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Sample records for therapy devices panel

  1. 78 FR 13347 - Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of... Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function... monitoring levels of methotrexate to ensure appropriate drug therapy. FDA is seeking panel input on the...

  2. 76 FR 50485 - Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical... Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced... July 14, 2011, FDA announced that a meeting of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the...

  3. 76 FR 14414 - Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee...

  4. 78 FR 41803 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical.... SUMMARY: The meeting of the Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...

  5. 78 FR 20328 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical... Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee scheduled for April 5...

  6. 76 FR 48871 - Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical...

  7. 76 FR 55398 - Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of Postponement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is postponing the meeting of the Immunology Devices Panel...

  8. 78 FR 26786 - Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical...

  9. 75 FR 35495 - Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... should have normal gonioscopic anatomy and a visually significant cataract eligible for...

  10. 76 FR 42713 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was... of the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee would be...

  11. 76 FR 18227 - Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices... Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel (the panel) of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee that published... meeting of the Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee, and the...

  12. Guns and High Gas Output Devices Panel: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ronald L.; Kaste, Pamela J.

    2000-01-01

    A new panel known as the Guns and High Gas Output Panel was organized in 1999 under the auspices of the JANNAF Propellant and Characterization SubCommittee (PDCS). This is an introduction to our first meeting, purpose of the panel, and the scope of activities to be covered. The primary purpose of the panel is very simple: to provide a single focal point for interfacing Government Laboratories (Department of Defense and Department of Energy) and commercial industry researchers to share R&D activities and findings (i.e. facilitate the exchange of information) specifically aimed at gun-launched propulsion and high-gas output devices (gas generators and air bag inflators). Specific areas of interest included in the Panel's scope (and the Technical Data Base) are the following: (1) new propellant formulations and chemistry, (2) new ingredients, (3) ballistic effects of the new formulations and ingredients, (4) new processing methods unique to gun propellants, (5) thermochemistry of new ingredients, (6) unique physical and mechanical properties, (7) burning rates of new propellants and small scale closed bomb testing, (8) plasma effects on the propellant, and (9) unique safety and insensitive munitions properties.

  13. 75 FR 1395 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting...

  14. 75 FR 61507 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was...: In the Federal Register of August 16, 2010, FDA announced that a meeting of the General and Plastic...

  15. Magnification devices for endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Massimo; Taschieri, Silvio; Lodi, Giovanni; Banfi, Giuseppe; Weinstein, Roberto L

    2009-07-08

    After the introduction of microsurgical principles in endodontics, involving new techniques for root canal treatment, there has been a continuous search for enhancing the visualisation of the surgical field. It would be interesting to know if the technical advantages for the operator brought in by magnification devices like surgical microscope, endoscope and magnifying loupes, are also associated with advantages for the patient, in terms of improvement of clinical and radiographic outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate and compare the effects of endodontic treatment performed with the aid of magnification devices versus endodontic treatment without magnification devices. We also aimed at comparing among them the different magnification devices used in endodontics (microscope, endoscope, magnifying loupes). The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched with appropriate search strategies. Handsearching included nine dental journals. The bibliographies of relevant clinical trials and relevant articles were checked for identifying studies outside the handsearched journals. Seven manufacturers of instruments in the field of endodontics and/or endodontic surgery, as well as the authors of the identified randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were contacted in order to identify unpublished or ongoing RCTs. There were no language restrictions. The last electronic search was conducted on 2nd April 2009, and the last handsearching was undertaken on 31st January 2009. All randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing endodontic therapy performed with or without using one or more types of magnification device, as well as randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing two or more magnification devices used as an adjunct to endodontic therapy were considered. Screening of studies and data extraction were conducted independently and in duplicate. The Cochrane Collaboration statistical guidelines were to be

  16. Magnification devices for endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Massimo; Taschieri, Silvio; Lodi, Giovanni; Banfi, Giuseppe; Weinstein, Roberto L

    2015-12-09

    After the introduction of microsurgical principles in endodontics involving new techniques for root canal treatment, there has been a drive to enhance the visualisation of the surgical field. It is important to know if the technical advantages for the operator brought in by magnification devices such as surgical microscopes, endoscopes and magnifying loupes, are also associated with advantages for the patient in terms of improvement of clinical and radiographic outcomes. This version updates the review published in 2009. To evaluate and compare the effects of endodontic treatment performed with the aid of magnification devices versus endodontic treatment without magnification devices. We also aimed to compare the different magnification devices used in endodontics with one another. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 13 October 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 9), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 13 October 2015) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 13 October 2015). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We considered all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing endodontic therapy performed with versus without one or more magnification devices, as well as randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing two or more magnification devices used as an adjunct to endodontic therapy. We conducted screening of search results independently and in duplicate. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. The Cochrane Collaboration statistical guidelines were to be followed for data synthesis. No trials met the inclusion criteria for this review. No article was identified in the

  17. 75 FR 57968 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Gastroenterology and Urology...

  18. 78 FR 25747 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Gastroenterology and Urology...

  19. 75 FR 36660 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation...

  20. 75 FR 9422 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration ] (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation...

  1. 78 FR 24426 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation...

  2. 78 FR 66942 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation...

  3. 77 FR 42318 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation...

  4. 76 FR 17422 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation...

  5. 77 FR 71195 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation...

  6. 75 FR 47606 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical.... ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical...

  7. Multipurpose Panel Display Device Investigation. [technology assessment and product development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, R.

    1977-01-01

    A multipurpose panel was developed to provide a flexible control and a LED display panel with easily changeable nomenclature for use in applications where panel space is limited, but where a number of similar subsystems must be controlled, or where basic panel nomenclature and functions must be changed rapidly, as in the case of between mission changes of space shuttle payloads. In the first application, panel area limitations are overcome by time sharing a central control panel among several subsystems. In the latter case, entire control panel changes are effected by simply replacing a memory module, thereby reducing the extent of installation and checkout procedures between missions. Several types of control technologies (other than LED's) which show potential in meeting criteria for overcoming limitations of the panel are assessed.

  8. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-09

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the classification of the respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are three guidance documents entitled: "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Respiratory Viral Panel Multiplex Nucleic Acid Assay," as applicable, "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Testing for Human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) Using Nucleic Acid Assays," and as applicable,"Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Testing for Detection and Differentiation of Influenza A Virus Subtypes Using Multiplex Nucleic Acid Assays.'' The agency classified the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance documents that will serve as the special controls for this device.

  9. 76 FR 41507 - Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Obstetrics and Gynecology...

  10. 76 FR 39882 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery...

  11. 76 FR 14415 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery...

  12. 75 FR 49940 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery...

  13. 78 FR 16684 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery...

  14. 75 FR 36102 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery...

  15. Advanced Small Animal Conformal Radiation Therapy Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunil; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Przybyla, Beata; Webber, Jessica; Boerma, Marjan; Clarkson, Richard; Moros, Eduardo G; Corry, Peter M; Griffin, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a small animal conformal radiation therapy device that provides a degree of geometrical/anatomical targeting comparable to what is achievable in a commercial animal irradiator. small animal conformal radiation therapy device is capable of producing precise and accurate conformal delivery of radiation to target as well as for imaging small animals. The small animal conformal radiation therapy device uses an X-ray tube, a robotic animal position system, and a digital imager. The system is in a steel enclosure with adequate lead shielding following National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements 49 guidelines and verified with Geiger-Mueller survey meter. The X-ray source is calibrated following AAPM TG-61 specifications and mounted at 101.6 cm from the floor, which is a primary barrier. The X-ray tube is mounted on a custom-made "gantry" and has a special collimating assembly system that allows field size between 0.5 mm and 20 cm at isocenter. Three-dimensional imaging can be performed to aid target localization using the same X-ray source at custom settings and an in-house reconstruction software. The small animal conformal radiation therapy device thus provides an excellent integrated system to promote translational research in radiation oncology in an academic laboratory. The purpose of this article is to review shielding and dosimetric measurement and highlight a few successful studies that have been performed to date with our system. In addition, an example of new data from an in vivo rat model of breast cancer is presented in which spatially fractionated radiation alone and in combination with thermal ablation was applied and the therapeutic benefit examined.

  16. Evidence Considerations for Mobile Devices in the Occupational Therapy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Erickson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile app-based device utilization, including smartphones and handheld tablets, suggests a need to evaluate evidence to guide selection and implementation of these devices in the occupational therapy process. The purpose of the research was to explore the current body of evidence in relation to mobile app-based devices and to identify factors in the use of these devices throughout the occupational therapy process. Following review of available occupational therapy profession guidelines, assistive technology literature, and available mobile device research, practitioners using mobile app-based devices in occupational therapy should consider three areas: client needs, practitioner competence, and device factors. The purpose of this guideline is to identify factors in the selection and use of mobile app-based devices throughout the occupational therapy process based on available evidence. Considerations for mobile device implementation during the occupational therapy process is addressed, including evaluating outcomes needs, matching device with the client, and identifying support needs of the client.

  17. 77 FR 18829 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... AMPLATZER ASO Device & Gore HELEX ASD Occluder as transcatheter Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) occluders used... these events in the overall context of the disease and existing treatment options; (2) to discuss... and is not known about device treatment options. FDA intends to make background material available to...

  18. Luminance uniformity study of OLED lighting panels depending on OLED device structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyeong Woo; Son, Young Hoon; Kang, Byoung Yeop; Lee, Jung Min; Nam, Hyoungsik; Kwon, Jang Hyuk

    2015-11-30

    This paper describes the luminance uniformity of OLED lighting panels depending on OLED device structures of single emission layer (single-EML), 2-tandem, and 3-tandem. The luminance distribution is evaluated through the circuit simulation and the fabricated panel measurement. In the simulation results with yellow-green color panels of 30 × 80 mm2 emission area, a 3-tandem structure shows the lowest non-uniformity (1.34% at 7.5V), compared to single-EML (5.67% at 2.8V) and 2-tandem (2.78% at 5.3 V) structures at 1,000 cd/m2. The luminance non-uniformity is germane to the OLED conductance showing that the high luminance-current efficiency is of the most importance to achieve the uniform voltage and luminance distribution. In measurement, a 3-tandem structure also achieves the most uniform luminance distribution with non-uniformity of 4.1% while single EML and 2-tandem structures accomplish 9.6%, and 6.4%, respectively, at ~1,000 cd/m2. In addition, the simulation results ensure that a 3-tandem structure panel is allowed to be enlarged the panel size up to about 5,000 mm2 for lower luminance non-uniformity than 10% without any auxiliary metal electrodes.

  19. 77 FR 32125 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    ...: Avena Russell, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, rm. 1535, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-3805, Avena[email protected

  20. 77 FR 18829 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ...-8900. Contact Person: Avena Russell, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, Rm. 1535, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, Avena[email protected

  1. 76 FR 71983 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ...-8900. Contact Person: Avena Russell, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, Rm. 1535, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, Avena[email protected

  2. 76 FR 6623 - Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... to be offered directly to consumers include: (a) Genetic carrier screening for hereditary diseases (e... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Molecular and Clinical Genetics Panel...

  3. 77 FR 12064 - Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... committee hot line/ phone line to learn about possible modifications before coming to the meeting. Agenda..., sponsored by U-Systems, Inc. The ABUS scanning device is intended to increase breast cancer detection in... regulates irradiators intended for use in the immunologically active cells in blood and other tissues and...

  4. 78 FR 77689 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... regulation classifies iontophoresis devices as class III when intended to use direct current to introduce... in which a substance bearing a charge is propelled through the skin by an electric current... to deliver currents to transport drugs, soluble salts, or ionic solutions across the skin. The...

  5. 78 FR 49272 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) (21 U.S.C. 360(k)) (510(k)) pathway... regulatory history of ECC devices has been discussed as part of the proposed rule (77 FR 36951, June 20, 2012... to premarket notification (510(k)) and special controls. The regulatory history of external pacemaker...

  6. Device for actively reducing sound transmission, and panel comprising such device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    A device for actively reducing sound transmission, provided with a first and second wall ( 3, 5 ) enclosing an inner space ( 1, 2 ), wherein at least the second wall ( 5 ) is provided with actuators ( 6 ), for instance eletromagnetic actuators and/or piezoeleteric elements, wherein the said inner

  7. Device for actively reducing sound transmission, and panel comprising such device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2005-01-01

    A device for actively reducing sound transmission, provided with a first and second wall ( 3, 5 ) enclosing an inner space ( 1, 2 ), wherein at least the second wall ( 5 ) is provided with actuators ( 6 ), for instance eletromagnetic actuators and/or piezoeleteric elements, wherein the said inner

  8. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  9. Novel Silicon Devices for Radiation Therapy Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, Mara, E-mail: mara.bruzzi@unifi.it

    2016-02-11

    Modern radiotherapy techniques pose specific constraints in radiation-monitoring and dosimetry due to the occurrence of small radiation fields with high dose gradients, variation in space and time of the dose rate, variation in space and time of the beam energy spectrum. Novel devices coping with these strict conditions are needed. This paper reviews the most advanced technologies developed with silicon-based materials for clinical radiotherapy. Novel Si diodes as Pt-doped Si, epitaxial Si as well as thin devices have optimized performance, their response being independent of the accumulated dose, thus ensuring radiation tolerance and no need of recalibration. Monolithic devices based on segmented Si detectors can be easily tailored to optimize spatial resolution in the large active areas required in clinical radiotherapy. In particular, a monolithic device based on epitaxial p-type silicon, characterized by high spatial resolution and ability to directly measure temporal variations in dose modulation proved to be best viable solution for pre-treatment verifications in IMRT fields.

  10. Endodontic therapy using magnification devices: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Massimo; Taschieri, Silvio

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate if the use of magnification devices in endodontics is associated with the improvement of clinical and radiographic outcomes. The treatment success as determined by clinical and radiographic evaluation after 1-year follow-up was the main outcome. The main search terms used alone or in combination were: endodontic treatment, endodontic therapy, endodontic surgery, apicoectomy, periapical surgery, microscope, endoscope, loupes, magnification devices. The authors searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Oral Health Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for articles published up to September 2009 plus hand-searching of relevant journals and reference list of pertinent reviews and included studies. Prospective clinical trials comparing endodontic therapy performed with or without using magnification devices, as well as trials comparing two or more magnification devices for endodontic therapy were considered. Three prospective studies were included, all dealing with endodontic surgery. No significant difference in outcomes was found among patients treated using magnifying loupes, surgical microscope or endoscope. Similarly, no difference was found with or without using the endoscope. No comparative study on magnification devices was found regarding orthograde endodontic treatment. The type of magnification device per se can only minimally affect the treatment outcome. Well-designed randomized trials should be performed to determine the true difference in treatment outcomes when using a magnification device in both orthograde and surgical endodontic treatment, if any exist. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluorescent sensors for the basic metabolic panel enable measurement with a smart phone device over the physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awqatty, Becker; Samaddar, Shayak; Cash, Kevin J; Clark, Heather A; Dubach, J Matthew

    2014-10-21

    The advanced functionality of portable devices such as smart phones provides the necessary hardware to potentially perform complex diagnostic measurements in any setting. Recent research and development have utilized cameras and data acquisition properties of smart phones to create diagnostic approaches for a variety of diseases or pollutants. However, in concentration measurements, such as blood glucose, the performance of handheld diagnostic devices depends largely on the sensing mechanism. To expand measurements to multiple components, often necessary in medical tests, with a single diagnostic device, robust platform based sensors are needed. Here, we developed a suite of dual wavelength fluorescent sensors with response characteristics necessary to measure each component of a basic metabolic panel, a common clinical measurement. Furthermore, the response of these sensors could be measured with a simple optical setup to convert a smart phone into a fluorescence measurement instrument. This approach could be used as a mobile basic metabolic panel measurement system for point of care diagnostics.

  12. Medical Devices for Obesity Treatment: Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Eric J; Rizk, Monika; Bazerbachi, Fateh; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K

    2018-01-01

    Endoscopic bariatric therapies (EBTs) are effective tools for the management of obesity. By mimicking restrictive and bypass surgery physiology, they provide a safe and effective treatment option with the added capabilities of reaching a broader population. Multiple efficacious medical devices, such as intragastric balloons, endoscopic suturing/plication devices, and bypass liners, at various stages of development are available in the United States. EBTs represent the newest addition to a multidisciplinary approach in obesity management. This article reviews several devices' safety and efficacy for primary care providers in the era of evolving obesity treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Home oxygen therapy: re-thinking the role of devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Andrea S; Sestini, Piersante; Rottoli, Paola

    2018-01-04

    A range of devices are available for delivering and monitoring home oxygen therapy (HOT). Guidelines do not give indications for the choice of the delivery device but recommend the use of an ambulatory system in subjects on HOT whilst walking. Areas covered: We provide a clinical overview of HOT and review traditional and newer delivery and monitoring devices for HOT. Despite relevant technology advancements, clinicians, faced with many challenges when they prescribe oxygen therapy, often remain familiar to traditional devices and continuous flow delivery of oxygen. Some self-filling delivery-less devices could increase the users' level of independence with ecological advantage and, perhaps, reduced cost. Some newer portable oxygen concentrators are being available, but more work is needed to understand their performances in different diseases and clinical settings. Pulse oximetry has gained large diffusion worldwide and some models permit long-term monitoring. Some closed-loop portable monitoring devices are also able to adjust oxygen flow automatically in accordance with the different needs of everyday life. This might help to improve adherence and the practice of proper oxygen titration that has often been omitted because difficult to perform and time-consuming. Expert commentary: The prescribing physicians should know the characteristics of newer devices and use technological advancements to improve the practice of HOT.

  14. Biomaterial-Based Implantable Devices for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Sue Anne; Danti, Serena

    2017-01-01

    This review article focuses on the current local therapies mediated by implanted macroscaled biomaterials available or proposed for fighting cancer and also highlights the upcoming research in this field. Several authoritative review articles have collected and discussed the state-of-the-art as well as the advancements in using biomaterial-based micro- and nano-particle systems for drug delivery in cancer therapy. On the other hand, implantable biomaterial devices are emerging as highly versatile therapeutic platforms, which deserve an increased attention by the healthcare scientific community, as they are able to offer innovative, more effective and creative strategies against tumors. This review summarizes the current approaches which exploit biomaterial-based devices as implantable tools for locally administrating drugs and describes their specific medical applications, which mainly target resected brain tumors or brain metastases for the inaccessibility of conventional chemotherapies. Moreover, a special focus in this review is given to innovative approaches, such as combined delivery therapies, as well as to alternative approaches, such as scaffolds for gene therapy, cancer immunotherapy and metastatic cell capture, the later as promising future trends in implantable biomaterials for cancer applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. 77 FR 20642 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    .... Contact Person: Avena Russell, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, Rm. 1535, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, Avena[email protected

  16. The long-term stability of amorphous silicon flat panel imaging devices for dosimetry purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwe, R. J. W.; McDermott, L. N.; Sonke, J. J.; Tielenburg, R.; Wendling, M.; van Herk, M. B.; Mijnheer, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the stability of the response of amorphous silicon (a-Si)-flat panel imagers for dosimetry applications. Measurements of the imager's response under reference conditions were performed on a regular basis for four detectors of the same manufacturer. We found

  17. Heat exchanger panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  18. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seong-Rin [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, 2017 Kemper Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Schoenung, Julie M., E-mail: jmschoenung@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, 2017 Kemper Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  19. Treatment Guidelines for Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma: Preliminary Consensus of an International Expert Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Dian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Haas, Rick L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Salerno, Kilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Washington, DC (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); O' Sullivan, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Le Pechoux, Cecile [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Evidence for external beam radiation therapy (RT) as part of treatment for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) is limited. Preoperative RT is the subject of a current randomized trial, but the results will not be available for many years. In the meantime, many practitioners use preoperative RT for RPS, and although this approach is used in practice, there are no radiation treatment guidelines. An international expert panel was convened to develop consensus treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 15 academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of sarcoma was assembled. A systematic review of reports related to RT for RPS, RT for extremity sarcoma, and RT-related toxicities for organs at risk was performed. Due to the paucity of high-quality published data on the subject of RT for RPS, consensus recommendations were based largely on expert opinion derived from clinical experience and extrapolation of relevant published reports. It is intended that these clinical practice guidelines be updated as pertinent data become available. Results: Treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS are presented. Conclusions: An international panel of radiation oncologists who specialize in sarcoma reached consensus guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Many of the recommendations are based on expert opinion because of the absence of higher level evidence and, thus, are best regarded as preliminary. We emphasize that the role of preoperative RT for RPS has not been proven, and we await data from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study of preoperative radiotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for patients with RPS. Further data are also anticipated pertaining to normal tissue dose constraints, particularly for bowel tolerance. Nonetheless, as we await these data, the guidelines herein can be used to establish treatment uniformity to aid future assessments of efficacy

  20. 78 FR 27971 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Endosseous Dental Implants (Blade-form), one of the remaining preamendments Class III devices. The Class III blade-form endosseous dental implant is a device placed into the maxilla or mandible and composed of... made final, would reclassify the blade-form endosseous dental implant into class II (special controls...

  1. Stanol esters as a component of maximal dietary therapy in the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Scott M

    2005-07-04

    Use of plant stanols/sterols in forms that are sufficiently bioavailable for therapeutic effect should be a key element of maximal dietary therapy. This principle was recognized by National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and has been amply confirmed by experimental studies in humans. Since the introduction of statins, dietary therapy for control of elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels has received less attention. The time has come, however, to reassert the importance of maximal dietary therapy as a cost-effective means for treatment of elevated LDL concentrations and for lifetime prevention of coronary heart disease.

  2. Gastrointestinal traits: individualizing therapy for obesity with drugs and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Acosta, Andres

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this article were to review the discrepancy between numbers of people requiring weight loss treatment and results and to assess the potential effects of pharmacologic treatments (recently approved for obesity) and endoscopically deployed devices on quantitative GI traits in development for obesity treatment. We conducted a review of relevant literature to achieve our objectives. The 2013 guidelines increased the number of adults recommended for weight loss treatment by 20.9% (116.0 million to 140.2 million). There is an imbalance between efficacy and costs of commercial weight loss programs and drug therapy (average weight loss about 5 kg). The number of bariatric procedures performed in the United States has doubled in the past decade. The efficacy of bariatric surgery is attributed to reduction in the volume of the stomach, nutrient malabsorption with some types of surgery, increased postprandial incretin responses, and activation of farnesoid X receptor mechanisms. These GI and behavioral traits identify sub-phenotypes of obesity, based on recent research. The mechanisms or traits targeted by drug and device treatments include centrally mediated alterations of appetite or satiation, diversion of nutrients, and alteration of stomach capacity, gastric emptying, or incretin hormones. Future treatment may be individualized based on quantitative GI and behavioral traits measured in obese patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ventricular assist devices as destination therapy: psychosocial and ethical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Sherry; Kostick, Kristin; Delgado, Estevan; Bruce, Courtenay R

    2015-01-01

    One of the candidate evaluation challenges is determining when and how psychosocial domains influence short- and long-term destination therapy ventricular assist device (DT-VAD) outcomes. There are very few DT-VAD studies and no validated instruments to identify psychosocial risk factors. General practice is to borrow from the transplant literature, which may not be applicable to this unique device application. We question the relevance of using transplant psychosocial evaluation for patients who are candidates for DT-VAD only, particularly because these patients require a certain level of cognitive, psychological, and behavioral functioning to ensure proper long-term self-care with the VAD. We may be missing important psychological characteristics in our pre-evaluations by "borrowing" from the transplant literature, thereby underplaying significant factors that are especially relevant for DT-VAD candidates. Conversely, we may be screening out candidates who may benefit greatly from DT-VAD by using transplant criteria as part of the screening process. We use a case study to illustrate some of the challenges of weighing psychosocial risk factors in the DT-VAD population and to emphasize the need for developing distinct psychosocial assessment criteria for DT-VAD patients.

  4. Design of a Novel Servo-motorized Laser Device for Visual Pathways Diseases Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ignacio Sarmiento

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a novel servo-motorized laser device and a research protocol for visual pathways diseases therapies. The proposed servo-mechanized laser device can be used for potential rehabilitation of patients with hemianopia, quadrantanopia, scotoma, and some types of cortical damages. The device uses a semi spherical structure where the visual stimulus will be shown inside, according to a previous stimuli therapy designed by an ophthalmologist or neurologist. The device uses a pair of servomotors (with torque=1.5kg, which controls the laser stimuli position for the internal therapy and another pair for external therapy. Using electronic tools such as microcontrollers along with miscellaneous electronic materials, combined with LabVIEW based interface, a control mechanism is developed for the new device. The proposed device is well suited to run various visual stimuli therapies. We outline the major design principles including the physical dimensions, laser device’s kinematical analysis and the corresponding software development.

