with respect to the possibly suboptimal clinical match plan. To further compensate for a component plan of the match case (primary/boost) not optimally sparing OARs, the query dose volume constraints were reduced using a dose scaling factor to be the minimum from either (a) the warped component plan (primary or boost) dose distribution or (b) the warped total plan dose distribution (primary + boost) scaled in proportion to the ratio of component prescription dose to total prescription dose. The dose-volume constraints were used to plan the query case with no human intervention

  3. SU-F-T-384: Step and Shoot IMRT, VMAT and Autoplan VMAT Nasopharnyx Plan Robustness to Linear Accelerator Delivery Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogson, EM [Institute of Medical Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Hansen, C [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Blake, S; Thwaites, D [Institute of Medical Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Arumugam, S [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Holloway, L [Institute of Medical Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the robustness of different treatment techniques in respect to simulated linac errors on the dose distribution to the target volume and organs at risk for step and shoot IMRT (ssIMRT), VMAT and Autoplan generated VMAT nasopharynx plans. Methods: A nasopharynx patient dataset was retrospectively replanned with three different techniques: 7 beam ssIMRT, one arc manual generated VMAT and one arc automatically generated VMAT. Treatment simulated uncertainties: gantry, collimator, MLC field size and MLC shifts, were introduced into these plans at increments of 5,2,1,−1,−2 and −5 (degrees or mm) and recalculated in Pinnacle. The mean and maximum doses were calculated for the high dose PTV, parotids, brainstem, and spinal cord and then compared to the original baseline plan. Results: Simulated gantry angle errors have <1% effect on the PTV, ssIMRT is most sensitive. The small collimator errors (±1 and ±2 degrees) impacted the mean PTV dose by <2% for all techniques, however for the ±5 degree errors mean target varied by up to 7% for the Autoplan VMAT and 10% for the max dose to the spinal cord and brain stem, seen in all techniques. The simulated MLC shifts introduced the largest errors for the Autoplan VMAT, with the larger MLC modulation presumably being the cause. The most critical error observed, was the MLC field size error, where even small errors of 1 mm, caused significant changes to both the PTV and the OAR. The ssIMRT is the least sensitive and the Autoplan the most sensitive, with target errors of up to 20% over and under dosages observed. Conclusion: For a nasopharynx patient the plan robustness observed is highest for the ssIMRT plan and lowest for the Autoplan generated VMAT plan. This could be caused by the more complex MLC modulation seen for the VMAT plans. This project is supported by a grant from NSW Cancer Council.

  4. SU-C-202-01: Incorporating Time-Dependent Hypoxia in IMRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, A [Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (United States); Nohadani, O [Northwestern University Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To incorporate uncertainties in oxygenation of tumor cells into radiation therapy planning via robust optimization. The model is demonstrated using a clinical prostate cancer case. Methods: The tumor oxygenation levels are determined based on pre- and mid-treatment PET scans. To account for oxygenation changes, we use a radio-sensitivity factor for the effective dose necessary to treat hypoxic cells. Due to the unpredictable nature of re-oxygenation of hypoxic cells, the radio-sensitivity factor and its change is modeled to reside in a time-dependent uncertainty set. This uncertainty can adapt to both pre- and mid-treatment scans, resulting in a two-stage robust treatment planning model. We develop a robust counterpart reformulation that transforms the original NP-hard problem into a linear program consisting of finitely many linear constraints, which can be solved efficiently. Results: The robust plan is compared to both the corresponding fractionated plan which ignores hypoxia, and to the commonly practiced dose-escalated plan that uniformly increases dose based on initial oxygen concentrations. For PTV, the robust plan improves D{sub 50}, D{sub 95}, and EUD by 4% on average compared to fractionated, and by 11% compared to the optimal escalated plan. Moreover, the robust plan spared organs at risk similar to the fractionated plan, while the escalated plan led to over 170% increase of Bladder D{sub 30}. Conclusion: The proposed robust adaptive model can improve tumor coverage by increasing dose to hypoxic tumor voxels that is overlooked by common fractionated treatments. In addition, the robust model anticipates the re-oxygenation process, thus reducing the excess dose at later fractions in comparison to uniform dose-escalation methods.

  5. TU-G-BRB-02: A New Mathematical Framework for IMRT Inverse Planning with Voxel-Dependent Optimization Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarepisheh, M; Uribe-Sanchez, A; Li, N; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2012-06-01

    To establish a new mathematical framework for IMRT treatment optimization with voxel-dependent optimization parameters. In IMRT inverse treatment planning, a physician seeks for a plan to deliver a prescribed dose to the target while sparing the nearby healthy tissues. The conflict between these objectives makes the multi-criteria optimization an appropriate tool. Traditionally, a clinically acceptable plan can be generated by fine-tuning organ-based parameters. We establish a new mathematical framework by using voxel-based parameters for optimization. We introduce three different Pareto surfaces, prove the relationship between those surfaces, and compare voxel-based and organ-based methods. We prove some new theorems providing conditions under which the Pareto optimality is guaranteed. The new mathematical framework has shown that: 1) Using an increasing voxel penalty function with an increasing derivative, in particular the popular power function, it is possible to explore the entire Pareto surface by changing voxel-based weighting factors, which increases the chances of getting more desirable plan. 2) The Pareto optimality is always guaranteed by adjusting voxel-based weighting factors. 3) If the plan is initially produced by adjusting organ-based weighting factors, it is impossible to improve all the DVH curves at the same time by adjusting voxel-based weighting factors. 4) A larger Pareto surface is explored by changing voxel-based weighting factors than by changing organ-based weighting factors, possibly leading to a plan with better trade-offs. 5) The Pareto optimality is not necessarily guaranteed while we are adjusting the voxel reference doses, and hence, adjusting voxel-based weighting factors is preferred in terms of preserving the Pareto optimality. We have developed a mathematical framework for IMRT optimization using voxel-based parameters. We can improve the plan quality by adjusting voxel-based weighting factors after organ-based parameter

  6. SU-E-T-365: Dosimetric Impact of Dental Amalgam CT Image Artifacts On IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, N; Young, L; Parvathaneni, U; Liao, J; Richard, P; Ford, E; Sandison, G [University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of high density dental amalgam in patient CT image data sets causes dose calculation errors for head and neck (HN) treatment planning. This study assesses and compares dosimetric variations in IMRT and VMAT treatment plans due to dental artifacts. Methods: Sixteen HN patients with similar treatment sites (oropharynx), tumor volume and extensive dental artifacts were divided into two groups: IMRT (n=8, 6 to 9 beams) and VMAT (n=8, 2 arcs with 352° rotation). All cases were planned with the Pinnacle 9.2 treatment planning software using the collapsed cone convolution superposition algorithm and a range of prescription dose from 60 to 72Gy. Two different treatment plans were produced, each based on one of two image sets: (a)uncorrected; (b)dental artifacts density overridden (set to 1.0g/cm{sup 3}). Differences between the two treatment plans for each of the IMRT and VMAT techniques were quantified by the following dosimetric parameters: maximum point dose, maximum spinal cord and brainstem dose, mean left and right parotid dose, and PTV coverage (V95%Rx). Average differences generated for these dosimetric parameters were compared between IMRT and VMAT plans. Results: The average absolute dose differences (plan a minus plan b) for the VMAT and IMRT techniques, respectively, caused by dental artifacts were: 2.2±3.3cGy vs. 37.6±57.5cGy (maximum point dose, P=0.15); 1.2±0.9cGy vs. 7.9±6.7cGy (maximum spinal cord dose, P=0.026); 2.2±2.4cGy vs. 12.1±13.0cGy (maximum brainstem dose, P=0.077); 0.9±1.1cGy vs. 4.1±3.5cGy (mean left parotid dose, P=0.038); 0.9±0.8cGy vs. 7.8±11.9cGy (mean right parotid dose, P=0.136); 0.021%±0.014% vs. 0.803%±1.44% (PTV coverage, P=0.17). Conclusion: For the HN plans studied, dental artifacts demonstrated a greater dose calculation error for IMRT plans compared to VMAT plans. Rotational arcs appear on the average to compensate dose calculation errors induced by dental artifacts. Thus, compared to VMAT, density

  7. SU-C-BRD-01: Multi-Centre Collaborative Quality Assurance Program for IMRT Planning and Delivery: Year 3 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNiven, A; Jaffray, D; Letourneau, D [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A multi-centre quality assurance program was developed to enable quality improvement by coupling measurement of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning and delivery performance for site-specific planning exercises with diagnostic testing. The third year of the program specifically assessed the quality of spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) planning and delivery amongst the participating centres. Methods: A spine SBRT planning exercise (24 Gy in 2 fractions) was created and completed by participants prior to an on-site visit. The delivery portion of the on-site visit included spine SBRT plan delivery and diagnostic testing, which included portal image acquisition for quantification of phantom positioning error and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) calibration accuracy. The measured dose was compared to that calculated in the treatment planning system (TPS) using 3%/2mm composite analysis and 3%/3mm gamma analysis. Results: Fourteen institutions participated, creating 17 spine SBRT plans (15 VMAT and 2 IMRT). Three different TPS, two beam energies (6 MV and 6 MV FFF), and four MLC designs from two linac vendors were tested. Large variation in total monitor units (MU) per plan (2494–6462 MU) and dose-volume parameters was observed. The maximum point dose in the plans ranged from 116–149% and was dependent upon the TPS used. Pass rates for measured to planned dose comparison ranged from 89.4–100% and 97.3–100% for 3%/2mm and 3%/3mm criteria respectively. The largest measured MLC error did Result in one of the poorer pass rates. No direct correlation between phantom positioning error and pass rates overall. Conclusion: Significant differences were observed in the planning exercise for some plan and dose-volume parameters based on the TPS used. Standard evaluation criteria showed good agreement between planned and measured dose for all participants, however on an individual plan basis, diagnostic tests were able to identify contributing

  8. Interpretation of Gamma Index for Quality Assurance of Simultaneously Integrated Boost (SIB) IMRT Plans for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiq, Maria; Atiq, Atia; Iqbal, Khalid; Shamsi, Quratul ain; Andleeb, Farah; Buzdar, Saeed Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Objective: The Gamma Index is prerequisite to estimate point-by-point difference between measured and calculated dose distribution in terms of both Distance to Agreement (DTA) and Dose Difference (DD). This study aims to inquire what percentage of pixels passing a certain criteria assure a good quality plan and suggest gamma index as efficient mechanism for dose verification of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy plans. Method: In this study, dose was calculated for 14 head and neck patients and IMRT Quality Assurance was performed with portal dosimetry using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Eclipse software has a Gamma analysis function to compare measured and calculated dose distribution. Plans of this study were deemed acceptable when passing rate was 95% using tolerance for Distance to agreement (DTA) as 3mm and Dose Difference (DD) as 5%. Result and Conclusion: Thirteen cases pass tolerance criteria of 95% set by our institution. Confidence Limit for DD is 9.3% and for gamma criteria our local CL came out to be 2.0% (i.e., 98.0% passing). Lack of correlation was found between DD and γ passing rate with R2 of 0.0509. Our findings underline the importance of gamma analysis method to predict the quality of dose calculation. Passing rate of 95% is achieved in 93% of cases which is adequate level of accuracy for analyzed plans thus assuring the robustness of SIB IMRT treatment technique. This study can be extended to investigate gamma criteria of 5%/3mm for different tumor localities and to explore confidence limit on target volumes of small extent and simple geometry.

  9. The effect of slice thickness on target and organs at risk volumes, dosimetric coverage and radiobiological impact in IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S P; Cheng, C-W; Das, I J

    2016-05-01

    Dose-volume histogram (DVH) has become an important tool for evaluation of radiation outcome as reflected from many clinical protocols. While dosimetric accuracy in treatment planning system (TPS) is well quantified, the variability in volume estimation is uncertain due to reconstruction algorithm that is investigated in this study. In addition, the impact of dose distribution and tumor control probability (TCP) were also investigated with CT slice thickness for IMRT planning. A water phantom containing various objects with accurately known volume ranging from 1 to 100 cm(3) was scanned with 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 mm slice thickness. The CT data sets were sent to Eclipse TPS for contour delineation and volume estimation. The data were compared with known volume for the estimation of error in the volume of each structure. IMRT Plans were generated on phantom containing four objects with different slice thickness (1-5 mm) to calculate TCP. ICRU-83-recommended dose points such as D 2%, D 50%, D 98%, as well as homogeneity and conformity index were also calculated. The variability of volumes with CT slice thickness was significant especially for small volume structures. A maximum error of 92% was noticed for 1 cm(3) volume of object with 10 mm slice thickness, whereas it was ~19% for 1 mm slice thickness. For 2 and 3 cm(3) objects, the maximum error of 99% was noticed with 10 mm slice thickness and ~60% with 5 mm. The differences are smaller for larger volumes with a cutoff at about 20 cm(3). The calculated volume of the objects is a function of reconstruction algorithm and slice thickness. The PTV mean dose and TCP decreased with increasing slice thickness. Maximum variation of ~5% was noticed in mean dose and ~2% in TCP with change in slice thickness from 1 to 5 mm. The relative decrease in target volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose is ~5% with change in slice thickness from 1 to 5 mm. The homogeneity index increases up to 163% and conformity index decreases by 4

  10. Prostate cancer treated with image-guided helical TomoTherapy {sup registered} and image-guided LINAC-IMRT. Correlation between high-dose bladder volume, margin reduction, and genitourinary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdz, Sonia; Wendt, Thomas G. [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jena (Germany); Schwedas, Michael; Salz, Henning [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Section of Medical Physics, Jena (Germany); Foller, Susan [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Urology, Jena (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    We compared different image-guidance (IG) strategies for prostate cancer with high-precision IG intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using TomoTherapy {sup registered} (Accuray Inc., Madison, WI, USA) and linear accelerator (LINAC)-IMRT and their impact on planning target volume (PTV) margin reduction. Follow-up data showed reduced bladder toxicity in TomoTherapy patients compared to LINAC-IMRT. The purpose of this study was to quantify whether the treatment delivery technique and decreased margins affect reductions in bladder toxicity. Setup corrections from 30 patients treated with helical TomoTherapy and 30 treated with a LINAC were analyzed. These data were used to simulate three IG protocols based on setup error correction and a limited number of imaging sessions. For all patients, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was documented and correlated with the treatment delivery technique. For fiducial marker (FM)-based RT, a margin reduction of up to 3.1, 3.0, and 4.8 mm in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions, respectively, could be achieved with calculation of a setup correction from the first three fractions and IG every second day. Although the bladder volume was treated with mean doses of 35 Gy in the TomoTherapy group vs. 22 Gy in the LINAC group, we observed less GU toxicity after TomoTherapy. Intraprostate FMs allow for small safety margins, help decrease imaging frequency after setup correction, and minimize the dose to bladder and rectum, resulting in lower GU toxicity. In addition, IMRT delivered with TomoTherapy helps to avoid hotspots in the bladder neck, a critical anatomic structure associated with post-RT urinary toxicity. (orig.) [German] Wir haben im Rahmen der Prostatakarzinombehandlung verschiedene bildgefuehrte (IG) Strategien der hochpraezisen intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) unter Einsatz der Tomotherapie (TomoTherapy {sup registered}, Accuray Inc., Madison

  11. Practical aspects of inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer: a radiation treatment planner's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, William; Patrocinio, Horacio

    2005-06-01

    From a radiation treatment planner perspective, in the treatment of prostate cancer, inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) differs considerably from conventional, conformal, and forward-planned IMRT. In this work we aim to discuss the rationale behind the use of inverse-planned IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer, as well as some of the practical aspects, including the differences in planning strategies, dose fractionation and issues in plan evaluation. The primary motivation behind the use of inverse-planned IMRT for prostate cancer radiotherapy is to attempt further dose escalation while maintaining critical structure and healthy tissue sparing at an acceptable level. The sparing of normal tissues is largely dependent on the size of the planning target volume (PTV) defined, and if the PTV overlaps critical structures. Depending on how the PTV is defined it may be impossible to achieve the desired healthy tissue sparing even with IMRT. A second role for the use of IMRT in the treatment of prostate cancer may be to conform the isodose distribution to a complex PTV, such as one that includes the seminal vesicles or the pelvic lymph nodes in the treatment volume. Finally, inverse planned IMRT may be useful in the planning and delivery of simultaneous integrated boosts where different parts of the target structures receive different daily doses. This again has applications for the simultaneous treatment of pelvic lymph nodes with the prostate treatment volume, and presents interesting opportunities for hypo-fractionation. All of these options of course require careful plan evaluation with respect to isodose distributions and dose-volume constraints as well as the radiobiological consequences of using unconventional fractionation. IMRT seems to be the most effective modality for treating complex target geometries and for delivering simultaneous integrated boosts. In particular for prostate cancer, the simultaneous treatment of the prostate

  12. SU-F-T-440: The Feasibility Research of Checking Cervical Cancer IMRT Pre- Treatment Dose Verification by Automated Treatment Planning Verification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X; Yin, Y; Lin, X [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, China, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the preliminary feasibility of automated treatment planning verification system in cervical cancer IMRT pre-treatment dose verification. Methods: The study selected randomly clinical IMRT treatment planning data for twenty patients with cervical cancer, all IMRT plans were divided into 7 fields to meet the dosimetric goals using a commercial treatment planning system(PianncleVersion 9.2and the EclipseVersion 13.5). The plans were exported to the Mobius 3D (M3D)server percentage differences of volume of a region of interest (ROI) and dose calculation of target region and organ at risk were evaluated, in order to validate the accuracy automated treatment planning verification system. Results: The difference of volume for Pinnacle to M3D was less than results for Eclipse to M3D in ROI, the biggest difference was 0.22± 0.69%, 3.5±1.89% for Pinnacle and Eclipse respectively. M3D showed slightly better agreement in dose of target and organ at risk compared with TPS. But after recalculating plans by M3D, dose difference for Pinnacle was less than Eclipse on average, results were within 3%. Conclusion: The method of utilizing the automated treatment planning system to validate the accuracy of plans is convenientbut the scope of differences still need more clinical patient cases to determine. At present, it should be used as a secondary check tool to improve safety in the clinical treatment planning.

  13. Evaluation of different calibration curves QA of IMRT plans with radiochromic films; Evaluacion de diversas curvas de calibracion QA de planes de IMRT con peliculas radiocromicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Rodriguez, J.; Martin Rincon, C.; Garcia Repiso, S.; Ramos Paheo, J. A.; Verde Velasco, J. M.; Sena Espinel, E. de

    2013-07-01

    The non-linear relationship between dose and the optical density, characteristic plates radiochromic Gafchromic EBT and EBT2, has been studied by various authors, whose publications are proposed different functional forms that fit the specific values measured curves that allow the full range of useful dose calibration. The objective of the work focuses on evaluating the influence of the use of different calibration curves in the dose measurement for quality control of IMRT treatments. (Author)

  14. SU-E-T-164: Clinical Implementation of ASi EPID Panels for QA of IMRT/VMAT Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosier, K; Wu, C; Beck, K; Radevic, M; Asche, D; Bareng, J; Kroner, A; Lehmann, J; Logsdon, M; Dutton, S; Rosenthal, S

    2012-06-01

    To investigate various issues for clinical implementation of aSi EPID panels for IMRT/VMAT QA. Six linacs are used in our clinic for EPID-based plan QA; two Varian Truebeams, two Varian 2100 series, two Elekta Infiniti series. Multiple corrections must be accounted for in the calibration of each panel for dosimetric use. Varian aSi panels are calibrated with standard dark field, flood field, and 40×40 diagonal profile for beam profile correction. Additional corrections to account for off-axis and support arm backscatter are needed for larger field sizes. Since Elekta iViewGT system does not export gantry angle with images, a third-party inclinometer must be physically mounted to back of linac gantry and synchronized with data acquisition via iViewGT PC clock. A T/2 offset correctly correlates image and gantry angle for arc plans due to iView image time stamp at the end of data acquisition for each image. For both Varian and Elekta panels, a 5 MU 10×10 calibration field is used to account for the nonlinear MU to dose response at higher energies. Acquired EPID images are deconvolved via a high pass filter in Fourier space and resultant fluence maps are used to reconstruct a 3D dose 'delivered' to patient using DosimetryCheck. Results are compared to patient 3D dose computed by TPS using a 3D-gamma analysis. 120 IMRT and 100 VMAT cases are reported. Two 3D gamma quantities (Gamma(V10) and Gamma(PTV)) are proposed for evaluating QA results. The Gamma(PTV) is sensitive to MLC offsets while Gamma(V10) is sensitive to gantry rotations. When a 3mm/3% criteria and 90% or higher 3D gamma pass rate is used, all IMRT and 90% of VMAT QA pass QA. After appropriate calibration of aSi panels and setup of image acquisition systems, EPID based 3D dose reconstruction method is found clinically feasible. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Comparison of 3DCRT,VMAT and IMRT techniques in metastatic vertebra radiotherapy: A phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Sonay; Tunc, Sema; Kahraman, Arda; Kahraman Cetintas, Sibel; Kurt, Meral

    2017-09-01

    Vertebra metastases can be seen during the prognosis of cancer patients. Treatment ways of the metastasis are radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. Three-dimensional conformal therapy (3D-CRT) is widely used in the treatment of vertebra metastases. Also, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) are used too. The aim of this study is to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the different radiotherapy techniques. In the aspect of this goal, it is studied with a randophantom in Uludag University Medicine Faculty, Radiation Oncology Department. By using a computerized tomography image of the phantom, one 3DCRT plan, two VMAT and three IMRT plans for servical vertebra and three different 3DCRT plans, two VMAT and two IMRT plans for lomber vertebra are calculated. To calculate 3DCRT plans, CMS XiO Treatment System is used and to calculate VMAT and IMRT plans Monaco Treatment Planning System is used in the department. The study concludes with the dosimetric comparison of the treatment plans in the spect of critical organ doses, homogeneity and conformity index. As a result of this study, all critical organ doses are suitable for QUANTEC Dose Limit Report and critical organ doses depend on the techniques which used in radiotherapy. According to homogeneity and conformity indices, VMAT and IMRT plans are better than one in 3DCRT plans in servical and lomber vertebra radiotherapy plans.

  16. Impact on quality of life of IMRT versus 3-D conformal radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvard Abel, MD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: This study further supports the hypothesis that the introduction of IMRT has improved the long-term quality of life of HN cancer patients who have been treated with radiation therapy, but might cause more acute side effects. Longer follow-up is needed to study late complications.

  17. A decision model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared to three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in patients receiving radiotherapy to the prostate bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Hannah E; Martin, Andrew; Schofield, Deborah; Duchesne, Gillian; Haworth, Annette; Hornby, Colin; Sidhom, Mark; Jackson, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a radiation therapy technology that facilitates the delivery of an improved dose distribution with less dose to surrounding critical structures. This study estimates the longer term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of IMRT in patients post radical prostatectomy. A Markov decision model was developed to calculate the incremental quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs of IMRT compared with three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). Costs were estimated from the perspective of the Australian health care system. IMRT was both more effective and less costly than 3DCRT over 20 years, with an additional 20 QALYs gained and over $1.1 million saved per 1000 patients treated. This result was robust to plausible levels of uncertainty. IMRT was estimated to have a modest long term advantage over 3DCRT in terms of both improved effectiveness and reduced cost. This result was reliant on clinical judgement and interpretation of the existing literature, but provides quantitative guidance on the cost effectiveness of IMRT whilst long term trial evidence is awaited. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. SU-F-BRE-01: A Rapid Method to Determine An Upper Limit On a Radiation Detector's Correction Factor During the QA of IMRT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Y [CHUM - Notre Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Bouchard, H [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Discrepancies in the verification of the absorbed dose to water from an IMRT plan using a radiation dosimeter can be wither caused by 1) detector specific nonstandard field correction factors as described by the formalism of Alfonso et al. 2) inaccurate delivery of the DQA plan. The aim of this work is to develop a simple/fast method to determine an upper limit on the contribution of composite field correction factors to these discrepancies. Methods: Indices that characterize the non-flatness of the symmetrised collapsed delivery (VSC) of IMRT fields over detector-specific regions of interest were shown to be correlated with IMRT field correction factors. The indices introduced are the uniformity index (UI) and the mean fluctuation index (MF). Each one of these correlation plots have 10 000 fields generated with a stochastic model. A total of eight radiation detectors were investigated in the radial orientation. An upper bound on the correction factors was evaluated by fitting values of high correction factors for a given index value. Results: These fitted curves can be used to compare the performance of radiation dosimeters in composite IMRT fields. Highly water-equivalent dosimeters like the scintillating detector (Exradin W1) and a generic alanine detector have been found to have corrections under 1% over a broad range of field modulations (0 – 0.12 for MF and 0 – 0.5 for UI). Other detectors have been shown to have corrections of a few percent over this range. Finally, a full Monte Carlo simulations of 18 clinical and nonclinical IMRT field showed good agreement with the fitted curve for the A12 ionization chamber. Conclusion: This work proposes a rapid method to evaluate an upper bound on the contribution of correction factors to discrepancies found in the verification of DQA plans.

  19. Sensitivity analysis for lexicographic ordering in radiation therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, T.; Matuszak, M.; Feng, M.; Fraass, B. A.; Ten Haken, R. K.; Romeijn, H. E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a method to efficiently identify and calculate meaningful tradeoffs between criteria in an interactive IMRT treatment planning procedure. The method provides a systematic approach to developing high-quality radiation therapy treatment plans. Methods: Treatment planners consider numerous dosimetric criteria of varying importance that, when optimized simultaneously through multicriteria optimization, yield a Pareto frontier which represents the set of Pareto-optimal treatment plans. However, generating and navigating this frontier is a time-consuming, nontrivial process. A lexicographic ordering (LO) approach to IMRT uses a physician’s criteria preferences to partition the treatment planning decisions into a multistage treatment planning model. Because the relative importance of criteria optimized in the different stages may not necessarily constitute a strict prioritization, the authors introduce an interactive process, sensitivity analysis in lexicographic ordering (SALO), to allow the treatment planner control over the relative sequential-stage tradeoffs. By allowing this flexibility within a structured process, SALO implicitly restricts attention to and allows exploration of a subset of the Pareto efficient frontier that the physicians have deemed most important. Results: Improvements to treatment plans over a LO approach were found by implementing the SALO procedure on a brain case and a prostate case. In each stage, a physician assessed the tradeoff between previous stage and current stage criteria. The SALO method provided critical tradeoff information through curves approximating the relationship between criteria, which allowed the physician to determine the most desirable treatment plan. Conclusions: The SALO procedure provides treatment planners with a directed, systematic process to treatment plan selection. By following a physician’s prioritization, the treatment planner can avoid wasting effort considering clinically inferior

  20. Effect of various methods for rectum delineation on relative and absolute dose-volume histograms for prostate IMRT treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusumoto, Chiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ohira, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan); Miyazaki, Masayoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Isono, Masaru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima-te@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Several reports have dealt with correlations of late rectal toxicity with rectal dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for high dose levels. There are 2 techniques to assess rectal volume for reception of a specific dose: relative-DVH (R-DVH, %) that indicates relative volume for a vertical axis, and absolute-DVH (A-DVH, cc) with its vertical axis showing absolute volume of the rectum. The parameters of DVH vary depending on the rectum delineation method, but the literature does not present any standardization of such methods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different delineation methods on rectal DVHs. The enrollment for this study comprised 28 patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer, who had undergone intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the prescription dose of 78 Gy. The rectum was contoured with 4 different methods using 2 lengths, short (Sh) and long (Lg), and 2 cross sections, rectum (Rec) and rectal wall (Rw). Sh means the length from 1 cm above the seminal vesicles to 1 cm below the prostate and Lg the length from the rectosigmoid junction to the anus. Rec represents the entire rectal volume including the rectal contents and Rw the rectal volume of the area with a wall thickness of 4 mm. We compared dose-volume parameters by using 4 rectal contour methods for the same plan with the R-DVHs as well as the A-DVHs. For the high dose levels, the R-DVH parameters varied widely. The mean of V{sub 70} for Sh-Rw was the highest (19.4%) and nearly twice as high as that for Lg-Rec (10.4%). On the contrary, only small variations were observed in the A-DVH parameters (4.3, 4.3, 5.5, and 5.5 cc for Sh-Rw, Lg-Rw, Sh-Rec, and Lg-Rec, respectively). As for R-DVHs, the parameters of V{sub 70} varied depending on the rectal lengths (Sh-Rec vs Lg-Rec: R = 0.76; Sh-Rw vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.85) and cross sections (Sh-Rec vs Sh-Rw: R = 0.49; Lg-Rec vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.65). For A-DVHs, however, the parameters of Sh rectal A-DVHs hardly changed

  1. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Katherine [Nepean Cancer Care Centre, Penrith, New South Wales 2750 (Australia); Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael [Nepean Cancer Care Centre, Penrith, New South Wales 2750 (Australia); The Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead, New South Wales 2145 (Australia); Gebski, Val [NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2050 (Australia); Nepean Cancer Care Centre, Penrith, New South Wales 2750 (Australia)

    2013-03-15

    A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. CT data sets from 25 past breast cancer patients were planned using (1) CRT prescribed to 50 Gy in 25 fractions (Fx) to the whole-breast planning target volume (PTV) and 10 Gy in 5Fx to the excision cavity and (2) IMRT prescribed to 60 Gy in 25Fx, with 60 Gy delivered to the excision cavity PTV and 50 Gy delivered to the whole-breast PTV, treated simultaneously. In total, 50 plans were created, with each plan evaluated by PTV coverage using conformity indices, plan maximum dose, lung dose, and heart maximum dose for patients with left-side lesions. CRT plans delivered the lowest plan maximum doses in 56% of cases (average CRT = 6314.34 cGy, IMRT = 6371.52 cGy). They also delivered the lowest mean lung dose in 68% of cases (average CRT = 1206.64 cGy, IMRT = 1288.37 cGy) and V20 in 88% of cases (average CRT = 20.03%, IMRT = 21.73%) and V30 doses in 92% of cases (average CRT = 16.82%, IMRT = 17.97%). IMRT created more conformal plans, using both conformity index and conformation number, in every instance, and lower heart maximum doses in 78.6% of cases (average CRT = 5295.26 cGy, IMRT = 5209.87 cGy). IMRT plans produced superior dose conformity and shorter treatment duration, but a slightly higher planning maximum and increased lung doses. IMRT plans are also faster to treat on a daily basis, with shorter fractionation.

  2. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Katherine; Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Gebski, Val

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. Methods CT data sets from 25 past breast cancer patients were planned using (1) CRT prescribed to 50 Gy in 25 fractions (Fx) to the whole-breast planning target volume (PTV) and 10 Gy in 5Fx to the excision cavity and (2) IMRT prescribed to 60 Gy in 25Fx, with 60 Gy delivered to the excision cavity PTV and 50 Gy delivered to the whole-breast PTV, treated simultaneously. In total, 50 plans were created, with each plan evaluated by PTV coverage using conformity indices, plan maximum dose, lung dose, and heart maximum dose for patients with left-side lesions. Results CRT plans delivered the lowest plan maximum doses in 56% of cases (average CRT = 6314.34 cGy, IMRT = 6371.52 cGy). They also delivered the lowest mean lung dose in 68% of cases (average CRT = 1206.64 cGy, IMRT = 1288.37 cGy) and V20 in 88% of cases (average CRT = 20.03%, IMRT = 21.73%) and V30 doses in 92% of cases (average CRT = 16.82%, IMRT = 17.97%). IMRT created more conformal plans, using both conformity index and conformation number, in every instance, and lower heart maximum doses in 78.6% of cases (average CRT = 5295.26 cGy, IMRT = 5209.87 cGy). Conclusion IMRT plans produced superior dose conformity and shorter treatment duration, but a slightly higher planning maximum and increased lung doses. IMRT plans are also faster to treat on a daily basis, with shorter fractionation. PMID:26229603

  3. Dosimetric comparison of vaginal vault ovoid brachytherapy versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans in postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma following whole pelvic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Khosla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dosimetric study to compare high dose rate (HDR vaginal vault ovoid brachytherapy plan versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT boost plan for doses delivered to target volume and organs at risk (OAR in postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma following whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT. Materials and Methods: Fifteen postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma suitable for vaginal ovoid brachytherapy following WPRT of 46 Gy/23 fractions/4.5 weeks were included. All were treated with brachytherapy (two sessions of 8.5 Gy each. The equivalent dose for IMRT was calculated by computing biologically effective dose of brachytherapy by linear quadratic model. Dose of brachytherapy (two sessions of 8.5 Gy was equivalent to IMRT dose of 26 Gy/13 fractions. Doses to target volume and OAR were compared between HDR and IMRT plans. Results: Target volume was well covered with both HDR and IMRT plans, but dose with brachytherapy was much higher (P < 0.05. Mean doses, doses to 0.1, 1, 2, and 5cc, 1/3 rd , 1/2, and 2/3 rd volume of bladder and rectum were significantly lower with HDR plans. Conclusion: In postoperative patients of cervical carcinoma, HDR brachytherapy following WPRT appears to be better than IMRT for tumor coverage and reducing dose to critical organs.

  4. TU-C-17A-08: Improving IMRT Planning and Reducing Inter-Planner Variability Using the Stochastic Frontier Method: Validation Based On Clinical and Simulated Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagne, MC; Archambault, L [Departement de Physique, Genie Physique et Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); CHU de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Centre de recherche sur le cancer, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Tremblay, D; Varfalvy, N [Departement de Physique, Genie Physique et Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); CHU de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy always requires compromises between PTV coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing. We previously developed metrics that correlate doses to OAR to specific patients’ morphology using stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). Here, we aim to examine the validity of this approach using a large set of realistically simulated dosimetric and geometric data. Methods: SFA describes a set of treatment plans as an asymmetric distribution with respect to a frontier defining optimal plans. Eighty head and neck IMRT plans were used to establish a metric predicting the mean dose to parotids as a function of simple geometric parameters. A database of 140 parotids was used as a basis distribution to simulate physically plausible data of geometry and dose. Distributions comprising between 20 and 5000 were simulated and the SFA was applied to obtain new frontiers, which were compared to the original frontier. Results: It was possible to simulate distributions consistent with the original dataset. Below 160 organs, the SFA could not always describe distributions as asymmetric: a few cases showed a Gaussian or half-Gaussian distribution. In order to converge to a stable solution, the number of organs in a distribution must ideally be above 100, but in many cases stable parameters could be achieved with as low as 60 samples of organ data. Mean RMS value of the error of new frontiers was significantly reduced when additional organs are used. Conclusion: The number of organs in a distribution showed to have an impact on the effectiveness of the model. It is always possible to obtain a frontier, but if the number of organs in the distribution is small (< 160), it may not represent de lowest dose achievable. These results will be used to determine number of cases necessary to adapt the model to other organs.

