WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapy field extent

  1. Field measurement of albedo for limited extent test surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailor, David J. [Portland State University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, P.O. Box 751-ME, Portland, OR 97207 (United States); Resh, Kyle; Segura, Del [Tulane University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 400 Lindy Boggs Center, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    A new method is introduced for field measurement of surface albedo. This method consists of the use of a cylindrical shade ring made of opaque fabric with a known (low) albedo placed over a test surface. The albedo measurement is accomplished using two small pyranometers situated so that the downward-facing pyranometer receives radiation only from the test surface and the shade ring. The upward-facing pyranometer simultaneously records the incoming solar radiation. The radiation received by the downward-facing pyramometer is a combination of reflected radiation from shaded and unshaded portions of these two surfaces, requiring detailed accounting of the resulting view factor geometries. The method presented here improves upon past approaches by allowing for smaller sample sizes, minimizing errors associated with reflective properties of the surroundings, and allowing for accurate measurements even under partially cloudy skies. In addition to these methodological improvements we introduce an approach for estimating the uncertainty in the resulting albedo measurements. Results from field measurements are presented to validate the measurement protocol, and to compare its accuracy with the accuracy of a published standard. (author)

  2. Field sampling for monitoring, migration and defining the areal extent of chemical contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Skalski, J.R.; Eberhardt, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    As part of two studies funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the USEPA, the authors have investigated field sampling strategies and compositing as a means of detecting spills or migration at commercial low-level radioactive and chemical waste disposal sites and bioassays for detecting contamination at chemical waste sites. Compositing (pooling samples) for detection is discussed first, followed by the development of a statistical test to determine whether any component of a composite exceeds a prescribed maximum acceptable level. Subsequently, the authors explore the question of optimal field sampling designs and present the features of a microcomputer program designed to show the difficulties in constructing efficient field designs and using compositing schemes. Finally, they propose the use of bioassays as an adjunct or replacement for chemical analysis as a means of detecting and defining the areal extent of chemical migration

  3. Radiation therapy rather than prior surgery reduces extent of resection during endonasal endoscopic reoperation for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Iyan; Forbes, Jonathan A; Ordóñez-Rubiano, Edgar G; Avendano-Pradel, Rafael; La Corte, Emanuele; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2018-07-01

    Radiation therapy is often advocated for residual or recurrent craniopharyngioma following surgical resection to prevent local recurrence. However, radiation therapy is not always effective and may render tumors more difficult to remove. If this is the case, patients may benefit more from reoperation if gross total resection can be achieved. Nevertheless, there is little data on the impact of radiation on reoperations for craniopharyngioma. In this study, we sought to analyze whether a history of previous radiation therapy (RT) affected extent of resection in patients with recurrent craniopharyngiomas subsequently treated with reoperation via endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA). The authors reviewed a prospectively acquired database of EEA reoperations of craniopharyngiomas over 13 years at Weill Cornell, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. All procedures were performed by the senior author. The operations were separated into two groups based on whether the patient had surgery alone (group A) or surgery and RT (group B) prior to recurrence. A total of 24 patients (16 male, 8 female) who underwent surgery for recurrent craniopharyngioma were identified. The average time to recurrence was 7.64 ± 4.34 months (range 3-16 months) for group A and 16.62 ± 12.1 months (range 6-45 months) for group B (p < 0.05). The average tumor size at recurrence was smaller in group A (1.85 ± 0.72 cm; range 0.5-3.2) than group B (2.59 ± 0.91 cm; range 1.5-4.6; p = 0.00017). Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 91% (10/11) of patients in group A and 54% (7/13) of patients in group B (p = 0.047). There was a near significant trend for higher average Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score at last follow-up for group A (83 ± 10.6) compared with group B (70 ± 16.3, p = 0.056). While RT for residual or recurrent craniopharyngioma may delay time to recurrence, ability to achieve GTR with additional surgery is reduced. In the case of

  4. Restricting the vertical and horizontal extent of the Field-of-View: Effects on manoeuvring performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.E.M.; Toet, A.; Delleman, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    It is known that Field-of-view restrictions affect distance estimation, postural equilibrium, and the ability to control heading. These are all important factors when manoeuvring on foot through complex structured environments. Although considerable research has been devoted to the horizontal

  5. Field sampling for monitoring migration and defining the areal extent of chemical contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Skalski, J.R.; Eberhardt, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.

    1984-11-01

    Initial research on compositing, field designs, and site mapping oriented toward detecting spills and migration at commercial low-level radioactive or chemical waste sites is summarized. Results indicate that the significance test developed to detect samples containing high levels of contamination when they are mixed with several other samples below detectable limits (composites), will be highly effective with large sample sizes when contaminant levels frequently or greatly exceed a maximum acceptable level. These conditions of frequent and high contaminant levels are most likely to occur in regions of a commercial waste site where the priors (previous knowledge) about a spill or migration are highest. Conversely, initial investigations of Bayes sampling strategies suggest that field sampling efforts should be inversely proportional to the priors (expressed as probabilities) for the occurrence of contamination

  6. Photodynamic therapy for skin field cancerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braathen, L R; Morton, C A; Basset-Seguin, N

    2012-01-01

    in this area. With respect to the skin, this term is used to define the presence of multiple non-melanoma skin cancer, its precursors, actinic keratoses and dysplastic keratinocytes in sun exposed areas. The multiplicity of the lesions and the extent of the area influence the treatment decision. Providing...... paper the use of PDT for the treatment of field cancerized skin is reviewed and recommendations are given for its use.......Field cancerization is a term that describes the presence of genetic abnormalities in a tissue chronically exposed to a carcinogen. These abnormalities are responsible for the presence of multilocular clinical and sub-clinical cancerous lesions that explains the increased risks of multiple cancers...

  7. Thyorid function after mantle field radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daehnert, W.; Kutzner, J.; Grimm, W.

    1981-01-01

    48 patients with malignant lymphoma received a 60 Co-radiation dose of 30 to 50 Gy using the mantle field technique. Thyroid function tests were performed 34 to 92 months after radiation therapy. One patient developed myxedema, ten (20.8%) had subclinical hypothyroidism and six (12.5%) latent hypothyroidism. The incidence of hypothyroidism after treatment of malignant lymphomas is summarized in a review of the literature. Discrepancies on the incidence of hypothyroidism were found, and their possible cause is discussed. Periodic examinations of all patients with thyroid radiation exposure are recommended. The examination can be limited to measurement of TSH concentration and palpation of the thyroid for nodules. (orig.) [de

  8. Dose-remission of pulsating electromagnetic fields as augmentation in therapy-resistant depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straasø, Birgit; Lauritzen, Lise; Lunde, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate to what extent a twice daily dose of Transcranial Pulsating ElectroMagnetic Fields (T-PEMF) was superior to once daily in patients with treatment-resistant depression as to obtaining symptom remission after 8 weeks of augmentation therapy. METHODS: A self-treatment set...

  9. Cross-sectional imaging to evaluate the extent of regional nodal disease in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Tara L., E-mail: anderson.tara@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States); Glazebrook, Katrina N., E-mail: glazebrook.katrina@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States); Murphy, Brittany L., E-mail: murphy.brittany@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Surgery, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States); Viers, Lyndsay D., E-mail: viers.lyndsay@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States); Hieken, Tina J, E-mail: hieken.tina@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Surgery, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Purpose: Cross-sectional imaging often is performed in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) and may identify level III axillary and extra-axillary nodal disease. Our aim was to investigate associations of radiologic nodal staging with pathological N (pN) stage at operation and to explore how this might aid surgical and radiotherapy treatment planning. Materials and methods: With IRB approval, we reviewed pre-treatment breast MRI, PET/CT, and CT imaging and clinicopathologic data on 348 breast cancer patients with imaging available for review undergoing NST followed by operation at our institution 1/2008-9/2013. We defined abnormal lymph node findings on MRI, CT, and PET/CT to include cortical thickening, FDG-avidity and loss of fatty hilum. Patients were assigned a radiologic nodal (rN) stage based on imaging findings. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP 10.1 software Results: Pre-NST imaging included axillary ultrasound in 338 patients (97%), breast MRI in 305 (88%) and PET/CT or CT in 215 (62%). 213 patients (61%) were biopsy-proven axillary lymph node-positive (LN+) pre-treatment. cT stage was T1 in 9%, T2 in 49%, T3 in 29%, T4 in 12%; median tumor size was 4 cm. Pre-treatment rN stage across all the patients was rN0 in 86 (25%), rN1 in 173 (50%), and rN3 in 89 (26%). rN3 disease included level III axillary, supraclavicular and suspicious internal mammary lymph nodes in 47 (53%), 32 (37%) and 45 (52%), respectively. Of patients LN+ at diagnosis, 78 (37%) were rN3. After NST, 162 patients (47%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 3 (5.9 ± 0.4) positive lymph nodes including 128 of 213 (60%) LN+ at diagnosis. Pre-NST rN stage correlated with the likelihood and extent of axillary disease at operation, p = 0.002. Fifty four of 89 rN3 patients (61%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 5 (8 ± 1) positive nodes. rN3 patients had larger nodal metastases (median 9 vs 6 mm) and more

  10. Cross-sectional imaging to evaluate the extent of regional nodal disease in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Tara L.; Glazebrook, Katrina N.; Murphy, Brittany L.; Viers, Lyndsay D.; Hieken, Tina J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Cross-sectional imaging often is performed in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) and may identify level III axillary and extra-axillary nodal disease. Our aim was to investigate associations of radiologic nodal staging with pathological N (pN) stage at operation and to explore how this might aid surgical and radiotherapy treatment planning. Materials and methods: With IRB approval, we reviewed pre-treatment breast MRI, PET/CT, and CT imaging and clinicopathologic data on 348 breast cancer patients with imaging available for review undergoing NST followed by operation at our institution 1/2008-9/2013. We defined abnormal lymph node findings on MRI, CT, and PET/CT to include cortical thickening, FDG-avidity and loss of fatty hilum. Patients were assigned a radiologic nodal (rN) stage based on imaging findings. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP 10.1 software Results: Pre-NST imaging included axillary ultrasound in 338 patients (97%), breast MRI in 305 (88%) and PET/CT or CT in 215 (62%). 213 patients (61%) were biopsy-proven axillary lymph node-positive (LN+) pre-treatment. cT stage was T1 in 9%, T2 in 49%, T3 in 29%, T4 in 12%; median tumor size was 4 cm. Pre-treatment rN stage across all the patients was rN0 in 86 (25%), rN1 in 173 (50%), and rN3 in 89 (26%). rN3 disease included level III axillary, supraclavicular and suspicious internal mammary lymph nodes in 47 (53%), 32 (37%) and 45 (52%), respectively. Of patients LN+ at diagnosis, 78 (37%) were rN3. After NST, 162 patients (47%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 3 (5.9 ± 0.4) positive lymph nodes including 128 of 213 (60%) LN+ at diagnosis. Pre-NST rN stage correlated with the likelihood and extent of axillary disease at operation, p = 0.002. Fifty four of 89 rN3 patients (61%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 5 (8 ± 1) positive nodes. rN3 patients had larger nodal metastases (median 9 vs 6 mm) and more

  11. Declining incidence of hip fractures and the extent of use of anti-osteoporotic therapy in Denmark 1997-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2009-01-01

    .7% in women. CONCLUSIONS: The decrease in hip fractures is much too large to be explained by the extent of anti-osteoporotic medication. Interestingly, the decrease in fracture rates also applied to men, despite much lower treatment rates. Potential explanations include smoking habits, obesity, national home...

  12. Multiple field optimisation for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, A.

    1997-01-01

    Intensity modulation in radiation treatment planning for photons has great potential for tailoring dose distributions in particularly challenging cases. Here we describe some preliminary work into the application of such methods to proton therapy. (author) 4 refs

  13. The rate and extent of improvement with therapy from the different types of aphasia in the first year after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, A M O; Shaw, S; Carrington, S; Griffiths, S

    2007-10-01

    To examine the rate and extent of improvement from the different types of aphasia in the first year after stroke. A prospective longitudinal study. A specialist stroke unit. Seventy-five aphasic patients with first-ever stroke. The type of aphasia was classified according to the criteria of the Western Aphasia Battery. The Western Aphasia Battery aphasia quotient was used to measure the initial severity and the rate and extent of improvement from aphasia. Assessments were made at baseline and 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks later. The median percentage increase in the Western Aphasia Battery aphasia quotient was statistically higher in patients with Broca's aphasia than in the other groups at all weeks. Patients with Wernicke's aphasia had a significantly greater median percentage increase in their aphasia quotient than those with conduction and anomic aphasia at weeks 12 and 24, but less than patients with global aphasia at week 24. Patients with Broca's aphasia appear to have the best prognosis for improvement of language function in the first year of stroke. The extent of improvement in patients with global aphasia is better than that of patients with Wernicke's aphasia.

  14. Biomaterials and Magnetic fields for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstanty

    2003-01-01

    The field of biomaterials has emerged as an important topic in the purview of NASA s new vision of research activities in the Microgravity Research Division. Although this area has an extensive track record in the medical field as borne out by the routine use of polymeric sutures, implant devices, and prosthetics, novel applications such as tissue engineering, artificial heart valves and controlled drug delivery are beginning to be developed. Besides the medical field, biomaterials and bio-inspired technologies are finding use in a host of emerging interdisciplinary fields such as self-healing and self-assembling structures, biosensors, fuel systems etc. The field of magnetic fluid technology has several potential applications in medicine. One of the emerging fields is the area of controlled drug delivery, which has seen its evolution from the basic oral delivery system to pulmonary to transdermal to direct inoculations. In cancer treatment by chemotherapy for example, targeted and controlled drug delivery has received vast scrutiny and substantial research and development effort, due to the high potency of the drugs involved and the resulting requirement to keep the exposure of the drugs to surrounding healthy tissue to a minimum. The use of magnetic particles in conjunction with a static magnetic field allows smart targeting and retention of the particles at a desired site within the body with the material transport provided by blood perfusion. Once so located, the therapeutical aspect (radiation, chemotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) of the treatment, now highly localized, can be implemented.

  15. The extent to which path-integral models account for evanescent (tunneling) and complex (near-field) waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranfagni, Anedio; Mugnai, Daniela; Cacciari, Ilaria

    2018-05-01

    The usefulness of a stochastic approach in determining time scales in tunneling processes (mainly, but not only, in the microwave range) is reconsidered and compared with a different approach to these kinds of processes, based on Feynman's transition elements. This latter method is found to be particularly suitable for interpreting situations in the near field, as results from some experimental cases considered here.

  16. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Corresponds to Drusen Location and Extent of Visual Field Defects in Superficial and Buried Optic Disc Drusen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmqvist, Lasse; Wegener, Marianne; Sander, Birgit A; Hamann, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are hyaline deposits located within the optic nerve head. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning is associated with the high prevalence of visual field defects seen in ODD patients. The goal of this study was to investigate the characteristics of patients with ODD and to compare the peripapillary RNFL thickness to the extent of visual field defects and anatomic location (superficial or buried) of ODD. Retrospective, cross sectional study. A total of 149 eyes of 84 ODD patients were evaluated. Sixty-five percent were female and 76% had bilateral ODD. Of 149 eyes, 109 had superficial ODD and 40 had buried ODD. Peripapillary RNFL thinning was seen in 83.6% of eyes, where optical coherence tomography was performed (n = 61). Eyes with superficial ODD had greater mean peripapillary RNFL thinning (P ≤ 0.0001) and visual field defects (P = 0.002) than eyes with buried ODD. There was a correlation between mean peripapillary RNFL thinning and visual field defects as measured by perimetric mean deviation (R-0.66; P = 0.0001). The most frequent visual field abnormalities were arcuate and partial arcuate defects. Peripapillary RNFL thickness correlates with anatomic location (superficial or buried) of ODD. Frequency and extent of visual field defects corresponded with anatomic location of ODD and peripapillary RNFL thickness, suggesting increased axonal damage in patients with superficial ODD.

  17. A field and glacier modelling based approach to determine the timing and extent of glaciation in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stephanie C.; Rowan, Ann V.; Barrow, Timothy T.; Plummer, Mitchell A.; Smith, Michael; Grab, Stefan W.; Carr, Simon J.; Fifield, L. Keith

    2014-05-01

    Moraines identified at high-altitude sites in southern Africa and dated to the last glacial maximum (LGM) indicate that the climate in this region was cold enough to support glaciers. Small glaciers are very sensitive to changes in temperature and precipitation and the identification of LGM moraines in southern Africa has important palaeoclimatic implications concerning the magnitude of temperature change and the seasonality of precipitation during the last glacial cycle. This paper presents a refined time-frame for likely glaciations based on surface exposure dating using Cl-36 at sites in Lesotho and reports results of a 2D glacier energy balance and ice flow modelling approach (Plummer and Phillips, 2003) to evaluate the most likely climatic scenarios associated with mapped moraine limits. Samples for surface exposure dating were collected from glacially eroded bedrock at several locations and yield ages within the timescale of the LGM. Scatter in the ages may be due to insufficient erosion of the bedrock surface due to the small and relatively thin nature of the glaciers. To determine the most likely climatic conditions that may have caused the glaciers to reach their mapped extent, we use a glacier-climate model, driven by data from local weather stations and a 30m (ASTER) DEM (sub-sampled to 10m) representation of the topographic surface. The model is forced using modern climate data for primary climatic controls (temperature and precipitation) and for secondary climatic parameters (relative humidity, cloudiness, wind speed). Various sensitivity tests were run by dropping temperature by small increments and by varying the amount of precipitation and its seasonality relative to present-day values. Results suggest that glaciers could have existed in the Lesotho highlands with a temperature depression of ~5-6 ºC and that the glaciers were highly sensitive to small changes in temperature. The additional accumulation of mass through wind redistribution appears to

  18. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Corresponds to Drusen Location and Extent of Visual Field Defects in Superficial and Buried Optic Disc Drusen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmqvist, Lasse; Wegener, Marianne; Sander, Birgit A

    2016-01-01

    (P = 0.002) than eyes with buried ODD. There was a correlation between mean peripapillary RNFL thinning and visual field defects as measured by perimetric mean deviation (R-0.66; P = 0.0001). The most frequent visual field abnormalities were arcuate and partial arcuate defects. CONCLUSIONS...... of patients with ODD and to compare the peripapillary RNFL thickness to the extent of visual field defects and anatomic location (superficial or buried) of ODD. METHODS: Retrospective, cross sectional study. RESULTS: A total of 149 eyes of 84 ODD patients were evaluated. Sixty-five percent were female and 76......% had bilateral ODD. Of 149 eyes, 109 had superficial ODD and 40 had buried ODD. Peripapillary RNFL thinning was seen in 83.6% of eyes, where optical coherence tomography was performed (n = 61). Eyes with superficial ODD had greater mean peripapillary RNFL thinning (P ≤ 0.0001) and visual field defects...

  19. Prism therapy and visual rehabilitation in homonymous visual field loss.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Evelyn C

    2011-02-01

    Homonymous visual field defects (HVFD) are common and frequently occur after cerebrovascular accidents. They significantly impair visual function and cause disability particularly with regard to visual exploration. The purpose of this study was to assess a novel interventional treatment of monocular prism therapy on visual functioning in patients with HVFD of varied etiology using vision targeted, health-related quality of life (QOL) questionnaires. Our secondary aim was to confirm monocular and binocular visual field expansion pre- and posttreatment.

  20. Assessing tumor extent on contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus full-field digital mammography and ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavika K; Garza, Sandra Alheli; Eversman, Sarah; Lopez-Alvarez, Yania; Kosiorek, Heidi; Pockaj, Barbara A

    To compare breast cancer size measurements on full-field digital mammography (FFDM), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CEDM), and ultrasound (US), with histologic tumor size used as the reference standard. Material and methods The HIPAA complaint, IRB approved study comprised 88 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent FFDM and CEDM;74 also had US. Breast density, histologic subtype, and maximum tumor measurements were recorded. Pearson correlation coefficients for FFDM, US, and CEDM vs histopathology were 0.598, 0.639, and 0.859, respectively (P<0.001). The following correlation coefficients were calculated for dense breasts (n=48): histopathology vs FFDM (0.555), US (0.633), and CEDM (0.843) (P<0.001); for nondense breasts (n=40), they were FFDM (0.618), US (0.512), and CEDM (0.885) (P<0.001). For size difference, the mean (SD) for histopathology vs FFDM, US, and CEDM was -1.3 (11.9) mm, -2.8 (11.1) mm, and 2.9 (9.5) mm, respectively. Limits of agreement were -24.8 to 22.0mm, -24.5 to 18.8mm, and -15.6 to 21.4mm, respectively. In patients with biopsy-proven malignancy, size measurements correlated well with histopathologic size, and were higher on CEDM than those for FFDM and US in patients with dense or nondense breasts. The added value of CEDM as a supplement to FFDM in determining tumor size, however, was greater in patients with dense breasts. CEDM may be a promising alternative preoperative measurement tool for breast cancer patients with dense breasts and/or limited access or contraindications to MRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prism therapy and visual rehabilitation in homonymous visual field loss.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Evelyn C

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Homonymous visual field defects (HVFD) are common and frequently occur after cerebrovascular accidents. They significantly impair visual function and cause disability particularly with regard to visual exploration. The purpose of this study was to assess a novel interventional treatment of monocular prism therapy on visual functioning in patients with HVFD of varied etiology using vision targeted, health-related quality of life (QOL) questionnaires. Our secondary aim was to confirm monocular and binocular visual field expansion pre- and posttreatment. METHODS: Twelve patients with acquired, documented HVFD were eligible to be included. All patients underwent specific vision-targeted, health-related QOL questionnaire and monocular and binocular Goldmann perimetry before commencing prism therapy. Patients were fitted with monocular prisms on the side of the HVFD with the base-in the direction of the field defect creating a peripheral optical exotropia and field expansion. After the treatment period, QOL questionnaires and perimetry were repeated. RESULTS: Twelve patients were included in the treatment group, 10 of whom were included in data analysis. Overall, there was significant improvement within multiple vision-related, QOL functioning parameters, specifically within the domains of general health (p < 0.01), general vision (p < 0.05), distance vision (p < 0.01), peripheral vision (p < 0.05), role difficulties (p < 0.05), dependency (p < 0.05), and social functioning (p < 0.05). Visual field expansion was shown when measured monocularly and binocularly during the study period in comparison with pretreatment baselines. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with HVFD demonstrate decreased QOL. Monocular sector prisms can improve the QOL and expand the visual field in these patients.

  2. Shaping magnetic fields to direct therapy to ears and eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, B; Kulkarni, S; Nacev, A; Sarwar, A; Preciado, D; Depireux, D A

    2014-07-11

    Magnetic fields have the potential to noninvasively direct and focus therapy to disease targets. External magnets can apply forces on drug-coated magnetic nanoparticles, or on living cells that contain particles, and can be used to manipulate them in vivo. Significant progress has been made in developing and testing safe and therapeutic magnetic constructs that can be manipulated by magnetic fields. However, we do not yet have the magnet systems that can then direct those constructs to the right places, in vivo, over human patient distances. We do not yet know where to put the external magnets, how to shape them, or when to turn them on and off to direct particles or magnetized cells-in blood, through tissue, and across barriers-to disease locations. In this article, we consider ear and eye disease targets. Ear and eye targets are too deep and complex to be targeted by a single external magnet, but they are shallow enough that a combination of magnets may be able to direct therapy to them. We focus on how magnetic fields should be shaped (in space and time) to direct magnetic constructs to ear and eye targets.

  3. Art Therapy and its Application in the Field of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Korbut, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The article broaches the subject of art therapy, which is also known as therapy through art. The activities carried out within it are based on the use of the therapeutic properties of the art practice. Art therapy is an extremely large concept and contains in itself many therapies based on its actions in art. Art therapy includes: therapy, which is based on plastic arts, music therapy, bibliotherapy, dramatherapy, dancetherapy and others. Writing about the properties of art therapy should als...

  4. Minimum Electric Field Exposure for Seizure Induction with Electroconvulsive Therapy and Magnetic Seizure Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won H; Lisanby, Sarah H; Laine, Andrew F; Peterchev, Angel V

    2017-05-01

    Lowering and individualizing the current amplitude in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been proposed as a means to produce stimulation closer to the neural activation threshold and more focal seizure induction, which could potentially reduce cognitive side effects. However, the effect of current amplitude on the electric field (E-field) in the brain has not been previously linked to the current amplitude threshold for seizure induction. We coupled MRI-based E-field models with amplitude titrations of motor threshold (MT) and seizure threshold (ST) in four nonhuman primates (NHPs) to determine the strength, distribution, and focality of stimulation in the brain for four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right-unilateral, and frontomedial) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) with cap coil on vertex. At the amplitude-titrated ST, the stimulated brain subvolume (23-63%) was significantly less than for conventional ECT with high, fixed current (94-99%). The focality of amplitude-titrated right-unilateral ECT (25%) was comparable to cap coil MST (23%), demonstrating that ECT with a low current amplitude and focal electrode placement can induce seizures with E-field as focal as MST, although these electrode and coil configurations affect differently specific brain regions. Individualizing the current amplitude reduced interindividual variation in the stimulation focality by 40-53% for ECT and 26% for MST, supporting amplitude individualization as a means of dosing especially for ECT. There was an overall significant correlation between the measured amplitude-titrated ST and the prediction of the E-field models, supporting a potential role of these models in dosing of ECT and MST. These findings may guide the development of seizure therapy dosing paradigms with improved risk/benefit ratio.

  5. Static Magnetic Field Therapy: A Critical Review of Treatment Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha P. Colbert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Static magnetic field (SMF therapy, applied via a permanent magnet attached to the skin, is used by people worldwide for self-care. Despite a lack of established SMF dosage and treatment regimens, multiple studies are conducted to evaluate SMF therapy effectiveness. Our objectives in conducting this review are to: (i summarize SMF research conducted in humans; (ii critically evaluate reporting quality of SMF dosages and treatment parameters and (iii propose a set of criteria for reporting SMF treatment parameters in future clinical trials. We searched 27 electronic databases and reference lists. Only English language human studies were included. Excluded were studies of electromagnetic fields, transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnets placed on acupuncture points, animal studies, abstracts, posters and editorials. Data were extracted on clinical indication, study design and 10 essential SMF parameters. Three reviewers assessed quality of reporting and calculated a quality assessment score for each of the 10 treatment parameters. Fifty-six studies were reviewed, 42 conducted in patient populations and 14 in healthy volunteers. The SMF treatment parameters most often and most completely described were site of application, magnet support device and frequency and duration of application. Least often and least completely described were characteristics of the SMF: magnet dimensions, measured field strength and estimated distance of the magnet from the target tissue. Thirty-four (61% of studies failed to provide enough detail about SMF dosage to permit protocol replication by other investigators. Our findings highlight the need to optimize SMF dosing parameters for individual clinical conditions before proceeding to a full-scale clinical trial.

  6. Unifying the field: developing an integrative paradigm for behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifert, G H; Forsyth, J P; Schauss, S L

    1993-06-01

    The limitations of early conditioning models and treatments have led many behavior therapists to abandon conditioning principles and replace them with loosely defined cognitive theories and treatments. Systematic theory extensions to human behavior, using new concepts and processes derived from and built upon the basic principles, could have prevented the divisive debates over whether psychological dysfunctions are the results of conditioning or cognition and whether they should be treated with conditioning or cognitive techniques. Behavior therapy could also benefit from recent advances in experimental cognitive psychology that provide objective behavioral methods of studying dysfunctional processes. We suggest a unifying paradigm for explaining abnormal behavior that links and integrates different fields of study and processes that are frequently believed to be incompatible or antithetical such as biological vulnerability variables, learned behavioral repertoires, and that also links historical and current antecedents of the problem. An integrative paradigmatic behavioral approach may serve a unifying function in behavior therapy (a) by promoting an understanding of the dysfunctional processes involved in different disorders and (b) by helping clinicians conduct functional analyses that lead to theory-based, individualized, and effective treatments.

  7. Hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji

    1994-01-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum of a Maxwell distribution higher than the room temperature of 300 K, has been studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in a living body for a deep-seated tumor in neutron capture therapy (NCT). Simulation calculations using MCNP-V3 were carried out in order to investigate the characteristics of the hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field. From the results of simulation calculations, the following were confirmed: (i) The irradiation field of the hyper-thermal neutrons is feasible by using some scattering materials with high temperature, such as Be, BeO, C, SiC and ZrH 1.7 . Especially, ZrH 1.7 is thought to be the best material because of good characteristics of up-scattering for thermal neutrons. (ii) The ZrH 1.7 of 1200 K yields the hyper-thermal neutrons of a Maxwell-like distribution at about 2000 K and the treatable depth is about 1.5 cm larger comparing with the irradiation of the thermal neutrons of 300 K. (iii) The contamination by the secondary gamma-rays from the scattering materials can be sufficiently eliminated to the tolerance level for NCT through the bismuth layer, without the larger change of the energy spectrum of hyper-thermal neutrons. ((orig.))

  8. Control of thermal therapies with moving power deposition field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Dhiraj; Minor, Mark A; Skliar, Mikhail; Roemer, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    A thermal therapy feedback control approach to control thermal dose using a moving power deposition field is developed and evaluated using simulations. A normal tissue safety objective is incorporated in the controller design by imposing constraints on temperature elevations at selected normal tissue locations. The proposed control technique consists of two stages. The first stage uses a model-based sliding mode controller that dynamically generates an 'ideal' power deposition profile which is generally unrealizable with available heating modalities. Subsequently, in order to approximately realize this spatially distributed idealized power deposition, a constrained quadratic optimizer is implemented to compute intensities and dwell times for a set of pre-selected power deposition fields created by a scanned focused transducer. The dwell times for various power deposition profiles are dynamically generated online as opposed to the commonly employed a priori-decided heating strategies. Dynamic intensity and trajectory generation safeguards the treatment outcome against modelling uncertainties and unknown disturbances. The controller is designed to enforce simultaneous activation of multiple normal tissue temperature constraints by rapidly switching between various power deposition profiles. The hypothesis behind the controller design is that the simultaneous activation of multiple constraints substantially reduces treatment time without compromising normal tissue safety. The controller performance and robustness with respect to parameter uncertainties is evaluated using simulations. The results demonstrate that the proposed controller can successfully deliver the desired thermal dose to the target while maintaining the temperatures at the user-specified normal tissue locations at or below the maximum allowable values. Although demonstrated for the case of a scanned focused ultrasound transducer, the developed approach can be extended to other heating modalities with

  9. Accuracy of field alignment in abdominal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortmann, R. D.; Hess, C. F.; Meisner, C.; Schmidberger, H.; Bamberg, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of field alignment in a homogeneous group of patients undergoing radiotherapy of the abdomen (adjuvant treatment of the paraaortic region in Stage I testicular seminoma). To evaluate the predictive value of the first verification on field placement errors during subsequent treatment delivery. Methods and Materials: In 45 patients, linear and rotational discrepancies were measured between simulation and first check and between 10 consecutive verification films. Results: For the total group of patients, the distribution of all deviations showed mean values between 2.3 mm and -2.7 mm with standard deviations of 3.9 mm to 4.7 mm for linear discrepancies, and -0.5 deg. to 0.3 deg. with standard deviations of 1.2 deg. to 2.1 deg. for rotational discrepancies, respectively. For all patients, deviations for the transition from simulator to the treatment machine were similar to deviations during subsequent treatment delivery, with 95% of all absolute deviations < 10.0 mm and 4 deg. , respectively. When performing correlation analysis between deviations at first check and during treatment delivery, a correlation for lateral displacements and a borderline correlation for caudal displacements could be found. There was no correlation for cranial and rotational displacements. Conclusions: Although a trend of deviations for subsequent treatment delivery may be shown at first check, our analysis indicates that the first verification cannot reliably predict inaccuracies during treatment delivery. Random fluctuations of field displacements of up to 1.0 cm prevail. They must be considered when prescribing the safety margins of the planned target volume and determining cutoff points for corrective actions in abdominal radiation therapy

  10. Four-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations demonstrating how the extent of intensity-modulation impacts motion effects in proton therapy lung treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Grassberger, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare motion effects in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) lung treatments with different levels of intensity modulation.Methods: Spot scanning IMPT treatment plans were generated for ten lung cancer patients for 2.5Gy(RBE) and 12Gy(RBE) fractions and two distinct energy-dependent spot sizes (σ∼8–17 mm and ∼2–4 mm). IMPT plans were generated with the target homogeneity of each individual field restricted to 20% ). These plans were compared to full IMPT (IMPT full ), which had no restriction on the single field homogeneity. 4D Monte Carlo simulations were performed upon the patient 4DCT geometry, including deformable image registration and incorporating the detailed timing structure of the proton delivery system. Motion effects were quantified via comparison of the results of the 4D simulations (4D-IMPT 20% , 4D-IMPT full ) with those of a 3D Monte Carlo simulation (3D-IMPT 20% , 3D-IMPT full ) upon the planning CT using the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), V 95 and D 1 -D 99 . The effects in normal lung were quantified using mean lung dose (MLD) and V 90% .Results: For 2.5Gy(RBE), the mean EUD for the large spot size is 99.9%± 2.8% for 4D-IMPT 20% compared to 100.1%± 2.9% for 4D-IMPT full . The corresponding values are 88.6%± 8.7% (4D-IMPT 20% ) and 91.0%± 9.3% (4D-IMPT full ) for the smaller spot size. The EUD value is higher in 69.7% of the considered deliveries for 4D-IMPT full . The V 95 is also higher in 74.7% of the plans for 4D-IMPT full , implying that IMPT full plans experience less underdose compared to IMPT 20% . However, the target dose homogeneity is improved in the majority (67.8%) of plans for 4D-IMPT 20% . The higher EUD and V 95 suggests that the degraded homogeneity in IMPT full is actually due to the introduction of hot spots in the target volume, perhaps resulting from the sharper in-target dose gradients. The greatest variations between the IMPT 20% and IMPT full deliveries are observed for patients with the

  11. Combined high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopy increase extent of resection and progression-free survival for pituitary adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Peter T.; Evans, John A.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Chole, Richard A.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Haughey, Bruce H.; Getz, Anne E.; Silverstein, Julie; Rich, Keith M.; Kim, Albert H.; Dacey, Ralph G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The clinical benefit of combined intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and endoscopy for transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resection has not been completely characterized. This study assessed the impact of microscopy, endoscopy, and/or iMRI on progression-free survival, extent of resection status (gross-, near-, and subtotal resection), and operative complications. Methods Retrospective analyses were performed on 446 transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma surgeries at a single institution between 1998 and 2012. Multivariate analyses were used to control for baseline characteristics, differences during extent of resection status, and progression-free survival analysis. Results Additional surgery was performed after iMRI in 56/156 cases (35.9 %), which led to increased extent of resection status in 15/156 cases (9.6 %). Multivariate ordinal logistic regression revealed no increase in extent of resection status following iMRI or endoscopy alone; however, combining these modalities increased extent of resection status (odds ratio 2.05, 95 % CI 1.21–3.46) compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery. Multivariate Cox regression revealed that reduced extent of resection status shortened progression-free survival for near- versus gross-total resection [hazard ratio (HR) 2.87, 95 % CI 1.24–6.65] and sub- versus near-total resection (HR 2.10; 95 % CI 1.00–4.40). Complication comparisons between microscopy, endoscopy, and iMRI revealed increased perioperative deaths for endoscopy versus microscopy (4/209 and 0/237, respectively), but this difference was non-significant considering multiple post hoc comparisons (Fisher exact, p = 0.24). Conclusions Combined use of endoscopy and iMRI increased pituitary adenoma extent of resection status compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery, and increased extent of resection status was associated with longer progression-free survival. Treatment modality combination did not significantly impact

  12. The Extent of Practicing the Skills of Team Work Leadership among Heads of Departments in Directorate of Education in Methnb, Saudi Arabia: A Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Norah Muhayya; Tayeb, Aziza

    2016-01-01

    Sound leadership has an important role in achieving the success of any institution; so the leader must possess some work team leadership skills such as decision-taking, communication, motivation, conflict management and meeting management. The current study is an attempt to identify the extent of practicing team work leadership skills among the…

  13. Awareness descriptions of three PTSD diagnosed patients’ inner experiences before, during and after Thought Field Therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Martinussen, Anita

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Thought Field Therapy (TFT) is a psychotherapeutic modality often utilised for single-session trauma treatment. It applies sensory stimulation to desensitise painful feelings, and may thus be called a psycho-sensory therapy. Qualitative research on TFT is particularly scarce, and this processual study seeks to fill that void. Research question How do PTSD patients describe their inner experiences before, during and after Thought Field Therapy? Method Three patients diagnose...

  14. Impact of tumor extent and location on treatment outcome in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Saito, Yoshihiro

    1996-01-01

    The results of treatment of 141 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive radiation therapy at Gunma University Hospital between 1976 and 1989 were retrospectively analyzed. Radiation was given with standard fractionation for a planned prophylactic dose of 40 Gy over 4 weeks and a definitive dose of 60 Gy over 6 weeks or more. The two- and five-year survival rates were 27% and 12% for stage IIIA, and 18% and 8% for stage IIIB, respectively (P=0.052). By univariate analysis, a primary tumor less than 5 cm in diameter was also an important predictor of survival (P=0.008). As for tumor location, the patients with primary tumors in the upper lobes or the superior segment of the lower lobes of the lung lived longer than those with primary tumors at any other site (P=0.032). Patients with epidermoid carcinoma had a higher survival rate at 5 years than those with other histologic types (14% vs 3%, P=0.074). Multivariate analysis showed that among tumor characteristics, the site of the primary tumor, the pattern of tumor spread and N stage were significantly associated with overall survival. Among the patients with stage III NSCLC, those with stage IIIA epidermoid carcinoma in the upper lobe or the superior segment of the lower lobe of the lung were considered to be the most favorable candidates for definitive radiation therapy. (author)

  15. Measurement and analysis of electromagnetic fields of pulsed magnetic field therapy systems for private use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaermann, Thomas; Suter, Fabian; Osterwalder, Diego; Luechinger, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Recently, pulsed magnetic field therapy (PMFT) systems have become available for private use. Although they may be applied without medical supervision, only a little is known about their field quantities. In this study, the spatial distribution and the temporal characteristics of the magnetic flux densities of three PMFT systems, available in Europe, were analysed. In close proximity to the surface, the maxima of the peak magnetic flux densities were 461 μT, 170 μT and 133 μT, respectively. At a distance of 30 cm above the whole body mat, the peak magnetic flux density was 77 μT. The excitation patterns consisted of repeating bursts with carrier frequencies between 210 and 1667 Hz. In conclusion, magnetic flux densities were far above International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection reference levels. Since these systems are supposed to be medical devices as well as wellness devices, risk analysis of PMFT systems and the effectiveness of these devices need to be investigated in future studies.

  16. A quality assurance program of simulators in radiotherapy. Pt. 2. Extent and results of long-term quality assurance tests on a therapy simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Sievers, K.; Kober, B.

    1997-01-01

    Background: Since 1990 we follow a quality assurance program with periodical tests of functional performance values of a 16-year-old simulator. Material and Method: For this purpose we adopted and modified German standards for quality assurance on linear accelerators and international standards elaborated for simulators (International Electrotechnical Commission). The tests are subdivided into daily visual checks (light field indication, optical distance indicator, isocentre-indicating devices, indication of gantry and collimator angles) and monthly and annually tests of relevant simulator parameters. Some important examples demonstrate the small variation of parameters over 6 years: Position of the light field centre when rotating the collimator, diameter of the isocentre circle when rotating the gantry, accuracy of the isocentre indication device, and coincidence of light field and simulated radiation field. Results: As an important result we can state, that by these rigid periodic tests it was possible to detect and compensate deteriorations of simulators quality rapidly. Conclusions: Technical improvements and specific calling-in of maintenance personnel whenever felt appropriate provided performance characteristics of our old simulator which are required by international recommendations as a basis for modern radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  17. What is Financial Therapy? Discovering Mechanisms and Aspects of an Emerging Field

    OpenAIRE

    Kristy L. Archuleta; Emily A. Burr; Anita K. Dale; Anthony Canale; Dan Danford; Erika Rasure; Jeff Nelson; Kelley Williams; Kurt Schindler; Brett Coffman; Ed Horwitz

    2012-01-01

    Very little research currently exists specifically on the topic of financial therapy. In this emerging field, it is important to lay the groundwork for future practice and study. The purpose of this study was to answer the question, “What are the mechanisms and aspects of financial therapy?” Using qualitative methods, eighteen members of the Financial Therapy Association were interviewed by members of the research team. The participants included six financial professi...

  18. Monte Carlo study of MLC fields for cobalt therapy machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komanduri M Ayyangar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An automated Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC system has been developed as add-on for the cobalt-60 teletherapy machines available in India. The goal of the present computational study is to validate the MLC design using Monte Carlo (MC modeling. The study was based on the Kirloskar-supplied Phoenix model machines that closely match the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL theratron-80 machine. The MLC is a retrofit attachment to the collimator assembly, with 14 non-divergent leaf pairs of 40 mm thick, 7 mm wide, and 150 mm long tungsten alloy plates with rounded edges and 20 mm tongue and 2 mm groove in each leaf. In the present work, the source and collimator geometry has been investigated in detail to arrive at a model that best represents the measured dosimetric data. The authors have studied in detail the proto-I MLC built for cobalt-60. The MLC field sizes were MC simulated for 2 × 2 cm 2 to 14 × 14 cm 2 square fields as well as irregular fields, and the percent depth dose (PDD and profile data were compared with ROPS† treatment planning system (TPS. In addition, measured profiles using the IMATRIXX system‡ were also compared with the MC simulations. The proto-I MLC can define radiation fields up to 14 × 14 cm΂ within 3 mm accuracy. The maximum measured leakage through the leaf ends in closed condition was 3.4% and interleaf leakage observed was 7.3%. Good agreement between MC results, ROPS and IMATRIXX results has been observed. The investigation also supports the hypothesis that optical and radiation field coincidence exists for the square fields studied with the MLC. Plots of the percent depth dose (PDD data and profile data for clinically significant irregular fields have also been presented. The MC model was also investigated to speed up the calculations to allow calculations of clinically relevant conformal beams.

  19. Comparison of Out-Of-Field Neutron Equivalent Doses in Scanning Carbon and Proton Therapies for Cranial Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athar, B.; Henker, K.; Jäkel, O.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare the secondary neutron lateral doses from scanning carbon and proton beam therapies. Method and Materials: We simulated secondary neutron doses for out-of-field organs in an 11-year old male patient. Scanned carbon and proton beams were simulated...

  20. Exploring the Usefulness of MISR-HR Products to Estimate Maize Crop Extent and Using Field Evidence to Evaluate the Results in South Africa's Free State Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, M. M.; Knox, N. M.; Hunt, L. A.; Kleyn, L.

    2014-12-01

    The MISR instrument on NASA's Terra platform has been operating for almost 15 years. Standard products are generated at a spatial resolution of 1.1 km or coarser, but a recently developed method to re-analyze the Level-1B2 data allows the retrieval of biogeophysical products at the native spatial resolution of the instrument (275 m). This development opens new opportunities to better address issues such as the management of agricultural production and food security. South African maize production is of great economic and social importance, not only nationally, but on the global market too, being one of the top ten maize producing countries. Seasonal maize production statistics are currently based on a combination of field measurements and estimates derived from manually digitizing high resolution imagery from the SPOT satellite. The field measurements are collected using the Producer Independent Crop Estimate System (PICES) developed by Crop Estimates Committee of the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. There is a strong desire to improve the quality of these statistics, to generate those earlier, and to automate the process to encompass larger areas. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the MISR-HR spectral and directional products, combined with the finer spatial resolution and the relatively frequent coverage afforded by that instrument, to address these needs. The study area is based in the Free State, South Africa, one of the primary maize growing areas in the country, and took place during the 2012-2013 summer growing season. The significance of the outcomes will be evaluated in the context of the 14+ years of available MISR data.

  1. Therapy by stationary photon fields from a 42 MeV betatron using wedge filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicke, L.; Kaercher, K.H.; Naesiger, H.; Prokosch, E.; Vienna Univ.

    1975-01-01

    The dose distribution in photon beams from a 42 MeV betatron using wedge filters of lead with different angles of slope is described. The wedge coefficient to be considered at a field size of 10 x 10 cm is given. The scope for isodoses modified by wedge filters is discussed with regard to stationary-field photon therapy. (orig.) [de

  2. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a finite element simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced the maximum electric field of 2.1-2.5 V cm-1 and 1.1-2.2 V cm-1 in the brain, corresponding to 6.2-7.2 times and 1.2-2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much larger with ECT (up to 100%) than with MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double-cone coil was the most focal, and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800-900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects.

  3. The relationship between the presence and extent of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and the risk of local recurrence (LR) in patients with infiltrating cancer of the breast treated with conservative surgery (CS) and radiation therapy (RT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abner, A.; Schnitt, S.; Connolly, J.; Recht, A.; Bornstein, B.; Nixon, A.; Hetelekidis, S.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Lobular carcinoma in situ, when found in an otherwise benign breast biopsy, is associated with an increased risk of developing a subsequent invasive breast cancer. Among patients with an infiltrating cancer resected without margin assessment, the extent of ductal carcinoma in situ is an established risk factor for LR after CS and RT. However, the association between the presence and extent of LCIS and the risk of recurrence in patients treated with CS and RT for infiltrating breast cancer remains at issue. Materials and Methods: Between 1968 and 1986, 1625 patients with clinical stage T1 and T2 invasive breast cancer were treated at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy with complete gross tumor excision and RT to a total of ≥60 Gy. Of these, 1160 had infiltrating ductal cancer (IDC), infiltrating lobular cancer (ILC), or mixed IDC/ILC (IMC) and sufficient pathologic material for review by the study pathologists (SS and JC) to establish the presence or absence of LCIS and were evaluable at 10 years. LCIS was present adjacent to the invasive cancer in (43(1027)) IDC (4%), and either within or adjacent to the infiltrating tumor in (70(82)) ILC (85%) and (26(51)) IMC (51%). Margins were evaluable in 35% of LCIS-positive patients and 33% of LCIS-negative patients. The median follow-up time was 153 months for surviving patients. Results: The 10-year crude risk of recurrence by first site of failure for all patients was as follows: Furthermore, there was no significant relationship between the extent of the LCIS adjacent to the invasive tumor and the LR risk: The 10-year crude risk of contralateral breast cancer was 7% for the patients with LCIS and 7% for those without LCIS. CONCLUSION: We conclude that neither the presence nor the extent of LCIS is related to the risk of LR in patients with invasive breast cancer treated with CS and RT. Thus, LCIS should not be considered a contraindication to breast conservation with CS and RT

  4. Television system for verification and documentation of treatment fields during intraoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, B.A.; Harrington, F.S.; Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) involves direct treatment of tumors or tumor beds with large single doses of radiation. The verification of the area to be treated before irradiation and the documentation of the treated area are critical for IORT, just as for other types of radiation therapy. A television system which allows the target area to be directly imaged immediately before irradiation has been developed. Verification and documentation of treatment fields has made the IORT television system indispensable

  5. Investigation properties of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and magnetic field-dependent hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatnasab, Z.; Abnisa, F.; Daud, W. M. A. Wan

    2018-03-01

    The application of superparamagnetic nanoparticles as heating agents in hyperthermia therapy has made a therapeutic breakthrough in cancer treatment. The high efficiency of this magnetic hyperthermia therapy has derived from a great capability of superparamagnetic nanoparticles to generate focused heat in inaccessible tumors being effectively inactivated. The main challenges of this therapy are the improvement of the induction heating power of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the control of the hyperthermia temperature in a secure range of 42 °C to 47 °C, at targeted area. The variation of these hyperthermia properties is principally dependent on the magnetic nanoparticles as well as the magnetic field leading to enhance the efficiency of magnetic hyperthermia therapy at targeted area and also avoid undue heating to healthy cells. The present study evaluates the magnetic hyperthermia therapy through the determination of superparamagnetic nanoparticles properties and magnetic field’ parameters.

  6. What is Financial Therapy? Discovering Mechanisms and Aspects of an Emerging Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy L. Archuleta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Very little research currently exists specifically on the topic of financial therapy. In this emerging field, it is important to lay the groundwork for future practice and study. The purpose of this study was to answer the question, “What are the mechanisms and aspects of financial therapy?” Using qualitative methods, eighteen members of the Financial Therapy Association were interviewed by members of the research team. The participants included six financial professionals, six mental health professions, and six researchers/educators all engaged in financial therapy. Six categories emerged from the analysis of data, including: (a integration, (b complexity, (c help seeker issues, (d helper issues, (e process, and (f research. The analysis resulted in a conceptual framework and ten theoretical assumptions of financial therapy.

  7. External beam radiotherapy of localized prostatic adenocarcinoma. Evaluation of conformal therapy, field number and target margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennernaes, B.; Rikner, G.; Letocha, H.; Nilsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify factors of importance in the planning of external beam radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Seven patients with urogenital cancers were planned for external radiotherapy of the prostate. Four different techniques were used, viz. a 4-field box technique and four-, five- or six-field conformal therapy set-ups combined with three different margins (1-3 cm). The evaluations were based on the doses delivered to the rectum and the urinary bladder. A normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was calculated for each plan using Lyman's dose volume reduction method. The most important factors that resulted in a decrease of the dose delivered to the rectum and the bladder were the use of conformal therapy and smaller margins. Conformal therapy seemed more important for the dose distribution in the urinary bladder. Five- and six-field set-ups were not significantly better than those with four fields. NTCP calculations were in accordance with the evaluation of the dose volume histograms. To conclude, four-field conformal therapy utilizing reduced margins improves the dose distribution to the rectum and the urinary bladder in the radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.)

  8. Practical Fluid Therapy and Treatment Modalities for Field Conditions for Horses and Foals with Gastrointestinal Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, C Langdon

    2018-04-01

    With advances in technology and owner education, field management in equine veterinary medicine continues to evolve. Equine gastrointestinal disease is one of the most common types of emergencies evaluated by equine practitioners, and many of these patients can be effectively managed in the field. Although the equine veterinarian must make numerous decisions, fluid therapy, pain management, and antimicrobial use are 3 of the major choices that must be addressed when initiating field treatment of equine gastrointestinal disease. This article addresses the practical use of these 3 treatment categories that are essential to field practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Androgen Deprivation Therapy Use in the Setting of High-dose Radiation Therapy and the Risk of Prostate Cancer–Specific Mortality Stratified by the Extent of Competing Mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Brent S., E-mail: brose44@gmail.com [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui; Wu, Jing [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Moran, Brian J. [Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, Westmont, Illinois (United States); Doseretz, Daniel E.; Katin, Michael J.; Ross, Rudolf H.; Salenius, Sharon A. [21st Century Oncology, Inc, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); D' Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: The addition of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to radiation therapy (RT) is the standard of care for men with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer (PC). However, whether competing mortality (CM) affects the ability of ADT to improve, survival remains unanswered. Methods and Materials: We calculated a CM risk score using a Fine-Gray semiparametric model that included age and cardiometabolic comorbidities from a cohort of 17,669 men treated with high-dose RT with or without supplemental ADT for nonmetastatic PC. Fine and Gray competing risk regression analysis was used to assess whether ADT reduced the risk of PC-specific mortality for men with a low versus a high risk of CM among the 4550 patients within the intermediate- and high-risk cohort after adjustment for established PC prognostic factors, year of treatment, site, and ADT propensity score. Results: After a median follow-up of 8.4 years, 1065 men had died, 89 (8.36%) of PC. Among the men with a low CM score, ADT use was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of PC-specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 0.35, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.87, P=.02) but was not for men with high CM (adjusted hazard ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval 0.77-2.30, P=.30). Conclusions: Adding ADT to high-dose RT appears to be associated with decreased PC-specific mortality risk in men with a low but not a high CM score. These data should serve to heighten awareness about the importance of considering competing risks when determining whether to add ADT to RT for older men with intermediate- or high-risk PC.

  10. Androgen Deprivation Therapy Use in the Setting of High-dose Radiation Therapy and the Risk of Prostate Cancer–Specific Mortality Stratified by the Extent of Competing Mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Brent S.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Wu, Jing; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Moran, Brian J.; Doseretz, Daniel E.; Katin, Michael J.; Ross, Rudolf H.; Salenius, Sharon A.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The addition of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to radiation therapy (RT) is the standard of care for men with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer (PC). However, whether competing mortality (CM) affects the ability of ADT to improve, survival remains unanswered. Methods and Materials: We calculated a CM risk score using a Fine-Gray semiparametric model that included age and cardiometabolic comorbidities from a cohort of 17,669 men treated with high-dose RT with or without supplemental ADT for nonmetastatic PC. Fine and Gray competing risk regression analysis was used to assess whether ADT reduced the risk of PC-specific mortality for men with a low versus a high risk of CM among the 4550 patients within the intermediate- and high-risk cohort after adjustment for established PC prognostic factors, year of treatment, site, and ADT propensity score. Results: After a median follow-up of 8.4 years, 1065 men had died, 89 (8.36%) of PC. Among the men with a low CM score, ADT use was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of PC-specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 0.35, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.87, P=.02) but was not for men with high CM (adjusted hazard ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval 0.77-2.30, P=.30). Conclusions: Adding ADT to high-dose RT appears to be associated with decreased PC-specific mortality risk in men with a low but not a high CM score. These data should serve to heighten awareness about the importance of considering competing risks when determining whether to add ADT to RT for older men with intermediate- or high-risk PC.

  11. The regional extent of suppression: strabismics versus nonstrabismics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Raiju Jacob; Clavagnier, Simon R; Bobier, William; Thompson, Benjamin; Hess, Robert F

    2013-10-09

    Evidence is accumulating that suppression may be the cause of amblyopia rather than a secondary consequence of mismatched retinal images. For example, treatment interventions that target suppression may lead to better binocular and monocular outcomes. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that the measurement of suppression may have prognostic value for patching therapy. For these reasons, the measurement of suppression in the clinic needs to be improved beyond the methods that are currently available, which provide a binary outcome. We describe a novel quantitative method for measuring the regional extent of suppression that is suitable for clinical use. The method involves a dichoptic perceptual matching procedure at multiple visual field locations. We compare a group of normal controls (mean age: 28 ± 5 years); a group with strabismic amblyopia (four with microesotropia, five with esotropia, and one with exotropia; mean age: 35 ± 10 years); and a group with nonstrabismic anisometropic amblyopia (mean age: 33 ± 12 years). The extent and magnitude of suppression was similar for observers with strabismic and nonstrabismic amblyopia. Suppression was strongest within the central field and extended throughout the 20° field that we measured. Suppression extends throughout the central visual field in both strabismic and anisometropic forms of amblyopia. The strongest suppression occurs within the region of the visual field corresponding to the fovea of the fixing eye.

  12. Characterization of the exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector for small field applications in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehr, C.; Lindsay, C.; Beaudry, J.; Penner, C.; Strgar, V.; Lee, R.; Duzenli, C.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate dosimetry in small field proton therapy is challenging, particularly for applications such as ocular therapy, and suitable detectors for this purpose are sought. The Exradin W1 plastic scintillating fibre detector is known to out-perform most other detectors for determining relative dose factors for small megavoltage photon beams used in radiotherapy but its potential in small proton beams has been relatively unexplored in the literature. The 1 mm diameter cylindrical geometry and near water equivalence of the W1 makes it an attractive alternative to other detectors. This study examines the dosimetric performance of the W1 in a 74 MeV proton therapy beam with particular focus on detector response characteristics relevant to relative dose measurement in small fields suitable for ocular therapy. Quenching of the scintillation signal is characterized and demonstrated not to impede relative dose measurements at a fixed depth. The background cable-only (Čerenkov and radio-fluorescence) signal is 4 orders of magnitude less than the scintillation signal, greatly simplifying relative dose measurements. Comparison with other detectors and Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the W1 is useful for measuring relative dose factors for field sizes down to 5 mm diameter and shallow spread out Bragg peaks down to 6 mm in depth.

  13. Matching Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy to an Anterior Low Neck Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amdur, Robert J.; Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan; Mendenhall, William; Hinerman, Russell

    2007-01-01

    When using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to treat head and neck cancer with the primary site above the level of the larynx, there are two basic options for the low neck lymphatics: to treat the entire neck with IMRT, or to match the IMRT plan to a conventional anterior 'low neck' field. In view of the potential advantages of using a conventional low neck field, it is important to look for ways to minimize or manage the problems of matching IMRT to a conventional radiotherapy field. Treating the low neck with a single anterior field and the standard larynx block decreases the dose to the larynx and often results in a superior IMRT plan at the primary site. The purpose of this article is to review the most applicable studies and to discuss our experience with implementing a technique that involves moving the position of the superior border of the low neck field several times during a single treatment fraction

  14. New three-dimensional moving field radiation therapy for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsuyama, Fuyuki; Kanno, Tetsuo; Nagata, Yutaka; Koga, Sukehiko [Fujita-Gakuen Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan); Jain, V K

    1992-06-01

    A new modified rotation radiation method called 'three-dimensional moving field radiation therapy' is described. The new method uses rotation in many planes while maintaining the same isocenter to achieve a good spatial dose distribution. This delivers a high dose to tumors and spares the surrounding normal structures. This easy method can be carried out using the equipment for conventional rotation radiation therapy. The new method was superior to the one plane rotation radiation therapy using a physical phantom with film, a chemical phantom using the iodine-starch reaction, and a new biological model using tumor cells. Treatment of six brain tumors irradiated with total air doses of 50-60 Gy caused no hair loss or radiation necrosis. (author).

  15. [The cell micro-encapsulation techniques and its advancement in the field of gene therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoling; Cai, Shaohui

    2006-12-01

    It is no doubt that the gene therapy using recombinant engineering cells provides a novel approach to many refractory diseases. However, the transplant rejection from the host's immune system against heterogeneous cells has been the main handicap of its clinical application. The modern cell micro-encapsulation technique with good immune isolation makes it possible to overcome this problem and has shown potential application foreground in clinical therapies for a lot of diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Hemophiliac disease. This article reviews mainly the relative materials and techniques in processing micro-encapsulation, the host cells used to construct the recombinant genetic engineering cells and application of cell micro-encapsulation technique in the field of gene therapy.