  5. [Management of infections from cardiac implantable electronic devices: recommendations from a study panel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante Mangoni, E; Carbonara, S; Iacobello, C; Tripodi, M F; Carretta, A; Caprioli, V; Pellegrino, P; Di Biase, M; Favale, S; Santantonio, T A; Esposito, S; Nappi, G; Angarano, G; Utili, R

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device (CIED) infections are an emerging clinical issue. There are no national recommendations on the management of these infections, also due to the limited number of dedicated and high quality clinical studies. Therefore, researchers from southern Italian centres have decided to share the clinical experience gathered so far in this field and report practical recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with CIED infection or endocarditis. Here we review the risk factors, diagnostic issues (microbiological and echocardiographic) and aetiology, and describe extensively the best therapeutic approach. We also address the management of complications, follow-up after discharge and the prevention of CIED infections. In this regard, a multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to appropriately manage the initial diagnostic process and the comorbidities, to plan proper antimicrobial treatment and complete percutaneous hardware removal, with the key support of microbiology and echocardiography.

  6. The case for over-the-counter shortwave therapy: safe and effective devices for pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawe, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed shortwave diathermy, an electromagnetic therapy, has been in clinical use for acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain for many decades. Innovation, miniaturization and advances in technology have allowed for the development of a new generation of shortwave devices that deliver a localized, low fixed dose of shortwave therapy. Clinical research has shown that these novel shortwave devices can be used safely in order to reduce acute and chronic pain, as well as the need for pain medications. Their ease of use and safety profile make low-dose shortwave devices an attractive alternative, or adjunct therapy, to pharmacological-based pain therapies.

  7. Low-power-consumption flat-panel light-emitting device driven by field-emission electron source using high-crystallinity single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoi, Norihiro; Abe, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yoshinori; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2017-06-01

    Thin electrode films assembled through a wet process using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are expected to play a role in reducing power consumption and saving energy in field-emission electron sources. The flat-panel light-emitting device for this study featured a line-sequential-scanning-type electrode structure equipped with electrodes for on-and-off controls of electron emissions, on which high-crystallinity SWCNTs were uniformly distributed. The device successfully emitted electrons on the flat panel in a stable manner. A technology for amplifying the luminance output by controlling the persistence characteristics of a fluorescent screen was also successfully developed. By combining such elemental technologies, a flat-panel light-emission device, as a stand-alone planar lighting device, which achieves a high-luminance efficiency of 87 lm/W and energy-conserved driving, was assembled for the first time in the world. The creation of field-emission electron sources driven with ultralow power consumption, along with applications that utilize such devices, is expected in the future.

  8. Method and devices for performing stereotactic microbeam radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham

    2010-01-05

    A radiation delivery system generally includes either a synchrotron source or a support frame and a plurality of microbeam delivery devices supported on the support frame, both to deliver a beam in a hemispherical arrangement. Each of the microbeam delivery devices or synchrotron irradiation ports is adapted to deliver at least one microbeam of radiation along a microbeam delivery axis, wherein the microbeam delivery axes of the plurality of microbeam delivery devices cross within a common target volume.

  9. Out-of-Pocket Spending for Ambulatory Physical Therapy Services From 2008 to 2012: National Panel Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevan, Julia; Riddle, Daniel L; Reed, Shelby D

    2015-12-01

    Out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditures are incurred as insurers and employers shift some of the burden of health care costs onto consumers. As cost-sharing increases, OOP expenditures could be a barrier to physical therapy care. The purposes of this study were: (1) to identify factors associated with any OOP physical therapy spending and (2) to identify factors associated with higher spending among individuals incurring OOP costs. The study was a retrospective analysis using the 4 most recently available panels of data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) encompassing 2008-2012. A data file containing episodes of physical therapy care for 2,189 people was created. Logistic regression was used to identify factors related to having an OOP expenditure. A multivariable generalized linear model was used to identify factors related to mean OOP expenditures. On average, an episode of care encompassed 9.9 visits, with mean total expenditures of $1,708 (median: $792). Fifty-four percent of episodes of care had an OOP expenditure. For individuals with OOP expenditures, the mean OOP expenditure for an episode of care was $351 (median: $144). Being female or non-Hispanic and having a higher income were associated with higher odds of incurring an OOP expenditure, whereas being in worse general health, >65 years of age, or nonwhite and having public funding were associated with lower odds of incurring an OOP expenditure. Amounts of OOP spending were higher in urban areas and in all census geographic regions relative to the Northeast region. Estimates are based on household-reported survey data, limited to ambulatory care, and do not include institutionalized individuals. At 54%, the proportion of individuals with OOP expenditures for physical therapy is lower than for general medical care. Several predictors were found of having OOP expenditures and of the magnitude of those expenditures. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  10. Concept of a selective tumour therapy and its evaluation by near-infrared fluorescence imaging and flat-panel volume computed tomography in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Frauke [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center, 37099 Goettingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute for Experimental Medicine, Hermann-Rein-Str. 3, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)], E-mail: falves@gwdg.de; Dullin, Christian [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Medical Center, 37099 Goettingen (Germany); Napp, Joanna [Max-Planck-Institute for Experimental Medicine, Hermann-Rein-Str. 3, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Missbach-Guentner, Jeannine [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center, 37099 Goettingen (Germany); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Medical Center, 37099 Goettingen (Germany); Jannasch, Katharina [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center, 37099 Goettingen (Germany); Mathejczyk, Julia; Pardo, Luis A.; Stuehmer, Walter [Max-Planck-Institute for Experimental Medicine, Hermann-Rein-Str. 3, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Tietze, Lutz-F. [Institute of Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry, Georg-August-University, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    Conventional chemotherapy of cancer has its limitations, especially in advanced and disseminated disease and suffers from lack of specificity. This results in a poor therapeutic index and considerable toxicity to normal organs. Therefore, many efforts are made to develop novel therapeutic tools against cancer with the aim of selectively targeting the drug to the tumour site. Drug delivery strategies fundamentally rely on the identification of good-quality biomarkers, allowing unequivocal discrimination between cancer and healthy tissue. At present, antibodies or antibody fragments have clearly proven their value as carrier molecules specific for a tumour-associated molecular marker. This present review draws attention to the use of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging to investigate binding specificity and kinetics of carrier molecules such as monoclonal antibodies. In addition, flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT) will be presented to monitor anatomical structures in tumour mouse models over time in a non-invasive manner. Each imaging device sheds light on a different aspect; functional imaging is applied to optimise the dose schedule and the concept of selective tumour therapies, whereas anatomical imaging assesses preclinically the efficacy of novel tumour therapies. Both imaging techniques in combination allow the visualisation of functional information obtained by NIRF imaging within an adequate anatomic framework.

  11. Left Ventricular Assist Device Therapy for Destination Therapy: Is Less Invasive Surgery a Safe Alternative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Sebastian V; Hanke, Jasmin S; Avsar, Murat; Ahrens, Philipp R; Deutschmann, Ove; Tümler, Kirstin A; Uribarri, Aitor; Rojas-Hernández, Sara; Sánchez, Pedro L; González-Santos, José M; Haverich, Axel; Schmitto, Jan D

    2017-06-20

    The number of older patients with congestive heart failure has dramatically increased. Because of stagnating cardiac transplantation, there is a need for an alternative therapy, which would solve the problem of insufficient donor organ supply. Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have recently become more commonly used as destination therapy (DT). Assuming that older patients show a higher risk-profile for LVAD surgery, it is expected that the increasing use of less invasive surgery (LIS) LVAD implantation will improve postoperative outcomes. Thus, this study aimed to assess the outcomes of LIS-LVAD implantation in DT patients. We performed a prospective analysis of 2-year outcomes in 46 consecutive end-stage heart failure patients older than 60 years, who underwent LVAD implantation (HVAD, HeartWare) for DT in our institution between 2011 and 2013. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the surgical implantation technique: LIS (n = 20) vs conventional (n = 26). There was no statistically significant difference in 2-year survival rates between the 2 groups, but the LIS group showed a tendency to improved patient outcome in 85.0% vs 69.2% (P = .302). Moreover, the incidence of postoperative bleeding was minor in LIS patients (0% in the LIS group vs 26.9% in the conventional surgery group, P < .05), who also showed lower rates of postoperative extended inotropic support (15.0% in the LIS group vs 46.2% in the conventional surgery group, P < .05). Our data indicate that DT patients with LIS-LVAD implantation showed a lower incidence of postoperative bleeding, a reduced need for inotropic support, and a tendency to lower mortality compared with patients treated with the conventional surgical technique. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical management of a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) with a cardiac resynchronization therapy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Elizabeth Marie; Ogburn, Anna L; Monroe, Denise

    2011-06-01

    A 24-yr-old, male western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was diagnosed with congestive heart failure using transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiology. New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III was assigned to the severity of the condition. Over 16 mo, this progressed to NYHA Class IV despite increasing medical therapy. Repeated evaluations suggested that implantation of a cardiac resynchronization therapy device with a defibrillator (CRT-D) could benefit this animal based on clinical signs and underlying evidence of dyssynchrony and suspected fibrotic myocardial disease. Surgical implantation of leads into the right atrium, right ventricle, and left ventricle was accomplished. The CRT-D device was placed under the thoracic pectoral muscles during an initial surgical procedure. Improvement in the gorilla's clinical condition after implantation of the CRT-D device was immediate and dramatic. Subsequent scanning of the device was accomplished through operant conditioning. The data from these device interrogations included stored and real-time cardiac data, which were used to minimize recognized environmental stressors and change device settings. Over 4 yr, case management was critical to successful device use in treatment of the clinical disease. This involved medications, training for device interrogation, exercise to increase activity and improve body condition, and phlebotomy attempts. Dietary management was necessary to manipulate caloric and sodium intake and encourage medication compliance. Cardiac resynchronization therapy device implantation, although requiring specialized equipment and surgical skill, appears to be a viable option for treatment of fibrosing cardiomyopathy with systolic dysfunction in gorillas refractory to medical management. In addition to treatment, this device provides cardiovascular data at rest that could allow for early diagnosis and treatment of gorillas with this and other cardiac conditions in the future. This

  13. Focal Therapy in Prostate Cancer-Report from a Consensus Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Rosette, J.; Ahmed, H.; Barentsz, J.; Johansen, T. Bjerklund; Brausi, M.; Emberton, M.; Frauscher, F.; Greene, D.; Harisinghani, M.; Haustermans, K.; Heidenreich, A.; Kovacs, G.; Mason, M.; Montironi, R.; Mouraviev, V.; de Reijke, T.; Taneja, S.; Thuroff, S.; Tombal, B.; Trachtenberg, J.; Wijkstra, H.; Polascik, T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a consensus in relation to case selection, conduct of therapy, and outcomes that are associated with focal therapy for men with localized prostate cancer. Material and Methods: Urologic surgeons, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and histopathologists from North America and

  14. Focal therapy in prostate cancer-report from a consensus panel.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosette, J.J.M.H.C. de la; Ahmed, H.; Barentsz, J.O.; Johansen, T.B.; Brausi, M.; Emberton, M.; Frauscher, F.; Greene, D.; Harisinghani, M.; Haustermans, K.; Heidenreich, A.; Kovacs, G.; Mason, M.; Montironi, R.; Mouraviev, V.; Reijke, T. de; Taneja, S.; Thuroff, S.; Tombal, B.; Trachtenberg, J.; Wijkstra, H.; Polascik, T.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish a consensus in relation to case selection, conduct of therapy, and outcomes that are associated with focal therapy for men with localized prostate cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Urologic surgeons, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and histopathologists from North America and

  15. Wireless gyroscope platform enabled by a portable media device for quantifying wobble board therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy

    2017-07-01

    The wobble board enables a therapy strategy for rehabilitation of the ankle foot complex. Quantification of therapy, such as through the use of a wobble board, can facilitate a therapist's acuity for advancing and optimizing the overall therapy strategy. The portable media device, such as an iPod, can be equipped with a software application to function as a wireless gyroscope platform. Integration of the wobble board with the portable media device functioning as a wireless gyroscope enables the potential for patient to therapist interaction through connectivity to the Internet. A patient can conduct wobble board therapy for the ankle foot complex from the convenient vantage point of a homebound setting with therapy data transmitted wirelessly as email attachments. The gyroscope signal of the wobble board therapy can be consolidated into a feature set for machine learning classification. Using a multilayer perceptron neural network considerable classification accuracy has been achieved for differentiating between a hemiplegic affected ankle and unaffected ankle while using a wobble board. The combination of machine learning, wireless systems, such as a portable media device functioning as a wireless gyroscope, and a conventional therapy device, such as a wobble board, are envisioned to advance the capability to optimally impact the rehabilitation experience.

  16. Left ventricular assist device therapy in advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Rogers, Joseph G

    2017-01-01

    Despite improvements in pharmacological therapy and pacing, prognosis in advanced heart failure (HF) remains poor, with a 1-year mortality of 25-50%. While heart transplantation provides excellent survival and quality of life for eligible patients, only a few can be offered this treatment due...

  17. Modeling of the laser device for the stress therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Nikolai V.; Shcheglov, Sergey A.; Romanova, Galina E.; Koneva, Ð.¢atiana A.

    2017-05-01

    Recently there is a great interest to the drug-free methods of treatment of various diseases. For example, audiovisual therapy is used for the stress therapy. The main destination of the method is the health care and well-being. Visual content in the given case is formed when laser radiation is passing through the optical mediums and elements. The therapy effect is achieved owing to the color varying and complicated structure of the picture which is produced by the refraction, dispersion effects, diffraction and interference. As the laser source we use three laser sources with wavelengths of 445 nm, 520 nm and 640 nm and the optical power up to 1 W. The beam is guided to the optical element which is responsible for the final image of the dome surface. The dynamic image can be achieved by the rotating of the optical element when the laser beam is static or by scanning the surface of the element. Previous research has shown that the complexity of the image connected to the therapy effect. The image was chosen experimentally in practice. The evaluation was performed using the fractal dimension calculation for the produced image. In this work we model the optical image on the surface formed by the laser sources together with the optical elements. Modeling is performed in two stages. On the first stage we perform the simple modeling taking into account simple geometrical effects and specify the optical models of the sources.

  18. Current Treatment Strategies for Heart Failure: Role of Device Therapy and LV Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaswamy, Praneeth; Walters, Tomos E; Nazer, Babak; Lee, Randall J

    2016-09-01

    Medical care of heart failure (HF) begins with the determination of the cause of the heart failure and diagnosing potential reversible causes (i.e., coronary heart disease, hyperthyroidism, etc.). Medical therapy includes pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies that limit and/or reverse the signs and symptoms of HF. Initial behavior modification includes dietary sodium and fluid restriction to avoid weight gain; and encouraging physical activity when appropriate. Optimization of medical therapy is the first line of treatment that includes the use of diuretics, vasodilators (i.e., ACE inhibitors or ARBs), beta blockers, and potentially inotropic agents and anticoagulation depending on the patient's severity of heart failure and LV dysfunction. As heart failure advances despite optimized medical management, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are appropriate device therapies. The development of progressive end-stage HF, despite maximal medical therapy, necessitates the consideration of mechanical circulatory devices such as ventricular assist devices (VADs) either as a bridge to heart transplantation or as destination therapy. Despite the advances in the treatment of heart failure, there is still a large morbidity and mortality associated with HF, thus the need to develop newer strategies for the treatment of HF.

  19. Application of head-mounted devices with eye-tracking in virtual reality therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Otto Hans-Martin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Using eye-tracking to assess visual attention in head-mounted devices (HMD opens up many possibilities for virtual reality (VR-based therapy. Existing therapy concepts where attention plays a major role can be transferred to VR. Furthermore, they can be expanded to a precise real-time attention assessment, which can serve as a foundation for new therapy approaches. Utilizing HMDs and eye-tracking in a clinical environment is challenging because of hygiene issues and requirements of patients with heterogeneous cognitive and motor impairments. In this paper, we provide an overview of those challenges, discuss possible solutions and present preliminary results of a study with patients.

  20. Group purchasing organizations: optimizing cardiac device selection, therapy delivery, and fiscal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweesy, Mark W; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Smith, Kerry W; Holland, James L

    2006-12-01

    Group purchasing organizations (GPOs) have played a major role in supporting health care delivery in recent years as the healthcare industry has faced stronger economic pressures. Consequently, a position statement was drafted to act as a guideline for a GPO in creating a fiscally responsible, yet unrestricted environment for physicians to select the most appropriate cardiac device for their patients. This cardiac device selection guideline is to be implemented in hundreds of member hospitals but may be of use in non-member hospitals as well. The guideline will only be effective when the physicians or cardiac device caregivers have the knowledge and skills to optimally program and match device therapies and algorithms to individual patient needs.

  1. Silk-based resorbable electronic devices for remotely controlled therapy and in vivo infection abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hu; Hwang, Suk-Won; Marelli, Benedetto; An, Bo; Moreau, Jodie E; Yang, Miaomiao; Brenckle, Mark A; Kim, Stanley; Kaplan, David L; Rogers, John A; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2014-12-09

    A paradigm shift for implantable medical devices lies at the confluence between regenerative medicine, where materials remodel and integrate in the biological milieu, and technology, through the use of recently developed material platforms based on biomaterials and bioresorbable technologies such as optics and electronics. The union of materials and technology in this context enables a class of biomedical devices that can be optically or electronically functional and yet harmlessly degrade once their use is complete. We present here a fully degradable, remotely controlled, implantable therapeutic device operating in vivo to counter a Staphylococcus aureus infection that disappears once its function is complete. This class of device provides fully resorbable packaging and electronics that can be turned on remotely, after implantation, to provide the necessary thermal therapy or trigger drug delivery. Such externally controllable, resorbable devices not only obviate the need for secondary surgeries and retrieval, but also have extended utility as therapeutic devices that can be left behind at a surgical or suturing site, following intervention, and can be externally controlled to allow for infection management by either thermal treatment or by remote triggering of drug release when there is retardation of antibiotic diffusion, deep infections are present, or when systemic antibiotic treatment alone is insufficient due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. After completion of function, the device is safely resorbed into the body, within a programmable period.

  2. Photobiomodulation therapy for androgenetic alopecia: A clinician's guide to home-use devices cleared by the Federal Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Erin M; Winter, Margo A; Hordinsky, Maria K; Sadick, Neil S; Farah, Ronda S

    2017-10-11

    The market for home-use photobiomodulation devices to treat androgenetic alopecia has rapidly expanded, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently cleared many devices for this purpose. Patients increasingly seek the advice of dermatologists regarding the safety and efficacy of these hair loss treatments. The purpose of this guide was threefold: (1) to identify all home-use photobiomodulation therapy devices with FDA-clearance for treatment of androgenetic alopecia; (2) to review device design, features and existing clinical evidence; and (3) to discuss practical considerations of photobiomodulation therapy, including patient suitability, treatment goals, safety, and device selection. A search of the FDA 510(k) Premarket Notification database was conducted using product code "OAP" to identify all home-use devices that are FDA-cleared to treat androgenetic alopecia. Thirteen commercially available devices were identified and compared. Devices varied in shape, wavelength, light sources, technical features, price, and level of clinical evidence. To date, there are no head-to-head studies comparing the efficacy of these devices. Photobiomodulation therapy devices have an excellent safety profile and mounting evidence supporting their efficacy. However, long-term, high quality studies comparing these devices in diverse populations are lacking. As these devices become increasingly popular, dermatologists should be familiar with this treatment modality to add to their therapeutic armamentarium. AGA, androgenetic alopecia; FDA, Food and Drug Administration; IEC, International Electrotechnical Commission; LED, light-emitting diode; PBMT, photobiomodulation therapy.

  3. Stationary Optical Concentrator Designs and Wafer Scale Monolithic Integration of Semiconductor Devices for Next Generation Photovoltaic Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Min

    A major barrier in utilizing solar energy for large scale deployment is the cost of the photovoltaic (PV) systems. Several approaches have been used for the cost reduction such as by modifying PV system designs in addition to enhancing the efficiency of solar cells. Due to the high cost of materials, minimizing the use of solar cells such as in concentrator type systems is highly attractive for reducing the cost of the PV modules by focusing the incident light onto the PV cell. However concentrator PV systems (CPV) require constant tracking of the sun and hence are complex in design and expensive to operate, except in limited situations such as large scale PV power plants. It is desirable to design new concentrator type systems that do not require continuous tracking of the sun. These systems could ultimately reduce the PV system cost to a minimum while maximizing the power conversion efficiency. In this thesis we propose a simple design for a stationary concentrator photovoltaic (SCPV) system that could significantly reduce the cost of generating electricity using PV devices. Using optical ray tracing simulations, we have been able to design SCPV systems that could reduce the PV module cost by 2--10 times without compromising on the power conversion efficiency of the system. Another alternative approach for sustainable high efficiency PV system design is to develop low cost PV cells for terrestrial applications. To meet the demands of low cost and large scale production, larger and thinner (or flexible) substrates are required. We demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic interconnected PV devices at the wafer scale (2 inch wafers). In this study, GaSb PV cells grown on semi-insulating GaAs were used as the model material. Crucial device fabrication steps such as a selective etching process have been developed that is necessary for isolating individual devices on the wafer and interconnecting them with sub-micron scale accuracy. Selective etching of

  4. Application of flat panel digital imaging for improvement of ocular melanoma patient set-up in proton beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daftari, Inder K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, 1600 Divisadero Street, H1033, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: daftari@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Essert, Timothy [Crocker Nuclear Laboratory, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, 1600 Divisadero Street, H1033, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)

    2009-01-11

    In order to reduce the dose to surrounding critical tissues and also minimize the probability of recurrence of the tumor the placement of radiation fields relative to patient anatomy is very essential in proton beam therapy of ocular tumors. To achieve this objective, patient setup and field placement have been verified before treatment by analyzing the portal images obtained with Polaroid film-camera system. The Polaroid films are becoming expensive and obsolete, making new methods of verifying the patient treatment position essential. The objective of this study was to implement an orthogonal flat panel digital imaging (FPDI) system as a tool to image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on the UC Davis cyclotron proton beam therapy line and to use the system for patient setup verification. The image quality of the system is sufficient to see an air hole with a diameter of 0.5 mm at a depth of 9 mm, in a 10 cm Lucite phantom. The subject contrast of the FPDI system varied from 16% to 29% by varying the size of the air hole in the phantom from 1 to 5 mm and changing the depth from 9 to 15 mm. The subject contrast for 0.5 mm air hole was 11%. The comparison of the setup variations as measured from Polaroid port films and FPDI was 0.1{+-}0.7 mm in the X-direction, 0.2{+-}0.2 mm in the Y-direction and 0.04{+-}0.1 mm in Z-direction, respectively. The day-to-day positional variations in-patient set-ups were studied for 30 patients using the FPDI system. The patient position set-up on first day of treatment [defined by the X, Y, Z coordinates of the chair and head holder] was registered as the reference image. The comparison of day-to-day patient position with reference image indicated net translation along the three orthogonal axes as 0.3{+-}1.88 mm in right-left direction, -0.3{+-}1.78 in superior-inferior direction and -0.6{+-}2.8 mm in anterior-posterior direction. The image quality of the FPDI system was sufficient to clearly reveal the radio-opaque markers on the

  5. Application of flat panel digital imaging for improvement of ocular melanoma patient set-up in proton beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daftari, Inder K.; Essert, Timothy; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2009-01-01

    In order to reduce the dose to surrounding critical tissues and also minimize the probability of recurrence of the tumor the placement of radiation fields relative to patient anatomy is very essential in proton beam therapy of ocular tumors. To achieve this objective, patient setup and field placement have been verified before treatment by analyzing the portal images obtained with Polaroid film-camera system. The Polaroid films are becoming expensive and obsolete, making new methods of verifying the patient treatment position essential. The objective of this study was to implement an orthogonal flat panel digital imaging (FPDI) system as a tool to image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on the UC Davis cyclotron proton beam therapy line and to use the system for patient setup verification. The image quality of the system is sufficient to see an air hole with a diameter of 0.5 mm at a depth of 9 mm, in a 10 cm Lucite phantom. The subject contrast of the FPDI system varied from 16% to 29% by varying the size of the air hole in the phantom from 1 to 5 mm and changing the depth from 9 to 15 mm. The subject contrast for 0.5 mm air hole was 11%. The comparison of the setup variations as measured from Polaroid port films and FPDI was 0.1±0.7 mm in the X-direction, 0.2±0.2 mm in the Y-direction and 0.04±0.1 mm in Z-direction, respectively. The day-to-day positional variations in-patient set-ups were studied for 30 patients using the FPDI system. The patient position set-up on first day of treatment [defined by the X, Y, Z coordinates of the chair and head holder] was registered as the reference image. The comparison of day-to-day patient position with reference image indicated net translation along the three orthogonal axes as 0.3±1.88 mm in right-left direction, -0.3±1.78 in superior-inferior direction and -0.6±2.8 mm in anterior-posterior direction. The image quality of the FPDI system was sufficient to clearly reveal the radio-opaque markers on the digital image. In

  6. Electromagnetic interference between external defibrillator and cardiac resynchronization therapy-pacemaker (CRT-P) devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Hamid; Al-Ameri, Hazim; Ottino, Jessica; Hastings, Cordell; Kippola, James; Gueron, Ioni; Daccarett, Marcos; Machado, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Implantable heart rhythm devices are susceptible to interference in hospitals where electromagnetic interference (EMI) sources are ubiquitous. We report three cases in which EMI from the external defibrillator caused the inability to interrogate Boston Scientific cardiac resynchronization therapy-pacemaker (CRT-P) devices. We have documented interference with the Boston Scientific CRT-P Contact Renewal device model numbers H120/H125 (Natick, MA, USA) and two brands of external defibrillators: the Philips Heartstart XL model number M4735A (Andover, MA, USA) and the Hewlett-Packard Codemaster model number M1722B (Palo Alto, CA, USA). For device implants, we routinely place external pacing pads with the external defibrillator in the "standby" mode for transcutaneous pacing so that only the pacer "start/stop" button needs to be pressed when necessary. We have not been able to interrogate three consecutive Boston Scientific CRT-P devices prior to closure while the external defibrillator had the back-up pacing mode on "standby." In our initial case, a second device was opened because this interaction was not recognized. We documented EMI with the standby pacing mode ON and discovered that by disabling only the "standby" pacing mode on the external defibrillator, the device could be interrogated without difficulty. This is a case series reporting EMI with a Boston Scientific CRT-P Contact Renewal device H120/H125 telemetry from an external defibrillator with pacing mode on "standby." Failure to recognize this important interaction may lead to inappropriate device and resource utilization. ©2011, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Design of a new tracking device for on-line dose monitor in ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Traini, Giacomo; Bollella, Angela; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Frallicciardi, Paola Maria; Mancini-Terracciano, Carlo; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Miraglia, Federico; Muraro, Silvia; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Senzacqua, Martina; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Charged Particle Therapy is a technique for cancer treatment that exploits hadron beams, mostly protons and carbons. A critical issue is the monitoring of the dose released by the beam to the tumor and to the surrounding tissues. We present the design of a new tracking device for monitoring on-line the dose in ion therapy through the detection of secondary charged particles produced by the beam interactions in the patient tissues. In fact, the charged particle emission shape can be correlated with the spatial dose release and the Bragg peak position. The detector uses the information provided by 12 layers of scintillating fibers followed by a plastic scintillator and a small calorimeter made of a pixelated Lutetium Fine Silicate crystal. Simulations have been performed to evaluate the achievable spatial resolution and a possible application of the device for the monitoring of the dose pro?le in a real treatment is presented.