  5. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amit, Guy; Marshall, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Purdie, Thomas G., E-mail: tom.purdie@rmp.uhn.ca; Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Levinshtein, Alex [Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Pekar, Vladimir [Philips Healthcare, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The treatment of thoracic cancer using external beam radiation requires an optimal selection of the radiation beam directions to ensure effective coverage of the target volume and to avoid unnecessary treatment of normal healthy tissues. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is a lengthy process, which requires the planner to iterate between choosing beam angles, specifying dose–volume objectives and executing IMRT optimization. In thorax treatment planning, where there are no class solutions for beam placement, beam angle selection is performed manually, based on the planner’s clinical experience. The purpose of this work is to propose and study a computationally efficient framework that utilizes machine learning to automatically select treatment beam angles. Such a framework may be helpful for reducing the overall planning workload. Methods: The authors introduce an automated beam selection method, based on learning the relationships between beam angles and anatomical features. Using a large set of clinically approved IMRT plans, a random forest regression algorithm is trained to map a multitude of anatomical features into an individual beam score. An optimization scheme is then built to select and adjust the beam angles, considering the learned interbeam dependencies. The validity and quality of the automatically selected beams evaluated using the manually selected beams from the corresponding clinical plans as the ground truth. Results: The analysis included 149 clinically approved thoracic IMRT plans. For a randomly selected test subset of 27 plans, IMRT plans were generated using automatically selected beams and compared to the clinical plans. The comparison of the predicted and the clinical beam angles demonstrated a good average correspondence between the two (angular distance 16.8° ± 10°, correlation 0.75 ± 0.2). The dose distributions of the semiautomatic and clinical plans were equivalent in terms of primary target volume

  6. Direct leaf trajectory optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy planning with sliding window delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, Dávid, E-mail: Papp.David@mgh.harvard.edu; Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 30 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors propose a novel optimization model for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning that directly optimizes deliverable leaf trajectories in the treatment plan optimization problem, and eliminates the need for a separate arc-sequencing step. Methods: In this model, a 360° arc is divided into a given number of arc segments in which the leaves move unidirectionally. This facilitates an algorithm that determines the optimal piecewise linear leaf trajectories for each arc segment, which are deliverable in a given treatment time. Multileaf collimator constraints, including maximum leaf speed and interdigitation, are accounted for explicitly. The algorithm is customized to allow for VMAT delivery using constant gantry speed and dose rate, however, the algorithm generalizes to variable gantry speed if beneficial. Results: The authors demonstrate the method for three different tumor sites: a head-and-neck case, a prostate case, and a paraspinal case. The authors first obtain a reference plan for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using fluence map optimization and 20 intensity-modulated fields in equally spaced beam directions, which is beyond the standard of care. Modeling the typical clinical setup for the treatment sites considered, IMRT plans using seven or nine beams are also computed. Subsequently, VMAT plans are optimized by dividing the 360° arc into 20 corresponding arc segments. Assuming typical machine parameters (a dose rate of 600 MU/min, and a maximum leaf speed of 3 cm/s), it is demonstrated that the optimized VMAT plans with 2–3 min delivery time are of noticeably better quality than the 7–9 beam IMRT plans. The VMAT plan quality approaches the quality of the 20-beam IMRT benchmark plan for delivery times between 3 and 4 min. Conclusions: The results indicate that high quality treatments can be delivered in a single arc with 20 arc segments if sufficient time is allowed for modulation in each segment.

  7. Volumetric modulated arc therapy versus step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of large nerve perineural spread to the skull base: a comparative dosimetric planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorayski, Peter; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Barry, Tamara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital and Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Foote, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with large nerve perineural (LNPN) infiltration of the base of skull is a radiotherapeutic challenge given the complex target volumes to nearby organs at risk (OAR). A comparative planning study was undertaken to evaluate dosimetric differences between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of LNPN. Five consecutive patients previously treated with IMRT for LNPN were selected. VMAT plans were generated for each case using the same planning target volumes (PTV), dose prescriptions and OAR constraints as IMRT. Comparative parameters used to assess target volume coverage, conformity and homogeneity included V95 of the PTV (volume encompassed by the 95% isodose), conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). In addition, OAR maximum point doses, V20, V30, non-target tissue (NTT) point max doses, NTT volume above reference dose, monitor units (MU) were compared. IMRT and VMAT plans generated were comparable for CI (P = 0.12) and HI (P = 0.89). VMAT plans achieved better V95 (P = < 0.001) and reduced V20 and V30 by 652 cubic centimetres (cc) (28.5%) and 425.7 cc (29.1%), respectively. VMAT increased MU delivered by 18% without a corresponding increase in NTT dose. Compared with IMRT plans for LNPN, VMAT achieved comparable HI and CI.

  8. A case study of radiotherapy planning for Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy for the whole scalp with matching electron treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sponseller, Patricia, E-mail: sponselp@uw.edu [Masters Program at the University of Wisconsin at La Crosse, La Crosse, WI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Paravathaneni, Upendra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to communicate a technique to match an electron field to the dose distribution of an Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) plan. A patient with multiple areas of squamous cell carcinoma over the scalp was treated using 60 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions to the entire scalp and first echelon nodes with multiple 6-MV photon fields. To deliver an adequate dose to the scalp, a custom 1.0-cm bolus helmet was fashioned using a solid piece of aquaplast. Along with the IMRT scalp treatment, a left zygoma area was treated with electrons matching the anterior border of the IMRT dose distribution. The border was matched by creating a left lateral field with the multileaf collimator shaped to the IMRT dose distribution. The result indicated an adequate dose to the skin match between the IMRT plan and the electron field. Results were confirmed using optically stimulated luminescence placed at the skin match area, so that the dose matched the prescription within 10%.

  9. SU-E-T-544: Commissioning and Clinical Evaluation of a Secondary Check Software for 3D Conformal and IMRT Treatment Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, P; Looe, H; Poppe, B

    2012-06-01

    The increasing complexities of the geometry of 3D radiation treatment plans possess challengesto the monitor unit (MU) and dose verification in clinical routine. In this work, the commissioningof the DIAMOND software (PTW-Freiburg Germany) for two Siemens linear accelerators(Primus & Artiste) along with the evaluation of its performance is described. DIAMOND employs the modified Clarkson integration method for dose computation and a pointeye-view (PEV) method for scatter calculation on collimators by a geometrical back-projectinginto the collimation system from the view of the source. During the commissioning process, themachine data (geometrical set up) and dosimetry base data such as the percentage depth dose(PDD), head scatter factor Sc as well as total scatter factor Sc,p, off-axis profiles are entered into the software. A comprehensive validation process is performed following the provided protocol.For evaluation purposes, twelve 3D conformal treatment plans and two prostate IMRT plans arecalculated with DIAMOND and the results are compared to the values from the treatmentplanning system (TPS). The deviations of the MU for 3D conformal treatment plans computed with the DIAMONDsoftware are within ±3%. For IMRT plan verification, the dose at a point in the target volume iscomputed for every treatment beam, with deviations within 0.40% to 3.28%. The typical time forsingle dose point verification is less than a minute, thus minimizing the clinical workload of theverification process. For dose matrices calculation at certain plane, a relative longercomputation time is needed depending on a field dimension. In this work, we have demonstrated the ability of the DIAMOND software to compute MU anddose at a point for 3D conformal and IMRT plans. Its speed and accuracy implies that DIAMOND can be implemented as independent secondary check software in the clinical routine. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Comparison of Planning Quality and Efficiency Between Conventional and Knowledge-based Algorithms in Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Amy T.Y., E-mail: changty@ha.org.hk [Department of Clinical Oncology, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital (Hong Kong); Hung, Albert W.M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital (Hong Kong); Cheung, Fion W.K.; Lee, Michael C.H. [Department of Medical Physics, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital (Hong Kong); Chan, Oscar S.H. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital (Hong Kong); Philips, Helen; Cheng, Yung-Tang [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Ng, Wai-Tong [Department of Clinical Oncology, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital (Hong Kong)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is widely used to achieve a highly conformal dose and improve treatment outcome. However, plan quality and planning time are institute and planner dependent, and no standardized tool exists to recognize an optimal plan. RapidPlan, a knowledge-based algorithm, can generate constraints to assist optimization and produce high-quality IMRT plans. This report evaluated the quality and efficiency of using RapidPlan in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) IMRT planning. Methods and Materials: RapidPlan was configured using 79 radical IMRT plans for NPC; 20 consecutive NPC patients indicated for radical radiation therapy between October 2014 and May 2015 were then recruited to assess its performance. The ability of RapidPlan to produce acceptable plans was evaluated. For plans that could not achieve clinical acceptance, manual touch-up was performed. The IMRT plans produced without RapidPlan (manual plans) and with RapidPlan (RP-2 plans, including those with manual touch-up) were compared in terms of dosimetric quality and planning efficiency. Results: RapidPlan by itself could produce clinically acceptable plans for 9 of the 20 patients; manual touch-up increased the number of acceptable plans (RP-2 plans) to 19. The target dose coverage and conformity were very similar. No difference was found in the maximum dose to the brainstem and optic chiasm. RP-2 plans delivered a higher maximum dose to the spinal cord (46.4 Gy vs 43.9 Gy, P=.002) but a lower dose to the parotid (mean dose to right parotid, 37.3 Gy vs 45.4 Gy; left, 34.4 Gy vs 43.1 Gy; P<.001) and the right cochlea (mean dose, 48.6 Gy vs 52.6 Gy; P=.02). The total planning time for RP-2 plans was significantly less than that for manual plans (64 minutes vs 295 minutes, P<.001). Conclusions: This study shows that RapidPlan can significantly improve planning efficiency and produce quality IMRT plans for NPC patients.

  11. Medical nutrition therapy planning

    OpenAIRE

    Torović Ljilja; Grujičić Maja; Pavlović-Trajković Ljiljana; Jovičić Jelena; Novaković Budimka; Balać Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Diet has vital, preventive and therapeutic functions. Medical nutrition therapy is a part of the Standardized Nutrition Care Process integrated in health care systems. Material and methods. An overview of the Nutrition Care Process model and the application of nutrition guidelines based on literature, reports, documents and programmes of international health, food and physical activity authorities was done. Results. The Nutrition Care Process model requires registered diet...

  12. Comparative planning of flattening-filter-free and flat beam IMRT for hypopharynx cancer as a function of beam and segment number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Nuesken, Frank G; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Melchior, Patrick; Licht, Norbert P; Rübe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Although highly conformal dose distributions can be achieved by IMRT planning, this often requires a large number of segments or beams, resulting in increased treatment times. While flattening-filter-free beams offer a higher dose rate, even more segments may be required to create homogeneous target coverage. Therefore, it is worthwhile to systematically investigate the dependence of plan quality on gantry angles and number of segments for flat vs. FFF beams in IMRT planning. For the practical example of hypopharynx cancer, we present a planning study of flat vs. FFF beams using three different configurations of gantry angles and different segment numbers. The two beams are very similar in physical properties, and are hence well-suited for comparative planning. Starting with a set of plans of equal quality for flat and FFF beams, we assess how far the number of segments can be reduced before the plan quality is markedly compromised, and compare monitor units and treatment times for the resulting plans. As long as a sufficiently large number of segments is permitted, all planning scenarios give good results, independently of gantry angles and flat or FFF beams. For smaller numbers of segments, plan quality decreases both for flat and FFF energies; this effect is stronger for fewer gantry angles and for FFF beams. For low segment numbers, FFF plans are generally worse than the corresponding flat beam plans, but they are less sensitive to a decrease in segment number if many gantry angles are used (18 beams); in this case the quality of flat and FFF plans remains comparable even for few segments.

  13. SU-E-T-500: Initial Implementation of GPU-Based Particle Swarm Optimization for 4D IMRT Planning in Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modiri, A; Hagan, A; Gu, X; Sawant, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose 4D-IMRT planning, combined with dynamic MLC tracking delivery, utilizes the temporal dimension as an additional degree of freedom to achieve improved OAR-sparing. The computational complexity for such optimization increases exponentially with increase in dimensionality. In order to accomplish this task in a clinically-feasible time frame, we present an initial implementation of GPU-based 4D-IMRT planning based on particle swarm optimization (PSO). Methods The target and normal structures were manually contoured on ten phases of a 4DCT scan of a NSCLC patient with a 54cm3 right-lower-lobe tumor (1.5cm motion). Corresponding ten 3D-IMRT plans were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Ver-13.6). A vendor-provided scripting interface was used to export 3D-dose matrices corresponding to each control point (10 phases × 9 beams × 166 control points = 14,940), which served as input to PSO. The optimization task was to iteratively adjust the weights of each control point and scale the corresponding dose matrices. In order to handle the large amount of data in GPU memory, dose matrices were sparsified and placed in contiguous memory blocks with the 14,940 weight-variables. PSO was implemented on CPU (dual-Xeon, 3.1GHz) and GPU (dual-K20 Tesla, 2496 cores, 3.52Tflops, each) platforms. NiftyReg, an open-source deformable image registration package, was used to calculate the summed dose. Results The 4D-PSO plan yielded PTV coverage comparable to the clinical ITV-based plan and significantly higher OAR-sparing, as follows: lung Dmean=33%; lung V20=27%; spinal cord Dmax=26%; esophagus Dmax=42%; heart Dmax=0%; heart Dmean=47%. The GPU-PSO processing time for 14940 variables and 7 PSO-particles was 41% that of CPU-PSO (199 vs. 488 minutes). Conclusion Truly 4D-IMRT planning can yield significant OAR dose-sparing while preserving PTV coverage. The corresponding optimization problem is large-scale, non-convex and computationally rigorous. Our initial results

  14. Clinical validation of an in-house EPID dosimetry system for IMRT QA at the Prince of Wales Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, M.; Vial, P.; Metcalfe, P.; Downes, S.

    2013-06-01

    In this study a simple method using standard flood-field corrected Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) images for routine Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Quality Assurance (QA) was investigated. The EPID QA system was designed and tested on a Siemens Oncor Impression linear accelerator with an OptiVue 1000ST EPID panel (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc, USA) and an Elekta Axesse linear accelerator with an iViewGT EPID (Elekta AB, Sweden) for 6 and 10 MV IMRT fields with Step-and-Shoot and dynamic-MLC delivery. Two different planning systems were used for patient IMRT field generation for comparison with the measured EPID fluences. All measured IMRT plans had >95% agreement to the planning fluences (using 3 cGy / 3 mm Gamma Criteria) and were comparable to the pass-rates calculated using a 2-D diode array dosimeter.

  15. The integration of DVH-based planning aspects into a convex intensity modulated radiation therapy optimization framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratt, Karin; Scherrer, Alexander

    2009-06-21

    The formulation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning aspects frequently uses the dose-volume histogram (DVH), whereas plan computations often happen in the more desirable convex IMRT optimization framework. Inspired by a recent publication of Zinchenko et al (2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 3231-50), this work addresses the integration of DVH-based planning aspects into this framework from a general point of view. It first provides the basic mathematical requirements on the evaluation functions in order to support such an incorporation. Then it introduces the condition number as a description for how precisely DVH-based planning aspects can be reformulated in terms of evaluation functions. Exemplary numerical studies for the generalized equivalent uniform dose and a physical constraint function show the influence of function parameter values and DVH approximation on the condition number. The work concludes by formulating the aspects that should be taken into account for an appropriate integration of DVH-based planning aspects.

  16. Variable beam dose rate and DMLC IMRT to moving body anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papiez, Lech; Abolfath, Ramin M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UTSouthwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Derivation of formulas relating leaf speeds and beam dose rates for delivering planned intensity profiles to static and moving targets in dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is presented. The analysis of equations determining algorithms for DMLC IMRT delivery under a variable beam dose rate reveals a multitude of possible delivery strategies for a given intensity map and for any given target motion patterns. From among all equivalent delivery strategies for DMLC IMRT treatments specific subclasses of strategies can be selected to provide deliveries that are particularly suitable for clinical applications providing existing delivery devices are used. Special attention is devoted to the subclass of beam dose rate variable DMLC delivery strategies to moving body anatomy that generalize existing techniques of such deliveries in Varian DMLC irradiation methodology to static body anatomy. Few examples of deliveries from this subclass of DMLC IMRT irradiations are investigated to illustrate the principle and show practical benefits of proposed techniques.

  17. A decision support tool to optimize IMRT QA workflow in a multi-vendor equipment environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Vial, Philip; Holloway, Lois

    2014-03-01

    Development of a software tool to ease the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) pre-treatment Quality Assurance process is presented in this study. The delivery of IMRT involves equipment from multiple vendors. The limitations of the equipment involved in this chain will impact on the best choice of equipment. This often results in the user needing to use multiple pieces of equipment before determining the most appropriate choices to optimise the QA work flow. This is a time consuming process and potentially delays the start of patient treatment. Software was developed in-house to assist the decision making process, validating deliverability of beam delivery parameters and selecting appropriate detector systems and configuration for QA of IMRT plans. The software has been demonstrated to be accurate and improves efficiency of IMRT pre-treatment QA.

  18. Superior sulcus non-small cell lung carcinoma: A comparison of IMRT and 3D-RT dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truntzer, Pierre; Antoni, Delphine; Santelmo, Nicola; Schumacher, Catherine; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Quoix, Elisabeth; Massard, Gilbert; Noël, Georges

    2016-01-01

    A dosimetric study comparing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) by TomoTherapy to conformational 3D radiotherapy (3D-RT) in patients with superior sulcus non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). IMRT became the main technique in modern radiotherapy. However it was not currently used for lung cancers. Because of the need to increase the dose to control lung cancers but because of the critical organs surrounding the tumors, the gains obtainable with IMRT is not still demonstrated. A dosimetric comparison of the planned target and organs at risk parameters between IMRT and 3D-RT in eight patients who received preoperative or curative intent irradiation. In the patients who received at least 66 Gy, the mean V95% was significantly better with IMRT than 3D-RT (p = 0.043). IMRT delivered a lower D2% compared to 3D-RT (p = 0.043). The IH was significantly better with IMRT (p = 0.043). The lung V 5 Gy and V 13 Gy were significantly higher in IMRT than 3D-RT (p = 0.043), while the maximal dose (D max) to the spinal cord was significantly lower in IMRT (p = 0.043). The brachial plexus D max was significantly lower in IMRT than 3D-RT (p = 0.048). For patients treated with 46 Gy, no significant differences were found. Our study showed that IMRT is relevant for SS-NSCLC. In patients treated with a curative dose, it led to a reduction of the exposure of critical organs, allowing a better dose distribution in the tumor. For the patients treated with a preoperative schedule, our results provide a basis for future controlled trials to improve the histological complete response by increasing the radiation dose.

  19. Intensity modulated radiation therapy class solutions in Philips Pinnacle treatment planning for central nervous system malignancies: Standardized, efficient, and effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhacheva, Anna; Palmer, Matthew; Du, Weiliang; Brown, Paul D; Mahajan, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is becoming more commonplace in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) malignancies. However, the determination of beam arrangements is still an empirical process, and optimization of any given plan may take hours on the part of the dosimetrist and the physician to achieve optimal conformity and normal tissue doses. Regional CNS class solutions (CS) for IMRT planning with the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system (version 8.0; ADAC Laboratories, Milpitas, CA) have been in partial implementation at our institution since 2009. The purpose of this present work was to investigate their validity in clinical practice. The plans of 55 patients treated for high-grade gliomas since 2009 were analyzed retrospectively. Thirty plans were categorized as having been planned with class solutions and 25 plans with user-defined optimization. Each plan was evaluated based on the following: (1) mean dose to the brain; (2) brain V30; and (3) Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) conformity index (CIRTOG). These data were then compared with 140 historical benchmark plans that were generated using user-defined optimization prior to 2009. The CS plans for gliomas in frontal, parietal-occipital, and temporal regions typically resulted in superior mean brain dose, brain V30, and conformity index when compared with user-defined plans. The CS plans for brainstem gliomas exhibited improved CIRTOG, but not brain V30 and brain mean dose. In trials of planning efficiency, the CS technique reduced treatment planning time by more than 2 times, independent of prior planning experience. We have developed a CS protocol for IMRT planning of gliomas that has dramatically simplified this complex planning process, allowing dosimetrists of all levels of experience to produce highly conformal plans in a time efficient manner. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multi-GPU configuration of 4D intensity modulated radiation therapy inverse planning using global optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Aaron; Sawant, Amit; Folkerts, Michael; Modiri, Arezoo

    2018-01-01

    We report on the design, implementation and characterization of a multi-graphic processing unit (GPU) computational platform for higher-order optimization in radiotherapy treatment planning. In collaboration with a commercial vendor (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), a research prototype GPU-enabled Eclipse (V13.6) workstation was configured. The hardware consisted of dual 8-core Xeon processors, 256 GB RAM and four NVIDIA Tesla K80 general purpose GPUs. We demonstrate the utility of this platform for large radiotherapy optimization problems through the development and characterization of a parallelized particle swarm optimization (PSO) four dimensional (4D) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. The PSO engine was coupled to the Eclipse treatment planning system via a vendor-provided scripting interface. Specific challenges addressed in this implementation were (i) data management and (ii) non-uniform memory access (NUMA). For the former, we alternated between parameters over which the computation process was parallelized. For the latter, we reduced the amount of data required to be transferred over the NUMA bridge. The datasets examined in this study were approximately 300 GB in size, including 4D computed tomography images, anatomical structure contours and dose deposition matrices. For evaluation, we created a 4D-IMRT treatment plan for one lung cancer patient and analyzed computation speed while varying several parameters (number of respiratory phases, GPUs, PSO particles, and data matrix sizes). The optimized 4D-IMRT plan enhanced sparing of organs at risk by an average reduction of 26% in maximum dose, compared to the clinical optimized IMRT plan, where the internal target volume was used. We validated our computation time analyses in two additional cases. The computation speed in our implementation did not monotonically increase with the number of GPUs. The optimal number of GPUs (five, in our study) is directly related to the

  1. The effect of photon energy on the intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan for prostate cancer: a planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, In-Ah [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Woo [Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Woong; Suh, Tae-Suk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    In this study, the effect of the beam energy on the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan for prostate cancer was studied for competing IMRT plans optimized for delivery with either 6- or 15-MV photons. This retrospective planning study included 10 patients treated for localized prostate cancer at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. A dose of 66 Gy was prescribed in 33 daily fractions of 2 Gy. For inverse IMRT treatment planning, we used a 7-coplanar non-opposed beam arrangement at 0, 50, 100, 150, 210, 260, and 310 degree angles. To ensure that differences among the plans were due only to energy selection, the beam arrangement, number of beam, and dose constraints were kept constant for all plans. The dose volume histograms (DVHs) for the 6- and 15-MV plans were compared for the planning target volume (PTV) and for organs at risk (OAR), such as the rectum, bladder and both femoral heads. The conformal index was defined as the ratio of the 95% isodose volume divided by the PTV volume enclosed by the 95% isodose line, because we selected the 95% isodose line as our reference. Doses received by the 95% and 5% volume of the PTV were less than or equal to 1% for 6-MV compared to the 15-MV IMRT plan for 10 patients. Percentage of doses received by the 10% volume of the bladder and rectum were less than or equal to 1%. Percentage of doses received by the 30 and 50% volume of bladder and rectum were 1 {approx} 2% higher for 6-MV photons. Also, percentage of dose received by the 10% and 50% volume of the right and the left femur heads were 4 {approx} 5% higher for 6-MV photons. The mean homogeneity index for the 6-MV and 15-MV photon plans was 1.06. The mean conformity index of 95% was 1.04 {+-} 0.01 and 1.12 {+-} 0.02 for 6-MV and 15-MV, respectively, but this difference was not statistically significant. The mean monitor unit was 812 {+-} 40 and 716 {+-} 33 for the 6-MV and the 15-MV photon plans, respectively. The 6-MV photon plan delivers 13

  2. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuky, Jacqueline, E-mail: vukyja@ohsu.edu [Section of Community Hematology/Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Pham, Huong T. [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Warren, Sarah; Douglass, Erika [Benaroya Research Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Badiozamani, Kasra [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Madsen, Berit; Hsi, Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, WA (United States); Song Guobin [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  3. Split-field vs extended-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for oropharyngeal cancer: Which spares the larynx? Which spares the thyroid?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yao; Chen, Josephine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Leary, Celeste I. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Shugard, Erin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Yom, Sue S., E-mail: yoms@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation of the low neck can be accomplished using split-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (sf-IMRT) or extended-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (ef-IMRT). We evaluated the effect of these treatment choices on target coverage and thyroid and larynx doses. Using data from 14 patients with cancers of the oropharynx, we compared the following 3 strategies for radiating the low neck: (1) extended-field IMRT, (2) traditional split-field IMRT with an initial cord-junction block to 40 Gy, followed by a full-cord block to 50 Gy, and (3) split-field IMRT with a full-cord block to 50 Gy. Patients were planned using each of these 3 techniques. To facilitate comparison, extended-field plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the neck volume. Target coverage was assessed using the dose to 95% of the neck volume (D{sub 95}). Mean thyroid and larynx doses were computed. Extended-field IMRT was used as the reference arm; the mean larynx dose was 25.7 ± 7.4 Gy, and the mean thyroid dose was 28.6 ± 2.4 Gy. Split-field IMRT with 2-step blocking reduced laryngeal dose (mean larynx dose 15.2 ± 5.1 Gy) at the cost of a moderate reduction in target coverage (D{sub 95} 41.4 ± 14 Gy) and much higher thyroid dose (mean thyroid dose 44.7 ± 3.7 Gy). Split-field IMRT with initial full-cord block resulted in greater laryngeal sparing (mean larynx dose 14.2 ± 5.1 Gy) and only a moderately higher thyroid dose (mean thyroid dose 31 ± 8 Gy) but resulted in a significant reduction in target coverage (D{sub 95} 34.4 ± 15 Gy). Extended-field IMRT comprehensively covers the low neck and achieves acceptable thyroid and laryngeal sparing. Split-field IMRT with a full-cord block reduces laryngeal doses to less than 20 Gy and spares the thyroid, at the cost of substantially reduced coverage of the low neck. Traditional 2-step split-field IMRT similarly reduces the laryngeal dose but also reduces low-neck coverage and delivers very high doses to the thyroid.

  4. Six years of experience in the planning and verification of the IMRT dynamics with portal dosimetry; Seis anos de expereincia en la planificacion y verificacion de la IMRT dinamica con portal dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Castro Novais, J.; Diaz Gavela, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is the make a review of the method of verification of the IMRT throughout the 6 years of functioning of the service of-radiophysics and radiology protection, analyzing the parameters of each field evaluation to the 718 made IMRT during this period. (Author)

  5. New multileaf collimator with a leaf width of 5 mm improves plan quality compared to 10 mm in step-and-shoot IMRT of HNC using integrated boost procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Felix; Hauswald, Henrik; Nill, Simeon; Rhein, Bernhard; Thieke, Christian; Roeder, Falk; Timke, Carmen; Zabel-du Bois, Angelika; Debus, Jürgen; Huber, Peter E

    2010-06-01

    To investigate whether a new multileaf collimator with a leaf width of 5 mm (MLC-5) over the entire field size of 40 x 40 cm(2) improves plan quality compared to a leaf width of 10 mm (MLC-10) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with integrated boost for head and neck cancer. A plan comparison was performed for ten patients with head and neck cancer. For each patient, seven plans were calculated: one plan with MLC-10 and nine beams, four plans with MLC-5 and nine beams (with different intensity levels and two-dimensional median filter sizes [2D-MFS]), and one seven-beam plan with MLC-5 and MLC-10, respectively. Isocenter, beam angles and planning constraints were not changed. Mean values of common plan parameters over all ten patients were estimated, and plan groups of MLC-5 and MLC-10 with nine and seven beams were compared. The use of MLC-5 led to a significantly higher conformity index and an improvement of the 90% coverage of PTV1 (planning target volume) and PTV2 compared with MLC-10. This was noted in the nine- and seven-beam plans. Within the nine-beam group with MLC-5, a reduction of the segment number by up to 25% at reduced intensity levels and for increased 2D-MFS did not markedly worsen plan quality. Interestingly, a seven-beam IMRT with MLC-5 was inferior to a nine-beam IMRT with MLC-5, but superior to a nine-beam IMRT with MLC-10. The use of an MLC-5 has significant advantages over an MLC-10 with respect to target coverage and protection of normal tissues in step-and-shoot IMRT of head and neck cancer.

  6. Development of a computational system for radiotherapic planning with the IMRT technique applied to the MCNP computer code with 3D graphic interface for voxel models; Desenvolvimento de um sistema computacional para o planejamento radioterapico com a tecnica IMRT aplicado ao codigo MCNP com interface grafica 3D para modelos de voxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Telma Cristina Ferreira

    2009-07-01

    The Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy - IMRT is an advanced treatment technique used worldwide in oncology medicine branch. On this master proposal was developed a software package for simulating the IMRT protocol, namely SOFT-RT which attachment the research group 'Nucleo de Radiacoes Ionizantes' - NRI at UFMG. The computational system SOFT-RT allows producing the absorbed dose simulation of the radiotherapic treatment through a three-dimensional voxel model of the patient. The SISCODES code, from NRI, research group, helps in producing the voxel model of the interest region from a set of CT or MRI digitalized images. The SOFT-RT allows also the rotation and translation of the model about the coordinate system axis for better visualization of the model and the beam. The SOFT-RT collects and exports the necessary parameters to MCNP code which will carry out the nuclear radiation transport towards the tumor and adjacent healthy tissues for each orientation and position of the beam planning. Through three-dimensional visualization of voxel model of a patient, it is possible to focus on a tumoral region preserving the whole tissues around them. It takes in account where exactly the radiation beam passes through, which tissues are affected and how much dose is applied in both tissues. The Out-module from SOFT-RT imports the results and express the dose response superimposing dose and voxel model in gray scale in a three-dimensional graphic representation. The present master thesis presents the new computational system of radiotherapic treatment - SOFT-RT code which has been developed using the robust and multi-platform C{sup ++} programming language with the OpenGL graphics packages. The Linux operational system was adopted with the goal of running it in an open source platform and free access. Preliminary simulation results for a cerebral tumor case will be reported as well as some dosimetric evaluations. (author)

  7. SU-F-T-590: Modeling PTV Dose Fall-Off for Cervical Cancer SBRT Treatment Planning Using VMAT and Step-And-Shoot IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, A Brito; Cohen, D; Eng, T; Gutierrez, A [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Due to the high dose per fraction in SBRT, dose conformity and dose fall-off are critical. In patients with cervical cancer, rapid dose fall-off is particularly important to limit dose to the nearby rectum, small bowel, and bladder. This study compares the target volume dose fall-off for two radiation delivery techniques, fixed-field IMRT & VMAT, using non-coplanar beam geometries. Further comparisons are made between 6 and 10MV photon beam energies. Methods: Eleven (n=11) patients were planned in Pinnacle3 v9.10 with a NovalisTx (HD120 MLC) machine model using 6 and 10 MV photons. The following three techniques were used: (1) IMRT (10 non-coplanar beams) (2) Dual, coplanar 360° VMAT arcs (4° spacing), and (3) Triple, non-coplanar VMAT arcs (1 full arc and dual partial arcs). All plans were normalized such that 98% of the PTV received at least 28Gy/4Fx. Dose was calculated using a 2.0mm isotropic dose grid. To assess dose fall-off, twenty concentric 2mm thick rings were created around the PTV. The maximum dose in each ring was recorded and the data was fitted to model dose fall-off. A separate analysis was performed by separating target volumes into small (0–50cc), medium (51–80cc), and large (81–110cc). Results: Triple, non-coplanar VMAT arcs showed the best dose fall-off for all patients evaluated. All fitted regressions had an R{sup 2}≥0.99. At 10mm from the PTV edge, 10 MV VMAT3-arc had an absolute improvement in dose fall-off of 3.8% and 6.9% over IMRT and VMAT2-arc, respectively. At 30mm, 10 MV VMAT3-arc had an absolute improvement of 12.0% and 7.0% over IMRT and VMAT2-arc, respectively. Faster dose fall-off was observed for small volumes as opposed to medium and large ones—9.6% at 20mm. Conclusion: Triple, non-coplanar VMAT arcs offer the sharpest dose fall-off for cervical SBRT plans. This improvement is most pronounced when treating smaller target volumes.

  8. Coverage-based constraints for IMRT optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, H; Ulrich, S; Bangert, M

    2017-09-05

    Radiation therapy treatment planning requires an incorporation of uncertainties in order to guarantee an adequate irradiation of the tumor volumes. In current clinical practice, uncertainties are accounted for implicitly with an expansion of the target volume according to generic margin recipes. Alternatively, it is possible to account for uncertainties by explicit minimization of objectives that describe worst-case treatment scenarios, the expectation value of the treatment or the coverage probability of the target volumes during treatment planning. In this note we show that approaches relying on objectives to induce a specific coverage of the clinical target volumes are inevitably sensitive to variation of the relative weighting of the objectives. To address this issue, we introduce coverage-based constraints for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Our implementation follows the concept of coverage-optimized planning that considers explicit error scenarios to calculate and optimize patient-specific probabilities [Formula: see text] of covering a specific target volume fraction [Formula: see text] with a certain dose [Formula: see text]. Using a constraint-based reformulation of coverage-based objectives we eliminate the trade-off between coverage and competing objectives during treatment planning. In-depth convergence tests including 324 treatment plan optimizations demonstrate the reliability of coverage-based constraints for varying levels of probability, dose and volume. General clinical applicability of coverage-based constraints is demonstrated for two cases. A sensitivity analysis regarding penalty variations within this planing study based on IMRT treatment planning using (1) coverage-based constraints, (2) coverage-based objectives, (3) probabilistic optimization, (4) robust optimization and (5) conventional margins illustrates the potential benefit of coverage-based constraints that do not require tedious adjustment of target

  9. Treatment with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marta, G.N.; Hanna, S.A.; Gadia, R.

    2014-11-15

    Through the development of four relevant clinical questions related with the proposed subject, we tried to present the main evidence for safety, toxicity and effectiveness using different radiotherapy techniques. The study population consisted of female patients of all ages with primary breast cancer treated with radiation therapy to the whole breast, regardless of histological type, staging, context of treatment (radical, adjuvant or palliative) and whether comorbidities were present or not. For this, a systematic review of the literature was performed in primary scientific research databases (Medline - Pubmed; Embase - Elsevier; Lilacs - Bireme; Cochrane Library - Central Register of Controlled Trials). All articles available until July 22, 2013, were included. The search strategy used for Medline research is described in Appendix. Articles were selected based on critical evaluation in search of the best available evidence. Recommendations were prepared based on discussion with the writing group, composed of three members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group specializing in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was made available for public consultation for 15 days and the suggestions forwarded to the writers for evaluation and consideration into the final text. Objective: to assess the most appropriate method of radiation therapy for treating patients with primary breast tumors. (author)

  10. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    OpenAIRE

    Small, Katherine; Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Gebski, Val

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. Methods CT data set...

  11. SU-E-T-357: Semi-Automated Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy (KBRT) Planning for Head-And-Neck Cancer (HNC): Can KBRT Plans Achieve Better Results Than Manual Planning?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutzky, C; Grzetic, S; Lo, J; Das, S [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy Treatment (KBRT) planning can be used to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for new patients using constraints derived from previously manually-planned, geometrically similar patients. We investigate whether KBRT plans can achieve greater dose sparing than manual plans using optimized, organspecific constraint weighting factors. Methods: KBRT planning of HNC radiotherapy cases geometrically matched each new (query) case to one of the 105 clinically approved plans in our database. The dose distribution of the planned match was morphed to fit the querys geometry. Dose-volume constraints extracted from the morphed dose distribution were used to run the IMRT optimization with no user input. In the first version, all constraints were multiplied by a weighting factor of 0.7. The weighting factors were then systematically optimized (in order of OARs with increasing separation from the target) to maximize sparing to each OAR without compromising other OARs. The optimized, second version plans were compared against the first version plans and the clinically approved plans for 45 unilateral/bilateral target cases using the dose metrics: mean, median and maximum (brainstem and cord) doses. Results: Compared to the first version, the second version significantly reduced mean/median contralateral parotid doses (>2Gy) for bilateral cases. Other changes between the two versions were not clinically meaningful. Compared to the original clinical plans, both bilateral and unilateral plans in the second version had lower average dose metrics for 5 of the 6 OARs. Compared to the original plans, the second version achieved dose sparing that was at least as good for all OARs and better for the ipsilateral parotid (bilateral) and oral cavity (bilateral/unilateral). Differences in planning target volume coverage metrics were not clinically significant. Conclusion: HNC-KBRT planning generated IMRT plans with at least equivalent dose sparing to

  12. SU-E-T-198: Hippocampal-Sparing Radiotherapy (HSRT) for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer (HNC) Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlop, A; Welsh, L; Nutting, C; Harrington, K; Bhide, S; Newbold, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that decline in cognitive function following brain radiotherapy (RT) is related to the radiation dose delivered to the hippocampi. In this work we evaluate the feasibility of using IMRT to generate HSRT plans in HNC. Methods: A planning study was undertaken for ten representative patients with HNC previously treated with radical (chemo)-RT using standard IMRT techniques. The hippocampi were delineated according to the RTOG hippocampal contouring atlas, on a T1w- MRI scan that was registered with the RT planning CT. LINAC-based, clinically acceptable, HSRT plans were generated and assessed using the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system. Results: Using a VMAT technique, a reduction in hippocampal dose was achievable in six cases. For these cases, the EQD2-D40% of the bilateral hippocampi was significantly reduced by HSRT (p = 0.006) from a median of 18.8Gy (range 14.4–34.6) to 6.5 Gy (4.2–9.5) for the delivered and HSRT plans respectively. Plans were also generated using a fixed-field IMRT technique with non-coplanar beams that were designed to avoid the bilateral hippocampi, resulting in a median EQD2-D40% of 11.2Gy (8.0–14.5). Both HSRT techniques also resulted in lower doses to the whole brain, brain stem, and cerebellum. The HSRT plans resulted in higher doses to some regions of non-contoured normaltissue, but the magnitude of these dose differences is unlikely to be of clinical significance in terms of acute and late toxicity. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that it is possible, in many cases, to adapt treatment plans for HNC to significantly reduce dose to the hippocampi. This reduction in dose would be predicted to Resultin a significant reduction in the probability of subsequent decline in cognitive function following RT. Our results point towards the need for the collection of prospective data on cognitive outcomes for the HNC patient population treated with radical (chemo)-RT.