  16. Improvement of field matching in segmented-field electron conformal therapy using a variable-SCD applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richert, John D [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Fields, Robert S [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809-3482 (United States); II, Kenneth L Matthews [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Boyd, Robert A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate that the use of an electron applicator with energy-dependent source-to-collimator distances (SCDs) will significantly improve the dose homogeneity for abutted electron fields in segmented-field electron conformal therapy (ECT). Multiple Coulomb scattering theory was used to calculate and study the P{sub 80-20} penumbra width of off-axis dose profiles as a function of air gap and depth. Collimating insert locations with air gaps (collimator-to-isocenter distance) of 5.0, 7.5, 11.5, 17.5 and 19.5 cm were selected to provide equal P{sub 80-20} at a depth of 1.5 cm in water for energies of 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV, respectively, for a Varian 2100EX radiation therapy accelerator. A 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator was modified accordingly, and collimating inserts used in the variable-SCD applicator for segmented-field ECT were constructed with diverging edges using a computer-controlled hot-wire cutter, which resulted in 0.27 mm accuracy in the abutted edges. The resulting electron beams were commissioned for the pencil-beam algorithm (PBA) on the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system. Four hypothetical planning target volumes (PTVs) and one patient were planned for segmented-field ECT using the new variable-SCD applicator, and the resulting dose distributions were compared with those calculated for the identical plans using the conventional 95 cm SCD applicator. Also, a method for quality assurance of segmented-field ECT dose plans using the variable-SCD applicator was evaluated by irradiating a polystyrene phantom using the treatment plans for the hypothetical PTVs. Treatment plans for all four of the hypothetical PTVs using the variable-SCD applicator showed significantly improved dose homogeneity in the abutment regions of the segmented-field ECT plans. This resulted in the dose spread (maximum dose-minimum dose), {sigma}, and D{sub 90-10} in the PTV being reduced by an average of 32%, 29% and 32%, respectively

  17. Considerations on occupational therapy in a custody and psychiatric treatment hospital: The psychosocial field versus the forensic psychiatry field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Santos de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Custody and Psychiatric Treatment Hospital (CPTH is ambivalent and ambiguous in its essence, because it gathers not only the characteristics of a mental institution, but also those of a prison – epitomized by the security system. By analyzing this context, one can perceive the importance of implementing some knowhow able to attend the real needs of the individuals hospitalized in this type of institution. This interpretation of their needs must be done in association with a work in mental health based on the principles of the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform and Psychosocial Field Practice. The objective of this study is to reflect on the real possibilities of implementing mental health work based on the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform, inserted in the Psychosocial Field, in institutions such as CPTHs. This reflection occurs from the conflicts arisen in the beginning of Occupational Therapy service in a CPTH located in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, as well as through the analysis of the reality in which this Custody Hospital is inserted. When studying the Psychiatric Reform Law, ordinance 28.195/1988, which deliberates on the functions of Occupational Therapy in the CPTHs of the state of Sao Paulo, and the Penal Execution Law, the reality was analyzed from its dimensions, to conclude that the institutional forces ruled the work process of occupational therapists. Therefore, the structural, particular, singular dimensions that rule the CPTH were understood and, after that, the “nodes” that hinder the implementation of mental health work in the Psychosocial Field in this type of institution were revealed.

  18. Quantitative approach to skin field cancerization using a nanoencapsulated photodynamic therapy agent: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passos SK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Simone K Passos,1,2 Paulo EN de Souza,3 Priscila KP Soares,1,3 Danglades RM Eid,1,2 Fernando L Primo,4 Antonio Cláudio Tedesco,4 Zulmira GM Lacava,1 Paulo C Morais3,51University of Brasília, Institute of Biological Sciences, DF, Brazil; 2Foundation for Teaching and Research on Health Sciences, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 3University of Brasília, Institute of Physics, Brasília, DF, Brazil; 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Philosophy, Sciences and Letters of Ribeirão Preto, Laboratory of Photobiology and Photomedicine, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Department of Control Science and Engineering, Hua-Zhong University of Science and Technology, Wuham, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: This paper introduces a new nanoformulation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (nano-ALA as well as a novel quantitative approach towards evaluating field cancerization for actinic keratosis and/or skin photodamage. In this pilot study, we evaluated field cancerization using nano-ALA and methyl aminolevulinate (MAL, the latter being commercialized as Metvix®.Methods and results: Photodynamic therapy was used for the treatment of patients with selected skin lesions, whereas the fluorescence of the corresponding photosensitizer was used to evaluate the time evolution of field cancerization in a quantitative way. Field cancerization was quantified using newly developed color image segmentation software. Using photodynamic therapy as the precancer skin treatment and the approach introduced herein for evaluation of fluorescent area, we found that the half-life of field cancerization reduction was 43.3 days and 34.3 days for nano-ALA and MAL, respectively. We also found that nano-ALA targeted about 45% more skin lesion areas than MAL. Further, we found the mean reduction in area of skin field cancerization was about 10% greater for nano-ALA than for MAL.Conclusion: Although preliminary, our findings indicate that the efficacy of nano-ALA in

  19. Improvement of dose distributions in abutment regions of intensity modulated radiation therapy and electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B.; Sethi, Anil; Emami, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used to radiate tumors that are in close proximity to vital organs. Targets consisting of a deep-seated region followed by a superficial one may be treated with abutting photon and electron fields. However, no systematic study regarding matching of IMRT and electron beams was reported. In this work, a study of dose distributions in the abutment region between tomographic and step-and-shoot IMRT and electron fields was carried out. A method that significantly improves dose homogeneity between abutting tomographic IMRT and electron fields was developed and tested. In this method, a target region that is covered by IMRT was extended into the superficial target area by ∼2.0 cm. The length and shape of IMRT target extension was chosen such that high isodose lines bent away from the region treated by the electrons. This reduced the magnitude of hot spots caused by the 'bulging effect' of electron field penumbra. To account for the uncertainties in positioning of the IMRT and electron fields, electron field penumbra was modified using conventional (photon) multileaf collimator (MLC). The electron beam was delivered in two steps: half of the dose delivered with MLCs in retracted position and another half with MLCs extended to the edge of electron field that abuts tomographic IMRT field. The experimental testing of this method using film dosimetry has demonstrated that the magnitude of the hot spots was reduced from ∼45% to ∼5% of the prescription dose. When an error of ±1.5 mm in field positioning was introduced, the dose inhomogeneity in the abutment region did not exceed ±15% of the prescription dose. With step-and-shoot IMRT, the most homogeneous dose distribution was achieved when there was a 3 mm gap between the IMRT and electron fields

  20. Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG)accelerators and their medical application in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourrier, J.

    2008-10-01

    Radiotherapy uses particle beams to irradiate and kill cancer tumors while sparing healthy tissues. Bragg peak shape of the proton energy loss in matter allows a ballistic improvement of the dose deposition compared with X rays. Thus, the irradiated volume can be precisely adjusted to the tumour. This thesis, in the frame of the RACCAM project, aims to the study and the design of a proton therapy installation based on a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator in order to build a spiral sector FFAG magnet for validation. First, we present proton therapy to define medical specifications leading to the technical specifications of a proton therapy installation. Secondly, we introduce FFAG accelerators through their past and on-going projects which are on their way around the world before developing the beam dynamic theories in the case of invariant focusing optics (scaling FFAG). We describe modelling and simulation tools developed to study the dynamics in a spiral scaling FFAG accelerator. Then we explain the spiral optic parameter search which has leaded to the construction of a magnet prototype. Finally, we describe the RACCAM project proton therapy installation starting from the injector cyclotron and ending with the extraction system. (author)

  1. Hadron cancer therapy complex using nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator and gantry design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Keil

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG rings for cancer hadron therapy offer reduced physical aperture and large dynamic aperture as compared to scaling FFAGs. The variation of tune with energy implies the crossing of resonances during acceleration. Our design avoids intrinsic resonances, although imperfection resonances must be crossed. We consider a system of three nonscaling FFAG rings for cancer therapy with 250 MeV protons and 400   MeV/u carbon ions. Hadrons are accelerated in a common radio frequency quadrupole and linear accelerator, and injected into the FFAG rings at v/c=0.1294. H^{+}/C^{6+} ions are accelerated in the two smaller/larger rings to 31 and 250  MeV/68.8 and 400   MeV/u kinetic energy, respectively. The lattices consist of doublet cells with a straight section for rf cavities. The gantry with triplet cells accepts the whole required momentum range at fixed field. This unique design uses either high-temperature superconductors or superconducting magnets reducing gantry magnet size and weight. Elements with a variable field at the beginning and at the end set the extracted beam at the correct position for a range of energies.

  2. Dose Determination using alanine detectors in a Mixed Neutron and Gamma Field for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Liver Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for liver malignancies is being investigated at the University of Mainz. One important aim is the set-up of a reliable dosimetry system. Alanine dosimeters have previously been applied for dosimetry of mixed radiation fields in antiproton therapy, and ma...

  3. Realization of fluence field modulated CT on a clinical TomoTherapy megavoltage CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P; Hermus, James; Geurts, Mark; Smilowitz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The multi-leaf collimator (MLC) assembly present on TomoTherapy (Accuray, Madison WI) radiation therapy (RT) and mega voltage CT machines is well suited to perform fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT). In addition, there is a demand in the RT environment for FFMCT imaging techniques, specifically volume of interest (VOI) imaging.A clinical TomoTherapy machine was programmed to perform VOI. Four different size ROIs were placed at varying distances from isocenter. Projections intersecting the VOI received ‘full dose’ while those not intersecting the VOI received 30% of the dose (i.e. the incident fluence for non VOI projections was 30% of the incident fluence for projections intersecting the VOI). Additional scans without fluence field modulation were acquired at ‘full’ and 30% dose. The noise (pixel standard deviation) and mean CT number were measured inside the VOI region and compared between the three scans. Dose maps were generated using a dedicated TomoTherapy treatment planning dose calculator.The VOI-FFMCT technique produced an image noise 1.05, 1.00, 1.03, and 1.05 times higher than the ‘full dose’ scan for ROI sizes of 10 cm, 13 cm, 10 cm, and 6 cm respectively within the VOI region. The VOI-FFMCT technique required a total imaging dose equal to 0.61, 0.69, 0.60, and 0.50 times the ‘full dose’ acquisition dose for ROI sizes of 10 cm, 13 cm, 10 cm, and 6 cm respectively within the VOI region.Noise levels can be almost unchanged within clinically relevant VOIs sizes for RT applications while the integral imaging dose to the patient can be decreased, and/or the image quality in RT can be dramatically increased with no change in dose relative to non-FFMCT RT imaging. The ability to shift dose away from regions unimportant for clinical evaluation in order to improve image quality or reduce imaging dose has been demonstrated. This paper demonstrates that FFMCT can be performed using the MLC on a clinical TomoTherapy machine for the

  4. Analysis of radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field in breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2002-01-01

    In a retrospective study of radiation-induced pulmonary changes for patients with breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer, we sent questionnaires to the main hospitals in Japan. In this study, we analyzed pulmonary changes after tangential whole-breast irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field. The questionnaires included patients data, therapy data, and lung injury information between August 1999 and May 2000. On the first questionnaires, answer letters were received from 107 institutions out of 158 (67.7%). On the second questionnaires, response rate (hospitals which had radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field) was 21.7% (23/106). We could find no risk factors of this type of pneumonitis. We suggested that lung irradiation might trigger this type of pneumonitis which is clinically similar to BOOP (bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia). It developed in 1.5-2.1% among the patients with breast conserving surgery and tangential whole-breast irradiation. And it is likely appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy. (author)

  5. ALS Biomarkers for Therapy Development: State of the Field & Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatar, Michael; Boylan, Kevin; Jeromin, Andreas; Rutkove, Seward B.; Berry, James; Atassi, Nazem; Bruijn, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers have become the focus of intense research in the field of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with the hope that they might aid therapy development efforts. Notwithstanding the discovery of many candidate biomarkers, none have yet emerged as validated tools for drug development. In this review we present a nuanced view of biomarkers based on the perspective of the FDA; highlight the distinction between discovery and validation; describe existing and emerging resources; review leading biological fluid-based, electrophysiological and neuroimaging candidates relevant to therapy development efforts; discuss lessons learned from biomarker initiatives in related neurodegenerative diseases; and outline specific steps that we, as a field, might take in order to hasten the development and validation of biomarkers that will prove useful in enhancing efforts to develop effective treatments for ALS patients. Most important among these perhaps is the proposal to establish a federated ALS Biomarker Consortium (ABC) in which all interested and willing stakeholders may participate with equal opportunity to contribute to the broader mission of biomarker development and validation. PMID:26574709

  6. Pseudomembranous colitis within radiotherapy field following concurrent chemoradiation therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen BJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bing-Jie Shen,1 Shih-Chiang Lin,2 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,3 Yueh-Hung Chou,4 Li-Ming Tseng,5 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,6,71Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Anatomical Pathology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 7Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Development of nonantibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis has been reported in patients receiving chemotherapy. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who received concurrent chemoradiation therapy after surgery for stage III pT3N1M0 rectal cancer. After completion of the therapy, the patient presented with a 2-week history of intermittent watery diarrhea (seven to nine times per day. However, the patient was afebrile and laboratory examination revealed no evidence of leukocytosis. Computed tomography disclosed inflammation of the sigmoid colon, infiltrative changes around the anastomotic site, and edematous changes straddling the serosal surface. Colonoscopic examination revealed multiple whitish patches within the radiation field, a finding suggestive of pseudomembranous colitis. No concomitant antibiotics were used during the period of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Empirical oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 hours was administrated for 2 weeks. At the end of this treatment, stool culture was negative for Clostridium difficile. Physicians should be aware of the potential for the development of

  7. BEMER Electromagnetic Field Therapy Reduces Cancer Cell Radioresistance by Enhanced ROS Formation and Induced DNA Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Storch

    Full Text Available Each year more than 450,000 Germans are expected to be diagnosed with cancer subsequently receiving standard multimodal therapies including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. On top, molecular-targeted agents are increasingly administered. Owing to intrinsic and acquired resistance to these therapeutic approaches, both the better molecular understanding of tumor biology and the consideration of alternative and complementary therapeutic support are warranted and open up broader and novel possibilities for therapy personalization. Particularly the latter is underpinned by the increasing utilization of non-invasive complementary and alternative medicine by the population. One investigated approach is the application of low-dose electromagnetic fields (EMF to modulate cellular processes. A particular system is the BEMER therapy as a Physical Vascular Therapy for which a normalization of the microcirculation has been demonstrated by a low-frequency, pulsed EMF pattern. Open remains whether this EMF pattern impacts on cancer cell survival upon treatment with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and the molecular-targeted agent Cetuximab inhibiting the epidermal growth factor receptor. Using more physiological, three-dimensional, matrix-based cell culture models and cancer cell lines originating from lung, head and neck, colorectal and pancreas, we show significant changes in distinct intermediates of the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways and enhanced cancer cell radiosensitization associated with increased DNA double strand break numbers and higher levels of reactive oxygen species upon BEMER treatment relative to controls. Intriguingly, exposure of cells to the BEMER EMF pattern failed to result in sensitization to chemotherapy and Cetuximab. Further studies are necessary to better understand the mechanisms underlying the cellular alterations induced by the BEMER EMF pattern and to clarify the application areas for human disease.

  8. Enhancing predicted efficacy of tumor treating fields therapy of glioblastoma using targeted surgical craniectomy: A computer modeling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshoej, Anders Rosendal; Saturnino, Guilherme Bicalho; Rasmussen, Line Kirkegaard

    2016-01-01

    the potential of the intervention to improve the clinical efficacy of TTFields therapy of brain cancer. Methods: We used finite element analysis to calculate the electrical field distribution in realistic head models based on MRI data from two patients: One with left cortical/subcortical glioblastoma and one......Objective: The present work proposes a new clinical approach to TTFields therapy of glioblastoma. The approach combines targeted surgical skull removal (craniectomy) with TTFields therapy to enhance the induced electrical field in the underlying tumor tissue. Using computer simulations, we explore...... with deeply seated right thalamic anaplastic astrocytoma. Field strength was assessed in the tumor regions before and after virtual removal of bone areas of varying shape and size (10 to 100 mm) immediately above the tumor. Field strength was evaluated before and after tumor resection to assess realistic...

  9. Effect of organ size and position on out-of-field dose distributions during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarboro, Sarah B; White, Allen; Yaldo, Derek; Kry, Stephen F; Howell, Rebecca M; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A

    2010-01-01

    Mantle field irradiation has historically been the standard radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. It involves treating large regions of the chest and neck with high doses of radiation (up to 30 Gy). Previous epidemiological studies on the incidence of second malignancies following radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma have revealed an increased incidence of second tumors in various organs, including lung, breast, thyroid and digestive tract. Multiple other studies, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, indicated an increased incidence in digestive tract including stomach cancers following mantle field radiotherapy. Assessment of stomach dose is challenging because the stomach is outside the treatment field but very near the treatment border where there are steep dose gradients. In addition, the stomach can vary greatly in size and position. We sought to evaluate the dosimetric impact of the size and variable position of the stomach relative to the field border for a typical Hodgkin lymphoma mantle field irradiation. The mean stomach dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimetry for nine variations in stomach size and position. The mean doses to the nine stomach variations ranged from 0.43 to 0.83 Gy when 30 Gy was delivered to the treatment isocenter. Statistical analyses indicated that there were no significant differences in the mean stomach dose when the stomach was symmetrically expanded up to 3 cm or shifted laterally (medial, anterior or posterior shifts) by up to 3 cm. There was, however, a significant (P > 0.01) difference in the mean dose when the stomach was shifted superiorly or inferiorly by ≥2.5 cm.

  10. Do immigrants from Turkey, Pakistan and Ex-Yugoslavia with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes initiate recommended statin therapy to the same extent as Danish-born residents? A nationwide register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez-Ramirez, Diana; Krasnik, Allan; Kildemoes, Helle Wallach

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore whether newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients without previous cardiovascular disease (CVD) initiate preventive statin therapy regardless of ethnic background. METHODS: Using nationwide individual-level registers, we followed a cohort of Danish-born residents and immigrants...... the odds ratios (ORs) of early statin therapy initiation (within 180 days after first GLM dispensing) are the same regardless of ethnic background. While age and gender were included as confounders in the basic model, income was included in the second model as a potential mediating variable. RESULTS....... CONCLUSIONS: Immigrants from Turkey, Pakistan and Ex-Yugoslavia with type 2 diabetes were less likely to initiate statin therapy than Danish-born residents-despite a similar or even higher risk of CVD. The treatment inequities associated with ethnicity were more pronounced in women than men...

  11. The heart field effect: Synchronization of healer-subject heart rates in energy therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Christine Caldwell

    2008-01-01

    Recent health research has focused on subtle energy and vibrational frequency as key components of health and healing. In particular, intentional direction of bioenergy is receiving increasing scientific attention. This study investigates the effect of the healer's electromagnetic (EM) heart field upon subjects during energy healing as measured by synchronization of heart rates and scores on a Subjective Units of Distress (SUD) scale and a Profile of Mood States (POMS) inventory. A nonequivalent pretest-posttest design was used based on heart rate comparisons between healer and subject and correlated with pre-and posttest SUD and POMS scores. Subjects included those who sat within the 3- to 4-foot "strong" range of the independent variable, the healer's heart field, while performing self-application of WHEE (the wholistic hybrid derived from EMDR [eye movement desensitization and reprocessing], and EFT [emotional freedom technique]), a meridian-based tapping technique (n=50); and those who performed the same process beyond the 15- to 18-foot range of the healer's EM heart field (n=41). The dependent variables were heart rate, SUD, and POMS inventory. All subjects completed these measures within 1 hour. Study results showed statistically significant heart-rate synchronization with the intervention population. In addition, SUD and POMS scores demonstrated considerably more improvement than in the control population, indicating additional benefit beyond the meridian-based therapies, such as WHEE, alone. Additional findings and future research recommendations are presented in this article.

  12. Treatment outcomes of extended-field radiation therapy for thoracic superficial esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Doo Yeul; Moon, Sung Ho; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Moon Soo; Lee, Jong Yeul; Suh, Yang Gun [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of extended-field radiation therapy for patients with thoracic superficial esophageal cancer (SEC). From May 2007 to October 2016, a total of 24 patients with thoracic SEC (T1a and T1b) who underwent definitive radiotherapy and were analyzed retrospectively. The median total radiotherapy dose was 64 Gy (range, 54 to 66 Gy) in conventional fractionation. All 24 patients received radiotherapy to whole thoracic esophagus and 23 patients received elective nodal irradiation. The supraclavicular lymph nodes, the celiac lymph nodes, and both of those nodal areas were included in 11, 3, and 9 patients, respectively. The median follow-up duration was 28.7 months (range 7.9 to 108.0 months). The 3-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 95.2%, 89.7%, and 78.7%, respectively. There were 5 patients (20.8%) with progression of disease, 2 local failures (8.3%) and 3 (12.5%) regional failures. Three patients also experienced distant metastasis and had died of disease progression. There were no treatment-related toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Definitive extended-field radiotherapy for thoracic SEC showed durable disease control rates in medically inoperable and endoscopically unfit patients. Even extended-field radiotherapy with elective nodal irradiation was safe without grade 3 or 4 toxicities.

  13. Treatment outcomes of extended-field radiation therapy for thoracic superficial esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Doo Yeul; Moon, Sung Ho; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Moon Soo; Lee, Jong Yeul; Suh, Yang Gun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of extended-field radiation therapy for patients with thoracic superficial esophageal cancer (SEC). From May 2007 to October 2016, a total of 24 patients with thoracic SEC (T1a and T1b) who underwent definitive radiotherapy and were analyzed retrospectively. The median total radiotherapy dose was 64 Gy (range, 54 to 66 Gy) in conventional fractionation. All 24 patients received radiotherapy to whole thoracic esophagus and 23 patients received elective nodal irradiation. The supraclavicular lymph nodes, the celiac lymph nodes, and both of those nodal areas were included in 11, 3, and 9 patients, respectively. The median follow-up duration was 28.7 months (range 7.9 to 108.0 months). The 3-year overall survival, local control, and progression-free survival rates were 95.2%, 89.7%, and 78.7%, respectively. There were 5 patients (20.8%) with progression of disease, 2 local failures (8.3%) and 3 (12.5%) regional failures. Three patients also experienced distant metastasis and had died of disease progression. There were no treatment-related toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Definitive extended-field radiotherapy for thoracic SEC showed durable disease control rates in medically inoperable and endoscopically unfit patients. Even extended-field radiotherapy with elective nodal irradiation was safe without grade 3 or 4 toxicities

  14. Neutron field characterization and dosimetry at the TRIUMF proton therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In 1972 the 500 MeV H' Cyclotron of the TRIUMF (Tri University Meson Factory) located in Vancouver, Canada became operational. Beside Meson Physics, high-energy protons of various energy and beam current levels from the TRIUMF Cyclotron are used for scientific research and biomedical applications. Recently, a 500 MeV proton beam from the cyclotron was used as the booster beam for the radioactive ion beam facility, ISAC (Isotope Separator Accelerator) and a second beam as primary irradiation source for the Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF). The major commercial applications of the PIF are the provision of high-energy proton beams for radiation hardness testing of electronic components used in space applications (NASA) and proton therapy of ocular tumors (British Columbia Proton Therapy Facility). The PIF vault was constructed within the main accelerator hall of the TRIUMF using stacks of large concrete blocks. An intense field of fast neutrons is produced during the interaction of high-energy proton beam with target materials, such as, beam stops, collimators and beam energy degraders. The leakage of such neutrons due to insufficient radiological shielding or through the shielding discontinuities may constitute a major share of the personnel radiation exposure of the radiation workers. The neutron energy distribution and dose equivalent near a lead beam stopper bombarded with 116 MeV and 65 MeV collimated proton beams at the Ocular Tumor irradiation facility were evaluated using a Bonner-Sphere Spectrometer and a REM counter respectively. The results were utilized to investigate efficacy of the existing radiological shielding of the PIF. This paper highlights experimental methods to analyze the high-energy accelerator produced neutron beam and basic guideline for the radiological shielding designs of irradiation vault of Proton Therapy facilities

  15. Coupling of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) therapy to molecular grounds of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Richard HW

    2018-01-01

    In this review we compile results cited in reliable journals that show a ratio for the use of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) in therapy, indeed. This is true especially for chronically inflamed joints. Furthermore, we try to link this therapeutic approach to the molecular background of chronic inflammation and arthritis. At first we start with the clinical outcome of PEMF therapy. Then, we look for possible triggers and an electromagnetic counterpart that is endogenously inherent in cell biology and in the tissues of interest. Finally, we want to investigate causal molecular and cellular mechanisms of possible PEMF actions. It shows that there are endogenous mechanisms, indeed, which can act as triggers for PEMF like the resting membrane potential as well as resonance mechanisms in charged moieties like membrane transporters. Especially voltage-gated calcium channels can be triggered. These may lead into specific signaling pathways and also may elicit nitric oxide as well as moderate radical reactions, which can ultimately lead to e.g. NFκB-like reactions. Concerted in the right way, these reactions can cause a kind of cell protection and ultimately lead to a dampening of inflammatory signals like interleukins.

  16. Carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy using a four-field box technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Million, R.R.; Bova, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of 16 patients with carcinoma of the cervical esophagus treated with radiation therapy at the University of Florida between September 1966 and March 1979. There is a minimum 2-year followup. Analysis of local control revealed 1/1 T1, 0/3 T2, 2/8 T3, and 1/2 TX lesions that were controlled by radiation therapy for 33, 47, 55, and 80 months. Two patients died less than 2 years after treatment without evidence of cancer. Excluding the sole T1 lesion, there were no local controls below 6700 rad; 3 of 5 lesions were controlled at doses in excess of 6700 rad. Late complications were stenosis (2 patients) and Lhermitte's syndrome (1 patient). An external beam technique consisting of an isocentric four-field box with a beeswax compensator has been devised in an effort to solve the technical problems in delivering high-dose radiation to the primary and regional nodes without producing myelitis

  17. THE LATEST RECOGNITIONS ON THE FIELD OF OSTEOARTHRITIS – ITS ETHIOPATHOGENESIS AND THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bregar

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some new recognitions on the field of osteoarthritis, its ethiopathogenesis and therapy are presented.Conclusions. OA is the most common rheumatic disease of joint which characterize the breakdown of cartilage. It is very painful and disabling disease with an increasing worldwide prevalence. Despite intensive research over past few decades the cause remain unknown and also the treatment remains unsatisfactory, nonspecific, only symptomatic until the expensive joint surgery replacement is necessary. The need for expensive joint surgery grows because of aging of population all over the world. In research there is important to find the mechanisms in the pathogenesis of the disease and on that base the disease – modified agents, which act against cartilage destruction factors or cause cartilage protection.

  18. TH-EF-204-02: Small Field Radiation Therapy: Physics and Recent Recommendations From IAEA and ICRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seuntjens, J.

    2016-01-01

    Joanna E. Cygler, Jan Seuntjens, J. Daniel Bourland, M. Saiful Huq, Josep Puxeu Vaque, Daniel Zucca Aparicio, Tatiana Krylova, Yuri Kirpichev, Eric Ford, Caridad Borras Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SRT) utilizes small static and dynamic (IMRT) fields, to successfully treat malignant and benign diseases using techniques such as Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). SRT is characterized by sharp dose gradients for individual fields and their resultant dose distributions. For appropriate targets, small field radiotherapy offers improved treatment quality by allowing better sparing of organs at risk while delivering the prescribed target dose. Specialized small field treatment delivery systems, such as robotic-controlled linear accelerators, gamma radiosurgery units, and dynamic arc linear accelerators may utilize rigid fixation, image guidance, and tumor tracking, to insure precise dose delivery to static or moving targets. However, in addition to great advantages, small field delivery techniques present special technical challenges for dose calibration due to unique geometries and small field sizes not covered by existing reference dosimetry protocols such as AAPM TG-51 or IAEA TRS 398. In recent years extensive research has been performed to understand small field dosimetry and measurement instrumentation. AAPM, IAEA and ICRU task groups are expected to provide soon recommendations on the dosimetry of small radiation fields. In this symposium we will: 1] discuss the physics, instrumentation, methodologies and challenges for small field radiation dose measurements; 2] review IAEA and ICRU recommendations on prescribing, recording and reporting of small field radiation therapy; 3] discuss selected clinical applications and technical aspects for specialized image-guided, small field, linear accelerator based treatment techniques such as IMRT and SBRT. Learning Objectives: To learn the physics of small fields in contrast to

  19. TH-EF-204-02: Small Field Radiation Therapy: Physics and Recent Recommendations From IAEA and ICRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seuntjens, J. [McGill University (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Joanna E. Cygler, Jan Seuntjens, J. Daniel Bourland, M. Saiful Huq, Josep Puxeu Vaque, Daniel Zucca Aparicio, Tatiana Krylova, Yuri Kirpichev, Eric Ford, Caridad Borras Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SRT) utilizes small static and dynamic (IMRT) fields, to successfully treat malignant and benign diseases using techniques such as Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). SRT is characterized by sharp dose gradients for individual fields and their resultant dose distributions. For appropriate targets, small field radiotherapy offers improved treatment quality by allowing better sparing of organs at risk while delivering the prescribed target dose. Specialized small field treatment delivery systems, such as robotic-controlled linear accelerators, gamma radiosurgery units, and dynamic arc linear accelerators may utilize rigid fixation, image guidance, and tumor tracking, to insure precise dose delivery to static or moving targets. However, in addition to great advantages, small field delivery techniques present special technical challenges for dose calibration due to unique geometries and small field sizes not covered by existing reference dosimetry protocols such as AAPM TG-51 or IAEA TRS 398. In recent years extensive research has been performed to understand small field dosimetry and measurement instrumentation. AAPM, IAEA and ICRU task groups are expected to provide soon recommendations on the dosimetry of small radiation fields. In this symposium we will: 1] discuss the physics, instrumentation, methodologies and challenges for small field radiation dose measurements; 2] review IAEA and ICRU recommendations on prescribing, recording and reporting of small field radiation therapy; 3] discuss selected clinical applications and technical aspects for specialized image-guided, small field, linear accelerator based treatment techniques such as IMRT and SBRT. Learning Objectives: To learn the physics of small fields in contrast to

  20. Quinolone and glycopeptide therapy for infection in mouse following exposure to mixed-field neutron-γ-photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, I.; Tom, S.P.; Ledney, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of increased doses of mixed-field neutron-γ-photon irradiation on bacterial translocation and subsequent sepsis, and the influence of antimicrobial therapy on these events, were studied in the C3H/HeN mouse. The results demonstrate a relationship between the doses of mixed-field radiation and the rates of infection due to Enterobacteriaceae. While L-ofloxacin therapy reduces the infection rate, prolongs survival and prevents mortality, the addition of a glycopeptide can enhance systemic infection by resistant bacteria in the irradiated host. (author)

  1. Quinolone and glycopeptide therapy for infection in mouse following exposure to mixed-field neutron-[gamma]-photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, I. (Naval Medical Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States) Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)); Tom, S.P.; Ledney, G.D. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The effects of increased doses of mixed-field neutron-[gamma]-photon irradiation on bacterial translocation and subsequent sepsis, and the influence of antimicrobial therapy on these events, were studied in the C3H/HeN mouse. The results demonstrate a relationship between the doses of mixed-field radiation and the rates of infection due to Enterobacteriaceae. While L-ofloxacin therapy reduces the infection rate, prolongs survival and prevents mortality, the addition of a glycopeptide can enhance systemic infection by resistant bacteria in the irradiated host. (author).

  2. ESR-dosimetry in thermal and epithermal neutron fields for application in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Tobias

    2016-01-22

    Dosimetry is essential for every form of radiotherapy. In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) mixed neutron and gamma fields have to be considered. Dose is deposited in different neutron interactions with elements in the penetrated tissue and by gamma particles, which are always part of a neutron field. The therapeutic dose in BNCT is deposited by densely ionising particles, originating from the fragmentation of the isotope boron-10 after capture of a thermal neutron. Despite being investigated for decades, dosimetry in neutron beams or fields for BNCT remains complex, due to the variety in type and energy of the secondary particles. Today usually ionisation chambers combined with metal foils are used. The applied techniques require extensive effort and are time consuming, while the resulting uncertainties remain high. Consequently, the investigation of more effective techniques or alternative dosimeters is an important field of research. In this work the possibilities of ESR-dosimeters in those fields have been investigated. Certain materials, such as alanine, generate stable radicals upon irradiation. Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometry the amount of radicals, which is proportional to absorbed dose, can be quantified. Different ESR detector materials have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany, with five setups, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been conducted in two epithermal neutron beams. The detector response, however, strongly depends on the dose depositing particle type and energy. It is hence necessary to accompany measurements by computational modelling and simulation. In this work the Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to calculate absorbed doses and dose components. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using amorphous track models. For the simulation, detailed models of

  3. Target volume delineation and field setup. A practical guide for conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nancy Y. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Radiation Oncology; Lu, Jiade J. (eds.) [National Univ. Health System, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-03-01

    Practical handbook on selection and delineation of tumor volumes and fields for conformal radiation therapy, including IMRT. Helpful format facilitating use on a step-by-step basis in daily practice. Designed to ensure accurate coverage of commonly encountered tumors along their routes of spread. This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to appropriately and confidently delineate tumor volumes/fields for conformal radiation therapy, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), in patients with commonly encountered cancers. The orientation of this handbook is entirely practical, in that the focus is on the illustration of clinical target volume (CTV) delineation for each major malignancy. Each chapter provides guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection for a particular disease, explains how the anatomy of lymphatic drainage shapes the selection of the target volume, and presents detailed illustrations of volumes, slice by slice, on planning CT images. While the emphasis is on target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal therapy and IMRT, information is also provided on conventional radiation therapy field setup and planning for certain malignancies for which IMRT is not currently suitable.

  4. The incidence of breast cancer following mantle field radiation therapy as a function of dose and technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinger, Alfred; Wasserman, Todd H.; Klein, Eric E.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Tracy; Piephoff, James V.; Kucik, Nancy A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: There is an increased incidence of breast cancer following mantle field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease (HD). We reviewed the experience at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (MIR) for radiation factors related to the development of breast cancer after mantle field radiation therapy for HD. Methods: The radiation therapy records of 152 women treated with mantle field irradiation for HD at MIR between 1966-1985 were reviewed for the development of breast cancer and treatment-related factors. All patients had a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. The treatment era (1966-1974 vs. 1975-1985), stage of HD, mediastinal dose, axillary dose, maximum dose from the anterior field (anterior d max dose), the anterior-posterior:posterior-anterior (AP:PA) ratio, age at the time of treatment, length of follow-up, and history of splenectomy were analyzed as possible contributing factors for the development of breast cancer. The observed number of breast cancers was compared to the expected number based on age-adjusted incidences from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Results: Ten breast cancers occurred in the population. Eight involved an upper outer quadrant. In a multivariate analysis, the development of breast cancer was significantly associated with axillary dose. Patients in the early treatment era were at an increased risk for the development of breast cancer due to high anterior d max and breast doses from weighting the fields anteriorly on a low energy linear accelerator. The use of current radiation therapy techniques was not related to an increased risk of breast cancer with a median follow-up of 13 years. Conclusions: A high dose to the axilla and the anterior d max point is significantly associated with the development of breast cancer after mantle field irradiation for HD. Efforts to protect the breast from high doses will likely lessen the increased risk of breast cancer in women treated with radiation therapy for HD

  5. Music Therapy as a Caring Intervention: Swedish Musicians Learning a New Professional Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Gunnar; Nystrom, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The question of competence in providing music therapy has rarely been the focus of interest in empirical research, as most music therapy research aims at measuring outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyse and describe musicians' learning processes when they study music therapy as a caring intervention. An initial presumption is…

  6. Extent of undertreatment and overtreatment with cholesterol-lowering therapy according to European guidelines in 92,348 Danes without ischemic cardiovascular disease and diabetes in 2004-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2017-01-01

    35-100 years recruited from 2004 through 2014 in the Copenhagen General Population Study. Each individual was assigned their 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular disease according to the European SCORE chart based on age, sex, smoking, total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure. European...... guidelines recommend cholesterol-lowering therapy definitely at ≥10% risk and LDL cholesterol ≥1.8 mmol/L, definitely at 5-9% risk and LDL cholesterol ≥2.5 mmol/L, possibly at 1-4% risk and LDL cholesterol ≥3 mmol/L, but not at ...,131 had 1-4% risk, and 23,104 had Definite undertreatment and overtreatment according to guidelines were found in 19% and 0.2% or in 187,660 and 1570 per million 35...

  7. Involved field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease autologous bone marrow transplantation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezner, Richard D.; Nademanee, Auayporn; Niland, Joyce C.; Vora, Nayana; Forman, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    From 1986 through 1992, involved-field radiation therapy (IF-RT) was administered to 29 of 86 patients with recurrent Hodgkin's disease (HD) who received a high-dose cyclophosphamide/etoposide regimen with autologous bone marrow transplantation (A-BMT). Patients without a significant history of prior RT received total body irradiation (TBI), initially as a single dose 5-7.5 Gy, and subsequently with fractionated TBI (F-TBI) delivering 12 Gy. Previously irradiated patients received a high-dose BCNU regimen instead of TBI. IF-RT was employed selectively, usually for sites of bulky disease (> 5 cm). IF-RT doses were typically 20 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction for TBI patients and 30-40 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction for non-TBI Patients. Fatal complications developed in four patients while second malignancies have developed in two. The region which received IF-RT was the site of first recurrence in only two cases (7%). With a median follow-up of 28 months, the two-year disease-free survival rate was 44%. For the 22 patients treated by either F-TBI or high-dose BCNU, the 2-year disease-free survival rate was 50% with a median follow up of 29 months. Selective use of IF-RT may increase the chances of complete remission and disease free survival in HD patients with a history of bulky disease

  8. SU-E-T-296: Single Field Per Day Vs. Multiple Fields Per Day and the Impact On BED in Proton Therapy Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, K; Wooten, H; Zhao, T; Klein, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A common practice, in proton therapy, is to deliver a rotating subset of fields from the treatment plan for the daily fractions. This study compares the impact this practice has on the biological effective dose (BED) versus delivering all planned fields daily. Methods: For two scenarios (a phantom with a geometry approximating the anatomy of a prostate treatment with opposing lateral beams, and a clinical 3-field brain treatment), treatment plans were produced in Eclipse (Varian) to simulate delivery of one, two, and three fields per fraction. The RT-Dose file, structure set, and α/β ratios were processed using in-house MATLAB code to return a new RT-Dose file containing the BED (including a proton RBE of 1.1) which was imported back into Eclipse for analysis. Results: For targets and regions of field overlap in the treatment plan, BED is not affected by delivery regimen. In the phantom, BED in the femoral heads showed increased by 20% when a single field was used rather than two fields. In the brain treatment, the minimum BED to the left optic nerve and the pituitary gland increased by 13% and 10% respectively, for a one-field regime compared to three-fields per fraction. Comparing the two-field and threefield regimes, the optic nerve BED was not significantly affected and the minimum pituitary BED was 4% higher for two fields per day. Conclusion: Hypo-fractionation effects, in regions of non-overlap of fields, significantly increase the BED to the involved tissues by as much as 20%. Care should be taken to avoid inadvertently sacrificing plan effectiveness in the interest of reduced treatment time

  9. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S.; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T.; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N. George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  10. Split-field vs extended-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for oropharyngeal cancer: Which spares the larynx? Which spares the thyroid?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yao; Chen, Josephine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Leary, Celeste I. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Shugard, Erin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Yom, Sue S., E-mail: yoms@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation of the low neck can be accomplished using split-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (sf-IMRT) or extended-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (ef-IMRT). We evaluated the effect of these treatment choices on target coverage and thyroid and larynx doses. Using data from 14 patients with cancers of the oropharynx, we compared the following 3 strategies for radiating the low neck: (1) extended-field IMRT, (2) traditional split-field IMRT with an initial cord-junction block to 40 Gy, followed by a full-cord block to 50 Gy, and (3) split-field IMRT with a full-cord block to 50 Gy. Patients were planned using each of these 3 techniques. To facilitate comparison, extended-field plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the neck volume. Target coverage was assessed using the dose to 95% of the neck volume (D{sub 95}). Mean thyroid and larynx doses were computed. Extended-field IMRT was used as the reference arm; the mean larynx dose was 25.7 ± 7.4 Gy, and the mean thyroid dose was 28.6 ± 2.4 Gy. Split-field IMRT with 2-step blocking reduced laryngeal dose (mean larynx dose 15.2 ± 5.1 Gy) at the cost of a moderate reduction in target coverage (D{sub 95} 41.4 ± 14 Gy) and much higher thyroid dose (mean thyroid dose 44.7 ± 3.7 Gy). Split-field IMRT with initial full-cord block resulted in greater laryngeal sparing (mean larynx dose 14.2 ± 5.1 Gy) and only a moderately higher thyroid dose (mean thyroid dose 31 ± 8 Gy) but resulted in a significant reduction in target coverage (D{sub 95} 34.4 ± 15 Gy). Extended-field IMRT comprehensively covers the low neck and achieves acceptable thyroid and laryngeal sparing. Split-field IMRT with a full-cord block reduces laryngeal doses to less than 20 Gy and spares the thyroid, at the cost of substantially reduced coverage of the low neck. Traditional 2-step split-field IMRT similarly reduces the laryngeal dose but also reduces low-neck coverage and delivers very high doses to the thyroid.

  11. The 100 Most Influential Papers in the Field of Thrombolytic Therapy: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Tariq Jamal; Usman, Muhammad Shariq; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Fatima, Kaneez; Norbash, Alexander; Qureshi, Adnan Iqbal; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Khosa, Faisal

    2017-08-01

    Bibliometric analyses are used by researchers and research funding agencies to help determine areas of greatest interest, and consequently which topics and domains warrant increased research attention. Bibliometric analyses have similarly been published in a number of clinical subspecialties concerning areas of specific medical interest; however, a thorough literature search revealed that such a study has been absent in the field of thrombolytics to date. To bridge this gap, we conducted a citation analysis of the 100 most influential articles on thrombolytics. Scopus was selected as the database of choice. Two independent researchers explored the database to extract relevant articles. The articles were ranked according to the number of citations, and a sequential list of the top 100 original articles was prepared in descending order. A detailed analysis was carried out to identify trends and uncover significant discriminators. A second list containing the top 10 review articles was also separately prepared. The 100 most-cited articles regarding thrombolytics were published between 1973 and 2015, with the most articles (n = 29) published in the 5-year period extending from 1996 to 2000. The total number of citations of these 100 most-cited articles ranged from a low of 389 to a high of 6971, with a median of 612.5 citations. These 100 most-cited articles originated from 26 different countries, with more than half from the USA (n = 54), followed by the next most popular countries of origin Germany (n = 20) and France (n = 15). The New England Journal of Medicine (n = 26) and The Lancet (n = 26) contributed the majority of the articles. Our analysis provides insight into the span of research activity and the nature of inquiry dealing with 'thrombolytic therapy,' with the hope that such analysis may help to effectively guide future research. Our analysis also yielded a list of the most highly cited and presumably most impactful guideline articles within

  12. Towards the optimisation of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gélat, P; Ter Haar, G; Saffari, N

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the non-invasive treatment of cancer has been demonstrated for a range of different cancers including those of the liver, kidney, prostate and breast. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over other techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection, in terms of its non-invasiveness and low risk of harmful side effects. There is, however, a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to induce tissue necrosis at the required foci whilst minimising the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. As such, a common side effect of focusing ultrasound in regions located behind the rib cage is the overheating of bone and surrounding tissue, which can lead to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy are deposited. This is likely to rely on a treatment planning procedure in which optimal source velocity distributions are obtained so as to maximise a dose quantity at the treatment sites, whilst ensuring that this quantity does not exceed a specified threshold at other field locations, particularly on the surface of the ribs. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalised Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data [1]. This work describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimisation problem with non-linear constraints. The methodology was subsequently tested at an excitation frequency of 100 kHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence

  13. Towards the optimisation of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the non-invasive treatment of cancer has been demonstrated for a range of different cancers including those of the liver, kidney, prostate and breast. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over other techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection, in terms of its non-invasiveness and low risk of harmful side effects. There is, however, a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to induce tissue necrosis at the required foci whilst minimising the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. As such, a common side effect of focusing ultrasound in regions located behind the rib cage is the overheating of bone and surrounding tissue, which can lead to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy are deposited. This is likely to rely on a treatment planning procedure in which optimal source velocity distributions are obtained so as to maximise a dose quantity at the treatment sites, whilst ensuring that this quantity does not exceed a specified threshold at other field locations, particularly on the surface of the ribs. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalised Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data [1]. This work describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimisation problem with non-linear constraints. The methodology was subsequently tested at an excitation frequency of 100 kHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence

  14. Measurement of DNA adducts and strand breaks in dab (Limanda limanda) collected in the field: effects of biotic (age, sex) and abiotic (sampling site and period) factors on the extent of DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akcha, F.; Leday, G.; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, A

    2004-08-18

    In the Eastern English Channel, the potential application of the comet assay and post-labelling technique in dab was evaluated for genotoxicity monitoring of the marine environment. The effects of biotic (age, sex) and abiotic (sampling site and period) factors on the extent of DNA lesions were also studied. Female and male dab of two class of size (juvenile and adult) were collected by trawling in different sites in Seine Bay and Somme Bay during September 2001. Single-strand breaks and adducts were, respectively, measured in erythrocytes and the liver. Results obtained for the adult female were compared with those collected during a first cruise in March 2001 [Akcha et al., Mutat Res. 534 (1-2) (2003) 21]. Significant effects of sex and age were demonstrated on the level of strand breaks. Moreover, a significant interaction between age and sex was shown that might indicate the complex influence of other factors on the extent of DNA damage (i.e. reproduction status). In the adult dab, the level of breaks is higher in the male than in the female, whereas the opposite trend was observed for the juvenile. Whatever the sex, the number of DNA breaks is higher in the adult than in the juvenile. For the female dab, significant differences were observed with the comet assay between the Seine Bay and the Somme Bay in March but not in September. This may be due to seasonal variations in the formation of DNA lesions related to variations in lipid content and levels of biotransformation activities and/or to spawning cycles. The presence of genotoxic substances in the study areas was also confirmed by the detection of DNA adducts in each sample analysed. Whereas no effect was shown on the total level of adducts for the tested biotic and abiotic factors, qualitative differences in adduct profiles were observed for each of these factors. For the female dab, comparison of adduct profiles obtained in March and September with one generated by hepatic microsomal activation in dab of

  15. Procedure for field axes measurement, beam indication adjustment, and figure of convergence determination within performance tests for radiation therapy equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quast, U; Krause, K; Rassow, J [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Klinische Strahlenphysik

    1976-09-01

    A routine measuring procedure for the verification of radiation field axes and figure of convergence within a spatial resolution of +- 0.5 mm is described. Measurements are done in two parallel planes in a certain distance before and behind the presumed isocentre. The used test arrangement permits rapid check and controlled adjustment of the alignment of beam or isocentre indicating devices for all isocentric radiation therapy equipment.

  16. Study on the dose distribution of the mixed field with thermal and epi-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kanda, Keiji

    1994-01-01

    Simulation calculations using DOT 3.5 were carried out in order to confirm the characteristics of depth-dependent dose distribution in water phantom dependent on incident neutron energy. The epithermal neutrons mixed to thermal neutron field is effective improving the thermal neutron depth-dose distribution for neutron capture therapy. A feasibility study on the neutron energy spectrum shifter was performed using ANISN-JR for the KUR Heavy Water Facility. The design of the neutron spectrum shifter is feasible, without reducing the performance as a thermal neutron irradiation field. (author)

  17. Impact of extent of resection and recurrent surgery on clinical outcome and overall survival in a consecutive series of 170 patients for glioblastoma in intraoperative high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburger, Jan; Wirtz, Christian R; König, Ralph W

    2017-06-01

    In patients with a glioblastoma (GBM), few unselected data exists using actual standard adjuvant treatment and contemporary surgical techniques like iMRI. Aim of study is to assess impact of EoR and recurrent surgery on survival and outcome. We assessed a consecutive unselected series of 170 surgeries for GBM (2008-2014) applying intraoperative MRI (iMRI). All patients received adjuvant radio-chemo-therapy. Overall-survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), complications and new permanent neurological deficits (nPND) were assessed. Uni- and multivariate-cox-regression-models were calculated. Mean follow-up was 40mo. GTR was intended in 82% and achieved in 77% of these cases. A nPND was found in 7% of patients. In multivariate cox-regression, GTR (HR:0.6, Psurgery and recurrent surgery. Concerning OS, in multivariate assessment an un-methylated MGMT-promotor (HR2.0, Psurgery for recurrent disease was positively associated with OS (HR0.6, PSurgery in a contemporary setup using iMRI, brain mapping and modern adjuvant treatment, has a higher OS and lower complication rates as previously published. A maximum but safe resection should be the goal of surgery since a perioperative complication significantly decreases OS. Recurrent surgery has a beneficial effect on OS without an increase of complications.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  19. Application of fluence field modulation to proton computed tomography for proton therapy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedes, G; De Angelis, L; Rit, S; Hansen, D; Belka, C; Bashkirov, V; Johnson, R P; Coutrakon, G; Schubert, K E; Schulte, R W; Parodi, K; Landry, G

    2017-07-12

    This simulation study presents the application of fluence field modulated computed tomography, initially developed for x-ray CT, to proton computed tomography (pCT). By using pencil beam (PB) scanning, fluence modulated pCT (FMpCT) may achieve variable image quality in a pCT image and imaging dose reduction. Three virtual phantoms, a uniform cylinder and two patients, were studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an ideal list-mode pCT scanner. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected for high image quality and only PBs intercepting them preserved full fluence (FF). Image quality was investigated in terms of accuracy (mean) and noise (standard deviation) of the reconstructed proton relative stopping power compared to reference values. Dose calculation accuracy on FMpCT images was evaluated in terms of dose volume histograms (DVH), range difference (RD) for beam-eye-view (BEV) dose profiles and gamma evaluation. Pseudo FMpCT scans were created from broad beam experimental data acquired with a list-mode pCT prototype. FMpCT noise in ROIs was equivalent to FF images and accuracy better than  -1.3%(-0.7%) by using 1% of FF for the cylinder (patients). Integral imaging dose reduction of 37% and 56% was achieved for the two patients for that level of modulation. Corresponding DVHs from proton dose calculation on FMpCT images agreed to those from reference images and 96% of BEV profiles had RD below 2 mm, compared to only 1% for uniform 1% of FF. Gamma pass rates (2%, 2 mm) were 98% for FMpCT while for uniform 1% of FF they were as low as 59%. Applying FMpCT to preliminary experimental data showed that low noise levels and accuracy could be preserved in a ROI, down to 30% modulation. We have shown, using both virtual and experimental pCT scans, that FMpCT is potentially feasible and may allow a means of imaging dose reduction for a pCT scanner operating in PB scanning mode. This may be of particular importance to proton therapy given the low integral dose found

  20. Patient groups in art therapies: A case study of the health care field in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vende K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to introduce the reader with an example of the arts therapies work in a children hospital in Latvia in order to describe art therapies work similarities and differences in three different specializations. Comparison will take place of patient groups in the work of art therapists in each specialization (art therapy, dance movement therapy and music therapy. The question of the research is: with which patient groups’ a specialist from a particular arts therapies specialization has worked within a year in VSIA BKUS children hospital “Gaiļezers” during the time period from 05.2009 to 05.2010?The results were gained by comparing patient groups at the age from 2,5 to 17 years in the children hospital and they showed that the art therapists and dance movement therapist most frequently were working with patients who have behaviour and emotional disorders. However music therapists are working more frequently with patients who have mental retardation.

  1. Assessment of radiation-induced second cancer risks in proton therapy and IMRT for organs inside the primary radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganetti, Harald; Athar, Basit S.; Moteabbed, Maryam; Adams, Judith A.; Schneider, Uwe; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-10-01

    There is clinical evidence that second malignancies in radiation therapy occur mainly within the beam path, i.e. in the medium or high-dose region. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk for developing a radiation-induced tumor within the treated volume and to compare this risk for proton therapy and intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Instead of using data for specific patients we have created a representative scenario. Fully contoured age- and gender-specific whole body phantoms (4 year and 14 year old) were uploaded into a treatment planning system and tumor volumes were contoured based on patients treated for optic glioma and vertebral body Ewing's sarcoma. Treatment plans for IMRT and proton therapy treatments were generated. Lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for developing a second malignancy were calculated using a risk model considering cell kill, mutation, repopulation, as well as inhomogeneous organ doses. For standard fractionation schemes, the LAR for developing a second malignancy from radiation therapy alone was found to be up to 2.7% for a 4 year old optic glioma patient treated with IMRT considering a soft-tissue carcinoma risk model only. Sarcoma risks were found to be below 1% in all cases. For a 14 year old, risks were found to be about a factor of 2 lower. For Ewing's sarcoma cases the risks based on a sarcoma model were typically higher than the carcinoma risks, i.e. LAR up to 1.3% for soft-tissue sarcoma. In all cases, the risk from proton therapy turned out to be lower by at least a factor of 2 and up to a factor of 10. This is mainly due to lower total energy deposited in the patient when using proton beams. However, the comparison of a three-field and four-field proton plan also shows that the distribution of the dose, i.e. the particular treatment plan, plays a role. When using different fractionation schemes, the estimated risks roughly scale with the total dose difference in%. In conclusion, proton therapy can

  2. TU-CD-304-07: Intensity Modulated Electron Beam Therapy Employing Small Fields in Virtual Scanning Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q; Liang, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic electron radiation therapies such as dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) utilize small fields to provide target conformity and fluence modulation. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of virtual scanning mode using small fields. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) were performed using validated Varian TrueBeam phase space files for electron beam energies of 6, 9, 12, and 16 MeV and square/circular fields (1×1/1, 2×2/2, 3×3/3, 4×4/4, 5×5/5 cm"2/cm diameter). Resulting dose distributions (kernels) were used for subsequent calculations. The following analyses were performed: (1) Comparison of composite square fields and reference 10×10 cm"2 dose distributions and (2) Scanning beam deliveries for square and circular fields realized as the convolution of kernels and scanning pattern. Preliminary beam weight and pattern optimization were also performed. Two linear scans of 10 cm with/without overlap were modeled. Comparison metrics included depth and orthogonal profiles at dmax. Results: (1) Composite fields regained reference depth dose profiles for most energies and fields within 5%. Smaller kernels and higher energies increased dose in the build-up and Bremsstrahlung region (30%, 16MeV and 1×1 cm"2), while reference dmax was maintained for all energies and composite fields. Smaller kernels (<2×2 cm"2) maintained penumbra and field size within 0.2 cm, and flatness within 2%. Deterioration of penumbra for larger kernels (5×5 cm"2) were observed. Balancing desirable dosimetry and efficiencies suggests that smaller kernels are used at edges and larger kernels in the center of the target. (2) Beam weight optimization improved cross-plane penumbra (0.2 cm) and increased the field size (0.4 cm) on average. In-plane penumbra and field size remained unchanged. Overlap depended on kernel size and optimal overlap resulted in flatness ±2%. Conclusion: Dynamic electron beam therapy in virtual scanning

  3. An Explorative Study Examining Augmentative and Alternative Communication Training in the Field of Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadberry, Anita L; Sweeney, Alison

    2017-07-01

    Music therapists work with many people who require Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). As communication goals are central to music therapy practice, many music therapists would benefit from training in AAC. The purpose of this survey study was to determine the state of AAC education for music therapists at the university level, how AAC is being used in music therapy sessions, and how practicing music therapists are trained in AAC. Music therapy faculty and credentialed music therapists in North America and Europe were invited to complete an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey data from each group of respondents. With regard to training in AAC at the university level, results indicate that almost half of music therapy faculty (44.66%) provided some training. The primary reason given for not providing training was a lack of educator knowledge in this area. Results indicate that a majority (81.77%) of music therapy clinicians are familiar with AAC and slightly over half (55.08%) reported that they work with clients who use AAC. Sixty-two percent of music therapists reported using AAC to promote expressive language, and 49% to increase receptive language. Over 80% of clinicians stated they would benefit from additional AAC training. Although a majority of music therapists are familiar with ACC, results indicate that ACC competency could be enhanced through university-level instruction and continuing professional development courses. © the American Music Therapy Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Possibilities of development photodynamic therapy under high temperature superconductor magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Mihir

    1996-01-01

    After a long extensive research work neutron photon therapy for treatment of acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was developed. High temperature superconductor magnet was developed and fitted in magnetic resonance imaging system to guide the patient. By this neutron-photon therapy AIDS effected cells are identified prominently. Patient is then injected with light sensitive drug molecules, which only AIDS cell retain. Light from photon (laser) then energizes the drug, which passes that energy to oxygen, which then leads a biochemical attack on the AIDS cells. If all goes well, the AIDS affected cells die. 10 refs., 1 fig

  5. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahalom, Joachim, E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Li, Ye-Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tsang, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wirth, Andrew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St. Andrews Place, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  6. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T.; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT

  7. Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in the treatment of pain and other symptoms in fibromyalgia: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multanen, Juhani; Häkkinen, Arja; Heikkinen, Pauli; Kautiainen, Hannu; Mustalampi, Sirpa; Ylinen, Jari

    2018-04-30

    Low-energy pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy has been suggested as a promising therapy to increase microcirculation, which is of great concern in patients with fibromyalgia. This study evaluated the effectiveness of PEMF therapy on the treatment of fibromyalgia. A group of 108 women with fibromyalgia were allocated to a 12-week treatment period with an active Bio-Electro-Magnetic-Energy-Regulation (BEMER) device and a similar treatment period with an inactive device. Each patient received active and sham treatments in a random order. Pain and stiffness were assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS, scale 0-100 mm), and functional status was assessed by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Mean VAS pain scores before the active and sham treatment periods were 66 (SD 22) and 63 (SD 22), respectively. After treatment periods, mean VAS pain scores had decreased significantly in active treatment, -12, 95% CI [-18, -6], and in sham treatment, -11, 95% CI [-17, -5]. Similarly, the decrease in stiffness and FIQ index after both treatments was statistically significant. However, per-protocol analysis showed no differences between active and sham treatments at any of the outcomes. This study demonstrated that low-energy PEMF therapy was not efficient in reducing pain and stiffness or in improving functioning in women with fibromyalgia. Bioelectromagnetics. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Exploring the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice: stories from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2011-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses interested in extending their interpersonal and psychotherapeutic skills sometimes undertake postgraduate training in gestalt therapy. Little is known about how this new knowledge and psychotherapeutic skill base informs their practice. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that aimed to explore the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice. Within a framework of narrative inquiry, four psychiatric nurses trained in gestalt therapy were invited to tell their stories of training in a gestalt approach to therapy, and recount their experiences of how it influenced their practice. In keeping with narrative analysis methods, the research findings were presented as a collection of four stories. Eight themes were derived from a thematic analysis conducted within and across the four stories. The discussion of the themes encapsulates the similarities and differences across the storied collection, providing a community and cultural context for understanding the individual stories. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  9. The GEANT4 toolkit capability in the hadron therapy field: simulation of a transport beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F.; Raffaele, L.; Russo, G.; Guatelli, S.; Pia, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare of Catania (Sicily, Italy), the first Italian hadron therapy facility named CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been realized. Inside CATANA 62 MeV proton beams, accelerated by a superconducting cyclotron, are used for the radiotherapeutic treatments of some types of ocular tumours. Therapy with hadron beams still represents a pioneer technique, and only a few centers worldwide can provide this advanced specialized cancer treatment. On the basis of the experience so far gained, and considering the future hadron-therapy facilities to be developed (Rinecker, Munich Germany, Heidelberg/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, PSI Villigen, Switzerland, CNAO, Pavia, Italy, Centro di Adroterapia, Catania, Italy) we decided to develop a Monte Carlo application based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the design, the realization and the optimization of a proton-therapy beam line. Another feature of our project is to provide a general tool able to study the interactions of hadrons with the human tissue and to test the analytical-based treatment planning systems actually used in the routine practice. All the typical elements of a hadron-therapy line, such as diffusers, range shifters, collimators and detectors were modelled. In particular, we simulated the Markus type ionization chamber and a Gaf Chromic film as dosimeters to reconstruct the depth (Bragg peak and Spread Out Bragg Peak) and lateral dose distributions, respectively. We validated our simulated detectors comparing the results with the experimental data available in our facility

  10. The GEANT4 toolkit capability in the hadron therapy field: simulation of a transport beam line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F.; Raffaele, L.; Russo, G.; Guatelli, S.; Pia, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare of Catania (Sicily, Italy), the first Italian hadron therapy facility named CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been realized. Inside CATANA 62 MeV proton beams, accelerated by a superconducting cyclotron, are used for the radiotherapeutic treatments of some types of ocular tumours. Therapy with hadron beams still represents a pioneer technique, and only a few centers worldwide can provide this advanced specialized cancer treatment. On the basis of the experience so far gained, and considering the future hadron-therapy facilities to be developed (Rinecker, Munich Germany, Heidelberg/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, PSI Villigen, Switzerland, CNAO, Pavia, Italy, Centro di Adroterapia, Catania, Italy) we decided to develop a Monte Carlo application based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the design, the realization and the optimization of a proton-therapy beam line. Another feature of our project is to provide a general tool able to study the interactions of hadrons with the human tissue and to test the analytical-based treatment planning systems actually used in the routine practice. All the typical elements of a hadron-therapy line, such as diffusers, range shifters, collimators and detectors were modelled. In particular, we simulated the Markus type ionization chamber and a Gaf Chromic film as dosimeters to reconstruct the depth (Bragg peak and Spread Out Bragg Peak) and lateral dose distributions, respectively. We validated our simulated detectors comparing the results with the experimental data available in our facility.