  8. New proton therapy devices; Quel appareillage pour la protontherapie de demain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, L.H.; Laugier, A. [Hopital Tenon, 75 - Paris (France); Laisne, A. [Hopital Tenon, 75 - Paris (France)]|[Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Ivanov, A.A. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscou (Russian Federation); Mandrillon, P.; Chauvel, P. [Cyclotron Biomedical, 06 - Nice (France); Mazal, A.; Habrand, J.L. [Centre de Protontherapie, 91 - Orsay (France); Tronc, D. [General Electric Medical Systems, 78 - Buc (France); Baccal, M.; Buzzi, J.M. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    1995-12-31

    The success of proton therapy depends on its cost. Hospital based equipment in fabrication for the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston costs in the excess of 17 millions of dollars, the accelerator being only a fraction of the cost. We think that price can be significantly decreased. We review the different new ways of accelerating protons currently under study in France in order to build a smaller, less expensive but reliable treatment device. (Author), 17 refs., 9 tabs.

  9. Effect of Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy on the Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Näpänkangas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mandibular advancement device therapy is effectively used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, but also several side effects in the masticatory system have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders connected to mandibular advancement device therapy. Material and Methods: The material consisted of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women, mean age 51.1 years, range 21 to 70 years diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Subjective symptoms and clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMD signs were recorded at the beginning of the treatment (baseline and at 1-month, 3-month, 6-month and 24-month follow-ups. The degree of TMD was assessed using the anamnestic (Ai and the clinical dysfunction index (Di of Helkimo. For assessing the effect of TMD the patients were divided in discontinuing and continuing groups. Results: According to Ai and Di, the severity of TMD remained unchanged during the follow-up in most of the patients. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ crepitation was found more frequently in discontinuing patients at all follow-ups. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05 at the six-month follow-up. Masticatory muscle pain during palpation was a frequent clinical sign at the baseline and during the follow-up period but the difference between discontinuing and continuing patients was not significant. Conclusions: It seems that signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders do not necessarily increase during long-term mandibular advancement device therapy. However, it seems that patients with clinically assessed temporomandibular joint crepitation may discontinue their mandibular advancement device therapy due to temporomandibular disorders.

  10. Metabolic Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    A metabolic panel is a group of tests that measures different chemicals in the blood. These tests are usually ... kidneys and liver. There are two types: basic metabolic panel (BMP) and comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP). The ...

  11. Frequency of obtaining national cholesterol education program adult treatment panel III goals for all major serum lipoproteins after initiation of lipid altering therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Gregory A; Ambegaonkar, Baishali M; Sazonov, Vasilisa; Brown, Jonathan B

    2009-12-15

    Statin treatment targeting low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is widely used for cardiovascular risk reduction, but many statin users still face greatly elevated risks. Some experts advocate additional therapy that targets high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. However, the size of the patient group that could benefit from HDL cholesterol or triglyceride therapy has not been reported. Using observational data from a large health maintenance organization, 5,158 patients were identified who initiated dyslipidemia pharmacotherapy from July 2004 to June 2006, continued therapy for 1 year, and had full lipid panels within 6 months before and 9 to 15 months after therapy initiation. Therapy (primarily statins) reduced the proportion of patients not at LDL cholesterol goals from 77% to 22% and the proportion with high triglyceride levels from 34% to 20%. HDL cholesterol levels were unchanged (49% and 50% were less than normal levels before and after therapy, respectively) in the aggregate and in high-risk subgroups (patients with coronary artery disease, diabetes, and 10-year heart disease risk >20%). After therapy, 29% of high-risk patients still had multiple lipid abnormalities. In conclusion, current dyslipidemia therapy substantially improved LDL cholesterol goal attainment in this cohort, but low HDL cholesterol levels were unaffected. About half the patients starting statins could be candidates for additional therapy targeting non-LDL cholesterol lipid fractions.

  12. An ontology-based annotation of cardiac implantable electronic devices to detect therapy changes in a national registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, Arnaud; Mabo, Philippe; Chauvin, Michel; Burgun, Anita

    2015-05-01

    The patient population benefitting from cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing. This study introduces a device annotation method that supports the consistent description of the functional attributes of cardiac devices and evaluates how this method can detect device changes from a CIED registry. We designed the Cardiac Device Ontology, an ontology of CIEDs and device functions. We annotated 146 cardiac devices with this ontology and used it to detect therapy changes with respect to atrioventricular pacing, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and defibrillation capability in a French national registry of patients with implants (STIDEFIX). We then analyzed a set of 6905 device replacements from the STIDEFIX registry. Ontology-based identification of therapy changes (upgraded, downgraded, or similar) was accurate (6905 cases) and performed better than straightforward analysis of the registry codes (F-measure 1.00 versus 0.75 to 0.97). This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of ontology-based functional annotation of devices in the cardiac domain. Such annotation allowed a better description and in-depth analysis of STIDEFIX. This method was useful for the automatic detection of therapy changes and may be reused for analyzing data from other device registries.

  13. Novel Na(+) doped Alq3 hybrid materials for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices and flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, S A; Borghate, S V; Kalyani, N Thejo; Dhoble, S J

    2015-05-01

    Pure and Na(+) -doped Alq3 complexes were synthesized by a simple precipitation method at room temperature, maintaining a stoichiometric ratio. These complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The X-ray diffractogram exhibits well-resolved peaks, revealing the crystalline nature of the synthesized complexes, FTIR confirms the molecular structure and the completion of quinoline ring formation in the metal complex. UV/Vis absorption and PL spectra of sodium-doped Alq3 complexes exhibit high emission intensity in comparison with Alq3 phosphor, proving that when doped in Alq3 , Na(+) enhances PL emission intensity. The excitation spectra of the synthesized complexes lie in the range 242-457 nm when weak shoulders are also considered. Because the sharp excitation peak falls in the blue region of visible radiation, the complexes can be employed for blue chip excitation. The emission wavelength of all the synthesized complexes lies in the bluish green/green region ranging between 485 and 531 nm. The intensity of the emission wavelength was found to be elevated when Na(+) is doped into Alq3 . Because both the excitation and emission wavelengths fall in the visible region of electromagnetic radiation, these phosphors can also be employed to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells by using the solar spectral conversion principle. Thus, the synthesized phosphors can be used as bluish green/green light-emitting phosphors for organic light-emitting diodes, flat panel displays, solid-state lighting technology - a step towards the desire to reduce energy consumption and generate pollution free light. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The relationship of self-compassion and depression: Cross-lagged panel analyses in depressed patients after outpatient therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Tobias; Berger, Thomas; Holtforth, Martin Grosse

    2016-09-15

    Previous cross-sectional studies suggest that self-compassion and depressive symptoms are consistently negatively associated. Although it is often implicitly assumed that (a lack of) self-compassion precedes depressive symptoms, so far no study has tested whether (lack of) self-compassion is a cause or a consequence of depressive symptoms, or both. To examine such reciprocal effects, we used data of 125 depressed outpatients after a time limited cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy. We assessed self-compassion and depressive symptoms via self-report measures and the presence of a major depressive episode directly after therapy, as well as 6 and 12 months later. Cross-lagged panel analyses indicated that (lack of) self-compassion significantly predicted subsequent depressive symptoms while controlling for autoregressive effects, whereas depressive symptoms did not predict subsequent levels of self-compassion. This was also the case for the relationship between self-compassion and the presence of a major depressive episode. The same patterns also occurred when we separately tested the reciprocal effects for two composite sub-measures of either positive or negative facets of self-compassion. Causality cannot be inferred from our results. Depressive symptoms and self-compassion could still be causally unrelated, and a third variable could account for their negative association. These findings support the notions that (a lack of) self-compassion could serve as a vulnerability factor for depression and that cultivating self-compassion may deserve a focus in depression prevention programs or treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III algorithm for selecting candidates for statin therapy: insights from the A to Z trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lemos, James A; Wiviott, Stephen D; Murphy, Sabina A; Blazing, Michael A; Lewis, Eldrin F; Califf, Robert M; Pfeffer, Marc A; Braunwald, Eugene

    2006-09-15

    The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III recommends an algorithm to integrate iterative risk-stratification information with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels to identify candidates for statin therapy. We used the Aggrastat to Zocor (A to Z) trial, in which all patients presented with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event in the absence of previous statin therapy, to evaluate the performance of this algorithm. Of 1,750 patients with ACS included in this analysis, 1,126 (64%) had an indication for statin therapy before enrollment and 624 (36%) did not have a statin indication before enrollment. We estimate that initiating statin therapy at moderate dosages (decreasing LDL by 1 mmol/L) according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines would have prevented approximately 15% of the ACS events leading to enrollment in the A to Z trial, whereas more intensive statin therapy (decreasing LDL by 1.5 mmol/L) would have prevented >21% of events. Aspirin use before enrollment was reported in only 38% of subjects with a statin indication. In conclusion, these observations represent missed opportunities for primary and secondary prevention and highlight the need for assessment of patient risk and better adherence to existing prevention guidelines.

  16. Tumor treating fields therapy device for glioblastoma: physics and clinical practice considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Edwin; Swanson, Kenneth D; Wong, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Alternating electric fields therapy, as delivered by the tumor treating fields device, is a new modality of cancer treatment that has been approved by the US FDA for recurrent glioblastoma. At a frequency of 200 kHz, these fields emanate from transducer arrays on the surface of the patient's scalp into the brain and perturb processes necessary for cytokinesis during tumor cell mitosis. In the registration Phase III trial for recurrent glioblastoma patients, the efficacy of the tumor treating fields as monotherapy was equivalent to chemotherapy, while scalp irritation was its major adverse event compared with systemic toxicities that were associated with cytotoxic chemotherapies. Alternating electric fields therapy is, therefore, an essential option for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the physics, cell biology and clinical data supporting the use of the tumor treating fields therapy.

  17. A novel vacuum assisted closure therapy model for use with percutaneous devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Saranne J; Nichols, Francesca R; Brunker, Lucille B; Bachus, Kent N

    2014-06-01

    Long-term maintenance of a dermal barrier around a percutaneous prosthetic device remains a common clinical problem. A technique known as Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) uses negative pressure to facilitate healing of impaired and complex soft tissue wounds. However, the combination of using negative pressure with percutaneous prosthetic devices has not been investigated. The goal of this study was to develop a methodology to apply negative pressure to the tissues surrounding a percutaneous device in an animal model; no tissue healing outcomes are presented. Specifically, four hairless rats received percutaneous porous coated titanium devices implanted on the dorsum and were bandaged with a semi occlusive film dressing. Two of these animals received NPWT; two animals received no NPWT and served as baseline controls. Over a 28-day period, both the number of dressing changes required between the two groups as well as the pressures were monitored. Negative pressures were successfully applied to the periprosthetic tissues in a clinically relevant range with a manageable number of dressing changes. This study provides a method for establishing, maintaining, and quantifying controlled negative pressures to the tissues surrounding percutaneous devices using a small animal model. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Illumination devices for uniform delivery of light to the oral cavity for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cassarly, William J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2011-10-01

    To date, the lack of light delivery mechanisms to the oral cavity remains a barrier to the treatment of oral cancer with photodynamic therapy (PDT). The greatest impediment to medical practitioners is the current need to shield the normal tissues of the oral cavity, a costly and time-consuming procedure. In this research, we present the design of illumination devices to deliver light to the oral cavity for PDT, which will facilitate administration of PDT in the clinic. The goal for such an illumination device, as indicated by our clinical collaborators at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, is to limit exposure of healthy tissue and produce an average irradiance of 100 mW/cm2 over the treatment field, with spatial non-uniformities below 10%. Furthermore, the size of the device must be compact to allow use in the oral cavity. Our research led to the design and fabrication of two devices producing spatial non-uniformities below 6% over a treatment area of 0.25 cm2 by design. One device consisted of an appropriately-sized reflector, inspired by solar concentrators, illuminated by a cylindrical diffusing fiber optimally located within the reflector; another was a solid lightpipe with a combination of optimized tapered and straight components.

  19. Development of a low-cost EMG biofeedback device kit as an educational tool for physical therapy students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suzuki, Risa; Muraoka, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Shuntaro

    2017-01-01

    .... Our aim was to develop a low-cost electromyography biofeedback device kit that students could build by themselves in class and to evaluate whether this kit was an adequate educational tool for physical therapy students...

  20. 13. Device therapy in secondary hospital (without a cath lab: Feasibility, logistics and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jelani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Device therapy for conduction abnormalities, heart failure, primary or secondary SCD preventions is under delivered to requiring patients. Most of these devices are implanted at tertiary care centers in major cities of most countries. This makes the availability of these guideline guided therapies to a very small percentage of needy patients. Implant of such devices at a secondary hospital (without a cardiac cath lab with training of previously novice hospital staff and available resources as well as support of the industry is an alternative and very viable option to have such important therapy delivered to requiring patients. The usage of simple-readily available-C-arm in operating theatre (OR or the interventional radiology suite can be utilized for this purpose. OR nursing staff and radiology technicians can be trained –with help of nursing education department– to help in such procedures over a relatively short period. Technical support utilized from the vendors representatives is an alternative to face the lack of EP technicians in local or international market. The follow up of these patients in OPD can be organized with help of the vendors on regular basis under supervision of trained cardiologist/s. This model can help establish device therapy service at a secondary hospital without huge expenditure on infrastructure or facing the lack of recruitment of specialized technical support that is difficult to find –especially for smaller cities–. We present our experience at a 250 bed secondary hospital, with a relatively small cardiac unit (3 consultants, 5 hospitalists, 10 cardiac ECG/Echo techs and no cath lab of introduction of this service with the help of nursing education department and vendors supplying these devices as well as OR and radiology departments. Training of radiology technicians and OR nursing staff on the basic procedural support with few in-service demonstration helped prepare adequate staff helping during implant

  1. [Experimental study of percutaneous hot ethanol injection therapy (PHEIT) by continuous heating device for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, N; Sato, M; Sonomura, T; Kishi, K; Terada, M; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, H; Nosaka, M; Takata, H; Nakanishi, H; Yoshikawa, A

    1998-06-01

    Percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) is widely used as a local treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, because only a small amount of ethanol can be used in one PEIT session and because the antitumor effect is limited, this modality is indicated only when there are three or fewer tumors and when the tumor diameter is liquid is inserted into the syringe heater, which heats the liquid to a desired temperature by adjusting the voltage. The needle thermocontroller is a puncture guide needle to which a heating device has been attached. The needle-tip thermosensor constantly measures, displays and records the temperature of the liquid at the needle tip during injection. Also, because the Continuous Heating Device is a closed-circuit system, there is no risk of accidental a fire, which ensures procedural safety. It is also possible to use this device to safely heat and inject a variety of other liquids, such as physiological saline and anticancer agents and thus contribute to the widespread development of ultrasound-guided injection therapy.

  2. Objective assessment of biomagnetic devices and alternative clinical therapies using infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockley, Graham J.

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming introduction of magnetic devices and other alternative therapies into the health care market prompts the need for objective evaluation of these techniques through the use of infrared thermal imaging. Many of these therapies are reported to promote the stimulation of blood flow or the relief of pain conditions. Infrared imaging is an efficient tool to assess such changes in the physiological state. Therefore, a thermal imager can help document and substantiate whether these therapies are in fact providing an effective change to the local circulation. Thermal images may also indicate whether the change is temporary or sustained. As a specific case example, preliminary findings will be presented concerning the use of magnets and the effect they have on peripheral circulation. This will include a discussion of the recommended protocols for this type of infrared testing. This test model can be applied to the evaluation of other devices and therapeutic procedures which are reputed to affect circulation such as electro acupuncture, orthopedic footwear and topical ointments designed to relieve pain or inflammation.

  3. Active exercises utilizing a facilitating device in the treatment of lymphedema resulting from breast cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Fátima Guerreiro Godoy, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the reduction in volume of arm lymphedema secondary to breast cancer therapy utilizing an exercise facilitating device. Twenty-one women with arm lymphedema resulting from the surgical and radiotherapeutic treatment of breast cancer were randomly selected. Evaluation was made by water-displacement volumetry before and after each session. The patients were submitted to a series of active exercises using a facilitating device for four 12-minute sessions with intervals of 3 minutes between sessions in the sitting position with alignment of the spinal column. The lymphedematous arm was maintained under compression using a cotton-polyester sleeve. The active exercising device used was a mobile flexion bar fixed on a metal base at a height of 30 cm from the tabletop and at a distance of 10 cm from the patient’s body. The paired t-test was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error of 5% (p-value ≤0.05 being considered significant. The initial mean volume of the arms was 2,089.9 and the final volume was 2,023.0 mL with a mean loss of 66.9 mL (p-value <0.001. In conclusion, active exercises utilizing facilitating devices can contribute to a reduction in size of lymphedematous limbs.

  4. Mastication movements and sleep quality of patients with myofascial pain: occlusal device therapy improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Gonçalves, Thais Marques Simek Vega; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Bavia, Paula Furlan; Rodrigues Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus

    2014-12-01

    Patients with myofascial pain experience impaired mastication, which might also interfere with their sleep quality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the jaw motion and sleep quality of patients with myofascial pain and the impact of a stabilization device therapy on both parameters. Fifty women diagnosed with myofascial pain by the Research Diagnostic Criteria were enrolled. Pain levels (visual analog scale), jaw movements (kinesiography), and sleep quality (Epworth Sleepiness Scale; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were evaluated before (control) and after stabilization device use. Range of motion (maximum opening, right and left excursions, and protrusion) and masticatory movements during Optosil mastication (opening, closing, and total cycle time; opening and closing angles; and maximum velocity) also were evaluated. Repeated-measures analysis of variance in a generalized linear mixed models procedure was used for statistical analysis (α=.05). At baseline, participants with myofascial pain showed a reduced range of jaw motion and poorer sleep quality. Treatment with a stabilization device reduced pain (Pmastication increased, and improvements in sleep scores for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (P<.001) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (P=.04) were found. Myofascial pain impairs jaw motion and quality of sleep; the reduction of pain after the use of a stabilization device improves the range of motion and sleep parameters. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spectral matching technology for light-emitting diode-based jaundice photodynamic therapy device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ru-ting; Guo, Zhen-ning; Lin, Jie-ben

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to obtain the spectrum of light-emitting diode (LED)-based jaundice photodynamic therapy device (JPTD), the bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo was regarded as target spectrum. According to the spectral constructing theory, a simple genetic algorithm as the spectral matching algorithm was first proposed in this study. The optimal combination ratios of LEDs were obtained, and the required LEDs number was then calculated. Meanwhile, the algorithm was compared with the existing spectral matching algorithms. The results show that this algorithm runs faster with higher efficiency, the switching time consumed is 2.06 s, and the fitting spectrum is very similar to the target spectrum with 98.15% matching degree. Thus, blue LED-based JPTD can replace traditional blue fluorescent tube, the spectral matching technology that has been put forward can be applied to the light source spectral matching for jaundice photodynamic therapy and other medical phototherapy.

  6. Combination therapy in clinical and cosmetic dermatology: the marriage of device and drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Mark Steven

    2004-01-01

    The first generations of lasers used in clinical and cosmetic dermatology achieved their effects by means of epidermal and dermal ablation. While effective in removing some of the stigmata of photodamage including pigmentary changes and rhytides, vascular abnormalities associated with such conditions as melasma and rosacea, were not sufficiently effective. The new generation of laser and non-laser light devices (eg, intense pulsed light or IPL) offer excellent results in the management of clinical and cosmetic conditions, including significant changes in improvement in vascular conditions such as rosacea and actinic damage and stimulating dermal collagen production, without significant injury to the epidermis. The combination of light therapies and topical agents adds to the efficacy of these procedures, particularly in post-procedural maintenance. Light-based therapies have been an important addition to the anti-acne armamentarium as they are effective and do not add to the increasing bacterial resistance problem.

  7. Malfunctions of Implantable Cardiac Devices in Patients Receiving Proton Beam Therapy: Incidence and Predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Poenisch, Falk [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pinnix, Chelsea C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sheu, Tommy [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Memon, Nada [Department of Cardiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rozner, Marc A. [Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dougherty, Anne H. [Department of Cardiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Photon therapy has been reported to induce resets of implanted cardiac devices, but the clinical sequelae of treating patients with such devices with proton beam therapy (PBT) are not well known. We reviewed the incidence of device malfunctions among patients undergoing PBT. Methods and Materials: From March 2009 through July 2012, 42 patients with implanted cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED; 28 pacemakers and 14 cardioverter-defibrillators) underwent 42 courses of PBT for thoracic (23, 55%), prostate (15, 36%), liver (3, 7%), or base of skull (1, 2%) tumors at a single institution. The median prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; range 46.8-87.5 Gy), and the median distance from the treatment field to the CIED was 10 cm (range 0.8-40 cm). Maximum proton and neutron doses were estimated for each treatment course. All CIEDs were checked before radiation delivery and monitored throughout treatment. Results: Median estimated peak proton and neutron doses to the CIED in all patients were 0.8 Gy (range 0.13-21 Gy) and 346 Sv (range 11-1100 mSv). Six CIED malfunctions occurred in 5 patients (2 pacemakers and 3 defibrillators). Five of these malfunctions were CIED resets, and 1 patient with a defibrillator (in a patient with a liver tumor) had an elective replacement indicator after therapy that was not influenced by radiation. The mean distance from the proton beam to the CIED among devices that reset was 7.0 cm (range 0.9-8 cm), and the mean maximum neutron dose was 655 mSv (range 330-1100 mSv). All resets occurred in patients receiving thoracic PBT and were corrected without clinical incident. The generator for the defibrillator with the elective replacement indicator message was replaced uneventfully after treatment. Conclusions: The incidence of CIED resets was about 20% among patients receiving PBT to the thorax. We recommend that PBT be avoided in pacing-dependent patients and that patients with any type of CIED receiving

  8. Design of a new tracking device for on-line beam range monitor in carbon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Giacomo; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bollella, Angela; Collamati, Francesco; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Ferroni, Fernando; Frallicciardi, Paola Maria; Mancini-Terracciano, Carlo; Marafini, Michela; Mattei, Ilaria; Miraglia, Federico; Muraro, Silvia; Paramatti, Riccardo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Senzacqua, Martina; Solfaroli-Camillocci, Elena; Toppi, Marco; Voena, Cecilia; Patera, Vincenzo

    2017-02-01

    Charged particle therapy is a technique for cancer treatment that exploits hadron beams, mostly protons and carbon ions. A critical issue is the monitoring of the beam range so to check the correct dose deposition to the tumor and surrounding tissues. The design of a new tracking device for beam range real-time monitoring in pencil beam carbon ion therapy is presented. The proposed device tracks secondary charged particles produced by beam interactions in the patient tissue and exploits the correlation of the charged particle emission profile with the spatial dose deposition and the Bragg peak position. The detector, currently under construction, uses the information provided by 12 layers of scintillating fibers followed by a plastic scintillator and a pixelated Lutetium Fine Silicate (LFS) crystal calorimeter. An algorithm to account and correct for emission profile distortion due to charged secondaries absorption inside the patient tissue is also proposed. Finally detector reconstruction efficiency for charged particle emission profile is evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation considering a quasi-realistic case of a non-homogenous phantom. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Invention of the Guide Catheter Irrigation Monitoring Device for Neuroendovascular Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkul, Ayca; Park, Jong-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Seung; Yilmaz, Ali; Kim, Bum-Tae

    2017-07-01

    The thromboembolic events during neuroendovascular therapy (NET) are the major complications of concern that can be occasionally fatal. The thrombotic occlusion of the guide catheter for NET is thought to be the risk of the thromboembolic events. We have developed an idea for inventing the monitoring system of the continuous irrigation through the guide catheter. We herein present a unique invention of the guide catheter irrigation monitoring device. We have developed ideas for preventing the thrombotic occlusion of the guide catheter. In order to design a convenient device working in the practical use, we have consulted and shared the ideas with the electrical engineers about putting the invention. The guide catheter irrigation monitoring device (GCIMD) consisted of three parts of optical sensor, main body and electric adapter. In brief, the basic principles of working of the GCIMD are as follows. The optical sensor is attached to the dripping chamber of the line to irrigation solution. The main body had the small light and speaker to make an alarm sounds. The sensor monitors the dripping of flush solution. If the dripping stops more than three seconds, a warning alarm has been activated. So, the operating physicians can concentrate and check the guide catheter irrigation. After the use of the GCIMD, there was no major thromboembolic complication in conjunction with the thrombotic occlusion of the guide catheter in our institute. We have developed a brilliant invention of the GCIMD for NET.