  13. A novel conformity index for intensity modulated radiation therapy plan evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Fion W K; Law, Maria Y Y

    2012-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has gained popularity in the treatment of cancers. Manual evaluation of IMRT plans for head-and-neck cancers has been especially challenging necessitating efficient and objective assessment tools. In this work, the authors address this issue by developing a personalized conformity index (CI) for comparison of IMRT plans for head-and-neck cancers and evaluating its plan quality discerning power in comparison with other widely used CIs. A two-dimensional CI with dose and distance incorporated (CI(DD)) was developed using the MATLAB program language, to quantify the planning target volume (PTV) coverage. Valuable information contained in the digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) RT objects were harvested for computation of each of the CI(DD) components. Apart from the dose penalty factor, a distance-based exponential function was employed by varying the penalty weight associated with the location of cold spots within the PTV. With the goal of deriving a customized penalty factor, the distances between individual pixel and its nearest PTV boundary was found. Using the exponential function, the impact of distance penalty was substantially larger for cold spots closer to the PTV centroid but petered out quickly wherever they were situated in the vicinity of PTV border. In order to evaluate the CI(DD) scoring system, three CT image data sets of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients were collected. Ten IMRT plans with degrading qualities were generated from each dataset and were ranked based on CI(DD) and other existing indices. The coefficient of variance was calculated for each dataset to compare the degree of variation. The CI(DD) scoring system that considered spatial importance of each voxel within the PTV was successfully developed. The results demonstrated that the CI(DD) including four discrete factors could provide accurate rankings of plan quality by examining the relative importance of each cold spot

  14. Treatment of locally advanced carcinomas of head and neck with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in combination with cetuximab and chemotherapy: the REACH protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Christian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary treatment of carcinoma of the oro-/hypopharynx or larynx may consist of combined platinum-containing chemoradiotherapy. In order to improve clinical outcome (i.e. local control/overall survival, combined therapy is intensified by the addition of the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab (Erbitux®. Radiation therapy (RT is carried out as intensity-modulated RT (IMRT to avoid higher grade acute and late toxicity by sparing of surrounding normal tissues. Methods/Design The REACH study is a prospective phase II study combining chemoradiotherapy with carboplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU and the monoclonal epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGFR antibody cetuximab (Erbitux® as intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced squamous-cell carcinomas of oropharynx, hypopharynx or larynx. Patients receive weekly chemotherapy infusions in the 1st and 5th week of RT. Additionally, cetuximab is administered weekly throughout the treatment course. IMRT is delivered as in a classical concomitant boost concept (bid from fraction 16 to a total dose of 69,9 Gy. Discussion Primary endpoint of the trial is local-regional control (LRC. Disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, toxicity, proteomic and genomic analyses are secondary endpoints. The aim is to explore the efficacy as well as the safety and feasibility of this combined radioimmunchemotherapy in order to improve the outcome of patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Trial registration ISRCTN87356938

  15. Image-guided, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma: preliminary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahgal, Arjun; Chan, Michael W; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Masson-Cote, Laurence; Bahl, Gaurav; Yu, Eugene; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Chung, Caroline; Catton, Charles; O'Sullivan, Brian; Irish, Jonathan C; Gilbert, Ralph; Zadeh, Gelareh; Cusimano, Michael; Gentili, Fred; Laperriere, Normand J

    2015-06-01

    We report our preliminary outcomes following high-dose image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Forty-two consecutive IG-IMRT patients, with either skull base chordoma (n = 24) or chondrosarcoma (n = 18) treated between August 2001 and December 2012 were reviewed. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 3-90 mo) in the chordoma cohort, and 67 months (range, 15-125) in the chondrosarcoma cohort. Initial surgery included biopsy (7% of patients), subtotal resection (57% of patients), and gross total resection (36% of patients). The median IG-IMRT total doses in the chondrosarcoma and chordoma cohorts were 70 Gy and 76 Gy, respectively, delivered with 2 Gy/fraction. For the chordoma and chondrosarcoma cohorts, the 5-year overall survival and local control rates were 85.6% and 65.3%, and 87.8% and 88.1%, respectively. In total, 10 patients progressed locally: 8 were chordoma patients and 2 chondrosarcoma patients. Both chondrosarcoma failures were in higher-grade tumors (grades 2 and 3). None of the 8 patients with grade 1 chondrosarcoma failed, with a median follow-up of 77 months (range, 34-125). There were 8 radiation-induced late effects-the most significant was a radiation-induced secondary malignancy occurring 6.7 years following IG-IMRT. Gross total resection and age were predictors of local control in the chordoma and chondrosarcoma patients, respectively. We report favorable survival, local control and adverse event rates following high dose IG-IMRT. Further follow-up is needed to confirm long-term efficacy. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Application of influence diagrams to prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, PO Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Phillips, Mark H [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, PO Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cho, Paul S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, PO Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Kalet, Ira [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, PO Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Doctor, Jason N [Biomedical and Health Informatics, University of Washington, PO Box 357240, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2004-05-07

    The purpose is to incorporate clinically relevant factors such as patient-specific and dosimetric information as well as data from clinical trials in the decision-making process for the selection of prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. The approach is to incorporate the decision theoretic concept of an influence diagram into the solution of the multiobjective optimization inverse planning problem. A set of candidate IMRT plans was obtained by varying the importance factors for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organ-at-risk (OAR) in combination with simulated annealing to explore a large part of the solution space. The Pareto set for the PTV and OAR was analysed to demonstrate how the selection of the weighting factors influenced which part of the solution space was explored. An influence diagram based on a Bayesian network with 18 nodes was designed to model the decision process for plan selection. The model possessed nodes for clinical laboratory results, tumour grading, staging information, patient-specific information, dosimetric information, complications and survival statistics from clinical studies. A utility node was utilized for the decision-making process. The influence diagram successfully ranked the plans based on the available information. Sensitivity analyses were used to judge the reasonableness of the diagram and the results. In conclusion, influence diagrams lend themselves well to modelling the decision processes for IMRT plan selection. They provide an excellent means to incorporate the probabilistic nature of data and beliefs into one model. They also provide a means for introducing evidence-based medicine, in the form of results of clinical trials, into the decision-making process.

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian [Department of Radiation Oncology, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, Wuxi (China); Ma, Chang-Ming, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.

  18. The use of biologically related model (Eclipse) for the intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning of nasopharyngeal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Monica W K; Leung, Lucullus H T; Yu, Peter K N

    2014-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common treatment technique for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Physical quantities such as dose/dose-volume parameters are used conventionally for IMRT optimization. The use of biological related models has been proposed and can be a new trend. This work was to assess the performance of the biologically based IMRT optimization model installed in a popular commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse) as compared to its dose/dose volume optimization model when employed in the clinical environment for NPC cases. Ten patients of early stage NPC and ten of advanced stage NPC were selected for this study. IMRT plans optimized using biological related approach (BBTP) were compared to their corresponding plans optimized using the dose/dose volume based approach (DVTP). Plan evaluation was performed using both biological indices and physical dose indices such as tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), target coverage, conformity, dose homogeneity and doses to organs at risk. The comparison results of the more complex advanced stage cases were reported separately from those of the simpler early stage cases. The target coverage and conformity were comparable between the two approaches, with BBTP plans producing more hot spots. For the primary targets, BBTP plans produced comparable TCP for the early stage cases and higher TCP for the advanced stage cases. BBTP plans reduced the volume of parotid glands receiving doses of above 40 Gy compared to DVTP plans. The NTCP of parotid glands produced by BBTP were 8.0 ± 5.8 and 7.9 ± 8.7 for early and advanced stage cases, respectively, while those of DVTP were 21.3 ± 8.3 and 24.4 ± 12.8, respectively. There were no significant differences in the NTCP values between the two approaches for the serial organs. Our results showed that the BBTP approach could be a potential alternative approach to the DVTP approach for NPC.

  19. IMRT in a pregnant patient: how to reduce the fetal dose?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Nyström, Håkan; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to find a solution for fetal dose reduction during head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a pregnant patient. The first step was optimization of the IMRT treatment plan with as few monitor units (MUs) as possible, while maintaining an acceptable...... dose distribution. The peripheral dose originating from the final IMRT plan was measured at distances reaching from the most proximal to the most distal fetal position, along the accelerator's longitudinal axis, using an anthropomorphic phantom extended with water-equivalent plastic. The measured...... peripheral dose was divided into leakage, and internal and collimator scatter, to find the degree to which each component influences the peripheral dose to build an appropriate shield. Collimator scatter was the greatest contributor to the peripheral dose throughout the range of the growing fetus. A shield...

  20. Optimization of beam angles for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning using genetic algorithm on a distributed computing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, Daryl P; Brunner, Stephen; Jones, Matthew D; Malhotra, Harish K; Bakhtiari, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    Planning intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment involves selection of several angle parameters as well as specification of structures and constraints employed in the optimization process. Including these parameters in the combinatorial search space vastly increases the computational burden, and therefore the parameter selection is normally performed manually by a clinician, based on clinical experience. We have investigated the use of a genetic algorithm (GA) and distributed-computing platform to optimize the gantry angle parameters and provide insight into additional structures, which may be necessary, in the dose optimization process to produce optimal IMRT treatment plans. For an IMRT prostate patient, we produced the first generation of 40 samples, each of five gantry angles, by selecting from a uniform random distribution, subject to certain adjacency and opposition constraints. Dose optimization was performed by distributing the 40-plan workload over several machines running a commercial treatment planning system. A score was assigned to each resulting plan, based on how well it satisfied clinically-relevant constraints. The second generation of 40 samples was produced by combining the highest-scoring samples using techniques of crossover and mutation. The process was repeated until the sixth generation, and the results compared with a clinical (equally-spaced) gantry angle configuration. In the sixth generation, 34 of the 40 GA samples achieved better scores than the clinical plan, with the best plan showing an improvement of 84%. Moreover, the resulting configuration of beam angles tended to cluster toward the patient's sides, indicating where the inclusion of additional structures in the dose optimization process may avoid dose hot spots. Additional parameter selection in IMRT leads to a large-scale computational problem. We have demonstrated that the GA combined with a distributed-computing platform can be applied to optimize gantry angle

  1. A Clinical phase I/II trial to investigate preoperative dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT in patients with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeder Falk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local control rates in patients with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma (RSTS remain disappointing even after gross total resection, mainly because wide margins are not achievable in the majority of patients. In contrast to extremity sarcoma, postoperative radiation therapy (RT has shown limited efficacy due to its limitations in achievable dose and coverage. Although Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT has been introduced in some centers to overcome the dose limitations and resulted in increased outcome, local failure rates are still high even if considerable treatment related toxicity is accepted. As postoperative administration of RT has some general disadvantages, neoadjuvant approaches could offer benefits in terms of dose escalation, target coverage and reduction of toxicity, especially if highly conformal techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT are considered. Methods/design The trial is a prospective, one armed, single center phase I/II study investigating a combination of neoadjuvant dose-escalated IMRT (50–56 Gy followed by surgery and IORT (10–12 Gy in patients with at least marginally resectable RSTS. The primary objective is the local control rate after five years. Secondary endpoints are progression-free and overall survival, acute and late toxicity, surgical resectability and patterns of failure. The aim of accrual is 37 patients in the per-protocol population. Discussion The present study evaluates combined neoadjuvant dose-escalated IMRT followed by surgery and IORT concerning its value for improved local control without markedly increased toxicity. Trial registration NCT01566123

  2. Evaluation of clinical IMRT treatment planning using the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform for absolute and relative dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhalouche, S.; Le Maitre, A. [INSERM UMR 1101 LaTIM, CHRU Morvan, 29609 Brest (France); Visvikis, D.; Pradier, O.; Boussion, N. [INSERM UMR 1101 LaTIM, CHRU Morvan, 29609 Brest, France and Department of Radiotherapy, CHRU Morvan, 29609 Brest (France)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate and validate the use of the Geant4 application for emission tomography (GATE) Monte Carlo simulation platform for clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dosimetry studies. Methods: The first step consisted of modeling a 6 MV photon beam linear accelerator (LINAC), with its corresponding validation carried out using percent depth dose evaluation, transverse profiles, tissue phantom ratio, and output factor on water phantom. The IMRT evaluation was performed by comparing simulation and measurements in terms of absolute and relative doses using IMRT dedicated quality assurance phantoms considering seven different patient datasets. Results: Concerning the LINAC simulated model validation tissue phantom ratios at 20 and 10 cm in water TPR{sub 10}{sup 20} obtained from GATE and measurements were 0.672 {+-} 0.063 and 0.675, respectively. In terms of percent depth dose and transverse profiles, error ranges were, respectively: 1.472%{+-} 0.285% and 4.827%{+-} 1.323% for field size of 4 Multiplication-Sign 4, 5 Multiplication-Sign 5, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10, 15 Multiplication-Sign 15, 20 Multiplication-Sign 20, 25 Multiplication-Sign 25, 30 Multiplication-Sign 30, and 40 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 2}. Most errors were observed at the edge of radiation fields because of higher dose gradient in these areas. Output factors showed good agreement between simulation and measurements with a maximum error of 1.22%. Finally, for IMRT simulations considering seven patient datasets, GATE provided good results with a relative error of 0.43%{+-} 0.25% on absolute dose between simulated and measured beams (measurements at the isocenter, volume 0.125 cm{sup 3}). Planar dose comparisons were also performed using gamma-index analysis. For the whole set of beams considered the mean gamma-index value was 0.497 {+-} 0.152 and 90.8%{+-} 3.6% of the evaluated dose points satisfied the 5%/ 4 mm criterion. Conclusions: These

  3. Linear algebraic methods applied to intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, S M; Xing, L

    2001-10-01

    Methods of linear algebra are applied to the choice of beam weights for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). It is shown that the physical interpretation of the beam weights, target homogeneity and ratios of deposited energy can be given in terms of matrix equations and quadratic forms. The methodology of fitting using linear algebra as applied to IMRT is examined. Results are compared with IMRT plans that had been prepared using a commercially available IMRT treatment planning system and previously delivered to cancer patients.

  4. IMRT in hypopharyngeal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, G.; Luetolf, U.M.; Davis, J.B.; Glanzmann, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-06-15

    Background and purpose: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) data on hypopharyngeal cancer (HC) are scant. In this study, the authors report on early results in an own HC patient cohort treated with IMRT. A more favorable outcome as compared to historical data on conventional radiation techniques was expected. Patients and methods: 29 consecutive HC patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT between 01/2002 and 07/2005 (mean follow-up 16 months, range 4-44 months). Doses of 60-71 Gy with 2.0-2.2 Gy/fraction were applied. 26/29 patients were definitively irradiated, 86% received simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. 60% presented with locally advanced disease (T3/4 Nx, Tx N2c/3). Mean primary tumor volume measured 36.2 cm{sup 3} (4-170 cm{sup 3}), mean nodal volume 16.6 cm{sup 3} (0-97 cm{sup 3}). Results: 2-year actuarial local, nodal, distant control, and overall disease-free survival were 90%, 93%, 93%, and 90%, respectively. In 2/4 patients with persistent disease (nodal in one, primary in three), salvage surgery was performed. The mean dose to the spinal cord (extension of > 5-15 mm) was 26 Gy (12-38 Gy); the mean maximum (point) dose was 44.4 Gy (26-58.9 Gy). One grade (G) 3 dysphagia and two G4 reactions (laryngeal fibrosis, dysphagia), both following the schedule with 2.2 Gy per fraction, have been observed so far. Larynx preservation was achieved in 25/26 of the definitively irradiated patients (one underwent a salvage laryngectomy); 23 had no or minimal dysphagia (G0-1). Conclusion: excellent early disease control and high patient satisfaction with swallowing function in HC following SIB IMRT were observed; these results need to be confirmed based on a longer follow-up period. In order to avoid G4 reactions, SIB doses of < 2.2 Gy/fraction are recommended for large tumors involving laryngeal structures. (orig.)

  5. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy to bilateral lower limb extremities concurrently: a planning case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, Emma, E-mail: emmafitz1390@gmail.com; Miles, Wesley; Fenton, Paul; Frantzis, Jim [Radiation Oncology, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Non-melanomatous skin cancers represent 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers in Australia with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) being the most common. A previously healthy 71-year-old woman presented with widespread and tender superficial skin cancers on the lower bilateral limbs. External beam radiation therapy through the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was employed as the treatment modality of choice as this technique provides conformal dose distribution to a three-dimensional treatment volume while reducing toxicity to surrounding tissues. The patient was prescribed a dose of 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) with 1.0 cm bolus over the ventral surface of each limb. The beam arrangement consisted of six treatment fields that avoided entry and exit through the contralateral limb. The treatment plans met the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) guidelines and produced highly conformal dosimetric results. Skin toxicity was measured against the National Cancer Institute: Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI: CTCAE) version 3. A well-tolerated treatment was delivered with excellent results given the initial extent of the disease. This case study has demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of IMRT for skin cancers as an alternative to surgery and traditional superficial radiation therapy, utilising a complex PTV of the extremities for patients with similar presentations.

  6. The role of Cobalt-60 source in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: From modeling finite sources to treatment planning and conformal dose delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanesar, Sandeep Kaur

    Cobalt-60 (Co-60) units played an integral role in radiation therapy from the mid-1950s to the 1970s. Although they continue to be used to treat cancer in some parts of the world, their role has been significantly reduced due to the invention of medical linear accelerators. A number of groups have indicated a strong potential for Co-60 units in modern radiation therapy. The Medical Physics group at the Cancer Center of the Southeastern Ontario and Queen's University has shown the feasibility of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) via simple conformal treatment planning and dose delivery using a Co-60 unit. In this thesis, initial Co-60 tomotherapy planning investigations on simple uniform phantoms are extended to actual clinical cases based on patient CT data. The planning is based on radiation dose data from a clinical Co-60 unit fitted with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and modeled in the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. An in house treatment planning program is used to calculate IMRT dose distributions. Conformal delivery in a single slice on a uniform phantom based on sequentially delivered pencil beams is verified by Gafchromic film. Volumetric dose distributions for Co-60 serial tomotherapy are then generated for typical clinical sites that had been treated at our clinic by conventional 6MV IMRT using Varian Eclipse treatment plans. The Co-60 treatment plans are compared with the clinical IMRT plans using conventional matrices such as dose volume histograms (DVH). Dose delivery based on simultaneously opened MLC leaves is also explored and a novel MLC segmentation method is proposed. In order to increase efficiency of dose calculations, a novel convolution based fluence model for treatment planning is also proposed. The ion chamber measurements showed that the Monte Carlo modeling of the beam data under the MIMiC MLC is accurate. The film measurements from the uniform phantom irradiations confirm that IMRT plans from our in-house treatment planning system

  7. A Dosimetric Evaluation of The Eclipse and Pinnacle Treatment Planning Systems in Treatment of Vertebral Bodies Using IMRT and VMAT with Modeled and Commissioned Flattening Filter Free (FFF) Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajo, Ramzi, Jr.

    Modern treatment planning systems (TPS's) utilize different algorithms in computing dose within the patient medium. The algorithms rely on properly modeled clinical setups in order to perform optimally. Aside from various parameters of the beam, modifiers, such as multileaf collimators (MLC's), must also be modeled properly. That could not be more true today, where dynamic delivery such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are being increasingly utilized due to their ability to deliver higher dose precisely to the target while sparing more surrounding normal tissue. Two of the most popular TPS's, Pinnacle (Philips) and Eclipse (Varian), were compared, with special emphasis placed on parameterization of the dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) in Eclipse. The DLG is a parameter that accounts for Varian's rounded MLC leaf ends. While Pinnacle accounts for the rounded leaf end by modeling the MLC's, Eclipse uses a measured parameter. This study investigated whether a single value measured DLG is sufficient for dynamic delivery. Using five planning volumes for vertebral body SBRT treatments, each prescribed for 3000 cGy in 5 fractions, an array of 20 treatment plans was generated using varying energies of 6MV-FFF and 10MV-FFF. Treatment techniques consisted of 9-field Step-and-shoot IMRT, and dual-arc VMAT using patient specific optimization criteria in the Pinnacle TPS v9.8. Each plan was normalized to ensure coverage of 3000cGy to 95% of the target volume. The dose was computed in Pinnacle v9.8, with the Collapsed Cone Convolution Superposition algorithm and Eclipse v11, with the Acuros XB algorithm, using a dose grid resolution of 2 mm in both systems. Dose volume histograms (DVH's) were generated for a comparison of max and mean dose to the targets and spinal cord, as well as 95% coverage of the targets and the volume of the spinal cord receiving 14.5 Gy (V14.5). Patient specific quality assurance (PSQA) fields were

  8. An assessment of biologically-based optimization (BORT) in the IMRT era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñagarícano, José A; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Wu, Chuan; Yan, Yulong

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of biological-based IMRT (BORT) in treatment planning development; more specifically, to assess the possible advantages of BORT over the classic 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DRT) and dose-based IMRT based on quantitative and qualitative indices. Three clinical cases are presented to evaluate the differences of BORT, IMRT, and 3DRT. 3DRT, IMRT, and BORT plans were generated for each case using a commercially available treatment planning system (Pinnacle by Philips). The plans were compared by evaluating biological endpoints such as tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue control probability (NTCP), and uncomplicated tumor control probability (P+), as well as isodose line distribution, dose-volume histograms (DVHs), and dose uniformity. In all cases of this study, BORT yielded improved isodose coverage and P+. Our preliminary results suggest that BORT could play an important role in treatment planning optimization, especially as biological models and predictive assays become more accurate. Further case studies are needed to establish a definitive role for this type of optimization.

  9. SU-E-T-555: Weighted Four-Dimensional IMRT Planning for Dynamic MLC Tracking Using a Practical and Simple Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, H; Cheung, Y; Jain, S; Sawant, A

    2012-06-01

    We present a simple, practical framework for truly 4D lung IMRT planning based on a weighted individual-phase optimization paradigm. This strategy is specifically developed for use in real-time tumor tracking delivery systems so as to utilize respiratory motion as an additional degree of freedom rather than a constraint. A 4D-CT scan from a lung SBRT patient was loaded into the Eclipse treatment planning system. The target and normal structures were manually contoured on each of the ten phases. For each phase, the total dose prescription was scaled by the number of phases and a seven-field plan was developed. An open-source deformable image and dose registration engine (DIRART) was used to deform the dose map at each phase to a reference phase. DVH data from the individually optimized phase plans were input into an in-house linear programming-based optimizer implemented in MATLAB, in order to determine dose-weighting factors for each phase. The objective function aimed to maintain PTV coverage while keeping normal structure dose as low as possible. This weighted-4D plan (W-4D) was compared to an ITV-based plan and a 4D plan with equal dose-weights to individual phases (E-4D). The W-4D dose fractions were determined to be 0.33, 0.01, 0.65 and 0.02 at phase 0%, 30%, 40%, and 90%, respectively (and zero elsewhere). PTV coverage (V95) was close to identical for all three strategies. The W-4D plan exhibited mean lung dose 18.8% and 8.5% lower and mean liver dose 23.3% and 5.7% lower than corresponding values from ITV-based and E-4D plans, respectively. By significantly improving normal structure sparing while maintaining PTV coverage, weighted 4D planning represents a more attractive solution than ITV-based planning for (currently investigational) real-time tumor tracking-based delivery systems. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Capability of leaf interdigitation with different inverse planning strategies in Monaco: an investigation of representative tumour sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jinghao; Meng, Xiangjuan; Liu, Tonghai; Yin, Yong

    2016-06-17

    The aim of this study was to experimentally assess the dosimetric impact of leaf interdigitation using different inverse treatment strategies for representative tumour sites and to identify the situations in which leaf interdigitation can benefit these tumour sites. Sixty previously treated patients (15 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), 15 multiple brain metastasis (MBM), 15 cervical cancer and 15 prostate cancer) were re-planned for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), sliding window IMRT (dMLC) and step-and-shoot IMRT (ssIMRT) with and without leaf interdigitation. Various dosimetric variables, such as PTV coverage, OARs sparing, delivery efficiency and planning time, were evaluated for each plan. In addition, a protocol developed by our group was applied to identify the situations in which leaf interdigitation can achieve benefits in clinical practice. Leaf interdigitation produced few benefits in PTV homogeneity for the MBM VMAT plans and NPC ssIMRT plans. For OARs, sparing was equivalent with and without leaf interdigitation. Leaf interdigitation showed an increase in MUs for dMLC plans and a decrease in MUs for ssIMRT plans. Leaf interdigitation resulted in an increase in segments for dMLC plans and a decrease in segments for NPC and MBM ssIMRT plans. For beam on time, leaf interdigitation showed an increase in MBM dMLC, NPC ssIMRT and prostate ssIMRT plans. In addition, leaf interdigitation saved planning time for VMAT and dMLC plans but increased planning time for ssIMRT plans. Leaf interdigitation does not improve plan quality when performing inverse treatment strategies, regardless of whether the target is simple or complex. However, it influences the delivery efficiency and planning time. Based on these observations, our study suggests that leaf interdigitation should be utilized when performing MBM VMAT plans and NPC ssIMRT plans.

  11. Out-of-field doses from pediatric craniospinal irradiations using 3D-CRT, IMRT, helical tomotherapy and electron-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Crijns, Wouter; Magliona, Federica; Depuydt, Tom; Vanhavere, Filip; Struelens, Lara

    2017-07-01

    Medulloblastoma treatment involves irradiation of the entire central nervous system, i.e. craniospinal irradiation (CSI). This is associated with the significant exposure of large volumes of healthy tissue and there is growing concern regarding treatment-associated side effects. The current study compares out-of-field organ doses in children receiving CSI through 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), helical tomotherapy (HT) and an electron-based technique, and includes radiation doses resulting from imaging performed during treatment. An extensive phantom study is performed, using an anthropomorphic phantom corresponding to a five year old child, in which organ absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent detectors. Additionally, the study evaluates and explores tools for calculating out-of-field patient doses using the treatment planning system (TPS) and analytical models. In our study, 3D-CRT resulted in very high doses to a limited number of organs, while it was able to spare organs such as the lungs and breast when compared to IMRT and HT. Both IMRT and HT spread the dose over more organs and were able to spare the heart, thyroid, bladder, uterus and testes when compared to 3D-CRT. The electron-based technique considerably decreased the out-of-field doses in deep-seated organs but could not avoid nearby out-of-field organs such as the lungs, ribs, adrenals, kidneys and uterus. The daily imaging dose is small compared to the treatment dose burden. The TPS error for out-of-field doses was most pronounced for organs further away from the target; nevertheless, no systematic underestimation was observed for any of the studied TPS systems. Finally, analytical modeling was most optimal for 3D-CRT although the number of organs that could be modeled was limited. To conclude, none of the techniques studied was capable of sparing all organs from out-of-field doses. Nevertheless, the electron-based technique showed the most

  12. An Automated Treatment Plan Quality Control Tool for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Using a Voxel-Weighting Factor-Based Re-Optimization Algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Song

    Full Text Available Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT currently plays an important role in radiotherapy, but its treatment plan quality can vary significantly among institutions and planners. Treatment plan quality control (QC is a necessary component for individual clinics to ensure that patients receive treatments with high therapeutic gain ratios. The voxel-weighting factor-based plan re-optimization mechanism has been proved able to explore a larger Pareto surface (solution domain and therefore increase the possibility of finding an optimal treatment plan. In this study, we incorporated additional modules into an in-house developed voxel weighting factor-based re-optimization algorithm, which was enhanced as a highly automated and accurate IMRT plan QC tool (TPS-QC tool. After importing an under-assessment plan, the TPS-QC tool was able to generate a QC report within 2 minutes. This QC report contains the plan quality determination as well as information supporting the determination. Finally, the IMRT plan quality can be controlled by approving quality-passed plans and replacing quality-failed plans using the TPS-QC tool. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed TPS-QC tool were evaluated using 25 clinically approved cervical cancer patient IMRT plans and 5 manually created poor-quality IMRT plans. The results showed high consistency between the QC report quality determinations and the actual plan quality. In the 25 clinically approved cases that the TPS-QC tool identified as passed, a greater difference could be observed for dosimetric endpoints for organs at risk (OAR than for planning target volume (PTV, implying that better dose sparing could be achieved in OAR than in PTV. In addition, the dose-volume histogram (DVH curves of the TPS-QC tool re-optimized plans satisfied the dosimetric criteria more frequently than did the under-assessment plans. In addition, the criteria for unsatisfied dosimetric endpoints in the 5 poor-quality plans could

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Image-Guided IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayles, P.

    2006-12-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of the subject of intensity modulated radiotherapy and the associated imaging. Most of the names associated with advanced radiotherapy can be found among the 80 authors and the book is therefore an authoritative reference text. The early chapters deal with the basic principles and include an interesting comparison between views of quality assurance for IMRT from Europe and North America. It is refreshing to see that the advice given has moved on from the concept of individual patient based quality control to more generic testing of the delivery system. However, the point is made that the whole process including the data transfer needs to be quality assured and the need for thorough commissioning of the process is emphasised. The `tricks' needed to achieve a dose based IMRT plan are well covered by the group at Ghent and there is an interesting summary of biological aspects of treatment planning for IMRT by Andrzej Niemierko. The middle section of the book deals with advanced imaging aspects of both treatment planning and delivery. The contributions of PET and MR imaging are well covered and there is a rather rambling section on molecular imaging. Image guidance in radiotherapy treatment is addressed including the concept of adaptive radiotherapy. The treatment aspects could perhaps have merited some more coverage, but there is a very thorough discussion of 4D techniques. The final section of the book considers each site of the body in turn. This will be found useful by those wishing to embark on IMRT in a new area, although some of the sections are more comprehensive than others. The book contains a wealth of interesting and thought provoking articles giving details as well as broad principles, and would be a useful addition to every departmental library. The editors have done a good job of ensuring that the different chapters are complementary, and of encouraging a systematic approach to the descriptions of IMRT in

  14. Changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry before the 25th fraction during the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Haihua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang (China); Hu Wei, E-mail: huw@tzhospital.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang (China); Ding Weijun; Shan Guoping; Wang Wei; Yu Changhui; Wang Biyun; Shao Minghai; Wang Jianhua; Yang Weifang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2012-07-01

    To quantify changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry, and to illustrate the inferiority of non-replanning during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Fifty-three NPC patients who received IMRT in 33 fractions were enrolled in this prospective trial. Before the 25th fraction, a new simulation computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for all patients. The dose-volume histograms of the phantom plan were compared with the initial plan. Significant reduction of the transverse diameter of the nasopharyngeal, the neck, and 2 parotid glands volume was observed on second CT compared with the first CT (mean reduction 7.48 {+-} 4.45 mm, 6.80 {+-} 15.14 mm, 5.70 {+-} 6.26 mL, and 5.04 {+-} 5.85 mL, respectively; p < 0.01). The maximum dose and V-40 of the spinal cord, mean dose, and V30 of the left and right parotid, and V-50 of the brain stem were increased significantly in the phantom plan compared with the initial plan (mean increase 4.75 {+-} 5.55 Gy, 7.18 {+-} 10.07%, 4.51 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 6.59 {+-} 17.82%, 5.33 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 11.68 {+-} 17.11% and 1.48 {+-} 3.67%, respectively; p < 0.01). On the basis of dose constraint criterion in the RTOG0225 protocol, the dose of the normal critical structures for 52.83% (28/53) of the phantom plans were out of limit compared with 1.89% (1/53) of the initial plans (p < 0.0001). Because of the significant change in anatomy and dose before the 25th fraction during IMRT, replanning should be necessary during IMRT with NPC.

  15. Total dural irradiation: RapidArc versus static-field IMRT: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Paul J., E-mail: paulj.kelly@hse.ie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mannarino, Edward; Lewis, John Henry; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Hacker, Fred L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional fixed-gantry angle intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with RapidArc for total dural irradiation. We also hypothesize that target volume-individualized collimator angles may produce substantial normal tissue sparing when planning with RapidArc. Five-, 7-, and 9-field fixed-gantry angle sliding-window IMRT plans were generated for comparison with RapidArc plans. Optimization and normal tissue constraints were constant for all plans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 100% of the dose. RapidArc was delivered using 350 Degree-Sign clockwise and counterclockwise arcs. Conventional collimator angles of 45 Degree-Sign and 315 Degree-Sign were compared with 90 Degree-Sign on both arcs. Dose prescription was 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. PTV metrics used for comparison were coverage, V{sub 107}%, D1%, conformality index (CI{sub 95}%), and heterogeneity index (D{sub 5}%-D{sub 95}%). Brain dose, the main challenge of this case, was compared using D{sub 1}%, Dmean, and V{sub 5} Gy. Dose to optic chiasm, optic nerves, globes, and lenses was also compared. The use of unconventional collimator angles (90 Degree-Sign on both arcs) substantially reduced dose to normal brain. All plans achieved acceptable target coverage. Homogeneity was similar for RapidArc and 9-field IMRT plans. However, heterogeneity increased with decreasing number of IMRT fields, resulting in unacceptable hotspots within the brain. Conformality was marginally better with RapidArc relative to IMRT. Low dose to brain, as indicated by V5Gy, was comparable in all plans. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed no clinically meaningful differences. The number of monitor units was lower and delivery time was reduced with RapidArc. The case-individualized RapidArc plan compared favorably with the 9-field conventional IMRT plan. In view of lower monitor unit requirements and shorter delivery time, Rapid

  16. IMRT using multi-leaf colimator of external shielding in treatment of breast cancer; IMRT no tratamento dos tumores de mama utilizando colimadores multi-folhas ou blocos de protecao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Joao Luis Fernandes da; Amadei, Larissa Pereira da Ponte [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia]. E-mail: jluis@hsl.org.br

    2005-07-01

    Objective: to compare dose homogeneity between conventional planning and a simplified IMRT. Methods: 10 patients with ductal breast cancer were selected and submitted to conventional planning and for IMRT planning. Results: in conventional planning the maximal dose points range 9.4% to 22.2%, while simplified IMRT found a range of maximal dose point 4.6 to 12.5%. And besides, the breast volume that receive {>=} 7% of the pre scripted dose was significantly reduced in IMRT planning. Conclusion: this simplified IMRT planning is an effective form to reach homogeneity dose distribution and practical use in day clinic. (author)

  17. Dosimetric adaptive IMRT driven by fiducial points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crijns, Wouter, E-mail: wouter.crijns@uzleuven.be [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van Herck, Hans [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Haustermans, Karin [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Slagmolen, Pieter [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); iMinds-KU Leuven Medical IT Department, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) – PSI, Center for the Processing of Speech and Images, KU Leuven and iMinds, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Oncology, MRC-CR-UK Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy have become standard treatments but are more sensitive to anatomical variations than 3D conformal techniques. To correct for inter- and intrafraction anatomical variations, fast and easy to implement methods are needed. Here, the authors propose a full dosimetric IMRT correction that finds a compromise in-between basic repositioning (the current clinical practice) and full replanning. It simplifies replanning by avoiding a recontouring step and a full dose calculation. It surpasses repositioning by updating the preoptimized fluence and monitor units (MU) using a limited number of fiducial points and a pretreatment (CB)CT. To adapt the fluence the fiducial points were projected in the beam's eye view (BEV). To adapt the MUs, point dose calculation towards the same fiducial points were performed. The proposed method is intrinsically fast and robust, and simple to understand for operators, because of the use of only four fiducial points and the beam data based point dose calculations. Methods: To perform our dosimetric adaptation, two fluence corrections in the BEV are combined with two MU correction steps along the beam's path. (1) A transformation of the fluence map such that it is realigned with the current target geometry. (2) A correction for an unintended scaling of the penumbra margin when the treatment beams scale to the current target size. (3) A correction for the target depth relative to the body contour and (4) a correction for the target distance to the source. The impact of the correction strategy and its individual components was evaluated by simulations on a virtual prostate phantom. This heterogeneous reference phantom was systematically subjected to population based prostate transformations to simulate interfraction variations. Additionally, a patient example illustrated the clinical practice. The correction strategy was evaluated using both dosimetric

  18. Impact of Multileaf Collimator Configuration Parameters on the Dosimetric Accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Nick; Perrin, David; Newhauser, Wayne; Zhang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC) transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA) on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2) and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being -0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  19. Impact of multileaf collimator configuration parameters on the dosimetric accuracy of 6-MV Intensity-Modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Petersen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected configuration parameters that govern multileaf collimator (MLC transmission and rounded leaf offset in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS (Pinnacle3, Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA on the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT dose calculation. The MLC leaf transmission factor was modified based on measurements made with ionization chambers. The table of parameters containing rounded-leaf-end offset values was modified by measuring the radiation field edge as a function of leaf bank position with an ionization chamber in a scanning water-tank dosimetry system and comparing the locations to those predicted by the TPS. The modified parameter values were validated by performing IMRT quality assurance (QA measurements on 19 gantry-static IMRT plans. Planar dose measurements were performed with radiographic film and a diode array (MapCHECK2 and compared to TPS calculated dose distributions using default and modified configuration parameters. Based on measurements, the leaf transmission factor was changed from a default value of 0.001 to 0.005. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in a small but statistically significant worsening of IMRT QA gamma-index passing rate, which revealed that the overall dosimetric accuracy of the TPS depends on multiple configuration parameters in a manner that is coupled and not intuitive because of the commissioning protocol used in our clinic. The rounded leaf offset table had little room for improvement, with the average difference between the default and modified offset values being −0.2 ± 0.7 mm. While our results depend on the current clinical protocols, treatment unit and TPS used, the methodology used in this study is generally applicable. Different clinics could potentially obtain different results and improve their dosimetric accuracy using our approach.