  11. The GEANT4 toolkit capability in the hadron therapy field: simulation of a transport beam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Cuttone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Di Rosa, F. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Russo, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Guatelli, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, Genova (Italy); Pia, M.G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, Genova (Italy)

    2006-01-15

    At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare of Catania (Sicily, Italy), the first Italian hadron therapy facility named CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been realized. Inside CATANA 62 MeV proton beams, accelerated by a superconducting cyclotron, are used for the radiotherapeutic treatments of some types of ocular tumours. Therapy with hadron beams still represents a pioneer technique, and only a few centers worldwide can provide this advanced specialized cancer treatment. On the basis of the experience so far gained, and considering the future hadron-therapy facilities to be developed (Rinecker, Munich Germany, Heidelberg/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, PSI Villigen, Switzerland, CNAO, Pavia, Italy, Centro di Adroterapia, Catania, Italy) we decided to develop a Monte Carlo application based on the GEANT4 toolkit, for the design, the realization and the optimization of a proton-therapy beam line. Another feature of our project is to provide a general tool able to study the interactions of hadrons with the human tissue and to test the analytical-based treatment planning systems actually used in the routine practice. All the typical elements of a hadron-therapy line, such as diffusers, range shifters, collimators and detectors were modelled. In particular, we simulated the Markus type ionization chamber and a Gaf Chromic film as dosimeters to reconstruct the depth (Bragg peak and Spread Out Bragg Peak) and lateral dose distributions, respectively. We validated our simulated detectors comparing the results with the experimental data available in our facility.

  12. Evaluation of Breast Sentinel Lymph Node Coverage by Standard Radiation Therapy Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovitch, Rachel; Ballonoff, Ari; Newman, Francis M.S.; Finlayson, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Background: Biopsy of the breast sentinel lymph node (SLN) is now a standard staging procedure for early-stage invasive breast cancer. The anatomic location of the breast SLN and its relationship to standard radiation fields has not been described. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of radiotherapy treatment planning data sets was performed in patients with breast cancer who had undergone SLN biopsy, and those with a surgical clip at the SLN biopsy site were identified. The location of the clip was evaluated relative to vertebral body level on an anterior-posterior digitally reconstructed radiograph, treated whole-breast tangential radiation fields, and standard axillary fields in 106 data sets meeting these criteria. Results: The breast SLN varied in vertebral body level position, ranging from T2 to T7 but most commonly opposite T4. The SLN clip was located below the base of the clavicle in 90%, and hence would be excluded from standard axillary radiotherapy fields where the inferior border is placed at this level. The clip was within the irradiated whole-breast tangent fields in 78%, beneath the superior-posterior corner multileaf collimators in 12%, and outside the tangent field borders in 10%. Conclusions: Standard axillary fields do not encompass the lymph nodes at highest risk of containing tumor in breast cancer patients. Elimination of the superior-posterior corner MLCs from the tangent field design would result in inclusion of the breast SLN in 90% of patients treated with standard whole-breast irradiation

  13. Automatic feathering of split fields for step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B; Sethi, Anil; Emami, Bahman

    2003-01-01

    Due to leaf travel range limitations of the Varian Dynamic Multileaf Collimator (DMLC) system, an IMRT field width exceeding 14.5 cm is split into two or more adjacent abutting sub-fields. The abutting sub-fields are then delivered as separate treatment fields. The accuracy of the delivery is very sensitive to multileaf positioning accuracy. The uncertainties in leaf and carriage positions cause errors in the delivered dose (e.g., hot or cold spots) along the match line of abutting sub-fields. The dose errors are proportional to the penumbra slope at the edge of each sub-field. To alleviate this problem, we developed techniques that feather the split line of IMRT fields. Feathering of the split line was achieved by dividing IMRT fields into several sub-groups with different split line positions. A Varian 21EX accelerator with an 80-leaf DLMC was used for IMRT delivery. Cylindrical targets with varying widths (>14.5 cm) were created to study the split line positions. Seven coplanar 6 MV fields were selected for planning using the NOMOS-CORVUS TM system. The isocentre of the fields was positioned at the centre of the target volume. Verification was done in a 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 polystyrene phantom using film dosimetry. We investigated two techniques to move the split line from its original position or cause feathering of them: (1) varying the isocentre position along the target width and (2) introduction of a 'pseudo target' outside of the patient (phantom). The position of the 'pseudo target' was determined by analysing the divergence of IMRT fields. For target widths of 14-28 cm, IMRT fields were automatically split into two sub-fields, and the split line was positioned along the centre of the target by CORVUS. Measured dose distributions demonstrated that the dose to the critical structure was 10% higher than planned when the split line crossed through the centre of the target. Both methods of modifying the split line positions resulted in maximum shifts of ∼1 cm

  14. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: overlapping co-axial modulated fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, P; Tangboonduangjit, P; White, P

    2004-01-01

    The Varian multi-leaf collimator has a 14.5 cm leaf extension limit from each carriage. This means the target volumes in the head and neck region are sometimes too wide for standard width-modulated fields to provide adequate dose coverage. A solution is to set up asymmetric co-axial overlapping fields. This protects the MLC carriage while in return the MLC provides modulated dose blending in the field overlap region. Planar dose maps for coincident fields from the Pinnacle radiotherapy treatment planning system are compared with planar dose maps reconstructed from radiographic film and electronic portal images. The film and portal images show small leaf-jaw matchlines at each field overlap border. Linear profiles taken across each image show that the observed leaf-jaw matchlines from the accelerator images are not accounted for by the treatment planning system. Dose difference between film reconstructed electronic portal images and planning system are about 2.5 cGy in a modulated field at d max . While the magnitude of the dose differences are small improved round end leaf modelling combined with a finer dose calculation grid may minimize the discrepancy between calculated and delivered dose

  15. Investigation of dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy using N isopropylacrylamide gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavarmegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser [Dept. of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeali, Azim [Medical Education Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Gel dosimeters have unique advantages in comparison with other dosimeters. Until now, these gels have been used in different radiotherapy techniques as a reliable dosimetric tool. Because dose distribution measurement is an important factor for appropriate treatment planning in different radiotherapy techniques, in this study, we evaluated the ability of the N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel to record the dose distribution resulting from the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this regard, a head phantom containing NIPAM gel was irradiated using the Tehran Research Reactor BNCT beam line, and then by a magnetic resonance scanner. Eventually, the R2 maps were obtained in different slices of the phantom by analyzing T2-weighted images. The results show that NIPAM gel has a suitable potential for recording three-dimensional dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry.

  16. Risk of Developing Second Cancer From Neutron Dose in Proton Therapy as Function of Field Characteristics, Organ, and Patient Age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharatou Jarlskog, Christina; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the risk of a second malignancy after treatment of a primary brain cancer using passive scattered proton beam therapy. The focus was on the cancer risk caused by neutrons outside the treatment volume and the dependency on the patient's age. Methods and Materials: Organ-specific neutron-equivalent doses previously calculated for eight different proton therapy brain fields were considered. Organ-specific models were applied to assess the risk of developing solid cancers and leukemia. Results: The main contributors (>80%) to the neutron-induced risk are neutrons generated in the treatment head. Treatment volume can influence the risk by up to a factor of ∼2. Young patients are subject to significantly greater risks than are adult patients because of the geometric differences and age dependency of the risk models. Breast cancer should be the main concern for females. For males, the risks of lung cancer, leukemia, and thyroid cancer were significant for pediatric patients. In contrast, leukemia was the leading risk for an adult. Most lifetime risks were <1% (70-Gy treatment). The only exceptions were breast, thyroid, and lung cancer for females. For female thyroid cancer, the treatment risk can exceed the baseline risk. Conclusion: The risk of developing a second malignancy from neutrons from proton beam therapy of a brain lesion is small (i.e., presumably outweighed by the therapeutic benefit) but not negligible (i.e., potentially greater than the baseline risk). The patient's age at treatment plays a major role

  17. Thought Field Therapy Compared to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Wait-List for Agoraphobia: A Randomized, Controlled Study with a 12-Month Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audun C. Irgens

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thought field therapy (TFT is used for many psychiatric conditions, but its efficacy has not been sufficiently documented. Hence, there is a need for studies comparing TFT to well-established treatments. This study compares the efficacy of TFT and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for patients with agoraphobia.Methods: Seventy-two patients were randomized to CBT (N = 24, TFT (N = 24 or a wait-list condition (WLC (N = 24 after a diagnostic procedure including the MINI PLUS that was performed before treatment or WLC. Following a 3 months waiting period, the WL patients were randomized to CBT (n = 12 or TFT (n = 12, and all patients were reassessed after treatment or waiting period and at 12 months follow-up. At first we compared the three groups CBT, TFT, and WL. After the post WL randomization, we compared CBT (N = 12 + 24 = 36 to TFT (N = 12 + 24 = 36, applying the pre-treatment scores as baseline for all patients. The primary outcome measure was a symptom score from the Anxiety Disorders Interview Scale that was performed by an interviewer blinded to the treatment condition. For statistical comparisons, we used the independent sample’s t-test, the Fisher’s exact test and the ANOVA and ANCOVA tests.Results: Both CBT and TFT showed better results than the WLC (p < 0.001 at post-treatment. Post-treatment and at the 12-month follow-up, there were not significant differences between CBT and TFT (p = 0.33 and p = 0.90, respectively.Conclusion: This paper reports the first study comparing TFT to CBT for any disorder. The study indicated that TFT may be an efficient treatment for patients with agoraphobia.Trial Registration:https://clinicaltrials.gov/, identifier NCT00932919.

  18. Clinical application of music therapy assessment within the field of child protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl; Killén, Kari

    2015-01-01

    and challenges of a nonverbal and emotional interactional medium such as music in assessing parent–child interaction and parental capacity are presented and discussed. The assessment model relates to theories of attunement, autonomy, and attachment, and clinical relevance for practice within the field of child...

  19. Localized field conformation radiotherapy combined with endocrine therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kaizu, Toshihide; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    To improve the quality of life (QOL) of the patients with prostate cancer, we limit the radiotherapy target volume to the prostate and seminal vesicles while using endocrine therapy towards the disease outside the target volume. Radiotherapy technique was rotation conformation technique with computer-controlled multileaf collimators to the total doses of up to 66-70 Gy. Among 145 evaluable cases with the median age of 74, overall and cause-specific 5-year survival rates were 59.3% and 84.1%, respectively, and the relative survival rate of the Stage A-C cases was 100%. The two thirds (33/50) of the deaths were not of prostate cancer. The rate of severe complication was 1.4%. As for QOL, the rate of impotence was 90%, however, the patients' overall satisfaction towards the treatment was 90%. From this analysis, this combined treatment seems beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  20. 27 CFR 4.2 - Territorial extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Territorial extent. 4.2 Section 4.2 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Scope § 4.2 Territorial extent. This part...

  1. Problems of multiple field technique in radiation therapy of cancer of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, H.; Huebener, K.H.; Voss, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    A method of adjustment frequently used for postoperative telecobalt irradiation of the mammary carcinoma was verified with the help of film-dosimetric measurements at a phantom. Special interest was taken in the regions with possible overlapping of contiguous fields requires consideration of the divergence of rays and of the mapping precision of 50%-isodoses in the radiation field, as there lie the principal reasons. For realization of a nearly homogeneous dose distribution, on the one hand, there is necessary parallelism of marginal rays of the neighbouring useful ray beams, the radiation head being tilted laterally by half the angle of aperture; on the other hand, the 50% boundary lines at the light beam localizer have to be shifted parallel by a corresponding distance. In spite of this possibility of optimization, it is distinctly more advantageous, with regard to time and technical aspects, to use a linear accelerator, being additionally applicable for electron pendulum irradiation of the thoracic wall. (orig.) [de

  2. Second International Conference on Near-Field Optical Analysis: Photodynamic Therapy and Photobiology Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgher, Debra L. (Editor); Morrison, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The International NASA/DARPA Photobiology Conference held at the Johnson Space Center in Houston/TX demonstrated where low level laser therapy (LLLT), respectively low intensity light activated biostimulation (LILAB) and nanotechnological applications employing photobiomodulation techniques will presumably go in the next ten years. The conference was a continuation of the 1st International Conference on Nearfield Optical Analysis organized by Andrei Sommer (ENSOMA Lab, University of Ulm, Germany) in November 2000 at Castle Reisenburg, Germany, which started with a group of ten scientists from eight different countries. The 1st conference was co-sponsored by the American Chemical Society to evaluate the molecular mechanism of accelerated and normal wound healing processes. The 2nd conference was co-sponsored by DARPA, NASA-JSC and the Medical College of Wisconsin. Despite the short time between events, the 2nd conference hosted 40 international experts form universities, research institutes, agencies and the industry. The materials published here are expected to become milestones forming a novel platform in biomedical photobiology. The multidisciplinary group of researchers focused on LLLT/LILAB-applications under extreme conditions expected to have beneficial effects particularly in space, on submarines, and under severe battlefield conditions. The group also focused on novel technologies with possibilities allowing investigating the interaction of light with biological systems, molecular mechanisms of wound healing, bone regeneration, nerve regeneration, pain modulation, as well as biomineralization and biofilm formulation processes induced by nanobacteria.

  3. Regulation of miRNAs by herbal medicine: An emerging field in cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Mansoori, Behzad; Baradaran, Behzad

    2017-02-01

    MicroRNAs' expression profiles have recently gained major attention as far as cancer research is concerned. MicroRNAs are able to inhibit target gene expression via binding to the 3' UTR of target mRNA, resulting in target mRNA cleavage or translation inhibition. MicroRNAs play significant parts in a myriad of biological processes; studies have proven, on the other hand, that aberrant microRNA expression is, more often than not, associated with the growth and progression of cancers. MicroRNAs could act as oncogenes (oncomir) or tumor suppressors and can also be utilized as biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and cancer therapy. Recent studies have shown that such herbal extracts as Shikonin, Sinomenium acutum, curcumin, Olea europaea, ginseng, and Coptidis Rhizoma could alter microRNA expression profiles through inhibiting cancer cell development, activating the apoptosis pathway, or increasing the efficacy of conventional cancer therapeutics. Such findings patently suggest that the novel specific targeting of microRNAs by herbal extracts could complete the restriction of tumors by killing the cancerous cells so as to recover survival results in patients diagnosed with malignancies. In this review, we summarized the current research about microRNA biogenesis, microRNAs in cancer, herbal compounds with anti-cancer effects and novel strategies for employing herbal extracts in order to target microRNAs for a better treatment of patients diagnosed with cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Ototoxicity evaluation in medulloblastoma patients treated with involved field boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT): a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Wilson Albieri; Nadalin, Wladimir; Odone Filho, Vicente; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio; Weltman, Eduardo; Chen, Michael Jenwei; Silva, Nasjla Saba da; Cappellano, Andrea Maria; Pereira, Liliane Desgualdo; Gonçalves, Maria Ines Rabelo; Ferrigno, Robson; Hanriot, Rodrigo Morais

    2014-01-01

    Ototoxicity is a known side effect of combined radiation therapy and cisplatin chemotherapy for the treatment of medulloblastoma. The delivery of an involved field boost by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may reduce the dose to the inner ear when compared with conventional radiotherapy. The dose of cisplatin may also affect the risk of ototoxicity. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the impact of involved field boost using IMRT and cisplatin dose on the rate of ototoxicity. Data from 41 medulloblastoma patients treated with IMRT were collected. Overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method Hearing function was graded according to toxicity criteria of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG). Doses to inner ear and total cisplatin dose were correlated with hearing function by univariate and multivariate data analysis. After a mean follow-up of 44 months (range: 14 to 72 months), 37 patients remained alive, with two recurrences, both in spine with CSF involvement, resulting in a disease free-survival and overall survival of 85.2% and 90.2%, respectively. Seven patients (17%) experienced POG Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Cisplatin dose was a significant factor for hearing loss in univariate analysis (p < 0.03). In multivariate analysis, median dose to inner ear was significantly associated with hearing loss (p < 0.01). POG grade 3 and 4 toxicity were uncommon with median doses to the inner ear bellow 42 Gy (p < 0.05) and total cisplatin dose of less than 375 mg/m 2 (p < 0.01). IMRT leads to a low rate of severe ototoxicity. Median radiation dose to auditory apparatus should be kept below 42 Gy. Cisplatin doses should not exceed 375 mg/m 2

  5. Bio-effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in context of cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliev, Timur; Tachibana, Katsuro; Bulanin, Denis; Mikhalovsky, Sergey; Whitby, Ray D L

    2014-01-01

    Bio-effects mediated by non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMF) have become a hot topic of research in the last decades. This interest has been triggered by a growing public concern about the rapid expansion of telecommunication devices and possible consequences of their use on human health. Despite a feasibility study of potential negative impacts, the therapeutic advantages of EMF could be effectively harnessed for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This review aims to examine recent findings relating to the mechanisms of action underlying the bio-effects induced by non-ionizing EMF. The potential of non-thermal and thermal effects is discussed in the context of possible applications for the induction of apoptosis, formation of reactive oxygen species, and increase of membrane permeability in malignant cells. A special emphasis has been put on the combination of EMF with magnetic nano-particles and ultrasound for cancer treatment. The review encompasses both human and animal studies.

  6. SU-F-T-83: Infant Total Skin Electron Therapy Using Five Fields Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, H; Howlin, T; Massey, V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We were presented with a 9 month old boy with Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) involving the skin. The plan was to treat the entire skin using 6 MeV electrons with the infant under complete anesthesia. The purpose of this work is to commission the 6 MeV electron beam and to develop a technique that can be used to deliver total skin dose to infants with minimal patient immobilization. Methods: A baby mannequin phantom that mimics the child’s length was used to determine the best technique to treat the infant. The 76 cm long phantom was placed on the floor. The phantom was placed in four unique immobilization devices to simulate four different treatment positions (anterior, posterior, left lateral and right lateral). Radiochromic films were used to determine beam profile in both axial and radial directions, and percent depth dose (PDD). Absolute calibration of the machine output at 214 cm distance was measured using an Exradin A11 parallel-plate ion chamber. A 1.0 cm plexiglass scatter plate was inserted in the collimator. Mosfet dosimeters were used for dose verification for phantom and and patient. Results: At 214 cm source to surface distance (SSD) using gantry angle of + 20o from vertical beam flatness is + 10% in the radial direction over a region of 70 cm and + 4% in the axial direction over 60 cm. A five field arrangement was determined to optimally deliver the desired dose with > 90% uniformity. The fifth field was used to boost the head vertex. Conclusion: It is possible to treat sedated infants with total skin dose using five positions. Four positions were enough to cover the body and the fifth position boosts the vertex of the head. All fractions can be reproduced accurately daily because of the patient’s stable immobilization.

  7. SU-F-T-83: Infant Total Skin Electron Therapy Using Five Fields Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H; Howlin, T; Massey, V [University of Kansas Hospital, Overland Park, KS (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We were presented with a 9 month old boy with Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) involving the skin. The plan was to treat the entire skin using 6 MeV electrons with the infant under complete anesthesia. The purpose of this work is to commission the 6 MeV electron beam and to develop a technique that can be used to deliver total skin dose to infants with minimal patient immobilization. Methods: A baby mannequin phantom that mimics the child’s length was used to determine the best technique to treat the infant. The 76 cm long phantom was placed on the floor. The phantom was placed in four unique immobilization devices to simulate four different treatment positions (anterior, posterior, left lateral and right lateral). Radiochromic films were used to determine beam profile in both axial and radial directions, and percent depth dose (PDD). Absolute calibration of the machine output at 214 cm distance was measured using an Exradin A11 parallel-plate ion chamber. A 1.0 cm plexiglass scatter plate was inserted in the collimator. Mosfet dosimeters were used for dose verification for phantom and and patient. Results: At 214 cm source to surface distance (SSD) using gantry angle of + 20o from vertical beam flatness is + 10% in the radial direction over a region of 70 cm and + 4% in the axial direction over 60 cm. A five field arrangement was determined to optimally deliver the desired dose with > 90% uniformity. The fifth field was used to boost the head vertex. Conclusion: It is possible to treat sedated infants with total skin dose using five positions. Four positions were enough to cover the body and the fifth position boosts the vertex of the head. All fractions can be reproduced accurately daily because of the patient’s stable immobilization.

  8. High Density Lipoprotein Structural Changes and Drug Response in Lipidomic Profiles following the Long-Term Fenofibrate Therapy in the FIELD Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yetukuri, L.; Huopaniemi, I.; Koivuniemi, A.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent FIELD study the fenofibrate therapy surprisingly failed to achieve significant benefit over placebo in the primary endpoint of coronary heart disease events. Increased levels of atherogenic homocysteine were observed in some patients assigned to fenofibrate therapy but the molecular...... of lysophosphatidylcholines and increase of sphingomyelins. Ethanolamine plasmalogens were diminished only in a subgroup of fenofibrate-treated patients with elevated homocysteine levels. Finally we performed molecular dynamics simulations to qualitatively reconstitute HDL particles in silico. We found that increased number...

  9. Effect of Expedited Microneedle-Assisted Photodynamic Therapy for Field Treatment of Actinic Keratoses: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhova, Tatyana A; Hassoun, Lauren A; Foolad, Negar; Barath, Mayanka; Sivamani, Raja K

    2017-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective and cosmetically favorable treatment modality for actinic keratoses (AKs). However, prolonged incubation times and pain associated with treatment are burdensome to the patient and a hindrance to widespread use of PDT as standard field therapy for AK. To evaluate efficacy and pain associated with microneedle expedited PDT. The Microneedle Photodynamic Therapy II (MNPDT-II) study was a randomized, single-blinded, split-face controlled, 2-arm clinical trial. Thirty-three participants with AK on the face were recruited in a university dermatology outpatient clinic from 2015 to 2016, and 32 participants completed the study. Participants were randomized into 2 incubations arms, either 10-minute or 20-minute aminolevulinic acid (ALA) incubation times, after pretreatment with a microneedle roller (200 um) vs a sham roller. They were blinded to the laterality of microneedle and sham roller assignments. After incubation, they were exposed to blue light (Blu-U, Dusa Pharmaceuticals) for 1000 seconds for a total fluence of 10 J/cm2. The primary outcome was to quantitatively measure AK resolution, and the secondary outcome was to assess pain associated with microneedle pretreatment. Thirty-three individuals were recruited and randomized to either the 20-minute or the 10-minute incubation arm. Thirty-two participants completed the study with a mean follow-up time of 34.5 days in the 20-minute group, and 30.2 days in the 10-minute group. For the 20-minute incubation arm, average AK clearance was 76% vs 58% on the sham side (P microneedle and sham sides (0.7 and 0.4; P = .28), respectively. For the 10-minute incubation arm AK clearance for the microneedle pretreated side was 43% compared with 38% on the sham side (P = .66). Pain during the blue light exposure was not significantly different between the microneedle and sham sides, 4.5 mm and 3.4 mm (P = .21), respectively. Photodynamic therapy with microneedle pretreatment at

  10. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Robert Michael, E-mail: hermann@strahlentherapie-westerstede.com [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Andreas [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Gemeinschaftspraxis für Strahlentherapie Hildesheim/Goslar (Germany); Becker, Alexandra [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Schneider, Michael [Orthopaedic Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Würzburg (Germany); Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Universität Kiel (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  11. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Becker, Alexandra; Schneider, Michael; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Christiansen, Hans; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice

  12. MO-AB-BRA-08: Rapid Treatment Field Uniformity Optimization for Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy Using Cherenkov Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreozzi, J; Zhang, R; Glaser, A; Pogue, B; Jarvis, L; Williams, B; Gladstone, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment field heterogeneity resulting from gantry angle choice in total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) following a modified Stanford dual-field technique, and determine a relationship between source to surface distance (SSD) and optimized gantry angle spread. Methods: Cherenkov imaging was used to image 62 treatment fields on a sheet of 1.2m x 2.2m x 1.2cm polyethylene following standard TSEBT setup at our institution (6 MeV, 888 MU/min, no spoiler, SSD=441cm), where gantry angles spanned from 239.5° to 300.5° at 1° increments. Average Cherenkov intensity and coefficient of variation in the region of interest were compared for the set of composite Cherenkov images created by summing all unique combinations of angle pairs to simulate dual-field treatment. The angle pair which produced the lowest coefficient of variation was further studied using an ionization chamber. The experiment was repeated at SSD=300cm, and SSD=370.5cm. Cherenkov imaging was also implemented during TSEBT of three patients. Results: The most uniform treatment region from a symmetric angle spread was achieved using gantry angles +/−17.5° about the horizontal axis at SSD=441cm, +/−18.5° at SSD=370.5cm, and +/−19.5° at SSD=300cm. Ionization chamber measurements comparing the original treatment spread (+/−14.5°) and the optimized angle pair (+/−17.5°) at SSD=441cm showed no significant deviation (r=0.999) in percent depth dose curves, and chamber measurements from nine locations within the field showed an improvement in dose uniformity from 24.41% to 9.75%. Ionization chamber measurements correlated strongly (r=0.981) with Cherenkov intensity measured concurrently on the flat Plastic Water phantom. Patient images and TLD results also showed modest uniformity improvements. Conclusion: A decreasing linear relationship between optimal angle spread and SSD was observed. Cherenkov imaging offers a new method of rapidly analyzing and optimizing TSEBT setup

  13. Phospholipid micelle-based magneto-plasmonic nanoformulation for magnetic field-directed, imaging-guided photo-induced cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Kopwitthaya, Atcha; Jeon, Mansik; Guo, Moran; Law, Wing-Cheung; Furlani, Edward P; Kim, Chulhong; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-11-01

    We present a magnetoplasmonic nanoplatform combining gold nanorods (GNR) and iron-oxide nanoparticles within phospholipid-based polymeric nanomicelles (PGRFe). The gold nanorods exhibit plasmon resonance absorbance at near infrared wavelengths to enable photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy, while the Fe3O4 nanoparticles enable magnetophoretic control of the nanoformulation. The fabricated nanoformulation can be directed and concentrated by an external magnetic field, which provides enhancement of a photoacoustic signal. Application of an external field also leads to enhanced uptake of the magnetoplasmonic formulation by cancer cells in vitro. Under laser irradiation at the wavelength of the GNR absorption peak, the PGRFe formulation efficiently generates plasmonic nanobubbles within cancer cells, as visualized by confocal microscopy, causing cell destruction. The combined magnetic and plasmonic functionalities of the nanoplatform enable magnetic field-directed, imaging-guided, enhanced photo-induced cancer therapy. In this study, a nano-formulation of gold nanorods and iron oxide nanoparticles is presented using a phospholipid micelle-based delivery system for magnetic field-directed and imaging-guided photo-induced cancer therapy. The gold nanorods enable photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy, while the Fe3O4 nanoparticles enable magnetophoretic control of the formulation. This and similar systems could enable more precise and efficient cancer therapy, hopefully in the near future, after additional testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dosimetric reproduction of a left-breast 3DCRT field-in-field radiation therapy planning in an anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luciana B., E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: jonymarques@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem; Barsanelli, Cristiane; Geraldo, Jony M., E-mail: cbarsanelli@yahoo.com.br [Hospital Luxemburgo, Instituto Mário Penna, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Aquino, Jean Carlos; Campos, Tarcísio P. Ribeiro, E-mail: jeancarlosaquino@outlook.com, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UGMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The proposal of this study was to reproduce the dosimetry established in a treatment planning system (TPS) following a 3D conformational radiation therapy (3DCRT) protocol of two parallel-opposite fields applied to the left-breast in a thorax phantom, with the use of the field-in-field technique. Computed tomography (CT) images of the anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom of the thorax with mobile breasts were generated. This phantom was developed by the NRI / UFMG research group. The generated images were transferred to the planning system XiO version-5 for the elaboration of the breast tele therapeutic planning with 2 Gy per fraction, in 25 fractions, with prescribed dose of 50 Gy. A set of ten EBT2 radiochromic films were irradiated at different doses. The values of RGB (Red, Green, Blue) of the radiochromic films were obtained by scanning and data transformed in optical density (OD), whose values were used to construct the calibration curve. EBT2 radiochromic films were positioned outside and inside of the thorax phantom: internally in the right and left lungs, on the face of the heart, in the glandular breast tissue-equivalent (TE) and in the left breast skin. After phantom radiation at the linear accelerator 6 MV Elekta Precise reproducing the 3DCRT, the radiochromic films were digitized after 24 h of exposure. The measurements of the intensities of the films in RGB were measured in the software ImageJ, transformed in optical density and converted in bidimensional dose distributions, applying the calibration curve. The experimental dosimetric data were analyzed and compared with values generated in the TPS. In addition, graphics and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were developed. The dose measurements in the glandular-TE in breast did not present statistically significant differences in relation to values at equivalent positions generated in the TPS. The organs at risk received doses below the reference values, according to TPS. It was verified the

  15. Dosimetric reproduction of a left-breast 3DCRT field-in-field radiation therapy planning in an anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Aquino, Jean Carlos; Campos, Tarcísio P. Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    The proposal of this study was to reproduce the dosimetry established in a treatment planning system (TPS) following a 3D conformational radiation therapy (3DCRT) protocol of two parallel-opposite fields applied to the left-breast in a thorax phantom, with the use of the field-in-field technique. Computed tomography (CT) images of the anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom of the thorax with mobile breasts were generated. This phantom was developed by the NRI / UFMG research group. The generated images were transferred to the planning system XiO version-5 for the elaboration of the breast tele therapeutic planning with 2 Gy per fraction, in 25 fractions, with prescribed dose of 50 Gy. A set of ten EBT2 radiochromic films were irradiated at different doses. The values of RGB (Red, Green, Blue) of the radiochromic films were obtained by scanning and data transformed in optical density (OD), whose values were used to construct the calibration curve. EBT2 radiochromic films were positioned outside and inside of the thorax phantom: internally in the right and left lungs, on the face of the heart, in the glandular breast tissue-equivalent (TE) and in the left breast skin. After phantom radiation at the linear accelerator 6 MV Elekta Precise reproducing the 3DCRT, the radiochromic films were digitized after 24 h of exposure. The measurements of the intensities of the films in RGB were measured in the software ImageJ, transformed in optical density and converted in bidimensional dose distributions, applying the calibration curve. The experimental dosimetric data were analyzed and compared with values generated in the TPS. In addition, graphics and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were developed. The dose measurements in the glandular-TE in breast did not present statistically significant differences in relation to values at equivalent positions generated in the TPS. The organs at risk received doses below the reference values, according to TPS. It was verified the

  16. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.

  17. Study on Computerized Treatment Plan of Field-in-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Conventional Radiation Therapy according to PBC Algorithm and AAA on Breast Cancer Tangential Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Mi Suk; Bae, Seong Soo; Kim, Dae Sup; Back, Geum Mun

    2012-01-01

    Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) provides more accurate dose calculation regarding impact on scatter and tissue inhomogeneity in comparison to Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) algorithm. This study tries to analyze the difference of dose distribution according to PBC algorithm and dose calculation algorithm of AAA on breast cancer tangential plan. Computerized medical care plan using Eclipse treatment planning system (version 8.9, VARIAN, USA) has been established for the 10 breast cancer patients using 6 MV energy of Linac (CL-6EX, VARIAN, USA). After treatment plan of Conventional Radiation Therapy plan (Conventional plan) and Field-in-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy plan (FiF plan) using PBC algorithm has been established, MU has been fixed, implemented dose calculation after changing it to AAA, and compared and analyzed treatment plan using Dose Volume Histogram (DVH). Firstly, as a result of evaluating PBC algorithm of Conventional plan and the difference according to AAA, the average difference of CI value on target volume has been highly estimated by 0.295 on PBC algorithm and as a result of evaluating dose of lung, V 47 Gy and has been highly evaluated by 5.83% and 4.04% each, Mean dose, V 20 , V 5 , V 3 Gy has been highly evaluated 0.6%, 0.29%, 6.35%, 10.23% each on AAA. Secondly, in case of FiF plan, the average difference of CI value on target volume has been highly evaluated on PBC algorithm by 0.165, and dose on ipsilateral lung, V 47 , V 45 Gy, Mean dose has been highly evaluated 6.17%, 3.80%, 0.15% each on PBC algorithm, V 20 , V 5 , V 3 Gy has been highly evaluated 0.14%, 4.07%, 4.35% each on AAA. When calculating with AAA on breast cancer tangential plan, compared to PBC algorithm, Conformity on target volume of Conventional plan, FiF plan has been less evaluated by 0.295, 0.165 each. For the reason that dose of high dose region of ipsilateral lung has been showed little amount, and dose of low dose region has been showed much amount

  18. The optimization of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2012-12-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables highly localized, non-invasive tissue ablation and its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of a range of cancers, including those of the kidney, prostate and breast. HIFU offers the ability to treat deep-seated tumours locally, and potentially bears fewer side effects than more invasive treatment modalities such as resection, chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. There remains however a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to ablate tissue at the required foci whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. This sometimes results in overheating of bone and overlying tissue during treatment, leading to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy is deposited. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data (Gélat et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 5553-81). The present paper describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimization problem with nonlinear constraints. The methodology has subsequently been tested at an excitation frequency of 1 MHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence of ribs. A single array-rib geometry was investigated on which a 50% reduction in the maximum acoustic pressure magnitude on the surface of the ribs was achieved with only a 4% reduction in the peak focal pressure compared to the spherical focusing case. This method was then compared with a binarized apodization approach

  19. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: a review of current work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledney, G D; Madonna, G S; Elliott, T B; Moore, M M; Jackson, W E

    1991-10-01

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, we developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60[Co sources. Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections. Combined therapy with S-TDCM and ceftriaxone for K. pneumoniae infections in mice exposed to a mixed radiation field or to gamma rays was more effective than single-agent therapy. In all irradiated-wounded mice, single therapy of acquired infections with an antibiotic or S-TDCM did not increase survival. Survival of irradiated-wounded mice after topical application of gentamicin sulfate cream suggested that bacteria colonizing the wound disseminated systemically in untreated irradiated mice, resulting in death from sepsis. In lethal models of acquired infections in irradiated-wounded mice, significant increases in survival were achieved when systemic treatments with S-TDCM or gentamicin were combined with topical treatments of gentamicin cream. Therapies for sepsis in all mice exposed to a mixed field were less effective than in mice exposed to gamma rays. Nonetheless, the data show a principle by which successful therapy may be provided to individuals receiving tissue trauma in conjunction with

  20. An open-label pilot study of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in the treatment of failed back surgery syndrome pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harper WL

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wayne L Harper,1 William K Schmidt,2 Nicole J Kubat,3 Richard A Isenberg41Tarheel Clinical Research, LLC, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2NorthStar Consulting, LLC, Davis, CA, USA; 3Nicole Kubat Consulting, Pasadena, CA, USA; 4Regenesis Biomedical, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ, USAAbstract: Persistent pain following back surgery remains a major treatment challenge. The primary objective of this open-label exploratory study was to investigate the analgesic effectiveness of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy administered twice daily over a 45-day period in 34 subjects (68% female with persistent or recurrent pain following back surgery. A secondary goal was to guide the design of future randomized controlled trials that could target responsive subpopulations. All predefined primary and secondary outcomes, including change in pain intensity (PI, physical function (Oswestry Disability Index, analgesic consumption, and overall well-being (Patient Global Impression of Change, are reported. A responder analysis (≥30% reduction in PI versus baseline was added as a post hoc evaluation. Safety outcomes, as well as results of a cost-avoidance survey, are also summarized. Of the 30 per-protocol subjects who completed the study, 33% reported a clinically meaningful (≥30% reduction in PI. A higher response rate (60% was reported for subjects who had undergone discectomy prior to the trial compared to subjects who had undergone other types of surgical interventions (decompression or fusion without discectomy. Improvements in PI were paralleled by improvements in secondary outcomes. Relative to baseline, responders reported an average 44% and 55% reduction in back PI and leg PI (respectively, and an average 13% improvement in Oswestry Disability Index scores. In the per-protocol population, 50% of responders and 12% of nonresponders reported less analgesia consumption at the end of treatment versus baseline. Sixty-seven percent of per-protocol responders and 0% of

  1. TH-C-12A-06: Feasibility of a MLC-Based Inversely Optimized Multi-Field Grid Therapy Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, J [Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Zhao, B; Huang, Y; Kim, J; Qin, Y; Wen, N; Ryu, S; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Grid therapy (GT), which generates highly spatially modulated dose distributions, can deliver single- or hypo-fractionated radiotherapy for large tumors without causing significant toxicities. GT may be applied in combination with immunotherapy, in light of recent preclinical data of synergetic interaction between radiotherapy and immunotherapy. However, conventional GT uses only one field, which does not have the advantage of multi-fields in 3D conformal-RT or IMRT. We have proposed a novel MLC-based, inverse-planned multi-field 3D GT technique. This study aims to test its deliverability and dosimetric accuracy. Methods: A lattice of small spheres was created as the boost volume within a large target. A simultaneous boost IMRT plan with 8-Gy to the target and 20-Gy to the boost volume was generated in the Eclipse treatment planning system (AAA v10) with a HD120 MLC. Nine beams were used, and the gantry and couch angles were selected so that the spheres were perfectly aligned in every beams eye view. The plan was mapped to a phantom with dose scaled. EBT3 films were calibrated and used to measure the delivered dose. Results: The IMRT plan generated a highly spatially modulated dose distribution in the target. D95%, D50%, D5% for the spheres and the targets in Gy were 18.5, 20.0, 21.4 and 7.9, 9.8, 16.1, respectively. D50% for a 1cm ring 1cm outside the target was 2.9-Gy. Film dosimetry showed good agreement between calculated and delivered dose, with an overall gamma passing rate of 99.6% (3%/1mm). The point dose differences for different spheres varied from 1–6%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the deliverability and dose calculation accuracy of the MLC-based inversely optimized multi-field GT technique, which achieved a brachytherapy-like dose distribution. Single-fraction high dose can be delivered to the spheres in a large target with minimal dose to the surrounding normal tissue.

  2. Design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect on return to work with coaching plus light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for workers with work-related chronic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius M. C. Schoutens

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-related chronic stress is a common problem among workers. The core complaint is that the employee feels exhausted, which has an effect on the well-being and functioning of the employee, and an impact on the employer and society. The employee’s absence is costly due to lost productivity and medical expenses. The usual form of care for work-related chronic stress is coaching, using a cognitive-behavioural approach whose primary aim is to reduce symptoms and improve functioning. Light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy are used for the treatment of several mental and physical disorders. The objective of this study is to determine whether coaching combined with light therapy plus pulsed electromagnetic field therapy is an effective treatment for reducing absenteeism, fatigue and stress, and improving quality of life compared to coaching alone. Methods/design The randomized placebo-controlled trial consists of three arms. The population consists of 90 participants with work-related chronic stress complaints. The research groups are: (i intervention group; (ii placebo group; and (iii control group. Participants in the intervention group will be treated with light therapy/pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for 12 weeks, twice a week for 40 min, and coaching (once a fortnight for 50 min. The placebo group receives the same treatment but with the light and pulsed electromagnetic field switched to placebo settings. The control group receives only coaching for 12 weeks, a course of six sessions, once a fortnight for 50 min. The primary outcome is the level of return to work. Secondary outcomes are fatigue, stress and quality of life. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 and 24 weeks after start of treatment. Discussion This study will provide information about the effectiveness of coaching and light therapy plus pulsed electromagnetic field therapy on return to work, and secondly on fatigue

  3. Design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect on return to work with coaching plus light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for workers with work-related chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoutens, Antonius M C; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2016-07-19

    Work-related chronic stress is a common problem among workers. The core complaint is that the employee feels exhausted, which has an effect on the well-being and functioning of the employee, and an impact on the employer and society. The employee's absence is costly due to lost productivity and medical expenses. The usual form of care for work-related chronic stress is coaching, using a cognitive-behavioural approach whose primary aim is to reduce symptoms and improve functioning. Light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy are used for the treatment of several mental and physical disorders. The objective of this study is to determine whether coaching combined with light therapy plus pulsed electromagnetic field therapy is an effective treatment for reducing absenteeism, fatigue and stress, and improving quality of life compared to coaching alone. The randomized placebo-controlled trial consists of three arms. The population consists of 90 participants with work-related chronic stress complaints. The research groups are: (i) intervention group; (ii) placebo group; and (iii) control group. Participants in the intervention group will be treated with light therapy/pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for 12 weeks, twice a week for 40 min, and coaching (once a fortnight for 50 min). The placebo group receives the same treatment but with the light and pulsed electromagnetic field switched to placebo settings. The control group receives only coaching for 12 weeks, a course of six sessions, once a fortnight for 50 min. The primary outcome is the level of return to work. Secondary outcomes are fatigue, stress and quality of life. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 and 24 weeks after start of treatment. This study will provide information about the effectiveness of coaching and light therapy plus pulsed electromagnetic field therapy on return to work, and secondly on fatigue, stress and quality of life in people with work-related chronic

  4. Updated Vertical Extent of Collision Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagg, R.; Bartzis, P.; Papanikolaou, P.

    2002-01-01

    The probabilistic distribution of the vertical extent of collision damage is an important and somewhat controversial component of the proposed IMO harmonized damage stability regulations for cargo and passenger ships. The only pre-existing vertical distribution, currently used in the international...

  5. The Geographic Extent of Global Supply Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machikita, Tomohiro; Ueki, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    We study the extent to which inter-firm relationships are locally concentrated and what determines firm differences in geographic proximity to domestic or foreign suppliers and customers. From micro-data on selfreported customer and supplier data of firms in Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, ...

  6. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, D; Mutic, S; Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount needed for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.

  7. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount needed for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.

  8. Pulsating electromagnetic field stimulation of urothelial cells induces apoptosis and diminishes necrosis: new insight to magnetic therapy in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczak, K; Kaszuba-Zwoinska, J; Thor, P J

    2012-08-01

    The evidence of electromagnetic therapy (EMT) efficacy in stress and/or urge urinary incontinence, as well as in detrusor overactivity is generally lacking in the literature. The potential EMT action of neuromuscular tissue depolarization has been described. Because there is no data on the influence of pulsating electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on the urothelium, we evaluated the effect of PEMF stimulation on rat urothelial cultured cells (RUCC). In our study 15 Wistar rats were used for RUCC preparation. RUCC were exposed to PEMF (50 Hz, 45±5 mT) three times for 4 hours each with 24-hour intervals. The unexposed RUCC was in the same incubator, but in a distance of 35 cm from the PEMF generator. Annexin V-APC (AnV+) labelled was used to determine the percentage of apoptotic cells and propidium iodide (PI+), as standard flow cytometric viability probe to distinguish necrotic cells from viable ones. The results are presented in percentage values. The flow cytometric analysis was carried out on a FACS calibur flow cytometer using Cell-Quest software. In PEMF-unstimulated RUCC, the percentage of AnV+, PI+, and AnV+PI+ positive cells were 1.24±0.34%, 11.03±1.55%, and 12.43±1.96%, respectively. The percentages of AnV+, PI+, and AnV+PI+ positive cells obtained after PEMF stimulation were 1.45±0.16% (p=0.027), 7.03±1.76% (p<0.001), and 9.48±3.40% (p=0.003), respectively. The PEMF stimulation of RUCC induces apoptosis (increase of AnV+ cells) and inhibits necrosis (decrease of PI+ cells) of urothelial cells. This leads us to the conclusion that a low-frequency pulsating electromagnetic field stimulation induces apoptosis and diminishes necrosis of rat urothelial cells in culture.

  9. In vivo wide-field multispectral dosimeter for use in ALA-PpIX based photodynamic therapy of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRochelle, Ethan P. M.; Davis, Scott C.; de Souza, Ana Luiza Ribeiro; Pogue, Brian W.

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for Actinic Kertoses (AK) using aminoluvelinic acid (ALA) is an FDA-approved treatment, which is generally effective, yet response rates vary. The origin of the variability is not well characterized, but may be related to inter-patient variability in the production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). While fiber-based point probe systems provide a method for measuring PpIX production, these measurements have demonstrated large spatial and inter-operator variability. Thus, in an effort to improve patient-specific dosimetry and treatment it is important to develop a robust system that accounts for spatial variability and reduces the chance of operator errors. To address this need, a wide-field multispectral imaging system was developed that is capable of quantifying maps of PpIX in both liquid phantoms and in vivo experiments, focusing on high sensitivity light signals. The system uses both red and blue excitation to elicit a fluorescent response at varying skin depths. A ten-position filter wheel with bandpass filters ranging from 635nm to 710nm are used to capture images along the emission band. A linear least-square spectral fitting algorithm provides the ability to decouple background autofluorescence from PpIX fluorescence, which has improved the system sensitivity by an order of magnitude, detecting nanomolar PpIX concentrations in liquid phantoms in the presence of 2% whole blood and 2% intralipid.

  10. SU-E-P-40: Dosimetric Characteristics of Field Aperture Margin Design in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the dosimetric effects of field aperture margin design in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). Methods: Three artificial spherical PTVs, with diameter of 10mm, 20mm and 30mm, were created on CT images of a human body thoracic phantom. Seven non-coplanar isocentric fields were used for treatment planning. For each PTV, treatment plans with margins 0mm, 1mm, 2mm and 3mm were planned. Dosimetric comparison among plans was done considering the following parameters: prescribed isodose line for target coverage, maximum dose, mean dose as well as dose spillages of V80, V50, and V20. Results: Corresponding to aperture margins of 0mm, 1mm,2m and 3mm used in the treatment planning, the percentage of isodose line chosen for dose prescription increases from 65% to 93% for 10mm PTV, 70% to 92% for 20mm PTV, and 75% to 92% for 30mm PTV. The maximum dose decrease accordingly from 155.7% to 109.5% for 10mm PTV, 145% to 111.6% for 20mm PTV, 137% to 112.2% for 30mm PTV. The mean dose decrease from 138.% to 104.4% for 10mm PTV, 122.8% to 106.1% for 20mm PTV, 121.3% to 106% for 30mm PTV. Dose spillages (mm3) increase (V80−2.6 to 4.02, V50−4.55 to 9.3, V20–87.86 to 101.71) for 10 mm PTV, (V80−6.78 to 9.89, V50–13.46 to 20.4, V20-119.16 to 219.1) for 20 mm PTV, (V80–22.01 to 28.59, V50–41.56 to 52.66, V20-532.71 to 551.84) for 30 mm PTV. Conclusion: In SBRT treatment planning, tight field aperture margin requires prescribing dose to lower isodose line that leading to higher dose inhomogeneity and higher mean dose to PTV. Loose margin allows prescribing dose to higher isodose line, therefore improves the dose homogeneity. However, it increases dose spillages. Clinician could try different margins according to the PTV size and location of surrounding critical organs to optimize the dose delivered to the patient.

  11. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of cancers of the head and neck: Comparison of split-field and whole-field techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabaja, Bouthaina; Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Rosen, Isaac; Tung, Sam; Morrison, William H.; Ang, K. Kian; Garden, Adam S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Oropharynx cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiation (IMRT) are often treated with a monoisocentric or half-beam technique (HB). IMRT is delivered to the primary tumor and upper neck alone, while the lower neck is treated with a matching anterior beam. Because IMRT can treat the entire volume or whole field (WF), the primary aim of the study was to test the ability to plan cases using WF-IMRT while obtaining an optimal plan and acceptable dose distribution and also respecting normal critical structures. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with early-stage oropharynx cancers had treatment plans created with HB-IMRT and WF-IMRT techniques. Plans were deemed acceptable if they met the planning guidelines (as defined or with minor violations) of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol H0022. Comparisons included coverage to the planning target volume (PTV) of the primary (PTV66) and subclinical disease (PTV54). We also compared the ability of both techniques to respect the tolerance of critical structures. Results: The volume of PTV66 treated to >110% was less in 9 of the 13 patients in the WF-IMRT plan as compared to the HB-IMRT plan. The calculated mean volume receiving >110% for all patients planned with WF-IMRT was 9.3% (0.8%-25%) compared to 13.7% (2.7%-23.7%) with HB-IMRT (p = 0.09). The PTV54 volume receiving >110% of dose was less in 10 of the 13 patients planned with WF-IMRT compared to HB-IMRT. The mean doses to all critical structures except the larynx were comparable with each plan. The mean dose to the larynx was significantly less (p = 0.001), 18.7 Gy, with HB-IMRT compared to 47 Gy with WF-IMRT. Conclusions: Regarding target volumes, acceptable plans can be generated with either WF-IMRT or HB-IMRT. WF-IMRT has an advantage if uncertainty at the match line is a concern, whereas HB-IMRT, particularly in cases not involving the base of tongue, can achieve much lower doses to the larynx

  12. Is Eurasian October snow cover extent increasing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R D; Derksen, C

    2013-01-01

    A number of recent studies present evidence of an increasing trend in Eurasian snow cover extent (SCE) in the October snow onset period based on analysis of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) historical satellite record. These increases are inconsistent with fall season surface temperature warming trends across the region. Using four independent snow cover data sources (surface observations, two reanalyses, satellite passive microwave retrievals) we show that the increasing SCE is attributable to an internal trend in the NOAA CDR dataset to chart relatively more October snow cover extent over the dataset overlap period (1982–2005). Adjusting the series for this shift results in closer agreement with other independent datasets, stronger correlation with continentally-averaged air temperature anomalies, and a decrease in SCE over 1982–2011 consistent with surface air temperature warming trends over the same period. (letter)

  13. The extent of forest in dryland biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Francois Bastin; Nora Berrahmouni; Alan Grainger; Danae Maniatis; Danilo Mollicone; Rebecca Moore; Chiara Patriarca; Nicolas Picard; Ben Sparrow; Elena Maria Abraham; Kamel Aloui; Ayhan Atesoglu; Fabio Attore; Caglar Bassullu; Adia Bey; Monica Garzuglia; Luis G. GarcÌa-Montero; Nikee Groot; Greg Guerin; Lars Laestadius; Andrew J. Lowe; Bako Mamane; Giulio Marchi; Paul Patterson; Marcelo Rezende; Stefano Ricci; Ignacio Salcedo; Alfonso Sanchez-Paus Diaz; Fred Stolle; Venera Surappaeva; Rene Castro

    2017-01-01

    Dryland biomes cover two-fifths of Earth’s land surface, but their forest area is poorly known. Here, we report an estimate of global forest extent in dryland biomes, based on analyzing more than 210,000 0.5-hectare sample plots through a photo-interpretation approach using large databases of satellite imagery at (i) very high spatial resolution and (ii) very high...

  14. Case Report: A Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patient Treated with GcMAF, Sonodynamic Therapy and Tumor Treating Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Toshio; Amitani, Haruka; Kubo, Kentaro; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nishikata, Takahito; Mette, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage activating factor (MAF)-based immunotherapy has a wide application for use in treating many diseases via macrophage activation. Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) using low-intensity ultrasound and tumor treating field (TTF) therapy are novel therapeutic modalities. SDT is usually combined with ozone therapy to improve local hypoxia within the tumor environment. We treated a 77-year-old male diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer ((NSCLC) stage 3B) using second-generation serum GcMAF and oral colostrum MAF-based immunotherapy combined with SDT, TTF and ozone therapies. This case report demonstrates that GcMAF, oral colostrum MAF, SDT, TTF and ozone therapy can be used for NSCLC without adverse effects. This case report suggests a new concept of cancer treatment using local destruction of cancer tissue, in this case conducted with SDT and TTF therapy, to be used in combination with serum GcMAF and colostrum MAF immunotherapy as a systemic treatment. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Total Skin Electron Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Using a Modern Dual-Field Rotational Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heumann, Thatcher R. [Emory University School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute (WCI), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Parker, Sareeta [Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Biostatistics Shared Core Resource at WCI, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Dhabbaan, Anees [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute (WCI), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Goodman, Michael [Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Flowers, Christopher R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K., E-mail: drkhurram2000@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute (WCI), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with rotational total skin electron irradiation (RTSEI) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), and to examine response by disease stage and race. Methods and Materials: We reviewed our outcomes for 68 CTCL patients who received RTSEI (≥30 Gy) from 2000 to 2013. Primary outcomes were complete clinical response (CCR), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Using log–rank tests and Cox proportional hazards, OS and RFS were compared across tumor stages at time of RTSEI with further racial subgroup analysis. Results: Median age at diagnosis and at time of radiation was 52 and 56 years, respectively. Median follow-up was 5.1 years, 49% were African American, and 49% were female. At time of treatment, 18, 37, and 13 patients were T stage 2, 3, and 4, respectively. At 6 weeks after RTSEI, overall CCR was 82% (88%, 83%, and 69% for T2, T3, and T4, respectively). Median RFS was 11 months for all patients and 14, 10, and 12 months for stage T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Tumor stage was not associated with RFS or CCR. Maintenance therapy after RTSEI was associated with improved RFS in both crude and multivariable analysis, controlling for T stage. Median OS was 76 months (91 and 59 months for T3 and T4, respectively). With the exception of improved OS in African Americans compared with whites at stage T2, race was not associated with CCR, RFS, or OS. Conclusions: These results represent the largest RTSEI clinical outcomes study in the modern era using a dual-field rotational technique. Our observed response rates match or improve upon the standard set by previous outcome studies using conventional TSEI techniques, despite a large percentage of advanced CTCL lesions in our cohort. We found that clinical response after RTSEI did not seem to be affected by T stage or race.

  16. Total skin electron therapy treatment verification: Monte Carlo simulation and beam characteristics of large non-standard electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavon, Ester Carrasco; Sanchez-Doblado, Francisco; Leal, Antonio; Capote, Roberto; Lagares, Juan Ignacio; Perucha, Maria; Arrans, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    Total skin electron therapy (TSET) is a complex technique which requires non-standard measurements and dosimetric procedures. This paper investigates an essential first step towards TSET Monte Carlo (MC) verification. The non-standard 6 MeV 40 x 40 cm 2 electron beam at a source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm as well as its horizontal projection behind a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) screen to SSD = 380 cm were evaluated. The EGS4 OMEGA-BEAM code package running on a Linux home made 47 PCs cluster was used for the MC simulations. Percentage depth-dose curves and profiles were calculated and measured experimentally for the 40 x 40 cm 2 field at both SSD = 100 cm and patient surface SSD = 380 cm. The output factor (OF) between the reference 40 x 40 cm 2 open field and its horizontal projection as TSET beam at SSD = 380 cm was also measured for comparison with MC results. The accuracy of the simulated beam was validated by the good agreement to within 2% between measured relative dose distributions, including the beam characteristic parameters (R 50 , R 80 , R 100 , R p , E 0 ) and the MC calculated results. The energy spectrum, fluence and angular distribution at different stages of the beam (at SSD = 100 cm, at SSD = 364.2 cm, behind the PMMA beam spoiler screen and at treatment surface SSD = 380 cm) were derived from MC simulations. Results showed a final decrease in mean energy of almost 56% from the exit window to the treatment surface. A broader angular distribution (FWHM of the angular distribution increased from 13deg at SSD 100 cm to more than 30deg at the treatment surface) was fully attributable to the PMMA beam spoiler screen. OF calculations and measurements agreed to less than 1%. The effect of changing the electron energy cut-off from 0.7 MeV to 0.521 MeV and air density fluctuations in the bunker which could affect the MC results were shown to have a negligible impact on the beam fluence distributions. Results proved the applicability of using MC

  17. Research Misconduct—Definitions, Manifestations and Extent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bornmann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the international scientific community has been rocked by a number of serious cases of research misconduct. In one of these, Woo Suk Hwang, a Korean stem cell researcher published two articles on research with ground-breaking results in Science in 2004 and 2005. Both articles were later revealed to be fakes. This paper provides an overview of what research misconduct is generally understood to be, its manifestations and the extent to which they are thought to exist.

  18. Measurement of extent of intense ion beam charge neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelko, V [Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Giese, H; Schalk, S [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). INR

    1997-12-31

    Various diagnostic tools were employed to study and optimize the extent of space charge neutralization in the pulsed intense proton beam facility PROFA, comprising Langmuir probes, capacitive probes, and a novel type of the three electrode collector. The latter does not only allow us to measure ion and electron beam current densities in a high magnetic field environment, but also to deduce the density spectrum of the beam electrons. Appropriate operating conditions were identified to attain a complete space charge neutralisation. (author). 5 figs., 4 refs.

  19. Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Supportive Art and Sport Interventions on Bam Earthquake Related Post Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Children: A Field Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Joshaghani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: "n "nThe main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of psychological therapies and art/sport supportive interventions separately,and in combination on post traumatic stress symptoms in children and compare them with a control group . "nMethods: In a field trial, we evaluated the efficacy of group behavioral therapy, art and sport supportive interventions in Bam earthquake children survivors with PTSD symptoms and compared it with a control group. Before and after interventions we evaluated the PTSD symptoms using K-SADS-PL semi-structural interview for each group and compared them using appropriate statistical methods. "nResults: The participants were 200 individuals who were randomized in four groups according to an intervention program including: Group behavioral therapy; Group behavioral therapy plus art and sport interventions; Art and sport interventions; and control group. During the interventions, 39 individuals were excluded. None of the participants had severed PTSD or other psychiatry disorders that needed pharmacological interventions. In interventional groups, the reduction of total PTSD symptoms and the symptoms of re-experience, avoidance and hyper arousal was not statistically significant. However, in the control group, the PTSD symptoms increased during the study which was statistically significant. "nConclusion: Group behavior therapy and supportive interventions (art and sport may have preventive effects on PTSD symptoms.