  10. When does atopic dermatitis warrant systemic therapy? Recommendations from an expert panel of the International Eczema Council

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, E.L.; Bruin-Weller, M. de; Flohr, C.; Ardern-Jones, M.R.; Barbarot, S.; Deleuran, M.; Bieber, T.; Vestergaard, C.; Brown, S.J.; Cork, M.J.; Drucker, A.M.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Foelster-Holst, R.; Guttman-Yassky, E.; Nosbaum, A.; Reynolds, N.J.; Silverberg, J.I.; Schmitt, J.; Seyger, M.M.B.; Spuls, P.I.; Stalder, J.F.; Su, J.C.; Takaoka, R.; Traidl-Hoffmann, C.; Thyssen, J.P.; Schaft, J. van der; Wollenberg, A.; Irvine, A.D.; Paller, A.S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are effectively managed with topical medication, a significant minority require systemic therapy. Guidelines for decision making about advancement to systemic therapy are lacking. OBJECTIVE: To guide those considering use of systemic

  11. Examining the mechanism of action of a new device using oral pressure therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Richard J; Kim, C; Siegel, Lawrence; Keenan, B T; Black, Jed; Farid-Moayer, Mehran; Podmore, Jonathan; Vaska, Matt

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the mechanism of action of the oral pressure therapy (OPT) device, a new treatment for sleep apnea. Case series. Academic medical center. Fifteen subjects with sleep apnea who had been successfully treated (responders) with the OPT device and 4 subjects who were not successfully treated (non-responders) with the OPT device. All subjects underwent a MRI (without the device, with the device in place without vacuum and with the device in place with vacuum) to examine the biomechanical changes associated with the OPT device. Oral pressure therapy significantly (P = 0.002) increased the size of the retropalatal airway in both the lateral and anterior-posterior dimensions by moving the soft palate anteriorly and superiorly and the anterior-superior segment of the tongue forward, toward the teeth. The percentage and absolute increase in the cross-sectional area of the retropalatal region, the superior movement of the soft palate, and the anterior displacement of the tongue were significantly greater in the responders than in the non-responders. In responders, there were significant increases in the mean (P = 0.002), maximum (P = 0.0002), and minimum (P = 0.04) cross-sectional areas of the retropalatal region with the OPT device. However, in the retroglossal region, airway caliber decreased with the OPT device. In those who responded to oral pressure therapy, it increased airway caliber in the retropalatal region by moving the soft palate anteriorly and superiorly and the anterior-superior segment of the tongue forward. Schwab RJ, Kim C, Siegel L, Keenan BT, Black J, Farid-Moayer M, Podmore J, Vaska M. Examining the mechanism of action of a new device using oral pressure therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

  12. Using portable negative pressure wound therapy devices in the home care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke JR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Joshua R Burke, Rachael Morley, Mustafa Khanbhai Academic Surgery Unit, Education and Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is the continuous or intermittent application of subatmospheric pressure to the surface of a wound that improves the wound environment, accelerates healing, and reduces wound closure time. Since its first documented use, this technology has lent itself to a number of adaptations, most notably, the development of portable devices facilitating treatment in the home care setting. With advancing surgical standards, wound healing is an important rate-limiting factor in early patient discharge and often a major cost of inpatient treatment. The efficacy of NPWT in the home care setting has been investigated through rate of wound closure, time in care, and patient experience. Rate of wound closure is the most appropriate primary end point. Much can be gleaned from patient experience, but the future success of portable NPWT will be measured on time in care and therefore cost effectiveness. However, there is a lack of level 1a evidence demonstrating increased efficacy of portable over inpatient NPWT. The development of portable NPWT is an encouraging innovation in wound care technology, and extending the benefits to the home care setting is both possible and potentially more beneficial. Keywords: portable, negative pressure wound therapy, vacuum-assisted closure, topical negative pressure therapy

  13. Implantable devices for pain control: spinal cord stimulation and intrathecal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krames, Elliot

    2002-12-01

    Untreated chronic pain is costly to society and to the individual suffering from it. The treatment of chronic pain, a multidimensional disease, should rely on the expertise of varying health care providers and should focus not only on the neurobiological mechanisms of the process but also on the psychosocial aspects of the disease. Implantable devices are costly and invasive, and such efficacious therapies should be used only when more conservative and less costly therapies have failed to provide relief of pain and suffering. Spinal cord stimulation provides neuromodulation of neuropathic, but not nociceptive, pain signals and when used for appropriate indications in the right individuals provides approximately 60-80% long-term pain relief in 60-80% of patients trialled for efficacy. Intrathecal therapies with opioids such as morphine, fentanyl, sufentanil or meperidine--or non-opioids such as clonidine or bupivacaine--provide analgesia in patients with nociceptive or neuropathic pain syndromes. Baclofen, intrathecally, provides profound relief of muscle spasticity due to multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, brain injuries or cerebral palsy.

  14. Panel Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brænder, Morten; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2014-01-01

    Based on our 2013-article, ”Does Deployment to War Affect Soldiers' Public Service Motivation – A Panel Study of Soldiers Before and After their Service in Afghanistan”, we present Panel Analysis as a methodological discipline. Panels consist of multiple units of analysis, observed at two or more...... in research settings where it is not possible to distribute units of analysis randomly or where the independent variables cannot be manipulated. The greatest disadvantage in regard to using panel studies is that data may be difficult to obtain. This is most clearly vivid in regard to the use of panel surveys...

  15. Solar panel parallel mounting configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutschler, Jr., Edward Charles (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes a plurality of solar panels interconnected with a power coupler and an electrically operated device to provide power to the device when the solar cells are insolated. The solar panels are subject to bending distortion when entering or leaving eclipse. Spacecraft attitude disturbances are reduced by mounting each of the solar panels to an elongated boom made from a material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, so that the bending of one panel is not communicated to the next. The boom may be insulated to reduce its bending during changes in insolation. A particularly advantageous embodiment mounts each panel to the boom with a single mounting, which may be a hinge. The single mounting prevents transfer of bending moments from the panel to the boom.

  16. In vitro biomechanical evaluation of single impulse and repetitive mechanical shockwave devices utilized for spinal manipulative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschner, Michael A K; Chun, Kwonsoo; Kim, Namhoon; Ehni, Bruce

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical shockwave therapy devices have been in clinical use for almost 40 years. While most often used to treat back pain, our understanding of their biomechanical performance is very limited. From biomechanical studies we know that biological tissue is viscoelastic and preferably excited around its resonance frequency. Targeting these frequencies has been the focus in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, but these concepts are relatively new in orthopedic and rehabilitation therapies. The exact mechanism by which shockwave therapy acts is not known. Knowledge of the performance characteristics of these devices, correlated with clinical outcome studies, may lead to better patient selection, improvement of device functionality, and knowledge of the underlying working principals of therapy. The objectives of this study were to determine the ability of several commercial shockwave devices to achieve a desired thrust profile in a benchtop setting, determine the thrust profile in a clinical analog, and determine the influence of operator experience level on device performance. We conducted two different types of testing: (1) bench testing to evaluate the devices themselves, and (2) clinical equivalent testing to determine the influence of the operator. The results indicated a significant dependence of thrust output on the compliance of the test media. The Activator V-E device matched the ideal half-sine thrust profile to 94%, followed by the Impulse device (84%), the Activator IV/FS (74%), and the Activator II (48%). While most devices deviated from the ideal profile on the return path, the Impulse device exhibited a secondary peak. Moreover, the Activator V-E device provided evidence that the device performs consistently despite operator experience level. This has been a major concern in manual spinal manipulation. Based on our results, a hyper-flexible spine would receive a lower peak thrust force than a hypo-flexible spine at the same power setting. Furthermore

  17. Impact of Out-of-Pocket Expenditure on Physical Therapy Utilization for Nonspecific Low Back Pain: Secondary Analysis of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolot, Janet; Viola, Deborah; Shi, Qiuhu; Hyland, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Physical therapy decreases low back pain, improves function, and may lead to decreased use of medical services. However, factors predicting physical therapy utilization for patients with low back pain are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to identify the impact of out-of-pocket expenditure on physical therapy utilization for US adults with nonspecific low back pain. This study was a secondary analysis of retrospective Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data. The participants were US adults with nonspecific low back pain. The outcome variable was the number of visits per episode of care. The research variable was out-of-pocket expenditure. Covariate variables were Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) component scores. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Three hundred fourteen adults met the inclusion criteria and submitted SF-12 scores, representing nearly 4 million adults. Out-of-pocket expenditure, physical component score, and the age-insurance category "18-64 years with public coverage only for all of the year or uninsured all of the year" negatively predicted visits per episode of care in the final regression model. Limitations of the study included use of a nonexperimental design, lack of information about symptom severity and content of physical therapy, and SF-12 scores were not taken coincidental with the episode of care. Out-of-pocket expenditure negatively predicts physical therapy utilization. More research is needed to identify all factors influencing physical therapy utilization so that effective health policies may be developed. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  18. Physical Therapy for a Child Poststroke With a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Kelly A

    2016-01-01

    To describe physical therapy (PT) examination and intervention during rehabilitation for a child poststroke with an implanted left ventricular assist device (LVAD). A 10-year-old boy with a history of congenital heart disease awaiting heart transplant was admitted to a pediatric rehabilitation hospital with right hemiplegia, and an external, portable LVAD. This child participated in standard PT examination procedures and interventions with accommodations for the LVAD. Observation was used to evaluate exercise response because of inability to measure vital signs. At admission, impaired muscle tone, balance, and endurance contributed to limitations in functional mobility. By discharge, improvements were seen in all impairments and also in ambulation distance, speed, and independence. This child awaiting heart transplant with an LVAD was able to tolerate intensive individualized PT. With monitoring and adjustments to the plan of care, he demonstrated improvements in functional mobility.

  19. Device for interstitial therapy of low pelvic tumours - the Hammersmith perineal hedgehog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branson, A.N.; Dunn, P.; Kam, K.C.; Lambert, H.E. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK))

    1985-06-01

    The freehand production of accurate volume or multiplane implants for interstitial therapy is difficult. The size of tumour that may be treated in this fashion is therefore limited. A solution to this problem is to use a perspex template to guide the implant and maintain its configuration during treatment. We describe our experience using such a template (the Syed-Neblett template) in treating pelvic tumours. The device has been adapted for use with the iridium wire available in the UK. Two new templates have been designed which are more versatile for treating tumours in this area, particularly close to and involving the perineum. Ten patients have been treated and with appropriate analgesia, antibiotic cover and nursing care the implant was well tolerated.

  20. A graphene-based electrochemical device with thermoresponsive microneedles for diabetes monitoring and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjae; Choi, Tae Kyu; Lee, Young Bum; Cho, Hye Rim; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Wang, Liu; Choi, Hyung Jin; Chung, Taek Dong; Lu, Nanshu; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-06-01

    Owing to its high carrier mobility, conductivity, flexibility and optical transparency, graphene is a versatile material in micro- and macroelectronics. However, the low density of electrochemically active defects in graphene synthesized by chemical vapour deposition limits its application in biosensing. Here, we show that graphene doped with gold and combined with a gold mesh has improved electrochemical activity over bare graphene, sufficient to form a wearable patch for sweat-based diabetes monitoring and feedback therapy. The stretchable device features a serpentine bilayer of gold mesh and gold-doped graphene that forms an efficient electrochemical interface for the stable transfer of electrical signals. The patch consists of a heater, temperature, humidity, glucose and pH sensors and polymeric microneedles that can be thermally activated to deliver drugs transcutaneously. We show that the patch can be thermally actuated to deliver Metformin and reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic mice.

  1. Management of stroke patients submitted to botulinum toxin type A therapy: a Delphi survey of an Italian expert panel of specialist injectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, M; Iocco, M; Molteni, F; Santamato, A; Smania, N

    2014-10-01

    should be assessed at repeated follow-up visits. This expert panel survey can provide guidance for clinicians in the assessment of patients treated with BTX-A therapy.

  2. Humidifiers for oxygen therapy: what risk for reusable and disposable devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fauci, V; Costa, G B; Facciolà, A; Conti, A; Riso, R; Squeri, R

    2017-06-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia accounts for the vast majority of healthcare-associated infections (HAI). Although numerous medical devices have been discussed as potential vehicles for microorganisms, very little is known about the role played by oxygen humidifiers as potential sources of nosocomial pathogens. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the safety of the reuse of humidifiers by analysing the rate of microbial contamination in reusable and disposable oxygen humidifiers used during therapy, and then discuss their potential role in the transmission of respiratory pathogens. Water samples from reusable and disposable oxygen humidifiers were collected from different wards of the University Hospital of Messina, Italy, where nosocomial pneumonia has a higher incidence rate due to the "critical" clinical conditions of inpatients. In particular, we monitored the Internal Medicine and Pulmonology wards for the medical area; the General Surgery and Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery wards for the surgical area and the Intensive Care Unit and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for the emergency area. The samples were always collected after a period of 5 days from initial use for both types of humidifiers. Samples were processed using standard bacteriological techniques and microbial colonies were identified using manual and automated methods. High rates of microbial contamination were observed in samples from reusable oxygen humidifiers employed in medical (83%), surgical (77%) and emergency (50%) areas. The most relevant pathogens were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, amongst the Gram-negative bacteria, and Staphylococcus aureus, amongst the Gram-positive bacteria. Other pathogens were detected in lower percentage. The disposable oxygen humidifier samples showed no contamination. This research presents evidence of the high rate and type of microbial contamination of reusable humidifiers employed for oxygen therapy. These devices may thus be involved in the transmission of potential

  3. Use of mobile device technology to continuously collect patient-reported symptoms during radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: A prospective feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. Falchook, MD

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: A substantial percentage of patients used mobile devices to continuously report symptoms throughout a course of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Future studies should evaluate the impact of mobile device symptom reporting on improving patient outcomes.

  4. When does atopic dermatitis warrant systemic therapy? Recommendations from an expert panel of the International Eczema Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Eric L; Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Flohr, Carsten; Ardern-Jones, Michael R; Barbarot, Sebastien; Deleuran, Mette; Bieber, Thomas; Vestergaard, Christian; Brown, Sara J; Cork, Michael J; Drucker, Aaron M; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Nosbaum, Audrey; Reynolds, Nick J; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Schmitt, Jochen; Seyger, Marieke M B; Spuls, Phyllis I; Stalder, Jean-Francois; Su, John C; Takaoka, Roberto; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Thyssen, Jacob P; van der Schaft, Jorien; Wollenberg, Andreas; Irvine, Alan D; Paller, Amy S

    2017-10-01

    Although most patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are effectively managed with topical medication, a significant minority require systemic therapy. Guidelines for decision making about advancement to systemic therapy are lacking. To guide those considering use of systemic therapy in AD and provide a framework for evaluation before making this therapeutic decision with the patient. A subgroup of the International Eczema Council determined aspects to consider before prescribing systemic therapy. Topics were assigned to expert reviewers who performed a topic-specific literature review, referred to guidelines when available, and provided interpretation and expert opinion. We recommend a systematic and holistic approach to assess patients with severe signs and symptoms of AD and impact on quality of life before systemic therapy. Steps taken before commencing systemic therapy include considering alternate or concomitant diagnoses, avoiding trigger factors, optimizing topical therapy, ensuring adequate patient/caregiver education, treating coexistent infection, assessing the impact on quality of life, and considering phototherapy. Our work is a consensus statement, not a systematic review. The decision to start systemic medication should include assessment of severity and quality of life while considering the individual's general health status, psychologic needs, and personal attitudes toward systemic therapies. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in focal therapy for prostate cancer: recommendations from a consensus panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Berrend G.; Fütterer, Jurgen J.; Gupta, Rajan T.; Katz, Aaron; Kirkham, Alexander; Kurhanewicz, John; Moul, Judd W.; Pinto, Peter A.; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Robertson, Cary; de la Rosette, Jean; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Jones, J. Stephen; Ukimura, Osamu; Verma, Sadhna; Wijkstra, Hessel; Marberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To establish a consensus on the utility of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to identify patients for focal therapy. Urological surgeons, radiologists, and basic researchers, from Europe and North America participated in a consensus meeting about the use of mpMRI in focal therapy of

  6. A new method and device of aligning patient setup lasers in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ui-Jung; Jo, Kwanghyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Kwak, Jung Won; Choi, Sang Hyuon; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kim, Mi Young; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Sung Yong; Kim, Siyong

    2016-01-08

    The aim of this study is to develop a new method to align the patient setup lasers in a radiation therapy treatment room and examine its validity and efficiency. The new laser alignment method is realized by a device composed of both a metallic base plate and a few acrylic transparent plates. Except one, every plate has either a crosshair line (CHL) or a single vertical line that is used for alignment. Two holders for radiochromic film insertion are prepared in the device to find a radiation isocenter. The right laser positions can be found optically by matching the shadows of all the CHLs in the gantry head and the device. The reproducibility, accuracy, and efficiency of laser alignment and the dependency on the position error of the light source were evaluated by comparing the means and the standard deviations of the measured laser positions. After the optical alignment of the lasers, the radiation isocenter was found by the gantry and collimator star shots, and then the lasers were translated parallel to the isocenter. In the laser position reproducibility test, the mean and standard deviation on the wall of treatment room were 32.3 ± 0.93 mm for the new method whereas they were 33.4 ± 1.49 mm for the conventional method. The mean alignment accuracy was 1.4 mm for the new method, and 2.1 mm for the conventional method on the walls. In the test of the dependency on the light source position error, the mean laser position was shifted just by a similar amount of the shift of the light source in the new method, but it was greatly magnified in the conventional method. In this study, a new laser alignment method was devised and evaluated successfully. The new method provided more accurate, more reproducible, and faster alignment of the lasers than the conventional method.

  7. Comparison of Flutter device and chest physical therapy in the treatment of cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondor, M; Nixon, P A; Mutich, R; Rebovich, P; Orenstein, D M

    1999-10-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) is recommended for the clearance of bronchial secretions in the management of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The Flutter valve (Scandipharm, Birmingham, AL) has been introduced as an alternative method to CPT for airway mucus clearance. The objective of this study was to compare the short-term effects of CPT and the Flutter valve on pulmonary function and exercise tolerance in patients with cystic fibrosis. Twenty-three patients, 5 to 21 years of age, were randomized to receive one of two interventions: CPT or the Flutter valve, upon admission to the hospital for a 2-week treatment of pulmonary exacerbation. Pulmonary function testing (PFTs) and the 6-min walk test were performed on admission, day 7, and day 14 of hospitalization. Data analysis indicated no significant differences between the two groups on admission. Both groups showed improvement in pulmonary function test results, but the Flutter group had a higher mean forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)) compared to the CPT group after 1 week of intervention. Both groups continued to improve during the 2-week intervention, with no significant difference in FVC or FEV(1) between groups by the end of 2 weeks. Mean forced expiratory flow rate between 25-75% of vital capacity (FEF(25-75)), 6-min walk distance, and resting arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO(2)) showed little change by day 7, but improved significantly (P< 0.05) by day 14 of hospitalization in both groups, with no significant difference between groups. This study demonstrated that patients using the Flutter device had better pulmonary function after 1 week of therapy and similar improvement in pulmonary function and exercise tolerance compared to CPT after 2 weeks of therapy, suggesting that Flutter valve therapy is an acceptable alternative to standard CPT during in-hospital care of patients with CF. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. 21 CFR 801.60 - Principal display panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal display panel. 801.60 Section 801.60...) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Devices § 801.60 Principal display panel. The term principal display panel, as it applies to over-the-counter devices in package form and...

  9. Can an NTI-tss device be effective as a first-line therapy in patients with TMD myofascial pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanoglu Erbasar, G N; Alpaslan, C; Eroglu Inan, G

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether integrating a nociceptive trigeminal inhibition-tension suppression system (NTI-tss) device with first-line therapy of myofascial pain, which includes guidance, assurance, counselling and behavioural changes, would be more effective in alleviating symptoms. This randomised controlled clinical trial included 40 patients who were clinically diagnosed with myofascial pain according to Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Patients were randomly divided into two groups: the first group comprised patients who received guidance, assurance, counselling and behavioural changes; an NTI-tss device was integrated to this protocol in the second group. Both groups exhibited reduction in pain levels and improvement of jaw function compared with baseline values, but the difference was not significant. Both groups demonstrated improvements in 6 weeks; however, the integration of NTI-tss device into the therapy protocol did not provide any additional benefit in relieving symptoms of myofascial pain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A new LED device used for photodynamic therapy in treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yiyun; Zhou, Guoyu; Chen, Jinan; Shen, Lingyue; Jianxin, Zhao; Xu, Qing; Zhu, Yulan

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and safety of a newly designed LED device used in photodiagnosis and photodynamic therapy of moderate to severe acne vulgaris in Chinese patients. Forty-six patients with moderate to severe facial acne showing high degrees of fluorescence by ultraviolet light examination were illuminated during ALA-PDT with two wavelengths of light (543-548 nm, and 630±6 nm, respectively) after 2 h of incubation with ALA. Each patient received treatment once every 30 days for two or three sessions. Two independent investigators assigned an acne severity score at baseline, one week after each treatment, as well as 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the completion of treatment. Adverse effects were recorded during and after each treatment. All patients rated their satisfaction with the results of treatment at a 12-week follow up visit. The ALA-PDL treatment regimen showed an overall effectiveness rate of 89.13% (41/46 patients). Some degree of clinical efficacy was seen in 71.42%, 86.67%, and 95.83% of patients with grades IV, V, and VI acne, respectively, and the rate of clinical effectiveness increased with increasing acne severity. When compared with baseline scores, significant reductions in acne scores were obtained at 8, and 12 weeks after completion of treatment. Maximum efficacy was shown at the 12 week follow up. No severe adverse events were observed. ALA-PDT administered with the newly designed LED device was an effective treatment for moderate to severe acne vulgaris, and side effects were mild and reversible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Single LED-based device to perform widefield fluorescence imaging and photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Clovis; Buzzá, Hilde H.; Stringasci, Mirian D.; Andrade, Cintia T.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Zanchin, Anderson L.; Tuboy, Aparecida M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that can be indicated for several cancer types and pre-cancer lesions. One of the main applications of PDT is the treatment of superficial skin lesions such as basal cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease and actinic keratosis. Three elements are necessary in PDT, a photosensitizer (PS); light at specific wavelength to be absorbed by the PS, and molecular oxygen. A typical PS used for skin lesion is protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is an intrinsic PS; its production is stimulated by a pro-drug, such as 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). Before starting a treatment, it is very important to follow up the PpIX production (to ensure that enough PS was produced prior to a PDT application) and, during a PDT session, to monitor its photodegradation (as it is evidence of the photodynamic effect taking place). The aim of this paper is to present a unique device, LINCE (MMOptics - São Carlos, Brazil), that brings together two probes that can, respectively, allow for fluorescence imaging and work as a light source for PDT treatment. The fluorescence probe of the system is optically based on 400 nm LED (light emitting diodes) arrays that allow observing the fluorescence emission over 450 nm. The PDT illumination probe options are constituted of 630 nm LED arrays for small areas and, for large areas, of both 630 nm and 450 nm LED arrays. Joining both functions at the same device makes PDT treatment simpler, properly monitorable and, hence, more clinically feasible. LINCE has been used in almost 1000 PDT treatments of superficial skin lesions in Brazil, with 88.4% of clearance of superficial BCC.