  20. Experience in the treatment of IMRT in prostate cancer. Planning, dosimetry and quality control; Experiencia en el tratamiento de IMRT en cancer de prostata. Planificacion, dosimetria y control de calidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Fernandez Bedoya, V.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Perez Gonzalez, L.; Torres Escobar, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to review the treatment of prostate cancer at our center. A description of the entire procedure, involving clinical dosimetry, and procedures for verification of treatment, including physical dosimetry and parallel computing system MSure (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton) as part of these procedures. This system is based on the model published by trifuente Yang et al. (Yang et al. 2002) for testing treatments regarding the number of monitor unit (MU) given. In addition, this software has a module for the testing of treatments for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), which will be analyzed in this study.

  1. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-01-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio® treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) Practice Patterns and IGRT's Impact on Workflow and Treatment Planning: Results From a National Survey of American Society for Radiation Oncology Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima; Elliott, David A; Chen, Yiyi; Kusano, Aaron S; Mitin, Timur; Thomas, Charles R; Holland, John M

    2016-03-15

    To survey image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) practice patterns, as well as IGRT's impact on clinical workflow and planning treatment volumes (PTVs). A sample of 5979 treatment site-specific surveys was e-mailed to the membership of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), with questions pertaining to IGRT modality/frequency, PTV expansions, method of image verification, and perceived utility/value of IGRT. On-line image verification was defined as images obtained and reviewed by the physician before treatment. Off-line image verification was defined as images obtained before treatment and then reviewed by the physician before the next treatment. Of 601 evaluable responses, 95% reported IGRT capabilities other than portal imaging. The majority (92%) used volumetric imaging (cone-beam CT [CBCT] or megavoltage CT), with volumetric imaging being the most commonly used modality for all sites except breast. The majority of respondents obtained daily CBCTs for head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), lung 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or IMRT, anus or pelvis IMRT, prostate IMRT, and prostatic fossa IMRT. For all sites, on-line image verification was most frequently performed during the first few fractions only. No association was seen between IGRT frequency or CBCT utilization and clinical treatment volume to PTV expansions. Of the 208 academic radiation oncologists who reported working with residents, only 41% reported trainee involvement in IGRT verification processes. Consensus guidelines, further evidence-based approaches for PTV margin selection, and greater resident involvement are needed for standardized use of IGRT practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of quality control tools for patients submitted to IMRT; Avaliacao das ferramentas de controle da qualidade para pacientes submetidos ao IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavor, Milton; Rodrigues, Laura N.; Silva, Marco A., E-mail: miltonlavor@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-04-15

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is currently being implemented in a rapidly growing number of centers in Brazil. As consequence many institutions are now facing the problem of performing a comprehensive quality control program before and during the implementation of IMRT in the clinical practice. This paper proposes a methodology for quality control and presents the results and evaluations of the data obtained from the proposed methodology. Ionization chamber and two-dimensional array detector were performed in IMRT treatment planning in order to assess the absolute value of the total dose of all fields. The relative total dose distribution of all fields was measured with a radiochromic film and a two-dimensional array in a phantom. A comparison between measured and calculated dose distributions was performed using the gamma-index method, assessing the percentage of points that meet the criteria of ±3% dose difference and ±3mm distance to agreement. As a result and review of 113 tested IMRT beams using ionization chamber and 81 using two-dimensional array, the proposal was to take an action level of about ±5% compared to the treatment planning systems and measurements, for the verification of the dose in a single point at the low gradient dose region. Analysis of the two-dimensional array measurements showed that the gamma value was <1 for 97.7% of the data and for the film the gamma value was <1 for 96.6% of the data. This work can establish action levels required for quality control program proposed and implemented in the Department of Radiotherapy - Hospital das Clinicas in Sao Paulo that allows an accurate delivery of dose in 'sliding-window' IMRT with micro multi leaf collimator. (author)

  4. RapidArc volumetric modulated therapy planning for prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming; Ohlhues, Lars; Medin, Joakim

    2009-01-01

    into clinical practice in May 2008 for treatment of prostate cancer patients. We report here our experiences with performing treatment planning using the Eclipse RapidArc optimization software for this patient group. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A stand-alone installation of Eclipse 8.5 with RapidArc optimization...... capability was performed at Rigshospitalet. Patient data for 8 prostate cancer patients were imported, most of whom were previously treated at Rigshospitalet using IMRT. Three of the patients were treated at Rigshospitalet using the RapidArc technique. Treatment plans were optimized using objectives as given...... by standard guidelines for clinical treatment planning. RapidArc plans were compared to the IMRT plans by which the patients were actually treated or in the three cases treated with the RapidArc technique to IMRT plans achieved using standard guidelines. Comparison was done with respect to target coverage...

  5. Poster - Thurs Eve-40: The potential of using SPECT ventilation information with IMRT for functional lung avoidance in radiotherapy of non small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawar, I; Yaremko, B; Craig, J; Chen, J; Oliver, M; Gaede, S; Rodrigues, G; Yu, E; Reid, R; Leung, E; Wong, E

    2008-07-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of using ventilation scans obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning in lung cancer radiotherapy to avoid well functioning lung. We fused SPECT ventilation scans acquired at GE Hawkeye SPECT-CT of ten stage-III lung radiotherapy patients with planning CT in treatment planning system (Pinnacle v8.0, Philips Medical Systems). We automatically segment out 50% and 70% ventilated volumes. For each patient, we generated IMRT plans using nine equally spaced beams with and without avoiding well ventilated volume. They were compared with three beam IMRT plans with beam directions chosen to minimize the mean dose to the ventilated lung volumes, while keeping cord dose below tolerance and dose uniformity in the target. The plans generated using functional lung avoidance information reduces the doses to the functioning lung. With both IMRT avoidance plans, we could not obtain better functional avoidance or lower V-20Gy (volume receiving 20Gy or more) for total lung when the planning target volume (PTV) was surrounded by functional lung volumes. We were able to achieve better ventilated lung avoidance and lower total lung V-20Gy when the PTV is close to, but not surrounded by functioning lung volumes. For patients with the PTV that is far from 50% and 70% functional lung volumes, three-field IMRT spare the ventilated lung as well as nine-field IMRT ventilation avoidance plan, with a lower total lung V20-Gy. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Effects of contrast materials in IMRT and VMAT of prostate using a commercial Monte Carlo algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundayadan Chandroth, Mahesh; Venning, Anthony; Chick, Brendan; Waller, Brett

    2016-06-01

    Contrast materials help in contouring in radiotherapy. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the effects of contrast materials in bladder on the dosimetry during prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy. The study also investigates the difference of the two dose calculation options namely 'dose to medium (Dm)' and 'dose to water (Dw)' in a commercial Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. Eight IMRT treatment plans were retrospectively studied which were used to treat high risk prostate cancer patients. The treatment plans generated in Monaco treatment planning system use seven coplanar beams and calculated 'Dm' as the clinical option. These plans were recalculated, keeping the segments, beam angle and monitor units the same, with different relative electron densities assigned to the structure 'bladder' to mimic the presence of contrast material. The same plans were recalculated using the 'Dw' option. Further, keeping the IMRT constraints and plan calculation properties the same, these plans were re-optimised with the delivery method changed to volumetric modulated arc therapy and calculated using both 'Dm' and 'Dw' options. For all the four scenarios, it was found that for the target volumes CTV and PTV, 'minimum dose' is the only endpoint studied having a significant difference with the presence of contrast material. For bladder, the endpoint V40 Gy is affected. Any significant dosimetric effect is found only when the relative electron density of the contrast material is 1.2 or more. Also, the dosimetric difference is greater when 'Dm' option is used for calculation. For rectum, the dosimetry remains unaffected. Hence, contrast materials should be contoured and assigned appropriate relative electron densities during IMRT and VMAT treatment planning of prostate. Also, the difference in dose reported with the two dose calculation options (Dm and Dw) in the presence of contrast materials is significant.

  7. The use of biologically related model (Eclipse for the intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning of nasopharyngeal carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica W K Kan

    Full Text Available Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is the most common treatment technique for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Physical quantities such as dose/dose-volume parameters are used conventionally for IMRT optimization. The use of biological related models has been proposed and can be a new trend. This work was to assess the performance of the biologically based IMRT optimization model installed in a popular commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse as compared to its dose/dose volume optimization model when employed in the clinical environment for NPC cases.Ten patients of early stage NPC and ten of advanced stage NPC were selected for this study. IMRT plans optimized using biological related approach (BBTP were compared to their corresponding plans optimized using the dose/dose volume based approach (DVTP. Plan evaluation was performed using both biological indices and physical dose indices such as tumor control probability (TCP, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP, target coverage, conformity, dose homogeneity and doses to organs at risk. The comparison results of the more complex advanced stage cases were reported separately from those of the simpler early stage cases.The target coverage and conformity were comparable between the two approaches, with BBTP plans producing more hot spots. For the primary targets, BBTP plans produced comparable TCP for the early stage cases and higher TCP for the advanced stage cases. BBTP plans reduced the volume of parotid glands receiving doses of above 40 Gy compared to DVTP plans. The NTCP of parotid glands produced by BBTP were 8.0 ± 5.8 and 7.9 ± 8.7 for early and advanced stage cases, respectively, while those of DVTP were 21.3 ± 8.3 and 24.4 ± 12.8, respectively. There were no significant differences in the NTCP values between the two approaches for the serial organs.Our results showed that the BBTP approach could be a potential alternative approach to the DVTP approach for NPC.

  8. Poster - Thurs Eve-01: Comparison of clinical IMRT plan quality and delivery accuracy: Few large segments vs many small segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchuk, S; Karnas, S; McCune, Kent; Mulligan, M; Dar, R; Chen, J

    2008-07-01

    Commercial radiation treatment planning systems for intensity modulation use optimization algorithms that can vary multi-leaf collimator (MLC) segment sizes, segment number and the minimum number of monitor units (MU) per segment. These parameters are varied according to the treatment site, size, location, and proximity to the organs at risk. This study compares the utility of optimization using (Case A) few large segments and a higher minimum MU per segment to that of (case B) using many smaller segments with a lower minimum MU per segment. For Case A, the patient benefits from a reduced treatment time associated with fewer MUs and fewer MLC movements and an increased accuracy in dose delivery. Also, shorter treatment times may lead to fewer patient movement uncertainties. The accumulated MLC leakage dose is reduced, the patient specific quality assurance (QA) is more manageable and small field modeling inaccuracies are reduced. Pinnacle-3 (v8) plans are generated with direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) for both scenarios. Three dimensional dose distributions and dose volume histograms are used to compare plan quality. We compare plans using few large MLC segments with those using many small MLC segments for some clinical cases. Improved plan quality is demonstrated using fewer MLC segments. Dose QAs are performed and compared for each scenario using MapCheck and film. When comparing dose delivery accuracy between different MU per segment settings, a decrease in delivery errors with minimum MU size is observed. In conclusion, few large MLC segments with larger area should be used when possible. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Treatment planning optimisation in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, S E; Burnet, N G; Lomax, A J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The goal of radiotherapy is to achieve uniform target coverage while sparing normal tissue. In proton therapy, the same sources of geometric uncertainty are present as in conventional radiotherapy. However, an important and fundamental difference in proton therapy is that protons have a finite range, highly dependent on the electron density of the material they are traversing, resulting in a steep dose gradient at the distal edge of the Bragg peak. Therefore, an accurate knowledge of the sources and magnitudes of the uncertainties affecting the proton range is essential for producing plans which are robust to these uncertainties. This review describes the current knowledge of the geometric uncertainties and discusses their impact on proton dose plans. The need for patient-specific validation is essential and in cases of complex intensity-modulated proton therapy plans the use of a planning target volume (PTV) may fail to ensure coverage of the target. In cases where a PTV cannot be used, other methods of quantifying plan quality have been investigated. A promising option is to incorporate uncertainties directly into the optimisation algorithm. A further development is the inclusion of robustness into a multicriteria optimisation framework, allowing a multi-objective Pareto optimisation function to balance robustness and conformity. The question remains as to whether adaptive therapy can become an integral part of a proton therapy, to allow re-optimisation during the course of a patient's treatment. The challenge of ensuring that plans are robust to range uncertainties in proton therapy remains, although these methods can provide practical solutions. PMID:23255545

  10. Soft-Rt: software for IMRT simulations based on MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira F, T. C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Campos, T., E-mail: tcff01@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment technique, widely used in external radiotherapy. This paper presents the Soft-Rt which allows the simulation of an entire IMRT treatment protocol. The Soft-Rt performs a full three-dimensional rendering of a set of patient images, including the definitions of region of interest with organs in risk, and the target tumor volume and margins (PTV). Thus, a more accurate analysis and planning can be performed, taking into account the features and orientation of the radiation beams. The exposed tissues as well as the amount of absorbed dose is depicted in healthy and/or cancerous tissues. As conclusion, Soft-Rt can predict dose on the PTV accurately, preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. Soft-Rt is coupled with SISCODES code. The SISCODES code is firstly applied to segment the set of CT or MRI patient images in distinct tissues pointing out its respective density and chemical compositions. Later, the voxel model is export to the Soft-Rt IMRT planning module in which a full treatment planning is created. All geometrical parameters are sent to the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code - MCNP - to simulate the interaction of each incident beam towards to the PTV avoiding organs in risk. The normalized dose results are exported to the Soft-Rt out-module, in which the three-dimensional model visualization is shown in a transparent glass procedure adopting gray scale for the dependence on the mass density of the correlated tissue; while, a color scale to depict dose values in a superimpose protocol. (Author)

  11. DISCHARGE PLANNING INCREASE THERAPY OBEDIENT OF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursalam Nursalam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discharge planning is a nurses learning  process of patients  hospitalized in  the hospital. Discharge planning  includes all treatments given to the patients  from the time of admission, during hospitalization, until the time of discharge. The aimed of this study was to evaluate  the patient’s  compliance for therapy (oral and injection medicine, nutrition and activities. Method: A quasy experimental purposive sampling design was used in this study. There were 14 respondents with DHF and GE who met to the inclusion criteria. The independent variable was Discharge planning and the dependent variable was patient’s  compliance for therapy.  Data were collected by using questionaire of medicine, nutrition and activity then analyzed by using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Mann Whitney U Test with significance level α≤0.05. Result: The result showed that discharge planning had significance influence to patient’s  compliance for therapy (p= 0.028. Discussion: It can be concluded that discharge planning has an effect to increase patient’s  compliance for therapy (oral and injection medicine, nutrition and activities.

  12. IMRT Commissioning: application of the AAPM's TG-119; Comissionamento de IMRT: aplicacao do TG-119 da AAPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeppellini, Caroline; Furnari, Laura, E-mail: laurafurnari@hotmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Inst. de Radiologia

    2013-08-15

    In order to verify the commissioning of the planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy system (IMRT), the TG-119 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) was applied. Using pre defined targets and normal structures, plans were realized, absolute and relative dose were measured with an ionizing chamber and films, and the results were compared with planned values. The maximum deviation of the measurements with the ionization chamber was 3,6%, but, in the total eleven measurements, only two were bigger than the tolerance limit of 3%, recommended by TG-119. The number of points which passed criteria gamma 3% to 3 mm ranged between 96.36% and 99.92%, all measurements were within the recommended 95%. The confidence limits found for both film and for chamber were lower than those achieved in the TG-119. Our results showed a good concordance with TG-119, what means that the system is adequate for clinical applications. (author)

  13. Dosimetric validation of planning system Eclipse 10 in partial breast irradiation treatments with IMRT; Validacion dosimetrica del sistema de planeacion Eclipse 10 en tratamientos de irradiacion parcial de mama con IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez T, J. J.; Gutierrez M, J. G.; Ortiz A, C. S.; Chagoya G, A.; Gutierrez C, J. G., E-mail: jvelaesfm@gmail.com [Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Hospital de Oncologia, Departamentos de Fisica Medica y Radioterapia, Av. Cuauhtemoc 330, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Partial breast irradiation is a new type of external radiation therapy to treat breast cancer in early clinical stages. Consist of administering to the channel surgical high doses of radiation in few treatment sessions. In this paper the dose calculations of the planning system Eclipse version 10 for a treatment of partial breast irradiation with X-rays beams (6 MV) intensity modulated were compared against the measurements made with OSL dosimeters and radio-chromic dye film. An anthropomorphic mannequin was used in which OSL dosimeters were collocated near the surface, an inside the radio-chromic dye film one plate; with this latest one dimensional dose distribution was measured. Previously dosimeters were calibrated irradiating them with a beam of X-rays 6 MV under the conditions specified in the IAEA-398 protocol. The OSL dosimeters were read in the Micro star Landauer equipment, the radio-chromic dye films were read with a scanner Epson 10000-Xl and analyzed with FilmCal and PTW Verisoft programs. The differences between measured and calculated dose were as follows: 3.6±1% for the OSL dosimeter and 96.3±1% of the analyzed points approved the gamma index criterion (3%, 3m m) when comparing the matrices of calculated dose and measured with the radio-chromic dye film. These results confirm the good dosimetric performance of planning system used under specific conditions used in the partial breast irradiation technique. (Author)

  14. SU-E-T-612: Hybrid-Input-Output Algorithm for IMRT Optimization with Dose-Volume Histogram Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Y; Jia, X; Zarepisheh, M; Jiang, S

    2012-06-01

    Dose-volume histogram (DVH) is a clinically relevant criterion to evaluate a treatment plan quality. It is hence desirable to incorporate DVH constraints in treatment planning process for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Yet, these constraints usually lead to difficulties due to their non-convex nature. The purpose of this project is to solve the IMRT optimization problem with DVH constraints using a hybrid-input-output (HIO) method. The IMRT optimization problem finds a dose distribution z under two constraints, where the elements of the vector z are the dose value at each spatial coordinate. First, there exist a corresponding fluence map x such that Dx=z and x>0, where D is the dose deposition matrix. Second, the dose distribution z should satisfy the DVH constraints. These two constraints define two sets of the dose distributions, denoted by A and B, and the solution to the IMRT problem lies in the intersection of these two sets. Our method finds the solution via the HIO algorithm that iteratively updates the solution according to its projections onto the two sets until convergence. The projection to A is handled by solving a least square problem and the projection to B is achieved by gradually adjusting voxel doses that validate the DVH criteria to meet the constraints. We have tested our algorithm using 7-field IMRT plans for 4 prostate cancer cases. Clinically relevant DVH constraints are considered for PTV, rectum, and bladder. In all the cases, the algorithm is able to find the solutions that satisfy all the DVH constraints. We have developed an algorithm to solve the IMRT optimization problem with DVH constraints using the HIO approach. Tests conducted in prostate cancer cases have demonstrated the effectiveness of our algorithm. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. IMRT QA: Selecting gamma criteria based on error detection sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steers, Jennifer M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 and Physics and Biology in Medicine IDP, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Fraass, Benedick A., E-mail: benedick.fraass@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The gamma comparison is widely used to evaluate the agreement between measurements and treatment planning system calculations in patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA). However, recent publications have raised concerns about the lack of sensitivity when employing commonly used gamma criteria. Understanding the actual sensitivity of a wide range of different gamma criteria may allow the definition of more meaningful gamma criteria and tolerance limits in IMRT QA. We present a method that allows the quantitative determination of gamma criteria sensitivity to induced errors which can be applied to any unique combination of device, delivery technique, and software utilized in a specific clinic. Methods: A total of 21 DMLC IMRT QA measurements (ArcCHECK®, Sun Nuclear) were compared to QA plan calculations with induced errors. Three scenarios were studied: MU errors, multi-leaf collimator (MLC) errors, and the sensitivity of the gamma comparison to changes in penumbra width. Gamma comparisons were performed between measurements and error-induced calculations using a wide range of gamma criteria, resulting in a total of over 20 000 gamma comparisons. Gamma passing rates for each error class and case were graphed against error magnitude to create error curves in order to represent the range of missed errors in routine IMRT QA using 36 different gamma criteria. Results: This study demonstrates that systematic errors and case-specific errors can be detected by the error curve analysis. Depending on the location of the error curve peak (e.g., not centered about zero), 3%/3 mm threshold = 10% at 90% pixels passing may miss errors as large as 15% MU errors and ±1 cm random MLC errors for some cases. As the dose threshold parameter was increased for a given %Diff/distance-to-agreement (DTA) setting, error sensitivity was increased by up to a factor of two for select cases. This increased sensitivity with increasing dose

  16. Implementation of a method for patient-specific IMRT treatment verification using dynalog files; Aplicacion de un metodo para la verificacion de tratamientos de imrt sobre la anatomia del paciente utilizando archivos dynalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calama Santiago, J. A.; Infante Utrilla, M. A.; Lavado Rodriguez, M. E.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this work is to implement a simple method of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification on the patient anatomy using dynalog files. Monitor units (MU) fraction and leaf positions, both planned and actually positioned during treatment, are sampled every 55 ms and stored in these files. This information was used in the treatment planning system to reconstruct the given fluence and to recalculate the absorbed dose in the patients CT, comparing absorbed dose distributions and histograms with those initially planned. Differences mainly appeared in areas with high absorbed dose gradients at the beginning and at the end of the radiation fields. These differences were lower than 3% in absorbed dose for most cases. No significant differences were found on dose-volume histograms. With proper linac and multileaf collimator commissioning, and a more stringent linac, treatment planning and record and verify system quality assurance program, this procedure allows patient-specific IMRT treatment verification, unlike conventional methods. (Author) 15 refs.

  17. Larynx-sparing techniques using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar Ad, Voichita, E-mail: voichita.bar-ad@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Haibo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dutta, Pinaki R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore whether the laryngeal dose can be reduced by using 2 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques: whole-neck field IMRT technique (WF-IMRT) vs. junctioned IMRT (J-IMRT). The effect on planning target volumes (PTVs) coverage and laryngeal sparing was evaluated. WF-IMRT technique consisted of a single IMRT plan, including the primary tumor and the superior and inferior neck to the level of the clavicular heads. The larynx was defined as an organ at risk extending superiorly to cover the arytenoid cartilages and inferiorly to include the cricoid cartilage. The J-IMRT technique consisted of an IMRT plan for the primary tumor and the superior neck, matched to conventional antero-posterior opposing lower neck fields at the level of the thyroid notch. A central block was used for the anterior lower neck field at the level of the larynx to restrict the dose to the larynx. Ten oropharyngeal cancer cases were analyzed. Both the primary site and bilateral regional lymphatics were included in the radiotherapy targets. The averaged V95 for the PTV57.6 was 99.2% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 97.4% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT. The averaged V95 for the PTV64 was 99.9% for the WF-IMRT technique compared with 98.9% (p = 0.02) for J-IMRT and the averaged V95 for the PT70 was 100.0% for WF-IMRT technique compared with 99.5% (p = 0.04) for J-IMRT. The averaged mean laryngeal dose was 18 Gy with both techniques. The averaged mean doses within the matchline volumes were 69.3 Gy for WF-MRT and 66.2 Gy for J-IMRT (p = 0.03). The WF-IMRT technique appears to offer an optimal coverage of the target volumes and a mean dose to the larynx similar with J-IMRT and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  18. Experimental IMRT breast dosimetry in a thorax phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Elsa B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Nogueira, Luciana B.; Lima, Andre C.S., E-mail: elsabpimenta@gmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: radioterapia.andre@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro de Tratamento em Radioterapia, Betim, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an essential therapeutic method. RT is often used as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer. The dose-volume restrictions of the organs at risk limit the prescribed dose to the target volume and biological and clinical effects may influence the final treatment outcome. The breast RT provides large risks to the adjacent organs and consequently the recommended dosimetry to the prescribed dose volume (PTV) is 50 Gy, lower than the most prescribed dose in other treatments (70-85 Gy). Such values implies in less tumor control compared to other sites. The present research proposal aimed to measure absorbed dose in a thorax phantom with synthetic breasts provided by an Intensity-Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) protocol in a RT center. On the methodology, IMRT protocol was selected following recommendations from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Radiochromic films and a thorax simulator were prepared by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI). Dosimeters were calibrated on a selected linear accelerator (LINAC). The comparison of the dosimetry from treatment planning system (TPS), Xio (Elekta) and from experimental data was performed. The spatial distribution of the breast internal dose and in the adjacent organs was depicted by the experimental data. In the film's calibration, the quadratic polynomial fit presented a satisfactory coefficient. Two-dimensional dose profiles were obtained in the breast suggesting that films can supply details and information that TPS does not provide. At the phantom's dosimetry, the internal mean doses taken at the synthetic breast presented usual values above the prescribed dose, besides overall values were within the dosimetric MSKCC criterion. The non full reproduction of the build-up region in the films had occurred due to the asymmetrical positioning of the films in the inner breast, in addition to their non constant distance from the skin. The hot regions were present may

  19. Dosimetric study of different radiotherapy planning approaches for hippocampal avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) based on fused CT and MRI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bu-Hai; Hua, Wei; Gu, Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Li, Jun; Liu, Li-Qin; Huang, Yu-Xiang

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric characteristics for hippocampal avoidance (HA) between the treatment plans based on fused CT and MRI imaging during whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) pertaining to: (1) 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), (2) dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT), and (3) RapidArc for patients with brain metastases. In our study, HA was defined as hippocampus beyond 5 mm, and planning target volume (PTV) was obtained subtracting HA volume from the volume of whole brain. There were 10 selected patients diagnosed with brain metastases receiving WBRT. These patients received plans for 3D-CRT (two fields), dIMRT (seven non-coplanar fields) and RapidArc (dual arc). The prescribed dose 30 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered to the whole-brain clinical target volume of patients. On the premise of meeting the clinical requirements, we compared target dose distribution, target coverage (TC), homogeneity index (HI), dose of organs at risk (OARs), monitor units (MU) and treatment time between the above three radiotherapy plans. V90 %, V95 % and TC of PTV for 3D-CRT plan were lowest of the three plans. V90 %, V95 % and HI of PTV in RapidArc plan were superior to the other two plans. TC of PTV in RapidArc plan was similar with dIMRT plan (P > 0.05). 3D-CRT was the optimal plan in the three plans for hippocampal protection. The median dose (Dmedian) and the maximum doses (Dmax) of hippocampus in 3D-CRT were 4.95, 10.87 Gy, which were lowest among the three planning approaches (P plans pertain to no significant difference (P > 0.05). When WBRT (30 Gy,10F) was equivalent to single dose 2 Gy,NTDmean of hippocampus in 3D-CRT, dIMRT and RapidArc were reduced to 3.60, 8.47, 8.20 Gy2, respectively. In addition, compared with dIMRT, MU of RapidArc was reduced and the treatment time was shortened by nearly 25 %. All three radiotherapy planning approaches in our study can meet the clinical requirements of HA. Although TC in 3D

  20. Fast voxel and polygon ray-tracing algorithms in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2006-05-01

    We present work on combining three algorithms to improve ray-tracing efficiency in radiation therapy dose computation. The three algorithms include: An improved point-in-polygon algorithm, incremental voxel ray tracing algorithm, and stereographic projection of beamlets for voxel truncation. The point-in-polygon and incremental voxel ray-tracing algorithms have been used in computer graphics and nuclear medicine applications while the stereographic projection algorithm was developed by our group. These algorithms demonstrate significant improvements over the current standard algorithms in peer reviewed literature, i.e., the polygon and voxel ray-tracing algorithms of Siddon for voxel classification (point-in-polygon testing) and dose computation, respectively, and radius testing for voxel truncation. The presented polygon ray-tracing technique was tested on 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning cases that required the classification of between 0.58 and 2.0 million voxels on a 2.5 mm isotropic dose grid into 1-4 targets and 5-14 structures represented as extruded polygons (a.k.a. Siddon prisms). Incremental voxel ray tracing and voxel truncation employing virtual stereographic projection was tested on the same IMRT treatment planning cases where voxel dose was required for 230-2400 beamlets using a finite-size pencil-beam algorithm. Between a 100 and 360 fold cpu time improvement over Siddon's method was observed for the polygon ray-tracing algorithm to perform classification of voxels for target and structure membership. Between a 2.6 and 3.1 fold reduction in cpu time over current algorithms was found for the implementation of incremental ray tracing. Additionally, voxel truncation via stereographic projection was observed to be 11-25 times faster than the radial-testing beamlet extent approach and was further improved 1.7-2.0 fold through point-classification using the method of translation over the cross product technique.

  1. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  2. Investigating multi-objective fluence and beam orientation IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; Fiege, Jason; Biagioli, Matthew; Poleszczuk, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Radiation Oncology treatment planning requires compromises to be made between clinical objectives that are invariably in conflict. It would be beneficial to have a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ perspective of the full spectrum of treatment plans that represent the possible trade-offs between delivering the intended dose to the planning target volume (PTV) while optimally sparing the organs-at-risk (OARs). In this work, the authors demonstrate Pareto-aware radiotherapy evolutionary treatment optimization (PARETO), a multi-objective tool featuring such bird’s-eye-view functionality, which optimizes fluence patterns and beam angles for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. The problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization is managed as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. To achieve this, PARETO is built around a powerful multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called Ferret, which simultaneously optimizes multiple fitness functions that encode the attributes of the desired dose distribution for the PTV and OARs. The graphical interfaces within PARETO provide useful information such as: the convergence behavior during optimization, trade-off plots between the competing objectives, and a graphical representation of the optimal solution database allowing for the rapid exploration of treatment plan quality through the evaluation of dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions. PARETO was evaluated for two relatively complex clinical cases, a paranasal sinus and a pancreas case. The end result of each PARETO run was a database of optimal (non-dominated) treatment plans that demonstrated trade-offs between the OAR and PTV fitness functions, which were all equally good in the Pareto-optimal sense (where no one objective can be improved without worsening at least one other). Ferret was able to produce high quality solutions even though a large number of parameters

  3. A hierarchical evolutionary algorithm for multiobjective optimization in IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clay; Kim, Minsun; Liao, Jay; Phillips, Mark H

    2010-09-01

    The current inverse planning methods for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are limited because they are not designed to explore the trade-offs between the competing objectives of tumor and normal tissues. The goal was to develop an efficient multiobjective optimization algorithm that was flexible enough to handle any form of objective function and that resulted in a set of Pareto optimal plans. A hierarchical evolutionary multiobjective algorithm designed to quickly generate a small diverse Pareto optimal set of IMRT plans that meet all clinical constraints and reflect the optimal trade-offs in any radiation therapy plan was developed. The top level of the hierarchical algorithm is a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA). The genes of the individuals generated in the MOEA are the parameters that define the penalty function minimized during an accelerated deterministic IMRT optimization that represents the bottom level of the hierarchy. The MOEA incorporates clinical criteria to restrict the search space through protocol objectives and then uses Pareto optimality among the fitness objectives to select individuals. The population size is not fixed, but a specialized niche effect, domination advantage, is used to control the population and plan diversity. The number of fitness objectives is kept to a minimum for greater selective pressure, but the number of genes is expanded for flexibility that allows a better approximation of the Pareto front. The MOEA improvements were evaluated for two example prostate cases with one target and two organs at risk (OARs). The population of plans generated by the modified MOEA was closer to the Pareto front than populations of plans generated using a standard genetic algorithm package. Statistical significance of the method was established by compiling the results of 25 multiobjective optimizations using each method. From these sets of 12-15 plans, any random plan selected from a MOEA population had a 11.3% +/- 0

  4. Accelerated iterative beam angle selection in IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangert, Mark, E-mail: m.bangert@dkfz.de [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center—DKFZ, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Iterative methods for beam angle selection (BAS) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning sequentially construct a beneficial ensemble of beam directions. In a naïve implementation, the nth beam is selected by adding beam orientations one-by-one from a discrete set of candidates to an existing ensemble of (n − 1) beams. The best beam orientation is identified in a time consuming process by solving the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem for every candidate beam and selecting the beam that yields the largest improvement to the objective function value. This paper evaluates two alternative methods to accelerate iterative BAS based on surrogates for the FMO objective function value. Methods: We suggest to select candidate beams not based on the FMO objective function value after convergence but (1) based on the objective function value after five FMO iterations of a gradient based algorithm and (2) based on a projected gradient of the FMO problem in the first iteration. The performance of the objective function surrogates is evaluated based on the resulting objective function values and dose statistics in a treatment planning study comprising three intracranial, three pancreas, and three prostate cases. Furthermore, iterative BAS is evaluated for an application in which a small number of noncoplanar beams complement a set of coplanar beam orientations. This scenario is of practical interest as noncoplanar setups may require additional attention of the treatment personnel for every couch rotation. Results: Iterative BAS relying on objective function surrogates yields similar results compared to naïve BAS with regard to the objective function values and dose statistics. At the same time, early stopping of the FMO and using the projected gradient during the first iteration enable reductions in computation time by approximately one to two orders of magnitude. With regard to the clinical delivery of noncoplanar IMRT treatments, we could

  5. Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors: A Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Andrea; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Mans, Anton; Belderbos, Jose S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Damen, Eugene M.F., E-mail: e.damen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the potential of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques with a limited number of segments for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: For a random selection of 27 patients eligible for SBRT, coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT and coplanar VMAT (using SmartArc) treatment plans were generated in Pinnacle{sup 3} and compared. In addition, film measurements were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the skin dose for the different treatment techniques. Results: Using VMAT, the delivery times could be reduced to an average of 6.6 min compared with 23.7 min with noncoplanar IMRT. The mean dose to the healthy lung was 4.1 Gy for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and 4.2 Gy for coplanar IMRT. The volume of healthy lung receiving >5 Gy and >20 Gy was 18.0% and 5.4% for VMAT, 18.5% and 5.0% for noncoplanar IMRT, and 19.4% and 5.7% for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The dose conformity at 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose of 54 Gy was 1.13 and 5.17 for VMAT, 1.11 and 4.80 for noncoplanar IMRT and 1.12 and 5.31 for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The measured skin doses were comparable for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and slightly greater for coplanar IMRT. Conclusions: Coplanar VMAT for SBRT for early-stage lung cancer achieved plan quality and skin dose levels comparable to those using noncoplanar IMRT and slightly better than those with coplanar IMRT. In addition, the delivery time could be reduced by {<=}70% with VMAT.