  20. Development of the 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water (ND,W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Akifumi; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukahori, Mai; Sakata, Suoh

    2013-01-01

    A primary standard for the absorbed dose rate to water in a 60 Co gamma-ray field was established at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) in fiscal year 2011. Then, a 60 Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water was developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL). The results of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organization (WHO) TLD SSDL audit demonstrated that there was good agreement between NIRS stated absorbed dose to water and IAEA measurements. The IAEA guide based on the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard was used to estimate the relative expanded uncertainty of the calibration factor for a therapy-level Farmer type ionization chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water (N D,W ) with the new field. The uncertainty of N D,W was estimated to be 1.1% (k=2), which corresponds to approximately one third of the value determined in the existing air kerma field. The dissemination of traceability of the calibration factor determined in the new field is expected to diminish the uncertainty of dose delivered to patients significantly. (author)

  1. Sci-Sat AM: Radiation Dosimetry and Practical Therapy Solutions - 05: Not all geometries are equivalent for magnetic field Fano cavity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkov, Victor N.; Rogers, David W.O. [Carleton University (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    The coupling of MRI and radiation treatment systems for the application of magnetic resonance guided radiation therapy necessitates a reliable magnetic field capable Monte Carlo (MC) code. In addition to the influence of the magnetic field on dose distributions, the question of proper calibration has arisen due to the several percent variation of ion chamber and solid state detector responses in magnetic fields when compared to the 0 T case (Reynolds et al., Med Phys, 2013). In the absence of a magnetic field, EGSnrc has been shown to pass the Fano cavity test (a rigorous benchmarking tool of MC codes) at the 0.1 % level (Kawrakow, Med.Phys, 2000), and similar results should be required of magnetic field capable MC algorithms. To properly test such developing MC codes, the Fano cavity theorem has been adapted to function in a magnetic field (Bouchard et al., PMB, 2015). In this work, the Fano cavity test is applied in a slab and ion-chamber-like geometries to test the transport options of an implemented magnetic field algorithm in EGSnrc. Results show that the deviation of the MC dose from the expected Fano cavity theory value is highly sensitive to the choice of geometry, and the ion chamber geometry appears to pass the test more easily than larger slab geometries. As magnetic field MC codes begin to be used for dose simulations and correction factor calculations, care must be taken to apply the most rigorous Fano test geometries to ensure reliability of such algorithms.

  2. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, Jeremy D.; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M.; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  3. Tumor therapy and pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joss, R.; Brunner, K.W.

    1982-01-01

    Many successfully treated tumour patients are children and juveniles. This raises questions as to the effects of tumour therapy on reproductiveness and offspring. The possible extent of damage to the male and female gonads caused by surgical, chemical, and radiological tumour therapy is investigated. Also, the problem of tumour therapy or women developing neoplasms during pregnancy. Pregnancies after successful tumour therapy are quite frequent today. Experience so far suggests that the rate of congenital deformities is not significantly increased. (orig.) [de

  4. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Medical Physics Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, H [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tsai, H [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Medical Physics Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  5. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y; Lin, Y; Chen, H; Tsai, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ( 6 LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ( 7 LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  6. The effect of music video exposure on students' perceived clinical applications of popular music in the field of music therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Lori F; Mori-Inoue, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of video exposure on music therapy students' perceptions of clinical applications of popular music in the field of music therapy. Fifty-one participants were randomly divided into two groups and exposed to a popular song in either audio-only or music video format. Participants were asked to indicate clinical applications; specifically, participants chose: (a) possible population(s), (b) most appropriate population(s), (c) possible age range(s), (d) most appropriate age ranges, (e) possible goal area(s) and (f) most appropriate goal area. Data for each of these categories were compiled and analyzed, with no significant differences found in the choices made by the audio-only and video groups. Three items, (a) selection of the bereavement population, (b) selection of bereavement as the most appropriate population and (c) selection of the age ranges of pre teen/mature adult, were additionally selected for further analysis due to their relationship to the video content. Analysis results revealed a significant difference between the video and audio-only groups for the selection of these specific items, with the video group's selections more closely aligned to the video content. Results of this pilot study suggest that music video exposure to popular music can impact how students choose to implement popular songs in the field of music therapy.

  7. Duodenal Derotation and Extent Tapering Jejunoplasty as Primary Repair for Neonates With High Jejunal Atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Luo

    2010-10-01

    Conclusion: In very proximal high atresia, the extent of tapering is limited by the proximity of the ligament of Treitz. Duodenal derotation provides better access to the high atresia. The results of this limited experience suggest that the DDETJ procedure could provide an alternative therapy in patients with high jejunal atresia.

  8. Intensity modulated proton therapy and its sensitivity to treatment uncertainties 2: the potential effects of inter-fraction and inter-field motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, A J

    2008-01-01

    Simple tools for studying the effects of inter-fraction and inter-field motions on intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans have been developed, and have been applied to both 3D and distal edge tracking (DET) IMPT plans. For the inter-fraction motion, we have investigated the effects of misaligned density heterogeneities, whereas for the inter-field motion analysis, the effects of field misalignment on the plans have been assessed. Inter-fraction motion problems have been analysed using density differentiated error (DDE) distributions, which specifically show the additional problems resulting from misaligned density heterogeneities for proton plans. Likewise, for inter-field motion, we present methods for calculating motion differentiated error (MDE) distributions. DDE and MDE analysis of all plans demonstrate that the 3D approach is generally more robust to both inter-fraction and inter-field motions than the DET approach, but that strong in-field dose gradients can also adversely affect a plan's robustness. An important additional conclusion is that, for certain IMPT plans, even inter-fraction errors cannot necessarily be compensated for by the use of a simple PTV margins, implying that more sophisticated tools need to be developed for uncertainty management and assessment for IMPT treatments at the treatment planning level

  9. Capturing heterogeneity: The role of a study area's extent for estimating mean throughfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Alexander; Voss, Sebastian; Metzger, Johanna Clara; Hildebrandt, Anke; Zimmermann, Beate

    2016-11-01

    The selection of an appropriate spatial extent of a sampling plot is one among several important decisions involved in planning a throughfall sampling scheme. In fact, the choice of the extent may determine whether or not a study can adequately characterize the hydrological fluxes of the studied ecosystem. Previous attempts to optimize throughfall sampling schemes focused on the selection of an appropriate sample size, support, and sampling design, while comparatively little attention has been given to the role of the extent. In this contribution, we investigated the influence of the extent on the representativeness of mean throughfall estimates for three forest ecosystems of varying stand structure. Our study is based on virtual sampling of simulated throughfall fields. We derived these fields from throughfall data sampled in a simply structured forest (young tropical forest) and two heterogeneous forests (old tropical forest, unmanaged mixed European beech forest). We then sampled the simulated throughfall fields with three common extents and various sample sizes for a range of events and for accumulated data. Our findings suggest that the size of the study area should be carefully adapted to the complexity of the system under study and to the required temporal resolution of the throughfall data (i.e. event-based versus accumulated). Generally, event-based sampling in complex structured forests (conditions that favor comparatively long autocorrelations in throughfall) requires the largest extents. For event-based sampling, the choice of an appropriate extent can be as important as using an adequate sample size.

  10. Involved-nodal radiation therapy leads to lower doses to critical organs-at-risk compared to involved-field radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvihill, David J.; McMichael, Kevin; Goyal, Sharad; Drachtman, Richard; Weiss, Aaron; Khan, Atif J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) after cytotoxic chemotherapy has become the standard of care in treating pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. However, recent interest in shrinking the treatment volume to involved node radiotherapy (INRT) may allow lower doses to critical organ structures. We dosimetrically compared IFRT and INRT treatment approaches. Methods: INRT treatment plans were retrospectively constructed from 17 consecutively treated pediatric patients identified with Hodgkin lymphoma who had been previously treated with conventional IFRT. The radiation doses delivered to organs-at-risk (OARs) with virtual INRT treatment plans based on INRT field design were then compared to the original IFRT treatment plans. Metrics for comparison included mean doses to organs and volumes of organ receiving at least 50% of the original prescription dose (V50%). A one-tailed, paired t-test was then performed to verify statistical significance at an alpha level of 0.05. Results: All organs at risk compared in this investigation (kidneys, heart, thyroid, parotids, and lungs) had significantly lower doses of radiation with INRT when compared to IFRT (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the volume of the breast receiving at least 50% of the initial prescription dose was statistically lower in the INRT plans. Conclusions: Utilizing the concept of INRT results in a reduction of radiation dose to critical organ structures in pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma when compared to the more traditional method of IFRT

  11. Corticocortical feedback increases the spatial extent of normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Jonathan J; Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Kreiman, Gabriel; Born, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Normalization has been proposed as a canonical computation operating across different brain regions, sensory modalities, and species. It provides a good phenomenological description of non-linear response properties in primary visual cortex (V1), including the contrast response function and surround suppression. Despite its widespread application throughout the visual system, the underlying neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. We recently observed that corticocortical feedback contributes to surround suppression in V1, raising the possibility that feedback acts through normalization. To test this idea, we characterized area summation and contrast response properties in V1 with and without feedback from V2 and V3 in alert macaques and applied a standard normalization model to the data. Area summation properties were well explained by a form of divisive normalization, which computes the ratio between a neuron's driving input and the spatially integrated activity of a "normalization pool." Feedback inactivation reduced surround suppression by shrinking the spatial extent of the normalization pool. This effect was independent of the gain modulation thought to mediate the influence of contrast on area summation, which remained intact during feedback inactivation. Contrast sensitivity within the receptive field center was also unaffected by feedback inactivation, providing further evidence that feedback participates in normalization independent of the circuit mechanisms involved in modulating contrast gain and saturation. These results suggest that corticocortical feedback contributes to surround suppression by increasing the visuotopic extent of normalization and, via this mechanism, feedback can play a critical role in contextual information processing.

  12. Corticocortical feedback increases the spatial extent of normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Kreiman, Gabriel; Born, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    Normalization has been proposed as a canonical computation operating across different brain regions, sensory modalities, and species. It provides a good phenomenological description of non-linear response properties in primary visual cortex (V1), including the contrast response function and surround suppression. Despite its widespread application throughout the visual system, the underlying neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. We recently observed that corticocortical feedback contributes to surround suppression in V1, raising the possibility that feedback acts through normalization. To test this idea, we characterized area summation and contrast response properties in V1 with and without feedback from V2 and V3 in alert macaques and applied a standard normalization model to the data. Area summation properties were well explained by a form of divisive normalization, which computes the ratio between a neuron's driving input and the spatially integrated activity of a “normalization pool.” Feedback inactivation reduced surround suppression by shrinking the spatial extent of the normalization pool. This effect was independent of the gain modulation thought to mediate the influence of contrast on area summation, which remained intact during feedback inactivation. Contrast sensitivity within the receptive field center was also unaffected by feedback inactivation, providing further evidence that feedback participates in normalization independent of the circuit mechanisms involved in modulating contrast gain and saturation. These results suggest that corticocortical feedback contributes to surround suppression by increasing the visuotopic extent of normalization and, via this mechanism, feedback can play a critical role in contextual information processing. PMID:24910596

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the treatment planning of radiation therapy in carcinoma of the cervix treated with the four-field pelvic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Laurence; Chacon, Bosco; Kind, Michele; Lasbareilles, Olivier; Muyldermans, Piet; Chemin, Antony; Le Treut, Alain; Pigneux, Jaques; Kantor, Guy

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the planning of radiation therapy for patients with carcinoma of the cervix treated with a four-field technique. Methods and Materials: Between May 1994 and February 1995, 18 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were entered in the study (1 T1 N-; 2 T2a N-; 1 T2b NO; 10 T2b N-; 2 T2b N+; 2 T3b N+). Node status was assessed by a laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy. During the first step, all the patients were simulated with an isocentric four-field pelvic technique. In one group (11 patients) simulation was done based on clinical examination, computed tomography (CT), and standard guidelines. In the second group (seven patients) simulation was based on clinical examination, CT, and with the help of diagnostic MRI, which was available at that time. During the second step, MRI in treatment position with skin markings of the isocenter of the radiation fields was then performed in every patient. During the third step, in each patient, the simulated radiation fields were correlated with the MRI defined target volume by superimposing them on midsagittal and midcoronal MR images. The adequacy of the margins was arbitrarly defined as 1 cm around the MRI defined target volume (tumor of the cervix and its extension, and uterus). Results: In the first group (11 patients), MRI in treatment position led to a change in 7 patients: six inadequate margins in the lateral fields and one in the anterior and lateral field. In almost all the cases, the adjustments were of an increase of 10 mm, equally matched between the anterior and posterior borders of the lateral fields. In the second group (seven patients), MRI in treatment position has led to a change in lateral fields in five patients. The mean adjustment was 10 mm: four increases (two anterior border, one posterior border, one anterior and posterior border), and one decrease of the posterior border. In the two groups, modifications of the anterior border of the lateral

  14. Evaluation of a randomized controlled trial on the effect on return to work with coaching combined with light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for workers with work-related chronic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nieuwenhuijsen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic work-related stress is quite prevalent in the working population and is in some cases accompanied by long-term sick leave. These stress complaints highly impact employees and are costly due to lost productivity and medical expenses. A new treatment platform with light therapy plus Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields (PEMF in combination with coaching was used to assess whether more positive effects on return to work, stress, work-related fatigue, and quality of life could be induced compared to coaching alone. Methods A placebo-controlled trial was executed after inclusion of 96 workers, aged 18–65 with work-related chronic stress complaints and who were on sick leave (either part-time or full-time. Participants were divided into three arms at random. Group 1 (n = 28 received the treatment and coaching (Intervention group, group 2 (n = 28 received the treatment with the device turned off and coaching (Placebo group and group 3 (n = 28 received coaching only (Control group. The data were collected at baseline, and after 6, 12 and 24 weeks. The primary outcome was % return to work, and secondary outcomes were work-related fatigue (emotional exhaustion and need for recovery after work, stress (distress and hair cortisol, and quality of life (SF-36 dimensions: vitality, emotional role limitation, and social functioning. Results Eighty-four workers completed all measurements, 28 in each group. All groups improved significantly over time in the level of return to work, as well as on all secondary outcomes. No statistical differences between the three groups were found either on the primary outcome or on any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusions Light therapy with Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields PEMF therapy has no additional effect on return to work, stress, fatigue, and quality of live compared to coaching alone. Trial registration NTR4794 , registration date: 18-sep-2014

  15. Evaluation of a randomized controlled trial on the effect on return to work with coaching combined with light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for workers with work-related chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Schoutens, Antonius M C; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2017-10-02

    Chronic work-related stress is quite prevalent in the working population and is in some cases accompanied by long-term sick leave. These stress complaints highly impact employees and are costly due to lost productivity and medical expenses. A new treatment platform with light therapy plus Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields (PEMF) in combination with coaching was used to assess whether more positive effects on return to work, stress, work-related fatigue, and quality of life could be induced compared to coaching alone. A placebo-controlled trial was executed after inclusion of 96 workers, aged 18-65 with work-related chronic stress complaints and who were on sick leave (either part-time or full-time). Participants were divided into three arms at random. Group 1 (n = 28) received the treatment and coaching (Intervention group), group 2 (n = 28) received the treatment with the device turned off and coaching (Placebo group) and group 3 (n = 28) received coaching only (Control group). The data were collected at baseline, and after 6, 12 and 24 weeks. The primary outcome was % return to work, and secondary outcomes were work-related fatigue (emotional exhaustion and need for recovery after work), stress (distress and hair cortisol), and quality of life (SF-36 dimensions: vitality, emotional role limitation, and social functioning). Eighty-four workers completed all measurements, 28 in each group. All groups improved significantly over time in the level of return to work, as well as on all secondary outcomes. No statistical differences between the three groups were found either on the primary outcome or on any of the secondary outcomes. Light therapy with Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields PEMF therapy has no additional effect on return to work, stress, fatigue, and quality of live compared to coaching alone. NTR4794 , registration date: 18-sep-2014.

  16. A design study on hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    A study about the installation of a hyper-thermal neutron converter to a clinical collimator was performed, as a series of the design study on a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. From the parametric-surveys by Monte Carlo calculation, it was confirmed that the practical irradiation field of hyper-thermal neutrons would be feasible by the modifications of the clinical collimator and the bismuth-layer structure. (author)

  17. Regional Extent of Peripheral Suppression in Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Raiju J; Clavagnier, Simon; Bobier, William R; Thompson, Benjamin; Hess, Robert F

    2017-04-01

    Previously, we have mapped amblyopic eye suppression within the central 20° of the visual field and observed a gradient of suppression that is strongest in central vision and weakens with increasing eccentricity. In this study, using a large dichoptic display, we extend our novel suppression mapping approach further into the periphery (from 20°-60°) to assess whether suppression continues to decline with eccentricity or plateaus. Sixteen participants with amblyopia (10 with strabismus, 6 with anisometropia without strabismus; mean age: 37.9 ± 11 years) and six normal observers (mean age: 28.3 ± 5 years) took part. The visual stimulus (60° diameter), viewed from 57 cm, was composed of four concentric annuli (5° radius) with alternate contrast polarities starting from an eccentricity of 10°. Each annulus was divided into eight sectors subtending 45° of visual angle. Participants adjusted the contrast of a single sector presented to the fellow eye to match the perceived contrast of the remaining stimulus elements that were presented to the amblyopic eye. A matching contrast that was lower in the fellow eye than the amblyopic eye indicated suppression. Patients with strabismus exhibited significantly stronger interocular suppression than controls across all eccentricities (P = 0.01). Patients with anisometropia did not differ from controls (P = 0.58). Suppression varied significantly with eccentricity (P = 0.005) but this effect did not differ between patient groups (P = 0.217). In amblyopia, suppression is present beyond the central 10° in patients with strabismus. Suppression becomes weaker at greater eccentricities and this may enable peripheral fusion that could be used by binocular treatment methods.

  18. High density lipoprotein structural changes and drug response in lipidomic profiles following the long-term fenofibrate therapy in the FIELD substudy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Yetukuri

    Full Text Available In a recent FIELD study the fenofibrate therapy surprisingly failed to achieve significant benefit over placebo in the primary endpoint of coronary heart disease events. Increased levels of atherogenic homocysteine were observed in some patients assigned to fenofibrate therapy but the molecular mechanisms behind this are poorly understood. Herein we investigated HDL lipidomic profiles associated with fenofibrate treatment and the drug-induced Hcy levels in the FIELD substudy. We found that fenofibrate leads to complex HDL compositional changes including increased apoA-II, diminishment of lysophosphatidylcholines and increase of sphingomyelins. Ethanolamine plasmalogens were diminished only in a subgroup of fenofibrate-treated patients with elevated homocysteine levels. Finally we performed molecular dynamics simulations to qualitatively reconstitute HDL particles in silico. We found that increased number of apoA-II excludes neutral lipids from HDL surface and apoA-II is more deeply buried in the lipid matrix than apoA-I. In conclusion, a detailed molecular characterization of HDL may provide surrogates for predictors of drug response and thus help identify the patients who might benefit from fenofibrate treatment.

  19. Multisensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent - Northern Hemisphere (MASIE-NH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Multisensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent Northern Hemisphere (MASIE-NH) products provide measurements of daily sea ice extent and sea ice edge boundary for the...

  20. Estimating Global Cropland Extent with Multi-year MODIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher O. Justice

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the suitability of 250 m MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data for mapping global cropland extent. A set of 39 multi-year MODIS metrics incorporating four MODIS land bands, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and thermal data was employed to depict cropland phenology over the study period. Sub-pixel training datasets were used to generate a set of global classification tree models using a bagging methodology, resulting in a global per-pixel cropland probability layer. This product was subsequently thresholded to create a discrete cropland/non-cropland indicator map using data from the USDA-FAS (Foreign Agricultural Service Production, Supply and Distribution (PSD database describing per-country acreage of production field crops. Five global land cover products, four of which attempted to map croplands in the context of multiclass land cover classifications, were subsequently used to perform regional evaluations of the global MODIS cropland extent map. The global probability layer was further examined with reference to four principle global food crops: corn, soybeans, wheat and rice. Overall results indicate that the MODIS layer best depicts regions of intensive broadleaf crop production (corn and soybean, both in correspondence with existing maps and in associated high probability matching thresholds. Probability thresholds for wheat-growing regions were lower, while areas of rice production had the lowest associated confidence. Regions absent of agricultural intensification, such as Africa, are poorly characterized regardless of crop type. The results reflect the value of MODIS as a generic global cropland indicator for intensive agriculture production regions, but with little sensitivity in areas of low agricultural intensification. Variability in mapping accuracies between areas dominated by different crop types also points to the desirability of a crop-specific approach rather than attempting

  1. In vivo preclinical low field MRI monitoring of tumor growth following a suicide gene therapy in an ortho-topic mice model of human glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, E.; Goetz, Ch.; Aubertin, G.; Constantinesco, A.; Choquet, Ph.; Kintz, J.; Accart, N.; Grellier, B.; Erbs, Ph.; Rooke, R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to monitor in vivo with low field MRI growth of a murine ortho-topic glioma model following a suicide gene therapy. Methods The gene therapy consisted in the stereotactic injection in the mice brain of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (M.V.A.) vector encoding for a suicide gene (FCU1) that transforms a non toxic pro-drug 5-fluoro-cytosine (5-F.C.) to its highly cytotoxic derivatives 5-fluorouracil (5-F.U.) and 5-fluoro-uridine-5 monophosphate (5-F.U.M.P.). Using a warmed-up imaging cell, sequential 3D T1 and T2 0.1T MRI brain examinations were performed on 16 Swiss female nu/nu mice bearing ortho-topic human glioblastoma (U 87-MG cells). The 6-week in vivo MRI follow-up consisted in a weekly measurement of the intracerebral tumor volume leading to a total of 65 examinations. Mice were divided in four groups: sham group (n = 4), sham group treated with 5-F.C. only (n = 4), sham group with injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector only (n = 4), therapy group administered with M.V.A.-FCU1 vector and 5-F.C. (n = 4). Measurements of tumor volumes were obtained after manual segmentation of T1- and T2-weighted images. Results Intra-observer and inter-observer tumor volume measurements show no significant differences. No differences were found between T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups. A significant statistical difference (p < 0.05) in T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups and the animals treated with the intratumoral injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector in combination with 2 weeks per os 5-F.C. administration was demonstrated. Conclusion Preclinical low field MRI was able to monitor efficacy of suicide gene therapy in delaying the tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model of ortho-topic glioblastoma. (authors)

  2. The accuracy of electron-boost fields in the radiation therapy of early breast cancer after lumpectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakar, D.; Bower, D.; Kambouris, A.

    1989-01-01

    Electron boost fields used in the radiotherapy of early breast cancer may be set up either clinically (on the basis of lumpectomy scar location and other clinical data) or on location of surgical clips shown by simulation films. A comparison of these two methods has been conducted on 27 patients. In 13 patients, the clinical set up was good (margin around the clips > 1.5 cm); in four, marginal (margin = 0.5-1.5 cm) and in 10, unacceptable (< 0.5 cm margin). The authors concluded that placement of surgical clips at the margins of the tumor bed and simulation of the electron boost fields is necessary to ensure geographic miss

  3. Short-term effects of extremely low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field and pulsed low-level laser therapy on rabbit model of corneal alkali burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Kanavi, Mozhgan; Tabeie, Faraj; Sahebjam, Farzin; Poursani, Nima; Jahanbakhsh, Nazanin; Paymanpour, Pouya; AfsarAski, Sasha

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of combining extremely low frequency-pulsed electromagnetic field (ELF-PEMF) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on alkali-burned rabbit corneas. Fifty alkali-burned corneas of 50 rabbits were categorized into five groups: ELF-PEMF therapy with 2 mT intensity (ELF 2) for 2 h daily; LLLT for 30 min twice daily; combined ELF-PEMF and LLLT (ELF + LLLT); medical therapy (MT); and control (i.e., no treatment). Clinical examination and digital photography of the corneas were performed on days 0, 2, 7, and 14. After euthanizing the rabbits, the affected eyes were evaluated by histopathology. The clinical and histopathologic results were compared between the groups. On days 7 and 14, no significant difference in the corneal defect area was evident between the ELF, LLLT, ELF + LLLT, and MT groups. Excluding the controls, none of the study groups demonstrated a significant corneal neovascularization in both routine histopathology and immunohistochemistry for CD31. Keratocyte loss was significantly higher in the MT group than in the ELF, LLLT, and ELF + LLLT groups. Moderate to severe stromal inflammation in the LLLT group was comparable with that in the MT group and was significantly lower than that in the other groups. In conclusion, combining LLLT and ELF was not superior to ELF alone or LLLT alone in healing corneal alkali burns. However, given the lower intensity of corneal inflammation and the lower rate of keratocytes loss with LLLT, this treatment may be superior to other proposed treatment modalities for healing alkali-burned corneas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Using multimedia information and communication technology (ICT) to provide added value to reminiscence therapy for people with dementia : Lessons learned from three field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, Alexander; Gündogdu, Ramazan; Butz, Katherina; Müller, Nadine; Kunze, Christophe; König, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In the care of people with dementia (PwD), occupational therapies and activities aiming at maintaining the quality of life of PwD, such as reminiscence therapy (RT), are taking on a more and more important role. Information and communication technology (ICT) has the potential to improve and to facilitate RT by facilitating access to and selection of biographical information and related contents or by providing novel multimodal interaction forms to trigger memories; however, interactive multimedia technology is barely used in practice. This article presents three exploratory field studies that evaluated different aspects of RT technology use for PwD in care homes, including the utilization of online movie databases, interactive surface touch computers as well as natural user interfaces allowing gestures and haptic interaction. In these studies, the usage of prototype systems was observed in occupational sessions by 5, 12 and 16 PwD. The results indicate positive effects of technology use, e. g. in the form of verbally elicited reminiscence statements, expressed joy and playful interaction. Lessons learned for the design of technology-based RT interventions are presented and discussed.

  5. Teaching Occupational Therapy on the Addiction Field - An experience in a multidisciplinary context with undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bianco Perrone

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to discuss the teaching of Occupational Therapy (OT in the context of substance abuse to undergraduate students. Aiming to debate the experience of multidisciplinary supervised practice during the course of academic studies, it presents the Academic League on Drug Dependence - LFD as a space for understanding the phenomenon of addiction and the construction of practice in this area. A qualitative observational study was carried out on the analysis of discussion between tutors and 25 undergraduate students from different courses (OT, psychology, nursing, and medicine that comprise the LFD, which is associated with the Program of Treatment and Guidance to Drug Addicts - PROAD of the Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP. We observed articulations about the construction of clinical reasoning in the OT area and the constitution of the students’ perceptions while professionals participating in a multidisciplinary team. It was possible to observe that the experience of the specificity of OT and collective supervision, which, in turn, enables the articulation, favored the construction of an expended comprehension of the subjects treated in the LFD. In this sense, the collective discussion of cases allowed ultidisciplinary dialogue that will constitute the identity of students as health professionals who position themselves in a coherent team. It was perceived that the teaching of OT, in the context of a multiprofessional league, inserted in a program of care for people with problems related to substance use, abuse and/or ependence, has been an experience of a continuous construction of a space that supports and dialogues on issues of the specificity of profession, and its inclusion in this team.

  6. Radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.J.; Richardson, G.; Hafermann, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1965, 401 patients with prostate cancer have received intensive local pelvic radiation therapy at the Virginia Mason Medical Center. Two hundred twenty-one of this series were in the Stage C category. The 36 Stage B cancers were either medically nonoperable, or advanced extent, or had high-grade histopathology. Ten patients each were in diffuse Stage A or Stage D groups, the latter receiving local palliative inensive treatment to the prostate area. The mean age of the patients was 67.6 years. The five year survival of the Stage C group was 57.7%. There was no apparent influence on the survival of irradiated Stage C patients who received estrogen therapy. Current treatment techniques employ 10 megavolt photon beam with whole pelvic nodal fields and bilateral are rotational boost fields. The incidence of reactions and complications is presented

  7. [Influence of pulsating magnetic field used in magnet therapy and magnet stimulation on cortisol secretion in human].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldańska-Okońska, Maria; Czernicki, Jan

    2003-01-01

    The aim of our study was to test the influence of magnetic fields during magnetotherapy and magnetostimulation over a longer period of time (like in physiotherapy) on cortisol secretion in humans. The study population was divided into two groups: magnetotherapy group (16 men) and magnetostimulation group (10 men). Magnetotherapy in the form of magnetic field induction (2.9 microT; frequency--40 Hz; square wave; bipolar; Magnetronic MF--10 apparatus) was applied for 20 min to the lumbar area in patients with chronic low back pain. Magnetostimulation (Viofor JPS system; M2P2 program; induction--25-80 microT; frequency--200 Hz, complex saw-like shape with a plateau halfway the height of the wave; bipolar) was applied every day for 12 min in patients with the same health problem. In both groups, the procedures were repeated 15 times (about 10:00 a.m.) with weekend breaks. Serum samples were collected at 6:00, 12:00, 16:00 and 24:00 and estimated by the micromethod of chemiluminescence (DPC Poland; Cat. No. LKC01). The circadian profile of cortisol was determined prior to the application, a day and a month after application. The data were analyzed statistically, using paired and unpaired Student's test. Magnetotherapy affects the cortisol secretion in the circadian profile by decreasing its level at 16:00 a day after 15 applications, whereas magnetostimulation by increasing its level at 12:00 a month after 15 applications, which may suggest its long-term effect on hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The comparison of the results indicated that a day after magnetotherapy and magnetostimulation, the circadian curves of cortisol secretion differed significantly by about 100%. All hormone oscillations did not exceed the physiological norms of the circadian cortisol level, not reaching the level so high as in an intense stress. This suggests rather their controlling effect on the cortisol level than their significant stressogenic nature.

  8. Estimation of steam-chamber extent using 4D seismic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, M. [Waseda Univ., Waseda (Japan); Endo, K. [Japan Canada Oil Sands Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Onozuka, S. [Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    The steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) technique is among the most effective steam injection methods and is widely applied in Canadian oil-sand reservoirs. The SAGD technology uses hot steam to decrease bitumen viscosity and allow it to flow. Japan Canada Oil Sands Limited (JACOS) has been developing an oil-sand reservoir in the Alberta's Hangingstone area since 1997. This paper focused on the western area of the reservoir and reported on a study that estimated the steam-chamber extent generated by horizontal well pairs. It listed steam injection start time for each well of the western area. Steam-chamber distribution was determined by distinguishing high temperature and high pore-pressure zones from low temperature and high pore-pressure zones. The bitumen recovery volume in the steam-chamber zone was estimated and compared with the actual cumulative production. This paper provided details of the methodology and interpretation procedures for the quantitative method to interpret 4D-seismic data for a SAGD process. A procedure to apply a petrophysical model was demonstrated first by scaling laboratory measurements to field-scale applications, and then by decoupling pressure and temperature effects. The first 3D seismic data in this study were already affected by higher pressures and temperatures. 11 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs.

  9. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gene & Cell Therapy Defined Gene therapy and cell therapy are overlapping fields of biomedical research that aim to repair the direct cause of genetic diseases. Read More Gene & Cell Therapy FAQ's Read the most common questions raised by ...

  10. Static magnetic field therapy for symptomatic diabetic neuropathy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Michael I; Wolfe, Gil I; Barohn, Richard A; Cole, Steven P; Parry, Gareth J; Hayat, Ghazala; Cohen, Jeffrey A; Page, Jeffrey C; Bromberg, Mark B; Schwartz, Sherwyn L

    2003-05-01

    To determine if constant wearing of multipolar, static magnetic (450G) shoe insoles can reduce neuropathic pain and quality of life (QOL) scores in symptomatic diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Randomized, placebo-control, parallel study. Forty-eight centers in 27 states. Three hundred seventy-five subjects with DPN stage II or III were randomly assigned to wear constantly magnetized insoles for 4 months; the placebo group wore similar, unmagnetized device. Nerve conduction and/or quantified sensory testing were performed serially. Daily visual analog scale scores for numbness or tingling and burning and QOL issues were tabulated over 4 months. Secondary measures included nerve conduction changes, role of placebo, and safety issues. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and chi-square analysis were performed. There were statistically significant reductions during the third and fourth months in burning (mean change for magnet treatment, -12%; for sham, -3%; P<.05, ANCOVA), numbness and tingling (magnet, -10%; sham, +1%; P<.05, ANCOVA), and exercise-induced foot pain (magnet, -12%; sham, -4%; P<.05, ANCOVA). For a subset of patients with baseline severe pain, statistically significant reductions occurred from baseline through the fourth month in numbness and tingling (magnet, -32%; sham, -14%; P<.01, ANOVA) and foot pain (magnet, -41%; sham, -21%; P<.01, ANOVA). Static magnetic fields can penetrate up to 20mm and appear to target the ectopic firing nociceptors in the epidermis and dermis. Analgesic benefits were achieved over time.

  11. Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy improves tendon-to-bone healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jennica J; Cirone, James M; Morris, Tyler R; Nuss, Courtney A; Huegel, Julianne; Waldorff, Erik I; Zhang, Nianli; Ryaby, James T; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2017-04-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common musculoskeletal injuries often requiring surgical intervention with high failure rates. Currently, pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) are used for treatment of long-bone fracture and lumbar and cervical spine fusion surgery. Clinical studies examining the effects of PEMF on soft tissue healing show promising results. Therefore, we investigated the role of PEMF on rotator cuff healing using a rat rotator cuff repair model. We hypothesized that PEMF exposure following rotator cuff repair would improve tendon mechanical properties, tissue morphology, and alter in vivo joint function. Seventy adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to three groups: bilateral repair with PEMF (n = 30), bilateral repair followed by cage activity (n = 30), and uninjured control with cage activity (n = 10). Rats in the surgical groups were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Control group was sacrificed at 8 weeks. Passive joint mechanics and gait analysis were assessed over time. Biomechanical analysis and μCT was performed on left shoulders; histological analysis on right shoulders. Results indicate no differences in passive joint mechanics and ambulation. At 4 weeks the PEMF group had decreased cross-sectional area and increased modulus and maximum stress. At 8 weeks the PEMF group had increased modulus and more rounded cells in the midsubstance. At 16 weeks the PEMF group had improved bone quality. Therefore, results indicate that PEMF improves early tendon healing and does not alter joint function in a rat rotator cuff repair model. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:902-909, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. SU-E-T-590: Optimizing Magnetic Field Strengths with Matlab for An Ion-Optic System in Particle Therapy Consisting of Two Quadrupole Magnets for Subsequent Simulations with the Monte-Carlo Code FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, K; Weber, U; Simeonov, Y; Zink, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Aim of this study was to optimize the magnetic field strengths of two quadrupole magnets in a particle therapy facility in order to obtain a beam quality suitable for spot beam scanning. Methods: The particle transport through an ion-optic system of a particle therapy facility consisting of the beam tube, two quadrupole magnets and a beam monitor system was calculated with the help of Matlab by using matrices that solve the equation of motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field and field-free region, respectively. The magnetic field strengths were optimized in order to obtain a circular and thin beam spot at the iso-center of the therapy facility. These optimized field strengths were subsequently transferred to the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and the transport of 80 MeV/u C12-ions through this ion-optic system was calculated by using a user-routine to implement magnetic fields. The fluence along the beam-axis and at the iso-center was evaluated. Results: The magnetic field strengths could be optimized by using Matlab and transferred to the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The implementation via a user-routine was successful. Analyzing the fluence-pattern along the beam-axis the characteristic focusing and de-focusing effects of the quadrupole magnets could be reproduced. Furthermore the beam spot at the iso-center was circular and significantly thinner compared to an unfocused beam. Conclusion: In this study a Matlab tool was developed to optimize magnetic field strengths for an ion-optic system consisting of two quadrupole magnets as part of a particle therapy facility. These magnetic field strengths could subsequently be transferred to and implemented in the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the particle transport through this optimized ion-optic system

  13. Potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering method for improving abutment dosimetry in eMLC-delivered segmented-field electron conformal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John G.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Matthews, Kenneth L.; Parker, Brent C.; Price, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States) and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States) and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809-3482 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of discrete Gaussian edge feathering of the higher energy electron fields for improving abutment dosimetry in the planning volume when using an electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) to deliver segmented-field electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: A discrete (five-step) Gaussian edge spread function was used to match dose penumbras of differing beam energies (6-20 MeV) at a specified depth in a water phantom. Software was developed to define the leaf eMLC positions of an eMLC that most closely fit each electron field shape. The effect of 1D edge feathering of the higher energy field on dose homogeneity was computed and measured for segmented-field ECT treatment plans for three 2D PTVs in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of the x-axis (parallel to leaf motion) and remained constant along the y-axis (perpendicular to leaf motion). Additionally, the effect of 2D edge feathering was computed and measured for one radially symmetric, 3D PTV in a water phantom, i.e., depth from the water surface to the distal PTV surface varied as a function of both axes. For the 3D PTV, the feathering scheme was evaluated for 0.1-1.0-cm leaf widths. Dose calculations were performed using the pencil beam dose algorithm in the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system. Dose verification measurements were made using a prototype eMLC (1-cm leaf width). Results: 1D discrete Gaussian edge feathering reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 2D PTVs by 34, 34, and 39%. In the 3D PTV, the broad leaf width (1 cm) of the eMLC hindered the 2D application of the feathering solution to the 3D PTV, and the standard deviation of dose increased by 10%. However, 2D discrete Gaussian edge feathering with simulated eMLC leaf widths of 0.1-0.5 cm reduced the standard deviation of dose in the 3D PTV by 33-28%, respectively. Conclusions: A five-step discrete Gaussian edge

  14. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruella, Marco [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruna, Riccardo [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Di Russo, Anna [Radiation Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Magni, Michele [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Caracciolo, Daniele [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Passera, Roberto [Division of Nuclear Medicine, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Corradini, Paolo [Division of Haematology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy); Parvis, Guido [Division of Haematology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino (Italy); Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio [Division of Haematology, Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona (Italy); Ladetto, Marco [Division of Haematology, San Giovanni Battista Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Tarella, Corrado, E-mail: corrado.tarella@gmail.com [Division of Haematology and Cell Therapy, Mauriziano Hospital and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Hemato-Oncology Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Devizzi, Liliana [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, and University of Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  15. Addition of Rituximab to Involved-Field Radiation Therapy Prolongs Progression-free Survival in Stage I-II Follicular Lymphoma: Results of a Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruella, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Bruna, Riccardo; Di Russo, Anna; Magni, Michele; Caracciolo, Daniele; Passera, Roberto; Matteucci, Paola; Di Nicola, Massimo; Corradini, Paolo; Parvis, Guido; Gini, Guido; Olivieri, Attilio; Ladetto, Marco; Ricardi, Umberto; Tarella, Corrado; Devizzi, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Rituximab (Rit) therapy added to involved-field radiation therapy (RT) has been proposed as an effective treatment for stage I-II follicular lymphoma (FL). The results of an observational multicenter study on the Rit-RT combination in limited-stage FL are here reported. Methods and Materials: Data have been collected from 2 consecutive cohorts of 94 patients with stage I-II FL treated between 1985 and 2011 at 5 Italian institutions. All patients had grade 1-3a FL, a median age of 54 years (range: 25-82). The first 51 patients received RT alone (control group), while the subsequent series of 43 patients received 4 rituximab courses (375 mg/m"2, days 1, 8, 15, 22) before RT (Rit-RT). Molecular disease was evaluated by nested bcl-2/IgH PCR or clonal IgH rearrangement was available in 33 Rit-RT patients. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.9 years (range: 1.8-22.9), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) projections for the whole cohort were 57% and 87.5%, respectively. The 10-year PFS was significantly longer (P<.05) in the Rit-RT group (64.6%) compared to RT alone (50.7%), whereas the 10-year OS projections were not significantly different. On bivariate analysis controlling for stage, there was only a trend toward improved PFS for Rit-RT (HR, 0.55; P=.081). Follicular lymphoma international prognostic index and age were associated with OS but not with PFS on Cox regression analysis. Bone marrow molecular analysis showing PCR positivity at diagnosis was strongly associated with relapse risk upon univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This multicenter observational study suggests a potential benefit of adding rituximab to radiation therapy for stage I-II FL. The results of the currently ongoing randomized studies are required to confirm these results. The study underlines the importance of molecular disease monitoring also for patient with limited-stage disease.

  16. Does Psychodynamic Environmental Therapy Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Poul; Hansen, Kim Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the first Danish prospective outcome study of psychodynamic environmental therapy of children in residential treatment with early, serious traumatisation and extential relational disturbances. The study delves beneath the surface and explores the extent to which the children...

  17. SU-G-JeP2-13: Spatial Accuracy Evaluation for Real-Time MR Guided Radiation Therapy Using a Novel Large-Field MRI Distortion Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolak, A; Bayouth, J; Bosca, R; Jackson, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate a large-field MRI phantom for assessment of geometric distortion in whole-body MRI for real-time MR guided radiation therapy. Methods: A prototype CIRS large-field MRI distortion phantom consisting of a PMMA cylinder (33 cm diameter, 30 cm length) containing a 3D-printed orthogonal grid (3 mm diameter rods, 20 mm apart), was filled with 6 mM NiCl_2 and 30 mM NaCl solution. The phantom was scanned at 1.5T and 3.0T on a GE HDxt and Discovery MR750, respectively, and at 0.35T on a ViewRay system. Scans were obtained with and without 3D distortion correction to demonstrate the impact of such corrections. CT images were used as a reference standard for analysis of geometric distortion, as determined by a fully automated gradient-search method developed in Matlab. Results: 1,116 grid points distributed throughout a cylindrical volume 28 cm in diameter and 16 cm in length were identified and analyzed. With 3D distortion correction, average/maximum displacements for the 1.5, 3.0, and 0.35T systems were 0.84/2.91, 1.00/2.97, and 0.95/2.37 mm, respectively. The percentage of points with less than (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mm) total displacement were (73%, 92%, 97%), (54%, 85%, 97%), and (55%, 90%, 99%), respectively. A reduced scan volume of 20 × 20 × 10 cm"3 (representative of a head and neck scan volume) consisting of 420 points was also analyzed. In this volume, the percentage of points with less than (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mm) total displacement were (90%, 99%, 100%), (63%, 95%, 100%), and (75%, 96%, 100%), respectively. Without 3D distortion correction, average/maximum displacements were 1.35/3.67, 1.67/4.46, and 1.51/3.89 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The prototype large-field MRI distortion phantom and developed software provide a thorough assessment of 3D spatial distortions in MRI. The distortions measured were acceptable for RT applications, both for the high field strengths and the system configuration developed by ViewRay.

  18. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  19. Therapy in Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costonis, Maureen Needham, Ed.

    This book contains a collection of articles on the subject of movement therapy. It can be used as a set of supplementary readings for an academic course in dance therapy or a psychiatric residency program. It includes an exhaustive bibliography on this field for students and practioners in this field. Four principal themes have been selected as a…

  20. Reconstructed North American Snow Extent, 1900-1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains reconstructed monthly North American snow extent values for November through March, 1900-1993. Investigators used a combination of satellite...

  1. Exploring the extent to which ELT students utilise smartphones for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zehra

    2015-11-09

    Nov 9, 2015 ... aimed to explore the extent to which English Language Teaching (ELT) students utilise ... Given the fact that almost all students have a personal smartphone, and use it ..... ears as a disadvantage for smartphones (Kétyi,.

  2. Extent of lymph node dissection for adenocarcinoma of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; McCulloch, Peter; Kazi, Hussain; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquin J; Yuan, Yuhong; Nitti, Donato

    2015-08-12

    The impact of lymphadenectomy extent on the survival of patients with primary resectable gastric carcinoma is debated. We aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze the evidence on the impact of the three main types of progressively more extended lymph node dissection (that is, D1, D2 and D3 lymphadenectomy) on the clinical outcome of patients with primary resectable carcinoma of the stomach. The primary objective was to assess the impact of lymphadenectomy extent on survival (overall survival [OS], disease specific survival [DSS] and disease free survival [DFS]). The secondary aim was to assess the impact of lymphadenectomy on post-operative mortality. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE until 2001, including references from relevant articles and conference proceedings. We also contacted known researchers in the field. For the updated review, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 2001 to February 2015. We considered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the three main types of lymph node dissection (i.e., D1, D2 and D3 lymphadenectomy) in patients with primary non-metastatic resectable carcinoma of the stomach. Two authors independently extracted data from the included studies. Hazard ratios (HR) and relative risks (RR) along with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to measure differences in survival and mortality rates between trial arms, respectively. Potential sources of between-study heterogeneity were investigated by means of subgroup and sensitivity analyses. The same two authors independently assessed the risk of bias of eligible studies according to the standards of the Cochrane Collaboration and the quality of the overall evidence based on the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) criteria. Eight RCTs (enrolling 2515 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Three RCTs (all performed in Asian countries) compared D3 with D2 lymphadenectomy: data suggested no significant difference in OS

  3. Neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesler, Rudi

    1995-01-01

    Standard radiotherapy uses Xrays or electrons which have low LET (linear energy transfer); in contrast, particles such as neutrons with high LET have different radiobiological responses. In the late 1960s, clinical trials by Mary Catterall at the Hammersmith Hospital in London indicated that fast neutron radiation had clinical advantages for certain malignant tumours. Following these early clinical trials, several cyclotron facilities were built in the 1980s for fast neutron therapy, for example at the University of Washington, Seattle, and at UCLA. Most of these newer machines use extracted cyclotron proton beams in the range 42 to 66 MeV with beam intensities of 15 to 60 microamps. The proton beams are transported to dedicated therapy rooms, where neutrons are produced from beryllium targets. Second-generation clinical trials showed that accurate neutron beam delivery to the tumour site is more critical than for photon therapy. In order to achieve precise beam geometries, the extracted proton beams have to be transported through a gantry which can rotate around the patient and deliver beams from any angle; also the neutron beam outline (''field shape'') must be adjusted to extremely irregular shapes using a flexible collimation system. A therapy procedure has to be appropriately organized, with physicians, radiotherapists, nurses, medical physicists and other staff in attendance; other specialized equipment, such as CT or MRI scanners and radiation simulators must be made available. Neutron therapy is usually performed only in radiation oncology departments of major medical centres

  4. Early and late toxicity of involved-field radiation therapy in conjunction with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell rescue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubich, L.; Mundt, A.; Sibley, G.; Hallahan, D.; Nautiyal, J.; Weichselbaum, R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Recent reports have demonstrated a benefit to involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) in patients with relapsed/metastatic disease undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell rescue (SCR). We evaluate here the early and late toxicity of this approach. Methods: Eighty-five patients with either metastatic breast cancer (MBC) (31) or relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD) (54) underwent HDCT/SCR. HDCT in the MBC patients consisted of cytoxan, thiotepa +/- carmustine and VP-16, cytoxan, BCNU +/- thiotepa in the HD patients. Thirty-four patients (40%) received IFRT either prior to (14) or following (20) HDCT to sites of disease involvement. A total of 18 patients received chest wall/mediastinal (CWMED) RT. Median followup for the MBC and HD patients were 21.3 months and 41 months, respectively. Results: Acute sequelae were similar in the 2 groups. Only one patient (5%) treated with IFRT (HD with 5 nodal sites) required a break from therapy due to low blood counts. Seven patients (0 MBC, 7 HD) (8.2%) suffered a toxic death (TD). No difference in was seen in the rate of TD in the patients as a whole ((1(14)) vs. (6(71))) (p =0.87) nor in the HD patients alone ((1(7)) vs. (6(47))) (p =0.91) with the use of IFRT prior to HDCT. Eleven patients (12.9%) developed late toxicity: 3 myelodysplasia/acute leukemia (MAL), 2 persistent low blood counts (requiring transfusions), 4 pulmonary toxicity (PT) and 2 hypothyroidism. All 4 cases of PT occurred in the HD group of which 3 received CWMED RT. The Table below shows the 5-yr actuarial risk of PT with and without CWMED RT as well as the 5-yr actuarial risk of MAL and any hematologic sequelae with and without RT. Multivariate analysis in the HD patients demonstrated that CWMED RT was the most significant factor for PT (p =0.09). All 3 cases of MAL and the 2 cases of persistent low blood counts occurred in the HD group. The use of IFRT did not increase the incidence of MAL or of any hematologic sequelae

  5. Extent and kinetics of recovery of occult spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K. Kian; Jiang, G.-L.; Feng Yan; Stephens, L. Clifton; Tucker, Susan L.; Price, Roger E.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain clinically useful quantitative data on the extent and kinetics of recovery of occult radiation injury in primate spinal cord, after a commonly administered elective radiation dose of 44 Gy, given in about 2 Gy per fraction. Methods and Materials: A group of 56 rhesus monkeys was assigned to receive two radiation courses to the cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord, given in 2.2 Gy per fraction. The dose of the initial course was 44 Gy in all monkeys. Reirradiation dose was 57.2 Gy, given after 1-year (n 16) or 2-year (n = 20) intervals, or 66 Gy, given after 2-year (n = 4) or 3-year (n = 14) intervals. Two animals developed intramedullary tumors before reirradiation and, therefore, did not receive a second course. The study endpoint was myeloparesis, manifesting predominantly as lower extremity weakness and decrease in balance, occurring within 2.5 years after reirradiation, complemented by histologic examination of the spinal cord. The data obtained were analyzed along with data from a previous study addressing single-course tolerance, and data from a preliminary study of reirradiation tolerance. Results: Only 4 of 45 monkeys completing the required observation period (2-2.5 years after reirradiation, 3-5.5 years total) developed myeloparesis. The data revealed a substantial recovery of occult injury induced by 44 Gy within the first year, and suggested additional recovery between 1 and 3 years. Fitting the data with a model, assuming that all (single course and reirradiation) dose-response curves were parallel, yielded recovery estimates of 33.6 Gy (76%), 37.6 Gy (85%), and 44.6 Gy (101%) of the initial dose, after 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively, at the 5% incidence (D 5 ) level. The most conservative estimate, using a model in which it was assumed that there was no recovery between 1 and 3 years following initial irradiation and that the combined reirradiation curve was not necessarily parallel to the single-course curve, still showed an

  6. GIS-based maps and area estimates of Northern Hemisphere permafrost extent during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindgren, A.; Hugelius, G.; Kuhry, P.; Christensen, T.R.; Vandenberghe, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents GIS-based estimates of permafrost extent in the northern circumpolar region during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), based on a review of previously published maps and compilations of field evidence in the form of ice-wedge pseudomorphs and relict sand wedges. We focus on field

  7. Duodenal and Other Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer Treated With Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Paraaortic Lymph Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poorvu, Philip D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sadow, Cheryl A. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Townamchai, Kanokpis; Damato, Antonio L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the rates of acute and late duodenal and other gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities among patients treated for cervical and endometrial cancers with extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) to the paraaortic nodes and to analyze dose-volume relationships of GI toxicities. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent EF-IMRT to the paraaortic nodes, of whom 46 met the inclusion criteria for GI toxicity and 45 for duodenal toxicity analysis. The median prescribed dose to the paraaortic nodes was 54 Gy (range, 41.4-65 Gy). The 4 duodenal segments, whole duodenum, small bowel loops, peritoneum, and peritoneum plus retroperitoneal segments of colon were contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric analysis was performed to identify dose-volume relationships to grade ≥3 acute (<90 day) and late (≥90 day) GI toxicity. Results: Only 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced acute grade ≥3 GI toxicity and 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced late grade ≥3 GI toxicity. The median dose administered to these 6 patients was 50.4 Gy. One of 12 patients who received 63 to 65 Gy at the level of the renal hilum experienced grade 3 GI toxicity. Dosimetric analysis of patients with and without toxicity revealed no differences between the mean absolute or fractional volumes at any 5-Gy interval between 5 Gy and the maximum dose. None of the patients experienced duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment of paraaortic nodes with IMRT is associated with low rates of GI toxicities and no duodenal-specific toxicity, including patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. This technique may allow sufficient dose sparing of the bowel to enable safe dose escalation to at least 65 Gy.

  8. Effect of manual therapy versus proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation in dynamic balance, mobility and flexibility in field hockey players. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma V; López-Martínez, Susana; Inglés, Marta; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Marta

    2018-04-22

    To compare the effectiveness of a specific Manual Therapy (MT) protocol applied to field hockey players (FHP), versus a Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) protocol, in the improvement of dynamic balance, active range of movement and lumbar flexibility one-week and four-weeks after the treatment. Randomized controlled trial. Participants were assigned to 2 groups: MT and PNF. 30 min' sessions were performed once a week for three weeks. Three evaluations were performed: basal, one-week and four-weeks post-treatment. University of Valencia (Spain). 22 in MT group and 20 in PNF group. Dynamic Balance, measured with Star Excursion Balance Test; Active Range of Motion (ROM), using a manual goniometer and Lumbar Flexibility, assessed with Fingertip-to-floor test. Both groups significantly improved in lateral and medial dynamic balance one-week post-treatment (p < 0.05); but the improvement in the MT group lasted until the fourth-week after treatment in both reaches (lateral and medial) (p < 0.05). MT group also obtained significant improvements in dorsal flexion of the ankle in the fourth-week post-treatment (p < 0.05) and in lumbar flexibility one-week post-treatment (p < 0.05). MT and PNF improve dynamic balance one-week post-treatment; however, the improvement obtained through MT is maintained four-weeks later. Only MT improves dorsal flexion of the ankle four-weeks post-treatment and lumbar flexibility one-week post-treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Duodenal and Other Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer Treated With Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Paraaortic Lymph Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poorvu, Philip D.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Townamchai, Kanokpis; Damato, Antonio L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the rates of acute and late duodenal and other gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities among patients treated for cervical and endometrial cancers with extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) to the paraaortic nodes and to analyze dose-volume relationships of GI toxicities. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent EF-IMRT to the paraaortic nodes, of whom 46 met the inclusion criteria for GI toxicity and 45 for duodenal toxicity analysis. The median prescribed dose to the paraaortic nodes was 54 Gy (range, 41.4-65 Gy). The 4 duodenal segments, whole duodenum, small bowel loops, peritoneum, and peritoneum plus retroperitoneal segments of colon were contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric analysis was performed to identify dose-volume relationships to grade ≥3 acute (<90 day) and late (≥90 day) GI toxicity. Results: Only 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced acute grade ≥3 GI toxicity and 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced late grade ≥3 GI toxicity. The median dose administered to these 6 patients was 50.4 Gy. One of 12 patients who received 63 to 65 Gy at the level of the renal hilum experienced grade 3 GI toxicity. Dosimetric analysis of patients with and without toxicity revealed no differences between the mean absolute or fractional volumes at any 5-Gy interval between 5 Gy and the maximum dose. None of the patients experienced duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment of paraaortic nodes with IMRT is associated with low rates of GI toxicities and no duodenal-specific toxicity, including patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. This technique may allow sufficient dose sparing of the bowel to enable safe dose escalation to at least 65 Gy

  10. Identification of Biokinetic Models Using the Concept of Extents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašić, Alma; Srinivasan, Sriniketh; Billeter, Julien; Bonvin, Dominique; Villez, Kris

    2017-07-05

    The development of a wide array of process technologies to enable the shift from conventional biological wastewater treatment processes to resource recovery systems is matched by an increasing demand for predictive capabilities. Mathematical models are excellent tools to meet this demand. However, obtaining reliable and fit-for-purpose models remains a cumbersome task due to the inherent complexity of biological wastewater treatment processes. In this work, we present a first study in the context of environmental biotechnology that adopts and explores the use of extents as a way to simplify and streamline the dynamic process modeling task. In addition, the extent-based modeling strategy is enhanced by optimal accounting for nonlinear algebraic equilibria and nonlinear measurement equations. Finally, a thorough discussion of our results explains the benefits of extent-based modeling and its potential to turn environmental process modeling into a highly automated task.

  11. Extent, accuracy, and credibility of breastfeeding information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Scott, Barbara J

    2005-05-01

    Our objective was to test and describe a model for evaluating Websites related to breastfeeding. Forty Websites most likely to be accessed by the public were evaluated for extent, accuracy, credibility, presentation, ease of use, and adherence to ethical and medical Internet publishing standards. Extent and accuracy of Website content were determined by a checklist of critical information. The majority of Websites reviewed provided accurate information and complied with the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. Approximately half the Websites complied with standards of medical Internet publishing. While much information on breastfeeding on the Internet is accurate, there is wide variability in the extent of information, usability of Websites, and compliance with standards of medical Internet publishing. Results of this study may be helpful to health care professionals as a model for evaluating breastfeeding-related Websites and to highlight considerations when recommending or designing Websites.

  12. SU-F-T-157: Physics Considerations Regarding Dosimetric Accuracy of Analytical Dose Calculations for Small Field Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, C [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Daartz, J; Cheung, K; Bussiere, M; Shih, H; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of dose calculations by analytical dose calculation methods (ADC) for small field proton therapy in a gantry based passive scattering facility. Methods: 50 patients with intra-cranial disease were evaluated in the study. Treatment plans followed standard prescription and optimization procedures of proton stereotactic radiosurgery. Dose distributions calculated with the Monte Carlo (MC) toolkit TOPAS were used to represent delivered treatments. The MC dose was first adjusted using the output factor (OF) applied clinically. This factor is determined from the field size and the prescribed range. We then introduced a normalization factor to measure the difference in mean dose between the delivered dose (MC dose with OF) and the dose calculated by ADC for each beam. The normalization was determined by the mean dose of the center voxels of the target area. We compared delivered dose distributions and those calculated by ADC in terms of dose volume histogram parameters and beam range distributions. Results: The mean target dose for a whole treatment is generally within 5% comparing delivered dose (MC dose with OF) and ADC dose. However, the differences can be as great as 11% for shallow and small target treated with a thick range compensator. Applying the normalization factor to the MC dose with OF can reduce the mean dose difference to less than 3%. Considering range uncertainties, the generally applied margins (3.5% of the prescribed range + 1mm) to cover uncertainties in range might not be sufficient to guarantee tumor coverage. The range difference for R90 (90% distal dose falloff) is affected by multiple factors, such as the heterogeneity index. Conclusion: This study indicates insufficient accuracy calculating proton doses using ADC. Our results suggest that uncertainties of target doses are reduced using MC techniques, improving the dosimetric accuracy for proton stereotactic radiosurgery. The work was supported by NIH/NCI under CA

  13. Do indices of coronary conductance after reperfusion reflect the extent of salvaged myocardium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Takahiro; Watanabe, Hisashi; Tsurusaki, Tetsushi; Minai, Kousuke; Ogawa, Takayuki; Iwano, Keiji; Tamura, Tetsutarou; Yoshida, Satoshi; Mutou, Makoto; Imai, Kamon; Horie, Toshinobu; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2004-05-01

    Existing indices of coronary conductance (hyperemic flow-versus-pressure slope index, FPSI, and zero flow pressure, Pzf) have been developed as measures of microcoronary resistance. These indices, however, refer to cases of normal hearts, and there are no reports studying these indices following acute myocardial infarction. In this study, we investigated whether FPSI and Pzf truly measure the extent of myocardial salvage after successful reperfusion therapy. We also developed a new index of zero pressure flow, Fzp. Nineteen patients who underwent successful reperfusion therapy to the proximal portion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) were studied. After successful reperfusion therapy, a Doppler wire was placed into the LAD. Aortic pressure was recorded in real time. Results from the aortic pressure and flow meter were combined to produce FPSI, Pzf, and Fzp. All cases underwent a resting thallium (Tl) and BMIPP scintigram within five days of successful reperfusion therapy. Infarcted myocardium was estimated using a severity score calculated from the Tl scintigraphy (TlSS), and the BMIPP (BMIPPSS) was estimated using a severity score. Patients with a TlSS/BMIPPSS ratio of less than 0.4 were assigned to the successful salvage group (group S), while the others were assigned to the failed salvage group (group F). FPSI of group F was 1.91 +/- 0.26 m/sec and of group S was 0.92 +/- 0.43 m/sec (P < 0.01). Pzf of group F was 51 +/- 3 mmHg and of group S was 51 +/- 5 mmHg (NS). Fzp of group F was -98 +/- 16 cm/sec and of group S was -46 +/- 4 cm/sec (P < 0.05). FPSI and the new index of Fzp were useful in estimating the extent of myocardial salvage. Our results suggest that the Pzf index could not differentiate between the two groups.