  12. No evidence that magnification devices improve the success of endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congiusta, Marie; Veitz-Keenan, Analia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, US National Institutes of Health Trials Register, WHO-Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials.Study selectionOnly randomised and quasi-randomised studies were pursued. No restrictions were placed on language or date of publication. The primary outcome sought was treatment success (complete healing or incomplete healing), uncertain healing and failure after one year of treatment, between one and four years and more than four years after treatment. Secondary outcomes considered for the inclusion criteria included outcomes related to the advantage of using a given magnification device in the clinical procedure such as; greater accuracy, the ease of removing broken instruments from the canal, quality of visualisation, quality of root end filling for the retrograde treatment, quality of perforation repair and the total time required for completing the clinical procedure.Data extraction and synthesisData would have been extracted by two review authors independently using a standardised data extraction form, and any disagreement would have been resolved by discussion and a third reviewer would have been consulted. Two review authors would have independently undertaken an assessment of the risk of bias.ResultsThe searches retrieved 1,234 studies. None of these satisfied the selection criteria, therefore no analysis was completed.ConclusionsNo article was identified in the current literature for the review that satisfied the inclusion criteria. It is unknown if and how the type of magnification device affects the treatment outcome considering the high number of factors that may have a significant impact on the success of endodontic therapy.

  13. The evolution and benefit of device therapy in patients listed for heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberk, Bert; Hinderks, Mark; Voros, Gabor; Garweg, Christophe; Vanhaecke, Johan; Willems, Rik

    2017-03-09

    The latest 2015 ESC Guidelines on the prevention of sudden cardiac death make a Class IIa recommendation for ICD implantation in patients listed for heart transplantation. This recommendation was based on expert consensus in view of the sparsity of data. All patients listed for heart transplantation at the University Hospitals of Leuven from 2002 until 2014 were studied retrospectively. Exclusion criteria were age HR 4.38, 95%CI 2.11-9.01), a history of stroke (HR 2.95, 95%CI 1.61-5.40), older age (HR 1.03, 95%CI 1.01-1.05) and a worse renal function (HR 1.15, 95%CI 1.00-1.33). The time on the waiting list for heart transplantation significantly increased together with an increased use of device therapy in this population. The proportion of patients reaching transplant remained unchanged. This patient group is prone to life-threatening arrhythmias and the use of an ICD may improve survival.

  14. Multi-Targeted Antithrombotic Therapy for Total Artificial Heart Device Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Angeleah; Riley, Jeffrey B; Joyce, Lyle D

    2016-03-01

    To prevent thrombotic or bleeding events in patients receiving a total artificial heart (TAH), agents have been used to avoid adverse events. The purpose of this article is to outline the adoption and results of a multi-targeted antithrombotic clinical procedure guideline (CPG) for TAH patients. Based on literature review of TAH anticoagulation and multiple case series, a CPG was designed to prescribe the use of multiple pharmacological agents. Total blood loss, Thromboelastograph(®) (TEG), and platelet light-transmission aggregometry (LTA) measurements were conducted on 13 TAH patients during the first 2 weeks of support in our institution. Target values and actual medians for postimplant days 1, 3, 7, and 14 were calculated for kaolinheparinase TEG, kaolin TEG, LTA, and estimated blood loss. Protocol guidelines were followed and anticoagulation management reduced bleeding and prevented thrombus formation as well as thromboembolic events in TAH patients postimplantation. The patients in this study were susceptible to a variety of possible complications such as mechanical device issues, thrombotic events, infection, and bleeding. Among them all it was clear that patients were at most risk for bleeding, particularly on postoperative days 1 through 3. However, bleeding was reduced into postoperative days 3 and 7, indicating that acceptable hemostasis was achieved with the anticoagulation protocol. The multidisciplinary, multi-targeted anticoagulation clinical procedure guideline was successful to maintain adequate antithrombotic therapy for TAH patients.

  15. Liver Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) Lactoferrin Lactose Tolerance Tests LDL Cholesterol LDL ... GGT) – another enzyme found mainly in liver cells Lactate dehydrogenase (LD) – an enzyme released with cell damage; found ...

  16. Liver Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Liver Panel Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Images View Sources Ask Us Also Known As Liver Profile Liver Function Tests LFTs Formal Name Hepatic ...

  17. Oxygen therapy devices and portable ventilators for improved physical activity in daily life in patients with chronic respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanetto, Karina Couto; Pitta, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    Patients with hypoxemia and chronic respiratory failure may need to use oxygen therapy to correct hypoxemia and to use ventilatory support to augment alveolar ventilation, reverse abnormalities in blood gases (in particular hypercapnia) and reduce the work of breathing. Areas covered: This narrative review provides an overview on the use of oxygen therapy devices or portable ventilators for improved physical activity in daily life (PADL) as well as discusses the issue of lower mobility in daily life among stable patients with chronic respiratory disease who present indication for long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) or home-based noninvasive ventilation (NIV). A literature review of these concepts was performed by using all related search terms. Expert commentary: Technological advances led to the development of light and small oxygen therapy devices and portable ventilators which aim to facilitate patients' mobility and ambulation. However, the day-by-day dependence of a device may reduce mobility and partially impair patients' PADL. Nocturnal NIV implementation in hypercapnic patients seems promising to improve PADL. The magnitude of their equipment-related physical inactivity is underexplored up to this moment and more long-term randomized clinical trials and meta-analysis examining the effects of ambulatory oxygen and NIV on PADL are required.

  18. Physical Medicine Devices; Reclassification of Shortwave Diathermy for All Other Uses, Henceforth To Be Known as Nonthermal Shortwave Therapy. Final order; technical correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify shortwave diathermy (SWD) for all other uses, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to rename the device "nonthermal shortwave therapy'' (SWT). FDA is also making a technical correction in the regulation for the carrier frequency for SWD and SWT devices.

  19. Randomized controlled crossover trial of a new oscillatory device as add-on therapy for COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlender, Zvi G; Arish, Nissim; Laxer, Uri; Berkman, Neville; Leibovitz, Allon; Fink, Gershon; Breuer, Raphael

    2012-12-01

    A new oscillatory device administers predetermined pressure oscillation sequences into the chest cavity over inhaled/exhaled air streams at low positive pressure. We assessed device safety and effect on 6MW performance, pulmonary function, and health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) in moderate-to-very severe COPD in a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover study. Outcomes with an oscillatory device (Pulsehaler(TM), Respinova Ltd, Herzliya, Israel) and a "muted" sham device (control) of identical appearance that delivered continuous positive air pressure were compared in two groups receiving opposite treatment sequences: 2-week oscillatory device/control, 2-week washout, 2-week control/oscillatory device, 2-week washout. The clinical trial was registered ( www.clinicaltrials.gov , NCT00821418) and approved by the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center Institutional Review Board (08-608). All participants signed informed consent; 22 patients completed the study with no marked differences in COPD exacerbations or side effects. A total of 91% of patients treated with the oscillatory device had a clinically significant improvement (increase >40 m) in 6MW performance. The 6MW distance with the oscillatory device increased significantly after 1 week of treatment (51.6 ± 7.6 m, +13.5 ± 2.3%, p device was significantly greater (p device but not with control. HRQL improved markedly (≥1 point) for dyspnea and mastery with the oscillatory device (p = 0.02) but not control. Treatment with a new oscillatory device appears to be safe, and to improve 6MW performance, pulmonary function, and HRQL in COPD. Further evaluation is warranted.

  20. Surgical implantation of a cardiac resynchronization therapy device in a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) with fibrosing cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Elizabeth Marie; Ogburn, Anna L; Hall, Jeffrey; Rush, Dwain; Lau, Yung; Dillon, A R; Garmon, Linda; Tillson, D M; Kay, G Neal

    2010-09-01

    A 24-yr-old, male western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was diagnosed in March of 2003 with congestive heart failure (CHF). Transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated global left and right ventricular hypokinesia with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.20. At the time of diagnosis, the animal exhibited symptoms and signs of CHF with minimal exertion (New York Heart Association class III). Over a 16-mo period, the severity of CHF progressed to class IV (resting signs and symptoms) despite angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, beta-blockers, and diuretics. Because of intractable CHF and a QRS duration that was markedly prolonged compared with the normal range for this species, a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device was implanted using implantation techniques based on human surgical procedures. Placement of the right ventricular, right atrial, and left ventricular leads and pulse generator were accomplished in 5.5 hr. Telemetry of the device postoperatively via wand or remote radio frequency has allowed for noninvasive programming and interrogation. The clinical improvement in CHF with this therapy was immediate and dramatic for this animal. Six months after CRT device implantation, the device leads became dislodged during an altercation with another gorilla, with the rapid development of CHF upon cessation of biventricular pacing. A second procedure to replace the leads returned the gorilla to his previous level of activity. In 2007, the pulse generator was electively replaced for battery depletion with a device capable of remote radiofrequency programming and interrogation. CRT implantation, although requiring specialized equipment and surgical skill, appears to be a viable option for treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy in gorillas.

  1. A controlled trial of the Litebook light-emitting diode (LED) light therapy device for treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desan, Paul H; Weinstein, Anea J; Michalak, Erin E; Tam, Edwin M; Meesters, Ybe; Ruiter, Martine J; Horn, Edward; Telner, John; Iskandar, Hani; Boivin, Diane B; Lam, Raymond W

    2007-01-01

    .... Light treatment devices using efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) whose output is relatively concentrated in short wavelengths may enable a more convenient effective therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Methods...

  2. Simulation of irradiation exposure of electronic devices due to heavy ion therapy with Monte Carlo Code MCNP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapins, Janis; Guilliard, Nicole; Bernnat, Wolfgang; Buck, Arnulf

    2017-09-01

    During heavy ion irradiation therapy the patient has to be located exactly at the right position to make sure that the Bragg peak occurs in the tumour. The patient has to be moved in the range of millimetres to scan the ill tissue. For that reason a special table was developed which allows exact positioning. The electronic control can be located outside the surgery. But that has some disadvantage for the construction. To keep the system compact it would be much more comfortable to put the electronic control inside the surgery. As a lot of high energetic secondary particles are produced during the therapy causing a high dose in the room it is important to find positions with low dose rates. Therefore, investigations are needed where the electronic devices should be located to obtain a minimum of radiation, help to prevent the failure of sensitive devices. The dose rate was calculated for carbon ions with different initial energy and protons over the entire therapy room with Monte Carlo particle tracking using MCNP6. The types of secondary particles were identified and the dose rate for a thin silicon layer and an electronic mixture material was determined. In addition, the shielding effect of several selected material layers was calculated using MCNP6.

  3. Active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs: rewriting the rule book on large area flat panel x-ray devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Koniczek, Martin; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2009-02-01

    The near-ubiquity of large area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in medical x-ray imaging applications is a testament to the usefulness and adaptability of the relatively simple concept of array pixels based on a single amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT coupled to a pixel storage capacitor. Interestingly, the fundamental advantages of a-Si:H thin film electronics (including compatibility with very large area processing, high radiation damage resistance, and continued development driven by interest in mainstream consumer products) are shared by the rapidly advancing technology of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) TFTs. Moreover, the far higher mobilities of poly-Si TFTs, compared to those of a- Si:H, facilitate the creation of faster and more complex circuits than are possible with a-Si:H TFTs, leading to the possibility of new classes of large area, flat panel imagers. Given recent progress in the development of initial poly-Si imager prototypes, the creation of increasingly sophisticated active pixel arrays offering pixel-level amplification, variable gain, very high frame rates, and excellent signal-to-noise performance under all fluoroscopic and radiographic conditions (including very low exposures and high spatial frequencies), appears within reach. In addition, it is conceivable that the properties of poly-Si TFTs could allow the development of large area imagers providing single xray photon counting capabilities. In this article, the factors driving the possible realization of clinically practical active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs are described and simple calculational estimates related to photon counting imagers are presented. Finally, the prospect for future development of such imagers is discussed.

  4. Frequency of inappropriate therapy in patients implanted with dual- versus single-chamber ICD devices in the ICD arm of MADIT-CRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Anne-Christine H; Sood, Nitesh; Ruwald, Martin H

    2013-01-01

    The majority of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are dual-chamber devices, but studies on the frequency of inappropriate therapy in dual- versus single-chamber devices have shown conflicting results. The aim of this study is to determine whether implantation of dual-chamber ICD...

  5. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Using a Mobile Application Synchronizable With Wearable Devices for Insomnia Treatment: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Gul; Kang, Jae Myeong; Cho, Seong-Jin; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Lee, Yu Jin; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Kim, Leen; Winkelman, John W

    2017-04-15

    The use of telemedicine with a mobile application (MA) and a wearable device (WD) for the management of sleep disorders has recently received considerable attention. We designed an MA synchronizable with a WD for insomnia treatment. Our pilot study determined the efficacy of simplified group cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered using our MA and assessed participant adherence to and satisfaction with the device. The efficacy of the CBT-I using MA (CBT-I-MA) was assessed by comparing sleep variables (sleep efficiency [SE], Insomnia Severity Index [ISI], and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory [PSQI] scores) before and after a 4-week treatment protocol in 19 patients with insomnia disorder patients. SE was assessed using a sleep diary, actigraphy, and the PSQI. The intervention significantly improved all three measures of SE (P development and replication studies of CBT-I-MA.

  6. A Novel Biomarker Panel Examining Response to Gemcitabine with or without Erlotinib for Pancreatic Cancer Therapy in NCIC Clinical Trials Group PA.3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Shultz

    Full Text Available NCIC Clinical Trials Group PA.3 was a randomized control trial that demonstrated improved overall survival (OS in patients receiving erlotinib in addition to gemcitabine for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Prior to therapy, patients had plasma samples drawn for future study. We sought to identify biomarkers within these samples.Using the proximity ligation assay (PLA, a probe panel was built from commercially available antibodies for 35 key proteins selected from a global genetic analysis of pancreatic cancers, and used to quantify protein levels in 20 uL of patient plasma. To determine if any of these proteins levels independently associated with OS, univariate and mulitbaraible Cox models were used. In addition, we examined the associations between biomarker expression and disease stage at diagnosis using Fisher's exact test. The correlation between Erlotinib sensitivity and each biomarkers was assessed using a test of interaction between treatment and biomarker.Of the 569 eligible patients, 480 had samples available for study. Samples were randomly allocated into training (251 and validation sets (229. Among all patients, elevated levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1 alpha, and interleukin-6 were independently associated with lower OS, while IL-8, CEA, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha and mucin-1 were associated with metastatic disease. Patients with elevated levels of receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2 expression had improved OS when treated with erlotinib compared to placebo. In conclusion, PLA is a powerful tool for identifying biomarkers from archived, small volume serum samples. These data may be useful to stratify patient outcomes regardless of therapeutic intervention.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00040183.

  7. Efficacy of biofeedback therapy via a mini wireless device on sleep bruxism contrasted with occlusal splint: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, WeiPing; Yang, Jie; Zhang, FeiMin; Yin, XinMin; Wei, XiaoLong; Wang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The putative causes of bruxism are multifactorial and there are no definite measures for bruxism management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy on sleep bruxism, compared with occlusal splint. Twenty-four volunteers with sleep bruxism were divided into two groups: the GTB group that were treated with biofeedback therapy (n  = 12) and the GTO group that were treated with occlusal splint (n  = 12). A mini pressure sensor integrated with a monitoring circuit by use of a maxillary biofeedback splint was fabricated. To foster the relaxation of the masticatory muscles and the nervous system, the wireless device received signals from bruxism events and vibrations alerted the bruxer when the threshold was exceeded. Total episodes and average duration of bruxism events during 8 hours of sleep were analyzed with the monitoring program (TRMY1.0). After 6 and 12 weeks, the episodes (P  =  0.001) and duration (P 0.05). Furthermore, the episodes had significant differences between the GTB group and the GTO group after the same period of treatment (P  =  0.000). The results suggest that biofeedback therapy may be an effective and convenient measure for mild bruxers, when compared with occlusal splint therapy. The mini wireless biofeedback method may be of value for the diagnosis and management of bruxism in the future. PMID:25859272

  8. In vivo determination of tooth mobility after fixed orthodontic appliance therapy with a novel intraoral measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, Anna; Al-Malat, R; Skupin, J; Keilig, L; Dirk, C; Karanis, R; Bourauel, C; Jäger, A

    2017-05-01

    Valid measurement systems recording tooth mobility upon displacement within the subtle range of physiological strains are missing. Here, we introduce a novel in vivo measurement device and demonstrate a first clinical application by monitoring tooth mobility changes during retention after fixed multibracket appliance therapy. Tooth mobility was measured in vivo on 21 patients (11 female, 10 male; mean age 16.1 ± 3.1 years) by displacing the upper first incisor 0.2 mm lingually for 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 s with the novel intraoral device. Measurements were recorded directly after, as much as 2, 7, and 14 days and up to 6 months after appliance debonding. Device performance was precise and valid in clinical use. Data revealed significant interindividual varying tooth mobility, which was very high during the first 2 days after appliance removal. After 1 week, mobility values decreased, but were generally higher upon short loadings compared to long ones. After 3 months, tooth mobility was significantly lower than directly after debonding. Interestingly, males exhibited significantly less mobility than females. Our work is the first using an in vivo measurement device capable of performing and recording tooth displacements within this delicate range and in such precision. Furthermore, our findings elucidate tooth mobility changes after multibracket treatment, giving important information for retention periods. Establishment of this novel measurement device in clinical use is an important improvement when approaching the complexity of tooth mobility in vivo regarding different issues like orthodontics, periodontal disease, or bruxism.

  9. Development of transfer standard devices for ensuring the accurate calibration of ultrasonic physical therapy machines in clinical use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hekkenberg, R T [TNO Prevention and Health, Zernikedreef 9, 2333 CK Leiden (Netherlands); Richards, A [National Measurement Laboratory, CSIRO, Bradfield Rd, West Lindfield 2070, Sydney (Australia); Beissner, K [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, PTB, Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Zeqiri, B [National Physical Laboratory, NPL, Queens Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Prout, G [National Measurement Laboratory, CSIRO, Bradfield Rd, West Lindfield 2070, Sydney (Australia); Cantrall, Ch [National Measurement Laboratory, CSIRO, Bradfield Rd, West Lindfield 2070, Sydney (Australia); Bezemer, R A [TNO Prevention and Health, Zernikedreef 9, 2333 CK Leiden (Netherlands); Koch, Ch [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, PTB, Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig, (Germany); Hodnett, M [National Physical Laboratory, NPL, Queens Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapy ultrasound is widely applied to patients. However, many devices do not comply with the relevant standard stating that the actual power output shall be within {+-}20% of the device indication. Extreme cases have been reported: from delivering effectively no ultrasound or operating at maximum power at all powers indicated. This can potentially lead to patient injury as well as mistreatment. The present European (EC) project is an ongoing attempt to improve the quality of the treatment of patients being treated with ultrasonic physical-therapy. A Portable ultrasound Power Standard (PPS) is being developed and accurately calibrated. The PPS includes: Ultrasound transducers (including one exhibiting an unusual output) and a driver for the ultrasound transducers that has calibration and proficiency test functions. Also included with the PPS is a Cavitation Detector to determine the onset of cavitation occurring within the propagation medium. The PPS will be suitable for conducting in-the-field accreditation (proficiency testing and calibration). In order to be accredited it will be important to be able to show traceability of the calibration, the calibration process and qualification of testing staff. The clinical user will benefit from traceability because treatments will be performed more reliably.

  10. Maintaining Control of Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease: Adherence to Inhaled Therapy and Risks and Benefits of Switching Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Andrea S; Paleari, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major obstructive airway diseases that involve underlying airway inflammation. The most widely used pharmacotherapies for asthma and COPD are inhaled agents that have been shown to be effective and safe in these patients. However, despite the availability of effective pharmacologic treatment and comprehensive treatment guidelines, the prevalence of inadequately controlled asthma and COPD is high. A main reason for this is poor adherence. Adherence is a big problem for all chronic diseases, but in asthma and COPD patients there are some additional difficulties because of poor inhalation technique and inhaler choice. Easier-to-use devices and educational strategies on proper inhaler use from health caregivers can improve inhaler technique. The type of device used and the concordance between patient and physician in the choice of inhaler can also improve adherence and are as important as the drug. Adherence to inhaled therapy is absolutely necessary for optimizing patient control. If disease control is not adequate despite good adherence, switching to a more appropriate inhaled therapy is recommended. By contrast, uninformed switching or switching to less user-friendly inhaler may impact disease control negatively. This critical review of the available literature is aimed to provide a guidance protocol on when a switch may be recommended in individual patients.

  11. Changes in functional connectivity correlate with behavioral gains in stroke patients after therapy using a brain-computer interface device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Mei Young

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interface (BCI technology is being incorporated into new stroke rehabilitation devices, but little is known about brain changes associated with its use. We collected anatomical and functional MRI of 9 stroke patients with persistent upper extremity motor impairment before, during, and after therapy using a BCI system. Subjects were asked to perform finger tapping of the impaired hand during fMRI. Action Research Arm Test (ARAT, 9-Hole Peg Test (9-HPT, and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS domains of Hand Function (HF and Activities of Daily Living (ADL were also assessed. Group-level analyses examined changes in whole-brain task-based functional connectivity (FC to seed regions in the motor network observed during and after BCI therapy. Whole-brain FC analyses seeded in each thalamus showed FC increases from baseline at mid-therapy and post-therapy (p< 0.05. Changes in FC between seeds at both the network and the connection levels were examined for correlations with changes in behavioral measures. Average motor network FC was increased post-therapy, and changes in average network FC correlated (p < 0.05 with changes in performance on ARAT (R2=0.21, 9-HPT (R2=0.41, SIS HF (R2=0.27, and SIS ADL (R2=0.40. Multiple individual connections within the motor network were found to correlate in change from baseline with changes in behavioral measures. Many of these connections involved the thalamus, with change in each of four behavioral measures significantly correlating with change from baseline FC of at least one thalamic connection. These preliminary results show changes in FC that occur with the administration of rehabilitative therapy using a BCI system. The correlations noted between changes in FC measures and changes in behavioral outcomes indicate that both adaptive and maladaptive changes in FC may develop with this therapy and also suggest a brain-behavior relationship that may be stimulated by the neuromodulatory component of BCI therapy.

  12. Circuits in the Sun: Solar Panel Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfroerer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Typical commercial solar panels consist of approximately 60 individual photovoltaic cells connected in series. Since the usual Kirchhoff rules apply, the current is uniform throughout the circuit, while the electric potential of the individual devices is cumulative. Hence, a solar panel is a good analog of a simple resistive series circuit, except…

  13. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy-European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroes, Erik S.; Thompson, Paul D.; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D.; Raal, Frederick J.; Ray, Kausik K.; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bruckert, Eric; de Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M.; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D.; Hegele, Robert A.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B.; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A.; Catapano, Alberico L.; Chapman, M. John; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Leiter, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of

  14. Panel discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No Author Given

    1975-01-01

    Panel discussion: summation and future projections. Introductory remarks by panelists followed by questions and comments from the floor. Panelists: Dr. Joseph Barnea (former director of Resources and Transport for the United Nations; energy consultant to the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR)); the Honorable Clyde F. Bel, Jr. (member of the Louisiana House of Representatives representing District 90 and New Orleans); Dr. David Lombard (acting chief of the Advanced Systems Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy Research and Technology, Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)); Fred C. Repper (vice-president of Central Power and Light Company in Corpus Christi, Texas); Dr. Hans Suter (environmental consultant in Corpus Christi, Texas; environmental columnist for the Corpus Christi Caller Times). Session chairman: Herbert Woodson.

  15. Between the devices lines: challenges of contemporary practices in occupational therapy and culture interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Umbuzeiro Valent

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses the challenge of establishing practices on the interface of occupational therapy and culture. It is based on studies on the problematic field defined by biopolitcs as a regime of hegemonic power composed by the domains of both these areas. It points out topics for the construction of social and cultural participation strategies for people who, for several reasons, live in vulnerable situations. These populations, traditionally received in the field of occupational therapy, circulate differently in the city and challenge the creation of innovative and transversal actions that affirm collective encounters and projects. The artistic practices engendered in certain critical perspective, appear as alternatives to activate experiments that make possible the production of subjectivities from heterogenesis. They are contributions to the set of interdisciplinary studies supporting complex and intersectorial actions which produce autonomy and cultural policies.

  16. Early Aqueous Suppressant Therapy on Hypertensive Phase Following Glaucoma Drainage Device Procedure: A Randomized Prospective Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Simon K; Kornmann, Helen L; Giaconi, JoAnn A; Kwong, Allen; Tran, Eric; Caprioli, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    To prospectively evaluate the effect of early aqueous suppression (therapy) on hypertensive phase (HP) and intraocular pressure (IOP) control after implantation of silicone Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV). Patients who underwent AGV implantation were randomized to initiate therapy (including β-blockers, α-agonists, or carbonic anhydrase inhibitors) when postoperative IOP>10 mm Hg (low-IOP initiation group) or >17 mm Hg (moderate-IOP initiation group). HP was defined as an IOP>21 mm Hg during the first 6 postoperative months, after an initial IOP reduction to measures included the occurrence of HP and IOP control. Fifty-two eyes (50 patients) underwent AGV implantation. Average follow-up was 21.9±10.7 months. HP was observed in 21 eyes (40.4%) with average peak IOP of 30±8 mm Hg, onset at 32±30 days, and duration of 15±32 days. One year postoperatively, those eyes with HP had higher IOP than eyes that did not develop HP (15.1±5.2, 11.4±4.3, respectively; P=0.021) and required more additional glaucoma surgeries (28.6%, 3.2%, respectively; P=0.013). The peak IOP at week 3 postoperatively in the low-IOP initiation group (26 eyes) was significantly lower than in the moderate-IOP initiation group (26 eyes; 15.7±3.6, 20.6±8.9, respectively; P=0.012). Eyes with therapy started after HP onset had significantly higher postoperative IOP from 2 to 4 months. Therapy initiated before the development of HP was not associated with a higher complication rate. Aqueous suppression initiated in the early postoperative period while IOPs were still in the low-teens and was able to reduce the incidence of IOP spike associated with the HP without an increased complication rate.