  6. The use of modified single pencil beam dose kernels to improve IMRT dose calculation accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Alanah M; Otto, Karl; Duzenli, Cheryl

    2004-12-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used to deliver highly conformal radiation doses to tumors while sparing nearby sensitive tissues. Discrepancies between calculated and measured dose distributions have been reported for regions of high dose gradients corresponding to complex radiation fluence patterns. For the single pencil beam convolution dose calculation algorithm, the ability to resolve areas of high dose structure is partly related to the shape of the pencil beam dose kernel (similar to how a photon detector's point spread function relates to imaging resolution). Improvements in dose calculation accuracy have been reported when the treatment planning system (TPS) is recommissioned using high-resolution measurement data as input. This study proposes to improve the dose calculation accuracy for IMRT planning by modifying clinical dose kernel shapes already present in the TPS, thus avoiding the need to reacquire higher resolution commissioning data. The in-house optimization program minimizes a cost-function based on a two-dimensional composite dose subtraction/distance-to-agreement (gamma) analysis. The final modified kernel shapes are reintroduced into the treatment planning system and improvements to the dose calcula tion accuracy for complex IMRT dose distributions evaluated. The central kernel value (radius =0 cm) has the largest effect on the dose calculation resolution and is the focus of this study.

  7. A computational tool for the efficient analysis of dose-volume histograms for radiation therapy treatment plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil; Myint, W. Kenji; Gopalakrishnan, Mahesh; Jang, Sunyoung; Logemann, Jerilyn A.; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2010-01-01

    A Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) program was primarily developed to increase the efficiency and accuracy of dose–volume histogram (DVH) analysis of large quantities of patient data in radiation therapy research. The program was written in MATLAB to analyze patient plans exported from the treatment planning system (Pinnacle3) in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (AAPM/RTOG) format. HART-computed DVH data was validated against manually extracted data from the planning system for five head and neck cancer patients treated with the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. HART calculated over 4000 parameters from the differential DVH (dDVH) curves for each patient in approximately 10–15 minutes. Manual extraction of this amount of data required 5 to 6 hours. The normalized root mean square deviation (NRMSD) for the HART–extracted DVH outcomes was less than 1%, or within 0.5% distance-to-agreement (DTA). This tool is supported with various user-friendly options and graphical displays. Additional features include optimal polynomial modeling of DVH curves for organs, treatment plan indices (TPI) evaluation, plan-specific outcome analysis (POA), and spatial DVH (zDVH) and dose surface histogram (DSH) analyses, respectively. HART is freely available to the radiation oncology community. PMID:20160690

  8. Individualized IMRT treatment approach for cervical lymph node metastases of unknown primary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, S.; Glanzmann, C.; Studer, G. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Huber, G. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-04-15

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the outcome of risk-adapted planning treatment volumes (PTVs) in patients with cervical lymph node metastases of unknown primary cancer (UPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Between January 2006 and November 2012, 28 patients with cervical lymph node metastases of UPC were treated in our institution with IMRT either postoperatively (n=20) or as definitive treatment (n=8). Nodal involvement distributed as follows: N1 (n=2), N2a (8), N2b (10), N2c (4), and N3 (4). Systemic therapy with cisplatin or cetuximab was added concomitantly in 20 of 28 patients (71%). Radiotherapy using simultaneously integrated boost (SIB-IMRT) was carried out with 2.0 or 2.11 Gy single doses up to 66/70 Gy. Mean/median follow-up was 31.6/30.5 months (range 3-78 months). In all, 15 of 28 patients were treated with unilateral SIB-IMRT (54%). An elective PTV to the contralateral oropharynx and contralateral level II-III lymph nodes was carried out in 8 patients with PET-CT suspected but not histologically proven involvement, recurrences or former tumor of the oropharynx. More extended treatment fields were reserved for patients with N2c or bilaterally N3 status (n=5). The 3-year overall survival, mucosal control, neck control and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 76, 100, 93, and 88%, respectively. No patient suffered from a locoregional recurrence. Two patients treated with radiotherapy alone had persistent nodal disease. No grade II or higher late sequel has been observed. Our single center approach to treat patients with cervical lymph node metastases of UPC with individualized, risk-adapted SIB-IMRT resulted in high locoregional tumor control and was well tolerated. (orig.)

  9. An improvement in IMRT QA results and beam matching in linacs using statistical process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagneur, Justin D; Ezzell, Gary A

    2014-09-08

    The purpose of this study is to apply the principles of statistical process control (SPC) in the context of patient specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA to set clinic-specific action limits and evaluate the impact of changes to the multileaf collimator (MLC) calibrations on IMRT QA results. Ten months of IMRT QA data with 247 patient QAs collected on three beam-matched linacs were retrospectively analyzed with a focus on the gamma pass rate (GPR) and the average ratio between the measured and planned doses. Initial control charts and action limits were calculated. Based on this data, changes were made to the leaf gap parameter for the MLCs to improve the consistency between linacs. This leaf gap parameter is tested monthly using a MLC sweep test. A follow-up dataset with 424 unique QAs were used to evaluate the impact of the leaf gap parameter change. The initial data average GPR was 98.6% with an SPC action limit of 93.7%. The average ratio of doses was 1.003, with an upper action limit of 1.017 and a lower action limit of 0.989. The sweep test results for the linacs were -1.8%, 0%, and +1.2% from nominal. After the adjustment of the leaf gap parameter, all sweep test results were within 0.4% of nominal. Subsequently, the average GPR was 99.4% with an SPC action limit of 97.3%. The average ratio of doses was 0.997 with an upper action limit of 1.011 and a lower action limit of 0.981. Applying the principles of SPC to IMRT QA allowed small differences between closely matched linacs to be identified and reduced. Ongoing analysis will monitor the process and be used to refine the clinical action limits for IMRT QA.

  10. The impact of RTOG 0614 and RTOG 0933 trials in routine clinical practice: The US Survey of Utilization of Memantine and IMRT planning for hippocampus sparing in patients receiving whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Alexander N; Stanic, Sinisa

    2016-03-01

    Two recent clinical trials, phase III RTOG 0614 and phase II RTOG 0933, showed some effectiveness of Memantine and IMRT planning for hippocampus sparing, among patients receiving whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for brain metastases; however, their use in routine clinical practice is unknown. A survey was sent to 1933 radiation oncologists in the US. Data collected included utilization of Memantine and hippocampus sparing, reasons for adoption and non-adoption, and demographic variables. A total of 196 radiation oncologists responded to the survey, with 64% reporting using Memantine in almost none of the patients receiving WBRT for brain metastases, and only 11% considering Memantine for trial was supported by 71% of radiation oncologists, whereas further exploration of Memantine for this purpose in a phase III trial was supported by 42%. At this time, the majority of surveyed radiation oncologists in the US do not use Memantine, or IMRT planning for hippocampus sparing in patients receiving WBRT. Further validation of the hippocampus sparing concept in a phase III trial was supported, before adopting it in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A dosimetric evaluation of dose escalation for the radical treatment of locally advanced vulvar cancer by intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloemers, Monique C.W.M., E-mail: c.bloemers@nki.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Portelance, Lorraine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ruo, Russell; Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this planning study was to determine whether intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduces the radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) when compared with 3D conventional radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in patients with vulvar cancer treated by irradiation. This study also investigated the use of sequential IMRT boost (seq-IMRT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT) for dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced vulvar cancer. Five vulvar cancer patients treated in the postoperative setting and 5 patients treated with definitive intent (def-group) were evaluated. For the postoperative group, 3D-CRT and IMRT plans to a total dose (TD) of 45 Gy were generated. For the def-group, 4 plans were generated: a 3D-CRT and an IMRT plan to a TD of 56.4 Gy, a SIB-IMRT plan to a TD of 56 Gy, and a SIB-IMRT with dose escalation (SIB-IMRT-esc): TD of 67.2 Gy. Mean dose and dose-volume histograms were compared using Student's t-test. IMRT significantly (all p < 0.05) reduced the D{sub mean}, V30, and V40 for all OAR in the adjuvant setting. The V45 was also significantly reduced for all OAR except the bladder. For patients treated in the def-group, all IMRT techniques significantly reduced the D{sub mean}, V40, and V45 for all OAR. The mean femur doses with SIB-IMRT and SIB-IMRT-esc were 47% and 49% lower compared with 3D-CRT. SIB-IMRT-esc reduced the doses to the OAR compared with seq-3D-CRT but increased the D{sub max.} for the small bowel, rectum, and bladder. IMRT reduces the dose to the OAR compared with 3D-CRT in patients with vulvar cancer receiving irradiation to a volume covering the vulvar region and nodal areas without compromising the dosimetric coverage of the target volume. IMRT for vulvar cancer is feasible and an attractive option for dose escalation studies.

  12. Multi-institutional comparison of simulated treatment delivery errors in ssIMRT, manually planned VMAT and autoplan-VMAT plans for nasopharyngeal radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pogson, Elise M; Aruguman, Sankar; Hansen, Christian R

    2017-01-01

    treatment errors included Multi Leaf Collimator (MLC) shifts, MLC field size (MLCfs), gantry and collimator errors. A change of more than 5% in most selected dose metrics was considered to have potential clinical impact. The original patient plan total Monitor Units (MUs) were correlated to the total number...

  13. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for carotid sparing in the management of early glottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Lee, Sol Min; Kim, Gwi Eon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Gi; Park, Jong In; Sung, Won Mo [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Dept. of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Radiotherapy of the neck is known to cause carotid artery stenosis. We compared the carotid artery dose received between volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and conventional fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans in patients with early glottic cancer. Twenty-one early glottic cancer patients who previously underwent definitive radiotherapy were selected for this study. For each patient, double arc VMAT, 8-field IMRT, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), and lateral parallel-opposed photon field radiotherapy (LPRT) plans were created. The 3DCRT plan was generated using lateral parallel-opposed photon fields plus an anterior photon field. VMAT and IMRT treatment plan optimization was performed under standardized conditions to obtain adequate target volume coverage and spare the carotid artery. Dose-volume specifications for the VMAT, IMRT, 3DCRT, and LPRT plans were calculated with radiotherapy planning system. Monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were measured to evaluate treatment efficiency. Target volume coverage and homogeneity results were comparable between VMAT and IMRT; however, VMAT was superior to IMRT for carotid artery dose sparing. The mean dose to the carotid arteries in double arc VMAT was reduced by 6.8% compared to fixed-field IMRT (p < 0.001). The MUs for VMAT and IMRT were not significantly different (p = 0.089). VMAT allowed an approximately two-fold reduction in treatment delivery time in comparison to IMRT (3 to 5 minutes vs. 5 to 10 minutes). VMAT resulted in a lower carotid artery dose compared to conventional fixed-field IMRT, and maintained good target coverage in patients with early glottic cancer.

  14. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation : Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Mazen; Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G

    2017-10-01

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  15. Independent dose calculation in IMRT for the Tps Iplan using the Clarkson modified integral; Calculo independiente de dosis en IMRT para el TPS Iplan usando la integral modificada de Clarkson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrada, A.; Tello, Z.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D., E-mail: jorge.alberto.adrada@gmail.com [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia, Obispo Oro 423, X5000BFI Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatments require a quality assurance (Q A) specific patient before delivery. These controls include the experimental verification in dose phantom of the total plan as well as dose distributions. The use of independent dose calculation (IDC) is used in 3D-Crt treatments; however its application in IMRT requires the implementation of an algorithm that allows considering a non-uniform intensity beam. The purpose of this work was to develop IDC software in IMRT with MLC using the algorithm proposed by Kung (Kung et al. 2000). The software was done using Matlab programming. The Clarkson modified integral was implemented on each flowing, applying concentric rings for the dose determination. From the integral of each field was calculated the dose anywhere. One time finished a planning; all data are exported to a phantom where a Q A plan is generated. On this is calculated the half dose in a representative volume of the ionization chamber and the dose at the center of it. Until now 230 IMRT planning were analyzed carried out ??in the treatment planning system (Tps) Iplan. For each one of them Q A plan was generated, were calculated and compared calculated dose with the Tps, IDC system and measurement with ionization chamber. The average difference between measured and calculated dose with the IDC system was 0.4% ± 2.2% [-6.8%, 6.4%]. The difference between the measured and the calculated doses by the pencil-beam algorithm (Pb) of Tps was 2.6% ± 1.41% [-2.0%, 5.6%] and with the Monte Carlo algorithm was 0.4% ± 1.5% [-4.9%, 3.7%]. The differences of the carried out software are comparable to the obtained with the ionization chamber and Tps in Monte Carlo mode. (author)

  16. Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) Practice Patterns and IGRT's Impact on Workflow and Treatment Planning: Results From a National Survey of American Society for Radiation Oncology Members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima, E-mail: nabaviza@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Elliott, David A. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health and Preventative Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Mitin, Timur; Thomas, Charles R.; Holland, John M. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To survey image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) practice patterns, as well as IGRT's impact on clinical workflow and planning treatment volumes (PTVs). Methods and Materials: A sample of 5979 treatment site–specific surveys was e-mailed to the membership of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), with questions pertaining to IGRT modality/frequency, PTV expansions, method of image verification, and perceived utility/value of IGRT. On-line image verification was defined as images obtained and reviewed by the physician before treatment. Off-line image verification was defined as images obtained before treatment and then reviewed by the physician before the next treatment. Results: Of 601 evaluable responses, 95% reported IGRT capabilities other than portal imaging. The majority (92%) used volumetric imaging (cone-beam CT [CBCT] or megavoltage CT), with volumetric imaging being the most commonly used modality for all sites except breast. The majority of respondents obtained daily CBCTs for head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), lung 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or IMRT, anus or pelvis IMRT, prostate IMRT, and prostatic fossa IMRT. For all sites, on-line image verification was most frequently performed during the first few fractions only. No association was seen between IGRT frequency or CBCT utilization and clinical treatment volume to PTV expansions. Of the 208 academic radiation oncologists who reported working with residents, only 41% reported trainee involvement in IGRT verification processes. Conclusion: Consensus guidelines, further evidence-based approaches for PTV margin selection, and greater resident involvement are needed for standardized use of IGRT practices.

  17. Steep dose gradients for simultaneous integrated boost IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratengeier, Klaus; Schwab, Franz; Flentje, Michael [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Meyer, Juergen [Univ. of Canterbury, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Christchurch (New Zealand); Vordermark, Dirk [Universitaetsklinikum Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Steep dose gradients between two planning target volumes (PTVs) as may be required for simultaneous integrated boosts (SIB) should be an option provided by IMRT algorithms. The aim was to analyse the geometry of the SIB problem and to implement the results in an algorithm for IMRT segment generation denoted two-step intensity modulated radiotherapy (2-Step IMRT). It was hypothesized that a gap between segments directed to the inner and the outer PTV would steepen the dose gradient. The mathematical relationships were derived from the individual dose levels and the geometry (diameters) of the PTVs. The results generated by means of 2-Step IMRT segments were equivalent or better than the segment generation using a commercial IMRT planning system. The dose to both the inner and the outer PTV was clearly more homogeneous and the composite objective value was the lowest. The segment numbers were lower or equal - with better sparing of the surrounding tissue. In summary, it was demonstrated that 2-Step IMRT was able to achieve steep dose gradients for SIB constellations. (orig.)

  18. Creación y desarrollo de un plan de control de calidad para tratamientos de radioterapia de intensidad modulada (IMRT)

    OpenAIRE

    Chinillach Ferrando, Néstor

    2017-01-01

    Dentro del proceso de control de calidad, es un hecho, la necesidad de realizar una verificación de los tratamientos de pacientes. Esto es especialmente significativo cuando se trata de tratamientos de IMRT, ya que el movimiento de las láminas se convierte en una fuente elevada de error. Esta verificación consiste en comprobar que el tratamiento que administra el acelerador coincide con el calculado en el sistema de planificación. Esta comparación, a grandes rasgos consiste en generar d...

  19. Minimizing Late Effects for Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold, IMRT, or Both?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznar, Marianne C., E-mail: marianne.camille.aznar@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Sciences, Niels Bohr Institute, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Maraldo, Maja V.; Schut, Deborah A. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lundemann, Michael [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Sciences, Niels Bohr Institute, and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brodin, N Patrik [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Institute of Onco-Physics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York (United States); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berthelsen, Anne K. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena; Petersen, Peter M. [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CD), lung cancer, and breast cancer. We investigated the risk for the development of CD and secondary lung, breast, and thyroid cancer after radiation therapy (RT) delivered with deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) compared with free-breathing (FB) using 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT). The aim of this study was to determine which treatment modality best reduced the combined risk of life-threatening late effects in patients with mediastinal HL. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with early-stage mediastinal HL were eligible for the study. Treatment plans were calculated with both 3DCRT and IMRT on both DIBH and FB planning computed tomographic scans. We reported the estimated dose to the heart, lung, female breasts, and thyroid and calculated the estimated life years lost attributable to CD and to lung, breast, and thyroid cancer. Results: DIBH lowered the estimated dose to heart and lung regardless of delivery technique (P<.001). There was no significant difference between IMRT-FB and 3DCRT-DIBH in mean heart dose, heart V20Gy, and lung V20Gy. The mean breast dose was increased with IMRT regardless of breathing technique. Life years lost was lowest with DIBH and highest with FB. Conclusions: In this cohort, 3DCRT-DIBH resulted in lower estimated doses and lower lifetime excess risks than did IMRT-FB. Combining IMRT and DIBH could be beneficial for a subgroup of patients.

  20. An investigation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy versus conventional two-dimensional and 3D-conformal radiation therapy for early stage larynx cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Daniel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT has been incorporated at several institutions for early stage laryngeal cancer (T1/T2N0M0, but its utility is controversial. Methods In three representative patients, multiple plans were generated: 1 Conventional 2D planning, with the posterior border placed at either the anterior aspect ("tight" plan or the mid-vertebral body ("loose" plan, 2 3D planning, utilizing both 1.0 and 0.5 cm margins for the planning target volume (PTV, and 3 IMRT planning, utilizing the same margins as the 3D plans. A dosimetric comparison was performed for the target volume, spinal cord, arytenoids, and carotid arteries. The prescription dose was 6300 cGy (225 cGy fractions, and the 3D and IMRT plans were normalized to this dose. Results For PTV margins of 1.0 cm and 0.5 cm, the D95 of the 2D tight/loose plans were 3781/5437 cGy and 5372/5869 cGy, respectively (IMRT/3D plans both 6300 cGy. With a PTV margin of 1.0 cm, the mean carotid artery dose was 2483/5671/5777/4049 cGy in the 2D tight, 2D loose, 3D, and IMRT plans, respectively. When the PTV was reduced to 0.5 cm, the the mean carotid artery dose was 2483/5671/6466/2577 cGy to the above four plans, respectively. The arytenoid doses were similar between the four plans, and spinal cord doses were well below tolerance. Conclusions IMRT provides a more ideal dose distribution compared to 2D treatment and 3D planning in regards to mean carotid dose. We therefore recommend IMRT in select cases when the treating physician is confident with the GTV.

  1. Treatment plan comparison of Linac step and shoot,Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton therapy for prostate cancer using dosimetrical and biological index

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cho, Sam Ju; Lee, Sang Hoon; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Huh, Hyun Do; Lim, Sangwook; Shin, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use various dosimetrical indices to determine the best IMRT modality technique for treating patients with prostate cancer. Ten patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to include different modalities, including the linac step and shoot, Tomotherapy, RapidArc, and Proton systems. Various dosimetrical indices, like the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Biological indices such as the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD), based tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were also calculated and used to compare the treatment plans. The RapidArc plan attained better PTV coverage, as evidenc...

  2. SU-F-T-351: Establishing a Workflow for IMRT Pre-Treatment Reviews for NRG-GY006 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giaddui, T [Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li, N; Moore, K; Mell, L [University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA (United States); Curry, K [MIM Software, Inc., Clevealand, OH (United States); Leath, C [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Kunos, C [Northeastern Ohio University College, Clevealand, OH (United States); Xiao, Y [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a workflow for NRG-GY006 IMRT pre-treatment reviews, incorporating advanced radiotherapy technologies being evaluated as part of the clinical trial. Methods: Pre-Treatment reviews are required for every IMRT case as part of NRG-GY006 (a randomized phase II trial of radiation therapy and cisplatin alone or in combination with intravenous triapine in women with newly diagnosed bulky stage I B2, stage II, IIIB, or IVA cancer of the uterine cervix or stage II-IVA vaginal cancer. The pretreatment review process includes structures review and generating an active bone marrow(ABM)- to be used as an avoidance structure during IMRT optimization- and evaluating initial IMRT plan quality using knowledgeengineering based planning (KBP). Institutions will initially submit their simulation CT scan, structures file and PET/CT to IROC QA center for generating ABM. The ABM will be returned to the institution for use in planning. Institutions will then submit an initial IMRT plan for review and will receive information back following implementation of a KBP algorithm, for use in re-optimization, before submitting the final IMRT used for treatment. Results: ABM structure is generated using MIM vista software (Version 6.5, MIM corporation, Inc.). Here, the planning CT and the diagnostic PET/CT are fused and a sub threshold structure is auto segmented above the mean value of the SUV of the bone marrow. The generated ABM were compared with those generated with other software system (e.g. Velocity, Varian) and Dice coefficient (reflects the overlap of structures) ranged between 80 – 90% was achieved. A KBP model was built in Varian Eclipse TPS using the RapidPlan KBP software to perform plan quality assurance. Conclusion: The workflow for IMRT pretreatment reviews has been established. It represents a major improvement of NRG Oncology clinical trial quality assurance and incorporates the latest radiotherapy technologies as part of NCI clinical trials. This project

  3. Evaluation of beam hardening and photon scatter by brass compensator for IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shimpei; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yukio; Miyashita, Hisayuki; Chang, Weishan; Kawachi, Toru; Katayose, Tetsurou; Kobayashi, Nao; Kunieda, Etsuo; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2012-11-01

    When a brass compensator is set in a treatment beam, beam hardening may take place. This variation of the energy spectrum may affect the accuracy of dose calculation by a treatment planning system and the results of dose measurement of brass compensator intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In addition, when X-rays pass the compensator, scattered photons are generated within the compensator. Scattered photons may affect the monitor unit (MU) calculation. In this study, to evaluate the variation of dose distribution by the compensator, dose distribution was measured and energy spectrum was simulated using the Monte Carlo method. To investigate the influence of beam hardening for dose measurement using an ionization chamber, the beam quality correction factor was determined. Moreover, to clarify the effect of scattered photons generated within the compensator for the MU calculation, the head scatter factor was measured and energy spectrum analyses were performed. As a result, when X-rays passed the brass compensator, beam hardening occurred and dose distribution was varied. The variation of dose distribution and energy spectrum was larger with decreasing field size. This means that energy spectrum should be reproduced correctly to obtain high accuracy of dose calculation for the compensator IMRT. On the other hand, the influence of beam hardening on k(Q) was insignificant. Furthermore, scattered photons were generated within the compensator, and scattered photons affect the head scatter factor. These results show that scattered photons must be taken into account for MU calculation for brass compensator IMRT.

  4. Evaluation of Dosimetry Check software for IMRT patient-specific quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Zalman, Travis; Ha, Chul S; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of the Dosimetry Check system for patient-specific IMRT QA. Typical QA methods measure the dose in an array dosimeter surrounded by homogenous medium for which the treatment plan has been recomputed. With the Dosimetry Check system, fluence measurements acquired on a portal dosimeter is applied to the patient's CT scans. Instead of making dose comparisons in a plane, Dosimetry Check system produces isodose lines and dose-volume histograms based on the planning CT images. By exporting the dose distribution from the treatment planning system into the Dosimetry Check system, one is able to make a direct comparison between the calculated dose and the planned dose. The versatility of the software is evaluated with respect to the two IMRT techniques - step and shoot and volumetric arc therapy. The system analyzed measurements made using EPID, PTW seven29, and IBA MatriXX, and an intercomparison study was performed. Plans from patients previously treated at our institution with treated anatomical site on brain, head & neck, liver, lung, and prostate were analyzed using Dosimetry Check system for any anatomical site dependence. We have recommendations and possible precautions that may be necessary to ensure proper QA with the Dosimetry Check system.

  5. Intensity Modulated Proton and Photon Therapy for Early Prostate Cancer With or Without Transperineal Injection of a Polyethylen Glycol Spacer: A Treatment Planning Comparison Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Damien C., E-mail: damien.weber@unige.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Zilli, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Vallee, Jean Paul [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Rectal toxicity is a serious adverse effect in early-stage prostate cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (RT). Injecting a spacer between Denonvilliers' fascia increases the distance between the prostate and the anterior rectal wall and may thus decrease the rectal radiation-induced toxicity. We assessed the dosimetric impact of this spacer with advanced delivery RT techniques, including intensity modulated RT (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and intensity modulated proton beam RT (IMPT). Methods and Materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were simulated for RT with or without spacer. Plans were computed for IMRT, VMAT, and IMPT using the Eclipse treatment planning system using both computed tomography spacer+ and spacer- data sets. Prostate {+-} seminal vesicle planning target volume [PTV] and organs at risk (OARs) dose-volume histograms were calculated. The results were analyzed using dose and volume metrics for comparative planning. Results: Regardless of the radiation technique, spacer injection decreased significantly the rectal dose in the 60- to 70-Gy range. Mean V{sub 70Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} with IMRT, VMAT, and IMPT planning were 5.3 {+-} 3.3%/13.9 {+-} 10.0%, 3.9 {+-} 3.2%/9.7 {+-} 5.7%, and 5.0 {+-} 3.5%/9.5 {+-} 4.7% after spacer injection. Before spacer administration, the corresponding values were 9.8 {+-} 5.4% (P=.012)/24.8 {+-} 7.8% (P=.012), 10.1 {+-} 3.0% (P=.002)/17.9 {+-} 3.9% (P=.003), and 9.7 {+-} 2.6% (P=.003)/14.7% {+-} 2.7% (P=.003). Importantly, spacer injection usually improved the PTV coverage for IMRT. With this technique, mean V{sub 70.2Gy} (P=.07) and V{sub 74.1Gy} (P=0.03) were 100 {+-} 0% to 99.8 {+-} 0.2% and 99.1 {+-} 1.2% to 95.8 {+-} 4.6% with and without Spacer, respectively. As a result of spacer injection, bladder doses were usually higher but not significantly so. Only IMPT managed to decrease the rectal dose after spacer injection for all dose levels, generally with no

  6. SU-E-T-79: A Study of the Effect of Clinical Tumor Volume Displacement On the Dosage of Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Ma, C; Li, D; Wu, F [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the effect of clinical tumor volume (CTV) displacement on the dosage of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for left-sided breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: We created 2 sets of IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 and PTV0.7 (with CTV displacement of 0.5cm and 0.7cm respectively) for each of the ten consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients after modified radical mastectomy, and compared the difference in PTV coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing between the two groups. And then, we compared the difference in PTV coverage in IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 between the group with properly estimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.5cm) and the one with underestimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.7cm). The difference in results between the corresponding two groups was compared using paired-sample t-test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: IMRT plans derived from PTV0.5 had more homogenous PTV coverage, and less heart, left lung, right breast, right lung, left humeral head and B-P radiation exposure, as well as less total Mu as compared with the ones stemmed from PTV0.7 (all p<0.05). IMRT plans with appropriate estimation of CTV displacement had better PTV coverage compared with the ones with underestimated CTV displacement (all p<0.01). Conclusion: The IMRT plans with smaller CTV displacement in post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer has dosimetrical advantages over the ones with larger CTV displacement. Underestimation of CTV displacement can lead to significant reduction of PTV coverage. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve PTV coverage and OAR (including heart and left lung) sparing. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  7. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  8. Multi-institutional comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer : a planning study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, Andrea; Van Gestel, Dirk; Arends, Mark P.; Korevaar, Erik W.; Schuring, Danny; Kunze-Busch, Martina C.; Louwe, Rob J. W.; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compared to static beam Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), the main advantage of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is a shortened delivery time, which leads to improved patient comfort and possibly smaller intra-fraction movements. This study aims at a treatment

  9. Evaluation of dosimetric effect caused by slowing with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaves for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhengzheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is to report 1 the sensitivity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT QA method for clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans with multi-leaf collimator (MLC leaf errors that will not trigger MLC interlock during beam delivery; 2 the effect of non-beam-hold MLC leaf errors on the quality of VMAT plan dose delivery.

  10. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation. Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakka, Mazen; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Faculty of Medicine, Erlangen (Germany); Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  11. Dosimetric Validation of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Using AAPM TG-119 Benchmark Plans in an Upgraded CLINAC 2100CD for Flattening Filter Free (FFF) Photon Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangaiah, Ashokkumar; Ganesh, K M; Ramalingam, K; Karthikeyan, K; Jagadheeskumar, N

    2017-11-26

    Background: Recently we have upgraded our Varian Clinac 2100CD with a 6MV FFF beam, this upgrade being the first of its kind in our country. Even though the dosimetric characteristics of FFF beams have been reported both in experimental and Monte Carlo studies, application in planning and delivery is complex. The aim of this study was to validate the commissioning of upgraded FFF beams dosimetrically using AAPM TG-119 bench mark plans for VMAT and to make a comparison with IMRT plans for both flattened filtered and FFF beams. Materials and Methods: AAPM TG-119 proposes a set of test clinical cases for testing the accuracy of IMRT planning and delivery systems. For these clinical cases we generated four treatment plans using IMRT FF, IMRT FFF, VMAT FF and VMAT FFF on a Varian Clinac 2100CD machine equipped with a millennium 120 MLC in Eclipse treatment planning system. Dose prescription and planning objectives were set according to the TG-119 goals and plans were scored based on planning objectives. Plans were compared using dose coverage, the conformity index and the homogeneity index. Point doses were measured at points recommended by TG-119 using a CC13 ion chamber. Planar dosimetry was accomplished using Imatrix and gamma evaluation was conducted using Omnipro IMRT software. Results: Dose distributions of FFF beam based plans were comparable to FF plans for both IMRT and VMAT. Our planning results matched TG-119 planning results. Measured point doses were within ±2% of planned doses and planar dosimetry gamma values were 95% of data points for all plans. Conclusion: We found a reduction of 40% treatment time for FFF against FF beams for sliding window IMRT. Upgraded FFF beams were in good agreement with TG-119 benchmark plans and goals. Creative Commons Attribution License

  12. Generation of a novel phase-space-based cylindrical dose kernel for IMRT optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J

    2012-05-01

    Improving dose calculation accuracy is crucial in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We have developed a method for generating a phase-space-based dose kernel for IMRT planning of lung cancer patients. Particle transport in the linear accelerator treatment head of a 21EX, 6 MV photon beam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was simulated using the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc code system. The phase space information was recorded under the secondary jaws. Each particle in the phase space file was associated with a beamlet whose index was calculated and saved in the particle's LATCH variable. The DOSXYZnrc code was modified to accumulate the energy deposited by each particle based on its beamlet index. Furthermore, the central axis of each beamlet was calculated from the orientation of all the particles in this beamlet. A cylinder was then defined around the central axis so that only the energy deposited within the cylinder was counted. A look-up table was established for each cylinder during the tallying process. The efficiency and accuracy of the cylindrical beamlet energy deposition approach was evaluated using a treatment plan developed on a simulated lung phantom. Profile and percentage depth doses computed in a water phantom for an open, square field size were within 1.5% of measurements. Dose optimized with the cylindrical dose kernel was found to be within 0.6% of that computed with the nontruncated 3D kernel. The cylindrical truncation reduced optimization time by approximately 80%. A method for generating a phase-space-based dose kernel, using a truncated cylinder for scoring dose, in beamlet-based optimization of lung treatment planning was developed and found to be in good agreement with the standard, nontruncated scoring approach. Compared to previous techniques, our method significantly reduces computational time and memory requirements, which may be useful for Monte-Carlo-based 4D IMRT or IMAT treatment planning.

  13. Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic based low cost tissue equivalent phantom for verification dosimetry in IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, S D; Deshpande, Sudesh; Ghadi, Yogesh; Shaiju, V S; Amols, H I; Mayya, Y S

    2009-12-17

    A novel IMRT phantom was designed and fabricated using Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic. Physical properties of ABS plastic related to radiation interaction and dosimetry were compared with commonly available phantom materials for dose measurements in radiotherapy. The ABS IMRT phantom has provisions to hold various types of detectors such as ion chambers, radiographic/radiochromic films, TLDs, MOSFETs, and gel dosimeters. The measurements related to pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT of carcinoma prostate were carried out using ABS and Scanditronics-Wellhoffer RW3 IMRT phantoms for five different cases. Point dose data were acquired using ionization chamber and TLD discs while Gafchromic EBT and radiographic EDR2 films were used for generating 2-D dose distributions. Treatment planning system (TPS) calculated and measured doses in ABS plastic and RW3 IMRT phantom were in agreement within +/-2%. The dose values at a point in a given patient acquired using ABS and RW3 phantoms were found comparable within 1%. Fluence maps and dose distributions of these patients generated by TPS and measured in ABS IMRT phantom were also found comparable both numerically and spatially. This study indicates that ABS plastic IMRT phantom is a tissue equivalent phantom and dosimetrically it is similar to solid/plastic water IMRT phantoms. Though this material is demonstrated for IMRT dose verification but it can be used as a tissue equivalent phantom material for other dosimetry purposes in radiotherapy.

  14. Assessment of three-dimensional set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Upasani, Maheshkumar; Master, Zubin; Patil, Anita; Phurailatpam, Reena; Nojin, Siji; Kannan, Sadhana; Godasastri, Jayant; Jalali, Rakesh

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess three-dimensional (3D) set-up errors using megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for supine craniospinal irradiation (CSI) on helical tomotherapy (HT). Patients were immobilized in a customized 4-clamp thermoplastic head mask with or without whole-body vacuum cradle. Set-up was based primarily on a set of cranial fiducial markers. MVCT scans were acquired and co-registered with planning scan separately at three different levels (brain, upper, and lower spine) at every fraction. Only translational displacements were analysed, wherein positive sign denotes deviation in anterior, left, and superior direction; while negative sign denotes deviation in posterior, right, and inferior direction. Mean displacements, systematic, and random errors of the study population were calculated at all three levels separately. Local residual uncertainty of the upper and lower spine was also derived assuming perfect co-registration of the skull. Set-up margins for clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) were derived at these three levels separately using published margin recipes. Data from 1868 co-registrations in 674 fractions on 33 patients was included. The mean displacements in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions were -1.21, -1.36, and 1.38 mm; -1.25, -0.34, and 0.65 mm; and -1.47, -2.78, and 0.22 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lumbar spine respectively. The corresponding 3D vector of displacement was 2.28; 1.45; and 3.15 mm respectively. There was a distinct systematic trend towards increasing inaccuracy from the brain towards the lower spine. Using Stroom's formula, the minimum recommended CTV to PTV margins in absence of daily image-guidance were 6.5; 7.0; and 9.5 mm for the brain; upper spine; and lower spine respectively. This increased to 7.5; 8.5; and 11.5 mm using van Herk's formula. Subset and sensitivity analyses

  15. Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT Increases Estimated Clinical Benefit in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisanne V van Dijk

    Full Text Available To compare the clinical benefit of robust optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (minimax IMPT with current photon Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT and PTV-based IMPT for head and neck cancer (HNC patients. The clinical benefit is quantified in terms of both Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP and target coverage in the case of setup and range errors.For 10 HNC patients, PTV-based IMRT (7 fields, minimax and PTV-based IMPT (2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 fields plans were tested on robustness. Robust optimized plans differed from PTV-based plans in that they target the CTV and penalize possible error scenarios, instead of using the static isotropic CTV-PTV margin. Perturbed dose distributions of all plans were acquired by simulating in total 8060 setup (±3.5 mm and range error (±3% combinations. NTCP models for xerostomia and dysphagia were used to predict the clinical benefit of IMPT versus IMRT.The robustness criterion was met in the IMRT and minimax IMPT plans in all error scenarios, but this was only the case in 1 of 40 PTV-based IMPT plans. Seven (out of 10 patients had relatively large NTCP reductions in minimax IMPT plans compared to IMRT. For these patients, xerostomia and dysphagia NTCP values were reduced by 17.0% (95% CI; 13.0-21.1 and 8.1% (95% CI; 4.9-11.2 on average with minimax IMPT. Increasing the number of fields did not contribute to plan robustness, but improved organ sparing.The estimated clinical benefit in terms of NTCP of robust optimized (minimax IMPT is greater than that of IMRT and PTV-based IMPT in HNC patients. Furthermore, the target coverage of minimax IMPT plans in the presence of errors was comparable to IMRT plans.