  14. Real-time flood extent maps based on social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Roskam, Ruud; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2015-04-01

    During a flood event it is often difficult to get accurate information about the flood extent and the people affected. This information is very important for disaster risk reduction management and crisis relief organizations. In the post flood phase, information about the flood extent is needed for damage estimation and calibrating hydrodynamic models. Currently, flood extent maps are derived from a few sources such as satellite images, areal images and post-flooding flood marks. However, getting accurate real-time or maximum flood extent maps remains difficult. With the rise of social media, we now have a new source of information with large numbers of observations. In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, the intensity of unique flood related tweets during a flood event, peaked at 8 tweets per second during floods in early 2014. A fair amount of these tweets also contains observations of water depth and location. Our hypothesis is that based on the large numbers of tweets it is possible to generate real-time flood extent maps. In this study we use tweets from the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, to generate these flood extent maps. The data-mining procedure looks for tweets with a mention of 'banjir', the Bahasa Indonesia word for flood. It then removes modified and retweeted messages in order to keep unique tweets only. Since tweets are not always sent directly from the location of observation, the geotag in the tweets is unreliable. We therefore extract location information using mentions of names of neighborhoods and points of interest. Finally, where encountered, a mention of a length measure is extracted as water depth. These tweets containing a location reference and a water level are considered to be flood observations. The strength of this method is that it can easily be extended to other regions and languages. Based on the intensity of tweets in Jakarta during a flood event we can provide a rough estimate of the flood extent. To provide more accurate flood extend

  15. LEVEL AND EXTENT OF MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN OREGON LOTIC FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the U.S. EPA's EMAP Oregon Pilot project, we conducted a probability survey of 154 Oregon streams and rivers to assess the spatial extent of mercury (Hg) contamination in fish tissue across the state. Samples consisted of whole fish analyses of both small (< 120 mm) a...

  16. Spatial extent in demographic research - approach and problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the starting methodological problems in demographic research is the definition of spatial extent, which mostly doesn’t correspond to spatial extent already defined by different levels of administrative-territorial unitsthat are used for distribution of usable statistical data. That’s why determining the spatial extent of a demographic research is closely tied with administrative-territorial division of the territory that is being researched, wherein the fact that differentiation of demographic phenomena and processes cannot be the only basis of setting the principles of regionalization must be strictly acknowledged. This problem is particularly common in historical demographic analyses of geographically determined wholes, which are in administratively-territorial sense represented by one or more smaller territorial units, with their borders changing through the history, which directly affects comparability of the statistical data, and makes it considerably more difficult to track demographic change through longer time intervals. The result of these efforts is usually a solution based on a compromise which enables us to examine the dynamics of population change with little deviation from already defined borders of regional geographic wholes. For that reason in this paper the problem of defining spatial extent in demographic research is examined trough several different approaches in case of Eastern Serbia, as a geographically determined region, a historic area, a spatially functioning whole and as a statistical unit for demographic research, with no judgment calls in regard to any of the regionalization principles. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 47006

  17. The Extent of Immature Fish Harvesting by the Commercial Fishery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sustainability of a given fishery is a function of the number of sexually matured fish present in water. If there is intensive immature fishing, the population of fish reaching the stage of recruitment will decrease, which in turn results in lower yield and biomass. The present study was conducted to estimate the extent of ...

  18. Does Trust Influence the Extent of Inter-Organizational Barter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek

    2014-01-01

    The 1999 World Business Environment Survey investigated, among many other things, the extent of inter-organizational barter in various countries. Reported values differed a lot, e.g. it was less than 1% in Hungary but more than 30% in neighboring Croatia. Since in many such contracts goods and...

  19. Veterinary drug prescriptions: to what extent do pet owners comply ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Separate questionnaires were designed for pet owners (clients) and veterinarians to ascertain the existence and extent of noncompliance in veterinary practice in lbadan and to elucidate the influence of such factors as logistics, education, economy, attitudes and veterinarian/client relationship on non-compliance. Analyses ...

  20. To what extent does banks' credit stimulate economic growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the extent to which banks' credit affects economic growth in Nigeria. The data used was collected from the Central Bank of Nigeria statistical bulletin for a period of 24 years from 1990 to 2013. We used credit to the private sector, credit to the public sector and inflation to proxy commercial bank credit ...

  1. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  2. Extent and Distribution of Groundwater Resources in Parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extent and distribution of groundwater resources in parts of Anambra State, Nigeria has been investigated. The results show that the study area is directly underlain by four different geological formations including, Alluvial Plain Sands, Ogwashi-Asaba Formation, Ameki/Nanka Sands and Imo Shale, with varying water ...

  3. Extent of implementation of collection development policies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is a survey research on the extent of implementation of collection development policies in academic libraries in Imo state. The population of the study comprises five (5) academic libraries in the area of study. The academic libraries understudy are: Imo State University Owerri (IMSU), Federal University of ...

  4. An investigation into Nigerian teacher's attitude towards and extent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The attitude of Biology teachers towards and their extent of improvisation, were investigated 80 teachers from 50 randomly selected secondary schools in Oyo state of Nigeria participated in the study. Analysis of the twenty item questionnaire administered to the teachers revealed that though many of them exhibited positive ...

  5. Extent of implementation of Collection Development Policies (CDP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was on the extent of implementation of collection development policies by public University libraries in the Niger Delta Area, Nigeria. Descriptive survey design was employed. Population for the study consisted of all the 16 Colle ction Development Librarians in the Area studied. No sample was used because the ...

  6. The extent of groundwater use for domestic and irrigation activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AKMENSAH

    2015-06-04

    Jun 4, 2015 ... Albert Kobina Mensah1*, Evans Appiah Kissi2, Kwabena Krah3 and Okoree D. Mireku4. 1Department of Geography, Kenyatta University, Nairobi. 2Department of .... catchment in Kiambu County in Kenya had limited themselves to the assessment of water quality. Little work has been done on the extent to ...

  7. Forest extent and deforestation in tropical Africa since 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Julie C; Jarzyna, Marta A; Staver, A Carla

    2018-01-01

    Accurate estimates of historical forest extent and associated deforestation rates are crucial for quantifying tropical carbon cycles and formulating conservation policy. In Africa, data-driven estimates of historical closed-canopy forest extent and deforestation at the continental scale are lacking, and existing modelled estimates diverge substantially. Here, we synthesize available palaeo-proxies and historical maps to reconstruct forest extent in tropical Africa around 1900, when European colonization accelerated markedly, and compare these historical estimates with modern forest extent to estimate deforestation. We find that forests were less extensive in 1900 than bioclimatic models predict. Resultantly, across tropical Africa, ~ 21.7% of forests have been deforested, yielding substantially slower deforestation than previous estimates (35-55%). However, deforestation was heterogeneous: West and East African forests have undergone almost complete decline (~ 83.3 and 93.0%, respectively), while Central African forests have expanded at the expense of savannahs (~ 1.4% net forest expansion, with ~ 135,270 km 2 of savannahs encroached). These results suggest that climate alone does not determine savannah and forest distributions and that many savannahs hitherto considered to be degraded forests are instead relatively old. These data-driven reconstructions of historical biome distributions will inform tropical carbon cycle estimates, carbon mitigation initiatives and conservation planning in both forest and savannah systems.

  8. The Extent of Reversibility of Polychlorinated Biphenyl Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent of reversibility of PCB bonding to sediments has been characterized in studies on the partitioning behavior of a hexachlorobiphenyl isomer. Linear non-singular isotherms have been observed for the adsorption and desorption of 2.4.5.2?,4?,5? hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) to...

  9. The Extent of Educational Technology's Influence on Contemporary Educational Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bradford-Watts

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates how advances in educational technologies have influenced contemporary educational practices.It discusses the nature of educational technology, the limitations imposed by the digital divide and other factors of uptake, and the factors leading to successful implementation of educational technologies.The extent of influence is then discussed,together with the probable implications for educational sites for the future.

  10. Determining wetland spatial extent and seasonal variations of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study, done in the Witbank Dam Catchment in Mpumalanga Province of South Africa, explores a remote-sensing technique to delineate wetland extent and assesses the seasonal variations of the inundated area. The objective was to monitor the spatio-temporal changes of wetlands over time through remote sensing ...

  11. 32 CFR 728.12 - Extent of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 728.12 Extent of care. Members who are away from their duty stations or are on duty where there is no... providing authorization for non-Federal care at DHHS expense. (b) Maternity episode for active duty female... facilities (once the mother has been admitted to the USMTF) from funds available for care of active duty...

  12. 27 CFR 24.158 - Extent of relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extent of relief. 24.158 Section 24.158 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT..., until all tax is fully paid. (d) Wine vinegar plant bond. The surety will be relieved of liability for...

  13. Assessing the Global Extent of Rivers Observable by SWOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelsky, T.; Durand, M. T.; Andreadis, K.; Beighley, E.; Allen, G. H.; Miller, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Flow of water through rivers is among the key fluxes in the global hydrologic cycle and its knowledge would advance the understanding of flood hazards, water resources management, ecology, and climate. However, gauges providing publicly accessible measurements of river stage or discharge remain sparse in many regions. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is a joint project of NASA and the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) that would provide the first high-resolution images of simultaneous terrestrial water surface height, inundation extent, and ocean surface elevation. Among SWOT's primary goals is the direct observation of variations in river water surface elevation and, where possible, estimation of river discharge from SWOT measurements. The mission science requirements specify that rivers wider than 100 m would be observed globally, with a goal of observing rivers wider than 50m. However, the extent of anticipated SWOT river observations remains fundamentally unknown because no high-resolution, global dataset of river widths exists. Here, we estimate the global extent of rivers wider than 50 m-100 m thresholds using established relationships among river width, discharge, and drainage area. We combine a global digital elevation model with in situ river discharge data to estimate the global extent of SWOT-observable rivers, and validate these estimates against satellite-derived measurements of river width in two large river basins (the Yukon and the Ohio). We then compare the extent of SWOT-observed rivers with the current publicly-available, global gauge network included in the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) database to examine the impact of SWOT on the availability of river observation over continental and global scales. Results suggest that if SWOT observes 100 m wide rivers, river basins with areas greater than 50,000 km2 will commonly be measured. If SWOT could observe 50 m wide rivers, then most 10,000 km2 basins

  14. Measuring the relative extent of pulmonary infiltrates by hierarchical classification of patient-specific image features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsevas, S.; Iakovidis, D. K.

    2011-11-01

    Pulmonary infiltrates are common radiological findings indicating the filling of airspaces with fluid, inflammatory exudates, or cells. They are most common in cases of pneumonia, acute respiratory syndrome, atelectasis, pulmonary oedema and haemorrhage, whereas their extent is usually correlated with the extent or the severity of the underlying disease. In this paper we propose a novel pattern recognition framework for the measurement of the extent of pulmonary infiltrates in routine chest radiographs. The proposed framework follows a hierarchical approach to the assessment of image content. It includes the following: (a) sampling of the lung fields; (b) extraction of patient-specific grey-level histogram signatures from each sample; (c) classification of the extracted signatures into classes representing normal lung parenchyma and pulmonary infiltrates; (d) the samples for which the probability of belonging to one of the two classes does not reach an acceptable level are rejected and classified according to their textural content; (e) merging of the classification results of the two classification stages. The proposed framework has been evaluated on real radiographic images with pulmonary infiltrates caused by bacterial infections. The results show that accurate measurements of the infiltration areas can be obtained with respect to each lung field area. The average measurement error rate on the considered dataset reached 9.7% ± 1.0%.

  15. The extent of emphysema in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Saher Burhan; Stavngaard, Trine; Hestad, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The global initiative for COPD (GOLD) adopted the degree of airway obstruction as a measure of the severity of the disease. The objective of this study was to apply CT to assess the extent of emphysema in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and relate...... measurement and visual and quantitative assessment of CT, from which the relative area of emphysema below -910 Hounsfield units (RA-910) was extracted. RESULTS: Mean RA-910 was 7.4% (n = 5) in patients with GOLD stage I, 17.0% (n = 119) in stage II, 24.2% (n = 79) in stage III and 33.9% (n = 6) in stage IV....... Regression analysis showed a change in RA-910 of 7.8% with increasing severity according to GOLD stage (P emphysema, whereas 25 patients had no emphysema. CONCLUSION: The extent of emphysema...

  16. Extent of hippocampal atrophy predicts degree of deficit in recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patai, Eva Zita; Gadian, David G; Cooper, Janine M; Dzieciol, Anna M; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-10-13

    Which specific memory functions are dependent on the hippocampus is still debated. The availability of a large cohort of patients who had sustained relatively selective hippocampal damage early in life enabled us to determine which type of mnemonic deficit showed a correlation with extent of hippocampal injury. We assessed our patient cohort on a test that provides measures of recognition and recall that are equated for difficulty and found that the patients' performance on the recall tests correlated significantly with their hippocampal volumes, whereas their performance on the equally difficult recognition tests did not and, indeed, was largely unaffected regardless of extent of hippocampal atrophy. The results provide new evidence in favor of the view that the hippocampus is essential for recall but not for recognition.

  17. A report on the extent of radioisotope usage in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    A market survey was carried out to study the extent of radioisotope usage in Malaysia. From the survey, the radioisotopes and their activities/quantities that are used in Industry, Medicine and Research were identified. The radioisotopes that are frequently needed or routinely used were also determined and this formed the basis of the recommendations put forward in this report. It is proposed that PUSPATI adopt the concept of a Distribution Centre in order to provide a service to the Malaysian community. (author)

  18. The extent and impact of outsourcing: evidence from Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Craig P. Aubuchon; Subhayu Bandyopadhyay; Sumon Bhaumik

    2012-01-01

    The authors use data from several sources, including plant-level data from the manufacturing sector in Germany, to expand the literature on outsourcing. They find that, in Germany, the extent of outsourcing among manufacturing industries is higher than among service industries and that the outsourcing intensity of these industries did not change much between 1995 and 2005. They also find a statistically significantly positive impact of industry-level outsourcing intensity on German plant-leve...

  19. Statistics of Radial Ship Extent as Seen by a Seeker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Auckland in pure and applied mathematics and physics, and a Master of Science in physics from the same university with a thesis in applied accelerator...does not demand contributions from two angle bins to one extent bin, unlike the rectangle; this is a very big advantage of the ellipse model. However...waveform that mimics the full length of a ship. This allows more economical use to be made of available false-target generation resources. I wish to

  20. Assessment of the depth and extent of myometrial invasion in uterine adenomyosis using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Mi Gyung; Cho, Jae Ho; Chang, Jay Chun; Park, Bok Hwan

    2000-01-01

    To determine the detection rate of MRI in the diagnosis of adenomyosis and ascertain the accuracy of MRI in assessing the extent and depth of the myometrial invasion. By retrospective analysis of MR images of the pelvis in 65 pathologically proven cases of uterine adenomyosis, we investigated the detection rate and differences of in the detection rate when this was based on (a) the extent, and (b) the depth of myometrial invasion. The condition was classified as diffuse or focal according to the extent of invasion, and mild, moderate, or severe according to its depth. Pathologically, there were 35 cases of focal adenomyosis (53.8%), and 30 of diffuse adenomyosis (46.2%). Among patients with the focal variety of this condition, 12 cases were mild, 14 were mild, 14 were moderate, and nine were severe, while among those with the diffuse variety, two were mild, ten were moderate and 18 were severe. A total of 48 cases (73.8%) were detected on MR images; the detection rate of focal adenomyosis was 60.0% (21/35) and that of diffuse adenomyosis was 90.0% (27/30). The detection rates of mild, moderate, and severe adenomyosis were 42.9% (6/14), 79.2% (19/24), and 85.2% (23/27), respectively. Among the 48 cases detected on MR images, the pathologic and MR findings were consistent with regard to both the extent and depth of myometrial invasion in 26 (54.2%). For diffuse adenomyosis, the consistency rate was higher than for the focal variety (81.5%, 22/27; compared with 19%, 4/21). The extent of myometrial invasion was correctly evaluated in 32 cases (66.7%); the consistency rate for the diffuse form was higher than for the focal form (96.3%(26/27), compared with 28.6% (6/21)). In 42 cases (87.5%), the depth of invasion was correctly evaluated, though differences in this depth were not significant. MR imaging was a useful imaging modality in the diagnosis of uterine adenomyosis. With regard to the extent of myometrial invasion, the detection rate was higher among cases of the

  1. To what extent can the nuclear public relations be effective?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki [CRC Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    The effect of public relations (PRs) on the public`s attitude to nuclear energy was assessed using a model developed under the assumption that the extent of attitude change of the public by the PRs activity is essentially the same as that by the nuclear information released by the newsmedia. The attitude change of the public was quantitatively estimated by setting variables explicitly manifesting the activities such as the circulation of exclusive publicity and the area of advertising messages in the newspaper as parameters. The public`s attitude became clear to have a nonlinear dependence on the amount of activity, the extent of its change being varied considerably with demographic classes. Under a given financial condition, the offer of PRs information to the people, as many as possible in a target region, in spite of its little force of appeal, was found to be more effective for the amelioration of public attitude than the repeated offer of the information to a limited member of the public. It also became clear that there exists the most effective media mix for the activity depending on the extent of target region and on the target class of demography, therefore, it is quite significant to determine beforehand the proper conditions for the activity to be executed, such a situation indicating the need for the introduction of nuclear PRs management. (Author).

  2. Regional Mapping of Plantation Extent Using Multisensor Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbick, N.; Ledoux, L.; Hagen, S.; Salas, W.

    2016-12-01

    Industrial forest plantations are expanding rapidly across the tropics and monitoring extent is critical for understanding environmental and socioeconomic impacts. In this study, new, multisensor imagery were evaluated and integrated to extract the strengths of each sensor for mapping plantation extent at regional scales. Three distinctly different landscapes with multiple plantation types were chosen to consider scalability and transferability. These were Tanintharyi, Myanmar, West Kalimantan, Indonesia, and southern Ghana. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI), Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2), and Sentinel-1A images were fused within a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) framework using random forest and high-resolution surveys. Multi-criteria evaluations showed both L-and C-band gamma nought γ° backscatter decibel (dB), Landsat reflectance ρλ, and texture indices were useful for distinguishing oil palm and rubber plantations from other land types. The classification approach identified 750,822 ha or 23% of the Taninathryi, Myanmar, and 216,086 ha or 25% of western West Kalimantan as plantation with very high cross validation accuracy. The mapping approach was scalable and transferred well across the different geographies and plantation types. As archives for Sentinel-1, Landsat-8, and PALSAR-2 continue to grow, mapping plantation extent and dynamics at moderate resolution over large regions should be feasible.

  3. To what extent can the nuclear public relations be effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki

    1996-01-01

    The effect of public relations (PRs) on the public's attitude to nuclear energy was assessed using a model developed under the assumption that the extent of attitude change of the public by the PRs activity is essentially the same as that by the nuclear information released by the newsmedia. The attitude change of the public was quantitatively estimated by setting variables explicitly manifesting the activities such as the circulation of exclusive publicity and the area of advertising messages in the newspaper as parameters. The public's attitude became clear to have a nonlinear dependence on the amount of activity, the extent of its change being varied considerably with demographic classes. Under a given financial condition, the offer of PRs information to the people, as many as possible in a target region, in spite of its little force of appeal, was found to be more effective for the amelioration of public attitude than the repeated offer of the information to a limited member of the public. It also became clear that there exists the most effective media mix for the activity depending on the extent of target region and on the target class of demography, therefore, it is quite significant to determine beforehand the proper conditions for the activity to be executed, such a situation indicating the need for the introduction of nuclear PRs management. (Author)

  4. Exploring the Origin, Extent, and Future of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertka, Constance M.

    2009-09-01

    1. Astrobiology in societal context Constance Bertka; Part I. Origin of Life: 2. Emergence and the experimental pursuit of the origin of life Robert Hazen; 3. From Aristotle to Darwin, to Freeman Dyson: changing definitions of life viewed in historical context James Strick; 4. Philosophical aspects of the origin-of-life problem: the emergence of life and the nature of science Iris Fry; 5. The origin of terrestrial life: a Christian perspective Ernan McMullin; 6. The alpha and the omega: reflections on the origin and future of life from the perspective of Christian theology and ethics Celia Deane-Drummond; Part II. Extent of Life: 7. A biologist's guide to the Solar System Lynn Rothschild; 8. The quest for habitable worlds and life beyond the Solar System Carl Pilcher; 9. A historical perspective on the extent and search for life Steven J. Dick; 10. The search for extraterrestrial life: epistemology, ethics, and worldviews Mark Lupisella; 11. The implications of discovering extraterrestrial life: different searches, different issues Margaret S. Race; 12. God, evolution, and astrobiology Cynthia S. W. Crysdale; Part III. Future of Life: 13. Planetary ecosynthesis on Mars: restoration ecology and environmental ethics Christopher P. McKay; 14. The trouble with intrinsic value: an ethical primer for astrobiology Kelly C. Smith; 15. God's preferential option for life: a Christian perspective on astrobiology Richard O. Randolph; 16. Comparing stories about the origin, extent, and future of life: an Asian religious perspective Francisca Cho; Index.

  5. Monitoring the Extent of Forests on National to Global Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townshend, J.; Townshend, J.; Hansen, M.; DeFries, R.; DeFries, R.; Sohlberg, R.; Desch, A.; White, B.

    2001-05-01

    Information on forest extent and change is important for many purposes, including understanding the global carbon cycle and managing natural resources. International statistics on forest extent are generated using many different sources often producing inconsistent results spatially and through time. Results will be presented comparing forest extent derived from the recent global Food and Agricultural Organization's (FAO) FRA 2000 report with products derived using wall-to-wall Landsat, AVHRR and MODIS data sets. The remotely sensed data sets provide consistent results in terms of total area despite considerable differences in spatial resolution. Although the location of change can be satisfactorily detected with all three remotely sensed data sets, reliable measurement of change can only be achieved through use of Landsat-resolution data. Contrary to the FRA 2000 results we find evidence of an increase in deforestation rates in the late 1990s in several countries. Also we have found evidence of considerable changes in some countries for which little or no change is reported by FAO. The results indicate the benefits of globally consistent analyses of forest cover based on multiscale remotely sensed data sets rather than a reliance on statistics generated by individual countries with very different definitions of forest and methods used to derive them.

  6. The extent of emphysema in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Saher Burhan; Stavngaard, Trine; Hestad, Marianne; Bach, Karen Skjoelstrup; Tonnesen, Philip; Dirksen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The global initiative for COPD (GOLD) adopted the degree of airway obstruction as a measure of the severity of the disease. The objective of this study was to apply CT to assess the extent of emphysema in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and relate this extent to the GOLD stage of airway obstruction. We included 209 patients with COPD. COPD was defined as FEV(1)/FVC or=20 pack-years. Patients were assessed by lung function measurement and visual and quantitative assessment of CT, from which the relative area of emphysema below -910 Hounsfield units (RA-910) was extracted. Mean RA-910 was 7.4% (n = 5) in patients with GOLD stage I, 17.0% (n = 119) in stage II, 24.2% (n = 79) in stage III and 33.9% (n = 6) in stage IV. Regression analysis showed a change in RA-910 of 7.8% with increasing severity according to GOLD stage (P < 0.001). Combined visual and quantitative assessment of CT showed that 184 patients had radiological evidence of emphysema, whereas 25 patients had no emphysema. The extent of emphysema increases with increasing severity of COPD and most patients with COPD have emphysema. Tissue destruction by emphysema is therefore an important determinant of disease severity in COPD.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Extent of Ion Spectral Structures at the Inner Edge of the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C.; Reeves, G. D.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2017-12-01

    Several ion spectral structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift and loss in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. Their study helps us understand ion access and losses in this region. Several studies have found that these structures vary with geomagnetic activity, local time, and ion species, but their spatial and temporal extent remain undetermined. We use data from the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometers onboard the Van Allen Probes to analyze the spectral structures in the energy range of 1- 50 keV. HOPE measurements on both Van Allen Probes spacecraft enable us to resolve the extent of these ion structures in space and time. As the structures respond to changes in the convection electric field on a variety of time scales, the lapping of the two spacecraft on time scales of minutes to hours helps determine their spatial and temporal evolution.

  8. Automated Snow Extent Mapping Based on Orthophoto Images from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Tomasz; Spallek, Waldemar; Witek-Kasprzak, Matylda

    2018-04-01

    The paper presents the application of the k-means clustering in the process of automated snow extent mapping using orthophoto images generated using the Structure-from-Motion (SfM) algorithm from oblique aerial photographs taken by unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). A simple classification approach has been implemented to discriminate between snow-free and snow-covered terrain. The procedure uses the k-means clustering and classifies orthophoto images based on the three-dimensional space of red-green-blue (RGB) or near-infrared-red-green (NIRRG) or near-infrared-green-blue (NIRGB) bands. To test the method, several field experiments have been carried out, both in situations when snow cover was continuous and when it was patchy. The experiments have been conducted using three fixed-wing UAVs (swinglet CAM by senseFly, eBee by senseFly, and Birdie by FlyTech UAV) on 10/04/2015, 23/03/2016, and 16/03/2017 within three test sites in the Izerskie Mountains in southwestern Poland. The resulting snow extent maps, produced automatically using the classification method, have been validated against real snow extents delineated through a visual analysis and interpretation offered by human analysts. For the simplest classification setup, which assumes two classes in the k-means clustering, the extent of snow patches was estimated accurately, with areal underestimation of 4.6% (RGB) and overestimation of 5.5% (NIRGB). For continuous snow cover with sparse discontinuities at places where trees or bushes protruded from snow, the agreement between automatically produced snow extent maps and observations was better, i.e. 1.5% (underestimation with RGB) and 0.7-0.9% (overestimation, either with RGB or with NIRRG). Shadows on snow were found to be mainly responsible for the misclassification.

  9. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  10. Evaluation of a randomized controlled trial on the effect on return to work with coaching combined with light therapy and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy for workers with work-related chronic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Schoutens, Antonius M. C.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic work-related stress is quite prevalent in the working population and is in some cases accompanied by long-term sick leave. These stress complaints highly impact employees and are costly due to lost productivity and medical expenses. A new treatment platform with light therapy

  11. In-vitro investigation of out-of-field cell survival following the delivery of conformal, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, Conor K; Hounsell, Alan R; Butterworth, Karl T; Trainor, Colman; McMahon, Stephen J; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Prise, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the out-of-field survival of cells irradiated with either the primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication following delivery of conformal, IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. Single beam, conformal, IMRT and VMAT plans were created to deliver 3 Gy to half the area of a T80 flask containing either DU-145 or AGO-1522 cells allowing intercellular communication between the in- and out-of-field cell populations. The same plans were delivered to a similar custom made phantom used to hold two T25 culture flasks, one flask in-field and one out-of-field to allow comparison of cell survival responses when intercellular communication is physically inhibited. Plans were created for the delivery of 8 Gy to the more radio-resistant DU-145 cells only in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay. In both cell lines, the out-of-field survival was not statistically different between delivery techniques for either cell line or dose. There was however, a statistically significant difference between survival out-of-field when intercellular communication was intact (single T80 culture flask) or inhibited (multiple T25 culture flasks) to in-field for all plans. No statistically significant difference was observed in-field with or without cellular communication to out-of-field for all plans. These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields when cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations is present. This data is further evidence that refinement of existing radiobiological models to include indirect cell killing effects is required. (paper)

  12. Interproximal grinding (disking) of caries in primary molars, attitudes and the extent utilized in a Swedish County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granath, Johanna; Asztély, Anna; Lundgren, Ted

    2018-04-30

    To assess the occurrence of interproximal grinding as a caries therapy in primary molars, to what degree grinding replaced conventional restorative caries therapy, to what extent anaesthesia was used while grinding and to assess open comments about attitudes about grinding. A questionnaire was sent to 108 public dental service clinics with questions concerning the use of grinding as a therapy and alternative to restorative treatment, the use of anaesthesia prior to conventional caries therapy and grinding, respectively. In addition, a content analysis of open comments about grinding was performed. Grinding had been performed in 96% of the clinics. Two-thirds of the dentists used grinding as an alternative to conventional restorative treatment at some point. Most dentists used anaesthesia prior to restorative therapy. Prior to grinding, the frequency of anaesthesia was lower (median 5.0) than for conventional restorative therapy (median 8.7) (p grinding. Grinding has been widely practiced in parts of Sweden, is presently a technique employed by a multitude of dentists, and that anaesthesia is used less frequently prior to grinding, in comparison to conventional restorative therapy. Dentist considered grinding as a treatment option in specific situations.

  13. Use of magnetic therapy in clinical neurology: literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shogam, I.I.; Lenchin, V.N.; Baranovskaya, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    A literature survey is presented on the current status of magnetic therapy in clinical neurology. It is generally accepted that the high susceptibility of the nervous system to the magnetic field is due to a large extent to the automatic component. Furthermore, it has also become clear that glial cells are far more susceptible to magnetic fields than are neurons. Controversy prevails on the question of whether the therapeutic effectiveness of magnetic fields involves a direct mechanism of action or an indirect one via reflex mechanisms. Nevertheless, effectiveness of magnetic therapy has been demonstrated and generally accepted in cases dealing with lagophthalmia, ptosis, various neuralgia, radiculitis, neuritis, vascular and infectious pathology of the brain, and so forth. Basically, the effectiveness of such therapy is strongly dependent on the location and the nature of the pathologic process, as well as on the functional status of the autonomic nervous system. In view of this, effective magnetic therapy is highly dependent on individualization of a given approach. 111 References.

  14. A Global Geospatial Database of 5000+ Historic Flood Event Extents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellman, B.; Sullivan, J.; Doyle, C.; Kettner, A.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Erickson, T.; Slayback, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    A key dataset that is missing for global flood model validation and understanding historic spatial flood vulnerability is a global historical geo-database of flood event extents. Decades of earth observing satellites and cloud computing now make it possible to not only detect floods in near real time, but to run these water detection algorithms back in time to capture the spatial extent of large numbers of specific events. This talk will show results from the largest global historical flood database developed to date. We use the Dartmouth Flood Observatory flood catalogue to map over 5000 floods (from 1985-2017) using MODIS, Landsat, and Sentinel-1 Satellites. All events are available for public download via the Earth Engine Catalogue and via a website that allows the user to query floods by area or date, assess population exposure trends over time, and download flood extents in geospatial format.In this talk, we will highlight major trends in global flood exposure per continent, land use type, and eco-region. We will also make suggestions how to use this dataset in conjunction with other global sets to i) validate global flood models, ii) assess the potential role of climatic change in flood exposure iii) understand how urbanization and other land change processes may influence spatial flood exposure iv) assess how innovative flood interventions (e.g. wetland restoration) influence flood patterns v) control for event magnitude to assess the role of social vulnerability and damage assessment vi) aid in rapid probabilistic risk assessment to enable microinsurance markets. Authors on this paper are already using the database for the later three applications and will show examples of wetland intervention analysis in Argentina, social vulnerability analysis in the USA, and micro insurance in India.

  15. Extent of pyrolysis impacts on fast pyrolysis biochar properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Catherine E; Hu, Yan-Yan; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Loynachan, Thomas E; Laird, David A; Brown, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    A potential concern about the use of fast pyrolysis rather than slow pyrolysis biochars as soil amendments is that they may contain high levels of bioavailable C due to short particle residence times in the reactors, which could reduce the stability of biochar C and cause nutrient immobilization in soils. To investigate this concern, three corn ( L.) stover fast pyrolysis biochars prepared using different reactor conditions were chemically and physically characterized to determine their extent of pyrolysis. These biochars were also incubated in soil to assess their impact on soil CO emissions, nutrient availability, microorganism population growth, and water retention capacity. Elemental analysis and quantitative solid-state C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed variation in O functional groups (associated primarily with carbohydrates) and aromatic C, which could be used to define extent of pyrolysis. A 24-wk incubation performed using a sandy soil amended with 0.5 wt% of corn stover biochar showed a small but significant decrease in soil CO emissions and a decrease in the bacteria:fungi ratios with extent of pyrolysis. Relative to the control soil, biochar-amended soils had small increases in CO emissions and extractable nutrients, but similar microorganism populations, extractable NO levels, and water retention capacities. Corn stover amendments, by contrast, significantly increased soil CO emissions and microbial populations, and reduced extractable NO. These results indicate that C in fast pyrolysis biochar is stable in soil environments and will not appreciably contribute to nutrient immobilization. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Detecting the Extent of Eutectoid Transformation in U-10Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jana, Saumyadeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McInnis, Colleen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lombardo, Nicholas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sweet, Lucas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Manandhar, Sandeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    During eutectoid transformation of U-10Mo alloy, uniform metastable γ UMo phase is expected to transform to a mixture of α-U and γ’-U2Mo phase. The presence of transformation products in final U-10Mo fuel, especially the α phase is considered detrimental for fuel irradiation performance, so it is critical to accurately evaluate the extent of transformation in the final U-10Mo alloy. This phase transformation can cause a volume change that induces a density change in final alloy. To understand this density and volume change, we developed a theoretical model to calculate the volume expansion and resultant density change of U-10Mo alloy as a function of the extent of eutectoid transformation. Based on the theoretically calculated density change for 0 to 100% transformation, we conclude that an experimental density measurement system will be challenging to employ to reliably detect and quantify the extent of transformation. Subsequently, to assess the ability of various methods to detect the transformation in U-10Mo, we annealed U-10Mo alloy samples at 500°C for various times to achieve in low, medium, and high extent of transformation. After the heat treatment at 500°C, the samples were metallographically polished and subjected to optical microscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. Based on our assessment, optical microscopy and image processing can be used to determine the transformed area fraction, which can then be correlated with the α phase volume fraction measured by XRD analysis. XRD analysis of U-10Mo aged at 500°C detected only α phase and no γ’ was detected. To further validate the XRD results, atom probe tomography (APT) was used to understand the composition of transformed regions in U-10Mo alloys aged at 500°C for 10 hours. Based on the APT results, the lamellar transformation product was found to comprise α phase with close to 0 at% Mo and γ phase with 28–32 at% Mo, and the Mo concentration was highest at the

  17. Extent of the Immirzi ambiguity in quantum general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marugan, Guillermo A Mena

    2002-01-01

    The Ashtekar-Barbero formulation of general relativity admits a one-parameter family of canonical transformations that preserves the expressions of the Gauss and diffeomorphism constraints. The loop quantization of the connection formalism based on each of these canonical sets leads to different predictions. This phenomenon is called the Immirzi ambiguity. It has been recently argued that this ambiguity could be generalized to the extent of a spatially dependent function instead of a parameter. This would ruin the predictability of loop quantum gravity. We prove that such expectations are not realized, so that the Immirzi ambiguity introduces exclusively a freedom in the choice of a real number. (letter to the editor)

  18. Determination of extent of surgical intervention for endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smakhtina, O.L.; Nugmanova, M.I.; Nigaj, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    Clinical, cytologic, histologic and X-ray procedures were used in examining 120 patients with endometrial carcinoma. The results of pre- and intraoperative determination of clinical stage were compared in 65 cases of uterine extirpation with appendages and lymphadenectomy. Errors in preoperative identification of the extent of tumor expansion were made in 9 cases (13.8+-4.3%). It was found that determinations of the site and expansion of tumor make the case for hysterocervico-angiolymphography whereas identification of tumor pattern and degree of cell differentiation-for cytologic and histologic assays

  19. Detecting the Extent of Eutectoid Transformation in U-10Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaraj, Arun; Jana, Saumyadeep; McInnis, Colleen A.; Lombardo, Nicholas J.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-01-01

    During eutectoid transformation of U-10Mo alloy, uniform metastable ? UMo phase is expected to transform to a mixture of ?-U and ?'-U_2Mo phase. The presence of transformation products in final U-10Mo fuel, especially the ? phase is considered detrimental for fuel irradiation performance, so it is critical to accurately evaluate the extent of transformation in the final U-10Mo alloy. This phase transformation can cause a volume change that induces a density change in final alloy. To understand this density and volume change, we developed a theoretical model to calculate the volume expansion and resultant density change of U-10Mo alloy as a function of the extent of eutectoid transformation. Based on the theoretically calculated density change for 0 to 100% transformation, we conclude that an experimental density measurement system will be challenging to employ to reliably detect and quantify the extent of transformation. Subsequently, to assess the ability of various methods to detect the transformation in U-10Mo, we annealed U-10Mo alloy samples at 500°C for various times to achieve in low, medium, and high extent of transformation. After the heat treatment at 500°C, the samples were metallographically polished and subjected to optical microscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. Based on our assessment, optical microscopy and image processing can be used to determine the transformed area fraction, which can then be correlated with the ? phase volume fraction measured by XRD analysis. XRD analysis of U-10Mo aged at 500°C detected only ? phase and no ?' was detected. To further validate the XRD results, atom probe tomography (APT) was used to understand the composition of transformed regions in U-10Mo alloys aged at 500°C for 10 hours. Based on the APT results, the lamellar transformation product was found to comprise ? phase with close to 0 at% Mo and ? phase with 28-32 at% Mo, and the Mo concentration was highest at the ?/? interface.

  20. Rapid Estimates of Rupture Extent for Large Earthquakes Using Aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polet, J.; Thio, H. K.; Kremer, M.

    2009-12-01

    The spatial distribution of aftershocks is closely linked to the rupture extent of the mainshock that preceded them and a rapid analysis of aftershock patterns therefore has potential for use in near real-time estimates of earthquake impact. The correlation between aftershocks and slip distribution has frequently been used to estimate the fault dimensions of large historic earthquakes for which no, or insufficient, waveform data is available. With the advent of earthquake inversions that use seismic waveforms and geodetic data to constrain the slip distribution, the study of aftershocks has recently been largely focused on enhancing our understanding of the underlying mechanisms in a broader earthquake mechanics/dynamics framework. However, in a near real-time earthquake monitoring environment, in which aftershocks of large earthquakes are routinely detected and located, these data may also be effective in determining a fast estimate of the mainshock rupture area, which would aid in the rapid assessment of the impact of the earthquake. We have analyzed a considerable number of large recent earthquakes and their aftershock sequences and have developed an effective algorithm that determines the rupture extent of a mainshock from its aftershock distribution, in a fully automatic manner. The algorithm automatically removes outliers by spatial binning, and subsequently determines the best fitting “strike” of the rupture and its length by projecting the aftershock epicenters onto a set of lines that cross the mainshock epicenter with incremental azimuths. For strike-slip or large dip-slip events, for which the surface projection of the rupture is recti-linear, the calculated strike correlates well with the strike of the fault and the corresponding length, determined from the distribution of aftershocks projected onto the line, agrees well with the rupture length. In the case of a smaller dip-slip rupture with an aspect ratio closer to 1, the procedure gives a measure

  1. Extent and application of patient diaries in Austria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heindl, Patrik; Bachlechner, Adelbert; Nydahl, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diaries written for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are offered in many European countries. In Austria, ICU diaries have been relatively unknown, but since 2012, they have started to emerge. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the extent and application of ICU diaries...... in Austria in 2015. Method: The study had a prospective multiple methods design of survey and interviews. All ICUs in Austria were surveyed in 2015 to identify which ICUs used diaries. ICUs using diaries were selected for semi-structured key-informant telephone interviews on the application of ICU diaries...

  2. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R 2 , RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  3. Radiation therapy for digestive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Levy, E.; Thirion, P.; Martin, L.; Calitchi, E.; Otmezguine, Y.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    This brief review of radiation therapy of digestive tumors in 1994 seeks to provide practical answers to the most commonly asked questions: What is the place of radiation therapy versus chemotherapy for the treatment of these patients ? What are the approved indications of radiation therapy and which avenues of research are being explored ? Radiation therapy is used in over two-thirds of patients referred to an oncology department for a gastrointestinal tract tumor. The main indications are reviewed: cancer of the rectum and anal canal and, to a lesser extent, cancer of the esophagus and pancreas. The main focuses of current research include radiation therapy-chemotherapy combinations, intraoperative radiation therapy, and radiation therapy of hepatobiliary tumors. (authors). 23 refs., 1 fig

  4. Nanomedicine and cancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Mathew; Ninan, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to radically change the way cancer is diagnosed, imaged, and treated. The holistic approach to cancer involves noninvasive procedures that emphasize restoring the health of human energy fields. Presenting a wealth of information and research about the most potent cancer healing therapies, this forward-thinking book explores how nanomedicine, holistic medicine, and other cancer therapies play important roles in treatment of this disease. Topics include nanobiotechnology for antibacterial therapy and diagnosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer, antioxidants and combinatorial therapies, and optical and mechanical investigations of nanostructures for biomolecular detection.

  5. Artesunate-mefloquine combination therapy in acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria in young children: a field study regarding neurological and neuropsychiatric safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Sarabel G; Chelo, David; Kinkela, Mina N; Djoukoue, Florence; Tietche, Felix; Hatz, Christoph; Weber, Peter

    2010-10-21

    Mefloquine-artesunate combination therapy for uncomplicated falciparum malaria is one of the treatments used in African children. Data concerning neurological safety in adults and children treated with mefloquine and artesunate combination therapy is well documented in Asia. Safety data for neurological and neuropsychiatric side effects of mefloquine and artesunate combination therapy in African children are scarce, although WHO recommends this therapy in Africa. A phase IV, open label, single arm study was conducted among African children between 10 and 20 kg with acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria. They were treated over three consecutive days with a paediatric fixed-dose combination of artesunate (50 mg/d) and mefloquine (125 mg/d). Parasitological, clinical and neurological examinations and standardized questions about neuropsychiatric symptoms were carried out on days 0, 4, 7, 28 and 63. The primary objective was to assess the neurological and neuropsychiatric safety of artesunate-mefloquine combination therapy in young children. From December 2007 to March 2009, 220 children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were treated with artesunate and mefloquine. 213 children were analysed according to study protocol. 50 neurological and neuropsychiatric adverse events occurred in 28 patients. Eleven drug-related neurological and neuropsychiatric adverse events occurred in eight patients. Sleeping disorders were present in 2.3%, neurological disorders in 1.4%, neuropsychiatric disorders in 1% and eating disorders in 0.5% of the patients. Adverse events were of mild to moderate intensity and resolved spontaneously. African children showed a low percentage of self-limited neurological and neuropsychiatric adverse events, confirming studies on neurological safety in Asian children treated with artesunate and mefloquine. Sleeping disorders were most frequently observed.

  6. Reassessing the extent of the Q classification for containment paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spires, G.

    1995-01-01

    A mounting number of site-specific paint debris transport and screen clogging analyses submitted to justify substandard containment paint work have been deemed persuasive by virtue of favorable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission safety evaluation report (SER) findings. These lay a strong foundation for a standardized approach to redefining the extent to which paint in containment needs to be considered open-quotes Q.close quotes This information justifies an initiative by licensees to roll back paint work quality commitments made at the design phase. This paper questions the validity of the basic premise that all primary containment paint can significantly compromise core and containment cooling [emergency core cooling system/engineered safeguard feature (ECCS/ESF)]. It is posited that the physical extent of painted containment surfaces for which extant material qualification and quality control (QC) structures need apply can be limited to zones relatively proximate to ECCS/ESF suction points. For other painted containment surfaces, simplified criteria should be allowed

  7. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaowen; Cao Yongzhen; Li Jin; Wang Qin

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  8. A method for predicting the extent of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huesemann, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    A series of solid- and slurry-phase soil bioremediation experiments involving different crude oils and refined petroleum products were performed to investigate the factors which affect the maximum extent of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) biodegradation. The authors used a comprehensive petroleum hydrocarbon characterization procedure involving group-type separation analyses, boiling-point distributions, and hydrocarbon typing by field ionization mass spectroscopy. Initial and final concentrations of specified hydrocarbon classes were determined in each of seven different bioremediation treatments. Generally, they found that the degree of TPH biodegradation was affected mainly by the type of hydrocarbons in the contaminant matrix. In contrast, the influence of experimental variables such as soil type, fertilizer concentrations, microbial plate counts, and treatment type (slurry versus landfarming) on the overall extent of TPH biodegradation was insignificant. Based on these findings, a predictive algorithm was developed to estimate the extent of TPH biodegradation from the average reduction of 86 individual hydrocarbon classes and their respective initial concentrations. Model predictions for gravimetric TPH removals were in close agreement with analytical results from two independent laboratories

  9. Random Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmarcke, Erik

    1983-03-01

    Random variation over space and time is one of the few attributes that might safely be predicted as characterizing almost any given complex system. Random fields or "distributed disorder systems" confront astronomers, physicists, geologists, meteorologists, biologists, and other natural scientists. They appear in the artifacts developed by electrical, mechanical, civil, and other engineers. They even underlie the processes of social and economic change. The purpose of this book is to bring together existing and new methodologies of random field theory and indicate how they can be applied to these diverse areas where a "deterministic treatment is inefficient and conventional statistics insufficient." Many new results and methods are included. After outlining the extent and characteristics of the random field approach, the book reviews the classical theory of multidimensional random processes and introduces basic probability concepts and methods in the random field context. It next gives a concise amount of the second-order analysis of homogeneous random fields, in both the space-time domain and the wave number-frequency domain. This is followed by a chapter on spectral moments and related measures of disorder and on level excursions and extremes of Gaussian and related random fields. After developing a new framework of analysis based on local averages of one-, two-, and n-dimensional processes, the book concludes with a chapter discussing ramifications in the important areas of estimation, prediction, and control. The mathematical prerequisite has been held to basic college-level calculus.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Elective Nodal Irradiation and Involved-Field Radiation in the Definitive Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Dosimetric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesarwala, Aparna H.; Ko, Christine J.; Ning, Holly; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Haglund, Karl E.; O’Meara, William P.; Simone, Charles B.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Photon involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT), the standard for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), results in favorable outcomes without increased isolated nodal failures, perhaps from scattered dose to elective nodal stations. Given the high conformality of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), proton IFRT could increase nodal failures. We investigated the feasibility of IMPT for elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in LA-NSCLC. Materials and Methods IMPT IFRT plans were generated to the same total dose of 66.6–72 Gy received by 20 LA-NSCLC patients treated with photon IFRT. IMPT ENI plans were generated to 46 CGE to elective nodal (EN) planning treatment volumes (PTV) plus 24 CGE to involved field (IF)-PTVs. Results Proton IFRT and ENI both improved D95 involved field (IF)-PTV coverage by 4% (pENI. Mean esophagus dose decreased 16% with IFRT and 12% with ENI; heart V25 decreased 63% with both (all pENI. Potential decreased toxicity indicates IMPT could allow ENI while maintaining a favorable therapeutic ratio compared to photon IFRT. PMID:25604729

  11. What is the microscopic tumor extent beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Richard; Woo, Tony; Assaad, Dalal; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; McKenzie, David; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Breen, Dale; Mamedov, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the microscopic tumor extension beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers. Methods and Materials: A prospective, single arm, study. Preoperatively, a radiation oncologist outlined the boundary of a gross lesion, and drew 5-mm incremental marks in four directions from the delineated border. Under local anesthesia, the lesion was excised, and resection margins were assessed microscopically by frozen section. Once resection margins were clear, the microscopic tumor extent was calculated using the presurgical incremental markings as references. A potential relationship between the distance of microscopic tumor extension and other variables was analyzed. Results: A total of 71 lesions in 64 consecutive patients, selected for surgical excision with frozen-section-assisted assessment of resection margins, were accrued. The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross lesion varied from 1 mm to 15 mm, with a mean of 5.2 mm. A margin of 10 mm was required to provide a 95% chance of obtaining clear resection margins. The microscopic tumor extent was positively correlated with the size of gross lesion, but not with other variables. Conclusions: The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross nonmelanoma skin cancer was variable, with a mean of 5.2 mm. Such information is critical for the proper radiation planning of skin cancer therapy

  12. What is the microscopic tumor extent beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Richard; Woo, Tony; Assaad, Dalal; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Barnes, Elizabeth A; McKenzie, David; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Breen, Dale; Mamedov, Alexander

    2005-07-15

    To quantify the microscopic tumor extension beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers. A prospective, single arm, study. Preoperatively, a radiation oncologist outlined the boundary of a gross lesion, and drew 5-mm incremental marks in four directions from the delineated border. Under local anesthesia, the lesion was excised, and resection margins were assessed microscopically by frozen section. Once resection margins were clear, the microscopic tumor extent was calculated using the presurgical incremental markings as references. A potential relationship between the distance of microscopic tumor extension and other variables was analyzed. A total of 71 lesions in 64 consecutive patients, selected for surgical excision with frozen-section-assisted assessment of resection margins, were accrued. The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross lesion varied from 1 mm to 15 mm, with a mean of 5.2 mm. A margin of 10 mm was required to provide a 95% chance of obtaining clear resection margins. The microscopic tumor extent was positively correlated with the size of gross lesion, but not with other variables. The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross nonmelanoma skin cancer was variable, with a mean of 5.2 mm. Such information is critical for the proper radiation planning of skin cancer therapy.

  13. Fertility and cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life

  14. Extent and application of ICU diaries in Germany in 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nydahl, Peter; Knueck, Dirk; Egerod, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    in keeping ICU diaries. CONCLUSION: Six years after the introduction of ICU diaries, ICU nurses in Germany are becoming familiar with the concept. Nursing shortage and bureaucratic challenges have impeded the process of implementation, but the adaption of ICU diaries to German conditions appears......, newsletters, newspapers, lectures and publications in German nursing journals. AIM: The aim of the study was to update our knowledge of the extent and application of ICU diaries in Germany in 2014. DESIGN: The study had a prospective mixed methods multicenter design. METHOD: All 152 ICUs in the two German...... of Germany had implemented diaries and three units were planning to do so. Interviews were conducted with nurses at 14 selected ICUs. Informants reported successful adaption of the diary concept to their culture, but variability in application. No units were identified where all nursing staff participated...

  15. Lymphadenectomy in bladder cancer: What should be the extent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Muruganandham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent of Lymh node dissection (LND during radical cystectomy is a subject of increasing importance with several studies suggesting that an extended LND may improve staging accuracy and outcome. Significant numbers of patients have lymph node metastasis above the boundaries of standard LND. Extended LND yields higher number of lymph nodes which may result in better staging. Various retrospective studies have reported better oncological outcomes with extended LND compared to limited LND. No difference in the mortality and the incidence of lymphocele formation has been found between ′standard′ and ′extended′ LND. Till we have a well-designed randomized controlled trial to address these issues for level 1 evidence, it is not justified to deny our patients the advantages of ′extended′ lymphadenectomy based on the current level of evidence.

  16. Peritoneum and mesenterium. Radiological anatomy and extent of peritoneal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Bastati, N.; Uffmann, M.; Schima, W.

    2009-01-01

    The abdominal cavity is subdivided into the peritoneal cavity, lined by the parietal peritoneum, and the extraperitoneal space. It extends from the diaphragm to the pelvic floor. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs and part of the pelvic organs. The parietal and visceral layers of the peritoneum are in sliding contact; the potential space between them is called the peritoneal cavity and is a part of the embryologic abdominal cavity or primitive coelomic duct. To understand the complex anatomical construction of the different variants of plicae and recesses of the peritoneum, an appreciation of the embryologic development of the peritoneal cavity is crucial. This knowledge reflects the understanding of the peritoneal anatomy, deep knowledge of which is very important in determining the cause and extent of peritoneal diseases as well as in decision making when choosing the appropriate therapeutic approach, whether surgery, conservative treatment, or interventional radiology. (orig.) [de

  17. Obesity and extent of emphysema depicted at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, S.; Li, R.; Leader, J.K.; Zheng, B.; Bon, J.; Gur, D.; Sciurba, F.; Jin, C.; Pu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the underlying relationship between obesity and the extent of emphysema depicted at CT. Methods and materials: A dataset of 477 CT examinations was retrospectively collected from a study of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The low attenuation areas (LAAs; ≤950 HU) of the lungs were identified. The extent of emphysema (denoted as %LAA) was defined as the percentage of LAA divided by the lung volume. The association between log-transformed %LAA and body mass index (BMI) adjusted for age, sex, the forced expiratory volume in one second as percent predicted value (FEV1% predicted), and smoking history (pack years) was assessed using multiple linear regression analysis. Results: After adjusting for age, gender, smoking history, and FEV1% predicted, BMI was negatively associated with severe emphysema in patients with COPD. Specifically, one unit increase in BMI is associated with a 0.93-fold change (95% CI: 0.91–0.96, p < 0.001) in %LAA; the estimated %LAA for males was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.36–2.26, p < 0.001) times that of females; per 10% increase in FEV1% predicated is associated with a 0.72-fold change (95% CI: 0.69–0.76, p < 0.001) in %LAA. Conclusion: Increasing obesity is negatively associated with severity of emphysema independent of gender, age, and smoking history. - Highlights: • BMI is inversely associated with emphysema depicted on CT. • Emphysema severity in men was higher than that in women. • ∼50% of the subjects with COPD in our dataset were either overweight or obese. • Age and smoking status are not significantly associated with %LAA

  18. Measuring the extent of overlaps in protected area designations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguignet, Marine; Arnell, Andy; Juffe-Bignoli, Diego; Shi, Yichuan; Bingham, Heather; MacSharry, Brian; Kingston, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades, a number of national policies and international conventions have been implemented to promote the expansion of the world's protected area network, leading to a diversification of protected area strategies, types and designations. As a result, many areas are protected by more than one convention, legal instrument, or other effective means which may result in a lack of clarity around the governance and management regimes of particular locations. We assess the degree to which different designations overlap at global, regional and national levels to understand the extent of this phenomenon at different scales. We then compare the distribution and coverage of these multi-designated areas in the terrestrial and marine realms at the global level and among different regions, and we present the percentage of each county's protected area extent that is under more than one designation. Our findings show that almost a quarter of the world's protected area network is protected through more than one designation. In fact, we have documented up to eight overlapping designations. These overlaps in protected area designations occur in every region of the world, both in the terrestrial and marine realms, but are more common in the terrestrial realm and in some regions, notably Europe. In the terrestrial realm, the most common overlap is between one national and one international designation. In the marine realm, the most common overlap is between any two national designations. Multi-designations are therefore a widespread phenomenon but its implications are not well understood. This analysis identifies, for the first time, multi-designated areas across all designation types. This is a key step to understand how these areas are managed and governed to then move towards integrated and collaborative approaches that consider the different management and conservation objectives of each designation.

  19. Stresses and Displacements in Functionally Graded Materials of Semi-Infinite Extent Induced by Rectangular Loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Qi Yue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the stress and displacement fields in a functionally graded material (FGM caused by a load. The FGM is a graded material of Si3N4-based ceramics and is assumed to be of semi-infinite extent. The load is a distributed loading over a rectangular area that is parallel to the external surface of the FGM and either on its external surface or within its interior space. The point-load analytical solutions or so-called Yue’s solutions are used for the numerical integration over the distributed loaded area. The loaded area is discretized into 200 small equal-sized rectangular elements. The numerical integration is carried out with the regular Gaussian quadrature. Weak and strong singular integrations encountered when the field points are located on the loaded plane, are resolved with the classical methods in boundary element analysis. The numerical integration results have high accuracy.

  20. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  1. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family therapy Overview Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided by a psychologist, ...

  2. "I look at my own forest and fields in a different way": the lived experience of nature-based therapy in a therapy garden when suffering from stress-related illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidenius, Ulrik; Stigsdotter, Ulrika K; Varning Poulsen, Dorthe; Bondas, Terese

    2017-12-01

    Evidence confirms that nature-based therapy (NBT) has a positive effect on people with mental illnesses. However, there is a lack of evidence on the meaning of NBT for specific patient groups. The Nacadia® Therapy Garden was designed according to an evidence-based design process, and an NBT programme was developed. The aim of the study was to illuminate the phenomenon of participants' lived experience of the NBT in Nacadia. Fourteen participants took part in semi-structured interviews (SSIs), and by way of reflective lifeworld research, the SSIs were analysed to identify and describe the meanings of the phenomenon. The essence of the phenomenon was found to be a process of adopting a searching approach to NBT and Nacadia to become familiar with the conditions. This familiarity stimulated the development of confidentiality and attachment to Nacadia. Feeling protected, safe, cared for, and not exposed was important, and motivated feelings of freedom, reduced demands, and increased the ability to access and try a spectrum of NBT activities. It encouraged participants to develop personal approaches and coping strategies to implement in their everyday lives for moving on.

  3. Structure of Exhausts in Magnetic Reconnection with an X-line of Finite Extent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Drake, J. F. [Department of Physics and the Institute for Physical Science and Technology and the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Gosling, J. T. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Phan, T.-D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Shay, M. A. [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2017-10-20

    We present quantitative predictions of the structure of reconnection exhausts in three-dimensional magnetic reconnection with an X-line of finite extent in the out-of-plane direction. Sasunov et al. showed that they have a tilted ribbon-like shape bounded by rotational discontinuities and tangential discontinuities. We show analytically and numerically that this prediction is largely correct. When there is an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field, the presence of the upstream field that does not reconnect acts as a boundary condition in the normal direction, which forces the normal magnetic field to be zero outside the exhaust. This condition constrains the normal magnetic field inside the exhaust to be small. Thus, rather than the ribbon tilting in the inflow direction, the exhaust remains collimated in the normal direction and is forced to expand nearly completely in the out-of-plane direction. This exhaust structure is in stark contrast to the two-dimensional picture of reconnection, where reconnected flux expands in the normal direction. We present analytical predictions for the structure of the exhausts in terms of upstream conditions. The predictions are confirmed using three-dimensional resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations with a finite-length X-line achieved using a localized (anomalous) resistivity. Implications to reconnection in the solar wind are discussed. In particular, the results can be used to estimate a lower bound for the extent of the X-line in the out-of-plane direction solely using single-spacecraft data taken downstream in the exhausts.