  17. The VANILLA sensor as a beam monitoring device for X-ray radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, J J; Hugtenburg, R P; Cussans, D; Perry, M; Hall, C; Stevens, P; Lawrence, H; McKenzie, A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer treatments such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) require increasingly complex methods to verify the accuracy and precision of the treatment delivery. In vivo dosimetry based on measurements made in an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been demonstrated. The distorting effect of the patient anatomy on the beam intensity means it is difficult to separate changes in patient anatomy from changes in the beam intensity profile. Alternatively, upstream detectors scatter and attenuate the beam, changing the energy spectrum of the beam, and generate contaminant radiation such as electrons. We used the VANILLA device, a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS), to measure the 2D beam profile of a 6 MV X-ray beam at Bristol Hospital in real-time in an upstream position to the patient without clinically significant disturbance of the beam (0.1% attenuation). MAPSs can be made very thin (~20 μm) with still a very good signal-to-noise performance. The VANILLA can reconstruct the collimated beam edge with approximately 64 μm precision. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development and evaluation of multi-energy PbO dosimeter for quality assurance of image-guide radiation therapy devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Han, Moo-Jae; Oh, Kyung-Min; Lee, Young-Kyu; Kim, Shin-Wook; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2017-04-01

    In radiation therapy, accurate radiotherapy treatment plan (RTP) reproduction is necessary to optimize the clinical results. Thus, attempts have recently been made to ensure high RTP reproducibility using image-guide radiation therapy (IGRT) technology. However, the clinical use of digital X-ray equipment requires extended quality assurance (QA) for those devices, since the IGRT device quality determines the precision of intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The study described in this paper was focused on developing a multi-energy PbO dosimeter for IGRT device QA. The Schottky-type polycrystalline PbO dosimeter with a Au/PbO/ITO structure was evaluated by comparing its response coincidence, dose linearity, measurement reproducibility, linear attenuation coefficient, and percent depth dose with those of Si diode and standard ionization chamber dosimeters.

  19. Techniques and Devices for Catheter-Directed Therapy in Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Alok; Al-Hakim, Ramsey; Benenati, James F

    2017-09-01

    The clinical presentation of a patient with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) can be classified into 3 categories: low-risk, submassive (presence of right heart strain), and massive (hemodynamic compromise). Massive PE is associated with high morbidity or mortality and typically treated with systemic intravenous thrombolysis. Over the last 2 decades, however, catheter-directed techniques have become an increasingly popular treatment modality for patients with a contraindication to systemic thrombolysis or without clinical improvement after systemic thrombolysis. Furthermore, endovascular treatment for patients with submassive PE has been of great interest due to the significantly increased mortality associated with right heart strain, and prospective clinical trials have demonstrated catheter-directed thrombolysis to decrease right heart strain earlier than systemic anticoagulation alone. This article describes available devices and endovascular techniques used to treat patients with massive and submassive acute PE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Which Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients With Left Ventricular Assist Device and Aspirin Allergy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Filippo; Pozzi, Loris; Sferrazza, Giulia; Della Valle, Patrizia; D'Angelo, Armando; Slepian, Marvin J; Pappalardo, Federico

    2018-02-01

    In patients with left ventricular assist device support and aspirin allergy, the choice of effective antiplatelet strategy remains a challenge. We compared the antithrombotic effect of clopidogrel vs ticagrelor in an LVAD patient with aspirin allergy by using a modified protocol of the thrombin generation test, accounting selectively for the platelet contribution on thrombin generation. Our results demonstrate enhanced antithrombotic efficacy offered by ticagrelor. Consistent with experimental results, the patient has passed more than 300 days without thromboembolic complications. This study provides additional mechanistic rationale supporting clinical evidence and opens the perspective to identify individual poor responsiveness to drugs by specifically evaluating drug-mediated platelet function. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Hepatic ( ... or kidneys ) is working. What Is a Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel? A liver function panel is a ...

  2. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic panel - comprehensive; Chem-20; SMA20; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-20; SMAC20; Metabolic panel 20 ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) - ... Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  3. Development of low-cost devices for image-guided photodynamic therapy treatment of oral cancer in global health settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Rudd, Grant; Daly, Liam; Hempstead, Joshua; Liu, Yiran; Khan, Amjad P.; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Thomas, Richard; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Cuckov, Filip; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based modality that shows promise for adaptation and implementation as a cancer treatment technology in resource-limited settings. In this context PDT is particularly well suited for treatment of pre-cancer and early stage malignancy of the oral cavity, that present a major global health challenge, but for which light delivery can be achieved without major infrastructure requirements. In recent reports we demonstrated that a prototype low-cost batterypowered 635nm LED light source for ALA-PpIX PDT achieves tumoricidal efficacy in vitro and vivo, comparable to a commercial turn-key laser source. Here, building on these reports, we describe the further development of a prototype PDT device to enable intraoral light delivery, designed for ALA- PDT treatment of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral cavity. We evaluate light delivery via fiber bundles and customized 3D printed light applicators for flexible delivery to lesions of varying size and position within the oral cavity. We also briefly address performance requirements (output power, stability, and light delivery) and present validation of the device for ALA-PDT treatment in monolayer squamous carcinoma cell cultures.

  4. Superior short-term cholesterol control and achievement of the adult treatment panel III low-density lipoprotein goals with initiation of statin therapy by the time of hospital discharge following acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Kevin A; Powell, Brian D; Williams, Brent A; Murphy, Joseph G; Kopecky, Stephen L; Wright, R Scott

    2004-03-15

    In a community-based population, we compared serum cholesterol concentrations following hospital discharge after acute myocardial infarction based on statin therapy at the time of hospital discharge. At the time of follow-up cholesterol measurement, patients discharged from the hospital on a statin had lower mean low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (106.4 vs 116.7 mg/dl, p Adult Treatment Panel III LDL goal of <100 mg/dl at the time of follow-up compared with patients who were discharged without a statin (49% vs 33%; adjusted odds ratio 2.56; p <0.01).

  5. Two decades of an indigenously developed brief-pulse electroconvulsive therapy device: A review of research work from National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Preeti; ShyamSundar, A.; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Gangadhar, B. N.; Candade, Vittal S.

    2016-01-01

    In 1993, a device to administer brief-pulse electroconvulsive therapy was indigenously developed through collaboration between the National Institution for Quality and Reliability and the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. The additional feature of computerized recording of the electroencephalograph and electrocardiograph for both online and offline use had substantial clinical and research implications. Over the past two decades, this device has been used extensively in different academic and nonacademic settings. A considerable body of research with clinical and heuristic interest has also emanated using this device. In this paper, we present the development of this device and follow it up with a review of research conducted at NIMHANS that validate the features and potentials of this device. PMID:26985102

  6. Intensity of lipid-lowering therapy and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment among the elderly before and after the 2004 National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Gregory A; Nag, Soma; Chan, Wiley

    2007-09-01

    In 2004, the Coordinating Committee of the National Cholesterol Education Program issued an update to the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines on cholesterol management (the Update). Our objectives were to compare the proportion of elderly patients receiving intensive or minimal-guideline lipid-lowering therapy and the proportions meeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals before and after the update. We used dispense records from Kaiser Permanente Northwest (Portland, OR) to identify elderly patients who received statin therapy in 2003 (n = 14425) and 2005 (n = 19422) and laboratory records to assess LDL-C goal attainment. Among new statin initiators, 85.4% of very-high-risk patients received minimal-guideline therapy in 2005, compared with 65.3% (P treatment, a significantly greater proportion of patients in 2005 versus 2003 attained the optional goal of <70 mg/dL (45.5% vs 34.4% P = .014). However, there was no significant difference in the proportion attaining <100 mg/dL (77.8% vs 81.8%, P = .281). After the Update, more elderly patients were receiving intensive or minimal-guideline statin therapy. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment was isolated and appeared to occur by shifting already well-controlled patients to lower LDL-C levels. Although these findings may translate into less overall coronary heart disease risk, more aggressive lipid-lowering therapy would likely further reduce risk.

  7. Validation of a novel combination hearing aid and tinnitus therapy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, James A; Frederick, Melissa; Sell, Sara; Griest, Susan; Abrams, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Most patients with tinnitus also have hearing loss. Hearing aids have been well-documented to provide amelioration for both hearing and tinnitus problems. Some hearing aids have built-in noise/sound generators that are intended to provide added benefit to patients with tinnitus. It has not been proven, however, whether these "combination instruments" are more effective for tinnitus management than hearing aids alone. The purpose of this study was to collect initial data addressing this question. Thirty individuals meeting study requirements (bothersome tinnitus, hearing aid candidate, and no use of hearing aids for the previous 12 months) were enrolled. All participants initially completed the primary outcome questionnaire (Tinnitus Functional Index [TFI]) and then returned to be fitted with combination instruments. The hearing aid portion of the devices was adjusted to optimize hearing ability. Participants were then randomized to either the experimental group (n = 15) or the control group (n = 15). The experimental group had the noise feature of the instruments activated and adjusted to achieve optimal relief from tinnitus. The control group did not have the noise portion activated. Following the hearing aid fitting, all study participants also received brief tinnitus counseling. Participants returned 1 to 2 weeks later for a follow-up appointment to confirm proper fit of the instruments and to make any necessary programming adjustments. Additionally, they returned 3 months after the fitting to complete the TFI, which also concluded their participation in the study. Both groups revealed significant improvement, as indicated by reductions in mean TFI index scores. Differences between groups at 3 months were not statistically significant. However, the experimental group showed a mean reduction in the TFI score that was 6.4 points greater than that for the control group. The difference approached significance (p = 0.09), suggesting that a larger group of

  8. Positive Response to Thermobalancing Therapy Enabled by Therapeutic Device in Men with Non-Malignant Prostate Diseases: BPH and Chronic Prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gerasimovich Aghajanyan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common types of non-malignant prostate diseases are benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and chronic prostatitis (CP. The aim of this study was to find out whether thermobalancing therapy with a physiotherapeutic device is effective for BPH and CP. Methods: During a 2.5-year period, 124 men with BPH over the age of 55 were investigated. Clinical parameters were tested twice: via the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS and via ultrasound measurement of prostate volume (PV and uroflowmetry maximum flow rate (Qmax, before and after six months of therapy. In 45 men with CP under the age of 55, the dynamics of the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI were studied. Results: The results of the investigated index tests in men with BPH confirmed a decrease in IPSS (p < 0.001, a reduction in PV (p < 0.001, an increase in Qmax (p < 0.001, and an improvement of quality of life (QoL (p < 0.001. NIH-CPSI scores in men with CP indicated positive dynamics. Conclusions: The observed positive changes in IPSS, PV, and Qmax in men with BPH and the improvement in NIH-CPSI-QoL in patients with CP after using a physiotherapeutic device for six months as mono-therapy, support the view that thermobalancing therapy with the device can be recommended for these patients. Furthermore, the therapeutic device is free of side effects.

  9. Correction to: Impact of an electronic monitoring device and behavioural feedback on adherence to multiple sclerosis therapies in youth: results of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, E Ann; Grover, Stephanie A; Powell, Victoria E; Alper, Gulay; Banwell, Brenda L; Edwards, Kim; Gorman, Mark; Graves, Jennifer; Lotze, Timothy E; Mah, Jean K; Mednick, Lauren; Ness, Jayne; Obadia, Maya; Slater, Ruth; Waldman, Amy; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Schwartz, Carolyn E

    2017-12-23

    The clinicaltrials.gov identifying number for the article titled "Impact of an electronic monitoring device and behavioral feedback on adherence to multiple sclerosis therapies in youth: results of a randomized trial" is NCT02234713 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02234713).

  10. A two-round Delphi study examining consensus of recommended clinical practices for patients with ventricular assist devices as destination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichetti, JoAnne V

    2011-03-01

    To identify the current clinical practices of Medicare-certified facilities offering ventricular assist devices as destination therapy and to attain a consensus of recommended clinical practices across the United States for the management of adults with ventricular assist devices as destination therapy. Sixty ventricular assist device coordinators from Medicare-certified centers were invited to participate in an online, 2-round Delphi survey. The surveys asked whether recommended practices are current practices and whether respondents always/agreed or never/disagreed with performing the recommended practice guidelines. Consensus was defined as 75% agreement. The clinical areas of focus were patient selection, preoperative preparation, postoperative care, infection control, nutrition, and patient discharge preparation. Practices were extracted from the advanced practice guidelines for HeartMate destination therapy and the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation's 2006 guidelines for the care of heart transplant candidates. Representing 21 states across the country, the first-round survey had a response rate of 57% (n = 34). The second-round survey had a response rate of 74% (n = 17), representing 28% of the 60 centers. Consensus was obtained for 122 practices. The dimension of patient selection-diagnostic tests and screening had the highest level of consensus (16%, n = 20), and the dimension of postoperative care-intermediate/intensive care unit dimension had the lowest level of consensus (3.3%, n = 4). Survey results identify a consensus of practices for the specific group of ventricular assist device coordinators who responded, but that consensus cannot be generalized to all ventricular assist device facilities. These results can, however, provide a foundation for further research leading to the development of standard-of-care practices for patients with ventricular assist devices as destination therapy.

  11. Novel devices for individualized controlled inhalation can optimize aerosol therapy in efficacy, patient care and power of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the treatment of pulmonary diseases the inhalation of aerosols plays a key role - it is the preferred route of drug delivery in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and cystic fibrosis. But, in contrast to oral and intravenous administration drug delivery to the lungs is controlled by additional parameters. Beside its pharmacology the active agent is furthermore determined by its aerosol characteristics as particle diameter, particle density, hygroscopicity and electrical charge. The patient related factors like age and stage of pulmonary disease will be additionally affected by the individual breathing pattern and morphometry of the lower airways. A number of these parameters with essential impact on the pulmonary drug deposition can be influenced by the performance of the inhalation system. Therefore, the optimization of nebulisation technology was a major part of aerosol science in the last decade. At this time the control of inspiration volume and air flow as well as the administration of a defined aerosol bolus was in the main focus. Up to date a more efficient and a more targeted pulmonary drug deposition - e.g., in the alveoli - will be provided by novel devices which also allow shorter treatment times and a better reproducibility of the administered lung doses. By such means of precise dosing and drug targeting the efficacy of inhalation therapy can be upgraded, e.g., the continuous inhalation of budesonide in asthma. From a patients' perspective an optimized inhalation manoeuvre means less side effects, e.g., in cystic fibrosis therapy the reduced oropharyngeal tobramycin exposure causes fewer bronchial irritations. Respecting to shorter treatment times also, this result in an improved quality of life and compliance. For clinical trials the scaling down of dose variability in combination with enhanced pulmonary deposition reduces the number of patients to be included and the requirement of pharmaceutical

  12. Automatic Prostate Tracking and Motion Assessment in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azcona, Juan Diego, E-mail: jdazcona@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305 (United States); Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Li, Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the prostate intrafraction motion in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments using cine megavoltage (MV) images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy using a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator equipped with an EPID for acquiring cine MV images during treatment. Cine MV images acquisition was scheduled for single or multiple treatment fractions (between 1 and 8). A novel automatic fiducial detection algorithm that can handle irregular multileaf collimator apertures, field edges, fast leaf and gantry movement, and MV image noise and artifacts in patient anatomy was used. All sets of images (approximately 25,000 images in total) were analyzed to measure the positioning accuracy of implanted fiducial markers and assess the prostate movement. Results: Prostate motion can vary greatly in magnitude among different patients. Different motion patterns were identified, showing its unpredictability. The mean displacement and standard deviation of the intrafraction motion was generally less than 2.0 ± 2.0 mm in each of the spatial directions. In certain patients, however, the percentage of the treatment time in which the prostate is displaced more than 5 mm from its planned position in at least 1 spatial direction was 10% or more. The maximum prostate displacement observed was 13.3 mm. Conclusion: Prostate tracking and motion assessment was performed with MV imaging and an EPID. The amount of prostate motion observed suggests that patients will benefit from its real-time monitoring. Megavoltage imaging can provide the basis for real-time prostate tracking using conventional linear accelerators.

  13. Localized environment characterization device

    KAUST Repository

    Alzain, Hashim

    2016-07-21

    Various apparatuses and methods are provided for measuring the likely environmental impact of a particular geographic location on power generation properties of potential solar installations at the particular location. In an example embodiment of one such apparatus, a measurement device is provided. The measurement device includes a base portion comprising a base frame element disposed on a plurality of supporting legs, and a top panel comprising a series of connected members and one or more measurement modules whose planar dimensions are defined by the series of connected members. The top panel is connected to the base portion by a joint such that the top panel can rotate about the joint, and a panel support element is configured to fasten the top panel immovably at a desired degree of rotation in relation to the base portion.

  14. Performance comparison between silicon solar panel and dye-sensitized solar panel in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, N. K. A.; Ahmad, M. K.; Urus, N. S. T.; Mohamad, F.; Nafarizal, N.; Ahmad, N.; Soon, C. F.; Ameruddin, A. S.; Faridah, A. B.; Shimomura, M.; Murakami, K.

    2017-09-01

    In carrying out experimental research in performance between silicon solar panel and dye-sensitive solar panel, we have been developing a device and a system. This system has been developed consisting of controllers, hardware and software. This system is capable to get most of the input sources. If only need to change the main circuit and coding for a different source input value. This device is able to get the ambient temperature, surface temperature, surrounding humidity, voltage with load, current with load, voltage without load and current without load and save the data into external memory. This device is able to withstand the heat and rain as it was fabricated in a waterproof box. This experiment was conducted to examine the performance of both the solar panels which are capable to maintain their stability and performance. A conclusion based on data populated, the distribution of data for dye-sensitized solar panel is much better than silicon solar panel as dye-sensitized solar panel is very sensitive to heat and not depend only on midday where is that is the maximum ambient temperature for both solar panel as silicon solar panel only can give maximum and high output only when midday.

  15. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... panel multiplex nucleic acid assay is a qualitative in vitro diagnostic device intended to...: Respiratory Viral Panel Multiplex Nucleic Acid Assay;” (2) For a device that detects and identifies Human...

  16. Medical eligibility, contraceptive choice, and intrauterine device acceptance among HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lisa B; Feldacker, Caryl; Jamieson, Denise J; Tweya, Hannock; Cwiak, Carrie; Bryant, Amy G; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Chaweza, Thomas; Mlundira, Linly; Kachale, Fanny; Stuart, Gretchen S; Hoffman, Irving; Phiri, Sam

    2014-09-01

    To determine medical eligibility for contraceptive use, contraceptive preference, and acceptance of a copper intrauterine device (IUD) among a cohort of HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). All HIV-infected women who received ART and sought contraceptive services at the Lighthouse clinic, an integrated HIV/ART clinic in Lilongwe, Malawi, between August and December 2010 were invited to participate in a structured interview. Eligibility and preference for the following contraceptive methods were assessed: combined hormonal contraceptives, progestogen-only pills, copper IUD, injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), and contraceptive implants. The final sample included 281 women; five were pregnant. The remaining 276 women were eligible for at least three contraceptive methods, with 242 (87.7%) eligible for all five methods evaluated. After counseling, 163 (58.0%) selected DMPA and 98 (34.9%) selected an IUD as their preferred contraceptive method. Regardless of their method of choice, 222 (79.0%) women agreed to have an IUD placed on the same day. Most methods of contraception are safe for use by HIV-infected women. Approximately 80% of the women were willing to receive an IUD. Efforts must be made to increase education about, and access to, long-acting reversible methods that may be acceptable and appropriate contraceptive options for HIV-infected women. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. All rights reserved.

  17. Micro-inverter solar panel mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John; Gilchrist, Phillip Charles

    2016-02-02

    Processes, systems, devices, and articles of manufacture are provided. Each may include adapting micro-inverters initially configured for frame-mounting to mounting on a frameless solar panel. This securement may include using an adaptive clamp or several adaptive clamps secured to a micro-inverter or its components, and using compressive forces applied directly to the solar panel to secure the adaptive clamp and the components to the solar panel. The clamps can also include compressive spacers and safeties for managing the compressive forces exerted on the solar panels. Friction zones may also be used for managing slipping between the clamp and the solar panel during or after installation. Adjustments to the clamps may be carried out through various means and by changing the physical size of the clamps themselves.

  18. Impact of High-flow Nasal Cannula Therapy in Quality Improvement and Clinical Outcomes in a Non-invasive Ventilation Device-free Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Fulva Kamit; Anil, Ayse Berna; Anil, Murat; Zengin, Neslihan; Bal, Alkan; Bicilioglu, Yuksel; Gokalp, Gamze; Durak, Fatih; Ince, Gulberat

    2017-10-15

    To analyze the change in quality indicators due to the use of high-flow nasal cannula therapy as a non-invasive ventilation method in children with respiratory distress/failure in a non-invasive ventilation device-free pediatric intensive care unit. Retrospective chart review of children with respiratory distress/failure admitted 1 year before (period before high-flow nasal cannula therapy) and 1 year after (period after high-flow nasal cannula therapy) the introduction of high-flow nasal cannula therapy. We compared quality indicators as rate of mechanical ventilation, total duration of mechanical ventilation, rate of re-intubation, pediatric intensive care unit length of stay, and mortality rate between these periods. Between November 2012 and November 2014, 272 patients: 141 before and 131 after high-flow nasal cannula therapy were reviewed (median age was 20.5 mo). Of the patients in the severe respiratory distress/failure subgroup, the rate of intubation was significantly lower in period after than in period before high-flow nasal cannula therapy group (58.1% vs. 76.1%; P intensive care unit length of stay was significantly shorter in patients who did not require mechanical ventilation in the period after than in the period before high-flow nasal cannula therapy group (3d vs. 4d; Pintensive care unit significantly improves the quality of therapy and its outcomes.

  19. 77 FR 16126 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid... the Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee (Microbiology Devices Panel.... VI. Risks to Health After considering the information discussed by the Microbiology Devices Panel...

  20. Device selection and outcomes of aerosol therapy: Evidence-based guidelines: American College of Chest Physicians/American College of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolovich, Myrna B; Ahrens, Richard C; Hess, Dean R; Anderson, Paula; Dhand, Rajiv; Rau, Joseph L; Smaldone, Gerald C; Guyatt, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    The proliferation of inhaler devices has resulted in a confusing number of choices for clinicians who are selecting a delivery device for aerosol therapy. There are advantages and disadvantages associated with each device category. Evidence-based guidelines for the selection of the appropriate aerosol delivery device in specific clinical settings are needed. (1) To compare the efficacy and adverse effects of treatment using nebulizers vs pressurized metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) with or without a spacer/holding chamber vs dry powder inhalers (DPIs) as delivery systems for beta-agonists, anticholinergic agents, and corticosteroids for several commonly encountered clinical settings and patient populations, and (2) to provide recommendations to clinicians to aid them in selecting a particular aerosol delivery device for their patients. A systematic review of pertinent randomized, controlled clinical trials (RCTs) was undertaken using MEDLINE, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library databases. A broad search strategy was chosen, combining terms related to aerosol devices or drugs with the diseases of interest in various patient groups and clinical settings. Only RCTs in which the same drug was administered with different devices were included. RCTs (394 trials) assessing inhaled corticosteroid, beta2-agonist, and anticholinergic agents delivered by an MDI, an MDI with a spacer/holding chamber, a nebulizer, or a DPI were identified for the years 1982 to 2001. A total of 254 outcomes were tabulated. Of the 131 studies that met the eligibility criteria, only 59 (primarily those that tested beta2-agonists) proved to have useable data. None of the pooled metaanalyses showed a significant difference between devices in any efficacy outcome in any patient group for each of the clinical settings that was investigated. The adverse effects that were reported were minimal and were related to the increased drug dose that was delivered. Each of the delivery devices provided similar outcomes

  1. SU-E-T-242: Design of a Novel Afterloader Clearance QA Device for Biliary HDR Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, JP; Deufel, CL [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Bile duct cancer affects 2–3 thousand people annually in the United States. Radiation therapy has been shown to double median survival, with combined external beam and intraluminal high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy being most effective. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) biliary HDR, a less-invasive alternative to trans-hepatic brachytherapy, is delivered through a catheter that travels a tortuous path from nose to bile duct, requiring wire drive force and dexterity beyond typical afterloader performance specifications. Thus, specific afterloader quality assurance(QA) is recommended for this procedure. Our aim was to create a device and process for Varisource afterloader clearance QA with objectives that it be quantitative and can monitor afterloader performance over time, compare performance between two distinct afterloaders and potentially Result in a predictive nomogram for patient-specific clearance. Methods: Based on retrospective reconstruction of 20 ERCP patient anatomies, we designed a phantom to test afterloader ability to drive the source wire along an intended treatment path. The ability of the afterloader to fully extend the intended treatment path is a function of number and diameters of turns. We have determined experimentally that relative position of the turns does not impact performance. Results: Both patient and QA paths involve three common turns/loops: a large turn representing the stomach(10.8cm±2.0cm), an elliptical loop representing the duodenum(7.3cm±1.5cmx4.8cm±0.7cm), and a final turn at the end of the bile duct that may be tight for some patient-specific anatomies and absent in others(3.7cm±0.7cm, where present). Our phantom design uses anatomical average turn diameters for the stomach and duodenum then terminates in a turn of quantitatively selectable diameter. The smallest final turn diameter that an afterloader can pass is recorded as the QA parameter. Conclusion: With this device and QA process, we

  2. MO-C-BRB-05: Translating NIH funding to a [potential] clinical device in breast cancer radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C. [Univ Maryland School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  3. Humid free efficient solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Manoj Kumar; Panjwani, Suresh Kumar; Mangi, Fareed Hussain; Khan, Danish; Meicheng, Li

    2017-09-01

    The paper examines the impact of the humidity on the Solar panels which makes a space for the drastic variation in the power generated and makes the device less efficient. Humidity readily affects the efficiency of the solar cells and creates a minimal layer of water on its surface. It also decreases the efficiency by 10-20% of the total power output produced. Moreover, to handle this issue, all around characterized measures are required to be taken to guarantee the smooth working of the solar panels utilized in humid areas. In connection with this issue, Karachi, the biggest city of Pakistan which is located near the costal line touching Arabian Sea, was taken as a reference city to measure the humidity range. In Karachi, the average humidity lies between 25-70% (as per Pakistan Meteorological Department PMD), that indirectly leads in decreasing power acquired from a Solar Panel and develops various complexities for the solar system. The system on average experiences stability issues, such as those of power fluctuations etc., due to which, the whole solar system installed observes abnormal variations in acquired power. Silica Gel was used as a desiccant material in order to assure dryness over the solar panel. More than four experiments were conducted with the usage of water absorbent to improve the efficiency and to make system more power efficient.