  16. Per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates do not predict clinically relevant patient dose errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Zhen Heming; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Canis Lupus LLC and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Departments of Human Oncology, Medical Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to determine the statistical correlation between per-beam, planar IMRT QA passing rates and several clinically relevant, anatomy-based dose errors for per-patient IMRT QA. The intent is to assess the predictive power of a common conventional IMRT QA performance metric, the Gamma passing rate per beam. Methods: Ninety-six unique data sets were created by inducing four types of dose errors in 24 clinical head and neck IMRT plans, each planned with 6 MV Varian 120-leaf MLC linear accelerators using a commercial treatment planning system and step-and-shoot delivery. The error-free beams/plans were used as ''simulated measurements'' (for generating the IMRT QA dose planes and the anatomy dose metrics) to compare to the corresponding data calculated by the error-induced plans. The degree of the induced errors was tuned to mimic IMRT QA passing rates that are commonly achieved using conventional methods. Results: Analysis of clinical metrics (parotid mean doses, spinal cord max and D1cc, CTV D95, and larynx mean) vs IMRT QA Gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 2/2, 1/1) showed that in all cases, there were only weak to moderate correlations (range of Pearson's r-values: -0.295 to 0.653). Moreover, the moderate correlations actually had positive Pearson's r-values (i.e., clinically relevant metric differences increased with increasing IMRT QA passing rate), indicating that some of the largest anatomy-based dose differences occurred in the cases of high IMRT QA passing rates, which may be called ''false negatives.'' The results also show numerous instances of false positives or cases where low IMRT QA passing rates do not imply large errors in anatomy dose metrics. In none of the cases was there correlation consistent with high predictive power of planar IMRT passing rates, i.e., in none of the cases did high IMRT QA Gamma passing rates predict low errors in anatomy dose metrics or vice versa

  17. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Ugur; Okutan, Murat; Demir, Bayram; Koksal, Canan

    2015-07-01

    Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  18. A high-speed scintillation-based electronic portal imaging device to quantitatively characterize IMRT delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Manisha K; Lynch, Bart D; Li, Jonathan G; Dempsey, James F

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) employing a fast scintillator and a high-speed camera. The device is designed to accurately and independently characterize the fluence delivered by a linear accelerator during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with either step-and-shoot or dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) delivery. Our aim is to accurately obtain the beam shape and fluence of all segments delivered during IMRT, in order to study the nature of discrepancies between the plan and the delivered doses. A commercial high-speed camera was combined with a terbium-doped gadolinium-oxy-sulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillator to form an EPID for the unaliased capture of two-dimensional fluence distributions of each beam in an IMRT delivery. The high speed EPID was synchronized to the accelerator pulse-forming network and gated to capture every possible pulse emitted from the accelerator, with an approximate frame rate of 360 frames-per-second (fps). A 62-segment beam from a head-and-neck IMRT treatment plan requiring 68 s to deliver was recorded with our high speed EPID producing approximately 6 Gbytes of imaging data. The EPID data were compared with the MLC instruction files and the MLC controller log files. The frames were binned to provide a frame rate of 72 fps with a signal-to-noise ratio that was sufficient to resolve leaf positions and segment fluence. The fractional fluence from the log files and EPID data agreed well. An ambiguity in the motion of the MLC during beam on was resolved. The log files reported leaf motions at the end of 33 of the 42 segments, while the EPID observed leaf motions in only 7 of the 42 segments. The static IMRT segment shapes observed by the high speed EPID were in good agreement with the shapes reported in the log files. The leaf motions observed during beam-on for step-and-shoot delivery were not temporally resolved by the log files.

  19. Comparison of dose accuracy between 2D array detectors and Epid for IMRT of nasopharynx cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiparmak, Duygu; Coban, Yasin; Merih, Adil; Avci, Gulhan Guler; Yigitoglu, Ibrahim

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to perform the dosimetric controls of nasopharynx cancer patient's intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans that generated by treatment planing system (TPS) with using two different equipments and also to make comparison in terms of their reliability and practicability. This study has been performed at Radiation Oncology Department, Medicine Faculty in Gaziosmanpasa University by using the VARIAN CLINAC DHX linear accelerator which is operated in the range of 6 MV. Selected 10 nasopharynx patients planned in TPS (Eclipce V13.0) and approved for treatment by medical physicists and radiation oncologists. These plans recalculated on EPID and mapcheck which are 2D dosimetric equipments to obtain dose maps. To compare these two dosimetric equipments gamma analysis method has been preferred. Achieved data is presented and discussed.

  20. Quantification of uncertainties in conventional plan evaluation methods in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbumani, Surega; Arunai Nambi Raj, N; S Prabhakar, Girish; Anchineyan, Pichandi; Bilimagga, Ramesh S; Palled, Siddanna R; Chairmadhurai, Arun

    2014-01-01

    In Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) dose distributions tend to be more complex and heterogeneous because of the modulated fluences in each beamlet of every single beam. These dose-volume (DV) parameters derived from the dose volume histogram (DVH) are physical quantities, thought to correlate with the biological response of the tissues. The aim of this study was to quantify the uncertainty of physical dose metrics to predict clinical outcomes of radiotherapy. The radiobiological estimates such as tumor control probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) were made for a cohort of 40 cancer patients (10 brain;19 head & neck;11 cervix) using the DV parameters. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlation of physical plan quality indicators with radiobiological estimates. The correlation between conformity index (CI) and TCP was found to be good and the dosimetric parameters for optic nerves, optic chiasm, brain stem, normal brain and parotids correlated well with the NTCP estimates. A follow up study (median duration 18 months) was also performed. There was no grade 3 or 4 normal tissue complications observed. Local tumor control was found to be higher in brain (90%) and pelvic cases (95%), whereas a decline of 70% was noted with head & neck cancer cases. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) concept of radiobiological model used in the software determines TCP and NTCP values which can predict outcomes precisely using DV data in the voxel level. The uncertainty of using physical dose metrics for plan evaluation is quantified with the statistical analysis. Radiobiological evaluation is helpful in ranking the rival treatment plans also.

  1. Analysis of fractionation correction methodologies for multiple phase treatment plans in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Ferreira, Brigida Costa; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Lopes, Maria do Carmo

    2013-03-01

    Radiation therapy is often delivered by multiple sequential treatment plans. For an accurate radiobiological evaluation of the overall treatment, fractionation corrections to each dose distribution must be applied before summing the three-dimensional dose matrix of each plan since the simpler approach of performing the fractionation correction to the total dose-volume histograms, obtained by the arithmetical sum of the different plans, becomes inaccurate for more heterogeneous dose patterns. In this study, the differences between these two fractionation correction methods, named here as exact (corrected before) and approximate (after summation), respectively, are assessed for different cancer types. Prostate, breast, and head and neck (HN) tumor patients were selected to quantify the differences between two fractionation correction methods (the exact vs the approximate). For each cancer type, two different treatment plans were developed using uniform (CRT) and intensity modulated beams (IMRT), respectively. The responses of the target and normal tissue were calculated using the Poisson linear-quadratic-time model and the relative seriality model, respectively. All treatments were radiobiologically evaluated and compared using the complication-free tumor control probability (P+), the biologically effective uniform dose (D) together with common dosimetric criteria. For the prostate cancer patient, an underestimation of around 14%-15% in P+ was obtained when the fractionation correction was applied after summation compared to the exact approach due to significant biological and dosimetric variations obtained between the two fractionation correction methods in the involved lymph nodes. For the breast cancer patient, an underestimation of around 3%-4% in the maximum dose in the heart was obtained. Despite the dosimetric differences in this organ, no significant variations were obtained in treatment outcome. For the HN tumor patient, an underestimation of about 5% in

  2. System engineering approach to planning anticancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Świerniak, Andrzej; Smieja, Jaroslaw; Puszynski, Krzysztof; Psiuk-Maksymowicz, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the analysis of cancer dynamics and the mathematically based synthesis of anticancer therapy. It summarizes the current state-of-the-art in this field and clarifies common misconceptions about mathematical modeling in cancer. Additionally, it encourages closer cooperation between engineers, physicians and mathematicians by showing the clear benefits of this without stating unrealistic goals. Development of therapy protocols is realized from an engineering point of view, such as the search for a solution to a specific control-optimization problem. Since in the case of cancer patients, consecutive measurements providing information about the current state of the disease are not available, the control laws are derived for an open loop structure. Different forms of therapy are incorporated into the models, from chemotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy to immunotherapy and gene therapy, but the class of models introduced is broad enough to incorporate other forms of therapy as well. The book be...

  3. Fully Automated Simultaneous Integrated Boosted-Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Is Feasible for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Binbin, E-mail: binbin.wu@gunet.georgetown.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States); McNutt, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zahurak, Marianna [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Simari, Patricio [Autodesk Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pang, Dalong [Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States); Taylor, Russell [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Sanguineti, Giuseppe [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whether overlap volume histogram (OVH)-driven, automated simultaneous integrated boosted (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer can be implemented in clinics. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to compare fully automated plans (APs) created by an OVH-driven, automated planning application with clinical plans (CPs) created by dosimetrists in a 3-dose-level (70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy), head-and-neck SIB-IMRT planning. Because primary organ sparing (cord, brain, brainstem, mandible, and optic nerve/chiasm) always received the highest priority in clinical planning, the study aimed to show the noninferiority of APs with respect to PTV coverage and secondary organ sparing (parotid, brachial plexus, esophagus, larynx, inner ear, and oral mucosa). The sample size was determined a priori by a superiority hypothesis test that had 85% power to detect a 4% dose decrease in secondary organ sparing with a 2-sided alpha level of 0.05. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression model was used for statistical comparison. Results: Forty consecutive patients were accrued from July to December 2010. GEE analysis indicated that in APs, overall average dose to the secondary organs was reduced by 1.16 (95% CI = 0.09-2.33) with P=.04, overall average PTV coverage was increased by 0.26% (95% CI = 0.06-0.47) with P=.02 and overall average dose to the primary organs was reduced by 1.14 Gy (95% CI = 0.45-1.8) with P=.004. A physician determined that all APs could be delivered to patients, and APs were clinically superior in 27 of 40 cases. Conclusions: The application can be implemented in clinics as a fast, reliable, and consistent way of generating plans that need only minor adjustments to meet specific clinical needs.

  4. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT with Oncentra MasterPlan® for the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koelbl Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several comparison studies have shown the capability of VMAT to achieve similar or better plan quality as IMRT, while reducing the treatment time. The experience of VMAT in a multi vendor environment is limited. We compared the plan quality and performance of VMAT to IMRT and we investigate the effects of varying various user-selectable parameters. Methods IMRT, single arc VMAT and dual arc VMAT were compared for four different head-and-neck tumors. For VMAT, the effect of varying gantry angle spacing and treatment time on the plan quality was investigated. A comparison of monitor units and treatment time was performed. Results IMRT and dual arc VMAT achieved a similar plan quality, while single arc could not provide an acceptable plan quality. Increasing the number of control points does not improve the plan quality. Dual arc VMAT delivery time is about 30% of IMRT delivery time. Conclusions Dual arc VMAT is a fast and accurate technique for the treatment of head and neck cancer. It applies similar number of MUs as IMRT, but the treatment time is strongly reduced, maintaining similar or better dose conformity to the PTV and OAR sparing.

  5. The critical spot eraser-a method to interactively control the correction of local hot and cold spots in IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süss, Philipp; Bortz, Michael; Küfer, Karl-Heinz; Thieke, Christian

    2013-03-21

    Common problems in inverse radiotherapy planning are localized dose insufficiencies like hot spots in organs at risk or cold spots inside targets. These are hard to correct since the optimization is based on global evaluations like maximum/minimum doses, equivalent uniform doses or dose-volume constraints for whole structures. In this work, we present a new approach to locally correct the dose of any given treatment plan. Once a treatment plan has been found that is acceptable in general but requires local corrections, these areas are marked by the planner. Then the system generates new plans that fulfil the local dose goals. Consequently, it is possible to interactively explore all plans between the locally corrected plans and the original treatment plan, allowing one to exactly adjust the degree of local correction and how the plan changes overall. Both the amount (in Gy) and the size of the local dose change can be navigated. The method is introduced formally as a new mathematical optimization setting, and is evaluated using a clinical example of a meningioma at the base of the skull. It was possible to eliminate a hot spot outside the target volume while controlling the dose changes to all other parts of the treatment plan. The proposed method has the potential to become the final standard step of inverse treatment planning.

  6. Image guided IMRT dosimetry using anatomy specific MOSFET configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Norrlinger, Bern; Heaton, Robert; Islam, Mohammad

    2008-06-23

    We have investigated the feasibility of using a set of multiple MOSFETs in conjunction with the mobile MOSFET wireless dosimetry system, to perform a comprehensive and efficient quality assurance (QA) of IMRT plans. Anatomy specific MOSFET configurations incorporating 5 MOSFETs have been developed for a specially designed IMRT dosimetry phantom. Kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT) imaging was used to increase the positional precision and accuracy of the detectors and phantom, and so minimize dosimetric uncertainties in high dose gradient regions. The effectiveness of the MOSFET based dose measurements was evaluated by comparing the corresponding doses measured by an ion chamber. For 20 head and neck IMRT plans the agreement between the MOSFET and ionization chamber dose measurements was found to be within -0.26 +/- 0.88% and 0.06 +/- 1.94% (1 sigma) for measurement points in the high dose and low dose respectively. A precision of 1 mm in detector positioning was achieved by using the X-Ray Volume Imaging (XVI) kV CBCT system available with the Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator. Using the anatomy specific MOSFET configurations, simultaneous measurements were made at five strategically located points covering high dose and low dose regions. The agreement between measurements and calculated doses by the treatment planning system for head and neck and prostate IMRT plans was found to be within 0.47 +/- 2.45%. The results indicate that a cylindrical phantom incorporating multiple MOSFET detectors arranged in an anatomy specific configuration, in conjunction with image guidance, can be utilized to perform a comprehensive and efficient quality assurance of IMRT plans.

  7. Developing free software for automatic registration for the quality control of IMRT with movies; Desarrollo de un software gratuito para el registro automatico durante el control de calidad de la IMRT con peliculas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, F. del; Meilan, E.; Pereira, L.; Salvador, F.; Munoz, V.; Salgado, M.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, as the commissioner of the e-JMRT, a Monte Carlo calculation network for IMRT planning, has developed software for the automatic recording of the image of the film with the results of the planning system.

  8. SU-F-T-395: Evaluation of Best Dosimetry Achievable with VMAT and IMRT Treatment Techniques Targeting Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpool, K; Schnell, E; Herman, T; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine from retrospective study the most appropriate technique for targeting small borderline operable pancreatic cancer surrounding blood vessels by evaluating the dosimetry and normal tissue sparing achievable using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). Methods: Treatment plans from ten patients who have undergone treatment with a prescribed dose of 4950 cGy, at 275 cGy per fraction, were analyzed. All plans were replanned using Eclipse TPS (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with complementary VMAT or IMRT techniques to obtain paired data sets for comparison. The coverage to at least 95% of the planned target volume (PTV) was normalized to receive 100% of the prescription dose. The normal tissue constraints followed the quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic (QUANTEC) guidelines and the organs at risks (OARs) were liver, kidneys, spinal cord and bowel. The plan evaluation was based on conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), uniformity index (UI), DVH parameters, and student’s-t statistics (2 tails). Results: The VMAT technique delivered less maximum dose to the right kidney, left kidney, total kidney, liver, spinal cord, and bowel by 9.3%, 5.9%, 6.7%, 3.9%, 15.1%, 3.9%, and 4.3%, respectively. The averaged V15 for the total kidney was 10.21% for IMRT and 7.29% for VMAT. The averaged V20 for the bowel was 19.89% for IMRT and 14.06% for VMAT. On average, the CI for IMRT was 1.20 and 1.16 for VMAT (p = 0.20). The HI was 0.08 for both techniques (p = 0.91) and UI was 1.05 and 1.06 for IMRT and VMAT respectively (p = 0.59). Conclusion: Both techniques achieve adequate PTV coverage. Although VMAT techniques show better normal tissue sparing from excessive dose, no significant differences were observed. Slight discrepancies may rise from different versions of calculation algorithms.

  9. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pancreatic and prostate cancer using pulsed low–dose rate delivery techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Kang, Shengwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Chengdu (China); Lin, Mu-han; Chen, Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, Fu; Guo, Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eye Ear Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Lili [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reirradiation of patients who were previously treated with radiotherapy is vastly challenging. Pulsed low–dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates treatment planning techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-based PLDR treatment of various sites, including cases with pancreatic and prostate cancer. A total of 20 patients with clinical recurrence were selected for this study, including 10 cases with pancreatic cancer and 10 with prostate cancer. Large variations in the target volume were included to test the ability of IMRT using the existing treatment planning system and optimization algorithm to deliver uniform doses in individual gantry angles/fields for PLDR treatments. Treatment plans were generated with 10 gantry angles using the step-and-shoot IMRT delivery technique, which can be delivered in 3-minute intervals to achieve an effective low dose rate of 6.7 cGy/min. Instead of dose constraints on critical structures, ring structures were mainly used in PLDR-IMRT optimization. In this study, the PLDR-IMRT plans were compared with the PLDR-3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans and the PLDR-RapidArc plans. For the 10 cases with pancreatic cancer that were investigated, the mean planning target volume (PTV) dose for each gantry angle in the PLDR-IMRT plans ranged from 17.6 to 22.4 cGy. The maximum doses ranged between 22.9 and 34.8 cGy. The minimum doses ranged from 8.2 to 17.5 cGy. For the 10 cases with prostate cancer that were investigated, the mean PTV doses for individual gantry angles ranged from 18.8 to 22.6 cGy. The maximum doses per gantry angle were between 24.0 and 34.7 cGy. The minimum doses per gantry angle ranged from 4.4 to 17.4 cGy. A significant reduction in the organ at risk (OAR) dose was observed with the PLDR-IMRT plan when compared with that using the PLDR-3DCRT

  10. The fixed-point iteration method for IMRT optimization with truncated dose deposition coefficient matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix is often pre-computed to parameterize the dose contribution to each voxel in the volume of interest from each beamlet of unit intensity. However, due to the limitation of computer memory and the requirement on computational efficiency, in practice matrix elements of small values are usually truncated, which inevitably compromises the quality of the resulting plan. A fixed-point iteration scheme has been applied in IMRT optimization to solve this problem, which has been reported to be effective and efficient based on the observations of the numerical experiments. In this paper, we aim to point out the mathematics behind this scheme and to answer the following three questions: 1) whether the fixed-point iteration algorithm converges or not? 2) when it converges, whether the fixed point solution is same as the original solution obtained with the complete DDC matrix? 3) if not the same, wh...

  11. Monte Carlo-based QA for IMRT of head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, F.; Sham, J.; Ma, C.-M.; Li, J.-S.

    2007-06-01

    It is well-known that the presence of large air cavity in a dense medium (or patient) introduces significant electronic disequilibrium when irradiated with megavoltage X-ray field. This condition may worsen by the possible use of tiny beamlets in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs), in particular those based on the pencil-beam method, do not provide accurate dose computation for the lungs and other cavity-laden body sites such as the head and neck. In this paper we present the use of Monte Carlo (MC) technique for dose re-calculation of IMRT of head and neck cancers. In our clinic, a turn-key software system is set up for MC calculation and comparison with TPS-calculated treatment plans as part of the quality assurance (QA) programme for IMRT delivery. A set of 10 off-the-self PCs is employed as the MC calculation engine with treatment plan parameters imported from the TPS via a graphical user interface (GUI) which also provides a platform for launching remote MC simulation and subsequent dose comparison with the TPS. The TPS-segmented intensity maps are used as input for the simulation hence skipping the time-consuming simulation of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). The primary objective of this approach is to assess the accuracy of the TPS calculations in the presence of air cavities in the head and neck whereas the accuracy of leaf segmentation is verified by fluence measurement using a fluoroscopic camera-based imaging device. This measurement can also validate the correct transfer of intensity maps to the record and verify system. Comparisons between TPS and MC calculations of 6 MV IMRT for typical head and neck treatments review regional consistency in dose distribution except at and around the sinuses where our pencil-beam-based TPS sometimes over-predicts the dose by up to 10%, depending on the size of the cavities. In addition, dose re-buildup of up to 4% is observed at the posterior nasopharyngeal

  12. Robust plan optimization using edge-enhanced intensity for intrafraction organ deformation in prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Das, Indra J; Anetai, Yusuke; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yamada, Yuji; Tamari, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated a method for prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on edge-enhanced (EE) intensity in the presence of intrafraction organ deformation using the data of 37 patients treated with step-and-shoot IMRT. On the assumption that the patient setup error was already accounted for by image guidance, only organ deformation over the treatment course was considered. Once the clinical target volume (CTV), rectum, and bladder were delineated and assigned dose constraints for dose optimization, each voxel in the CTV derived from the DICOM RT-dose grid could have a stochastic dose from the different voxel location according to the probability density function as an organ deformation. The stochastic dose for the CTV was calculated as the mean dose at the location through changing the voxel location randomly 1000 times. In the EE approach, the underdose region in the CTV was delineated and optimized with higher dose constraints that resulted in an edge-enhanced intensity beam to the CTV. This was compared to a planning target volume (PTV) margin (PM) approach in which a CTV to PTV margin equivalent to the magnitude of organ deformation was added to obtain an optimized dose distribution. The total monitor units, number of segments, and conformity index were compared between the two approaches, and the dose based on the organ deformation of the CTV, rectum, and bladder was evaluated. The total monitor units, number of segments, and conformity index were significantly lower with the EE approach than with the PM approach, while maintaining the dose coverage to the CTV with organ deformation. The dose to the rectum and bladder were significantly reduced in the EE approach compared with the PM approach. We conclude that the EE approach is superior to the PM with regard to intrafraction organ deformation.

  13. Comparison of a new noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique for craniospinal irradiation with 3 coplanar techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders T; Lukacova, Slavka; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin A.

    2015-01-01

    When standard conformal x-ray technique for craniospinal irradiation is used, it is a challenge to achieve satisfactory dose coverage of the target including the area of the cribriform plate, while sparing organs at risk. We present a new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), noncoplanar...... patient using the noncoplanar IMRT-based technique, a coplanar IMRT-based technique, and a coplanar volumetric-modulated arch therapy (VMAT) technique. Dosimetry data for all patients were compared with the corresponding data from the conventional treatment plans. The new noncoplanar IMRT technique...... substantially reduced the mean dose to organs at risk compared with the standard radiation technique. The 2 other coplanar techniques also reduced the mean dose to some of the critical organs. However, this reduction was not as substantial as the reduction obtained by the noncoplanar technique. Furthermore...

  14. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clivio Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR after ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV_WAR and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV_Pelvis with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6 and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15 photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV_Pelvis: Dmax Results IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV_WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV_Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean. U5-95% for PTV_WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15, 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15; for PTV_Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6, 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15, 538 ± 29 (RA6, 635 ± 139 (RA15; the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15 and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15. GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. Conclusion RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT.

  15. Radiation therapy planning for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Filippi, Andrea R

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements...... axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3......, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). METHODS: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30...

  16. A planning comparison of 7 irradiation options allowed in RTOG 1005 for early-stage breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guang-Pei, E-mail: gpchen@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Liu, Feng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); White, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, MI (United States); Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This study compared the 7 treatment plan options in achieving the dose-volume criteria required by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1005 protocol. Dosimetry plans were generated for 15 representative patients with early-stage breast cancer (ESBC) based on the protocol-required dose-volume criteria for each of the following 7 treatment options: 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), whole-breast irradiation (WBI) plus 3DCRT lumpectomy boost, 3DCRT WBI plus electron boost, 3DCRT WBI plus intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) boost, IMRT WBI plus 3DCRT boost, IMRT WBI plus electron boost, IMRT WBI plus IMRT boost, and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) with IMRT. A variety of dose-volume parameters, including target dose conformity and uniformity and normal tissue sparing, were compared for these plans. For the patients studied, all plans met the required acceptable dose-volume criteria, with most of them meeting the ideal criteria. When averaged over patients, most dose-volume goals for all plan options can be achieved with a positive gap of at least a few tenths of standard deviations. The plans for all 7 options are generally comparable. The dose-volume goals required by the protocol can in general be easily achieved. IMRT WBI provides better whole-breast dose uniformity than 3DCRT WBI does, but it causes no significant difference for the dose conformity. All plan options are comparable for lumpectomy dose uniformity and conformity. Patient anatomy is always an important factor when whole-breast dose uniformity and conformity and lumpectomy dose conformity are considered.

  17. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Alber, Markus [Department of Medical Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C DK-8000 (Denmark); Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Bokrantz, Rasmus [RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm SE-111 34 (Sweden); Chen, Danny [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Men, Chunhua [Department of Research, Elekta, Maryland Heights, Missouri 63043 (United States); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Papp, Dávid [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Romeijn, Edwin [H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Salari, Ehsan [Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas 67260 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  18. Flattening Filter-Free Beams in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Sinonasal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Wu-Zhe; Huang, Bao-Tian

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric impacts of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for sinonasal cancer. For fourteen cases, IMRT and VMAT planning was performed using 6-MV photon beams with both conventional flattened and FFF modes. The four types of plans were compared in terms of target dose homogeneity and conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, number of monitor units (MUs) per fraction, treatment time and pure beam-on time. FFF beams led to comparable target dose homogeneity, conformity, increased number of MUs and lower doses to the spinal cord, brainstem and normal tissue, compared with flattened beams in both IMRT and VMAT. FFF beams in IMRT resulted in improvements by up to 5.4% for sparing of the contralateral optic structures, with shortened treatment time by 9.5%. However, FFF beams provided comparable overall OAR sparing and treatment time in VMAT. With FFF mode, VMAT yielded inferior homogeneity and superior conformity compared with IMRT, with comparable overall OAR sparing and significantly shorter treatment time. Using FFF beams in IMRT and VMAT is feasible for the treatment of sinonasal cancer. Our results suggest that the delivery mode of FFF beams may play an encouraging role with better sparing of contralateral optic OARs and treatment efficiency in IMRT, but yield comparable results in VMAT.

  19. PET/CT in Radiation Therapy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2018-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important component of the management of lymphoma patients. Most lymphomas are metabolically active and accumulate 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Positron emission tomography with computer tomography (PET/CT) imaging using FDG is used routinely in staging and treatment...

  20. Radiation-induced secondary malignancies for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a pilot study of patients treated via IMRT or VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HF

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hsiao-Fei Lee,1,2 Jen-Hong Lan,1,2 Pei-Ju Chao,1,2 Hui-Min Ting,1,2 Hui-Chun Chen,2 Hsuan-Chih Hsu,2 Tsair-Fwu Lee1–4 1Medical Physics and Informatics Laboratory of Electronics Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Yuan’s General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Patients treated with radiotherapy are at risk of developing a second cancer during their lifetime, which can directly impact treatment decision-making and patient management. The aim of this study was to qualify and compare the secondary cancer risk (SCR after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients. Patients and methods: We analyzed the treatment plans of a cohort of 10 NPC patients originally treated with IMRT or VMAT. Dose distributions in these plans were used to calculate the organ equivalent dose (OED with Schneider’s full model. Analyses were applied to the brain stem, spinal cord, oral cavity, pharynx, parotid glands, lung, mandible, healthy tissue, and planning target volume. Results: We observed that the OED-based risks of SCR were slightly higher for the oral cavity and mandible when VMAT was used. No significant difference was found in terms of the doses to other organs, including the brain stem, parotids, pharynx, submandibular gland, lung, spinal cord, and healthy tissue. In the NPC cohort, the lungs were the organs that were most sensitive to radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: VMAT afforded superior results in terms of organ-at-risk-sparing compared with IMRT. Most OED

  1. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous material effect in gamma index evaluation of IMRT technique based on fan beam and Cone Beam CT patient images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, W. E.; Waliyyulhaq, M.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    Patient-specific Quality Assurance (QA) technique in lung case Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is traditionally limited to homogeneous material, although the fact that the planning is carried out with inhomogeneous material present. Moreover, the chest area has many of inhomogeneous material, such as lung, soft tissue, and bone, which inhomogeneous material requires special attention to avoid inaccuracies in dose calculation in the Treatment Planning System (TPS). Recent preliminary studies shown that the role of Cone Beam CT (CBCT) can be used not only to position the patient at the time prior to irradiation but also to serve as planning modality. Our study presented the influence of a homogeneous and inhomogeneous materials using Fan Beam CT and Cone Beam CT modalities in IMRT technique on the Gamma Index (GI) value. We used a variation of the segment and Calculation Grid Resolution (CGR). The results showed the deviation of averaged GI value to be between CGR 0.2 cm and 0.4 cm with homogeneous material ranging from -0.44% to 1.46%. For inhomogeneous material, the value was range from -1.74% to 0.98%. In performing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques for lung cancer, homogeneous material can be implemented in evaluating the gamma index.

  2. Phase 1-2 Study of Dual-Energy Computed Tomography for Assessment of Pulmonary Function in Radiation Therapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahig, Houda; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Lapointe, Andréanne; Bedwani, Stephane; Roberge, David; de Guise, Jacques; Blais, Danis; Vu, Toni; Lambert, Louise; Chartrand-Lefebvre, Carl; Lord, Martin; Filion, Edith

    2017-10-01

    To quantify lung function according to a dual-energy computed tomography (DECT)-derived iodine map in patients treated with radiation therapy for lung cancer, and to assess the dosimetric impact of its integration in radiation therapy planning. Patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy for early-stage or intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced lung cancer were prospectively enrolled in this study. A DECT in treatment position was obtained at time of treatment planning. The relative contribution of each voxel to the total lung function was based on iodine distribution. The composition of each voxel was determined on the basis of a 2-material decomposition. The DECT-derived lobar function was compared with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). A functional map was integrated in the treatment planning system using 6 subvolumes of increasing iodine distribution levels. Percent lung volume receiving 5 Gy (V5), V20, and mean dose (MLD) to whole lungs (anatomic) versus functional lungs were compared. Twenty-five patients with lung cancer, including 18 patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy and 7 patients with intensity modulated radiation therapy (locally advanced), were included. Eighty-four percent had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Median (range) forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 62% of predicted (29%-113%), and median diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was 56% (39%-91%). There was a strong linear correlation between DECT- and SPECT/CT-derived lobar function (Pearson coefficient correlation r=0.89, P<.00001). Mean (range) differences in V5, V20, and MLD between anatomic and functional lung volumes were 16% (0%-48%, P=.03), 5% (1%-15%, P=.12), and 15% (1%-43%, P=.047), respectively. Lobar function derived from a DECT iodine map correlates well with SPECT/CT, and its integration in lung treatment planning is associated with significant

  3. Dysphagia and trismus after concomitant chemo-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (chemo-IMRT) in advanced head and neck cancer; dose-effect relationships for swallowing and mastication structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Lisette; Heemsbergen, Wilma D; de Jong, Rianne; van Rossum, Maya A; Smeele, Ludi E; Rasch, Coen R N; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2013-03-01

    Prospective assessment of dysphagia and trismus in chemo-IMRT head and neck cancer patients in relation to dose-parameters of structures involved in swallowing and mastication. Assessment of 55 patients before, 10-weeks (N=49) and 1-year post-treatment (N=37). Calculation of dose-volume parameters for swallowing (inferior (IC), middle (MC), and superior constrictors (SC)), and mastication structures (e.g. masseter). Investigation of relationships between dose-parameters and endpoints for swallowing problems (videofluoroscopy-based laryngeal Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS), and study-specific structured questionnaire) and limited mouth-opening (measurements and questionnaire), taking into account baseline scores. At 10-weeks, volume of IC receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) and mean dose IC were significant predictors for PAS. One-year post-treatment, reported problems with swallowing solids were significantly related to masseter dose-parameters (mean, V20, V40 and V60) and an inverse relationship (lower dose related to a higher probability) was observed for V60 of the IC. Dose-parameters of masseter and pterygoid muscles were significant predictors of trismus at 10-weeks (mean, V20, and V40). At 1-year, dose-parameters of all mastication structures were strong predictors for subjective mouth-opening problems (mean, max, V20, V40, and V60). Dose-effect relationships exist for dysphagia and trismus. Therefore treatment plans should be optimized to avoid these side effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated proton therapy for oropharyngeal cancer compared with intensity-modulated radiation: A case-matched control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Emma B; Kocak-Uzel, Esengul; Feng, Lei; Thaker, Nikhil G; Blanchard, Pierre; Rosenthal, David I; Gunn, G Brandon; Garden, Adam S; Frank, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    A potential advantage of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) over intensity-modulated (photon) radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) is lower radiation dose to several critical structures involved in the development of nausea and vomiting, mucositis, and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to quantify doses to critical structures for patients with OPC treated with IMPT and compare those with doses on IMRT plans generated for the same patients and with a matched cohort of patients actually treated with IMRT. In this study, 25 patients newly diagnosed with OPC were treated with IMPT between 2011 and 2012. Comparison IMRT plans were generated for these patients and for additional IMRT-treated controls extracted from a database of patients with OPC treated between 2000 and 2009. Cases were matched based on the following criteria, in order: unilateral vs bilateral therapy, tonsil vs base of tongue primary, T-category, N-category, concurrent chemotherapy, induction chemotherapy, smoking status, sex, and age. Results showed that the mean doses to the anterior and posterior oral cavity, hard palate, larynx, mandible, and esophagus were significantly lower with IMPT than with IMRT comparison plans generated for the same cohort, as were doses to several central nervous system structures involved in the nausea and vomiting response. Similar differences were found when comparing dose to organs at risks (OARs) between the IMPT cohort and the case-matched IMRT cohort. In conclusion, these findings suggest that patients with OPC treated with IMPT may experience fewer and less severe side effects during therapy. This may be the result of decreased beam path toxicities with IMPT due to lower doses to several dysphagia, odynophagia, and nausea and vomiting-associated OARs. Further study is needed to evaluate differences in long-term disease control and chronic toxicity between patients with OPC treated with IMPT in comparison to those

  5. Dysphagia and trismus after concomitant chemo-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (chemo-IMRT) in advanced head and neck cancer; dose-effect relationships for swallowing and mastication structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van der Molen, L; Heemsbergen, W.D; de Jong, R; van Rossum, M.A; Smeele, L.E; Rasch, C.R.N; Hilgers, F.J.M

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Prospective assessment of dysphagia and trismus in chemo-IMRT head and neck cancer patients in relation to dose-parameters of structures involved in swallowing and mastication...