  4. Structure of Exhausts in Magnetic Reconnection with an X-line of Finite Extent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P. A.; Drake, J. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Phan, T.-D.; Shay, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present quantitative predictions of the structure of reconnection exhausts in three-dimensional magnetic reconnection with an X-line of finite extent in the out-of-plane direction. Sasunov et al. showed that they have a tilted ribbon-like shape bounded by rotational discontinuities and tangential discontinuities. We show analytically and numerically that this prediction is largely correct. When there is an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field, the presence of the upstream field that does not reconnect acts as a boundary condition in the normal direction, which forces the normal magnetic field to be zero outside the exhaust. This condition constrains the normal magnetic field inside the exhaust to be small. Thus, rather than the ribbon tilting in the inflow direction, the exhaust remains collimated in the normal direction and is forced to expand nearly completely in the out-of-plane direction. This exhaust structure is in stark contrast to the two-dimensional picture of reconnection, where reconnected flux expands in the normal direction. We present analytical predictions for the structure of the exhausts in terms of upstream conditions. The predictions are confirmed using three-dimensional resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations with a finite-length X-line achieved using a localized (anomalous) resistivity. Implications to reconnection in the solar wind are discussed. In particular, the results can be used to estimate a lower bound for the extent of the X-line in the out-of-plane direction solely using single-spacecraft data taken downstream in the exhausts.

  5. Stem cell therapy: From bench to bedside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamarat, R.; Lataillade, J. J.; Bey, E.; Gourmelon, P.; Benderitter, M.

    2012-01-01

    Several countries have increased efforts to develop medical countermeasures to protect against radiation toxicity due to acts of bio-terrorism as well as cancer treatment. Both acute radiation injuries and delayed effects such as cutaneous effects and impaired wound repair depend, to some extent, on angiogenesis deficiency. Vascular damage influences levels of nutrients, oxygen available to skin tissue and epithelial cell viability. Consequently, the evolution of radiation lesions often becomes uncontrolled and surgery is the final option-amputation leading to a disability. Therefore, the development of strategies designed to promote healing of radiation injuries is a major therapeutic challenge. Adult mesenchymal stem cell therapy has been combined with surgery in some cases and not in others and successfully applied in patients with accidental radiation injuries. Although research in the field of radiation skin injury management has made substantial progress in the past 10 y, several strategies are still needed in order to enhance the beneficial effect of stem cell therapy and to counteract the deleterious effect of an irradiated tissue environment. This review summarises the current and evolving advances concerning basic and translational research based on stem cell therapy for the management of radiological burns. (authors)

  6. Paramedic Initiation of Neuroprotective Agent Infusions: Successful Achievement of Target Blood Levels and Attained Level Effect on Clinical Outcomes in the FAST-MAG Pivotal Trial (Field Administration of Stroke Therapy - Magnesium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkirkova, Kristina; Starkman, Sidney; Sanossian, Nerses; Eckstein, Marc; Stratton, Samuel; Pratt, Frank; Conwit, Robin; Hamilton, Scott; Sharma, Latisha; Liebeskind, David; Restrepo, Lucas; Valdes-Sueiras, Miguel; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2017-07-01

    Paramedic use of fixed-size lumen, gravity-controlled tubing to initiate intravenous infusions in the field may allow rapid start of neuroprotective therapy for acute stroke. In a large, multicenter trial, we evaluated its efficacy in attaining target serum levels of candidate neuroprotective agent magnesium sulfate and the relation of achieved magnesium levels to outcome. The FAST-MAG phase 3 trial (Field Administration of Stroke Therapy - Magnesium) randomized 1700 patients within 2 hours of onset to paramedic-initiated, a 15-minute loading intravenous infusion of magnesium or placebo followed by a 24-hour maintenance dose. The drug delivery strategy included fixed-size lumen, gravity-controlled tubing for field drug administration, and a shrink-wrapped ambulance kit containing both the randomized field loading and hospital maintenance doses for seamless continuation. Among patient randomized to active treatment, magnesium levels in the first 72 hours were assessed 987 times in 572 patients. Mean patient age was 70 years (SD±14 years), and 45% were women. During the 24-hour period of active infusion, mean achieved serum level was 3.91 (±0.8), consistent with trial target. Mg levels were increased by older age, female sex, lower weight, height, body mass index, and estimated glomerular filtration rate, and higher blood urea nitrogen, hemoglobin, and higher hematocrit. Adjusted odds for clinical outcomes did not differ by achieved Mg level, including disability at 90 days, symptomatic hemorrhage, or death. Paramedic infusion initiation using gravity-controlled tubing permits rapid achievement of target serum levels of potential neuroprotective agents. The absence of association of clinical outcomes with achieved magnesium levels provides further evidence that magnesium is not biologically neuroprotective in acute stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Significance of microscopic extention from 1162 esophageal carcinoma specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Zhu Shuchai; Han Chun; Zhang Xin; Xiao Aiqin; Ma Guoxin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the subclinical microscopic tumor extention along the long axis in 1162 specimens of esophageal carcinoma so as to help define the clinical target volume(CTV) according to the degree of microscopic extention(ME) for radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. Methods: 1162 resected esophageal carcinoma specimens originally located in the neck and thorax were studied with special reference to the correlation between upper and lower resection length from the tumor and positive microscopic margin. Another 52 resected esophageal carcinoma specimens were made into pathological giant sections: the actual resection length of upper and para-esophageal normal tissues was compared with that of the lower nor- mal tissues from the tumor, there by, the ratio of shrinkage was obtained and compared. Results: After fixation, microscopic positive margin ratio of the upper resection border in length ≤0.5 cm group was higher than that in length > 0.5 cm group (16.4% vs 4.1%, P=0.000). Microscopic positive margin ratio of the lower resection border in length ≤1.5 cm group was higher than that in length > 1.5 cm group( 8.1% vs 0.4%, P = 0.000). This showed that the positive margin ratio of the upper border was higher than that of the lower border in resection length > 1.5 cm group(3.5% vs 0.4%, P=0. 000). The actual length of upper and lower normal esophageal tissue after having been made into pathological giant sections in 52 patients, was 30% ± 14% and 44% ± 19% of that measured in the operation. Conclusions: Considering the shrinkage of the normal esophagus during fixation, a CTV margin of 2.0 cm along the upper long axis and 3.5 cm along the lower long axis should be chosen for radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma, according to the ratio of shrinkage. Ascending invasion proportion is higher than the descending invasion in that tumor. (authors)

  8. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotman, Irena, E-mail: gotman@technion.ac.il; Gutmanas, Elazar Y., E-mail: gutmanas@technion.ac.il [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  9. Distracted walking: Examining the extent to pedestrian safety problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Mwakalonge

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrians, much like drivers, have always been engaged in multi-tasking like using hand-held devices, listening to music, snacking, or reading while walking. The effects are similar to those experienced by distracted drivers. However, distracted walking has not received similar policies and effective interventions as distracted driving to improve pedestrian safety. This study reviewed the state-of-practice on policies, campaigns, available data, identified research needs, and opportunities pertaining to distracted walking. A comprehensive review of literature revealed that some of the agencies/organizations disseminate useful information about certain distracting activities that pedestrians should avoid while walking to improve their safety. Various walking safety rules/tips have been given, such as not wearing headphones or talking on a cell phone while crossing a street, keeping the volume down, hanging up the phone while walking, being aware of traffic, and avoiding distractions like walking with texting. The majority of the past observational-based and experimental-based studies reviewed in this study on distracted walking is in agreement that there is a positive correlation between distraction and unsafe walking behavior. However, limitations of the existing crash data suggest that distracted walking may not be a severe threat to the public health. Current pedestrian crash data provide insufficient information for researchers to examine the extent to which distracted walking causes and/or contributes to actual pedestrian safety problems.

  10. The extent and nature of alcohol advertising on Australian television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Simone; Roberts, Michele; Pescud, Melanie; Chapman, Kathy; Quester, Pascale; Miller, Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Current alcohol guidelines in Australia recommend minimising alcohol consumption, especially among minors. This study investigated (i) the extent to which children and the general population are exposed to television advertisements that endorse alcohol consumption and (ii) the themes used in these advertisements. A content analysis was conducted on alcohol advertisements aired over two months in major Australian cities. The advertisements were coded according to the products that were promoted, the themes that were employed, and the time of exposure. Advertising placement expenditure was also captured. In total, 2810 alcohol advertisements were aired, representing one in 10 beverage advertisements. Advertisement placement expenditure for alcohol products in the five cities over the two months was $15.8 million. Around half of all alcohol advertisements appeared during children's popular viewing times. The most common themes used were humour, friendship/mateship and value for money. Children and adults are regularly exposed to advertisements that depict alcohol consumption as fun, social and inexpensive. Such messages may reinforce existing alcohol-related cultural norms that prevent many Australians from meeting current intake guidelines. © 2012 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  11. The nature and extent of college student hazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Elizabeth J; Madden, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the nature and extent of college student hazing in the USA. Hazing, a form of interpersonal violence, can jeopardize the health and safety of students. Using a web-based survey, data were collected from 11,482 undergraduate students, aged 18-25 years, who attended one of 53 colleges and universities. Additionally, researchers interviewed 300 students and staff at 18 of the campuses. Results reveal hazing among USA college students is widespread and involves a range of student organizations and athletic teams. Alcohol consumption, humiliation, isolation, sleep-deprivation and sex acts are hazing practices common across student groups. Furthermore, there is a large gap between the number of students who report experience with hazing behaviors and those that label their experience as hazing. To date, hazing prevention efforts in post-secondary education have focused largely on students in fraternities/sororities and intercollegiate athletes. Findings from this study can inform development of more comprehensive and research-based hazing prevention efforts that target a wider range of student groups. Further, data can serve as a baseline from which to measure changes in college student hazing over time.

  12. Extent and modes of physics instruction in European dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letić, Milorad; Popović, Gorjana

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dental education towards integration of sciences and convergence of curricula have affected instruction in physics. Earlier studies of undergraduate curricula make possible comparisons in physics instruction. For this study, the websites of 245 European dental schools were explored, and information about the curriculum was found on 213 sites. Physics instruction in the form of a separate course was found in 63 percent of these schools, with eighty-two hours and 5.9 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits on average. Physics integrated with other subjects or into modules was found in 19 percent of these schools. Half of these schools had on average sixty-one hours and 6.9 ECTS credits devoted to physics. Eighteen percent of the schools had no noticeable obligatory physics instruction, but in half of them physics was found to be required or accepted on admission, included in other subjects, or appeared as an elective course. In 122 dental schools, the extent of physics instruction was found to be between forty and 120 contact hours. Physics instruction has been reduced by up to 14 percent in the last fourteen years in the group of eleven countries that were members of the European Union (EU) in 1997, but by approximately 30 percent in last five years in the group of ten Accession Countries to the EU.

  13. Optimal starting gantry angles using equiangular-spaced beams with intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer on RTOG 0126: A clinical study of 5 and 7 fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Butler, James B.; El-Gubtan, Adel S.; Nugent, Zoann

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the effects of starting gantry angle and number of equiangular-spaced beams for prostate cancer radiotherapy on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0126 protocol using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and methods: Ten localized prostate cancer patients were prescribed to 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Static IMRT plans using five and seven equiangular-spaced beams were generated. The starting gantry angles were incremented by 5 o resulting in 15 (5 beams) and 11 (7 beams) plans per patient. Constant target coverage was ensured for all plans in order to isolate the variation in the rectal and bladder metrics as a function of starting gantry angle. Results: The variation with starting gantry angle in rectal metrics using 5 beams was statistically significant (p o and 50 o . Statistically insignificant differences were observed for the bladder metrics using 5 beams. There was little dosimetric variation in the rectal and bladder metrics with 7 beams. Nearly equivalent rectal V 75 Gy was achieved between 5 optimal equiangular-spaced beams starting at 20 o (class solution) and 7 equiangular-spaced beams starting at 0 o for most patients. Conclusions: The use of an optimal starting gantry angle for 5 equiangular-spaced beams, as indicated by a class solution in this study, will facilitate rectal sparing and can produce plans that are equivalent to those employing 7 equiangular-spaced beams

  14. Efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo sobre la mamografía: nuestra experiencia Effect of replacement hormone therapy on mammography: our experience in this field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daysi Navarro Despaigne

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, cuyo objetivo fue describir el efecto de la terapia hormonal de reemplazo (THR sobre las mamografías de mujeres de edad mediana que asistieron a la Clínica de Climaterio y Osteoporosis (ClimOs entre enero de 1998 y diciembre de 2003. A cada mujer se le realizó mamografía (Mx inicial y durante el uso de la THR, las cuales fueron informadas como: 1 mamografías sin alteraciones, 2 con cambios menores [densidad irregular y microcalcificaciones] y 3 con cambios mayores [nódulos, quistes u otra alteración]. Como tratamiento recibieron estrógenos solos (E, estrógenos y progestagenos combinados continuos (EP y terapia no estrogénica (fitoestrógenos, tibolona. La muestra estuvo constituida por 112 mujeres, con edades entre 34 y 59 años. La Mx inicial mostró: no alteraciones en el 85,5 %, cambios menores en el 9,1 y cambios mayores en el 5,4. En la posTHR (tiempo promedio entre ambos estudios: 2,5 años, el 66 % continuó con mamografías normales, en el 29,0 hubo cambios menores (pA retrospective study was conducted, with the objective of describing the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT on mammography performed on middle-aged females, who had been seen at climacterics and osteoporosis clinics from January 1998 to December 2003. Mammography had been performed on each woman at the beginning and during the use of the HRT, being the results as follows: 1 mammography showing no changes; 2 mammography with slight changes irregular density and microcalcification and 3 mammography with major changes nodules, cysts or any other change . As a treatment, they received estrogen (E, continuos combined estrogen and progestagen (EP and nonestrogen therapy (phytoestrogen, tibolone. The sample was composed of 112 women aged 34 to 59 years. The initial Mx showed no changes in 85,5 %, slight changes in 9,1 and major changes in 5,4 of females. After the application of HRT (average time between both mammographic

  15. Micronutrient problems in Thailand - extent, past and present research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snitwongse, P.

    1975-01-01

    Micronutrient problems in Thailand are briefly discussed, particularly with reference to rice. At present, the relative amounts of zinc in rice-growing areas (soils) are being analyzed for total and available zinc. Fertilizer (N, P, K) uptake by rice is being studied in the field by means of zinc-65. Observations on the relative uptake of P by rice associated with different zinc levels are made on pot cultures, using phosphorus-32

  16. The Use of Color in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withrow, Rebecca L.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the published literature on the separate fields of art therapy and color therapy, synthesizing them in a proposed use of color within art therapy. Specific techniques focusing on use of color in a nonrepresentational expressive form are suggested as a way to extend the therapeutic benefits of art therapy. The intention of this…

  17. Assessing the extent of non-stationary biases in GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Jannatun; Johnson, Fiona; Sharma, Ashish

    2017-06-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are the main tools for estimating changes in the climate for the future. The imperfect representation of climate models introduces biases in the simulations that need to be corrected prior to their use for impact assessments. Bias correction methods generally assume that the bias calculated over the historical period does not change and can be applied to the future. This study investigates this assumption by considering the extent and nature of bias non-stationarity using 20th century precipitation and temperature simulations from six CMIP5 GCMs across Australia. Four statistics (mean, standard deviation, 10th and 90th quantiles) in monthly and seasonal biases are obtained for three different time window lengths (10, 25 and 33 years) to examine the properties of bias over time. This approach is repeated for two different phases of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), which is known to have strong influences on the Australian climate. It is found that bias non-stationarity at decadal timescales is indeed an issue over some of Australia for some GCMs. When considering interdecadal variability there are significant difference in the bias between positive and negative phases of the IPO. Regional analyses confirmed these findings with the largest differences seen on the east coast of Australia, where IPO impacts tend to be the strongest. The nature of the bias non-stationarity found in this study suggests that it will be difficult to modify existing bias correction approaches to account for non-stationary biases. A more practical approach for impact assessments that use bias correction maybe to use a selection of GCMs where the assumption of bias non-stationarity holds.

  18. The extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendall, J.-M.; Collier, J. S.; Rümpker, G.

    2013-11-01

    The granitic islands of the Seychelles Plateau have long been recognised to overlie continental crust, isolated from Madagascar and India during the formation of the Indian Ocean. However, to date the extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles region remains unknown. This is particularly true beneath the Mascarene Basin between the Seychelles Plateau and Madagascar and beneath the Amirante Arc. Constraining the size and shape of the Seychelles continental fragment is needed for accurate plate reconstructions of the breakup of Gondwana and has implications for the processes of continental breakup in general. Here we present new estimates of crustal thickness and VP/VS from H-κ stacking of receiver functions from a year long deployment of seismic stations across the Seychelles covering the topographic plateau, the Amirante Ridge and the northern Mascarene Basin. These results, combined with gravity modelling of historical ship track data, confirm that continental crust is present beneath the Seychelles Plateau. This is ˜30-33 km thick, but with a relatively high velocity lower crustal layer. This layer thins southwards from ˜10 km to ˜1 km over a distance of ˜50 km, which is consistent with the Seychelles being at the edge of the Deccan plume prior to its separation from India. In contrast, the majority of the Seychelles Islands away from the topographic plateau show no direct evidence for continental crust. The exception to this is the island of Desroche on the northern Amirante Ridge, where thicker low density crust, consistent with a block of continental material is present. We suggest that the northern Amirantes are likely continental in nature and that small fragments of continental material are a common feature of plume affected continental breakup.

  19. Migratory decisions in birds: Extent of genetic versus environmental control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonowski, M.S.; Conway, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Migration is one of the most spectacular of animal behaviors and is prevalent across a broad array of taxa. In birds, we know much about the physiological basis of how birds migrate, but less about the relative contribution of genetic versus environmental factors in controlling migratory tendency. To evaluate the extent to which migratory decisions are genetically determined, we examined whether individual western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) change their migratory tendency from one year to the next at two sites in southern Arizona. We also evaluated the heritability of migratory decisions by using logistic regression to examine the association between the migratory tendency of burrowing owl parents and their offspring. The probability of migrating decreased with age in both sexes and adult males were less migratory than females. Individual owls sometimes changed their migratory tendency from one year to the next, but changes were one-directional: adults that were residents during winter 2004-2005 remained residents the following winter, but 47% of adults that were migrants in winter 2004-2005 became residents the following winter. We found no evidence for an association between the migratory tendency of hatch-year owls and their male or female parents. Migratory tendency of hatch-year owls did not differ between years, study sites or sexes or vary by hatching date. Experimental provision of supplemental food did not affect these relationships. All of our results suggest that heritability of migratory tendency in burrowing owls is low, and that intraspecific variation in migratory tendency is likely due to: (1) environmental factors, or (2) a combination of environmental factors and non-additive genetic variation. The fact that an individual's migratory tendency can change across years implies that widespread anthropogenic changes (i.e., climate change or changes in land use) could potentially cause widespread changes in the migratory tendency of

  20. Rate and extent of aqueous perchlorate removal by iron surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Angela M; De Leon, Corinne H; Young, Thomas M

    2003-07-15

    The rate and extent of perchlorate reduction on several types of iron metal was studied in batch and column reactors. Mass balances performed on the batch experiments indicate that perchlorate is initially sorbed to the iron surface, followed by a reduction to chloride. Perchlorate removal was proportional to the iron dosage in the batch reactors, with up to 66% removal in 336 h in the highest dosage system (1.25 g mL(-1)). Surface-normalized reaction rates among three commercial sources of iron filings were similar for acid-washed samples. The most significant perchlorate removal occurred in solutions with slightly acidic or near-neutral initial pH values. Surface mediation of the reaction is supported by the absence of reduction in batch experiments with soluble Fe2+ and also by the similarity in specific reaction rate constants (kSA) determined for three different iron types. Elevated soluble chloride concentrations significantly inhibited perchlorate reduction, and lower removal rates were observed for iron samples with higher amounts of background chloride contamination. Perchlorate reduction was not observed on electrolytic sources of iron or on a mixed-phase oxide (Fe3O4), suggesting that the reactive iron phase is neither pure zerovalent iron nor the mixed oxide alone. A mixed valence iron hydr(oxide) coating or a sorbed Fe2+ surface complex represent the most likely sites for the reaction. The observed reaction rates are too slow for immediate use in remediation system design, but the findings may provide a basis for future development of cost-effective abiotic perchlorate removal techniques.

  1. The extent of use of online pharmacies in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanmy, Norah

    2017-09-01

    Online pharmacies sell medicine over the Internet and deliver them by mail. The main objective of this study is to explore the extent of use of online pharmacies in Saudi Arabia which will be useful for the scientific community and regulators. An Arabic survey questionnaire was developed for this study. The questionnaire was distributed via email and social media. Four sections were created to cover the objectives: experience with online shopping in general, demographics, awareness of the existence and customer experiences of buying medicine online, and reasons for buying/not buying medicine online. A total of 633 responses were collected. Around 69% (437) of them were female and the majority (256, 40.4%) was in the age range 26-40. Only 23.1% (146) were aware of the existence of online pharmacies where 2.7% (17) of them had bought a medicine over the Internet and 15 (88.2%) respondents out of the 17 was satisfied with the process. Lack of awareness of the availability of such services was the main reason for not buying medicines online. Many respondents (263, 42.7%) were willing to try an online pharmacy, although majorities (243, 45.9%) were unable to differentiate between legal and illegal online pharmacies. The largest categories of products respondents were willing to buy them online were nonprescription medicines and cosmetics. The popularity of purchasing medicines over the Internet is still low in Saudi Arabia. However, because the majority of respondents are willing to purchase medicines online, efforts should be made by the Saudi FDA to set regulations and monitor this activity.

  2. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hong; He, Ri-Hui; Zheng, Yun-Rong; Tao, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the main method of psychotherapy generally accepted in the field of substance addiction and non-substance addiction. This chapter mainly introduces the methods and technology of cognitive-behavior therapy of substance addiction, especially in order to prevent relapse. In the cognitive-behavior treatment of non-substance addiction, this chapter mainly introduces gambling addiction and food addiction.

  3. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  4. Accelerators for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-01-01

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy

  5. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  6. SU-F-T-387: A Novel Optimization Technique for Field in Field (FIF) Chestwall Radiation Therapy Using a Single Plan to Improve Delivery Safety and Treatment Planning Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabibian, A; Kim, A; Rose, J; Alvelo, M; Perel, C; Laiken, K; Sheth, N [Bayonne Medical Center, Bayonne, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A novel optimization technique was developed for field-in-field (FIF) chestwall radiotherapy using bolus every other day. The dosimetry was compared to currently used optimization. Methods: The prior five patients treated at our clinic to the chestwall and supraclavicular nodes with a mono-isocentric four-field arrangement were selected for this study. The prescription was 5040 cGy in 28 fractions, 5 mm bolus every other day on the tangent fields, 6 and/or 10 MV x-rays, and multileaf collimation.Novelly, tangents FIF segments were forward planned optimized based on the composite bolus and non-bolus dose distribution simultaneously. The prescription was spilt into 14 fractions for both bolus and non-bolus tangents. The same segments and monitor units were used for the bolus and non-bolus treatment. The plan was optimized until the desired coverage was achieved, minimized 105% hotspots, and a maximum dose of less than 108%. Each tangential field had less than 5 segments.Comparison plans were generated using FIF optimization with the same dosimetric goals, but using only the non-bolus calculation for FIF optimization. The non-bolus fields were then copied and bolus was applied. The same segments and monitor units were used for the bolus and non-bolus segments. Results: The prescription coverage of the chestwall, as defined by RTOG guidelines, was on average 51.8% for the plans that optimized bolus and non-bolus treatments simultaneous (SB) and 43.8% for the plans optimized to the non-bolus treatments (NB). Chestwall coverage of 90% prescription averaged to 80.4% for SB and 79.6% for NB plans. The volume receiving 105% of the prescription was 1.9% for SB and 0.8% for NB plans on average. Conclusion: Simultaneously optimizing for bolus and non-bolus treatments noticeably improves prescription coverage of the chestwall while maintaining similar hotspots and 90% prescription coverage in comparison to optimizing only to non-bolus treatments.

  7. SU-F-T-387: A Novel Optimization Technique for Field in Field (FIF) Chestwall Radiation Therapy Using a Single Plan to Improve Delivery Safety and Treatment Planning Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabibian, A; Kim, A; Rose, J; Alvelo, M; Perel, C; Laiken, K; Sheth, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A novel optimization technique was developed for field-in-field (FIF) chestwall radiotherapy using bolus every other day. The dosimetry was compared to currently used optimization. Methods: The prior five patients treated at our clinic to the chestwall and supraclavicular nodes with a mono-isocentric four-field arrangement were selected for this study. The prescription was 5040 cGy in 28 fractions, 5 mm bolus every other day on the tangent fields, 6 and/or 10 MV x-rays, and multileaf collimation.Novelly, tangents FIF segments were forward planned optimized based on the composite bolus and non-bolus dose distribution simultaneously. The prescription was spilt into 14 fractions for both bolus and non-bolus tangents. The same segments and monitor units were used for the bolus and non-bolus treatment. The plan was optimized until the desired coverage was achieved, minimized 105% hotspots, and a maximum dose of less than 108%. Each tangential field had less than 5 segments.Comparison plans were generated using FIF optimization with the same dosimetric goals, but using only the non-bolus calculation for FIF optimization. The non-bolus fields were then copied and bolus was applied. The same segments and monitor units were used for the bolus and non-bolus segments. Results: The prescription coverage of the chestwall, as defined by RTOG guidelines, was on average 51.8% for the plans that optimized bolus and non-bolus treatments simultaneous (SB) and 43.8% for the plans optimized to the non-bolus treatments (NB). Chestwall coverage of 90% prescription averaged to 80.4% for SB and 79.6% for NB plans. The volume receiving 105% of the prescription was 1.9% for SB and 0.8% for NB plans on average. Conclusion: Simultaneously optimizing for bolus and non-bolus treatments noticeably improves prescription coverage of the chestwall while maintaining similar hotspots and 90% prescription coverage in comparison to optimizing only to non-bolus treatments.

  8. A study of the dosimetry of small field photon beams used in intensity modulated radiation therapy in inhomogeneous media: Monte Carlo simulations, and algorithm comparisons and corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Andrew Osler

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of inhomogeneity corrections for lung, air, and bone in radiotherapy treatment planning. Traditionally, corrections based on physical density have been used. Modern algorithms use the electron density derived from CT images. Small fields are used in both conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, however, their beam characteristics in inhomogeneous media have not been extensively studied. This work compares traditional and modern treatment planning algorithms to Monte Carlo simulations in and near low-density inhomogeneities. Field sizes ranging from 0.5 cm to 5 cm in diameter are projected onto a phantom containing inhomogeneities and depth dose curves are compared. Comparisons of the Dose Perturbation Factors (DPF) are presented as functions of density and field size. Dose Correction Factors (DCF), which scale the algorithms to the Monte Carlo data, are compared for each algorithm. Physical scaling algorithms such as Batho and Equivalent Pathlength (EPL) predict an increase in dose for small fields passing through lung tissue, where Monte Carlo simulations show a sharp dose drop. The physical model-based collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithm correctly predicts the dose drop, but does not accurately predict the magnitude. Because the model-based algorithms do not correctly account for the change in backscatter, the dose drop predicted by CCC occurs farther downstream compared to that predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations. Beyond the tissue inhomogeneity all of the algorithms studied predict dose distributions in close agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Dose-volume relationships are important in understanding the effects of radiation to the lung. The dose within the lung is affected by a complex function of beam energy, lung tissue density, and field size. Dose algorithms vary in their abilities to correctly predict the dose to the lung tissue. A thorough analysis of the effects of density, and field size on dose to the

  9. Tracking fine-scale seasonal evolution of surface water extent in Central Alaska and the Canadian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, S. W.; Smith, L. C.; Pitcher, L. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Topp, S.

    2017-12-01

    Quantifying spatial and temporal variability in surface water storage at high latitudes is critical for assessing environmental sensitivity to climate change. Traditionally the tradeoff between high spatial and high temporal resolution space-borne optical imagery has limited the ability to track fine-scale changes in surface water extent. However, the recent launch of hundreds of earth-imaging CubeSats by commercial satellite companies such as Planet opens up new possibilities for monitoring surface water from space. In this study we present a comparison of seasonal evolution of surface water extent in two study areas with differing geologic, hydrologic and permafrost regimes, namely, the Yukon Flats in Central Alaska and the Canadian Shield north of Yellowknife, N.W.T. Using near-daily 3m Planet CubeSat imagery, we track individual lake surface area from break-up to freeze-up during summer 2017 and quantify the spatial and temporal variability in inundation extent. We validate our water delineation method and inundation extent time series using WorldView imagery, coincident in situ lake shoreline mapping and pressure transducer data for 19 lakes in the Northwest Territories and Alaska collected during the NASA Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) 2017 field campaign. The results of this analysis demonstrate the value of CubeSat imagery for dynamic surface water research particularly at high latitudes and illuminate fine-scale drivers of cold regions surface water extent.

  10. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S J; Pozzi, E C C; Monti Hughes, A; Provenzano, L; Koivunoro, H; Carando, D G; Thorp, S I; Casal, M R; Bortolussi, S; Trivillin, V A; Garabalino, M A; Curotto, P; Heber, E M; Santa Cruz, G A; Kankaanranta, L; Joensuu, H; Schwint, A E

    2017-10-03

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson's correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  11. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S. J.; Pozzi, E. C. C.; Monti Hughes, A.; Provenzano, L.; Koivunoro, H.; Carando, D. G.; Thorp, S. I.; Casal, M. R.; Bortolussi, S.; Trivillin, V. A.; Garabalino, M. A.; Curotto, P.; Heber, E. M.; Santa Cruz, G. A.; Kankaanranta, L.; Joensuu, H.; Schwint, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  12. Extent of Cropland and Related Soil Erosion Risk in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidele Karamage

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Land conversion to cropland is one of the major causes of severe soil erosion in Africa. This study assesses the current cropland extent and the related soil erosion risk in Rwanda, a country that experienced the most rapid population growth and cropland expansion in Africa over the last decade. The land cover land use (LCLU map of Rwanda in 2015 was developed using Landsat-8 imagery. Based on the obtained LCLU map and the spatial datasets of precipitation, soil properties and elevation, the soil erosion rate of Rwanda was assessed at 30-m spatial resolution, using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE model. According to the results, the mean soil erosion rate was 250 t·ha−1·a−1 over the entire country, with a total soil loss rate of approximately 595 million tons per year. The mean soil erosion rate over cropland, which occupied 56% of the national land area, was estimated at 421 t·ha−1·a−1 and was responsible for about 95% of the national soil loss. About 24% of the croplands in Rwanda had a soil erosion rate larger than 300 t·ha−1·a−1, indicating their unsuitability for cultivation. With a mean soil erosion rate of 1642 t·ha−1·a−1, these unsuitable croplands were responsible for 90% of the national soil loss. Most of the unsuitable croplands are distributed in the Congo Nile Ridge, Volcanic Range mountain areas in the west and the Buberuka highlands in the north, regions characterized by steep slopes (>30% and strong rainfall. Soil conservation practices, such as the terracing cultivation method, are paramount to preserve the soil. According to our assessment, terracing alone could reduce the mean cropland soil erosion rate and the national soil loss by 79% and 75%, respectively. After terracing, only a small proportion of 7.6% of the current croplands would still be exposed to extreme soil erosion with a rate >300 t·ha−1·a−1. These irremediable cropland areas should be returned to mountain forest to

  13. Evaluation of nature and extent of injuries during Dahihandi festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemade, P; Wade, R; Patwardhan, A R; Kale, S

    2012-01-01

    Injuries related to the Hindu festival of Dahihandi where a human pyramid is formed and a pot of money kept at a height is broken, celebrated in the state of Maharashtra, have seen a significant rise in the past few years. The human pyramid formed is multi-layered and carries with it a high risk of injury including mortality. To evaluate the nature, extent and influencing factors of injuries related to Dahihandi festival. We present a retrospective analysis of patients who presented in a tertiary care center with injuries during the Dahihandi festival in the year 2010. 124 patients' records were evaluated for timing of injury, height of the Dahihandi pyramid, position of the patient in the multi-layered pyramid, mode of pyramid collapse and mechanism of an injury. A binary regression logistic analysis for risk factors was done at 5% significance level. Univariate and multi-variate binary logistic regression of the risk factors for occurrence of a major or minor injury was done using Minitab™ version 16.0 at 5% significance. Out of 139 patients presented to the center, 15 were not involved directly in the formation of pyramid, rest 124 were included in the analysis. A majority of the patients were above 15 years of age [110 (83.6%)]. 46 (37.1%) patients suffered major injuries. There were 39 fractures, 3 cases of chest wall trauma with 10 cases of head injuries and 1 death. More than half of the patients [78 (56.1%)] were injured after 1800 hours. 73 (58.9%) injured participants were part of the pyramid constructed to reach the Dahihandi placed at 30 feet or more above the ground. 72 (51.8%) participants were part of the middle layers of the pyramid. Fall of a participant from upstream layers on the body was the main mechanism of injury, and majority [101 (81.5%)] of the patients suffered injury during descent phase of the pyramid. There is a considerable risk of serious, life-threatening injuries inherent to human pyramid formation and descent in the Dahihandi

  14. Geographic extent and variation of a coral reef trophic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T R; Muthiga, N A

    2016-07-01

    Trophic cascades caused by a reduction in predators of sea urchins have been reported in Indian Ocean and Caribbean coral reefs. Previous studies have been constrained by their site-specific nature and limited spatial replication, which has produced site and species-specific understanding that can potentially preclude larger community-organization nuances and generalizations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the extent and variability of the cascade community in response to fishing across ~23° of latitude and longitude in coral reefs in the southwestern Indian Ocean. The taxonomic composition of predators of sea urchins, the sea urchin community itself, and potential effects of changing grazer abundance on the calcifying benthic organisms were studied in 171 unique coral reef sites. We found that geography and habitat were less important than the predator-prey relationships. There were seven sea urchin community clusters that aligned with a gradient of declining fishable biomass and the abundance of a key predator, the orange-lined triggerfish (Balistapus undulatus). The orange-lined triggerfish dominated where sea urchin numbers and diversity were low but the relative abundance of wrasses and emperors increased where sea urchin numbers were high. Two-thirds of the study sites had high sea urchin biomass (>2,300 kg/ha) and could be dominated by four different sea urchin species, Echinothrix diadema, Diadema savignyi, D. setosum, and Echinometra mathaei, depending on the community of sea urchin predators, geographic location, and water depth. One-third of the sites had low sea urchin biomass and diversity and were typified by high fish biomass, predators of sea urchins, and herbivore abundance, representing lightly fished communities with generally higher cover of calcifying algae. Calcifying algal cover was associated with low urchin abundance where as noncalcifying fleshy algal cover was not clearly associated with herbivore abundance. Fishing of the orange

  15. A Fully Automated Classification for Mapping the Annual Cropland Extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, F.; Defourny, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping the global cropland extent is of paramount importance for food security. Indeed, accurate and reliable information on cropland and the location of major crop types is required to make future policy, investment, and logistical decisions, as well as production monitoring. Timely cropland information directly feed early warning systems such as GIEWS and, FEWS NET. In Africa, and particularly in the arid and semi-arid region, food security is center of debate (at least 10% of the population remains undernourished) and accurate cropland estimation is a challenge. Space borne Earth Observation provides opportunities for global cropland monitoring in a spatially explicit, economic, efficient, and objective fashion. In the both agriculture monitoring and climate modelling, cropland maps serve as mask to isolate agricultural land for (i) time-series analysis for crop condition monitoring and (ii) to investigate how the cropland is respond to climatic evolution. A large diversity of mapping strategies ranging from the local to the global scale and associated with various degrees of accuracy can be found in the literature. At the global scale, despite efforts, cropland is generally one of classes with the poorest accuracy which make difficult the use for agricultural. This research aims at improving the cropland delineation from the local scale to the regional and global scales as well as allowing near real time updates. To that aim, five temporal features were designed to target the key- characteristics of crop spectral-temporal behavior. To ensure a high degree of automation, training data is extracted from available baseline land cover maps. The method delivers cropland maps with a high accuracy over contrasted agro-systems in Ukraine, Argentina, China and Belgium. The accuracy reached are comparable to those obtained with classifiers trained with in-situ data. Besides, it was found that the cropland class is associated with a low uncertainty. The temporal features

  16. SU-E-T-623: Delivery of 3D Conformal Proton-Therapy Fields at Extended Source- To-Axis Distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryck, E; Slopsema, R [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric properties of proton dose distributions delivered at extended source-to-skin distances (SSD). Methods: Radiation was delivered with a gantry-mounted proton double scattering system (Proteus 230, IBA). This system has a maximum field diameter of 24 cm at isocenter and a nominal source-to-axis distance of 230 cm. Dose was measured at nominal SSD as well as at -10, +10, +25, +50, +75, and +100 cm for several range and modulation width combinations. Depth dose distributions were measured with a multi-layer ionization chamber (MLIC), and lateral dose distributions with a 2D ionization chamber array as well as with a diode in a water phantom. Results: The maximum field diameter was found to increase from 24.0 cm at nominal SSD to 29.1 cm and 33.3 cm at +50 cm and +100 cm respectively. Field flatness remained below 3% for all SSD. Tilt in the spread-out Bragg peak depth dose distribution increased with SSD up to 0.4 %-per-g/cm2 at +100 cm. The measured range decreased with 1.1x10-3 g/cm2 per centimeter shift in SSD due to proton energy loss in air, very close to the theoretically calculated value of 1.06x10-3 g/cm3. The output and dose rate decrease with the inverse of the SSD squared as expected. Conclusion: Extending the SSD up to 100 cm increases the maximum field diameter from 24.0 cm to 33.3 cm while the dose uniformity remains acceptable.

  17. TU-H-BRA-03: Performance of a Clinical Gridded Electron Gun in Magnetic Fields: Implications for MRI-Linac Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, B; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Bazalova-Carter, M [University of Victoria, VCH040, Victoria, BC (Australia); Oborn, B [Illawarra Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Constantin, D [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Holloway, L [Liverpool Hospital and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Fahrig, R [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent advances towards MRI Linac radiotherapy have motivated a wide range of studies characterizing electromagnetic interactions between the two devices. One of the most sensitive components is the linac electron gun. To data, only non gridded (diode) guns have been investigated however, most linac vendors utilize gridded (triode) guns, which enable efficient and robust beam gating. The purpose of this study was to develop a realistic model of a gridded gun used clinically, and to characterize its performance in magnetic fields. Methods: The gridded electron gun used on Varian high energy machines was measured using 3D laser scanning quoted as accurate to 0.1mm. Based on the scane, a detailed CAD mode was developed. From this, key geometry was extracted and a FEM model was developed (Opera/SCALA). Next, the high voltage (HV), grid voltage, and emission current were read from six dose matched TrueBeam linacs for the 6X, 10X and 15X photon modes (0 B-field). The mean values were used to represent each mode, which was simulated I constant magnetic fields from 0–200G in-line, and 0–35G perpendicular. Results: Experimentally measured HV, grid voltage, and emission current from 6X, 10X and 15X modes were respectively: 15±.03kV, 10±.08kV, 11±.03kV; 93±7V, 41±3V, and 70±6V; 327±27mA, 129±10mA, and 214±19mA. The error in simulated emission current of each mode was 3%,6%, and 3%. For in-line fields, 50% beam loss occurred at 114, 96, and 97G; for perpendicular; at 12, 13 and 14G. Sensitivity for a given geometry is primarily determined by HV setting. Conclusion: Future MRI-Linac systems will almost certainly use gridded guns. We present the first model of a clinical gridded gun, and match the experimental emission current to within 6% across three different operating modes. This clinical gun shows increased sensitivity to magnetic fields than previous work,and different modes show different sensitivity.

  18. TU-H-BRA-03: Performance of a Clinical Gridded Electron Gun in Magnetic Fields: Implications for MRI-Linac Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, B; Keall, P; Bazalova-Carter, M; Oborn, B; Constantin, D; Holloway, L; Fahrig, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recent advances towards MRI Linac radiotherapy have motivated a wide range of studies characterizing electromagnetic interactions between the two devices. One of the most sensitive components is the linac electron gun. To data, only non gridded (diode) guns have been investigated however, most linac vendors utilize gridded (triode) guns, which enable efficient and robust beam gating. The purpose of this study was to develop a realistic model of a gridded gun used clinically, and to characterize its performance in magnetic fields. Methods: The gridded electron gun used on Varian high energy machines was measured using 3D laser scanning quoted as accurate to 0.1mm. Based on the scane, a detailed CAD mode was developed. From this, key geometry was extracted and a FEM model was developed (Opera/SCALA). Next, the high voltage (HV), grid voltage, and emission current were read from six dose matched TrueBeam linacs for the 6X, 10X and 15X photon modes (0 B-field). The mean values were used to represent each mode, which was simulated I constant magnetic fields from 0–200G in-line, and 0–35G perpendicular. Results: Experimentally measured HV, grid voltage, and emission current from 6X, 10X and 15X modes were respectively: 15±.03kV, 10±.08kV, 11±.03kV; 93±7V, 41±3V, and 70±6V; 327±27mA, 129±10mA, and 214±19mA. The error in simulated emission current of each mode was 3%,6%, and 3%. For in-line fields, 50% beam loss occurred at 114, 96, and 97G; for perpendicular; at 12, 13 and 14G. Sensitivity for a given geometry is primarily determined by HV setting. Conclusion: Future MRI-Linac systems will almost certainly use gridded guns. We present the first model of a clinical gridded gun, and match the experimental emission current to within 6% across three different operating modes. This clinical gun shows increased sensitivity to magnetic fields than previous work,and different modes show different sensitivity.

  19. Dependence of some transmission factors on field size and treatment depth in external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) using the theratron equinox 100 cobalt 60 machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odonkor, P.

    2015-07-01

    The use of beam modifiers in today’s radiotherapy is very important as it attenuates the beam and reduces the dose to the patient; therefore the need to know the amount of attenuation (in terms of a transmission factor) they provide during treatment. The purpose of this research work is to evaluate the variation (or dependence) of the transmission factors (TFs) of block tray and physical wedges (of different angles) as a function of treatment depth and field size using both iso-centric setups, SAD and SSD; and thus compare the results from the two setup techniques. Wedge and tray TF measurements were performed in a full scatter, large water phantom using a 0.04cc ionization chamber and an average photon energy of 1.25MV from a cobalt-60 unit at an SAD/SSD of 100cm at various depths and field sizes with gantry and collimator angles fixed at 0°. From the measurements carried out, the wedge TF of the 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60°, wedges were found to be 0.775±0.005, 0.650±0.010, 0.505±0.015, and 0.280±0.015 respectively; and the tray TF was found to be 0.960±0.003. Also, the results obtained showed that both the wedge TF and the tray TF has a strong linear dependence on treatment depth; however, the variation of the 15°, wedge TF and the tray TF with depth is less significant (less than 2%). Maximum percentage variation for the 15°, wedge for the SAD setup was 1.1% and 1.59% for the SSD setup; and that for the tray was 0.60% for the SAD setup and 0.12% for the SSD setup. Also, the variation of the 15°, 30°, and 45°, wedge TF with field size was less significant (less than 2%); and a weaker dependence was observed with field size as compared to the treatment depth. However, the 60°, wedge showed a significant variation (maximum of 2.22% and 2.88% for the SAD and SSD setups respectively) as an increase in field size was accompanied by an increase in its wedge TF. Also though the tray TF graphically showed a strong linear dependence on field size the

  20. Patient-specific quality assurance for the delivery of 60Co intensity modulated radiation therapy subject to a 0.35 T lateral magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. Harold; Rodriguez, Vivian L.; Green, Olga L.; Hu, Yanle; Kashani, Rojano; Wooten, H. Omar; Yang, Deshan; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This work describes a patient-specific dosimetry quality assurance (QA) program for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using ViewRay, the first commercial magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy device. Methods and materials The program consisted of the following components: 1) one-dimensional multipoint ionization chamber measurement using a customized 15 cm3 cubic phantom, 2) two-dimensional (2D) radiographic film measurement using a 30×30×20 cm3 phantom with multiple inserted ionization chambers, 3) quasi- three-dimensional (3D) diode array (ArcCHECK) measurement with a centrally inserted ionization chamber, 4) 2D fluence verification using machine delivery log files, and 5) 3D Monte-Carlo (MC) dose reconstruction with machine delivery files and phantom CT. Results The ionization chamber measurements agreed well with treatment planning system (TPS) computed doses in all phantom geometries where the mean difference (mean ± SD) was 0.0% ± 1.3% (n=102, range, −3.0 % to 2.9%). The film measurements also showed excellent agreement with the TPS computed 2D dose distributions where the mean passing rate using 3% relative/3 mm gamma criteria was 94.6% ± 3.4% (n=30, range, 87.4% to 100%). For ArcCHECK measurements, the mean passing rate using 3% relative/3 mm gamma criteria was 98.9% ± 1.1% (n=34, range, 95.8% to 100%). 2D fluence maps with a resolution of 1×1 mm2 showed 100% passing rates for all plan deliveries (n=34). The MC reconstructed doses to the phantom agreed well with planned 3D doses where the mean passing rate using 3% absolute/3 mm gamma criteria was 99.0% ± 1.0% (n=18, range, 97.0% to100%), demonstrating the feasibility of evaluating the QA results in the patient geometry. Conclusions We have developed a dosimetry program for ViewRay’s patient-specific IMRT QA. The methodology will be useful for other ViewRay users. The QA results presented here can assist the RT community to establish appropriate tolerance and

  1. The extent and application of patient diaries in Danish ICUs in 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Schwartz-Nielsen, Kathrine Hvid; Hansen, Glennie Marie

    2007-01-01

    in the Scandinavian countries and the UK as a means to improve cognitive recovery and prevent psychological trauma following critical illness. Descriptive design, using qualitative key informant telephone interviews (n= 19) was used as the source of data. A semi-structured interview guide was used and field notes......The aim of this study was to describe the extent and application of patient diaries in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) in 2006. Following critical illness, many patients experience disturbed and disconnected memories. Patient diaries in the ICU have been introduced locally by nurses...... from the interviews were mailed to the informants for verification and additional information. Nineteen out of 48 Danish ICUs use patient diaries. Patient diaries are mainly used for sedated, ventilated patients during critical illness. The purpose of diaries was mainly to assist memory due to post...

  2. Berlin in Motion: Interprofessional teaching and learning for students in the fields of medicine, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and nursing (INTER-M-E-P-P).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, Annerose; Heinze, Cornelia; Höppner, Heidi; Behrend, Ronja; Czakert, Judith; Hitzblech, Tanja; Kaufmann, Ina; Maaz, Asja; Räbiger, Jutta; Peters, Harm

    2016-01-01

    The Berlin project "Interprofessional teaching and learning in medicine, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and nursing" (INTER-M-E-P-P) pursues the goal of developing and testing interprofessional courses in an exemplary manner, and then implement these into their regular study programs. Under the direction of a steering committee of the participating institutions, professions and status groups, interprofessional courses were designed, carried out and evaluated. Specific to this project are the participation of students in the steering committee, and the accompanying of external supervision. The evaluation integrates the perspectives of all project participants, and combines quantitative and qualitative methods. INTER-M-E-P-P established cooperative structures between the participating universities and programs. Three courses were designed, taught and evaluated in an interprofessional manner. The various curricula, organizational patterns and locations of the study paths led to a great need for resources in regard to planning and implementation. This process can be made difficult by any stereotypes or preconceptions inherent to those doing the planning; however, under external supervision, the individual professional viewpoints can still be broadened and enriched. A sustainable implementation of interprofessional education into the curricula of health science study programs is currently complicated by barriers such as different geographical locations and differing university regulations concerning study and testing. Implementation will require long-term support at the university as well as at political levels.

  3. Effects on cerebral circulation of decimeter wave therapy and variable magnetic field in patients with hemiparesis of vascular and traumatic origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strelkova, N.I.; Gavrilkov, A.T.; Dyuzhilova, N.F.; Strel' tsova, Ye.N.

    1981-08-01

    Both the artherosclerotic process in the case of cerebrovascular accident and cerebral trauma lead to impairment of cerebral hemodynamics, blood and spinal fluid circulation, macroscopic and microscopic disturbances. Electromagnetic waves in the decimeter range (decimeter waves - DMW) and a variable magnetic field (VMF) were used to treat these processes. Treatment was delivered directly to the region of the cerebral lesion, on the basis of the penetrating capacity of DMW and VMF to a relatively great depth (7 to 9 and 4 to 7 cm, respectively). Results of these treatments are discussed.

  4. Intensity-modulated proton therapy for elective nodal irradiation and involved-field radiation in the definitive treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesarwala, Aparna H; Ko, Christine J; Ning, Holly; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Haglund, Karl E; O'Meara, William P; Simone, Charles B; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-05-01

    Photon involved-field (IF) radiation therapy (IFRT), the standard for locally advanced (LA) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), results in favorable outcomes without increased isolated nodal failures, perhaps from scattered dose to elective nodal stations. Because of the high conformality of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), proton IFRT could increase nodal failures. We investigated the feasibility of IMPT for elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in LA-NSCLC. IMPT IFRT plans were generated to the same total dose of 66.6-72 Gy received by 20 LA-NSCLC patients treated with photon IFRT. IMPT ENI plans were generated to 46 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) to elective nodal planning treatment volumes (PTV) plus 24 CGE to IF-PTVs. Proton IFRT and ENI improved the IF-PTV percentage of volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (D95) by 4% (P ENI. The mean esophagus dose decreased 16% with IFRT and 12% with ENI; heart V25 decreased 63% with both (all P ENI. Potential decreased toxicity indicates that IMPT could allow ENI while maintaining a favorable therapeutic ratio compared with photon IFRT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Therapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, J.; Hodgson, D.C.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignancies of the lymphoid system. The exact etiology for most lymphomas has not been determined, but both viral and bacterial infections have been shown to be important etiologic factors. The WHO classification of hematopoietic and lymphoid tumours classifies lymphomas into B-cell and T-cell neoplasms. B-cell lymphomas account for more than 85% of all lymphomas. The Ann Arbor staging classification has been adopted by the AJCC and UICC as a standard for classifying extent of anatomic disease. The two most common histologic disease entities are follicular lymphomas and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. The management of follicular lymphomas is used as a paradigm for the management of all indolent lymphomas. Radiation therapy is used for stage I and II disease, while alkylating agent chemotherapy, immunotherapy and radioimmunotherapy are most frequently used in stage III and IV disease that requires treatment. Most patients with follicular lymphoma enjoy prolonged survival, but at present there is no evidence that those with stage III and IV follicular lymphoma can be cured. Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas serve as a paradigm for treating aggressive lymphomas. Stage I and II diffuse large cell lymphomas are generally treated with combined modality therapy with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy followed by involved field radiation therapy, while those with stage III and IV disease are treated with chemotherapy alone. Patients who fail initial management are treated with further chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue has been shown to be particularly effective as salvage treatment for diffuse large cell lymphomas. The management of a heterogeneous group of primary extranodal lymphomas in general follows the above treatment principles, with additional treatment being required for those with a high risk of CNS failures, or involvement of contralateral paired organs. The management of MALT lymphomas

  6. Evolución de la terapia ocupacional en el campo de la oncología = Occupational therapy evolution in oncology field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarrete Salas, E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:El objetivo de lasiguiente revisión bibliográfica fue conocer la trayectoria de la Terapia Ocupacional (T.O. en el área oncológica durante las últimas 4 décadas. Para ello se realizó una búsqueda en las bases de datos MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINALH y AMED, con los descriptores Terapia Ocupacional, oncología y cáncer, tanto en el título como en el abstract; se excluyeron los artículos que no estuviesen en idioma inglés o español.Los resultados arrojaron un total de 68 publicaciones de T.O. y cáncer, con una curva sostenida de crecimiento en el número de trabajos publicados. En cuanto a tipo de cáncer predominan las publicaciones que aluden a cáncer en general, aunque destaca el interés por estudiar pacientes con cáncer mamario. La metodología predominante es descriptiva aunque en las últimas 2 décadas los trabajos publicados con metodología cualitativa alcanzaron un 30% del total. Destaca el foco puesto en los pacientes (86% de las publicaciones, aunque también hay trabajos referidos al equipo de salud oncológica (14%. Se comprueba además que la gran mayoría de las publicaciones corresponde a intervenciones de T.O. (80%. En conclusión, pese a que el número total de publicaciones de T.O. en oncología es reducido, nuestra revisión bibliográfica permite afirmar que existe un creciente y sostenido interés por explorar este tipo de patologías e integrar activamente los equipos de salud oncológica Abstract:The aim of following bibliographical review was to know which path of the Occupational Therapy (O.T. has been in the oncology area during the last 4 decades. A research was carried out in the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINALH and AMED, with key words Occupational Therapy, oncology and cancer, as much in the title as in the abstract; only articles in English or Spanishwere included. Results threw a total of 68 publications of O.T. and cancer, with a sustained curve of growth in the number of published papers

  7. MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy in low-field (0.23-T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Ojala, Risto O.; Klemola, Rauli; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Vaara, Teuvo J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy. Sixty-seven nerve root infiltrations under MRI guidance were done for 61 patients suffering from lumbosacral radicular pain. Informed consent was acquired from all patients. A 0.23-T open-MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Philips Medical Systems, MR Technologies, Finland) was used. A surface coil was used in all cases. Nerve root infiltration was performed with MRI-compatible 20-G needle (Chiba type MReye, Cook, Bloomington, Ind.; or Manan type, MD Tech, Florida). The evaluation of clinical outcome was achieved with 6 months of clinical follow-up and questionnaire. The effect of nerve root infiltration to the radicular pain was graded: 1=good to excellent, i.e., no pain or not disturbing pain allowing normal physical activity at 3 months from the procedure; 2=temporary, i.e., temporary relief of pain; 3=no relief of pain; and 4=worsening of pain. As an adjunct to MRI-guided positioning of the needle the correct needle localization by the nerve root was confirmed with saline injection to nerve root channel and single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) imaging. The MRI guidance allowed adequate needle positioning in all but 1 case (98.5%). This failure was caused by degeneration-induced changes in anatomy. Of patients, 51.5% had good to excellent effect with regard to radicular pain from the procedure, 22.7% had temporary relief, 21.2% had no effect, and in 4.5% the pain worsened. Our results show that MRI guidance is accurate and safe in performing nerve root infiltration at lumbosacral area. The results of radicular pain relief from nerve root infiltration are comparable to CT or fluoroscopy studies on the subject. (orig.)

  8. [Autonomy: to what extent is the concept relevant in psychiatry?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, F A

    2012-01-01

    Autonomy is an important concept in psychiatry, but because it is a somewhat abstract and ambiguous notion, it is not applicable in its entirety in a psychiatric context. This becomes obvious in situations where patients are receiving long term care and treatment. To modify the concept of autonomy in such a way that it acquires an extra dimension that renders it applicable to daily psychiatric practice. The literature was reviewed in order to find articles that reveal the tensions that arise between autonomy and dependence in psychiatry and that reflect the human characteristics that are concealed behind the modern concepts of autonomy, freedom and respect for autonomy. Concepts such as person, identity, acknowledgement, dialogical ethics and life histories are used as an addition to the concepts of autonomy of Kant and Mill. A phenomenological and a context sensitive conception of autonomy is needed within the perspective of dialogical ethics. A dialogical perspective requires from psychiatric professionals a susceptibility for what the patient as a human being really has to say. On the basis of a dialogue where there is space and attention for life histories, backgrounds and the potentials of patients, a new perspective can be developed that is shared by the persons involved. In psychiatry, statements about real autonomy and genuine respect for autonomy are only truly meaningful within the context of doctors, nurses and patients. A hermeneutic approach to patients which involves dialogue creates new opportunities in the field of staff-patient relations.

  9. Feminist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  10. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  11. Assessment of trends in inundation extent in the Barotse Floodplain, upper Zambezi River Basin: A remote sensing-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Zimba

    2018-02-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: The results revealed that there is observable inter-annual variability in inundation extent in the Barotse Floodplain with prominent differences demonstrated in both the flood ascending/peak and receding period. For the period 2003–2013 the results indicated a rising trend in inundation extent with a Mann–Kendall Z statistic of 1.71 and increase in magnitude of 33.1 km2 at significance level alpha of 0.05. Strong correlations between inundation extent and water level and between inundation extent and discharge with correlation coefficients of determination of 0.86 and 0.89 respectively were observed. For the period 2000–2011 water level time series showed a rising trend with the Mann–Kendall Z statistic of 2.97 and increase in magnitude of 0.1 m at significance level alpha of 0.05. Overall, during the period 1952–2004 discharge in the floodplain showed a declining trend with Mann–Kendall Z statistics of −2.88 and −3.38 at the inlet and outlet of the floodplain respectively. By correlation inference, the overall inundation extent trend in the floodplain was in a downward movement. Rainfall and discharge variability, high evapotranspiration and the changes in the land cover-use in the catchment of the floodplain are largely the factors affecting the observed variability and trends in inundation extent in the floodplain. The presented remote sensing based approach significantly reduces the need for the expensive and time limiting traditional physical field based wetland inundation mapping methods that form a limitation for achieving progress in wetland monitoring especially in open and sparsely gauged floodplains such as the Barotse.