  4. From diagnosis to therapy in lung cancer: management of CT detected pulmonary nodules, a summary of the 2015 Chinese-German Lung Cancer Expert Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chunxia; Meyer, Mathias; Pirker, Robert; Voigt, Wieland; Shi, Jingyun; Pilz, Lothar; Huber, Rudolf M; Wu, Yilong; Wang, Jinghong; He, Yonglan; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Jian; Zhi, Xiuyi; Shi, Meiqi; Zhu, Bo; Schoenberg, Stefan S; Henzler, Thomas; Manegold, Christian; Zhou, Caicun; Roessner, Eric Dominic

    2016-08-01

    The first Chinese-German Lung Cancer Expert Panel was held in November 2015 one day after the 7th Chinese-German Lung Cancer Forum, Shanghai. The intention of the meeting was to discuss strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer within the context of lung cancer screening. Improved risk classification criteria and novel imaging approaches for screening populations are highly required as more than half of lung cancer cases are false positive during the initial screening round if the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demographic criteria [≥30 pack years (PY) of cigarettes, age ≥55 years] are applied. Moreover, if the NLST criteria are applied to the Chinese population a high number of lung cancer patients are not diagnosed due to non-smoking related risk factors in China. The primary goal in the evaluation of pulmonary nodules (PN) is to determine whether they are malignant or benign. Volumetric based screening concepts such as investigated in the Dutch-Belgian randomized lung cancer screening trial (NELSON) seem to achieve higher specificity. Chest CT is the best imaging technique to identify the origin and location of the nodule since 20% of suspected PN found on chest X-ray turn out to be non-pulmonary lesions. Moreover, novel state-of-the-art CT systems can reduce the radiation dose for lung cancer screening acquisitions down to a level of 0.1 mSv with improved image quality to novel reconstruction techniques and thus reduce concerns related to chest CT as the primary screening technology. The aim of the first part of this manuscript was to summarize the current status of novel diagnostic techniques used for lung cancer screening and minimally invasive treatment techniques for progressive PNs that were discussed during the first Chinese-German Lung Cancer. This part should serve as an educational part for the readership of the techniques that were discussed during the Expert Panel. The second part summarizes the consensus recommendations

  5. BMP (Basic Metabolic Panel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Send Us Your Feedback Choose ... Screen Chem 7 SMA 7 SMAC7 Formal Name Basic Metabolic Panel This article was last reviewed on ...

  6. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  7. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  8. Family caregivers' inside perspectives: caring for an adult with a left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuccilli, Linda; Casida, Jesus Jessie; Bakas, Tamilynn; Pagani, Francis D

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the experience of caring for an adult with a left-ventricular assist device as a destination therapy (LVAD-DT) remains in its infancy. A hermeneutic-phenomenological inquiry guided by van Manen's methods was used to explore the LVAD-DT family caregiving experience.Participants/Setting-Seven family caregivers (1 man and 6 women) 50 to 74 years old who cared for an adult with an LVAD-DT in home settings. Recruitment and data collection occurred in an outpatient mechanical circulatory support center in the Midwest. Data were collected by means of face-to-face interviews using open-ended questions and 1 follow-up interview. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis consisted of writing, rewriting, and reflecting across participants' data, which produced themes illustrating the experience and meaning of caring for an adult with an LVAD-DT. Themes were consensually validated. Procedures for trustworthiness are described. Five main themes were identified from participants' experiences: (1) advanced heart failure is a life-changing event, (2) self-doubt about LVAD caregiving improves over time, (3) lifestyle adjustments come with time, (4) persistent worry and stress, and (5) caregiving is not a burden-it's a part of life. These main themes were elucidated by 8 subthemes in which participants described a process of adjustment despite persistent worry and stress and eventually accepted caregiving as part of their lives. Future studies are needed to explore caregiver burden, adaptation, and the effects of caregiving outcomes, such as emotional and physical health and overall quality of life.

  9. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN

    2011-03-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  10. Maintaining persistence and adherence with subcutaneous growth-hormone therapy in children: comparing jet-delivery and needle-based devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spoudeas HA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helen A Spoudeas,1 Priti Bajaj,2 Nathan Sommerford3 1London Centre for Paediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London, 2Ferring Pharmaceuticals, London, 3Health Informatics Research, Sciensus Ltd, Brighton, UK Purpose: Persistence and adherence with subcutaneous growth hormone (GH; somatropin therapy in children is widely acknowledged to be suboptimal. This study aimed to investigate how the use of a jet-delivery device, ZomaJet®, impacts on medication-taking behaviors compared to needle-based devices.Materials and methods: A retrospective cohort study of children aged ≤18 years was conducted using a UK-based, nationwide database of GH home-delivery schedules. Data were evaluated for the period between January 2010 and December 2012 for 6,061 children receiving either Zomacton® (somatropin via the ZomaJet jet-delivery device or one of six brands of GH all administered via needle-based devices. Persistence was analyzed for patients with appropriate data, measured as the time interval between first and last home deliveries. An analysis of adherence was conducted only for patients using ZomaJet who had appropriate data, measured by proportion of days covered. Brand switches were identified for all patients.Results: Persistence with GH therapy was significantly longer in patients using ZomaJet compared to needle-based devices (599 days versus 535 days, respectively, n=4,093; P<0.001; this association was observed in both sexes and across age subgroups (≤10 and 11–16 years. The majority (58% of patients using ZomaJet were classed as adherent (n=728. Only 297 patients (5% switched GH brand (n=6,061, and patients tended to use ZomaJet for longer than other devices before switching.Conclusion: It appears important that the choice of a jet-delivery device is offered to children prescribed daily GH therapy. These devices may represent a much-needed effective strategy for maintaining persistence with subcutaneous GH administration in

  11. Vacuum erection devices revisited: its emerging role in the treatment of erectile dysfunction and early penile rehabilitation following prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlajani, Geetu; Raina, Rupesh; Jones, Stephen; Ali, Marwan; Zippe, Craig

    2012-04-01

    Vacuum erection devices (VEDs) are becoming first-line therapies for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and preservation (rehabilitation) of erectile function following treatment for prostate cancer. Currently, there is limited efficacy of the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in elderly patients, or patients with moderate to severe diabetes, hypertension, and coronary artery disease. The article aims to study the role of VED in patients following prostate cancer therapy. Alternative therapies such as VED have emerged as one of the primary options for patients refractory to oral therapy. VED has also been successfully used in combination treatment with oral therapy and penile injections. More recently, there has been interest in the use of VED in early intervention protocols to encourage corporeal rehabilitation and prevention of postradical prostatectomy veno-occlusive dysfunction. This is evident by the preservation of penile length and girth that is seen with early use of the VED following radical prostatectomy. There are ongoing studies to help preserve penile length and girth with early use of VED following prostate brachytherapy and external beam radiation for prostate cancer. Recently, there has also been interest in the use of VED to help maintain penile length following surgical correction of Peyronie's disease and to increase penile size prior to implantation of the penile prosthesis. VEDs can be one of the options for penile rehabilitation after prostate cancer therapy. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  12. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-26

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, socalled panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects. © 2010 ACM.

  13. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-25

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, so-called panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects.

  14. Efficacy of a static progressive stretch device as an adjunct to physical therapy in treating adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: a prospective, randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M; Donatelli, R; Hellman, M; Echternach, J

    2014-09-01

    Stress relaxation and static progressive stretch are techniques used for non-surgical restoration of shoulder range of motion for patients with adhesive capsulitis. To compare a static progressive stretch device plus traditional therapy with traditional therapy alone for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. Prospective, randomised controlled trial. Sixty patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder were assigned at random to an experimental group or a control group. Both groups received three traditional therapy sessions per week for 4 weeks. In addition, the experimental group used a static progressive stretch device for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was shoulder range of motion (active and passive shoulder abduction, and passive shoulder external rotation). The secondary outcome measures were function [measured by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire] and pain [measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS)]. At baseline, there were no differences between the two groups. However, after the intervention, there were significant (Pactive abduction (95% CI 20.3 to 35.0). At 12-month follow-up, the differences between the groups were maintained and even increased for mean shoulder range of motion, VAS scores and DASH scores, with significant differences (Pactive abduction (95% CI 87.0 to 101.7). Use of a static progressive stretch device in combination with traditional therapy appears to have beneficial long-term effects on shoulder range of motion, pain and functional outcomes in patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. At 12-month follow-up, the experimental group had continued to improve, while the control group had relapsed. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Combined sildenafil with vacuum erection device therapy in the management of diabetic men with erectile dysfunction after failure of first-line sildenafil monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lu; Peng, Fang-Li; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Cai-Ling; Chen, Jun

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of sildenafil plus vacuum erection devices in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus with moderate to severe erectile dysfunction who are dissatisfied with the results of using sildenafil alone. The study included 66 diabetes mellitus patients presenting erectile dysfunction for at least 6 months and dissatisfied with the use of 100 mg sildenafil monotherapy. The patients were randomized in two groups. Those in group A (n = 33) were instructed to use a vacuum erection device only, whereas those in group B (n = 33) were treated with combination therapy, including sildenafil 100 mg and a vacuum erection device. Erectile function was evaluated subjectively using the International Index of Erectile Function, Sexual Encounter Profile questionnaire questions 2 and 3 at visit 1 (baseline; study entry), visit 2 (4 weeks after baseline), and visit 3 (12 weeks after baseline; study end). There were no significant differences in average patient age, duration of diabetes, duration of erectile dysfunction, baseline International Index of Erectile Function scores, hypertension, blood testosterone, smoking and alcohol consumption between two groups. Mean International Index of Erectile Function scores were significantly higher for group B at the 1-month (14.86 ± 2.17 vs 12.41 ± 2.63; P erectile function, and it is well tolerated by diabetes mellitus patients not responding to first-line sildenafil alone. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. REINFORCED COMPOSITE PANEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A composite panel having front and back faces, the panel comprising facing reinforcement, backing reinforcement and matrix material binding to the facing and backing reinforcements, the facing and backing reinforcements each independently comprising one or more reinforcing sheets, the facing...... by matrix material, the facing and backing reinforcements being interconnected to resist out-of-plane relative movement. The reinforced composite panel is useful as a barrier element for shielding structures, equipment and personnel from blast and/or ballistic impact damage....

  17. Solar reflection panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Grossman, James W [Albuquerque, NM; Reshetnik, Michael [Boulder, CO

    2006-07-18

    A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front surface of the composite panel. The composite panel comprises a front sheet affixed to a surface of a core material, preferably a core material comprising a honeycomb structure, and a back sheet affixed to an opposite surface of the core material. The invention may further comprise a sealing strip, preferably comprising EPDM, positioned between the glass mirror and the front surface of the composite panel. The invention also is of methods of making such solar collectors.

  18. A comparison of interfraction setup error, patient comfort, and therapist acceptance for 2 different prostate radiation therapy immobilization devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pei Ping Pang, MSc

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: The CIS demonstrated stability and reproducibility in prostate treatment setup comparable to LI. The CIS device had no impact on patient comfort; however, RTs indicated a preference for LI over the CIS mainly because of its weight and bulkiness.

  19. Understanding the release efficiency of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from trawls with a square mesh panel: effects of panel area, panel position, and stimulation of escape response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Bent; Wienbeck, Harald; Karlsen, Junita Diana

    2015-01-01

    Based on size selectivity data for more than 25 000 cod (Gadus morhua) collected during experimental trawl fishing with six different codends, all of which included a square mesh panel,we investigated the effect on cod-release efficiency based on the size of the square mesh panel area, position...... of the square mesh panel, and stimulation of the escape response. Based on the results, we were able to explain why the BACOMAcodend, applied in the Baltic Sea cod directed trawl fishery, releases juvenile cod efficiently, whereas other designs, including a squaremesh panel with similar mesh size, are less...... the catch-accumulation zone. Our findings demonstrated that this release was as efficient as for a panel mounted in the catch-accumulation zone of the codend. Devices that stimulate behaviour may improve the release efficiency of cod through square mesh panels in other fisheries where this is a problem...

  20. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  1. Toluidine blue O and porphyrin-mediated photodynamic therapy on three main pathogenic bacteria of periodontitis using portable LED phototherapy device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT has been commonly used in treating many diseases, such as cancer and infectious diseases. We investigated the different effects of PDT on three main pathogenic bacteria of periodontitis — Prevotella melaninogenica (P.m., Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g. and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.. The portable red light-emitting diode (LED phototherapy device was used to assess the exogenous PDT effects with different light doses and photosensitizer concentrations (Toluidine blue O, TBO. The portable blue LED phototherapy device was used to assess the endogenous PDT effects with the use of endogenous photosensitizers (porphyrin under different light doses. We found out that both exogenous and endogenous PDT were able to restrict the growth of all the three bacteria significantly. Moreover, the optimal PDT conditions for these bacteria were obtained through this in vitro screening and could guide the clinical PDT on periodontitis.

  2. Efficacy in Deep Vein Thrombosis Prevention With Extended Mechanical Compression Device Therapy and Prophylactic Aspirin Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Mark A; Sympson, Alexandra N; Scheuerman, Christina M; Gregg, Justin L; Hussain, Lala R

    2017-05-01

    Aspirin at 325 mg twice daily is now included as a nationally approved venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis protocol for low-risk total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients. The purpose of this study is to examine whether there is a difference in deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurrence after a limited tourniquet TKA using aspirin-based prophylaxis with or without extended use of mechanical compression device (MCD) therapy. One hundred limited tourniquet TKA patients, whose DVT risk was managed with aspirin 325 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, were randomized to either using an MCD during hospitalization only or extended use at home up to 6 weeks postoperatively. Lower extremity duplex venous ultrasonography (LEDVU) was completed on the second postoperative day, 14 days postoperatively, and at 3 months postoperatively to confirm the absence of DVT after treatment. The DVT rate for the postdischarge MCD therapy group was 0% and 23.1% for the inpatient MCD group (P aspirin for 3 weeks postoperatively, and on MCD therapy for up to 6 weeks postoperatively experienced superior DVT prophylaxis than patients receiving MCD therapy only as an inpatient (P aspirin and extended-use MCD further validates this type of prophylaxis in low DVT risk TKA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. RECIPANEL: RECYCLED PAPER PANELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERNÁN CAÑOLA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se estudia la fabricación y el comportamiento mecánico de paneles a base de papel reciclado. El objetivo principal del proyecto es producir un prototipo de panel que emplee elementos provenientes de residuos sólidos (papel periódico y de un material conglomerante (cemento Portland blanco. El panel debe ser económico, debe tener buenas propiedades mecánicas y debe tener dimensiones comerciales para su uso en muros tabiques y en cielos falsos en la industria de la construcción. El Recipanel es un panel no estructural a base de papel reciclado. El Recipanel cumple las normas colombianas en lo relativo a los paneles de uso no estructural y presenta además unas excelentes características mecánicas.

  4. Posterior Wall Capture and Femoral Artery Stenosis Following Use of StarClose Closing Device: Diagnosis and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir [Medical University of Lodz, First Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Elgalal, Marcin T., E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Second Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech; Grzelak, Piotr [Medical University of Lodz, First Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Vascular Surgery (Poland); Majos, Agata [Medical University of Lodz, Second Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland)

    2013-10-15

    A case of femoral artery obstruction following application of a StarClose type arterial puncture closing device (APCD) is presented. Ultrasonographic and angiographic imaging of this complication was obtained. The posterior wall of the vessel was accidentally caught in the anchoring element of the nitinol clip. This complication was successfully resolved by endovascular treatment and the implantation of a stent.

  5. Make Your Own Solar Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students make a simulated solar panel to learn about the principles behind energy production using solar panels. Provides information about how solar panels function to produce energy. (MCO)

  6. Recommendations for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Priscila R.; Carvalho, Vladimir C.; Cimerman,Sergio; Lima,Ana Lucia Munhoz

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A panel of national experts was convened by the Brazilian Infectious Diseases Society in order to determine the recommendations for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) in Brazil. The following aspects are covered in the document: organization of OPAT programs; patient evaluation and eligibility criteria, including clinical and sociocultural factors; diagnosis of eligibility; venous access and antimicrobial infusion devices; protocols for antimicrobial use and monitorin...

  7. POPOVER Review Panel report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davito, A.; Baker, C.J.; King, C.J.; Costerus, B.; Nelson, T.; Prokosch, D.; Pastrnak, J.; Grace, P.

    1996-04-10

    The POPOVER series of high explosive (HE) certification tests was conducted at the Big Explosives Experimental Facility (BEEF) in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The two primary objectives of POPOVER were to certify that: (1) BEEF meets DOE requirements for explosives facilities and is safe for personnel-occupied operations during testing of large charges of conventional HE. (2) Facility structures and equipment will function as intended when subjected to the effects of these charges. After careful analysis of test results, the POPOVER Review Panel concludes that the POPOVER series met both objectives. Further details on the Review Panel`s conclusions are included in Section 7--Findings and Recommendations.

  8. The relative role of patient physiology and device optimisation in cardiac resynchronisation therapy: A computational modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, Andrew; Blazevic, Bojan; Lamata, Pablo; Plank, Gernot; Ginks, Matthew; Duckett, Simon; Sohal, Manav; Shetty, Anoop; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Razavi, Reza; Smith, Nicolas P; Niederer, Steven A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is an established treatment for heart failure, however the effective selection of patients and optimisation of therapy remain controversial. While extensive research is ongoing, it remains unclear whether improvements in patient selection or therapy planning offers a greater opportunity for the improvement of clinical outcomes. This computational study investigates the impact of both physiological conditions that guide patient selection and the optimisation of pacing lead placement on CRT outcomes. A multi-scale biophysical model of cardiac electromechanics was developed and personalised to patient data in three patients. These models were separated into components representing cardiac anatomy, pacing lead location, myocardial conductivity and stiffness, afterload, active contraction and conduction block for each individual, and recombined to generate a cohort of 648 virtual patients. The effect of these components on the change in total activation time of the ventricles (ΔTAT) and acute haemodynamic response (AHR) was analysed. The pacing site location was found to have the largest effect on ΔTAT and AHR. Secondary effects on ΔTAT and AHR were found for functional conduction block and cardiac anatomy. The simulation results highlight a need for a greater emphasis on therapy optimisation in order to achieve the best outcomes for patients. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Poor health status and distress in cardiac patients: The role of device therapy vs. underlying heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Habibović (Mirela); H. Versteeg (Henneke); A.J. Pelle (Aline); D.A.M.J. Theuns (Dominic); L.J.L.M. Jordaens (Luc); S.S. Pedersen (Susanne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAimsImplantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, which includes the risk of shocks, is considered the primary culprit of reductions in patient reported outcomes (PROs; e.g. health status and distress), thereby negating the role of underlying disease severity. We examined the

  10. Poor health status and distress in cardiac patients : The role of device therapy vs. underlying heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibovic, M.; Versteeg, H.; Pelle, A.J.M.; Theuns, D.A.M.J.; Jordaens, L.; Pedersen, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, which includes the risk of shocks, is considered the primary culprit of reductions in patient reported outcomes (PROs; e.g. health status and distress), thereby negating the role of underlying disease severity. We examined the relative

  11. [Assessment of rehabilitation progress in patients with cervical radicular pain syndrome after application of high intensity laser therapy - HILT and Saunders traction device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haładaj, Robert; Pingot, Julia; Pingot, Mariusz

    2015-07-01

    Osteoarthritis of the spine is a major global health problem, it is an epidemic of our times. It affects all parts of the spine, but the hardest to treat is its cervical region. The cervical spine is most mobile, delicate and sensitive to any load. It requires special care in conservative treatment. To date the selection of effective therapeutic approaches has been controversial. The aim of the study was to assess the progress of rehabilitation in patients with cervical radicular pain syndrome after using two different methods of treatment: HILT and spinal axial traction with the use of Saunders device. The randomized study included 150 patients (81 women and 69 men, aged 24-67 years, mean age 45.5) divided into two groups of 75 patients each with characteristic symptoms of radicular pain. The measurement of the range of cervical spine movement of the cervical spine, visual analog scale for pain - VAS and a NDI questionnaire (Neck Disability Index - Polish version) - an indicator of functional disorders - were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the two different therapies. The results obtained by Saunders method remained significantly higher than those obtained when HILT laser therapy was used for most of the examined parameters. A thorough analysis of the results showed greater analgesic efficacy, improved global mobility and reduced functional impairment in patients treated with Saunders method. Both therapeutic methods manifest analgesic effect and a positive impact on the improvement of range of cervical spine movement in patients with radicular pain in this spine region. HILT laser therapy and Saunders traction device reduce neck disability index in the treated patients. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  12. Assessing the potential of e-mail for communicating drug therapy recommendations to physicians in patients with heart failure and ventricular-assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekura, Jona; Tita, Cristina; Lanfear, David E; Williams, Celeste T; Jennings, Douglas L

    2014-10-01

    This project explores electronic mail (e-mail) as a potential medium for pharmacists to communicate pharmacotherapy interventions to prescribers. This retrospective descriptive analysis was conducted at an urban, academic teaching hospital. The pharmacist attempted a drug therapy intervention via e-mail when unable to make face-to-face contact with the attending physician. Eligible patients for this project were admitted to the advanced heart failure (HF) team between December 1, 2010, and July 31, 2011, and had at least 1 attempted e-mail intervention. The primary outcome was the number of accepted interventions, while the secondary end point was the time until a physician e-mail response. A total of 51 e-mail interventions were attempted on 29 patients (mean age = 53, 24% caucasian, 59% male, 69% left ventricular-assist device [VAD]). Overall, of the total 51 interventions,44 (86.3%) were accepted. The average time to a physician e-mail response was 41 minutes. Initiation of drug therapy and changing dose and route or frequency accounted for the most frequent intervention (33%). The most common drug classes involved in the e-mail interventions were angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (15.7%), loop diuretics (9.8%), and antiplatelet agents (7.8%). Clinical pharmacists with well-established physician relationships can effectively implement timely drug therapy recommendations using e-mail communications in patients with advanced HF or VADs. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  14. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  15. Basic metabolic panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-7; SMA7; Metabolic panel 7; CHEM-7 ... Bope ET, Kellerman RD. Endocrine and metabolic disorders. In: Bope ET, ... PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 5. Oh MS, Briefel G. Evaluation ...

  16. FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experts on the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel provide independent scientific advice to the EPA on a wide range of health and safety issues related to pesticides.

  17. CF Mutation Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... L. et. al. (2011 September 29). Kids in America Newborn Screening for Cystic Fibrosis. Medscape Today News ...

  18. Hexagon solar power panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Irwin

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy panel comprises a support upon which silicon cells are arrayed. The cells are wafer thin and of two geometrical types, both of the same area and electrical rating, namely hexagon cells and hourglass cells. The hourglass cells are composites of half hexagons. A near perfect nesting relationship of the cells achieves a high density packing whereby optimum energy production per panel area is achieved.