  6. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  7. The use of an aSi-based EPID for routine absolute dosimetric pre-treatment verification of dynamic IMRT fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Esch, Ann; Depuydt, Tom; Huyskens, Dominique Pierre

    2004-05-01

    In parallel with the increased use of intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields in radiation therapy, flat panel amorphous silicon (aSi) detectors are becoming the standard for online portal imaging at the linear accelerator. In order to minimise the workload related to the quality assurance of the IMRT fields, we have explored the possibility of using a commercially available aSi portal imager for absolute dosimetric verification of the delivery of dynamic IMRT fields. We investigated the basic dosimetric characteristics of an aSi portal imager (aS500, Varian Medical Systems), using an acquisition mode especially developed for portal dose (PD) integration during delivery of a-static or dynamic-radiation field. Secondly, the dose calculation algorithm of a commercially available treatment planning system (Cadplan, Varian Medical Systems) was modified to allow prediction of the PD image, i.e. to compare the intended fluence distribution with the fluence distribution as actually delivered by the dynamic multileaf collimator. Absolute rather than relative dose prediction was applied. The PD image prediction was compared to the corresponding acquisition for several clinical IMRT fields by means of the gamma evaluation method. The acquisition mode is accurate in integrating all PD over a wide range of monitor units, provided detector saturation is avoided. Although the dose deposition behaviour in the portal image detector is not equivalent to the dose to water measurements, it is reproducible and self-consistent, lending itself to quality assurance measurements. Gamma evaluations of the predicted versus measured PD distribution were within the pre-defined acceptance criteria for all clinical IMRT fields, i.e. allowing a dose difference of 3% of the local field dose in combination with a distance to agreement of 3 mm.

  8. On the use of biomathematical models in patient-specific IMRT dose QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen Heming [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Montefiore Medical Center and Institute of Onco-Physics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of biomathematical models such as tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) as new quality assurance (QA) metrics.Methods: Five different types of error (MLC transmission, MLC penumbra, MLC tongue and groove, machine output, and MLC position) were intentionally induced to 40 clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient plans (20 H and N cases and 20 prostate cases) to simulate both treatment planning system errors and machine delivery errors in the IMRT QA process. The changes in TCP and NTCP for eight different anatomic structures (H and N: CTV, GTV, both parotids, spinal cord, larynx; prostate: CTV, rectal wall) were calculated as the new QA metrics to quantify the clinical impact on patients. The correlation between the change in TCP/NTCP and the change in selected DVH values was also evaluated. The relation between TCP/NTCP change and the characteristics of the TCP/NTCP curves is discussed.Results:{Delta}TCP and {Delta}NTCP were summarized for each type of induced error and each structure. The changes/degradations in TCP and NTCP caused by the errors vary widely depending on dose patterns unique to each plan, and are good indicators of each plan's 'robustness' to that type of error.Conclusions: In this in silico QA study the authors have demonstrated the possibility of using biomathematical models not only as patient-specific QA metrics but also as objective indicators that quantify, pretreatment, a plan's robustness with respect to possible error types.

  9. Forward versus inverse planning in oropharyngeal cancer: A comparative study using physical and biological indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sundaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Possible benefits of inverse planning. Aims: To analyze possible benefits of inverse planning intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT over field-in-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (FIF-3DCRT and to evaluate the differences if any, between low (6 Million Volts and high energy (15 Million Volts IMRT plans. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx, previously treated with 6 MV step and shoot IMRT were studied. V 100 , V 33 , V 66 , mean dose and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP were evaluated for parotid glands. Maximum dose and NTCP were the parameters for spinal cord. Statistical Analysis Used: A two-tailed t-test was applied to analyze statistical significance between the different techniques. Results: For combined parotid gland, a reduction of 4.374 Gy, 9.343 Gy and 7.883 Gy were achieved for D 100 , D 66 and D 33 , respectively in 6 MV-IMRT when compared with FIF-3DCRT. Spinal cord sparing was better in 6 MV-IMRT (40.963 ± 2.650, with an average reduction of maximum spinal cord dose by 7.355 Gy from that using the FIF-3DCRT technique. The uncomplicated tumor control probabilities values were higher in IMRT plans thus leading to a possibility of dose escalation. Conclusions: Though low-energy IMRT is the preferred choice for treatment of oropharyngeal cancers, FIF-3DCRT must be given due consideration as a second choice for its well established advantages over traditional conventioan technique.

  10. Explicit and convex optimization of plan quality measures in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    CERN Document Server

    Engberg, Lovisa; Forsgren, Anders; Hårdemark, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Given the widespread agreement that doses-at-volume play important roles in quality assessment of radiation therapy treatment plans, planning objectives that correlate well with explicit dose-at-volume optimization are likely to correlate well with plan quality. In this study, planning objectives are formulated to explicitly either minimize or maximize convex approximations of dose-at-volume, namely, mean-tail-doses. This is in contrast to the conventionally used planning objectives, which are used to maximize clinical goal fulfilment by relating to deviations from dose-at-volume thresholds. Advantages of the proposed planning objectives are investigated through juxtaposition with conventional objectives in a computational study of two patient cases, each with three doses-at-volume to be minimized subject to PTV coverage. With proposed planning objectives, this is translated into minimizing three mean-tail-doses. Comparison with conventional objectives is carried out in the dose-at-volume domain and in the no...

  11. Relevant reduction effect with a modified thermoplastic mask of rotational error for glottic cancer in IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hong; Jung, Joo-Young; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Ryu, Mi Ryeong; Bae, Sun Hyun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Yong Ho; Choe, Bo-Young; Suh, Tae Suk

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the glottis rotational error (GRE) by using a thermoplastic mask for patients with the glottic cancer undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We selected 20 patients with glottic cancer who had received IMRT by using the tomotherapy. The image modalities with both kilovoltage computed tomography (planning kVCT) and megavoltage CT (daily MVCT) images were used for evaluating the error. Six anatomical landmarks in the image were defined to evaluate a correlation between the absolute GRE (°) and the length of contact with the underlying skin of the patient by the mask (mask, mm). We also statistically analyzed the results by using the Pearson's correlation coefficient and a linear regression analysis ( P parameter in the linear regression analysis (mask versus absolute roll: P = 0.004 [ P < 0.05]; mask versus 3D-error: P = 0.000 [ P < 0.05]). The range of the 3D-errors with contact by the mask was from 1.2% - 39.7% between the maximumand no-contact case in this study. A thermoplastic mask with a tight, increased contact area may possibly contribute to the uncertainty of the reproducibility as a variation of the absolute GRE. Thus, we suggest that a modified mask, such as one that covers only the glottis area, can significantly reduce the patients' setup errors during the treatment.

  12. Treating Social Anxiety in Adolescents: Ten Group Therapy Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur-Elmer, Alison; McBride, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adolescents and concludes by offering a set of 10 group therapy lesson plans for SAD that therapists can use in their practice. The overview includes a description of social anxiety disorder and highlights various theories of anxiety. The…

  13. Experimental evaluation of a robust optimization method for IMRT of moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancić, Christian; Trofimov, Alexei; Chan, Timothy C Y; Sharp, Gregory C; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2009-05-07

    Internal organ motion during radiation therapy, if not considered appropriately in the planning process, has been shown to reduce target coverage and increase the dose to healthy tissues. Standard planning approaches, which use safety margins to handle intrafractional movement of the tumor, are typically designed based on the maximum amplitude of motion, and are often overly conservative. Comparable coverage and reduced dose to healthy organs appear achievable with robust motion-adaptive treatment planning, which considers the expected probability distribution of the average target position and the uncertainty of its realization during treatment delivery. A dosimetric test of a robust optimization method for IMRT was performed, using patient breathing data. External marker motion data acquired from respiratory-gated radiotherapy patients were used to build and test the framework for robust optimization. The motion trajectories recorded during radiation treatment itself are not strictly necessary to generate the initial version of a robust treatment plan, but can be used to adapt the plan during the course of treatment. Single-field IMRT plans were optimized to deliver a uniform dose to a rectangular area. During delivery on a linear accelerator, a computer-driven motion phantom reproduced the patients' breathing patterns and a two-dimensional ionization detector array measured the dose delivered. The dose distributions from robust-optimized plans were compared to those from standard plans, which used a margin expansion. Dosimetric tests confirmed the improved sparing of the non-target area with robust planning, which was achieved without compromising the target coverage. The maximum dose in robust plans did not exceed 110% of the prescription, while the minimum target doses were comparable in standard and robust plans. In test courses, optimized for a simplified target geometry, and delivered to a phantom that moved in one dimension with an average amplitude of 17

  14. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Four Consensus Guidelines and Dosimetric Evaluation of 3D-CRT Versus Tomotherapy IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Shawn, E-mail: smalone@ottawahospital.on.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Croke, Jennifer [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Roustan-Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric [Department of Pathology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Avruch, Leonard [Department of Radiology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Malone, Colin [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Morash, Christopher [Division of Urology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Li Yan; Malone, Kyle [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Nyiri, Balazs [Department of Medical Physics, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Spaans, Johanna [Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Despite the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, approximately one-half of patients relapse. Four consensus guidelines have been published (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group, Princess Margaret Hospital, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) with the aim of standardizing the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and improve outcomes. To date, no attempt has been made to compare these guidelines in terms of treatment volumes or organ at risk (OAR) irradiation. The extent to which the guideline-derived plans meet the dosimetric constraints of present trials or of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) trial is also unknown. Our study also explored the dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients treated with postoperative RT were included. The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were applied to cover the guideline-generated planning target volumes (66 Gy in 33 fractions). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for CTV/planning target volume coverage and to evaluate OAR irradiation. The OAR DVHs were compared with the constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trials. 3D-CRT plans were compared with the tomotherapy plans for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group planning target volume to evaluate the advantages of IMRT. Results: The CTV differed significantly between guidelines (p < 0.001). The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-CTVs were significantly smaller than the other CTVs (p < 0.001). Differences in prostate bed coverage superiorly accounted for the major volumetric differences between the guidelines. Using 3D-CRT, the DVHs rarely met the QUANTEC or RADICALS rectal constraints, independent of the guideline used. The RADICALS

  15. In vitro study of cell survival following dynamic MLC intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Duzenli, Cheryl; Durand, Ralph E

    2007-04-01

    The possibility of reduced cell kill following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared to conventional radiation therapy has been debated in the literature. This potential reduction in cell kill relates to prolonged treatment times typical of IMRT dose delivery and consequently increased repair of sublethal lesions. While there is some theoretical support to this reduction in cell kill published in the literature, direct experimental evidence specific to IMRT dose delivery patterns is lacking. In this study we present cell survival data for three cell lines: Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts, human cervical carcinoma, SiHa and colon adenocarcinoma, WiDr. Cell survival was obtained for 2.1 Gy delivered as acute dose with parallel-opposed pair (POP), irradiation time 75 s, which served as a reference; regular seven-field IMRT, irradiation time 5 min; and IMRT with a break for multiple leaf collimator (MLC) re-initialization after three fields were delivered, irradiation time 10 min. An actual seven-field dynamic MLC IMRT plan for a head and neck patient was used. The IMRT plan was generated for a Varian EX or iX linear accelerator with 120 leaf Millenium MLC. Survival data were also collected for doses 1X, 2X, 3X, 4X, and 5x 2.1 Gy to establish parameters of the linear-quadratic equation describing survival following acute dose delivery. Cells were irradiated inside an acrylic cylindrical phantom specifically designed for this study. Doses from both IMRT and POP were validated using ion chamber measurements. A reproducible increase in cell survival was observed following IMRT dose delivery. This increase varied from small for V79, with a surviving fraction of 0.8326 following POP vs 0.8420 following uninterrupted IMRT, to very pronounced for SiHa, with a surviving fraction of 0.3903 following POP vs 0.5330 for uninterrupted IMRT. When compared to IMRT or IMRT with a break for MLC initialization, cell survival following acute dose delivery was

  16. Comparing dose in the build-up region between compensator- and MLC-based IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javedan, Khosrow; Zhang, Geoffrey G; Hoffe, Sarah; Feygelman, Vladimir; Forster, Kenneth

    2012-09-06

    The build-up dose in the megavoltage photon beams can be a limiting factor in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments. Excessive surface dose can cause patient discomfort and treatment interruptions, while underdosing may lead to tumor repopulation and local failure. Dose in the build-up region was investigated for IMRT delivery with solid brass compensator technique(compensator-based IMRT) and compared with that of multileaf collimator (MLC)-based IMRT. A Varian Trilogy linear accelerator equipped with an MLC was used for beam delivery. A special solid brass step-wise compensator was designed and built for testing purposes. Two step-and-shoot MLC fields were programmed to produce a similar modulated step-wise dose profile. The MLC and compensator dose profiles were measured and adjusted to match at the isocenter depth of 10 cm. Build-up dose in the 1-5 mm depth range was measured with an ultrathin window, fixed volume parallel plate ionization chamber. Monte Carlo simulations were used to model the brass compensator and step-and-shoot MLC fields. The measured and simulated profiles for the two IMRT techniques were matched at the isocenter depth of 10 cm. Different component contributions to the shallow dose, including the MLC scatter, were quantified. Mean spectral energies for the open and filtered beams were calculated. The compensator and MLC profiles at 10 cm depth were matched better than ± 1.5%. The build-up dose was up to 7% lower for compensator IMRT compared to MLC IMRT due to beam hardening in the brass. Low-energy electrons contribute 22% and 15% dose at 1 mm depth for compensator and MLC modalities, respectively. Compensator-based IMRT delivers less dose in the build-up region than MLC-based IMRT does, even though a compensator is closer to the skin than the MLC.

  17. Can We Advance Proton Therapy for Prostate? Considering Alternative Beam Angles and Relative Biological Effectiveness Variations When Comparing Against Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, Tracy, E-mail: tunderwood@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Moteabbed, Maryam; Zietman, Anthony; Efstathiou, Jason; Paganetti, Harald; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: For prostate treatments, robust evidence regarding the superiority of either intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy is currently lacking. In this study we investigated the circumstances under which proton therapy should be expected to outperform IMRT, particularly the proton beam orientations and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) assumptions. Methods and Materials: For 8 patients, 4 treatment planning strategies were considered: (A) IMRT; (B) passively scattered standard bilateral (SB) proton beams; (C) passively scattered anterior oblique (AO) proton beams, and (D) AO intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). For modalities (B)-(D) the dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distributions were simulated using the TOPAS Monte Carlo platform and RBE was calculated according to 3 different models. Results: Assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1, our implementation of IMRT outperformed SB proton therapy across most normal tissue metrics. For the scattered AO proton plans, application of the variable RBE models resulted in substantial hotspots in rectal RBE weighted dose. For AO IMPT, it was typically not possible to find a plan that simultaneously met the tumor and rectal constraints for both fixed and variable RBE models. Conclusion: If either a fixed RBE of 1.1 or a variable RBE model could be validated in vivo, then it would always be possible to use AO IMPT to dose-boost the prostate and improve normal tissue sparing relative to IMRT. For a cohort without rectum spacer gels, this study (1) underlines the importance of resolving the question of proton RBE within the framework of an IMRT versus proton debate for the prostate and (2) highlights that without further LET/RBE model validation, great care must be taken if AO proton fields are to be considered for prostate treatments.

  18. Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate for endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ruijie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Junjie, E-mail: junjiewang47@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Xu, Feng [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Hua [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. The nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V{sub 20} of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability.

  19. Prototype demonstration of radiation therapy planning code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, R.C.; Adams, K.J.; Estes, G.P.; Hughes, L.S. III; Waters, L.S. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiation therapy planning is the process by which a radiation oncologist plans a treatment protocol for a patient preparing to undergo radiation therapy. The objective is to develop a protocol that delivers sufficient radiation dose to the entire tumor volume, while minimizing dose to healthy tissue. Radiation therapy planning, as currently practiced in the field, suffers from inaccuracies made in modeling patient anatomy and radiation transport. This project investigated the ability to automatically model patient-specific, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in advanced Los Alamos radiation transport codes (such as MCNP), and to efficiently generate accurate radiation dose profiles in these geometries via sophisticated physics modeling. Modem scientific visualization techniques were utilized. The long-term goal is that such a system could be used by a non-expert in a distributed computing environment to help plan the treatment protocol for any candidate radiation source. The improved accuracy offered by such a system promises increased efficacy and reduced costs for this important aspect of health care.

  20. Motion-Compensated Estimation of Delivered Dose during External BeamRadiation Therapy: Implementation in Philips’ Pinnacle3 Treatment Planning System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharat, S.; Parikh, P.; Noel, C.; Meltsner, M.; Bzdusek, K.; Kaus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent research efforts investigating dose escalation techniques for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) andintensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have demonstrated great benefit when high-dose hypofractionated treatment schemes are implemented16,21. The use of

  1. PET-CT guided SIB-IMRT combined with concurrent 5-FU/MMC for the treatment of anal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Michel; Beer, Jürgen; Bodis, Stefan; von Moos, Roger; Vlachopoulou, Vasiliki; Zwahlen, Daniel R; Oehler, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate local control (LC), survival and toxicity in anal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution. From August 2010 to May 2015, 26 patients were treated at our institution with IMRT and concurrent 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin-C (5-FU/MMC) for localized squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCAC). Radiotherapy (RT) with 50.4-60 Gy was delivered with a sequential boost in 31%, and a simultaneous-integrated boost (SIB-IMRT) in 69% of cases. Initial staging was based on PET-CT and MRI. Clinical measures of interest were the influence of PET-CT on staging and treatment planning, LC, disease free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), colostomy free survival (CFS) and toxicities. Median age was 61 years, 22 patients (85%) were female, and no patient was HIV-positive. The proportion of patients with stage I, II, IIIA and IIIB disease was 15%, 35%, 23% and 27%, respectively. PET-CT modified the extent of nodal disease in 9/23 cases (39%) and lead to major changes in treatment planning in 4/23 patients (17%). MRI was more accurate at identifying T4 disease. RT was delivered at full dose in 26 patients (100%) and chemotherapy in 22/26 patients (85%). Two patients (7.7%) required RT breaks. Median follow-up was 35 months [IQR: 19-52]. The 2-year LC, DFS, OS and CFS were 100%, 100%, 100% and 92%. Acute grade ≥3 dermatitis and diarrhea occurred in 73% and 8% of cases, respectively. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was seen in 10/23 patients (43%). Four patients (15%) developed chronic grade 2 GI toxicity. PET-CT provided additional information leading to major changes in treatment planning for 17% of patients. Considering our excellent outcomes, routine use of PET-CT as standard staging modality and IMRT planning procedure appears justified for patients with SCCAC.

  2. Dosimetric comparison between step-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy for upper thoracic and cervical esophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Min; Li, Qilin; Ning, Zhonghua; Gu, Wendong; Huang, Jin; Mu, Jinming; Pei, Honglei, E-mail: hongleipei@126.com

    2016-07-01

    To compare and analyze the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs step-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (sIMRT) for upper thoracic and cervical esophageal carcinoma. Single-arc VMAT (VMAT1), dual-arc VMAT (VMAT2), and 7-field sIMRT plans were designed for 30 patients with upper thoracic or cervical esophageal carcinoma. Planning target volume (PTV) was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, and PTV1 was prescribed to 60 Gy in 28 fractions. The parameters evaluated included dose homogeneity and conformality, dose to organs at risk (OARs), and delivery efficiency. (1) In comparison to sIMRT, VMAT provided a systematic improvement in PTV1 coverage. The homogeneity index of VMAT1 was better than that of VMAT2. There were no significant differences among sIMRT, VMAT1, and VMAT2 in PTV coverage. (2) VMAT1 and VMAT2 reduced the maximum dose of spinal cord as compared with sIMRT (p < 0.05). The rest dose-volume characteristics of OARs were similar. (3) Monitor units of VMAT2 and VMAT1 were more than sIMRT. However, the treatment time of VMAT1, VMAT2, and sIMRT was (2.0 ± 0.2), (2.8 ± 0.3), and (9.8 ± 0.8) minutes, respectively. VMAT1 was the fastest, and the difference was statistically significant. In the treatment of upper thoracic and cervical esophageal carcinoma by the AXESSE linac, compared with 7-field sIMRT, VMAT showed better PTV1 coverage and superior spinal cord sparing. Single-arc VMAT had similar target volume coverage and the sparing of OAR to dual-arc VMAT, with shortest treatment time and highest treatment efficiency in the 3 kinds of plans.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of treatment techniques IMRT and VMAT for breast cancer; Comparacion dosimetrica de las tecnicas de tratamiento IMRT y VMAT para cancer en mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbina, G. L. [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Maestria en Fisica Medica, Av. Tupac Amaru s/n, Rimac, Lima 25 (Peru); Garcia, B. G., E-mail: gerlup@hotmail.com [Red AUNA, Clinica Delgado, Av. Angamos Cdra. 4 esquina Gral. Borgono, Miraflores, Lima (Peru)

    2015-10-15

    In this study the dosimetric distribution was compared in the different treatment techniques such as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in female patients with breast cancer with stage II-B and III-A, 6 cases (both calculated on VMAT and IMRT) were studied, comparison parameter that are taken into account are: compliance rate, homogeneity index, monitor units, volume dose 50 Gy (D-50%) and 5 Gy (D-5%) volume dose. Comparisons are made in primary tumor volume to optimize treatment in patients with breast cancer, with IMRT using Step, Shoot and VMAT Monte Carlo algorithm, in addition to the organs at risk; the concern to make this work is due to technological advances in radiotherapy and the application of new treatment techniques, that increase the accuracy allowing treatment dose climbing delivering a higher dose to the patient. (Author)

  4. Proof of principle: Applicator-guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI-based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenholt, Marianne S; Vestergaard, Anne; Kallehauge, Jesper F; Mohamed, Sandy; Nielsen, Søren K; Petersen, Jørgen B; Fokdal, Lars; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Tanderup, Kari

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new technique involving high-precision stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) boost in combination with intracavitary-interstitial (IC-IS) brachytherapy (BT) in cervical tumors that cannot be sufficiently covered by IC-IS-BT due to extensive residual disease and/or difficult topography at the time of BT. Three patients with stage IIIB-IVA cervical cancer had significant residual disease at the time of BT. MRI-guided IC-IS-BT (pulsed-dose rate) was combined with a stereotactic IMRT boost guided according to the BT applicator in situ, using cone beam CT. The planning aim dose (total external beam radiotherapy and BT) for the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) was D90 >70-85 Gy, whereas constraints for organs at risk were D2cm3 81 Gy were obtained in the central HR-CTV and D90 >69 Gy in the distal regions of HR-CTV. Image-guided set up of the IMRT boost with the applicator in situ was feasible. The dose plans were robust to intra-fraction uncertainties of 3 mm. Local control with acceptable morbidity was obtained at a followup of 3, 2.5, and 1 year, respectively. The combination of MRI-guided BT with an applicator-guided stereotactic IMRT boost is feasible. This technique seems to be useful in the few cases where HR-CTV coverage cannot be obtained even with IS-IC-BT. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. To evaluate the accuracy of dynamic versus static IMRT delivery using portal dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, S; Caivano, R; Cozzolino, M; Califano, G; Chiumento, C; Fiorentino, A; Fusco, V

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the delivery accuracy of dynamic (DMLC) and static (SMLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques using portal dosimetry (PD) in Varian Eclipse Treatment Planning System. Seven DMLC IMRT Head and Neck plans were retrospectively generated for the study using SMLC mode at 20, 10 and 5 levels of intensity (SMLC20, SMLC10, SMLC5). Dosimetric verifications performed by PD on a total of 107 fields were evaluated using the gamma index (maximum (γmax), average (γavg), percentage of points with (γ%) ≤ 1). The images were acquired at a source-detector distance of 100 cm at gantry zero degree and also at clinically planned gantry angles. For both modes, measurements are within acceptable criteria. (γ%) ≤ 1 improves by increasing SMLC levels (+3.4 % from SMLC5 to SMLC20, p < 0.001) and using DMLC (+3.9 % and +0.6 % compared to SMLC5 and SMLC20, respectively, p < 0.001). Also (γmax) parameter improves significantly by increasing SMLC levels (+22 % from SMLC5 to SMLC20) and using DMLC (+34 % and +16 % compared to SMLC5 and SMLC20, respectively). The effect of the gantry rotation influences the delivery accuracy by up to -7 % (p < 0.05). The effect of leaves travelling direction was almost negligible (1 %). A good agreement between calculated and measured fluences was obtained for DMLC and SMLC techniques at higher intensity levels; however, DMLC delivery ensures the best reproduction of computed fluence maps. The gantry rotation influences the delivery accuracy in particular for SMLC modes at lower intensity levels.

  6. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katrina, E-mail: Trinabena23@gmail.com; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  7. Examination of the properties of IMRT and VMAT beams and evaluation against pre-treatment quality assurance results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, S B; Kairn, T; Middlebrook, N; Sutherland, B; Hill, B; Kenny, J; Langton, C M; Trapp, J V

    2015-03-21

    This study aimed to provide a detailed evaluation and comparison of a range of modulated beam evaluation metrics, in terms of their correlation with QA testing results and their variation between treatment sites, for a large number of treatments. Ten metrics including the modulation index (MI), fluence map complexity, modulation complexity score (MCS), mean aperture displacement (MAD) and small aperture score (SAS) were evaluated for 546 beams from 122 intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans targeting the anus, rectum, endometrium, brain, head and neck and prostate. The calculated sets of metrics were evaluated in terms of their relationships to each other and their correlation with the results of electronic portal imaging based quality assurance (QA) evaluations of the treatment beams. Evaluation of the MI, MAD and SAS suggested that beams used in treatments of the anus, rectum, head and neck were more complex than the prostate and brain treatment beams. Seven of the ten beam complexity metrics were found to be strongly correlated with the results from QA testing of the IMRT beams (p beams with 100% specificity. However, few of the metrics are correlated with the results from QA testing of the VMAT beams, whether they were evaluated as whole 360° arcs or as 60° sub-arcs. Select evaluation of beam complexity metrics (at least MI, MCS and SAS) is therefore recommended, as an intermediate step in the IMRT QA chain. Such evaluation may also be useful as a means of periodically reviewing VMAT planning or optimiser performance.

  8. SU-E-J-244: Development and Validation of a Knowledge Based Planning Model for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A [Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN (United States); Larsen, E; Hayes, C; Grow, A [North Florida Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bahamondes, S.; Zheng, Y; Wu, X [JFK Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Lake Worth, FL (United States); Choi, M; Pai, S [Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Gatos, CA (United States); Li, J [Doctors Hospital of Augusta, Augusta, GA (United States); Cranford, K [Trident Medical Center, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The study aims to develop and validate a knowledge based planning (KBP) model for external beam radiation therapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: RapidPlan™ technology was used to develop a lung KBP model. Plans from 65 patients with LA-NSCLC were used to train the model. 25 patients were treated with VMAT, and the other patients were treated with IMRT. Organs-at-risk (OARs) included right lung, left lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. DVH and geometric distribution DVH were extracted from the treated plans. The model was trained using principal component analysis and step-wise multiple regression. Box plot and regression plot tools were used to identify geometric outliers and dosimetry outliers and help fine-tune the model. The validation was performed by (a) comparing predicted DVH boundaries to actual DVHs of 63 patients and (b) using an independent set of treatment planning data. Results: 63 out of 65 plans were included in the final KBP model with PTV volume ranging from 102.5cc to 1450.2cc. Total treatment dose prescription varied from 50Gy to 70Gy based on institutional guidelines. One patient was excluded due to geometric outlier where 2.18cc of spinal cord was included in PTV. The other patient was excluded due to dosimetric outlier where the dose sparing to spinal cord was heavily enforced in the clinical plan. Target volume, OAR volume, OAR overlap volume percentage to target, and OAR out-of-field volume were included in the trained model. Lungs and heart had two principal component scores of GEDVH, whereas spinal cord and esophagus had three in the final model. Predicted DVH band (mean ±1 standard deviation) represented 66.2±3.6% of all DVHs. Conclusion: A KBP model was developed and validated for radiotherapy of LA-NSCLC in a commercial treatment planning system. The clinical implementation may improve the consistency of IMRT/VMAT planning.

  9. Improving dose homogeneity in large breasts by IMRT. Efficacy and dosimetric accuracy of different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo-Madyan, Y. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim Medical Center, Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine (NEMROCK), Faculty of Medicine, Univ. of Cairo (Egypt); Polednik, M.; Rahn, A.; Schneider, F.; Dobler, B.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim Medical Center, Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    Purpose: evaluation of a simplified intensity-modulated irradiation (IMRT), a three-field (MFT), and a conventional two-tangential-field technique regarding dose homogeneity, target coverage, feasibility and, for the first time, dosimetric reliability in patients with large breasts treated postoperatively for breast cancer on a low-energy linac. Material and methods: CT datasets of ten patients with relatively large breast volumes treated for breast cancer were selected. For each patient, four treatment plans were created: low-energy conventional (C-LE), high-energy conventional (C-HE), three-field (MFT), and a two-field aperture-based IMRT technique. Apertures for the IMRT and MFT were created with the aid of a three-dimensional dose display. Dosimetric accuracy of each technique was evaluated in an anthropomorphic thorax/breast phantom. Results: the mean of planning target volumes receiving < 95% or > 105% of the prescribed total dose was reduced from 16.0% to 13.9% to 10.4% to 8.9% in the C-LE, C-HE, MFT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Phantom dose measurements agreed well with the calculated dose within the breast tissue. Conclusion: aperture-based IMRT using two tangential incident beam directions, as well as a three-field technique with inverse optimization, provide a better alternative to the standard wedged tangential beams for patients with large breasts treated on low-energy linacs while maintaining the efficiency of the treatment-planning and delivery process. (orig.)

  10. New method for estimation of fluence complexity in IMRT fields and correlation with gamma analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanušová, T.; Vondráček, V.; Badraoui-Čuprová, K.; Horáková, I.; Koniarová, I.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimation of fluence complexity in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields is proposed. Unlike other previously published works, it is based on portal images calculated by the Portal Dose Calculation algorithm in Eclipse (version 8.6, Varian Medical Systems) in the plane of the EPID aS500 detector (Varian Medical Systems). Fluence complexity is given by the number and the amplitudes of dose gradients in these matrices. Our method is validated using a set of clinical plans where fluence has been smoothed manually so that each plan has a different level of complexity. Fluence complexity calculated with our tool is in accordance with the different levels of smoothing as well as results of gamma analysis, when calculated and measured dose matrices are compared. Thus, it is possible to estimate plan complexity before carrying out the measurement. If appropriate thresholds are determined which would distinguish between acceptably and overly modulated plans, this might save time in the re-planning and re-measuring process.

  11. Investigation of conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques to determine the absorbed fetal dose in pregnant patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öğretici, Akın, E-mail: akinogretici@gmail.com; Akbaş, Uğur; Köksal, Canan; Bilge, Hatice

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the fetal doses of pregnant patients undergoing conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for breast cancers. An Alderson Rando phantom was chosen to simulate a pregnant patient with breast cancer who is receiving radiation therapy. This phantom was irradiated using the Varian Clinac DBX 600 system (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA) linear accelerator, according to the standard treatment plans of both three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) and IMRT techniques. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure the irradiated phantom's virtually designated uterus area. Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements (in the phantom) revealed that the mean cumulative fetal dose for 3-D CRT is 1.39 cGy and for IMRT it is 8.48 cGy, for a pregnant breast cancer woman who received radiation treatment of 50 Gy. The fetal dose was confirmed to increase by 70% for 3-D CRT and 40% for IMRT, if it is closer to the irradiated field by 5 cm. The mean fetal dose from 3-D CRT is 1.39 cGy and IMRT is 8.48 cGy, consistent with theoretic calculations. The IMRT technique causes the fetal dose to be 5 times more than that of 3-D CRT. Theoretic knowledge concerning the increase in the peripheral doses as the measurements approached the beam was also practically proven.

  12. Optimal Normal Tissue Sparing in Craniospinal Axis Irradiation Using IMRT With Daily Intrafractionally Modulated Junction(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusters, Johannes M.A.M.; Louwe, Rob J.W.; Kollenburg, Peter G.M. van; Kunze-Busch, Martina C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E.M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssens, Geert O.R.J., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment technique for craniospinal irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with improved dose homogeneity at the field junction(s), increased target volume conformity, and minimized dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: Five patients with high-risk medulloblastoma underwent CT simulation in supine position. For each patient, an IMRT plan with daily intrafractionally modulated junction(s) was generated, as well as a treatment plan based on conventional three-dimensional planning (3DCRT). A dose of 39.6 Gy in 22 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy was prescribed. Dose-volume parameters for target volumes and OARs were compared for the two techniques. Results: The maximum dose with IMRT was <107% in all patients. V{sub <95} and V{sub >107} were <1 cm{sup 3} for IMRT compared with 3-9 cm{sup 3} for the craniospinal and 26-43 cm{sup 3} for the spinal-spinal junction with 3DCRT. These observations corresponded with a lower homogeneity index and a higher conformity index for the spinal planning target volume with IMRT. IMRT provided considerable sparing of acute and late reacting tissues. V{sub 75} for the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction, and intestine was 81%, 81%, and 22% with 3DCRT versus 5%, 0%, and 1% with IMRT, respectively. V{sub 75} for the heart and thyroid was 42% and 32% vs. 0% with IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT with daily intrafractionally modulated junction results in a superior target coverage and junction homogeneity compared with 3DCRT. A significant dose reduction can be obtained for acute as well as late-reacting tissues.

  13. Dysphagia and trismus after concomitant chemo-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (chemo-IMRT) in advanced head and neck cancer; dose-effect relationships for swallowing and mastication structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, L.; Heemsbergen, W.D.; de Jong, R.; van Rossum, M.A.; Smeele, L.E.; Rasch, C.R.N.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Prospective assessment of dysphagia and trismus in chemo-IMRT head and neck cancer patients in relation to dose-parameters of structures involved in swallowing and mastication. Material and methods: Assessment of 55 patients before, 10-weeks (N=49) and 1-year post-treatment

  14. Dysphagia and trismus after concomitant chemo-Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (chemo-IMRT) in advanced head and neck cancer; dose-effect relationships for swallowing and mastication structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, Lisette; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; de Jong, Rianne; van Rossum, Maya A.; Smeele, Ludi E.; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Hilgers, Frans J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Prospective assessment of dysphagia and trismus in chemo-IMRT head and neck cancer patients in relation to dose-parameters of structures involved in swallowing and mastication. Assessment of 55 patients before, 10-weeks (N=49) and 1-year post-treatment (N=37). Calculation of dose-volume parameters

  15. SERA - An Advanced Treatment Planning System for Neutron Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Wemple; C. L. Albright; D. W. Nigg; D. W. Wessol; F. J. Wheeler; G. J. Harkin; M. B. Rossmeirer; M. T. Cohen; M. W. Frandsen

    1999-06-01

    The technology for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has advanced significantly over the past few years. Because of the more complex nature of the problem, the computational methods that work well for treatment planning in photon radiotherapy are not applicable to BNCT. The necessary methods have, however, been developed and have been successfully employed both for research applications as well as human trials. Computational geometry for BNCT applications can be constructed directly from tomographic medical imagery and computed radiation dose distributions can be readily displayed in formats that are familiar to the radiotherapy community. The SERA system represents a significant advance in several areas for treatment planning. However further improvements in speed and results presentation are still needed for routine clinical applications, particularly when optimizations of dose pattern is required.