  12. Patient-specific quality assurance for the delivery of (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy subject to a 0.35-T lateral magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H Harold; Rodriguez, Vivian L; Green, Olga L; Hu, Yanle; Kashani, Rojano; Wooten, H Omar; Yang, Deshan; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    This work describes a patient-specific dosimetry quality assurance (QA) program for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using ViewRay, the first commercial magnetic resonance imaging-guided RT device. The program consisted of: (1) a 1-dimensional multipoint ionization chamber measurement using a customized 15-cm(3) cube-shaped phantom; (2) 2-dimensional (2D) radiographic film measurement using a 30- × 30- × 20-cm(3) phantom with multiple inserted ionization chambers; (3) quasi-3D diode array (ArcCHECK) measurement with a centrally inserted ionization chamber; (4) 2D fluence verification using machine delivery log files; and (5) 3D Monte Carlo (MC) dose reconstruction with machine delivery files and phantom CT. Ionization chamber measurements agreed well with treatment planning system (TPS)-computed doses in all phantom geometries where the mean ± SD difference was 0.0% ± 1.3% (n=102; range, -3.0%-2.9%). Film measurements also showed excellent agreement with the TPS-computed 2D dose distributions where the mean passing rate using 3% relative/3 mm gamma criteria was 94.6% ± 3.4% (n=30; range, 87.4%-100%). For ArcCHECK measurements, the mean ± SD passing rate using 3% relative/3 mm gamma criteria was 98.9% ± 1.1% (n=34; range, 95.8%-100%). 2D fluence maps with a resolution of 1 × 1 mm(2) showed 100% passing rates for all plan deliveries (n=34). The MC reconstructed doses to the phantom agreed well with planned 3D doses where the mean passing rate using 3% absolute/3 mm gamma criteria was 99.0% ± 1.0% (n=18; range, 97.0%-100%), demonstrating the feasibility of evaluating the QA results in the patient geometry. We developed a dosimetry program for ViewRay's patient-specific IMRT QA. The methodology will be useful for other ViewRay users. The QA results presented here can assist the RT community to establish appropriate tolerance and action limits for ViewRay's IMRT QA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for the Delivery of 60Co Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Subject to a 0.35-T Lateral Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H. Harold; Rodriguez, Vivian L.; Green, Olga L.; Hu, Yanle; Kashani, Rojano; Wooten, H. Omar; Yang, Deshan; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This work describes a patient-specific dosimetry quality assurance (QA) program for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using ViewRay, the first commercial magnetic resonance imaging-guided RT device. Methods and Materials: The program consisted of: (1) a 1-dimensional multipoint ionization chamber measurement using a customized 15-cm 3 cube-shaped phantom; (2) 2-dimensional (2D) radiographic film measurement using a 30- × 30- × 20-cm 3 phantom with multiple inserted ionization chambers; (3) quasi-3D diode array (ArcCHECK) measurement with a centrally inserted ionization chamber; (4) 2D fluence verification using machine delivery log files; and (5) 3D Monte Carlo (MC) dose reconstruction with machine delivery files and phantom CT. Results: Ionization chamber measurements agreed well with treatment planning system (TPS)-computed doses in all phantom geometries where the mean ± SD difference was 0.0% ± 1.3% (n=102; range, −3.0%-2.9%). Film measurements also showed excellent agreement with the TPS-computed 2D dose distributions where the mean passing rate using 3% relative/3 mm gamma criteria was 94.6% ± 3.4% (n=30; range, 87.4%-100%). For ArcCHECK measurements, the mean ± SD passing rate using 3% relative/3 mm gamma criteria was 98.9% ± 1.1% (n=34; range, 95.8%-100%). 2D fluence maps with a resolution of 1 × 1 mm 2 showed 100% passing rates for all plan deliveries (n=34). The MC reconstructed doses to the phantom agreed well with planned 3D doses where the mean passing rate using 3% absolute/3 mm gamma criteria was 99.0% ± 1.0% (n=18; range, 97.0%-100%), demonstrating the feasibility of evaluating the QA results in the patient geometry. Conclusions: We developed a dosimetry program for ViewRay's patient-specific IMRT QA. The methodology will be useful for other ViewRay users. The QA results presented here can assist the RT community to establish appropriate tolerance and action limits for ViewRay's IMRT

  14. Carbon Ion Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  15. In vivo preclinical low field MRI monitoring of tumor growth following a suicide gene therapy in an ortho-topic mice model of human glioblastoma;Controle par IRM bas champ in vivo de l'efficacite d'une therapie genique par gene suicide dans un modele murin de glioblastome orthotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, E.; Goetz, Ch.; Aubertin, G.; Constantinesco, A.; Choquet, Ph. [Service de biophysique et medecine nucleaire, hopital de Hautepierre, CHRU de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Institut de mecanique des fluides et des solides, CNRS, universite de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Kintz, J.; Accart, N.; Grellier, B.; Erbs, Ph.; Rooke, R. [Transgene SA, parc d' innovation, 67 - Illkirch Graffenstaden (France)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose The aim of this study was to monitor in vivo with low field MRI growth of a murine ortho-topic glioma model following a suicide gene therapy. Methods The gene therapy consisted in the stereotactic injection in the mice brain of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (M.V.A.) vector encoding for a suicide gene (FCU1) that transforms a non toxic pro-drug 5-fluoro-cytosine (5-F.C.) to its highly cytotoxic derivatives 5-fluorouracil (5-F.U.) and 5-fluoro-uridine-5 monophosphate (5-F.U.M.P.). Using a warmed-up imaging cell, sequential 3D T1 and T2 0.1T MRI brain examinations were performed on 16 Swiss female nu/nu mice bearing ortho-topic human glioblastoma (U 87-MG cells). The 6-week in vivo MRI follow-up consisted in a weekly measurement of the intracerebral tumor volume leading to a total of 65 examinations. Mice were divided in four groups: sham group (n = 4), sham group treated with 5-F.C. only (n = 4), sham group with injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector only (n = 4), therapy group administered with M.V.A.-FCU1 vector and 5-F.C. (n = 4). Measurements of tumor volumes were obtained after manual segmentation of T1- and T2-weighted images. Results Intra-observer and inter-observer tumor volume measurements show no significant differences. No differences were found between T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups. A significant statistical difference (p < 0.05) in T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups and the animals treated with the intratumoral injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector in combination with 2 weeks per os 5-F.C. administration was demonstrated. Conclusion Preclinical low field MRI was able to monitor efficacy of suicide gene therapy in delaying the tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model of ortho-topic glioblastoma. (authors)

  16. Neutron-photon mixed field dosimetry by TLD-700 glow curve analysis and its implementation in dose monitoring for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggio, E. F.; Longhino, J. M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Departamento de Fisica de Reactores y Radiaciones / CNEA, Av. E. Bustillo Km 9.5, R8402AGP San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Andres, P. A., E-mail: efboggio@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Division Proteccion Radiologica / CNEA, Av. E. Bustillo Km 9.5, R8402AGP San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    BNCT is a cancerous cells selective, non-conventional radiotherapy modality to treat malignant tumors such as glioblastoma, melanoma and recurrent head and neck cancer. It consists of a two-step procedure: first, the patient is injected with a tumor localizing drug containing a non-radioactive isotope (Boron-10) with high slow neutron capture cross-section. In a second step, the patient is irradiated with neutrons, which are absorbed by the Boron-10 agent with the subsequently nuclear reaction B- 10(n,a)Li-7, thereby resulting in dose at cellular level due to the high-Let particles. The neutron fields suitable for BNCT are characterized by high neutron fluxes and low gamma dose. Determination of each component is not an easy task, especially when the volume of measurement is quite small or inaccessible for a miniature ionization chamber, for example. A method of measuring the photon and slow neutron dose(mainly by N-14 and B-10) from the glow curve (GC) analysis of a single {sup 7}LiF thermoluminescence detector is evaluated. This method was suggested by the group headed by Dr. Grazia Gambarini. The dosemeters used were TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF:Mg,Ti with 95.6% {sup 6}Li) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF:Mg,Ti with 99.9% {sup 7}LiF) from Harshaw. Photon dose measurement using the GC analysis method with TLD-700 in mixed fields requires the relation of the two main peaks of a TLD-600 GC shape obtained from an exposition to the same neutron field, and a photon calibrated GC with TLD-700. The requirements for slow neutron dose measurements are similar. In order to properly apply the GC analysis method at the Ra-6 Research Reactor BNCT facility, measurements were carried out in a standard water phantom, fully characterized on the BNCT beam by conventional techniques (activation detectors and paired ionization chambers technique). Next, the method was implemented in whole body dose monitoring of a patient undergoing a BNCT treatment, using a Bo MAb (Bottle Manikin Absorption) phantom

  17. Computed tomography in radiation therapy planning: Thoracic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydel, H.G.; Zingas, A.; Haghbin, M.; Mondalek, P.; Smereka, R.

    1983-01-01

    With the explosive spread of computed tomographic (CT) scanning throughout the United States, one of the main applications has been in patients who are treated for cancer by surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. For the radiation oncologist, the desire to provide local tumor control and avoid geographic misses to achieve an expected prolongation of survival has led to the use of large radiation fields in the treatment of intrathoracic cancer, including bronchogenic carcinoma, cancer of the esophagus, and other malignant tumors. The optimal radiation therapy plan is a balance between local tumor control and the necessity to preserve normal structures by the use of directed and limited fields for bulk disease. CT scanning has been employed to accurately demonstrate the extent of tumor as well as to determine the isodose distribution of radiation, including the spatial distribution of radiation portals in single planar and three-dimensional aspects as well as consideration of tissue inhomogeneities. The accurate planning of the distribution of therapeutic irradiation includes both the tumor-bearing target volume and the critical normal tissues. This chapter provides information regarding these aspects of the application of CT scanning to radiation therapy for bronchogenic carcinoma and carcinoma of the esophagus

  18. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  19. An essay on the extent and significance of the Greek athletic culture in the classical period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Heine

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the extent of the Greek athletic culture in the classical period. It is demonstrated that the athletic culture had a surprising extent, and the article goes on the discuss the historical significance of this fact.......This article discusses the extent of the Greek athletic culture in the classical period. It is demonstrated that the athletic culture had a surprising extent, and the article goes on the discuss the historical significance of this fact....

  20. Tumor development in field-cancerized tissue is inhibited by a double application of Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without exceeding radio-tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Molinari, Ana J.; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Trivillin, Veronica A.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Aromando, Romina F.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: BNCT is based on the capture reaction between boron, selectively targeted to tumor tissue, and thermal neutrons which gives rise to lethal, short-range high linear energy transfer particles that selectively damage tumor tissue, sparing normal tissue. We previously evidenced a remarkable therapeutic success of a 'single' application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), GB-1(Na 2 10 B 10 H 10 ) or (GB-10+BPA) to treat hamster cheek pouch tumors with no normal tissue radiotoxicity. Based on these results, we developed a model of precancerous tissue in the hamster cheek pouch for long-term studies. Employing this model we evaluated the long-term potential inhibitory effect on the development of second primary tumors from precancerous tissue and eventual radiotoxicity of a single application of BNCT mediated by BPA, GB-10 or (GB-10+BPA), in the RA-6. The clinical rationale of this study was to search for a BNCT protocol that is therapeutic for tumor, not radio-toxic for the normal tissue that lies in the neutron beam path, and exerts the desired inhibitory effect on the development of second primary tumors, without exceeding the radio-tolerance of precancerous tissue, the dose limiting tissue in this case. Second primary tumors that arise in precancerous tissue (also called locoregional recurrences) are a frequent cause of therapeutic failure in head and neck tumors. Aim: Evaluate the radiotoxicity and inhibitory effect of a 'double' application of the same BNCT protocols that were proved therapeutically successful for tumor and precancerous tissue, with a long term follow up (8 months). A 'double' application of BNCT is a potentially useful strategy for the treatment of tumors, in particular the larger ones, but the cost in terms of side-effects in dose-limiting tissues might preclude its application and requires cautious evaluation. Materials and methods: We performed a double application of 1) BPA-BNCT; 2) (GB

  1. Automated method for measuring the extent of selective logging damage with airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendy, L.; Hagen, S. C.; Sullivan, F. B.; Pearson, T. R. H.; Walker, S. M.; Ellis, P.; Kustiyo; Sambodo, Ari Katmoko; Roswintiarti, O.; Hanson, M. A.; Klassen, A. W.; Palace, M. W.; Braswell, B. H.; Delgado, G. M.

    2018-05-01

    Selective logging has an impact on the global carbon cycle, as well as on the forest micro-climate, and longer-term changes in erosion, soil and nutrient cycling, and fire susceptibility. Our ability to quantify these impacts is dependent on methods and tools that accurately identify the extent and features of logging activity. LiDAR-based measurements of these features offers significant promise. Here, we present a set of algorithms for automated detection and mapping of critical features associated with logging - roads/decks, skid trails, and gaps - using commercial airborne LiDAR data as input. The automated algorithm was applied to commercial LiDAR data collected over two logging concessions in Kalimantan, Indonesia in 2014. The algorithm results were compared to measurements of the logging features collected in the field soon after logging was complete. The automated algorithm-mapped road/deck and skid trail features match closely with features measured in the field, with agreement levels ranging from 69% to 99% when adjusting for GPS location error. The algorithm performed most poorly with gaps, which, by their nature, are variable due to the unpredictable impact of tree fall versus the linear and regular features directly created by mechanical means. Overall, the automated algorithm performs well and offers significant promise as a generalizable tool useful to efficiently and accurately capture the effects of selective logging, including the potential to distinguish reduced impact logging from conventional logging.

  2. Mapping the Extent of M82's outlfows with VIRUS-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indahl, Briana; Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; McLinden, Emily

    2017-06-01

    Starburst-driven outflows (SBDOs) and other feedback processes play a critical role in the evolution of galaxies through the regulation and disruption of star formation. However, our ability to observe and quantify feedback from SBDOs directly has been limited by the inability to obtain the spectroscopy needed for physical diagnostics over the large areas of local SBDOs. We present integral field spectroscopy taken with the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph (VIRUS-P) on the 2.7 meter Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory mapping the full extent of M82’s northern outflow out to ~12kpc covering ~139 square arcminutes. We measured line ratios ([OIII]/Hβ, [OI]/Hα, [NII]/Hα), [SII]/Hα) for each spaxel in our fields. Using Ionization Diagnostic Diagrams (IDDs) we spatially map shock dominated regions which we show trace the biconical structure of the outflow. M82 is a local galaxy (z~0.000677) and the classical example of a starburst galaxy with vigorous outflows. As a result it has been comprehensively studied for nearly 50 years. However, we present the most sensitive and extensive map of the warm ionized gas to date from the disk to the Hα cap at ~12kpc.

  3. Association between the extent of urinary albumin excretion and glycaemic variability indices measured by continuous glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S-M; Kim, T-H; Oh, S; Baek, J; Joung, J Y; Park, S-M; Cho, Y Y; Sohn, S Y; Hur, K Y; Lee, M-S; Lee, M-K; Kim, J H

    2015-02-01

    The contribution of glycaemic variability to the microvascular complication of diabetes has not been established. We examined whether there is an independent association between indices of glycaemic variability in continuous glucose monitoring and extent of albuminuria. A total of 173 patients with Type 2 diabetes (without insulin therapy, n = 96; with insulin therapy, n = 77) who had unexplained large fluctuations in blood glucose values underwent three-day continuous glucose monitoring. We used a multinomial logistic regression model to determine whether the indices of glycaemic variability independently affected the odds of having a spot urine albumin/creatinine ratio of 30-299 mg/g and ≥ 300 mg/g. Higher standard deviation (P = 0.002), mean of daily differences (P = 0.023) and mean amplitude of glycaemic excursion (P = 0.043) significantly increased the odds of having a urine albumin/creatinine ratio of ≥ 300 mg/g. In multivariable analysis, only higher standard deviation, but not mean amplitude of glycaemic excursion and mean of daily differences, independently increased the odds of having a urine albumin/creatinine ratio of ≥ 300 mg/g (P = 0.025). Coefficient of variation (sd/mean) was not associated with the odds of having a urine albumin/creatinine ratio of 30-299 or ≥ 300 mg/g. The independent association between standard deviation and the extent of albuminuria was lost when the measures were normalized by mean glucose level. At least in terms of relative measures of glycaemic variability, we failed to demonstrate an independent association between glycaemic variability and albuminuria extent in patients with inadequately controlled Type 2 diabetes. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  4. Sci-Sat AM: Radiation Dosimetry and Practical Therapy Solutions - 01: Optimization of an organic field effect transistor for radiation dosimetry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syme, Alasdair [Dept of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, QEII Health Sciences Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To use Monte Carlo simulations to optimize the design of an organic field effect transistor (OFET) to maximize water-equivalence across the diagnostic and therapeutic photon energy ranges. Methods: DOSXYZnrc was used to simulate transport of mono-energetic photon beams through OFETs. Dose was scored in the dielectric region of devices and used for evaluating the response of the device relative to water. Two designs were considered: 1. a bottom-gate device on a substrate of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) with an aluminum gate, a dielectric layer of either PMMA or CYTOP (a fluorocarbon) and an organic semiconductor (pentacene). 2. a symmetric bilayer design was employed in which two polymer layers (PET and CYTOP) were deposited both below the gate and above the semiconductor to improve water-equivalence and reduce directional dependence. The relative thickness of the layers was optimized to maximize water-equivalence. Results: Without the bilayer, water-equivalence was diminished relative to OFETs with the symmetric bilayer at low photon energies (below 80 keV). The bilayer’s composition was designed to have one layer with an effective atomic number larger than that of water and the other with an effective atomic number lower than that of water. For the particular materials used in this study, a PET layer 0.1mm thick coupled with a CYTOP layer of 900 nm provided a device with a water-equivalence within 3% between 20 keV and 5 MeV. Conclusions: organic electronic devices hold tremendous potential as water-equivalent dosimeters that could be used in a wide range of applications without recalibration.

  5. Life-stage-specific physiology defines invasion extent of a riverine fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David J.; Beauchamp, David A.; Olden, Julian D.

    2015-01-01

    Many ecologists have called for mechanism-based investigations to identify the underlying controls on species distributions. Understanding these controls can be especially useful to construct robust predictions of how a species range may change in response to climate change or the extent to which a non-native species may spread in novel environments.Here, we link spatially intensive observations with mechanistic models to illustrate how physiology determines the upstream extent of the aquatic ectotherm smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in two headwater rivers.Our results demonstrate that as temperatures become increasingly cold across a downstream to upstream gradient, food consumption in age 0 bass becomes increasingly constrained, and as a result, these fish become growth limited. Sufficient first summer growth of age 0 bass is essential for overwinter survival because young bass must persist from energy reserves accumulated during the summer, and those reserves are determined by body size.Our field data reveal the upstream extent of adult bass reproduction corresponds to a point in the downstream/upstream gradient where cold temperatures impair growth opportunities in young bass. This pattern was repeated in both study streams and explained why bass positioned nests twice as far upstream in the warm compared to the cold stream in the same basin. Placement of spawning nests by adult bass is likely subject to strong evolutionary selection in temperate systems: if bass spawn too far upstream, their young are unlikely to grow large enough to survive the winter. Consumption and growth in older bass (age 3–4) was far less sensitive to temperature. Based on these data, we suggest that temperature-sensitive age 0 bass constrain the upstream distribution limits of bass within temperate streams.In this study, we investigated how temperature-dependent physiology changed through the life history of a species and, in doing so, identified a climate-sensitive life

  6. SU-F-T-195: Systematic Constraining of Contralateral Parotid Gland Led to Improved Dosimetric Outcomes for Multi-Field Optimization with Scanning Beam Proton Therapy: Promising Results From a Pilot Study in Patients with Base of Tongue Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R; Liu, A; Poenisch, F; Palmer, M; Gillin, M; Zhu, X [Department of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Crowford, C; Georges, R; Amin, M [Department of Medical Dosimetry, MD Anderson Cancer Ctr, Houston, TX (United States); Sio, T; Gunn, B; Frank, S [Radiation Oncology Department MD Anderson Cancer Ctr, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for head and neck cancer is time-consuming due to the large number of organs-at-risk (OAR) to be considered. As there are many competing objectives and also wide range of acceptable OAR constraints, the final approved plan may not be most optimal for the given structures. We evaluated the dose reduction to the contralateral parotid by implementing standardized constraints during optimization for scanning beam proton therapy planning. Methods: Twenty-four (24) consecutive patients previously treated for base of tongue carcinoma were retrospectively selected. The doses were 70Gy, 63Gy and 57Gy (SIB in 33 fractions) for high-, intermediate-, and standard-risk clinical target volumes (CTV), respectively; the treatment included bilateral neck. Scanning beams using MFO with standardized bilateral anterior oblique and PA fields were applied. New plans where then developed and optimized by employing additional contralateral parotid constraints at multiple defined dose levels. Using a step-wise iterative process, the volume-based constraints at each level were then further reduced until known target coverages were compromised. The newly developed plans were then compared to the original clinically approved plans using paired student t-testing. Results: All 24 newly optimized treatment plans maintained initial plan quality as compared to the approved plans, and the 98% prescription dose coverage to the CTV’s were not compromised. Representative DVH comparison is shown in FIGURE 1. The contralateral parotid doses were reduced at all levels of interest when systematic constraints were applied to V10, V20, V30 and V40Gy (All P<0.0001; TABLE 1). Overall, the mean contralateral parotid doses were reduced by 2.26 Gy on average, a ∼13% relative improvement. Conclusion: Applying systematic and volume-based contralateral parotid constraints for IMPT planning significantly reduced the dose at all dosimetric

  7. An exploration of the extent of inclusion of spirituality and spiritual care concepts in core nursing textbooks.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Timmins, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Holistic care that encompasses a spiritual dimension is an expectation in modern healthcare (Rothman, 2009). Increasing attention is being paid to the role of nurses in providing spiritual care to patients. However nurses lack specific skills and expertise in this area (Lundmark, 2006; Timmins, 2010; RCN, 2011), and the extent to which their undergraduate education prepares them for this role is unclear. There is often an absence of clear direction about what to teach undergraduate nursing students. The extent to which core textbooks direct student studies in this area is not known. There is some evidence that some of these fundamental core textbooks provide insufficient direction (Pesut, 2008), thus gaps in knowledge and care provision in this field could be exacerbated.

  8. The use of remote sensing to estimate changes of seagrass extent and biomass in Cockburn Sound, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyan, S.

    2018-05-01

    The extent of seagrasses in Cockburn Sound was examined using Nearmap images of year 2010, 2012, 2014, and 2016 to be compared to the last assessment in 1999. It was identified that the seagrass coverage has increased by 231 Ha since 1999, with most of the growth occurred in the southern part. While the water quality in Cockburn Sound has improved, it is believed that there are other pressures affecting the slow growth rate of the seagrasses. Seagrass biomass was also evaluated using Landsat images of year 1994, 1999, 2010, 2012, 2014, and 2016 in addition to a field survey data of leaf biomass in 2016. Despite its increasing extent, seagrass in Cockburn Sound indicated a declining biomass since 1994, which is believed due to the changing nutrient content.

  9. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  10. Mapping Daily and Maximum Flood Extents at 90-m Resolution During Hurricanes Harvey and Irma Using Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galantowicz, J. F.; Picton, J.; Root, B.

    2017-12-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing can provided a distinct perspective on flood events by virtue of wide sensor fields of view, frequent observations from multiple satellites, and sensitivity through clouds and vegetation. During Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, we used AMSR2 (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2, JAXA) data to map flood extents starting from the first post-storm rain-free sensor passes. Our standard flood mapping algorithm (FloodScan) derives flooded fraction from 22-km microwave data (AMSR2 or NASA's GMI) in near real time and downscales it to 90-m resolution using a database built from topography, hydrology, and Global Surface Water Explorer data and normalized to microwave data footprint shapes. During Harvey and Irma we tested experimental versions of the algorithm designed to map the maximum post-storm flood extent rapidly and made a variety of map products available immediately for use in storm monitoring and response. The maps have several unique features including spanning the entire storm-affected area and providing multiple post-storm updates as flood water shifted and receded. From the daily maps we derived secondary products such as flood duration, maximum flood extent (Figure 1), and flood depth. In this presentation, we describe flood extent evolution, maximum extent, and local details as detected by the FloodScan algorithm in the wake of Harvey and Irma. We compare FloodScan results to other available flood mapping resources, note observed shortcomings, and describe improvements made in response. We also discuss how best-estimate maps could be updated in near real time by merging FloodScan products and data from other remote sensing systems and hydrological models.

  11. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  12. Addiction between therapy and criminalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birklbauer, Alois; Schmidthuber, Kathrin

    2014-12-01

    The present paper delves into the question of whether and to what extent it is appropriate to leave addiction problems between the conflicting priorities of therapy and criminalization. After outlining the issue the criminal addictive behaviour including crimes associated with drug misuse and with obtaining drugs is described. Subsequently it is discussed if and how you could make allowances for addiction-related legal insanity in the criminal law sector. Following a few remarks on the principle of "voluntary therapy instead of penal sanction" as a way to alleviate the strict law on narcotic drugs misuse a summary and an outlook with criminal-political demands complete the issue.

  13. Scientific perspectives on music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillecke, Thomas; Nickel, Anne; Bolay, Hans Volker

    2005-12-01

    What needs to be done on the long road to evidence-based music therapy? First of all, an adequate research strategy is required. For this purpose the general methodology for therapy research should be adopted. Additionally, music therapy needs a variety of methods of allied fields to contribute scientific findings, including mathematics, natural sciences, behavioral and social sciences, as well as the arts. Pluralism seems necessary as well as inevitable. At least two major research problems can be identified, however, that make the path stony: the problem of specificity and the problem of eclecticism. Neuroscientific research in music is giving rise to new ideas, perspectives, and methods; they seem to be promising prospects for a possible contribution to a theoretical and empirical scientific foundation for music therapy. Despite the huge heterogeneity of theoretical approaches in music therapy, an integrative model of working ingredients in music therapy is useful as a starting point for empirical studies in order to question what specifically works in music therapy. For this purpose, a heuristic model, consisting of five music therapy working factors (attention modulation, emotion modulation, cognition modulation, behavior modulation, and communication modulation) has been developed by the Center for Music Therapy Research (Viktor Dulger Institute) in Heidelberg. Evidence shows the effectiveness of music therapy for treating certain diseases, but the question of what it is in music therapy that works remains largely unanswered. The authors conclude with some questions to neuroscientists, which we hope may help elucidate relevant aspects of a possible link between the two disciplines.

  14. Dance/Movement Therapy. A Healing Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Fran J.

    This book examines the field of dance therapy from its inception in the 1940's to the present. A detailed analysis is conducted of the theory and practice of the major pioneers. The book covers biographical reports and the influence of many dance therapy leaders. Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) is discussed as well as dance therapy in specific…

  15. Neutron irradiation therapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Conventional neutron irradiation therapy machines, based on the use of cyclotrons for producing neutron beams, use a superconducting magnet for the cyclotron's magnetic field. This necessitates complex liquid He equipment and presents problems in general hospital use. If conventional magnets are used, the weight of the magnet poles considerably complicates the design of the rotating gantry. Such a therapy machine, gantry and target facilities are described in detail. The use of protons and deuterons to produce the neutron beams is compared and contrasted. (U.K.)

  16. Advances in particle therapy a multidisciplinary approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bernier, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Hadron therapy is a groundbreaking new method of treating cancer. Boasting greater precision than other therapies, this therapy is now utilised in many clinical settings and the field is growing. More than 50 medical facilities currently perform (or are planned to perform) this treatment, with this number set to double by 2020. This new text covers the most recent advances in hadron therapy, exploring the physics, technology, biology, diagnosis, clinical applications, and economics behind the therapy. Providing essential and up-to-date information on recent developments in the field, this book will be of interest to current and aspiring specialists from a wide range of backgrounds.

  17. The Indiana University proton radiation therapy project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, C.; Derenchuk, V.; Cameron, J.; Fasano, M.; Gilmore, J.; Hashemian, R.; Hornback, N.; Low, D.A.; Morphis, J.; Peterson, C.; Rosselot, D.; Sandison, G.; Shen, R.N.; Shidnia, H.

    1993-01-01

    A fixed horizontal beam line at the Indiana University cyclotron facility (IUCF) has been equipped for proton radiation therapy treatment of head, neck, and brain tumors. The complete system will be commissioned and ready to treat patients early in 1993. IUCF can produce external proton beams from 45 to 200 MeV in energy, which corresponds to a maximum range in water of 26 cm. Beam currents over 100 nA are easily attained, allowing dose rates in excess of 200 cGy/min, even for large fields. Beam spreading systems have been tested which provide uniform fields up to 20 cm in diameter. Range modulation is accomplished with a rotating acrylic device, which provides uniform depth dose distributions from 3 to 18 cm in extent. Tests have been conducted on detectors which monitor the beam position and current, and the dose symmetry. This report discusses those devices, as well as the cyclotron characteristics, measured beam properties, safety interlocks, computerized dose delivery/monitoring system, and future plans. (orig.)

  18. Radiation therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dembo, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Several principles governing the cure of patients with ovarian cancer by radiotherapy were established during the last decade. The author reviews some of the studies at The Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH), which led to the establishment of the following principles: The entire peritoneal cavity should be encompassed by the treatment field, because once the disease has spread beyond the ovary, the entire peritoneal cavity is at risk for recurrent cancer. The moving-strip and open-field techniques are equally effective in tumor control. Late complications can be kept to a minimum (<5% bowel surgery, <1% radiation hepatitis, < 1% treatment mortality), but their frequency increases with increasing total radiation dosage, increasing fraction size, and possibly the extent of the previous surgical procedures (Dembo 1985a). Optimal selection of patients for radiotherapy compared with other forms of treatment is based on grouping of patients according to prognostic factors, including presenting stage of disease, amount and site of residual tumor, and histophatologic features. The potential exists for abdominopelvic radiation to be applied curatively as consolidation or as salvage therapy for patients whose disease has not been completely eradicated by chemotherapy;however, further study is needed to clarify the magnitude of this benefit, the situations in which radiotherapy is indicated, and factors that determine the toxicity of the combined-modality treatment

  19. High-Dose and Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage NK/T-Cell Lymphoma of Waldeyer's Ring: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Xi-Wen; Li, Ye-Xiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com; Fang, Hui; Jin, Jing; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Song, Yong-Wen; Ren, Hua; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric benefit, treatment outcome, and toxicity of high-dose and extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with early-stage NK/T-cell lymphoma of Waldeyer's ring (WR-NKTCL). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with early-stage WR-NKTCL who received extended-field IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy to the primary involved regions and positive cervical lymph nodes (planning target volume requiring radical irradiation [PTV{sub 50}]) and 40 Gy to the negative cervical nodes (PTV{sub 40}). Dosimetric parameters for the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Locoregional control (LRC), overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median mean doses to the PTV{sub 50} and PTV{sub 40} were 53.2 Gy and 43.0 Gy, respectively. Only 1.4% of the PTV{sub 50} and 0.9% of the PTV{sub 40} received less than 95% of the prescribed dose, indicating excellent target coverage. The average mean doses to the left and right parotid glands were 27.7 and 28.4 Gy, respectively. The 2-year OS, PFS, and LRC rates were 71.2%, 57.4%, and 87.8%. Most acute toxicities were grade 1 to 2, except for grade ≥3 dysphagia and mucositis. The most common late toxicity was grade 1-2 xerostomia, and no patient developed any ≥grade 3 late toxicities. A correlation between the mean dose to the parotid glands and the degree of late xerostomia was observed. Conclusions: IMRT achieves excellent target coverage and dose conformity, as well as favorable survival and locoregional control rates with acceptable toxicities in patients with WR-NKTCL.

  20. The Spatial Extent of Epiretinal Electrical Stimulation in the Healthy Mouse Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Hosseinazdeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Retinal prostheses use electrical stimulation to restore functional vision to patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa. A key detail is the spatial pattern of ganglion cells activated by stimulation. Therefore, we characterized the spatial extent of network-mediated electrical activation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in the epiretinal monopolar electrode configuration. Methods: Healthy mouse RGC activities were recorded with a micro-electrode array (MEA. The stimuli consisted of monophasic rectangular cathodic voltage pulses and cycling full-field light flashes. Results: Voltage tuning curves exhibited significant hysteresis, reflecting adaptation to electrical stimulation on the time scale of seconds. Responses decreased from 0 to 300 µm, and were also dependent on the strength of stimulation. Applying the Rayleigh criterion to the half-width at half-maximum of the electrical point spread function suggests a visual acuity limit of no better than 20/946. Threshold voltage showed only a modest increase across these distances. Conclusion: The existence of significant hysteresis requires that future investigations of electrical retinal stimulation control for such long-memory adaptation. The spread of electrical activation beyond 200 µm suggests that neighbouring electrodes in epiretinal implants based on indirect stimulation of RGCs may be indiscriminable at interelectrode spacings as large as 400 µm.

  1. Extent and persistence of secondary water quality impacts after enhanced reductive bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Robert C.; Jason M. Tillotson,; Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Kent, Douglas B.; Curtis, Gary P.

    2017-01-01

    Electron donor (ED) addition can be very effective in stimulating enhanced reductive bioremediation (ERB) of a wide variety of groundwater contaminants. However, ERB can result in Secondary Water Quality Impacts (SWQIs) including decreased levels of dissolved oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3- ), and sulfate (SO42- ), and elevated levels of dissolved manganese (Mn2+), dissolved iron (Fe2+), methane (CH4), sulfide (S2- ), organic carbon, and naturally occurring hazardous compounds (e.g., arsenic). Fortunately, this ‘plume’ of impacted groundwater is usually confined within the original contaminant plume and is unlikely to adversely impact potable water supplies. This report summarizes available information on processes controlling the production and natural attenuation of SWQI parameters and can be used as a guide in understanding the magnitude, areal extent, and duration of SWQIs in ERB treatment zones and the natural attenuation of SWQI parameters as the dissolved solutes migrate downgradient with ambient groundwater flow. This information was compiled from a wide variety of sources including a survey and statistical analysis of SWQIs from 47 ERB sites, geochemical model simulations, field studies at sites where organic-rich materials have entered the subsurface (e.g., wastewater, landfill leachate, and hydrocarbon plumes), and basic information on physical, chemical, and biological processes in the subsurface. This information is then integrated to provide a general conceptual model of the major processes controlling SWQI production and attenuation.

  2. Data-mining Based Detection of Glaciers: Quantifying the Extent of Alpine Valley Glaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Luo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The extent of glaciation in alpine valleys often gives clues to past climates, plate movement, mountain landforms, bedrock geology and more. However, without field investigation, the degree to which a valley was affected by a glacier has been difficult to assess. We developed a model that uses quantitative parameters derived from digital elevations model (DEM data to predict whether a glacier was likely present in an alpine valley. The model's inputs are mainly derived from the basin hypsometry, and a new parameter termed the Hypothetical Basin Equilibrium Elevation (HBEE, which is based on the equilibrium elevation altitude (ELA of a glacier. We used data mining techniques that comb through large data sets to find patterns for classification and prediction as the basis for the model. Four classifiers were utilized, and each was tested with two different training set/test data ratios of nearly 150 basins that were previously delineated as fully- or non-glaciated. The classifiers had a predictive accuracy of up to 90% with none falling below 72%. Two of the classifiers, classification tree and naïve-Bayes, have graphical outputs that visually describe the classification process, predictive results, and in the naïve-Bayes case, the relative effectiveness towards the model of each attribute. In all scenarios, the HBEE was found to be an accurate predictor for the model. The model can be applied to any area where glaciation may have occurred, but is particularly useful in areas where the valley is inaccessible for detailed field investigation.

  3. Coastline undulations on the West Coast of Denmark: Offshore extent, relation to breaker bars and transported sediment volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Knudsen, Søren B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with field measurements of undulations of the bottom bathymetry along an otherwise straight coast at the Danish West Coast. Two bathymetric datasets and two time series of wave measurements are used in order to determine the following properties: the offshore extent of shoreline...... with undulations on the depth contours between −5m and +2m relative to mean sea level. In the other data set, only undulations on the depth contours between −1m and +1m are well correlated with the shoreline undulations. The main difference in the wave climate between the two locations is the orientation...

  4. CLINICAL FIELD NOTE - ULTRASOUND THERAPY: GETTING IT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Incorporating this vital information has led to a turn around in the evidence of ultrasound research ... in clinical practice, there has not been enough research evidence to support its .... Parameters: 1W/cm , 50% duty cycle (pulsed), 15 minutes,. 2 with a 5cm ... New England Journal of Medicine 317: 141-145. Gam, A.N., F.

  5. Extended Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Boost for Lymph Node–Positive Cervical Cancer: Analysis of Regional Control and Recurrence Patterns in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A.; Kim, Hayeon; Choi, Serah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Sukumvanich, Paniti; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is commonly used for nodal staging in locally advanced cervical cancer; however the false negative rate for para-aortic disease are 20% to 25% in PET-positive pelvic nodal disease. Unless surgically staged, pelvis-only treatment may undertreat para-aortic disease. We have treated patients with PET-positive nodes with extended field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to address the para-aortic region prophylactically with concomitant boost to involved nodes. The purpose of this study was to assess regional control rates and recurrence patterns. Methods and Materials: Sixty-one patients with cervical cancer (stage IBI-IVA) diagnosed from 2003 to 2012 with PET-avid pelvic nodes treated with extended field IMRT (45 Gy in 25 fractions with concomitant boost to involved nodes to a median of 55 Gy in 25 fractions) with concurrent cisplatin and brachytherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The nodal location was pelvis-only in 41 patients (67%) and pelvis + para-aortic in 20 patients (33%). There were a total of 179 nodes, with a median number of positive nodes of 2 (range, 1-16 nodes) per patient and a median nodal size of 1.8 cm (range, 0.7-4.5 cm). Response was assessed by PET/CT at 12 to 16 weeks. Results: Complete clinical and imaging response at the first follow-up visit was seen in 77% of patients. At a mean follow-up time of 29 months (range, 3-116 months), 8 patients experienced recurrence. The sites of persistent/recurrent disease were as follows: cervix 10 (16.3%), regional nodes 3 (4.9%), and distant 14 (23%). The rate of para-aortic failure in patients with pelvic-only nodes was 2.5%. There were no significant differences in recurrence patterns by the number/location of nodes, largest node size, or maximum node standardized uptake value. The rate of late grade 3+ adverse events was 4%. Conclusions: Extended field IMRT was well tolerated and resulted in low regional recurrence

  6. Involved Node Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Aznar, Marianne C; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy...... to 36 Gy). Patients attended regular follow-up visits until 5 years after therapy. RESULTS: The 4-year freedom from disease progression was 96.4% (95% confidence interval: 92.4%-100.4%), median follow-up of 50 months (range: 4-71 months). Three relapses occurred: 2 within the previous radiation field......, and 1 in a previously uninvolved region. The 4-year overall survival was 94% (95% confidence interval: 88.8%-99.1%), median follow-up of 58 months (range: 4-91 months). Early radiation therapy toxicity was limited to grade 1 (23.4%) and grade 2 (13.8%). During follow-up, 8 patients died, none from HL, 7...

  7. Seminar: Music Therapy in Dementia Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2009-01-01

    This seminar presents music therapy in person centered dementia care. In the first part focus is on research and documentation. How can short term music therapy document changes in symptoms of depression? Is Dementia Care Mapping a valid assessment tool for documenting group music therapy......? In the next part focus is on clinical music therapy – in group work as well as in individual work – and how the music therapist works in the interdisciplinary field....

  8. To what extent is clinical and laboratory information used to perform medication reviews in the nursing home setting? the CLEAR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalvo, Carlota Mestres; Hurkens, Kim P. G. M.; de Wit, Hugo A. j M.; van Oijen, Brigit P. C.; Janknegt, Rob; Schols, Jos M. G. A.; Mulder, Wubbo J.; Verhey, Frans R.; Winkens, Bjorn; van der Kuy, Paul-Hugo M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate to what extent laboratory data, actual medication, medical history, and/or drug indication influence the quality of medication reviews for nursing home patients. Methods: Forty-six health care professionals from different fields were requested to

  9. Assessing the Influences of a Flood Diversion Project on Mitigating River Stage, Inundation Extent and Economic Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bo Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan usually suffers severe inundation disasters during typhoons and strong rainstorms, and therefore flood mitigation is considered an important issue. To assess the effect of the Yuansantze flood diversion tunnel (YFDT on flood mitigation at the upstream reaches of the Keelung River, a three-dimensional, unstructured grid, Finite-Volume, primitive equation Community Ocean Model (FVCOM was used. The model was validated with observed data for water levels and inundation extent during different typhoon events. The simulated results show a good agreement with field measurements of water level with three historical typhoon events but underestimated the measured inundation extent with Typhoon Nari. The validated model was then applied to assess the flood mitigation and economic loss with the YFDT. The results demonstrated that the river level decreases approximately 3 m with the YFDT and that the inundation extent decreases by more than 50% in the Ruifang District with YFDT. The YDFT aims to not only mitigate hazards but also reduce economic losses. The average annual expected benefit after construction of the YFDT is approximately 184 million NTD in the Ruifang District.

  10. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    interventions of media alone as well as through the intervention of media in conjunction with personal support within the groups. However, analyses of the inter-group comparisons offer no statistically significant difference. However, analyses of the inter-group comparisons offer no statistically significant difference. Comparative analyses confirm the effectiveness of behaviour therapy in combination with additional drug treatment when compared to behaviour therapy alone.In all the studies presented here, relevant changes in weight of -5% to -10% are only partially achieved. High weight losses of less than -10% were found among the intervention group in two of the studies. One study reported a weight loss of -11.4% with the “group therapy” intervention method, while another study reported a weight loss of -11.2% with the “behaviour therapy plus drug treatment” intervention method. Studies with a subsequent follow-up period indicate a clear weight loss at the end of the intervention followed by a renewed weight gain towards the end of the follow-up period.For the evaluation of economic, social-ethical or legal aspects we could not identify any studies. Discussion: A comparative assessment among the studies proved difficult due to their heterogeneous nature. Little conformity can be detected in either the contents of the behaviour therapy or in the treatment plans. The length of the follow-up periods also varies from study to study. Many studies only analyze weight changes within one group or for the entire study population. However, the results of these analyses all indicate a significant weight loss at the end of the intervention. Conclusion: Some effects of behaviour therapy on a reduction in weight can be shown. However, relevant weight changes of -5% to -10% are only achieved to a certain extent. The extremely heterogeneous nature of the interventions makes a comparison of the study results very difficult. A trend can be detected indicates that those treatments

  11. Detecting spatial structures in throughfall data: The effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and variogram estimation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Beate; Zimmermann, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    In the last decades, an increasing number of studies analyzed spatial patterns in throughfall by means of variograms. The estimation of the variogram from sample data requires an appropriate sampling scheme: most importantly, a large sample and a layout of sampling locations that often has to serve both variogram estimation and geostatistical prediction. While some recommendations on these aspects exist, they focus on Gaussian data and high ratios of the variogram range to the extent of the study area. However, many hydrological data, and throughfall data in particular, do not follow a Gaussian distribution. In this study, we examined the effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and calculation method on variogram estimation of throughfall data. For our investigation, we first generated non-Gaussian random fields based on throughfall data with large outliers. Subsequently, we sampled the fields with three extents (plots with edge lengths of 25 m, 50 m, and 100 m), four common sampling designs (two grid-based layouts, transect and random sampling) and five sample sizes (50, 100, 150, 200, 400). We then estimated the variogram parameters by method-of-moments (non-robust and robust estimators) and residual maximum likelihood. Our key findings are threefold. First, the choice of the extent has a substantial influence on the estimation of the variogram. A comparatively small ratio of the extent to the correlation length is beneficial for variogram estimation. Second, a combination of a minimum sample size of 150, a design that ensures the sampling of small distances and variogram estimation by residual maximum likelihood offers a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency. Third, studies relying on method-of-moments based variogram estimation may have to employ at least 200 sampling points for reliable variogram estimates. These suggested sample sizes exceed the number recommended by studies dealing with Gaussian data by up to 100 %. Given that most previous

  12. Play Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  13. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  14. Manual Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hakgüder, Aral; Kokino, Siranuş

    2002-01-01

    Manual therapy has been used in the treatment of pain and dysfunction of spinal and peripheral joints for more than a hundred years. Manual medicine includes manipulation, mobilization, and postisometric relaxation techniques. The aim of manual therapy is to enhance restricted movement caused by blockage of joints keeping postural balance, restore function and maintain optimal body mechanics. Anatomic, biomechanical, and neurophysiological evaluations of the leucomotor system is essential for...

  15. 34 CFR 600.10 - Date, extent, duration, and consequence of eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Date, extent, duration, and consequence of eligibility... EDUCATION ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General § 600.10 Date, extent, duration, and consequence of eligibility... statutory and regulatory requirements governing its eligibility. (e) Consequence of eligibility. (1) If, as...

  16. Prevalence, Vascular Distribution, and Multiterritorial Extent of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Peñalvo, José L; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    age, 45.8 years; 63% male) to evaluate the systemic extent of atherosclerosis in the carotid, abdominal aortic, and iliofemoral territories by 2-/3-dimensional ultrasound and coronary artery calcification by computed tomography. The extent of subclinical atherosclerosis, defined as presence of plaque...

  17. Extent of resection and timing of surgery in adult low grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Mirza, Farhan; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-06-01

    Low grade glioma is a group of WHO grade II tumours including diffuse astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and oligoastrocytoma. Strong evidence exists in literature now to support early surgery and higher extent of safe resection in improving outcomes. In this review, we are highlighting some of the important studies done in the last few years specifically addressing timing of surgery and extent of resection.

  18. Effects of geographical extent on the determinants of woody plant diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhiheng; Rahbek, Carsten; Fang, Jingyun

    2012-01-01

    the quantitative effects of geographical extent are rarely tested. Here, using distribution maps of 11,405 woody species found in China and associated environmental data to the domain, we investigated the influence of geographical extent on the determinants of species richness patterns. Our results revealed...

  19. Intracavitary therapy of craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.; Fig, L. M.; Gross, M.D.; Ann Arbor Nuclear Medicine Service, Ann Arbor, MI

    1999-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are benign cystic para-hypophyseal tumors often associated with hypopituitarism and visual-field abnormalities. Their therapy by surgery and external beam radiotherapy is imperfect. The intracavitary instillation of beta-emitting colloid radiopharmaceuticals into the cysts permits the delivery of far higher radiation doses to the cyst lining than is possible by external beam radiotherapy. This technique permits destruction of the lining epithelium with resultant elimination of cyst fluid formation and cyst shrinkage in up to 80% of cases

  20. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  1. CAR T-Cell Therapies in Glioblastoma: A First Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Stupp, Roger; Linette, Gerald P; Posey, Avery D; June, Carl H

    2018-02-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The current standard of care for newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients includes surgery to the extent, temozolomide combined with radiotherapy, and alternating electric fields therapy. After recurrence, there is no standard therapy and survival is less than 9 months. Recurrent glioblastoma offers a unique opportunity to investigate new treatment approaches in a malignancy known for remarkable genetic heterogeneity, an immunosuppressive microenvironment, and a partially permissive anatomic blood-brain barrier. Results from three first-in-man chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell trials targeting IL13Rα2, Her2/CMV, and EGFRvIII have recently been reported. Each one of these trials addresses important questions, such as T-cell trafficking to CNS, engraftment and persistence, tumor microenvironment remodeling, and monitoring of glioma response to CAR T cells. Objective radiologic responses have been reported. Here, we discuss and summarize the results of these trials and suggest opportunities for the field. Clin Cancer Res; 24(3); 535-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Landsat-Derived Estimates of Mangrove Extents in the Sierra Leone Coastal Landscape Complex during 1990-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pinki; Trzaska, Sylwia; de Sherbinin, Alex

    2017-12-21

    This study provides the first assessment of decadal changes in mangrove extents in Sierra Leone. While significant advances have been made in mangrove mapping using remote sensing, no study has documented long-term changes in mangrove extents in Sierra Leone-one of the most vulnerable countries in West Africa. Such understanding is critical for devising regional management strategies that can support local livelihoods. We utilize multi-date Landsat data and cloud computational techniques to quantify spatiotemporal changes in land cover, with focus on mangrove ecosystems, for 1990-2016 along the coast of Sierra Leone. We specifically focus on four estuaries-Scarcies, Sierra Leone, Yawri Bay, and Sherbro. We relied on the k-means approach for an unsupervised classification, and validated the classified map from 2016 using ground truth data collected from Sentinel-2 and high-resolution images and during field research (accuracy: 95%). Our findings indicate that the Scarcies river estuary witnessed the greatest mangrove loss since 1990 (45%), while the Sierra Leone river estuary experienced mangrove gain over the last 26 years (22%). Overall, the Sierra Leone coast lost 25% of its mangroves between 1990 and 2016, with the lowest coverage in 2000, during the period of civil war (1991-2002). However, natural mangrove dynamics, as supported by field observations, indicate the potential for regeneration and sustainability under carefully constructed management strategies.

  3. Therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Sadeghi, R.; Takavar, A.; Fard, A.; Saghari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Although there have been very significant development in the field of radionuclide therapy within the past 10 years, radionuclide therapy in the form of 131 I, 33 P,.... have been in use for over 46 years. Palliation of bone pain is a good example for radionuclide therapy. It has an especial role in advanced metastatic cancer. 32 P, 89 Sr-Cl, 186 Re-HEDP, 133 Sm-EDTMP, and 117 mSn-DTPA are used in these patients. They are usually effective and help to maintain a painless life for patients with advanced cancer. Although this kind of therapy is not as rapid as radiotherapy, its effect lasts longer. In addition re-treatment with these agents is safe and effective. Radioimmunotherapy is a new exciting technique in the radionuclide therapy. In this technique monoclonal antibodies or their fragments are labeled with a suitable radionuclide, these antibodies can irradiate tumor cells over a distance of some fraction of a millimeter. Bulky tumors are obviously unsuitable targets for Rit. Several antibodies specific for Cd 20 (B1 and 1 F 5) and CD 37 (Mb-1) labeled with 131 I have been used for hematologic malignancies with good response. Several antigens associated with carcinomas of various histologic types have been targeted for therapeutic purposes by antibodies labeled with different radionuclides. Other routes of administration like intraperitoneal, intrathecal, and intravesical have been used with different rates of success. Pre targeting techniques can be used to reduce unwanted radioactive concentration in normal tissues. The avidin-biotin system is an example, which exploits the high-affinity binding between avidin and biotin, and was first used with anti-Cea antibody. Radiation synovectomy is another aspect of radionuclide therapy 198 Au colloid, 90 Y resin colloid, and 165 Dy-FHMA are some of the radionuclides used in the field of hematology. There has been significant advances in the field of therapy in nuclear medicine in recent years, which are briefly

  4. Extent of Resection in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Impact of a Specialized Neuro-Oncology Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Haj

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM consists of microsurgical resection followed by concomitant radiochemotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. The best outcome regarding progression free (PFS and overall survival (OS is achieved by maximal resection. The foundation of a specialized neuro-oncology care center (NOC has enabled the implementation of a large technical portfolio including functional imaging, awake craniotomy, PET scanning, fluorescence-guided resection, and integrated postsurgical therapy. This study analyzed whether the technically improved neurosurgical treatment structure yields a higher rate of complete resection, thus ultimately improving patient outcome. Patients and methods: The study included 149 patients treated surgically for newly diagnosed GBM. The neurological performance score (NPS and the Karnofsky performance score (KPS were measured before and after resection. The extent of resection (EOR was volumetrically quantified. Patients were stratified into two subcohorts: treated before (A and after (B the foundation of the Regensburg NOC. The EOR and the PFS and OS were evaluated. Results: Prognostic factors for PFS and OS were age, preoperative KPS, O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT promoter methylation status, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 mutation status and EOR. Patients with volumetrically defined complete resection had significantly better PFS (9.4 vs. 7.8 months; p = 0.042 and OS (18.4 vs. 14.5 months; p = 0.005 than patients with incomplete resection. The frequency of transient or permanent postoperative neurological deficits was not higher after complete resection in both subcohorts. The frequency of complete resection was significantly higher in subcohort B than in subcohort A (68.2% vs. 34.8%; p = 0.007. Accordingly, subcohort B showed significantly longer PFS (8.6 vs. 7.5 months; p = 0.010 and OS (18.7 vs. 12.4 months; p = 0.001. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed complete resection, age

  5. X-ray diagnostics, X-ray therapy, diagnostics and therapy with radioactive materials in free medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setzer, H.D.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of the documents of the Kassenaerztliche Vereinigung Niederbayerns in Straubing, the work of the established general practicioners in the fields of X-ray and nuclear medicine was investigated for the 1st quarter of 1971, and the X-ray diagnostic services rendered were evaluated according to age and sex. 2/3 of all doctors participating in a health insurance plan in Lower Bavaria are general practitioners; all other fields are represented less often than in Munich. The values for the whole Federal Republic are in between. Internal specialists, radiologists, and urologists together carry out 85.7% of the ten examinations which contribute most to the total gonadal dose. An application of the data on the 1st quarter to the annual value is only possible by allowing for an error of 13.1%. All in all, 6% more X-ray services are administered to men than to women. For both sexes, the genetically most important group of 15-34 resp. 15-39 years of age is highly represented, although young men receive X-ray diagnostics more frequently. X-ray therapy makes up only about 0.5% of all services. Nuclear medical diagnostics is employed to the same extent by radiologists and internal specialists, while therapy with radioactive substances is almost exclusively provided by radiologists. Relative to the population density, radioactive substances are more often used in Lower Bavaria than in West Berlin. (orig.) [de

  6. A global view of shifting cultivation: Recent, current, and future extent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Heinimann

    Full Text Available Mosaic landscapes under shifting cultivation, with their dynamic mix of managed and natural land covers, often fall through the cracks in remote sensing-based land cover and land use classifications, as these are unable to adequately capture such landscapes' dynamic nature and complex spectral and spatial signatures. But information about such landscapes is urgently needed to improve the outcomes of global earth system modelling and large-scale carbon and greenhouse gas accounting. This study combines existing global Landsat-based deforestation data covering the years 2000 to 2014 with very high-resolution satellite imagery to visually detect the specific spatio-temporal pattern of shifting cultivation at a one-degree cell resolution worldwide. The accuracy levels of our classification were high with an overall accuracy above 87%. We estimate the current global extent of shifting cultivation and compare it to other current global mapping endeavors as well as results of literature searches. Based on an expert survey, we make a first attempt at estimating past trends as well as possible future trends in the global distribution of shifting cultivation until the end of the 21st century. With 62% of the investigated one-degree cells in the humid and sub-humid tropics currently showing signs of shifting cultivation-the majority in the Americas (41% and Africa (37%-this form of cultivation remains widespread, and it would be wrong to speak of its general global demise in the last decades. We estimate that shifting cultivation landscapes currently cover roughly 280 million hectares worldwide, including both cultivated fields and fallows. While only an approximation, this estimate is clearly smaller than the areas mentioned in the literature which range up to 1,000 million hectares. Based on our expert survey and historical trends we estimate a possible strong decrease in shifting cultivation over the next decades, raising issues of livelihood security

  7. Adaptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, Robert A; Silva, Ariosto S; Gillies, Robert J; Frieden, B Roy

    2009-06-01

    A number of successful systemic therapies are available for treatment of disseminated cancers. However, tumor response is often transient, and therapy frequently fails due to emergence of resistant populations. The latter reflects the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment as well as the evolutionary capacity of cancer phenotypes to adapt to therapeutic perturbations. Although cancers are highly dynamic systems, cancer therapy is typically administered according to a fixed, linear protocol. Here we examine an adaptive therapeutic approach that evolves in response to the temporal and spatial variability of tumor microenvironment and cellular phenotype as well as therapy-induced perturbations. Initial mathematical models find that when resistant phenotypes arise in the untreated tumor, they are typically present in small numbers because they are less fit than the sensitive population. This reflects the "cost" of phenotypic resistance such as additional substrate and energy used to up-regulate xenobiotic metabolism, and therefore not available for proliferation, or the growth inhibitory nature of environments (i.e., ischemia or hypoxia) that confer resistance on phenotypically sensitive cells. Thus, in the Darwinian environment of a cancer, the fitter chemosensitive cells will ordinarily proliferate at the expense of the less fit chemoresistant cells. The models show that, if resistant populations are present before administration of therapy, treatments designed to kill maximum numbers of cancer cells remove this inhibitory effect and actually promote more rapid growth of the resistant populations. We present an alternative approach in which treatment is continuously modulated to achieve a fixed tumor population. The goal of adaptive therapy is to enforce a stable tumor burden by permitting a significant population of chemosensitive cells to survive so that they, in turn, suppress proliferation of the less fit but chemoresistant

  8. Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ri-Hui; Tao, Ran

    2017-01-01

    This chapter first summarizes the therapy of addiction disorder, and elaborates on the progress of medication. First, the difference between dependency and addiction are introduced. The basic principles of the therapy of substance and non-substance addiction are then put forward. It is also pointed out in this chapter that with the progress of the study, the goal of addiction disorder therapy is expected to transfer from reducing the relapse and harm of the addiction to completely eliminating and recovering from it. This chapter also introduces the progress of psychological addiction elimination technology, especially the "Unconditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm and Conditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm" and PITDH technology. Finally it is pointed out that in addiction disorder therapy, comprehensive intervention has become a trend. With regard to the medication for addiction disorders, this chapter also includes the progress and deficiencies of substance and non-substance addiction. In terms of addiction disorder rehabilitation, the foundation of substance addiction is medication which is, however, limited for non-substance addiction. The key to the rehabilitation of addiction disorder is psycho-behavioral therapy, which is especially effective in eliminating craving.

  9. The physics of radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Faiz M

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Khan's classic textbook on radiation oncology physics is now in its thoroughly revised and updated Fourth Edition. It provides the entire radiation therapy team—radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists—with a thorough understanding of the physics and practical clinical applications of advanced radiation therapy technologies, including 3D-CRT, stereotactic radiotherapy, HDR, IMRT, IGRT, and proton beam therapy. These technologies are discussed along with the physical concepts underlying treatment planning, treatment delivery, and dosimetry. This Fourth Edition includes brand-new chapters on image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and proton beam therapy. Other chapters have been revised to incorporate the most recent developments in the field. This edition also features more than 100 full-color illustrations throughout.

  10. Particle therapy for noncancer diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert, Christoph; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Biophysics Department, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Philipps-University Marburg, Center for Radiology, Department of Radiation Therapy, Baldinger Strasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Biophysics Department, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hochschulstrasse 3, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany) and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Radiation therapy using high-energy charged particles is generally acknowledged as a powerful new technique in cancer treatment. However, particle therapy in oncology is still controversial, specifically because it is unclear whether the putative clinical advantages justify the high additional costs. However, particle therapy can find important applications in the management of noncancer diseases, especially in radiosurgery. Extension to other diseases and targets (both cranial and extracranial) may widen the applications of the technique and decrease the cost/benefit ratio of the accelerator facilities. Future challenges in this field include the use of different particles and energies, motion management in particle body radiotherapy and extension to new targets currently treated by catheter ablation (atrial fibrillation and renal denervation) or stereotactic radiation therapy (trigeminal neuralgia, epilepsy, and macular degeneration). Particle body radiosurgery could be a future key application of accelerator-based particle therapy facilities in 10 years from today.

  11. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols......, was that participants gained a new understanding about their personal life. In addition, some participants were able to continue to use art therapy experiences as selfdevelopmental tools after the research study terminated. Jung’s description of the interactive relationship between the two living parts of the psyche...

  12. Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Solmes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood oxygen will often be able to accomplish more with less fatigue with the help of supplemental oxygen therapy. Shortness of breath is a mechanical problem resulting from the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Oxygen therapy may or may not reduce shortness of breath, but it will help the lungs and heart to function with less stress.