  16. Simplifying EPID dosimetry for IMRT treatment verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecharroman-Gallego, R.; Mans, Anton; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep C.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Herk, Marcel van; Mijnheer, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are increasingly used for IMRT dose verification, both pretreatment and in vivo. In this study, an earlier developed backprojection model has been modified to avoid the need for patient-specific transmission measurements and, consequently, leads to a faster procedure. Methods: Currently, the transmission, an essential ingredient of the backprojection model, is estimated from the ratio of EPID measurements with and without a phantom/patient in the beam. Thus, an additional irradiation to obtain ''open images'' under the same conditions as the actual phantom/patient irradiation is required. However, by calculating the transmission of the phantom/patient in the direction of the beam instead of using open images, this extra measurement can be avoided. This was achieved by using a model that includes the effect of beam hardening and off-axis dependence of the EPID response on photon beam spectral changes. The parameters in the model were empirically obtained by performing EPID measurements using polystyrene slab phantoms of different thickness in 6, 10, and 18 MV photon beams. A theoretical analysis to verify the sensitivity of the model with patient thickness changes was performed. The new model was finally applied for the analysis of EPID dose verification measurements of step-and-shoot IMRT treatments of head and neck, lung, breast, cervix, prostate, and rectum patients. All measurements were carried out using Elekta SL20i linear accelerators equipped with a hydrogenated amorphous silicon EPID, and the IMRT plans were made using PINNACLE software (Philips Medical Systems). Results: The results showed generally good agreement with the dose determined using the old model applying the measured transmission. The average differences between EPID-based in vivo dose at the isocenter determined using either the new model for transmission and its measured value were 2.6{+-}3.1%, 0.2{+-}3.1%, and 2

  17. Feasibility of using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation for IMRT dose calculations for the Novalis Tx with a HD-120 multi-leaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunuk; Shin, Jungsuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Han, Youngyih; Kim, Jinsung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an independent dose verification system by using a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) conducted by using a Varian Novalis Tx (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) equipped with a highdefinition multi-leaf collimator (HD-120 MLC). The Geant4 framework was used to implement a dose calculation system that accurately predicted the delivered dose. For this purpose, the Novalis Tx Linac head was modeled according to the specifications acquired from the manufacturer. Subsequently, MC simulations were performed by varying the mean energy, energy spread, and electron spot radius to determine optimum values of irradiation with 6-MV X-ray beams by using the Novalis Tx system. Computed percentage depth dose curves (PDDs) and lateral profiles were compared to the measurements obtained by using an ionization chamber (CC13). To validate the IMRT simulation by using the MC model we developed, we calculated a simple IMRT field and compared the result with the EBT3 film measurements in a water-equivalent solid phantom. Clinical cases, such as prostate cancer treatment plans, were then selected, and MC simulations were performed. The accuracy of the simulation was assessed against the EBT3 film measurements by using a gamma-index criterion. The optimal MC model parameters to specify the beam characteristics were a 6.8-MeV mean energy, a 0.5-MeV energy spread, and a 3-mm electron radius. The accuracy of these parameters was determined by comparison of MC simulations with measurements. The PDDs and the lateral profiles of the MC simulation deviated from the measurements by 1% and 2%, respectively, on average. The computed simple MLC fields agreed with the EBT3 measurements with a 95% passing rate with 3%/3-mm gamma-index criterion. Additionally, in applying our model to clinical IMRT plans, we found that the MC calculations and the EBT3 measurements agreed well with a passing rate of greater

  18. Impact of MLC properties and IMRT technique in meningioma and head-and-neck treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantz, Steffi; Söhn, Matthias; Troeller, Almut

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The impact of multileaf collimator (MLC) design and IMRT technique on plan quality and delivery improvements for head-and-neck and meningioma patients is compared in a planning study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten previously treated patients (5 head-and-neck, 5 meningioma) were re...

  19. Importance of contouring the cervical spine levels in initial intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiation for head and neck cancers: Implications for re-irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parashar Bhupesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the maximum differential cervical spinal (C-spine cord dose in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans of patients undergoing radiotherapy for treatment of head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: The C-spine of ten head and neck cancer patients that were planned using IMRT and each cervical vertebral body and the right and left sides was contoured by splitting the cord in the center. Dose-volume histograms (DVH and maximum point doses were obtained for each contour and compared. Results: The dose to the cord varied with the location of the primary tumor but such variation was not consistently seen. This report provides information that is critical for planning reirradiation treatments. We recommend that contouring of the C-spine cord with IMRT should include outlining of each cervical cord level and identification of the right and the left sides of the cord on each plan.

  20. Dosimetric Evaluation of VMAT, IMRT, and Proton Treatment Techniques Targeting Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpool, Kristyn Brenna

    Purpose: With the advent of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT), clinicians opted to favor this technology assuming it a better form of treatment. It was of interest to investigate its benefits compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) when creating treatment plans for pancreatic cancer for which challenges are considered: target location, avoiding excess dose to surrounding organs, and keeping highest dose within the planned target volume. This study aimed to determine which technique offered the best dose conformity and healthy organ sparing based on dosimetry and radiobiology models to help the clinic distribute fairly the patient load to the most adequate treatment delivery machine. Materials and Methods: Twenty pancreatic cancer treatment plans were analyzed. Original plans were re-planned and calculated with Varian Eclipse treatment planning system using VMAT or IMRT to create paired data sets. IMRT plans utilized 6-9 fields and VMAT plans used two arc fields. Both techniques used 6 MV beams and prescription dose of 4950 cGy in 18 fractions. Plan evaluations were based on Conformity Index (CI) and normal tissue (kidneys, liver, spinal cord, and bowel) doses analyzed using QUANTEC; and radiobiology analysis using the Uncomplicated Tumor Control Probability (UTCP). Results: On average, VMAT resulted in 10.56% (p = 0.19) and 17.46% (p = 0.16) higher mean doses to the total kidneys and liver and 7.48% (p = 0.10) and 0.44% (p = 0.93) lower mean doses to the bowel and maximum spinal cord dose, respectively. Conclusions: VMAT has not shown to be a significantly superior technique at providing target coverage and sparing normal structures, thus determination of the treatment technique should be based on individual cases. Purpose: To examine dosimetric differences between AAA and Acuros XB mathematical treatment planning software in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods: CT images from twelve pancreatic cancer patients were used

  1. Poster - Thurs Eve-09: Evaluation of a commercial 2D ion-chamber array for intensity modulated radiation therapy dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, X; Bracken, G; Kerr, A

    2008-07-01

    Experimental verification of calculated dose from a treatment planning system is often essential for quality assurance (QA) of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Film dosimetry and single ion chamber measurements are commonly used for IMRT QA. Film dosimetry has very good spatial resolution, but is labor intensive and absolute dose is not reliable. Ion chamber measurements are still required for absolute dose after measurements using films. Dosimeters based on 2D detector arrays that can measure 2D dose in real-time are gaining wider use. These devices provide a much easier and reliable tool for IMRT QA. We report the evaluation of a commercial 2D ion chamber array, including its basic performance characteristics, such as linearity, reproducibility and uniformity of relative ion chamber sensitivities, and comparisons between measured 2D dose and calculated dose with a commercial treatment planning system. Our analysis shows this matrix has excellent linearity and reproducibility, but relative sensitivities are tilted such that the +Y region is over sensitive, while the -Y region is under sensitive. Despite this behavior, our results show good agreement between measured 2D dose profiles and Eclipse planned data for IMRT test plans and a few verification plans for clinical breast field-in-field plans. The gamma values (3% or 3 mm distance-to-agreement) are all less than 1 except for one or two pixels at the field edge This device provides a fast and reliable stand-alone dosimeter for IMRT QA. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yujiao [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, Fan [Occupational and Environmental Safety Office, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  3. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  4. IMRT treatment of anal cancer with a scrotal shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, Rodney C., E-mail: Rodney.Hood@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Wu, Q. Jackie; McMahon, Ryan; Czito, Brian; Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The risk of sterility in males undergoing radiotherapy in the pelvic region indicates the use of a shielding device, which offers protection to the testes for patients wishing to maintain fertility. The use of such devices in the realm of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the pelvic region can pose many obstacles during simulation, treatment planning, and delivery of radiotherapy. This work focuses on the development and execution of an IMRT plan for the treatment of anal cancer using a scrotal shielding device on a clinical patient. An IMRT plan was developed using Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), using a wide array of gantry angles as well as fixed jaw and fluence editing techniques. When possible, the entire target volume was encompassed by the treatment field. When the beam was incident on the scrotal shield, the jaw was fixed to avoid the device and the collimator rotation optimized to irradiate as much of the target as possible. This technique maximizes genital sparing and allows minimal irradiation of the gonads. When this fixed-jaw technique was found to compromise adequate coverage of the target, manual fluence editing techniques were used to avoid the shielding device. Special procedures for simulation, imaging, and treatment verification were also developed. In vivo dosimetry was used to verify and ensure acceptable dose to the gonads. The combination of these techniques resulted in a highly conformal plan that spares organs and risk and avoids the genitals as well as entrance of primary radiation onto the shielding device.

  5. [Multicenter trial for sudden hearing loss therapy - planning and concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plontke, S K; Girndt, M; Meisner, C; Probst, R; Oerlecke, I; Richter, M; Steighardt, J; Dreier, G; Weber, A; Baumann, I; Plößl, S; Löhler, J; Laszig, R; Werner, J A; Rahne, T

    2016-04-01

    Systemic steroids are widely used worldwide as a standard of care for primary therapy of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL). The German ISSHL guideline recommends high-dose steroids for primary therapy of ISSHL, without evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The rationale for the treatment of ISSHL using high dose steroids is only based on retrospective cohort studies.This article describes the planning and initiation of a multicenter, national, randomized, controlled clinical trial entitled Efficacy and safety of high dose glucocorticosteroid treatment for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss - a three-armed, randomized, triple-blind, multicenter trial (HODOKORT). This clinical trial aims to compare standard dose with two types of high-dose steroids for primary systemic therapy with respect to their efficacy in improving hearing, and thus communication ability, in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.This study is funded by the "Clinical Trials with High Patient Relevance" research program in the health research framework of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. It is one of two studies by the German Study Center of Clinical Trials of the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DSZ-HNO). Planning and initiation was done in cooperation with the DSZ-HNO, the Coordination Center of Clinical Trials of the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, and the Study Center of the University Hospital Freiburg.

  6. Irradiation of head-and-neck tumors with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Comparison between two IMRT techniques with 3D conformal irradiation; Bestrahlung von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren mit fluenzmodulierter Radiotherapie (IMRT). Vergleich zweier IMRT-Techniken mit 3D-konformaler Bestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeger, Jonas

    2013-09-11

    For 12 patients with inoperable head-neck carcinoma that were treated with 3D conformal irradiation techniques additional irradiation plans using IMRT were developed. It was shown that the IMRT techniques are superior to the 3D conformal technique. The new rapid arc technique is unclear with respect to the critical organs (parotid glands, spinal canal and mandibles) but is significantly advantageous for the other normal tissue with respect to conformity (steeper dose gradients) and thus radiation dose reduction. The resulting lower irradiation time and the reduced radiation exposure being important for the treatment economy and patients' comfort should favor the more planning intensive rapid arc technique.

  7. A national survey of the availability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlDuhaiby Eman Z

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The timely and appropriate adoption of new radiation therapy (RT technologies is a challenge both in terms of providing of optimal patient care and managing health care resources. Relatively little is known regarding the rate at which new RT technologies are adopted in different jurisdictions, and the barriers to implementation of these technologies. Methods Surveys were sent to all radiation oncology department heads in Canada regarding the availability of RT equipment from 2006 to 2010. Data were collected concerning the availability and use of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, and the obstacles to implementation of these technologies. Results IMRT was available in 37% of responding centers in 2006, increasing to 87% in 2010. In 2010, 72% of centers reported that IMRT was available for all patients who might benefit, and 37% indicated that they used IMRT for "virtually all" head and neck patients. SRS availability increased from 26% in 2006 to 42.5% in 2010. Eighty-two percent of centers reported that patients had access to SRS either directly or by referral. The main barriers for IMRT implementation included the need to train or hire treatment planning staff, whereas barriers to SRS implementation mostly included the need to purchase and/or upgrade existing planning software and equipment. Conclusions The survey showed a growing adoption of IMRT and SRS in Canada, although the latter was available in less than half of responding centers. Barriers to implementation differed for IMRT compared to SRS. Enhancing human resources is an important consideration in the implementation of new RT technologies, due to the multidisciplinary nature of the planning and treatment process.

  8. Reducing the low-dose lung radiation for central lung tumors by restricting the IMRT beams and arc arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosca, Florin, E-mail: frosca@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mass General/North Shore, Danvers, MA (United States); Kirk, Michael; Soto, Daniel; Sall, Walter; McIntyre, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mass General/North Shore, Danvers, MA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    To compare the extent to which 7 different radiotherapy planning techniques for mediastinal lung targets reduces the lung volume receiving low doses of radiation. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients with targets, including the mediastinal nodes, were identified. Treatment plans were generated to both 60- and 74-Gy prescription doses using 7 different planning techniques: conformal, hybrid conformal/intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), 7 equidistant IMRT beams, 2 restricted beam IMRT plans, a full (360 Degree-Sign ) modulated arc, and a restricted modulated arc plan. All plans were optimized to reduce total lung V5, V10, and V20 volumes, while meeting normal tissue and target coverage constraints. The mean values for the 13 patients are calculated for V5, V10, V20, V{sub ave}, V0-20, and mean lung dose (MLD) lung parameters. For the 74-Gy prescription dose, the mean lung V10 was 42.7, 43.6, 48.2, 56.6, 57, 55.8, and 54.1% for the restricted {+-}36 Degree-Sign IMRT, restricted modulated arc, restricted {+-}45 Degree-Sign IMRT, full modulated arc, hybrid conformal/IMRT, equidistant IMRT, and conformal plans, respectively. A similar lung sparing hierarchy was found for the 60-Gy prescription dose. For the treatment of central lung targets, the {+-}36 Degree-Sign restricted IMRT and restricted modulated arc planning techniques are superior in lowering the lung volume treated to low dose, as well as in minimizing MLD, followed by the {+-}45 Degree-Sign restricted IMRT plan. All planning techniques that allow the use of lateral or lateral/oblique beams result in spreading the low dose over a higher lung volume. The area under the lung dose-volume histogram curve below 20 Gy, V0-20, is proposed as an alternative to individual V{sub dose} parameters, both as a measure of lung sparing and as a parameter to be minimized during IMRT optimization.

  9. Verification of dosimetric commissioning accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery using task Group-119 guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunakaran Kaviarasu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study is to verify the accuracy of the commissioning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT based on the recommendation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 119 (TG-119. Materials and Methods: TG-119 proposes a set of clinical test cases to verify the accuracy of IMRT planning and delivery system. For these test cases, we generated two sets of treatment plans, the first plan using 7–9 IMRT fields and a second plan utilizing two-arc VMAT technique for both 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. The template plans of TG-119 were optimized and calculated by Varian Eclipse Treatment Planning System (version 13.5. Dose prescription and planning objectives were set according to the TG-119 goals. The point dose (mean dose to the contoured chamber volume at the specified positions/locations was measured using compact (CC-13 ion chamber. The composite planar dose was measured with IMatriXX Evaluation 2D array with OmniPro IMRT Software (version 1.7b. The per-field relative gamma was measured using electronic portal imaging device in a way similar to the routine pretreatment patient-specific quality assurance. Results: Our planning results are compared with the TG-119 data. Point dose and fluence comparison data where within the acceptable confident limit. Conclusion: From the obtained data in this study, we conclude that the commissioning of IMRT and VMAT delivery were found within the limits of TG-119.

  10. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV){sub 50Gy} or PTV{sub 62.5Gy} (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results: SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D{sub 98} was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D{sub 98} was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D{sub 98} was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D{sub 98} was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions: The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup

  11. Extrapleural pneumonectomy, photodynamic therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kevin L; Both, Stefan; Friedberg, Joseph S; Rengan, Ramesh; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has recently been proposed for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Here, we describe our experience with a multimodality approach for the treatment of mesothelioma, incorporating extrapleural pneumonectomy, intraoperative photodynamic therapy and postoperative hemithoracic IMRT. From 2004-2007, we treated 11 MPM patients with hemithoracic IMRT, 7 of whom had undergone porfimer sodium-mediated PDT as an intraoperative adjuvant to surgical debulking. The median radiation dose to the planning treatment volume (PTV) ranged from 45.4-54.5 Gy. For the contralateral lung, V20 ranged from 1.4-28.5%, V5 from 42-100% and MLD from 6.8-16.5 Gy. In our series, 1 patient experienced respiratory failure secondary to radiation pneumonitis that did not require mechanical ventilation. Multimodality therapy combining surgery with increased doses of radiation using IMRT, and newer treatment modalities such as PDT , appears safe. Future prospective analysis will be needed to demonstrate efficacy of this approach in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. Efforts to reduce lung toxicity and improve dose delivery are needed and provide the promise of improved local control and quality of life in a carefully chosen multidisciplinary approach.

  12. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapkaroski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.sapkaroski@gmail.com; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes.

  13. Conditions for reliable time-resolved dosimetry of electronic portal imaging devices for fixed-gantry IMRT and VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Jung, Jae Won; Patyal, Baldev; Mandapaka, Anant; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Jong Oh

    2013-07-01

    The continuous scanning mode of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) that offers time-resolved information has been newly explored for verifying dynamic radiation deliveries. This study seeks to determine operating conditions (dose rate stability and time resolution) under which that mode can be used accurately for the time-resolved dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. The authors have designed the following test beams with variable beam holdoffs and dose rate regulations: a 10 × 10 cm open beam to serve as a reference beam; a sliding window (SW) beam utilizing the motion of a pair of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves outside the 10 × 10 cm jaw; a step and shoot (SS) beam to move the pair in step; a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beam. The beams were designed in such a way that they all produce the same open beam output of 10 × 10 cm. Time-resolved ion chamber measurements at isocenter and time-resolved and integrating EPID measurements were performed for all beams. The time-resolved EPID measurements were evaluated through comparison with the ion chamber and integrating EPID measurements, as the latter are accepted procedures. For two-dimensional, time-resolved evaluation, a VMAT beam with an infield MLC travel was designed. Time-resolved EPID measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of such EPID dose images for this beam were performed and intercompared. For IMRT beams (SW and SS), the authors found disagreement greater than 2%, caused by frame missing of the time-resolved mode. However, frame missing disappeared, yielding agreement better than 2%, when the dose rate of irradiation (and thus the frame acquisition rates) reached a stable and planned rate as the dose of irradiation was raised past certain thresholds (a minimum 12 s of irradiation per shoot used for SS IMRT). For VMAT, the authors found that dose rate does not affect the frame acquisition rate, thereby causing no frame missing. However, serious inplanar

  14. SU-E-T-436: Accelerated Gated IMRT: A Feasibility Study for Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, M; Boussion, N; Visvikis, D [INSERM UMR 1101 - LaTIM, Brest (France); Fayad, H [INSERM UMR 1101 - LaTIM, UBO, Brest (France); Pradier, O [CHRU Morvan, Radiotherapy, Brest (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering a gated Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment using multiple respiratory phases in order to account for all anatomic changes during free breathing and accelerate the gated treatment without increasing the dose per fraction. Methods: For 7 patients with lung cancer, IMRT treatment plans were generated on a full inspiration (FI) Computed Tomography (CT) and a Mid Intensity Position (MIP) CT. Moreover, in order to achieve an accelerated gated IMRT, multiple respiratory phase plans were calculated: 2-phase plans including the FI and the full expiration phases, and 3-phase plans by adding the mid-inspiration phase. In order to assess the tolerance limits, plans' doses were registered and summed to the FI-based plan. Mean dose received by Organs at Risk (OARs) and target volumes were used to compare obtained plans. Results: The mean dose differences between the FI plans and the multi-phase plans never exceeded 0.4 Gy (Fig. 1). Concerning the clinical target volume these differences were even smaller: less than 0.1 Gy for both the 2-phase and 3-phase plans. Regarding the MIP treatment plan, higher doses in different healthy structures were observed, with a relative mean increase of 0.4 to 1.5 Gy. Finally, compared to the prescribed dose, the FI as well as the multi-phase plans were associated with a mean difference of 0.4 Gy, whereas in the case of MIP a higher mean difference of 0.6 Gy was observed. Conclusion: The doses obtained while planning a multi-phase gated IMRT treatment were within the tolerance limits. Compared to MIP, a better healthy tissue sparing was observed in the case of treatment planning based on one or multiple phases. Future work will consist in testing the multi-phase treatment delivery while accounting for the multileaf collimator speed constraints.

  15. An empirical calibration method for an a-Si portal imaging device: applications in pretreatment verification of IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, L; Mordacchini, C; Pozzi, L; Vite, C

    2012-09-01

    A new calibration method for an amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) used for dose measurements in pretreatment verification (field-related) of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with sliding-window technique. The method is independent of data contained in the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf-motion files and of any calculations made by the treatment planning system (TPS). Sensitivity of the EPID is dependent on radiation energy. For fluence-modulated fields, different dose/reading calibration factors are associated with each pixel of the image acquired by calculating equivalent areas representing the exact ratio between primary and scatter components. The dose measured in the detector plane was compared with that calculated with TPS by using gamma-analysis. Each calibration factor was compared with that calculated by considering the individual contributions of primary and secondary radiation obtained using the convolution method with analytical kernel for homogeneous media. In 837/854 (98%) of the clinical fields analysed, the proportion of irradiated area in which the gamma-index was method. The proposed calibration method is suitable for routine clinical pretreatment verification in IMRT.

  16. Direct aperture optimization for IMRT using Monte Carlo generated beamlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Alanah M; Bush, Karl; Milette, Marie-Pierre; Popescu, I Antoniu; Otto, Karl; Duzenli, Cheryl

    2006-10-01

    This work introduces an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo (MC) beamlet does distribution matrix into a direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm for IMRT inverse planning. The technique is referred to as Monte Carlo-direct aperture optimization (MC-DAO). The goal is to assess if the combination of accurate Monte Carlo tissue inhomogeneity modeling and DAO inverse planning will improve the dose accuracy and treatment efficiency for treatment planning. Several authors have shown that the presence of small fields and/or inhomogeneous materials in IMRT treatment fields can cause dose calculation errors for algorithms that are unable to accurately model electronic disequilibrium. This issue may also affect the IMRT optimization process because the dose calculation algorithm may not properly model difficult geometries such as targets close to low-density regions (lung, air etc.). A clinical linear accelerator head is simulated using BEAMnrc (NRC, Canada). A novel in-house algorithm subdivides the resulting phase space into 2.5 X 5.0 mm2 beamlets. Each beamlet is projected onto a patient-specific phantom. The beamlet dose contribution to each voxel in a structure-of-interest is calculated using DOSXYZnrc. The multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions are linked to the location of the beamlet does distributions. The MLC shapes are optimized using direct aperture optimization (DAO). A final Monte Carlo calculation with MLC modeling is used to compute the final dose distribution. Monte Carlo simulation can generate accurate beamlet dose distributions for traditionally difficult-to-calculate geometries, particularly for small fields crossing regions of tissue inhomogeneity. The introduction of DAO results in an additional improvement by increasing the treatment delivery efficiency. For the examples presented in this paper the reduction in the total number of monitor units to deliver is approximately 33% compared to fluence-based optimization methods.

  17. SU-F-T-380: Comparing the Effect of Respiration On Dose Distribution Between Conventional Tangent Pair and IMRT Techniques for Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, M; Ramaseshan, R [BCCA Abbotsford Centre, Abbotsford, BC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this project, we compared the conventional tangent pair technique to IMRT technique by analyzing the dose distribution. We also investigated the effect of respiration on planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage in both techniques. Methods: In order to implement IMRT technique a template based planning protocol, dose constrains and treatment process was developed. Two open fields with optimized field weights were combined with two beamlet optimization fields in IMRT plans. We compared the dose distribution between standard tangential pair and IMRT. The improvement in dose distribution was measured by parameters such as conformity index, homogeneity index and coverage index. Another end point was the IMRT technique will reduce the planning time for staff. The effect of patient’s respiration on dose distribution was also estimated. The four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) for different phase of breathing cycle was used to evaluate the effect of respiration on IMRT planned dose distribution. Results: We have accumulated 10 patients that acquired 4DCT and planned by both techniques. Based on the preliminary analysis, the dose distribution in IMRT technique was better than conventional tangent pair technique. Furthermore, the effect of respiration in IMRT plan was not significant as evident from the 95% isodose line coverage of PTV drawn on all phases of 4DCT. Conclusion: Based on the 4DCT images, the breathing effect on dose distribution was smaller than what we expected. We suspect that there are two reasons. First, the PTV movement due to respiration was not significant. It might be because we used a tilted breast board to setup patients. Second, the open fields with optimized field weights in IMRT technique might reduce the breathing effect on dose distribution. A further investigation is necessary.

  18. SU-E-T-29: A Dosimetric Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, T; Lin, X; Yin, Y; Liu, T [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric differences among fixed field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and double-arc volumetricmodulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with simultaneous integrated boost in rectal cancer. Methods: Ten patients with rectal cancer previously treated with IMRT were included in this analysis. For each patient, two treatment techniques were designed for each patient: the fixed 7 fields IMRT and double-arc VMAT with RapidArc technique. The treatment plan was designed to deliver in one process with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). The prescribed doses to the planning target volume of the subclinical disease (PTV1) and the gross disease (PTV2) were 45 Gy and 55 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively. The dose distribution in the target, the dose to the organs at risk, total MU and the delivery time in two techniques were compared to explore the dosimetric differences. Results: For the target dose and homogeneity in PTV1 and PTV2, no statistically differences were observed in the two plans. VMAT plans showed a better conformity in PTV1. VMAT plans reduced the mean dose to bladder, small bowel, femur heads and iliac wings. For iliac wings, VMAT plans resulted in a statistically significant reduction in irradiated volume of 15 Gy, 20 Gy, 30 Gy but increased the 10 Gy irradiated volume. VMAT plans reduced the small bowel irradiated volume of 20 Gy and 30 Gy. Compared with IMRT plans, VMAT plans showed a significant reduction of monitor units by nearly 30% and reduced treatment time by an average of 70% Conclusion: Compared to IMRT plans, VMAT plans showed the similar target dose and reduced the dose of the organs at risk, especially for small bowel and iliac wings. For rectal cancer, VMAT with simultaneous integrated boost can be carried out with high quality and efficiency.

  19. Optimizing global liver function in radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Victor W; Epelman, Marina A; Wang, Hesheng; Edwin Romeijn, H; Feng, Mary; Cao, Yue; Ten Haken, Randall K; Matuszak, Martha M

    2016-09-07

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients differ in both pre-treatment liver function (e.g. due to degree of cirrhosis and/or prior treatment) and radiosensitivity, leading to high variability in potential liver toxicity with similar doses. This work investigates three treatment planning optimization models that minimize risk of toxicity: two consider both voxel-based pre-treatment liver function and local-function-based radiosensitivity with dose; one considers only dose. Each model optimizes different objective functions (varying in complexity of capturing the influence of dose on liver function) subject to the same dose constraints and are tested on 2D synthesized and 3D clinical cases. The normal-liver-based objective functions are the linearized equivalent uniform dose ([Formula: see text]) (conventional '[Formula: see text] model'), the so-called perfusion-weighted [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) (proposed 'fEUD model'), and post-treatment global liver function (GLF) (proposed 'GLF model'), predicted by a new liver-perfusion-based dose-response model. The resulting [Formula: see text], fEUD, and GLF plans delivering the same target [Formula: see text] are compared with respect to their post-treatment function and various dose-based metrics. Voxel-based portal venous liver perfusion, used as a measure of local function, is computed using DCE-MRI. In cases used in our experiments, the GLF plan preserves up to [Formula: see text] more liver function than the fEUD ([Formula: see text]) plan does in 2D cases, and up to [Formula: see text] in 3D cases. The GLF and fEUD plans worsen in [Formula: see text] of functional liver on average by 1.0 Gy and 0.5 Gy in 2D and 3D cases, respectively. Liver perfusion information can be used during treatment planning to minimize the risk of toxicity by improving expected GLF; the degree of benefit varies with perfusion pattern. Although fEUD model optimization is computationally inexpensive and often

  20. Estimation of local confidence limit for 6 MV photon beam IMRT system using AAPM TG 119 test protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Kadam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate local confidence limit for 6 MV photon beam based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT using TG119 test protocol.Methods: The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM Task Group 119 (TG119 prescribed a protocol to evaluate overall accuracy of IMRT system rather than independent uncertainty in dose calculation, dose delivery and measurement system. Two preliminary and five clinical test cases were created based on dose prescriptions and planning objectives given by TG119 report. Verification plans were created in a planning slab phantom, 2D Matrix dosimetry system (I’MatriXX with multicube phantom and aS-1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID. Radiation absorbed doses to high dose points in the planning target volume (PTV region and low dose points in avoidance structures were measured using CC13 ionization chamber having sensitive volume of 0.13 cm3. The measured and planned doses were normalized with respect to their prescription doses and intercompared. The gamma analysis was carried out for both I’MatriXX and EPID, adopting the acceptance criteria of 3% DD (dose difference and 3 mm DTA (distance to agreement with 10% threshold dose.Results: For the point dose measurements with ion chamber, the average dose difference ratio in high dose low gradient PTV region was -0.0133 ± 0.012 corresponding to a confidence limit of 0.037. The average dose difference in low dose region (avoidance structure was -0.00004 ± 0.010 corresponding to a confidence limit of 0.021. The average percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3% DD and 3 mm DTA for composite planar dose distribution measured by I’MatriXX was 99.47 ± 0.43 which corresponds to a confidence limit of 1.38 (i.e. 98.62% passing. Similarly, the average percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3% DD and 3 mm DTA for per-field dose distribution measured by EPID was 98.00 ± 2.49 which corresponds to a

  1. Automatic optimisation of beam orientations using the simplex algorithm and optimisation of quality control using statistical process control (S.P.C.) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (I.M.R.T.); Optimisation automatique des incidences des faisceaux par l'algorithme du simplexe et optimisation des controles qualite par la Maitrise Statistique des Processus (MSP) en Radiotherapie Conformationnelle par Modulation d'Intensite (RCMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerard, K

    2008-11-15

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (I.M.R.T.) is currently considered as a technique of choice to increase the local control of the tumour while reducing the dose to surrounding organs at risk. However, its routine clinical implementation is partially held back by the excessive amount of work required to prepare the patient treatment. In order to increase the efficiency of the treatment preparation, two axes of work have been defined. The first axis concerned the automatic optimisation of beam orientations. We integrated the simplex algorithm in the treatment planning system. Starting from the dosimetric objectives set by the user, it can automatically determine the optimal beam orientations that best cover the target volume while sparing organs at risk. In addition to time sparing, the simplex results of three patients with a cancer of the oropharynx, showed that the quality of the plan is also increased compared to a manual beam selection. Indeed, for an equivalent or even a better target coverage, it reduces the dose received by the organs at risk. The second axis of work concerned the optimisation of pre-treatment quality control. We used an industrial method: Statistical Process Control (S.P.C.) to retrospectively analyse the absolute dose quality control results performed using an ionisation chamber at Centre Alexis Vautrin (C.A.V.). This study showed that S.P.C. is an efficient method to reinforce treatment security using control charts. It also showed that our dose delivery process was stable and statistically capable for prostate treatments, which implies that a reduction of the number of controls can be considered for this type of treatment at the C.A.V.. (author)

  2. Solution IMRT static of a radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer with lymphangitis; Solucion IMRT estatica de un tratamiento radioterapico del cancer de mama con linfangitis carcinomatosa cutanea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puertolas Hernandez, J. R.; Iriondo Igerabide, U.; Urraca de la Serna, J. M.; Lozano Flores, F. J.; Pino Leon, C.; Larretxa Etxarri, R.

    2013-07-01

    In breast cancer, the planning of treatment with IMRT technique mode static MLC has been efficient to get a perfect union of doses in the skin between the lower limit of the supraclavicular fields and the upper limit of the tangential fields. The technique Planning requires the creation of auxiliary volumes that allow you to manage the particularities inherent to the tangential fields of breast. (Author)

  3. Target volume delineation and field setup. A practical guide for conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nancy Y. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Radiation Oncology; Lu, Jiade J. (eds.) [National Univ. Health System, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-03-01

    Practical handbook on selection and delineation of tumor volumes and fields for conformal radiation therapy, including IMRT. Helpful format facilitating use on a step-by-step basis in daily practice. Designed to ensure accurate coverage of commonly encountered tumors along their routes of spread. This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to appropriately and confidently delineate tumor volumes/fields for conformal radiation therapy, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), in patients with commonly encountered cancers. The orientation of this handbook is entirely practical, in that the focus is on the illustration of clinical target volume (CTV) delineation for each major malignancy. Each chapter provides guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection for a particular disease, explains how the anatomy of lymphatic drainage shapes the selection of the target volume, and presents detailed illustrations of volumes, slice by slice, on planning CT images. While the emphasis is on target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal therapy and IMRT, information is also provided on conventional radiation therapy field setup and planning for certain malignancies for which IMRT is not currently suitable.

  4. SU-F-P-37: Implementation of An End-To-End QA Test of the Radiation Therapy Imaging, Planning and Delivery Process to Identify and Correct Possible Sources of Deviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas Aranda, F; Suarez, V; Arbiser, S; Sansogne, R [Vidt Centro Medico, Ciudad Autonoma De Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aire (Argentina)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement an end-to-end QA test of the radiation therapy imaging, planning and delivery process, aimed to assess the dosimetric agreement accuracy between planned and delivered treatment, in order to identify and correct possible sources of deviation. To establish an internal standard for machine commissioning acceptance. Methods: A test involving all steps of the radiation therapy: imaging, planning and delivery process was designed. The test includes analysis of point dose and planar dose distributions agreement between TPS calculated and measured dose. An ad hoc 16 cm diameter PMMA phantom was constructed with one central and four peripheral bores that can accommodate calibrated electron density inserts. Using Varian Eclipse 10.0 and Elekta XiO 4.50 planning systems, IMRT, RapidArc and 3DCRT with hard and dynamic wedges plans were planned on the phantom and tested. An Exradin A1SL chamber is used with a Keithley 35617EBS electrometer for point dose measurements in the phantom. 2D dose distributions were acquired using MapCheck and Varian aS1000 EPID.Gamma analysis was performed for evaluation of 2D dose distribution agreement using MapCheck software and Varian Portal Dosimetry Application.Varian high energy Clinacs Trilogy, 2100C/CD, 2000CR and low energy 6X/EX where tested.TPS-CT# vs. electron density table were checked for CT-scanners used. Results: Calculated point doses were accurate to 0.127% SD: 0.93%, 0.507% SD: 0.82%, 0.246% SD: 1.39% and 0.012% SD: 0.01% for LoX-3DCRT, HiX-3DCRT, IMRT and RapidArc plans respectively. Planar doses pass gamma 3% 3mm in all cases and 2% 2mm for VMAT plans. Conclusion: Implementation of a simple and reliable quality assurance tool was accomplished. The end-to-end proved efficient, showing excellent agreement between planned and delivered dose evidencing strong consistency of the whole process from imaging through planning to delivery. This test can be used as a first step in beam model acceptance for clinical

  5. Individualized Selection of Beam Angles and Treatment Isocenter in Tangential Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninkhof, Joan, E-mail: j.penninkhof@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Spadola, Sara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Baaijens, Margreet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lanconelli, Nico [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose and Objective: Propose a novel method for individualized selection of beam angles and treatment isocenter in tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: For each patient, beam and isocenter selection starts with the fully automatic generation of a large database of IMRT plans (up to 847 in this study); each of these plans belongs to a unique combination of isocenter position, lateral beam angle, and medial beam angle. The imposed hard planning constraint on patient maximum dose may result in plans with unacceptable target dose delivery. Such plans are excluded from further analyses. Owing to differences in beam setup, database plans differ in mean doses to organs at risk (OARs). These mean doses are used to construct 2-dimensional graphs, showing relationships between: (1) contralateral breast dose and ipsilateral lung dose; and (2) contralateral breast dose and heart dose (analyzed only for left-sided). The graphs can be used for selection of the isocenter and beam angles with the optimal, patient-specific tradeoffs between the mean OAR doses. For 30 previously treated patients (15 left-sided and 15 right-sided tumors), graphs were generated considering only the clinically applied isocenter with 121 tangential beam angle pairs. For 20 of the 30 patients, 6 alternative isocenters were also investigated. Results: Computation time for automatic generation of 121 IMRT plans took on average 30 minutes. The generated graphs demonstrated large variations in tradeoffs between conflicting OAR objectives, depending on beam angle