  13. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  14. Radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaRue, S.M.; Gillette, S.M.; Poulson, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, radiotherapy of thoracic and abdominal tumors in animals has been limited. However, the availability of computerized tomography and other imaging techniques to aid in determining the extent of tumor, an increase in knowledge of dose tolerance of regional organs, the availability of isocentrically mounted megavoltage machines, and the willingness of patients to pursue more aggressive treatment is making radiation therapy of tumors in these regions far more common. Tumor remission has been reported after radiation therapy of thymomas. Radiation therapy has been used to treat mediastinal lymphoma refractory to chemotherapy, and may be beneficial as part of the initial treatment regimen for this disease. Chemodectomas are responsive to radiation therapy in human patients, and favorable response has also been reported in dogs. Although primary lung tumors in dogs are rare, in some cases radiation therapy could be a useful primary or adjunctive therapy. Lung is the dose-limiting organ in the thorax. Bladder and urethral tumors in dogs have been treated using intraoperative and external-beam radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy. These tumors are difficult to control locally with surgery alone, although the optimal method of combining treatment modalities has not been established. Local control of malignant perianal tumors is also difficult to achieve with surgery alone, and radiation therapy should be used. Intraoperative radiation therapy combined with external-beam radiation therapy has been used for the management of metastatic carcinoma to the sublumbar lymph nodes. Tolerance of retroperitoneal tissues may be decreased by disease or surgical manipulation

  15. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, R.E; Fisher, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The new insights and controversies concerning the radiobiological properties of malignant melanoma and how these relate to new clinical approaches are reviewed. The recent clinical experience with large individual fraction sizes is analyzed. The treatment of malignant melanoma in certain specialized sites is also described. An attempt is made to place in perspective the usefulness of radiation therapy in the treatment of this complex disease. Finally, certain new applications for radiation therapy both alone and in combustion with other treatment modalities are proposed that may ultimately prove appropriate for clinical trials

  16. Gene therapy and its implications in Periodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Swapna; Dani, Nitin; Ansari, Shumaila S.; Kale, Triveni

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a field of Biomedicine. With the advent of gene therapy in dentistry, significant progress has been made in the control of periodontal diseases and reconstruction of dento-alveolar apparatus. Implementation in periodontics include: -As a mode of tissue engineering with three approaches: cell, protein-based and gene delivery approach. -Genetic approach to Biofilm Antibiotic Resistance. Future strategies of gene therapy in preventing periodontal diseases: -Enhances host defense mechanism against infection by transfecting host cells with an antimicrobial peptide protein-encoding gene. -Periodontal vaccination. Gene therapy is one of the recent entrants and its applications in the field of periodontics are reviewed in general here. PMID:20376232

  17. Reconstructed North American, Eurasian, and Northern Hemisphere Snow Cover Extent, 1915-1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains time series of monthly snow cover extent (SCE) for North America, Eurasia, and the Northern Hemisphere from 1915 to 1997, based on snow cover...

  18. Quantifying emphysema extent from weakly labeled CT scans of the lungs using label proportions learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørting, Silas Nyboe; Petersen, Jens; Wille, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of emphysema extent is important in diagnosing and monitoring patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several studies have shown that emphysema quantification by supervised texture classification is more robust and accurate than traditional densitometry. Current...... techniques require highly time consuming manual annotations of patches or use only weak labels indicating overall disease status (e.g, COPD or healthy). We show how visual scoring of regional emphysema extent can be exploited in a learning with label proportions (LLP) framework to both predict presence...... of emphysema in smaller patches and estimate regional extent. We evaluate performance on 195 visually scored CT scans and achieve an intraclass correlation of 0.72 (0.65–0.78) between predicted region extent and expert raters. To our knowledge this is the first time that LLP methods have been applied...

  19. extent of use of ict by fish farmers in isoko agricultural zone of delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr. TONY A

    Abstract. The study examined the extent of use of ICTs by fish farmers in Isoko .... TABLE 1: Percentage distribution of respondents selected socioeconomics ... fish breeds, feeds and management), and made inquiries about market predictions.

  20. To what extent do science ESP learning materials fit the purpose for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To what extent do science ESP learning materials fit the purpose for which they have been devised? An evaluation in terms of Cronje's (1993) criteria. ... Journal for Language Teaching. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced ...

  1. LBA-ECO LC-07 Wetland Extent, Vegetation, and Inundation: Lowland Amazon Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides a map of wetland extent, vegetation type, and dual-season flooding state of the entire lowland Amazon basin. The map was derived from mosaics...

  2. Sea Ice Edge Location and Extent in the Russian Arctic, 1933-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Ice Edge Location and Extent in the Russian Arctic, 1933-2006 data are derived from sea ice charts from the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI),...

  3. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE), Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) is a record for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE) spanning from October 4, 1966 to present, updated monthly...

  4. The extent of unwanted infrared photoacoustic signals from polymer sampling tubings exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicanic, D.; Solyom, A.; Angeli, G.; Wegh, H.; Postumus, M.; Jalink, H.

    1995-01-01

    The extent of unwanted photoacoustic (PA) signals due to volatiles released from various polymer tubing materials [transparent, red and black polyethylene (PE), polymer of tetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and copolymer of tetrafluorethylene and hexafluorethylene (FEP)] when exposed to 245 nm radiation was

  5. Comment on ''Canonical formalism for Lagrangians with nonlocality of finite extent''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llosa, Josep

    2003-01-01

    The paper by Woodward [Phys. Rev. A 62, 052105 (2000)] claimed to have proved that Lagrangian theories with a nonlocality of finite extent are necessarily unstable. In this Comment we propose that this conclusion is false

  6. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: ICE (Ice Extent Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains locations of ice extent in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Vector lines in the data set represent 50 percent ice coverage. Location-specific type and...

  7. Global extent and determinants of savanna and forest as alternative biome states

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Staver, C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, fire–tree cover feedbacks can maintain savanna and forest as alternative stable states. However, the global extent of fire- driven discontinuities in tree cover is unknown, especially accounting for seasonality and soils. The authors...

  8. The value and extent of religious participation of members of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-14

    Jan 14, 2013 ... ... of Human. Resource Management, .... This is why employees of the SAPS, as human beings, to a large extent ... everywhere, supporting us in the workplace, at home and in hospitals. ..... such as diversity interventions).

  9. The extent of problematic alcohol and other drug use within selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To describe the nature and extent of AOD problems in selected workplace ... compiled by an Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) service provider in SA. As part of an EAP risk audit, assessments for AOD-related problems were ...

  10. Global Human Built-up And Settlement Extent (HBASE) Dataset From Landsat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Human Built-up And Settlement Extent (HBASE) Dataset from Landsat is a global map of HBASE derived from the Global Land Survey (GLS) Landsat dataset for...

  11. Extent of Surgery Does Not Influence 30-Day Mortality in Surgery for Metastatic Bone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Hindsø, Klaus; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann

    2016-01-01

    describing the extent of the surgical trauma were found to be associated with 30-day mortality. The 30-day mortality in patients undergoing surgery for MBD is highly dependent on the general health status of the patients as measured by the ASA score and the Karnofsky performance status. The extent of surgery......, measured as duration of surgery, blood loss, and degree of bone resection were not associated with 30-day mortality....

  12. The Extent of computerization in big companies of the Spanish hotel sector

    OpenAIRE

    Infante Moro, Alfonso; Martínez López, Francisco José; Infante Moro, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study of the hotel sector regarding the extent of computerization in its big companies. This study examines the extent of computerization in big companies of the Spanish hotel sector with the aim of confirming the viability and sustainability of this sector relative to changes in ICT, a stage which is defined by the extensive use of the Internet and online social networks, and the handling of large quantities of information generated within these new env...

  13. 2D-3D registration for cranial radiation therapy using a 3D kV CBCT and a single limited field-of-view 2D kV radiograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munbodh, Reshma; Knisely, Jonathan Ps; Jaffray, David A; Moseley, Douglas J

    2018-05-01

    We present and evaluate a fully automated 2D-3D intensity-based registration framework using a single limited field-of-view (FOV) 2D kV radiograph and a 3D kV CBCT for 3D estimation of patient setup errors during brain radiotherapy. We evaluated two similarity measures, the Pearson correlation coefficient on image intensity values (ICC) and maximum likelihood measure with Gaussian noise (MLG), derived from the statistics of transmission images. Pose determination experiments were conducted on 2D kV radiographs in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left lateral (LL) views and 3D kV CBCTs of an anthropomorphic head phantom. In order to minimize radiation exposure and exclude nonrigid structures from the registration, limited FOV 2D kV radiographs were employed. A spatial frequency band useful for the 2D-3D registration was identified from the bone-to-no-bone spectral ratio (BNBSR) of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) computed from the 3D kV planning CT of the phantom. The images being registered were filtered accordingly prior to computation of the similarity measures. We evaluated the registration accuracy achievable with a single 2D kV radiograph and with the registration results from the AP and LL views combined. We also compared the performance of the 2D-3D registration solutions proposed to that of a commercial 3D-3D registration algorithm, which used the entire skull for the registration. The ground truth was determined from markers affixed to the phantom and visible in the CBCT images. The accuracy of the 2D-3D registration solutions, as quantified by the root mean squared value of the target registration error (TRE) calculated over a radius of 3 cm for all poses tested, was ICC AP : 0.56 mm, MLG AP : 0.74 mm, ICC LL : 0.57 mm, MLG LL : 0.54 mm, ICC (AP and LL combined): 0.19 mm, and MLG (AP and LL combined): 0.21 mm. The accuracy of the 3D-3D registration algorithm was 0.27 mm. There was no significant difference in mean TRE for the 2D-3D registration

  14. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Keiichi; Miyoshi, Makoto; Jinguu, Ken-ichi

    1982-01-01

    Of the cases of lung cancer in which radiation therapy was given between 1961 and November 1981, 399 cases for which histological type was confirmed, and irradiated as follows were reviewed. The cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma irradiated with more than 5,000 rad or more, those of undifferentiated carcinoma irradiated with 3,000 rad or more, and those irradiated pre- and post-operatively with 3,000 rad or more. The actual 5 year survival rate for stages I, II, III and IV were 29.6, 9.3, 7.5 and 1.9% respectively, and the survival rate tended to be better for adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma at stages I, II and III, but not different at stage IV. There was no difference between large cell, small cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Irradiation with 200 rad every other day or 150 rad daily was better than that with 200 rad, and daily irradiation with 150 rad was used since 1976. The therapy of stage III small cell carcinoma at the age of up to 80 years was improved with the combination of anticancer agents, maintenance therapy and immunotherapy, but these combined therapies were not significantly effective for the cancers with other histological types or at other stages. Although there was no significant difference in statistics for resectable cases, clinically, the results were experienced to be better after resection, and surgery was done in combination as much as possible. (Kaihara, S.)

  15. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  16. Shock therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Erin

    2016-02-03

    Therapies administered by mental health nurses, aimed at "curing" gay people of their sexual preference were still in common use in the UK in the 1960s and early 1970s. Some nurses tried to avoid participating in these practices, but many believed that they were helping their patients, as a new book reveals.

  17. Successes and challenges from formation to implementation of eleven broad-extent conservation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik A; Mattsson, Brady J; Germino, Matthew J; Burg, Max Post Van Der; Bradford, John B; Brunson, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    Integration of conservation partnerships across geographic, biological, and administrative boundaries is increasingly relevant because drivers of change, such as climate shifts, transcend these boundaries. We explored successes and challenges of established conservation programs that span multiple watersheds and consider both social and ecological concerns. We asked representatives from a diverse set of 11 broad-extent conservation partnerships in 29 countries 17 questions that pertained to launching and maintaining partnerships for broad-extent conservation, specifying ultimate management objectives, and implementation and learning. Partnerships invested more funds in implementing conservation actions than any other aspect of conservation, and a program's context (geographic extent, United States vs. other countries, developed vs. developing nation) appeared to substantially affect program approach. Despite early successes of these organizations and benefits of broad-extent conservation, specific challenges related to uncertainties in scaling up information and to coordination in the face of diverse partner governance structures, conflicting objectives, and vast uncertainties regarding future system dynamics hindered long-term success, as demonstrated by the focal organizations. Engaging stakeholders, developing conservation measures, and implementing adaptive management were dominant challenges. To inform future research on broad-extent conservation, we considered several challenges when we developed detailed questions, such as what qualities of broad-extent partnerships ensure they complement, integrate, and strengthen, rather than replace, local conservation efforts and which adaptive management processes yield actionable conservation strategies that account explicitly for dynamics and uncertainties regarding multiscale governance, environmental conditions, and knowledge of the system? © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. Correlation between left ventricular filling and ischemic extent during exercise-induced myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Akitada; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Iwase, Mitsunori

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how the extent of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia influence left ventricular filling. Twenty-two consecutive patients with effort angina, consisting of 16 with single vessel disease and 6 with double vessel disease, underwent exercise studies in lying and sitting positions. Extent score (ES) and severity score (SS) were calculated on polar map prepared from early exercise Tl-201 myocardial SPECT images to determine ischemic extent. Pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (PAWP), as obtained at exercise in lying position, correlated significantly well with both ES (r=0.75, p<0.001) and SS (r=0.61, p<0.01). There was, however, no significant correlation between the other hemodynamic parameters, such as heart rate, systolic pressure, rate-pressure product, cardiac index and stroke index, and both ES and SS. Either increased PAWP or ischemic extent was not dependent on the number of diseased vessels. In conclusion, the extent of increased left ventricular filling did not correlate with the number of diseased vessels, but correlated positively with ischemic extent. (N.K.)

  19. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  20. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  1. Methane emissions from global wetlands: An assessment of the uncertainty associated with various wetland extent data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bowen; Tian, Hanqin; Lu, Chaoqun; Chen, Guangsheng; Pan, Shufen; Anderson, Christopher; Poulter, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    A wide range of estimates on global wetland methane (CH4) fluxes has been reported during the recent two decades. This gives rise to urgent needs to clarify and identify the uncertainty sources, and conclude a reconciled estimate for global CH4 fluxes from wetlands. Most estimates by using bottom-up approach rely on wetland data sets, but these data sets show largely inconsistent in terms of both wetland extent and spatiotemporal distribution. A quantitative assessment of uncertainties associated with these discrepancies among wetland data sets has not been well investigated yet. By comparing the five widely used global wetland data sets (GISS, GLWD, Kaplan, GIEMS and SWAMPS-GLWD), it this study, we found large differences in the wetland extent, ranging from 5.3 to 10.2 million km2, as well as their spatial and temporal distributions among the five data sets. These discrepancies in wetland data sets resulted in large bias in model-estimated global wetland CH4 emissions as simulated by using the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM). The model simulations indicated that the mean global wetland CH4 emissions during 2000-2007 were 177.2 ± 49.7 Tg CH4 yr-1, based on the five different data sets. The tropical regions contributed the largest portion of estimated CH4 emissions from global wetlands, but also had the largest discrepancy. Among six continents, the largest uncertainty was found in South America. Thus, the improved estimates of wetland extent and CH4 emissions in the tropical regions and South America would be a critical step toward an accurate estimate of global CH4 emissions. This uncertainty analysis also reveals an important need for our scientific community to generate a global scale wetland data set with higher spatial resolution and shorter time interval, by integrating multiple sources of field and satellite data with modeling approaches, for cross-scale extrapolation.

  2. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma - the role of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gospodarowicz, Mary K.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: To review the approach to the diagnosis, assessment, treatment and continuing management of patients with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with the emphasis on the role of radiation therapy in this group of diseases. The entity of 'Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma' encompasses a diverse group of disorders involving almost any part of the body. This diversity bedevils any attempt to unify the approach to this disease on a rational basis. Nevertheless, some broad principles can be applied to almost any presentation of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The approach to the management of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is based on the histologic type, localization and extent of disease and other disease and patient related prognostic factors. The accurate pathologic diagnosis of lymphoma has been greatly facilitated by availability of markers, molecular and genetic techniques. The newly proposed revised classification of lymphomas and its impact on these of RT will be discussed. Although the Ann Arbor staging classification has been shown to provide important prognostic information, other factors have equivalent, if not greater, influence on outcome in patients with Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The management of lymphomas is based primarily on the histologic type and extent of the disease including stage, tumour bulk, number of sites involved and location of the disease. The success of curative radiation therapy is contingent upon the presence of localized disease, normal tissue tolerance allowing the delivery of RT curative dose (30-35 Gy) and the tumour bulk. The current evidence suggests that locoregional RT for stage I and II low grade lymphoma results in approximately 50% prolonged (10-15 years) failure free rate and possible cure. Radiation alone is no longer used for intermediate and high grade lymphomas. The standard management of stage I and II intermediate grade large cell and mixed lymphomas is with doxorubicin based chemotherapy (e.g. CHOP) followed by involved field radiation. The

  3. Medical leech therapy (Hirudotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leeches have been used in medicine long time before BC. In recent years medical leech therapy has gained increasing interest in reconstructive surgery and pain management and other medical fields. The possible indications and success rates of this treatment are discussed. There is a special interest in salvage of flaps and grafts by the use of medical leeches. Retrospective analysis indicates a success rate of >80%. Randomized controlled trials have been performed in osteoarthritis. Case reports and smaller series are available for the treatment of chronic wounds, post-phlebitic syndrome and inflammatory skin diseases. The most common adverse effects are prolonged bleeding and infection by saprophytic intestinal bacteria of leeches. Medical leech therapy is a useful adjunct to other measures wound management.

  4. Effect of Emphysema Extent on Serial Lung Function in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, Vincent; Hansell, David M; Sverzellati, Nicola; Weycker, Derek; Antoniou, Katerina M; Atwood, Mark; Oster, Gerry; Kirchgaessler, Klaus-Uwe; Collard, Harold R; Wells, Athol U

    2017-11-01

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema may have artificially preserved lung volumes. In this post hoc analysis, we investigated the relationship between baseline emphysema and fibrosis extents, as well as pulmonary function changes, over 48 weeks. Data were pooled from two phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of IFN-γ-1b in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (GIPF-001 [NCT00047645] and GIPF-007 [NCT00075998]). Patients with Week 48 data, baseline high-resolution computed tomographic images, and FEV 1 /FVC ratios less than 0.8 or greater than 0.9 (0.9 in GIPF-007), as well as randomly selected patients with ratios of 0.8-0.9 and 0.7-0.8, were included. Changes from baseline in pulmonary function at Week 48 were analyzed by emphysema extent. The relationship between emphysema and fibrosis extents and change in pulmonary function was assessed using multivariate linear regression. Emphysema was identified in 38% of patients. A negative correlation was observed between fibrosis and emphysema extents (r = -0.232; P emphysema extent (28 to 65%) showed the smallest FVC decline, with a difference of 3.32% at Week 48 versus patients with no emphysema (P = 0.047). In multivariate analyses, emphysema extent greater than or equal to 15% was associated with significantly reduced FVC decline over 48 weeks versus no emphysema or emphysema less than 15%. No such association was observed for diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide or composite physiologic index. FVC measurements may not be appropriate for monitoring disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema extent greater than or equal to 15%.

  5. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individual, couples, family, and group therapy formats. Art therapy is an effective treatment for people experiencing developmental, medical, educational, and social or psychological impairment. Individuals who benefit from art therapy include ...

  6. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation ... Inc. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 5 Physical and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ...

  7. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  8. A Study of the Trend and Extent of Drug Abuse Among Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings show that drug-abusers are predominantly males, single, unskilled workers, traders, unemployed and civil servants. Psychiatric hospitals and rehabilitation centres served as treatment centres for participants with previous admission records. Drug therapy, psychotherapy and occupational therapy were the ...

  9. The spatial extent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission in the Herbig star HD 179218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, A. S.; Labadie, L.; Pantin, E.; Matter, A.; Alvarez, C.; Esquej, P.; Grellmann, R.; Rebolo, R.; Telesco, C.; Wolf, S.

    2018-04-01

    spatial extent. Based on spatial and spectroscopic considerations as well as on qualitative comparison with IRS 48 and HD 97048, we favor a scenario in which PAHs extend out to large radii across the flared disk surface and are at the same time predominantly in an ionized charge state due to the strong UV radiation field of the 180 L⊙ central star.

  10. Age, extent and carbon storage of the central Congo Basin peatland complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargie, Greta C; Lewis, Simon L; Lawson, Ian T; Mitchard, Edward T A; Page, Susan E; Bocko, Yannick E; Ifo, Suspense A

    2017-02-02

    Peatlands are carbon-rich ecosystems that cover just three per cent of Earth's land surface, but store one-third of soil carbon. Peat soils are formed by the build-up of partially decomposed organic matter under waterlogged anoxic conditions. Most peat is found in cool climatic regions where unimpeded decomposition is slower, but deposits are also found under some tropical swamp forests. Here we present field measurements from one of the world's most extensive regions of swamp forest, the Cuvette Centrale depression in the central Congo Basin. We find extensive peat deposits beneath the swamp forest vegetation (peat defined as material with an organic matter content of at least 65 per cent to a depth of at least 0.3 metres). Radiocarbon dates indicate that peat began accumulating from about 10,600 years ago, coincident with the onset of more humid conditions in central Africa at the beginning of the Holocene. The peatlands occupy large interfluvial basins, and seem to be largely rain-fed and ombrotrophic-like (of low nutrient status) systems. Although the peat layer is relatively shallow (with a maximum depth of 5.9 metres and a median depth of 2.0 metres), by combining in situ and remotely sensed data, we estimate the area of peat to be approximately 145,500 square kilometres (95 per cent confidence interval of 131,900-156,400 square kilometres), making the Cuvette Centrale the most extensive peatland complex in the tropics. This area is more than five times the maximum possible area reported for the Congo Basin in a recent synthesis of pantropical peat extent. We estimate that the peatlands store approximately 30.6 petagrams (30.6 × 10 15  grams) of carbon belowground (95 per cent confidence interval of 6.3-46.8 petagrams of carbon)-a quantity that is similar to the above-ground carbon stocks of the tropical forests of the entire Congo Basin. Our result for the Cuvette Centrale increases the best estimate of global tropical peatland carbon stocks by

  11. The Eocene Arctic Azolla phenomenon: species composition, temporal range and geographic extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Margaret; Barke, Judith; van der Burgh, Johan; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna; Pearce, Martin; Bujak, Jonathan; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2010-05-01

    Azolla is a free-floating freshwater fern that is renowned for its rapid vegetative spread and invasive biology, being one of the world's fastest growing aquatic macrophytes. Two species of this plant have been shown to have bloomed and reproduced in enormous numbers in the latest Early to earliest Middle Eocene of the Arctic Ocean and North Sea based on samples from IODP cores from the Lomonosov Ridge (Arctic) and from outcrops in Denmark (Collinson et al 2009 a,b Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 155,1-14; and doi:10.1016/j.revpalbo.2009.12.001). To determine the geographic and temporal extent of this Azolla phenomenon, and the spatial distribution of the different species, we have examined samples from 15 additional sites using material from ODP cores and commercial exploration wells. The sites range from the Sub-Arctic (Northern Alaska and Canadian Beaufort Mackenzie Basin) to the Nordic Seas (Norwegian-Greenland Sea and North Sea Basin). Our data show that the Azolla phenomenon involved at least three species. These are distinguished by characters of the megaspore apparatus (e.g. megaspore wall, floats, filosum) and the microspore massulae (e.g. glochidia fluke tips). The Lomonosov Ridge (Arctic) and Danish occurrences are monotypic but in other sites more than one species co-existed. The attachment to one another and the co-occurrence of megaspore apparatus and microspore massulae, combined with evidence that these spores were shed at the fully mature stage of their life cycle, shows that the Azolla remains were not transported over long distances, a fact which could not be assumed from isolated massula fragments alone. Our evidence, therefore, shows that Azolla plants grew on the ocean surfaces for approximately 1.2 million years (from 49.3 to 48.1 Ma) and that the Azolla phenomenon covered the area from Denmark northwards across the North Sea Basin and the whole of the Arctic and Nordic seas. Apparently, early Middle Eocene Northern Hemisphere middle

  12. Extent of postoperative prophylactic radiotherapy after radical surgery of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jincheng; Tao Hua; Zha Wenwu; Xu Kangxiong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the extent of postoperative prophylactic radiotherapy after radical surgery of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Should the entire mediastinum (M), bilateral supraclavicular areas(S) and the left gastric area(L) be all included in the irradiation field. Methods The clinical data of 204 such patients treated from 1996 through 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. They were classified into four groups: group A, 26 patients given irradiation to the mediastinum M alone; group B, 139 patients given irradiation to the mediastinum and bilateral supraclavicular areas M + S; group C, 10 patients irradiation to the mediastinum plus left gastric area M + L; and group D, 29 patients irradiation to all these three areas ( M + S + L). The overall and disease-free survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan- Meier method and comparison of these groups was done with the Logrank test. Prognostic variables were entered into a Cox regression model controlling the age, gender, length, site, pT, pN, and treatment received. Results: The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates of all 204 patients were 83.8%, 53.2%, 34.1% and 77.8%, 51.6%, 33.8% , respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival rates for patients in group A, group B, group C, and group D were 36.3%, 30.7%, 40.0% and 43.6% (χ 2 = 3.05, P=0.385), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the pT and pN were independent risk factors for disease-free survival rate, whereas treatment arm gave no significant difference (χ 2 =2.77, P=0.096). None of the 43 patents without irradiation to the L had abdominal lymph node metastasis from lesions in the upper and upper-middle third (located middle third but invasion to the upper third) thoracic esophagus. The data of supraclavicular lymph node metastasis between patients with and without irradiation showed that S in lesion in the lower and middle-lower third (located middle third but invasion to the lower third) thoracic

  13. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  14. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  15. Particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics

  16. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive......Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...

  17. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  18. Radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Jr, J F; Deliso, H B

    1993-12-31

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ({sup 131}I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  19. Proton-therapy and hadron-therapy ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissonnat, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the ARCHADE project (Advanced Resource Center for Hadron-therapy in Europe), a research project in Carbone ion beam therapy and clinical Proton-therapy, this work investigates the beam monitoring and dosimetry aspects of ion beam therapy. The main goal, here, is to understand the operating mode of air ionization chambers, the detectors used for such applications. This study starts at a very fundamental level as the involved physical and chemical parameters of air were measured in various electric field conditions with dedicated setups and used to produce a simulation tools aiming at reproducing the operating response in high intensity PBS (Pencil Beam Scanning) coming from IBA's (Ion Beam Applications) next generation of proton beam accelerators. In addition, an ionization chamber-based dosimetry equipment was developed, DOSION III, for radiobiology studies conducted at GANIL under the supervision of the CIMAP laboratory. (author)

  20. Factors influencing the spatial extent of mobile source air pollution impacts: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Jonathan I

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been growing interest among exposure assessors, epidemiologists, and policymakers in the concept of "hot spots", or more broadly, the "spatial extent" of impacts from traffic-related air pollutants. This review attempts to quantitatively synthesize findings about the spatial extent under various circumstances. Methods We include both the peer-reviewed literature and government reports, and focus on four significant air pollutants: carbon monoxide, benzene, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter (including both ultrafine particle counts and fine particle mass. From the identified studies, we extracted information about significant factors that would be hypothesized to influence the spatial extent within the study, such as the study type (e.g., monitoring, air dispersion modeling, GIS-based epidemiological studies, focus on concentrations or health risks, pollutant under study, background concentration, emission rate, and meteorological factors, as well as the study's implicit or explicit definition of spatial extent. We supplement this meta-analysis with results from some illustrative atmospheric dispersion modeling. Results We found that pollutant characteristics and background concentrations best explained variability in previously published spatial extent estimates, with a modifying influence of local meteorology, once some extreme values based on health risk estimates were removed from the analysis. As hypothesized, inert pollutants with high background concentrations had the largest spatial extent (often demonstrating no significant gradient, and pollutants formed in near-source chemical reactions (e.g., nitrogen dioxide had a larger spatial extent than pollutants depleted in near-source chemical reactions or removed through coagulation processes (e.g., nitrogen oxide and ultrafine particles. Our illustrative dispersion model illustrated the complex interplay of spatial extent definitions, emission rates

  1. Successes and challenges from formation to implementation of eleven broad-extent conservation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik A.; Bradford, John B.; Germino, Matthew J.; Mattsson, Brady J.; Post van der Burg, Max; Brunson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Integration of conservation partnerships across geographic, biological, and administrative boundaries is increasingly relevant because drivers of change, such as climate shifts, transcend these boundaries. We explored successes and challenges of established conservation programs that span multiple watersheds and consider both social and ecological concerns. We asked representatives from a diverse set of 11 broadextent conservation partnerships in 29 countries 17 questions that pertained to launching and maintaining partnerships for broad-extent conservation, specifying ultimate management objectives, and implementation and learning. Partnerships invested more funds in implementing conservation actions than any other aspect of conservation, and a program’s context (geographic extent, United States vs. other countries, developed vs. developing nation) appeared to substantially affect program approach. Despite early successes of these organizations and benefits of broad-extent conservation, specific challenges related to uncertainties in scaling up information and to coordination in the face of diverse partner governance structures, conflicting objectives, and vast uncertainties regarding future system dynamics hindered long-term success, as demonstrated by the focal organizations. Engaging stakeholders, developing conservation measures, and implementing adaptive management were dominant challenges. To inform future research on broad-extent conservation, we considered several challenges when we developed detailed questions, such as what qualities of broad-extent partnerships ensure they complement, integrate, and strengthen, rather than replace, local conservation efforts and which adaptive management processes yield actionable conservation strategies that account explicitly for dynamics and uncertainties regarding multiscale governance, environmental conditions, and knowledge of the system?

  2. Mapping US Urban Extents from MODIS Data Using One-Class Classification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas are one of the most important components of human society. Their extents have been continuously growing during the last few decades. Accurate and timely measurements of the extents of urban areas can help in analyzing population densities and urban sprawls and in studying environmental issues related to urbanization. Urban extents detected from remotely sensed data are usually a by-product of land use classification results, and their interpretation requires a full understanding of land cover types. In this study, for the first time, we mapped urban extents in the continental United States using a novel one-class classification method, i.e., positive and unlabeled learning (PUL, with multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data for the year 2010. The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS night stable light data were used to calibrate the urban extents obtained from the one-class classification scheme. Our results demonstrated the effectiveness of the use of the PUL algorithm in mapping large-scale urban areas from coarse remote-sensing images, for the first time. The total accuracy of mapped urban areas was 92.9% and the kappa coefficient was 0.85. The use of DMSP-OLS night stable light data can significantly reduce false detection rates from bare land and cropland far from cities. Compared with traditional supervised classification methods, the one-class classification scheme can greatly reduce the effort involved in collecting training datasets, without losing predictive accuracy.

  3. On the relationship between atmospheric circulation and the fluctuations in the sea ice extents of the Bering and Okhotsk Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Parkinson, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the hemispheric atmospheric circulation on the sea ice covers of the Bering Sea and the Sea of Okhotsk is examined using data obtained with the Nimbus 5 electrically scanning microwave radiometer for the four winters of the 1973-1976 period. The 3-day averaged sea ice extent data were used to establish periods for which there is an out-of-phase relationship between fluctuations of the two ice covers. A comparison of the sea-level atmospheric pressure field with the seasonal, interannual, and short-term sea ice fluctuations reveal an association between changes in the phase and the amplitude of the long waves in the atmosphere and advance and retreat of Arctic ice covers.

  4. Therapy of the burnout syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczak, Dieter; Wastian, Monika; Schneider, Michael

    2012-01-01

    studies and the need for further research. Some authors report the effects of considerable natural recovering. Numerous limitations affect the quality of the results. Intervention contents and duration, study design and study size are very diverse and do not permit direct comparison. Most of the samples are small by size with low statistical power, long-term follow-ups are missing. Comorbidities and parallel utilized therapies are insufficient documented or controlled. Most of the studies use the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) as diagnostic or outcome-tool, but with different cut-off-points. It should be noticed that the validity of the MBI as diagnostic tool is not proved. Ethical, juridical and social determining factors are not covered or discussed in the studies. The efficacy of therapies for the treatment of the burnout syndrome is insufficient investigated. Only for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) exists an adequate number of studies which prove its efficacy. Big long-term experimental studies are missing which compare the efficacy of the single therapies and evaluate their evidence. The natural recovering without any therapy needs further research. Additionally, it has to be examined to what extent therapies and their possible effects are thwarted by the conditions of the working place and the working conditions.

  5. Mobile Phones and Psychosocial Therapies with Vulnerable People: a First State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Maria Yolanda García; Sexto, Carlos Ferrás; Rocha, Álvaro; Aguilera, Adrián

    2016-06-01

    Mobile phones are becoming a communication tool commonly used by people all over the world; and they are started to be adopted in psychosocial therapies involving vulnerable people. We are herein presenting the results of an academic literature review. We identified scientific papers published between 2006 and 2015 resorting to academic databases available on the Internet, applying a systematic selection method based on quality criteria. Secondly, we analysed contents, highlighting the scarcity of research involving vulnerable people. The available literature specialized in psychosocial therapies offers investigation results which involve mobile phones and patients in general, focusing particularly on the clinical psychology field and, to a lesser extent, on the social work field. Particularly significant are the investigation works developed in the United States. In the present paper we introduce a first "state of the art", identifying opportunities and also the limitations surrounding the use of mobile phones in psychosocial therapies targeting the vulnerable. Issues concerning privacy and data confidentiality, and the access of vulnerable people to mobile phones and how they use them, pose significant challenges; but they offer the opportunity to reach isolated or impoverished populations, or even to facilitate access to social and healthcare services. We close this paper formulating possible orientations, hypotheses and goals to design new investigation works involving vulnerable populations.

  6. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Physical Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Physical Therapy Print en español Terapia física Physical Therapy Basics Doctors often recommend physical therapy (PT) ...

  7. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  8. Translational research on advanced therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Belardelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  9. Translational research on advanced therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardelli, Filippo; Rizza, Paola; Moretti, Franca; Carella, Cintia; Galli, Maria Cristina; Migliaccio, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues) is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  10. Radiation therapy of brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, R; Huenig, R [Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland). Universitaetsinstitut fuer Medizinische Radiologie

    1975-08-01

    Experiences are reported obtained with radiation therapy of brain metastases in 121 patients during the last 15 years. The treatment to a lesser extent aimed at prolongation of survival but much more at the attempt to alleviate troubles and to spare pain. The indication thus involved medical points of view as well as ethical ones. The radiotherapy of cerebral metastases comprises the whole cranial volume and requires a focal dose of minimally 4,000 R within four weeks. In 53% of the patients, the regression of neurological symptoms was considerable, in 18% even complete, partly beginning already after a few days of treatment. The number of recurrences was small. Under conditions of rigorous indication, the radiation therapy of brain metastases offers a rewarding palliative measure.

  11. Human activities on the deep seafloor in the North East Atlantic: an assessment of spatial extent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R Benn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental impacts of human activities on the deep seafloor are of increasing concern. While activities within waters shallower than 200 m have been the focus of previous assessments of anthropogenic impacts, no study has quantified the extent of individual activities or determined the relative severity of each type of impact in the deep sea. METHODOLOGY: The OSPAR maritime area of the North East Atlantic was chosen for the study because it is considered to be one of the most heavily impacted by human activities. In addition, it was assumed data would be accessible and comprehensive. Using the available data we map and estimate the spatial extent of five major human activities in the North East Atlantic that impact the deep seafloor: submarine communication cables, marine scientific research, oil and gas industry, bottom trawling and the historical dumping of radioactive waste, munitions and chemical weapons. It was not possible to map military activities. The extent of each activity has been quantified for a single year, 2005. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human activities on the deep seafloor of the OSPAR area of the North Atlantic are significant but their footprints vary. Some activities have an immediate impact after which seafloor communities could re-establish, while others can continue to make an impact for many years and the impact could extend far beyond the physical disturbance. The spatial extent of waste disposal, telecommunication cables, the hydrocarbon industry and marine research activities is relatively small. The extent of bottom trawling is very significant and, even on the lowest possible estimates, is an order of magnitude greater than the total extent of all the other activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To meet future ecosystem-based management and governance objectives for the deep sea significant improvements are required in data collection and availability as well as a greater awareness of the relative impact of

  12. Family Psychology and Family Therapy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameguchi, Kenji; Murphy-Shigematsu, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan, tracing the origins of these movements, explaining how these fields were activated by the problem of school refusal, and describing an approach to family therapy that has been developed to work with families confronting this problem, as well as preventive programs of family…

  13. Gestalt Therapy: Its Inheritance from Gestalt Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yontef, Gary M.

    When adequately elaborated, the basic method of Gestalt therapy can be traced to the phenomenological field theory of Gestalt psychology. Gestalt therapy differs from Gestalt psychology not because of a difference in philosophy or method, but because of different contexts; the clinical context has different demands than those of basic research.…

  14. An exploration of the extent of inclusion of spirituality and spiritual care concepts in core nursing textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona; Murphy, Maryanne; Neill, Freda; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Holistic care that encompasses a spiritual dimension is an expectation in modern healthcare (Rothman, 2009). Increasing attention is being paid to the role of nurses in providing spiritual care to patients. However nurses lack specific skills and expertise in this area (Lundmark, 2006; Timmins, 2010; RCN, 2011), and the extent to which their undergraduate education prepares them for this role is unclear. There is often an absence of clear direction about what to teach undergraduate nursing students. The extent to which core textbooks direct student studies in this area is not known. There is some evidence that some of these fundamental core textbooks provide insufficient direction (Pesut, 2008), thus gaps in knowledge and care provision in this field could be exacerbated. The aim of this study is to examine the extent to which spiritual care concepts are addressed in core nursing textbooks. Five hundred and forty three books were sampled from the Nursing and Midwifery Core Collection list (UK) (Tomlinsons, 2010) representing 94% of the total (n=580). A survey, the Spirituality Textbook Analysis Tool (STAT), was developed and used to collect data. One hundred and thirty of the books included content related to spirituality and religion. However there was little consistency in the core nursing textbooks with regard to direction for providing spiritual care. Thirty eight percent of the books defined spiritual care and 36% provided an outline of the role of the nurse in providing this. While some books advocated the assessment of patients' spiritual needs (32%) few referred specifically to assessment tools. It is essential that nurses are adequately prepared to address the spiritual needs of patients. While there are numerous spiritual care texts that deal solely with this issue for nurses, there is an argument emerging that core nursing texts used by nursing students ought to encompass spiritual care elements. Lack of specific focus on this field, by these key

  15. Impact of ECG findings and process-of-care characteristics on the likelihood of not receiving reperfusion therapy in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: results of a field evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI do not receive reperfusion therapy and are known to have poorer outcomes. We aimed to perform the first population-level, integrated analysis of clinical, ECG and hospital characteristics associated with non-receipt of reperfusion therapy in patients with STEMI. METHODS AND RESULTS: This systematic evaluation of STEMI care in 82 hospitals in Quebec included all patients with a discharge diagnosis of myocardial infarction, presenting with characteristic symptoms and an ECG showing STEMI as attested by at least one of two study cardiologists or left bundle branch block (LBBB. Excluding LBBB, an ECG was considered a definite STEMI diagnosis if both cardiologists scored 'certain STEMI' and ambiguous if one scored 'uncertain' or 'not STEMI'. Centers were classified according to accessibility to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI: 1 on-site PPCI; 2 routine transfer for PPCI; 3 varying mix of PPCI transfer and on-site fibrinolysis; and 4 routine on-site fibrinolysis. Of 3730 STEMI/LBBB patients, 812 (21.8% did not receive reperfusion therapy. In multivariate analysis, likelihood of no reperfusion therapy was a function of PPCI accessibility (odds ratio [OR] for fibrinolysis versus PPCI centers = 3.1; 95% CI: 2.2-4.4, presence of LBBB (OR = 24.1; 95% CI: 17.8-32.9 and an ECG ambiguous for STEMI (OR = 4.1; 95% CI: 3.3-5.1. When the ECG was ambiguous, likelihood of no reperfusion therapy was highest in hospitals most distant from PPCI centers. CONCLUSIONS: ECG diagnostic ambiguity, LBBB and PPCI accessibility are important predictors of not receiving reperfusion therapy, suggesting opportunities for improving outcomes.

  16. A method for determining the extent of thermal burns in elephants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shakespeare

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A practical method was developed to assess the extent of burns suffered by elephants caught in bush fires. In developing this method, the surface areas of the different body parts of juvenile, subadult and adult elephants were first determined using standard equations, and then expressed as a percentage of the total body surface area. When viewed from a distance, the burnt proportion of all body segments is estimated, converted to percentages of total body surface area, and then summed to determine the extent of burns suffered.

  17. Role of extent of resection on quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed GBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudry, Usama Khalid; Shaikh, Huzaifa Ismail; Nisar, Areeba; Khan, Saad Akhtar; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2018-01-01

    Glioblastomas known for their adverse outcomes are most reportedly managed by surgical resection. Studies on the impact of (Extent of Resection) EOR against Quality of Life (QOL) are very limited. We have collected data from recent studies in this review to extract a general consensus among the neurosurgeons regarding the EOR. Key parameters like functional independence, neurocognitive improvements and global health status have been explored in the context of QOL. The currently available data suggests that an increased EOR may help improve QOL in GBM patients. With the help of recent advancements it may be possible to attain a better extent of resection while operating on GBMs.

  18. 241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

    2013-08-26

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

  19. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  20. Diabetes and male sex are key risk factor correlates of the extent of coronary artery calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoll, Rachel; Zhao, Ying; Wiklund, Urban

    2017-01-01

    for CAC scoring. RESULTS: Among all patients, male sex (OR = 4.85, pdyslipidemia and smoking also showing a relationship. Among patients with CAC, age, diabetes, hypertension...... and dyslipidemia were associated with an increasing CAC score in males and females, with diabetes being the strongest dichotomous risk factor (p... males and females. To a lesser extent, hypertension and dyslipidemia were also associated in the high CAC quantiles and the low CAC quantiles respectively. CONCLUSION: In addition to age and male sex in the total population, diabetes is the most important correlate of CAC extent in both sexes....

  1. [Neurofeedback therapy in the treatment of tinnitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z Q; Lei, G X; Li, Y L; Zhang, D; Shen, W D; Yang, S M; Qiao, Y H

    2018-02-01

    Neurofeedback therapy is a fast-growing field of tinnitus treatment, which is a new type of biofeedback therapy. In the past, the "muscle tone" and "blood flow" were used as feedback signals in biofeedback therapy to treat tinnitus, however there was no long-term follow-up report. Instead, neurofeedback therapy utilizes EEG (electroencephalogram) as the feedback signal, which is also called EEG biofeedback therapy. At present, most treatments of tinnitus only record subjective measures of patients as evaluation indicators, whereas neurofeedback therapy is more convincing for using comprehensive evaluation including changes of brain wave as objective indicators and subjective measures of patients. A significant number of tinnitus patients have varying degree of hearing loss. As neurofeedback therapy takes advantage of EEG as feedback signal that is delivered to the patients through visual information, it has unique advantages of being not affected by the degree of hearing loss compared to the sound masking or other sound treatment. Long-term follow-up results showed that the efficacy of neurofeedback therapy was stable after half a year of short-term treatment. This paper summarizes the progress of the various types of biofeedback therapy in the treatment of tinnitus, and focuses on the neurofeedback therapy for the mechanism, indication, process, efficacy evaluation, defect and prospect of neurofeedback therapy in tinnitus treatment in order to help promote the development of domestic clinical neurofeedback therapy in tinnitus.

  2. Some aspects of using expressive arts-therapies in education and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Miholić Damir; Martinec Renata

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary approaches in different fields of expressive arts-therapies (art-therapy, music therapy, dance movement therapy, bibliotherapy, psychodrama and drama therapy) are presented in this article. In that way, theoretical background, some elements of observation and assessment, as well as specific methods of therapy interventions are described. Relevant knowledge about different aspects of expressive art-therapies is presented by reviewing some recent references and results of different...

  3. To what extent is clinical and laboratory information used to perform medication reviews in the nursing home setting? the CLEAR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mestres Gonzalvo C

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carlota Mestres Gonzalvo,1 Kim PGM Hurkens,2 Hugo AJM de Wit,3 Brigit PC van Oijen,1 Rob Janknegt,1 Jos MGA Schols,4 Wubbo J Mulder,5 Frans R Verhey,6 Bjorn Winkens,7 Paul-Hugo M van der Kuy1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Geriatric Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Toxicology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen, 4Department of Family Medicine and Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 6Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Alzheimer Centre Limburg/School for Mental Health and Neurosciences, 7Department of Methodology and Statistics, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate to what extent laboratory data, actual medication, medical history, and/or drug indication influence the quality of medication reviews for nursing home patients. Methods: Forty-six health care professionals from different fields were requested to perform medication reviews for three different cases. Per case, the amount of information provided varied in three subsequent stages: stage 1, medication list only; stage 2, adding laboratory data and reason for hospital admission; and stage 3, adding medical history/drug indication. Following a slightly modified Delphi method, a multidisciplinary team performed the medication review for each case and stage. The results of these medication reviews were used as reference reviews (gold standard. The remarks from the participants were scored, according to their potential clinical impact, from relevant to harmful on a scale of 3 to -1. A total score per case and stage was calculated and expressed as a percentage of the total score from the expert

  4. Field transformations to multivalued fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinert, H [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Changes of field variables may lead to multivalued fields which do not satisfy the Schwarz integrability conditions. Their quantum field theory needs special care as is shown in an application to the superfluid and superconducting phase transitions.

  5. [Gestalt therapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J; Poupard, D

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe Gestalt Therapy. They retrace its fundamental theoretical axes. These are psychoanalysis, character analysis, the german Gestalt theory of perception, existentialism, and the Orient. Some principal concepts are then elaborated more fully such as the cycle of awareness, desensitization, excitation anxiety and the five defense mechanisms: retroflection, introjection, projection, deflection, and confluence. The nature and goals of the therapeutic process are also described before the presentation of some techniques specific to this approach such as enactment and role playing. Finally, certain basic Gestalt rules, which aim at facilitating and intensifying the communication process among group members, are enunciated.

  6. A curve fitting approach to estimate the extent of fermentation of indigestible carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Weening, D.; Jonkers, E.; Boer, T.; Stellaard, F.; Small, A. C.; Preston, T.; Vonk, R. J.; Priebe, M. G.

    Background Information about the extent of carbohydrate digestion and fermentation is critical to our ability to explore the metabolic effects of carbohydrate fermentation in vivo. We used cooked (13)C-labelled barley kernels, which are rich in indigestible carbohydrates, to develop a method which

  7. Flood extent and water level estimation from SAR using data-model integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajadi, O. A.; Meyer, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images have long been recognized as a valuable data source for flood mapping. Compared to other sources, SAR's weather and illumination independence and large area coverage at high spatial resolution supports reliable, frequent, and detailed observations of developing flood events. Accordingly, SAR has the potential to greatly aid in the near real-time monitoring of natural hazards, such as flood detection, if combined with automated image processing. This research works towards increasing the reliability and temporal sampling of SAR-derived flood hazard information by integrating information from multiple SAR sensors and SAR modalities (images and Interferometric SAR (InSAR) coherence) and by combining SAR-derived change detection information with hydrologic and hydraulic flood forecast models. First, the combination of multi-temporal SAR intensity images and coherence information for generating flood extent maps is introduced. The application of least-squares estimation integrates flood information from multiple SAR sensors, thus increasing the temporal sampling. SAR-based flood extent information will be combined with a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to reduce false alarms and to estimate water depth and flood volume. The SAR-based flood extent map is assimilated into the Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System (Hec-RAS) model to aid in hydraulic model calibration. The developed technology is improving the accuracy of flood information by exploiting information from data and models. It also provides enhanced flood information to decision-makers supporting the response to flood extent and improving emergency relief efforts.

  8. The extent of permafrost in China during the local Last Glacial Maximum (LLGM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, L.; Jin, H.; Li, C.; Cui, Z.; Chang, X.; Marchenko, S.S.; Vandenberghe, J.; Zhang, T.; Luo, D.; Liu, G.; Yi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations into relict periglacial phenomena in northern and western China and on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau provide information for delineating the extent of permafrost in China during the Late Pleistocene. Polygonal and wedge-shaped structures indicate that, during the local Last Glacial

  9. To What Extent Do Student Teachers Have the Values Required for the Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Vives, Fabia; Camps, Misericordia; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine to what extent the values held by student teachers at the start of a university degree programme coincide with the values that practising teachers consider important for their profession. Our findings show that student teachers and practising teachers have different value profiles, and that there is…

  10. Fascin expression in cholesteatoma: correlation with destruction of the ossicular chain and extent of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnetoglu, A; Sari, M; Baglam, T; Erbarut Seven, I; Yumusakhuylu, A C; Topuz, M F; Batman, C

    2015-08-01

    Fascin is an actin-bundling protein found in cell membrane protrusions and increases cell motility. The expression of fascin in epithelial neoplasms has been described only recently. No data are available concerning the role of this protein in invasive cholesteatoma. Thus, we investigated the expression of fascin in cholesteatoma tissue and the relationship between fascin expression and intraoperative evaluation of the destruction of the ossicular chain and extent of disease. Cholesteatoma specimens of 28 patients and external auditory canal (EAC) skin specimens of the same patients (as the control group) were collected from mastoidectomies. Immunohistochemical technique was used to investigate the fascin expression in all cholesteatoma tissues and EAC skin specimens. Immunohistochemical staining was assessed semiquantitatively based on the thickness of epithelium. SPSS software version 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was performed to statistically analyse the relationships between fascin expression and intraoperative evaluation destruction of ossicular chain and extent of the disease. Immunohistochemically, there was no or very low fascin expression observed in normal epithelial cells of EAC skin, while expressed in cholesteatoma tissue. Also, fascin expression in cholesteatoma tissues was significantly correlated with destruction of ossicular chain and extent of the disease. Fascin expression is usually found in cholesteatoma epithelium and is correlated with destruction of the ossicular chain and extent of disease. Considering all of the correlations between the clinical and histopathological findings, 'fascin immunoexpression scoring' may be used for histological grading of cholesteatoma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Interdependence between measures of extent and severity of myocardial perfusion defects provided by automatic quantification programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Ali, Henrik Hussein; Palmer, John; Carlsson, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the values of lesion extent and severity provided by the two automatic quantification programs AutoQUANT and 4D-MSPECT using myocardial perfusion images generated by Monte Carlo simulation of a digital phantom. The combination between a realistic computer phantom and a...

  12. Estimating the seaward extent of sea breeze from QuickSCAT scatterometry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aparna, M.; Shetye, S.R.; Shankar, D.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.

    An objective method for quantifying the seaward extent of the sea breeze is presented. The underlying assumption is that the offshore decay in the strength of the sea breeze results in an offshore decay of the vector correlation between the wind...

  13. To What Extent Can Motor Imagery Replace Motor Execution While Learning a Fine Motor Skill?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Szarkiewicz, Sylwia; Prekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna; Jaskowski, Wojciech; van der Lubbe, Robert Henricus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is generally thought to share common mechanisms with motor execution. In the present study, we examined to what extent learning a fine motor skill by motor imagery may substitute physical practice. Learning effects were assessed by manipulating the proportion of motor execution and

  14. 26 CFR 1.731-1 - Extent of recognition of gain or loss on distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., that is, capital gain or loss. (b) Gain or loss recognized by partnership. A distribution of property... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Distributions by A Partnership § 1.731-1 Extent of... gain. (i) Where money is distributed by a partnership to a partner, no gain shall be recognized to the...

  15. Extent of availability and utilization of law reports by law students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the extent of availability and utilization of law reports by final year lawstudents in the Universities of Uyo and Calabar law libraries. Survey research design was adopted for the study. A total of 450 under graduate final year Law students projects were examined to determine thefrequencyofcitations of ...

  16. Accuracy of determining preoperative cancer extent measured by automated breast ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Fukuma, Eisuke

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of measuring preoperative cancer extent using automated breast ultrasonography (US). This retrospective study consisted of 40 patients with histopathologically confirmed breast cancer. All of the patients underwent automated breast US (ABVS; Siemens Medical Solutions, Mountain View, CA, USA) on the day before the surgery. The sizes of the lesions on US were measured on coronal multiplanar reconstruction images using the ABVS workstation. Histopathological measurement of tumor size included not only the invasive foci but also any in situ component and was used as the gold standard. The discrepancy of the tumor extent between automated breast US and the histological examination was calculated. Automated breast US enabled visualization of the breast carcinomas in all patients. The mean size of the lesions on US was 12 mm (range 4-62 mm). The histopathological diagnosis was ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in seven patients and invasive ductal carcinoma in 33 patients (18 without an intraductal component, 15 with an intraductal component). Lesions ranged in diameter from 4 to 65 mm (mean 16 mm). The accuracy of determination of the tumor extent with a deviation in length of <2 cm was 98% (39/40). Automated breast US is thought to be useful for evaluating tumor extent preoperatively.

  17. The Extent to which the Chemistry Textbook of Grade 11 is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to identify the extent to which the chemistry textbook of grade 11 in Ethiopian schools is appropriate for learner-centered approach. The content of the new chemistry textbook for grade 11 was analyzed vis-à-vis the suggested evidence of learnercentered techniques. The analysis covered the ...

  18. To What Extent Does Current Scientific Research and Textbook Content Align? A Methodology and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierema, Andrea M.-K.; Schwartz, Renee S.; Gill, Sharon A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for reform in education recommend science curricula to be based on central ideas instead of a larger number of topics and for alignment between current scientific research and curricula. Because alignment is rarely studied, especially for central ideas, we developed a methodology to discover the extent of alignment between primary…

  19. Extent of reference services to users in Ebonyi State Public Libraary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Users are very satisfied with the extent of reference services provided to them by the public library studied. Findings further show that the reference section of Ebonyi State Public Library, Abakiliki is faced with the problems of inadequate reading space, equipment and furniture, reference information sources, unconducive ...

  20. a research tool for analysing and monitoring the Extent to which ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practice at the majority of under-resourced rural schools in the country. ... into the extent to which they integrate natural resource management issues. ... education is promoted as the best educational strategy to deal with the ... environmental sustainability and human wellbeing. ..... Comparative Education, 38(2), 171–187.

  1. Total Quality Management in Secondary Schools in Kenya: Extent of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngware, Moses Waithanji; Wamukuru, David Kuria; Odebero, Stephen Onyango

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent to which secondary schools practiced aspects of total quality management (TQM). Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional research design was used in this study. A sample of 300 teachers in a residential session during a school holiday provided their perceptions on the practice of TQM in their schools. Data…

  2. Detecting the Extent of Cellular Decomposition after Sub-Eutectoid Annealing in Rolled UMo Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautz, Elizabeth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jana, Saumyadeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sweet, Lucas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-07-31

    This report presents an automated image processing approach to quantifying microstructure image data, specifically the extent of eutectoid (cellular) decomposition in rolled U-10Mo foils. An image processing approach is used here to be able to quantitatively describe microstructure image data in order to relate microstructure to processing parameters (time, temperature, deformation).

  3. The Extent and Effects of Peer Pressure among High School Students: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, B. Bradford

    1982-01-01

    The extent of peer pressure in high school and its influences on behavior were examined in accounts from college undergraduates. One-third of both genders identified peer pressure as difficult, being stronger for females. Pressure areas included dating, sexual activity, and drug and alcohol use, but not parent-child relationships. (Author/CM)

  4. Effect of dietary molasses on the site and extent of digestion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this experiment was to determine the site and extent of digestion of nutrients in sheep fed broiler litter alone (100% litter treatment), broiler litter plus 7.5% sugarcane molasses (92.5% litter treatment) and broiler litter plus 15% molasses (85% litter treatment). Voluntary intake was increased by molasses, ...

  5. Efficacy of helical CT in evaluating local tumor extent of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yutaka

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the diagnostic accuracy of helical CT (HCT) in the determination of local tumor extent of breast cancer. One hundred forty consecutive patients with breast cancer, including 87 invasive ductal carcinomas without extensive intraductal components (EIC), 44 invasive ductal carcinomas with EIC, 2 non-invasive ductal carcinomas, and 7 invasive lobular carcinomas, were included in the study. Three-dimensional tumor diameter including whole extent was measured on HCT, and the amount of invasion to fat tissue, skin, pectoral muscle, and chest wall was estimated using a three-step scale. These results were then compared with the pathological findings. Breast cancers appeared as areas of high attenuation compared with the surrounding breast tissue in all patients. Tumor extent was correctly diagnosed by HCT to within a maximum difference of 1 cm in 88 patients (63%) and within 2 cm in 122 patients (87%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing muscular invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 100%, 99%, and 99%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing skin invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 84%, 93%, and 91%, respectively. HCT was able to visualize all of the tumors and detect the correct tumor extent in most patients. (author)

  6. Efficacy of helical CT in evaluating local tumor extent of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Yutaka [Juntendo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Urayasu Hospital

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the diagnostic accuracy of helical CT (HCT) in the determination of local tumor extent of breast cancer. One hundred forty consecutive patients with breast cancer, including 87 invasive ductal carcinomas without extensive intraductal components (EIC), 44 invasive ductal carcinomas with EIC, 2 non-invasive ductal carcinomas, and 7 invasive lobular carcinomas, were included in the study. Three-dimensional tumor diameter including whole extent was measured on HCT, and the amount of invasion to fat tissue, skin, pectoral muscle, and chest wall was estimated using a three-step scale. These results were then compared with the pathological findings. Breast cancers appeared as areas of high attenuation compared with the surrounding breast tissue in all patients. Tumor extent was correctly diagnosed by HCT to within a maximum difference of 1 cm in 88 patients (63%) and within 2 cm in 122 patients (87%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing muscular invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 100%, 99%, and 99%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing skin invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 84%, 93%, and 91%, respectively. HCT was able to visualize all of the tumors and detect the correct tumor extent in most patients. (author)

  7. The visual extent of an object: suppose we know the object locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijlings, J.R.R.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Scha, R.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    The visual extent of an object reaches beyond the object itself. This is a long standing fact in psychology and is reflected in image retrieval techniques which aggregate statistics from the whole image in order to identify the object within. However, it is unclear to what degree and how the visual

  8. 41 CFR 102-118.60 - To what extent must my agency use electronic commerce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... agency use electronic commerce? 102-118.60 Section 102-118.60 Public Contracts and Property Management... Services § 102-118.60 To what extent must my agency use electronic commerce? Your agency must use electronic commerce in all areas of your transportation program. This includes the use of electronic systems...

  9. Less ice on the Baltic reduces the extent of hypoxic bottom waters and sedimentary phosphorus release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaat, J.E.; Bouwer, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A significant relation was established between the maximum extent of sea ice covering the Baltic Sea and the hypoxic area in the deeper parts of the Baltic Proper, with a lag of 2 years: for the period 1970-2000, less ice was correlated with a smaller anoxic area. At the same time, maximum ice

  10. A curve fitting approach to estimate the extent of fermentation of indigestible carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Weening, D.; Jonkers, E.; Boer, T.; Stellaard, F.; Small, A. C.; Preston, T.; Vonk, R. J.; Priebe, M. G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Information about the extent of carbohydrate digestion and fermentation is critical to our ability to explore the metabolic effects of carbohydrate fermentation in vivo. We used cooked (13)C-labelled barley kernels, which are rich in indigestible carbohydrates, to develop a method which

  11. Northern Alaskan land surface response to reduced Arctic sea ice extent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Matthew E. [University of Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Cassano, John J. [University of Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-05-15

    With Arctic sea ice extent at near-record lows, an improved understanding of the relationship between sea ice and the land surface is warranted. We examine the land surface response to changing sea ice by first conducting a simulation using the Community Atmospheric Model version 3.1 with end of the twenty-first century sea ice extent. This future atmospheric response is then used to force the Weather and Research Forecasting Model version 3.1 to examine the terrestrial land surface response at high resolution over the North Slope of Alaska. Similar control simulations with twentieth century sea ice projections are also performed, and in both simulations only sea ice extent is altered. In the future sea ice extent experiment, atmospheric temperature increases significantly due to increases in latent and sensible heat flux, particularly in the winter season. Precipitation and snow pack increase significantly, and the increased snow pack contributes to warmer soil temperatures for most seasons by insulating the land surface. In the summer, however, soil temperatures are reduced due to increased albedo. Despite warmer near-surface atmospheric temperatures, it is found that spring melt is delayed throughout much of the North Slope due to the increased snow pack, and the growing season length is shortened. (orig.)

  12. DOD Service Academies. Update on Extent of Sexual Harassment. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. National Security and International Affairs Div.