  19. Hexagon solar power panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, I. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy panel support is described upon which silicon cells are arrayed. The cells are wafer thin and of two geometrical types, both of the same area and electrical rating, namely hexagon cells and hourglass cells. The hourglass cells are composites of half hexagons. A near perfect nesting relationship of the cells achieves a high density packing whereby optimum energy production per panel area is achieved.

  20. Pop-Art Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    James Rosenquist's giant Pop-art panels included realistic renderings of well-known contemporary foods and objects, juxtaposed with famous people in the news--largely from the 1960s, '70s and '80s--and really serve as visual time capsules. In this article, eighth-graders focus on the style of James Rosenquist to create their own Pop-art panel that…

  1. NPWT or HRT-dressing? Results of an expert panel and a Delphi panel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, M H E; Cutting, K

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the similarities and differences between Hydration Response Technology (HRT) and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with regard to wound bed preparation, and to devise a set of recommendations for their use on the basis of the opinion of two panels. An expert panel that analysed in vitro and clinical data as well as the similarities and differences between the two modalities was established. This culminated in a series of recommendations on which modality to use for which indication. These recommendations were presented to a Delphi panel, consisting of users of both NPWT and HRT-dressing. The panel was then asked to produce its own recommendations. The outcomes and recommendations of both panels were reported. NPWT is the preferred treatment modality for abdominal dehisced wounds, and to a lesser extent, for surgical wound healing by secondary intention. For all other indications, the treatment modalities are at least equal, with HRT-dressing often being the superior mode to treat wounds such as venous leg ulcers, arterial ulcers and vasculitis. In the opinion of the expert panel and the Delphi panel, both modalities share a number of clinical and non-clinical properties. However, because of the numerous advantages of HRT technology, HRT dressing has the potential to replace NPWT in a number of indications, where the patient, health-care providers and institutions may benefit. This study was sponsored by Sorbion GmbH & Co, Senden, Germany. Authors M. Hermans and K. Cutting are consultants to Sorbion GmbH & Co, Senden, Germany.

  2. A controlled trial of the Litebook light-emitting diode (LED light therapy device for treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telner John

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent research has emphasized that the human circadian rhythm system is differentially sensitive to short wavelength light. Light treatment devices using efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs whose output is relatively concentrated in short wavelengths may enable a more convenient effective therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD. Methods The efficacy of a LED light therapy device in the treatment of SAD was tested in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center trial. Participants aged 18 to 65 with SAD (DSM-IV major depression with seasonal pattern were seen at Baseline and Randomization visits separated by 1 week, and after 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks of treatment. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores (SIGH-SAD were obtained at each visit. Participants with SIGH-SAD of 20 or greater at Baseline and Randomization visits were randomized to active or control treatment: exposure to the Litebook LED treatment device (The Litebook Company Ltd., Alberta, Canada which delivers 1,350 lux white light (with spectral emission peaks at 464 nm and 564 nm at a distance of 20 inches or to an inactivated negative ion generator at a distance of 20 inches, for 30 minutes a day upon awakening and prior to 8 A.M. Results Of the 26 participants randomized, 23 completed the trial. Mean group SIGH-SAD scores did not differ significantly at randomization. At trial end, the proportions of participants in remission (SIGH-SAD less than 9 were significantly greater (Fisher's exact test, and SIGH-SAD scores, as percent individual score at randomization, were significantly lower (t-test, with active treatment than with control, both in an intent-to-treat analysis and an observed cases analysis. A longitudinal repeated measures ANOVA analysis of SIGH-SAD scores also indicated a significant interaction of time and treatment, showing superiority of the Litebook over the placebo condition. Conclusion The results of this pilot study support

  3. A controlled trial of the Litebook light-emitting diode (LED) light therapy device for treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desan, Paul H; Weinstein, Andrea J; Michalak, Erin E; Tam, Edwin M; Meesters, Ybe; Ruiter, Martine J; Horn, Edward; Telner, John; Iskandar, Hani; Boivin, Diane B; Lam, Raymond W

    2007-08-07

    Recent research has emphasized that the human circadian rhythm system is differentially sensitive to short wavelength light. Light treatment devices using efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) whose output is relatively concentrated in short wavelengths may enable a more convenient effective therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). The efficacy of a LED light therapy device in the treatment of SAD was tested in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center trial. Participants aged 18 to 65 with SAD (DSM-IV major depression with seasonal pattern) were seen at Baseline and Randomization visits separated by 1 week, and after 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks of treatment. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores (SIGH-SAD) were obtained at each visit. Participants with SIGH-SAD of 20 or greater at Baseline and Randomization visits were randomized to active or control treatment: exposure to the Litebook LED treatment device (The Litebook Company Ltd., Alberta, Canada) which delivers 1,350 lux white light (with spectral emission peaks at 464 nm and 564 nm) at a distance of 20 inches or to an inactivated negative ion generator at a distance of 20 inches, for 30 minutes a day upon awakening and prior to 8 A.M. Of the 26 participants randomized, 23 completed the trial. Mean group SIGH-SAD scores did not differ significantly at randomization. At trial end, the proportions of participants in remission (SIGH-SAD less than 9) were significantly greater (Fisher's exact test), and SIGH-SAD scores, as percent individual score at randomization, were significantly lower (t-test), with active treatment than with control, both in an intent-to-treat analysis and an observed cases analysis. A longitudinal repeated measures ANOVA analysis of SIGH-SAD scores also indicated a significant interaction of time and treatment, showing superiority of the Litebook over the placebo condition. The results of this pilot study support the hypothesis that light therapy with the Litebook is an

  4. A single implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock unmasking an electrical storm of 389 ventricular tachycardia episodes triggering device therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Miguel A; Valverde, Irene; Puchol, Alberto; Castellanos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Padial, Luis; Sánchez, Ana M; Alvarez-Temiño, María; Palomino, Miguel

    2008-11-01

    We describe the case of a patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy who presented the first implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shock approximately 5 months after implantation. Device interrogation surprisingly revealed the occurrence of 389 ventricular tachyarrhythmia episodes terminated by asymptomatic antitachycardia pacing (ATP) except for the episode requiring shock. The present case of electrical storm highlights how contemporary tiered ATP schemes constitute a valuable but underused form of termination for ventricular tachyarrhythmias in ICD patients, reducing the number of painful shocks and their adverse consequences.

  5. Comparison of the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy and a vacuum erectile device on penile erectile dysfunction: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Tao; Ye, Lei; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Jun

    2017-11-01

    This randomized clinical trial (October 2012-December 2013) compared extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and a vacuum erectile device (VED) for management of erectile dysfunction (ED). Consecutive Chinese patients (20-55 years) with ED, abnormal nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity (NPTR), and international index of erectile function-5 items (IIEF-5) score <22 were randomized to receive ESWT or VED (twice weekly, 4 weeks). Primary outcomes were treatment efficacy and success rate 4 weeks after completion of therapy. Secondary outcomes included changes in IIEF-5 score, sex encounter profile (SEP) score, erection hardness score (EHS) and NPTR assessments 4 weeks post-therapy. All enrolled patients (n = 30 per group) completed the study. At baseline, age, IIEF-5 score, SEP score, EHS, and NPTR assessments were similar between groups. Four weeks post-therapy, IIEF-5 score increased in the ESWT (15.03 ± 3.00 vs. 11.60 ± 2.28) and VED (15.10 ± 3.06 vs. 11.53 ± 2.27) groups, as did SEP score, EHS, and NPTR measures (all P < .05). Efficacy in the ESWT and VED groups was excellent in 10% and 13.3%, respectively, and moderate in 63.3% and 53.3%, respectively. Treatment success rate in the ESWT and VED groups was 73.3% and 67.7%, respectively. VED use and ESWT have comparable efficacies in the treatment of ED in Chinese patients.

  6. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using International Diabetes Foundation and Adult Treatment Panel III criteria: associations with insulin resistance, disturbed body fat compartmentalization, elevated C-reactive protein, and [corrected] hypoadiponectinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Katherine; Wand, Handan; Law, Matthew; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David; Carr, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Definitions exist to identify those "at risk." Treatment of HIV infection with highly active antiretroviral therapy can induce severe metabolic complications including lipodystrophy, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. The purpose of this study was to report the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients and compare insulin resistance and total body, limb, and visceral fat and adipokines in those with and without metabolic syndrome. This was an international cross-sectional study of a well-characterized cohort of 788 HIV-infected adults recruited at 32 centers. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was examined using International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) criteria, relative to body composition (whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal computed tomography), lipids, glycemic parameters, insulin resistance, leptin, adiponectin, and C-reactive protein (CRP). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 14% (n = 114; 83 men) by IDF criteria and 18% (n = 139; 118 men) by ATPIII criteria; the concordance was significant but only moderate (kappa = 0.46, P adults was lower than that reported for the general population. Metabolic syndrome was associated with a substantially increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes in this specific cohort. Many subjects without metabolic syndrome had at least two metabolic syndrome components (particularly elevated lipid levels) but did not meet waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio cutoff metabolic syndrome criteria in this group with high rates of body fat partitioning disturbances.

  7. Neutron production from beam-modifying devices in a modern double scattering proton therapy beam delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Newhauser, Wayne D; DeLuca, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    In this work the neutron production in a passive beam delivery system was investigated. Secondary particles including neutrons are created as the proton beam interacts with beam shaping devices in the treatment head. Stray neutron exposure to the whole body may increase the risk that the patient develops a radiogenic cancer years or decades after radiotherapy. We simulated a passive proton beam delivery system with double scattering technology to determine the neutron production and energy distribution at 200 MeV proton energy. Specifically, we studied the neutron absorbed dose per therapeutic absorbed dose, the neutron absorbed dose per source particle and the neutron energy spectrum at various locations around the nozzle. We also investigated the neutron production along the nozzle's central axis. The absorbed doses and neutron spectra were simulated with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The simulations revealed that the range modulation wheel (RMW) is the most intense neutron source of any of the beam spreading devices within the nozzle. This finding suggests that it may be helpful to refine the design of the RMW assembly, e.g., by adding local shielding, to suppress neutron-induced damage to components in the nozzle and to reduce the shielding thickness of the treatment vault. The simulations also revealed that the neutron dose to the patient is predominated by neutrons produced in the field defining collimator assembly, located just upstream of the patient. PMID:19147903

  8. Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs.

  9. Report of the Panel on Tactical Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-07-01

    connaissance-strike operations. Floodlights , pulsed flashers, and laser scanning devices along with in- frared and ultraviolet illuminators can have uses in...guidance, the Panel recommends the use of microwave distance- measuring equipment from ground beacons through airborne relays. This concept, called...standing problems in locating and attacking ground radars: accuracy and radar shutdown.) Non-radiating targets would be located in the beacon

  10. {100} or 45.degree.-rotated {100}, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN

    2012-05-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, {100} or 45.degree.-rotated {100} oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  11. Age and gender considerations for technology-assisted delivery of therapy for substance use disorder treatment: A patient survey of access to electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Denis; Heffernan, Sean; Chaudhry, Amina; King, Van; Strain, Eric C

    2016-12-01

    Technology-assisted treatment (TAT) can be an effective supplement to established face-to-face therapy modalities with a growing literature in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. TAT access, interest, and familiarity are potential limitations to the use and efficacy of these approaches to treatment. 174 participants in outpatient SUD treatment were administered a survey regarding technology device and Internet access, and interest in engaging in TAT SUD counseling (SUDC). The group was dichotomized by mean age and gender to examine potential variations in in these subgroups. Forty-three (43%) of participants were female, and the mean age was 44.8 years, and 89% of participants had Internet access. 83% of participants were interested in TAT for SUD counseling; 81% expected it to be at least "moderately helpful." 34% of participants noted they would choose to continue face-to-face therapy exclusively. 91% of participants had cell phones, but only 50% could access data or the Internet via their handheld device. 80% of participants stated they would be interested in trying SUDC via their phone. Women had a higher preference for computer-based SUDC than men, with gender being significantly correlated with TAT perceive helpfulness. These findings suggest that patients in outpatient SUD treatment have access to resources for TAT implementation, although access was not always readily available. Future research will be needed to determine whether the technology that this population possesses will be able to support the evolving TAT modalities and whether interest in TAT across age and gender groups equalizes over time.

  12. 77 FR 36951 - Gastroenterology-Urology Devices; Reclassification of Implanted Blood Access Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... Implanted Blood Access Devices AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to reclassify the implanted blood access device...-Urology Devices Panel recommended that both implanted and nonimplanted blood access devices be classified...

  13. Low-cost photodynamic therapy devices for global health settings: Characterization of battery-powered LED performance and smartphone imaging in 3D tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Joshua; Jones, Dustin P.; Ziouche, Abdelali; Cramer, Gwendolyn M.; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2015-05-01

    A lack of access to effective cancer therapeutics in resource-limited settings is implicated in global cancer health disparities between developed and developing countries. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based treatment modality that has exhibited safety and efficacy in the clinic using wavelengths and irradiances achievable with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) operated on battery power. Here we assess low-cost enabling technology to extend the clinical benefit of PDT to regions with little or no access to electricity or medical infrastructure. We demonstrate the efficacy of a device based on a 635 nm high-output LED powered by three AA disposable alkaline batteries, to achieve strong cytotoxic response in monolayer and 3D cultures of A431 squamous carcinoma cells following photosensitization by administering aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to induce the accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Here we characterize challenges of battery-operated device performance, including battery drain and voltage stability specifically over relevant PDT dose parameters. Further motivated by the well-established capacity of PDT photosensitizers to serve as tumour-selective fluorescence contrast agents, we demonstrate the capability of a consumer smartphone with low-cost add-ons to measure concentration-dependent PpIX fluorescence. This study lays the groundwork for the on-going development of image-guided ALA-PDT treatment technologies for global health applications.

  14. Low-cost photodynamic therapy devices for global health settings: Characterization of battery-powered LED performance and smartphone imaging in 3D tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Joshua; Jones, Dustin P; Ziouche, Abdelali; Cramer, Gwendolyn M; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P

    2015-05-12

    A lack of access to effective cancer therapeutics in resource-limited settings is implicated in global cancer health disparities between developed and developing countries. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based treatment modality that has exhibited safety and efficacy in the clinic using wavelengths and irradiances achievable with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) operated on battery power. Here we assess low-cost enabling technology to extend the clinical benefit of PDT to regions with little or no access to electricity or medical infrastructure. We demonstrate the efficacy of a device based on a 635 nm high-output LED powered by three AA disposable alkaline batteries, to achieve strong cytotoxic response in monolayer and 3D cultures of A431 squamous carcinoma cells following photosensitization by administering aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to induce the accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Here we characterize challenges of battery-operated device performance, including battery drain and voltage stability specifically over relevant PDT dose parameters. Further motivated by the well-established capacity of PDT photosensitizers to serve as tumour-selective fluorescence contrast agents, we demonstrate the capability of a consumer smartphone with low-cost add-ons to measure concentration-dependent PpIX fluorescence. This study lays the groundwork for the on-going development of image-guided ALA-PDT treatment technologies for global health applications.

  15. Advanced solar panel designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes solar cell panel designs that utilize new hgih efficiency solar cells along with lightweight rigid panel technology. The resulting designs push the W/kg and W/sq m parameters to new high levels. These new designs are well suited to meet the demand for higher performance small satellites. This paper reports on progress made on two SBIR Phase 1 contracts. One panel design involved the use of large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells of 19% efficiency combined with a lightweight rigid graphite fiber epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power level of 60 W/kg with a potential of reaching 80 W/kg. The second panel design involved the use of newly developed high efficiency (22%) dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with an advanced lightweight rigid substrate using aluminum honeycomb core with high strength graphite fiber mesh facesheets. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power of 105 W/kg and 230 W/sq m. This paper will address the construction details of the panels and an a analysis of the component weights. A strawman array design suitable for a typical small-sat mission is described for each of the two panel design technologies being studied. Benefits in respect to weight reduction, area reduction, and system cost reduction are analyzed and compared to conventional arrays.

  16. Panel 3 - characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erck, R.A.; Erdemir, A.; Janghsing Hsieh; Lee, R.H.; Xian Zheng Pan; Deming Shu [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Feldman, A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Glass, J.T. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (United States); Kleimer, R. [Coors Ceramics Co., Golden, CO (United States); Lawton, E.A. [JPL/Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States); McHargue, C.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The task of this panel was to identify and prioritize needs in the area of characterization of diamond and diamond-like-carbon (DLC) films for use in the transportation industry. Until recent advances in production of inexpensive films of diamonds and DLC, it was not feasible that these materials could be mass produced. The Characterization Panel is restricting itself to identifying needs in areas that would be most useful to manufacturers and users in producing and utilizing diamond and DLC coatings in industry. These characterization needs include in-situ monitoring during growth, relation of structure to performance, and standards and definitions.

  17. Plasma-panel based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a novel micropattern gas detector inspired by plasma display panels (PDPs), the core component of plasma-TVs. A PDP comprises millions of discrete cells per square meter, each of which, when provided with a signal pulse, can initiate and sustain a plasma discharge. Configured as a detector, a pixel or cell is biased to discharge when a free-electron is generated in the gas. The PPS consists of an array of small plasma discharge pixels, and can be configured to have either an ``open-cell'' or ``closed-cell'' structure, operating with high gain in the Geiger region. We describe both configurations and their application to particle physics. The open-cell PPS lends itself to ultra-low-mass, ultrathin structures, whereas the closed-cell microhexcavity PPS is capable of higher performance. For the ultrathin-PPS, we are fabricating 3-inch devices based on two types of extremely thin, inorganic, transparent, substrate materials: one being 8-10 µm thick, and the other 25-27 µm thick. These gas-filled ultrathin devices are designed to operate in a beam-line vacuum environment, yet must be hermetically-sealed and gas-filled in an ambient environment at atmospheric pressure. We have successfully fabricated high resolution, submillimeter pixel electrodes on both types of ultrathin substrates. We will also report on the fabrication, staging and operation of the first microhexcavity detectors (µH-PPS). The first µH-PPS prototype devices have a 16 by 16 matrix of closed packed hexagon pixels, each having a 2 mm width. Initial tests of these detectors, conducted with Ne based gases at atmospheric pressure, indicate that each pixel responds independent of its neighboring cells, producing volt level pulse amplitudes in response to ionizing radiation. Results will include the hit rate response to a radioactive beta source, cosmic ray muons, the background from spontaneous discharge, pixel isolation and uniformity, and efficiency measurements. This

  18. Removing and reimplanting deep brain stimulation therapy devices in resistant OCD (when the patient does not respond): case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Eva; Plans, Gerard; Alonso, Pino; Aparicio, Marco A; Segalàs, Cinto; Cardoner, Narcís; Soriano-Mas, Carles; López-Solà, Clara; Menchón, José M

    2016-02-06

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is emerging as a promising tool in the treatment of refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) but the search for the best target still continues. This issue is especially relevant when particularly resistant profiles are observed in some patients, which have been ascribed to individual responses to DBS according to differential patterns of connectivity. As patients have been implanted, new dilemmas have emerged, such as what to do when the patient does not respond to surgery. Here we describe a 22-year-old male with extremely severe OCD who did not respond to treatment with DBS in the nucleus accumbens, but who did respond after explanting and reimplanting leads targeting the ventral capsule-ventral striatum region. Information regarding the position of the electrodes for both surgeries is provided and possible brain structures affected during stimulation are reviewed. To our knowledge this case is the first in the literature reporting the removal and reimplantation of DBS leads for therapeutical benefits in a patient affected by a mental disorder. The capability for explantation and reimplantation of leads should be considered as part of the DBS therapy reversibility profile in resistant mental disorders, as it allows application in cases of non-response to the first surgery.

  19. Use of a portable, single-use negative pressure wound therapy device in home care patients with low to moderately exuding wounds: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Theresa; Trueman, Paul; Rossington, Alan

    2014-03-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used in the management of acute and chronic wounds. The purpose of this 8-week study was to evaluate outcomes of using a new canisterless, portable, single-use NPWT system in patients with wounds treated in a Canadian community healthcare setting. The device is designed to provide negative pressure at 80±20 mm Hg, 24 hours a day of continuous usage, for a maximum wear time of 7 days. Data on wound outcomes, including exudate levels, wound appearance, and wound area, were collected weekly by a Registered Nurse as part of routine practice. When treatment was discontinued, patients and nurses were asked to rate their satisfaction with the device. Data from patients who had used a conventional NPWT device to manage their wounds were retrospectively abstracted from their medical records. In the prospective study, conducted between October 2011 and July 2012, 326 patients (median age=61 years; range 17-91 years) with wounds of mixed etiology (53 pressure ulcers, 21 venous leg ulcers, 16 diabetic foot ulcers, and 15 traumatic and 221 surgical wounds) were treated for a maximum of 8 weeks with the portable NPWT device. The majority of patients (228 out of 326; 68%) achieved complete wound closure within 8 weeks of treatment. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of median time to healing of all wounds was 9 weeks. The majority of patients (318 patients, 97%) reported they were pleased or satisfied with the dressing performance. Nurses indicated satisfaction with the dressing performance for all but two patients (99%). The majority (89%) of patients managed with conventional NPWT (n=539) had an open surgical wound with moderate or high levels of exudate. Healing rates in the portable and conventional NPWT group were similar (10% to 11% per week). Portable, single-use NPWT has the potential to deliver good wound outcomes in community care settings and simplify the use of negative pressure for nurses and patients. Additional research is

  20. Photovoltaic-Panel Laminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Two-piece unit heats and presses protective layers to form laminate. Rubber diaphragm between upper and lower vacuum chambers alternates between neutral position and one that presses against solar-cell array, supplying distributed force necessary to press layers of laminate together. Encapsulation helps to protect cells from environment and to ensure long panel life while allowing efficient generation of electricity from Sunlight.

  1. Student Panels, Business Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten

    of MSc programmes, the MSc coordinator as well as the administrative secretary. A student panel meets with the department twice in the first year: Early in February to sum up experience from the first semester and in early in June to sum up experience from the second semester. At semester start each MSc...

  2. Normalisation of haemodynamics in patients with end-stage heart failure with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sunil; Woldendorp, Kei; Muthiah, Kavitha; Robson, Desiree; Prichard, Roslyn; Macdonald, Peter S; Keogh, Anne M; Kotlyar, Eugene; Jabbour, Andrew; Dhital, Kumud; Granger, Emily; Spratt, Phillip; Jansz, Paul; Hayward, Christopher S

    2014-10-01

    New generation continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) utilise centrifugal pumps. Data concerning their effect on patient haemodynamics, ventricular function and tissue perfusion is limited. We aimed to document these parameters following HeartWare centrifugal continuous-flow LVAD (HVAD) implantation and to assess the impact of post-operative right heart failure (RHF). We reviewed 53 consecutive patients (mean age 49.5 ± 14.1 yrs) with HVAD implanted in the left ventricle, at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, between January 2007 and August 2012. Available paired right heart catheterisation (n=35) and echocardiography (n=39) data was reviewed to assess response of invasive haemodynamics and ventricular function to LVAD support. A total of 28 patients (53%) were implanted from interim mechanical circulatory support. Seventeen patients (32%) required short-term post-implant veno-pulmonary artery extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. At 100 ± 61 days post-implant, mean pulmonary artery pressure and mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure decreased from 38.8 ± 7.7 to 22.9 ± 7.7 mmHg and 28.3 ± 6.4 to 13.4 ± 5.4 mmHg respectively (pRHF patients (72.2%, n=18) compared to those without (96.9%, n=35, p=0.01). HVAD support improves haemodynamics, LV dimensions and renal function. Following implantation with a centrifugal continuous-flow LVAD, RHF remains a significant risk with a tendency to worse outcomes in the short to medium term. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Light emitting ceramic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  4. AML multi-gene panel testing: A review and comparison of two gene panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, G; Vierkoetter, K; Namiki, S; Lawicki, S; Fernandez, X; Ige, K; Kawahara, W; Lum, C

    2016-05-01

    Risk adapted therapy is standard practice in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). A common diagnostic approach involves focusing on a three gene panel (CEPBA, FLT3, and NPM1). However, a complete representation of prognostic and predictive factors in AML necessitates an expanded series of genes, due to the dynamic interactions present between concurrent mutations. Hence, the current study aims to describe the benefits of an expanded risk profile in an unselected cohort of AML cases. The genomes of 11 randomly selected patients with AML were sequenced using next generation sequencing. A narrow three gene panel and broader 50 gene panel were contrasted. The expanded gene panel detected one additional pathogenic mutation in five patients and two pathogenic mutations in two patients, resulting in a change in their risk profile. Only 5/11 (45%) of AML patients demonstrated a pathogenic mutation on the 3 gene profile, however all patients had at least one detectable pathogenic mutation on the broader gene panel. The detection of a concurrent mutation by the expanded gene panel reversed the favorable risk profile for three patients. Detection of concurrent mutations enables rejection or validation of prognoses associated with NPM1 or CEBPA mutations. DNMT3a and TP53 mutations in AML have a pertinent prognostic and therapeutic value for patients and their addition enhances the current three gene panel. In our small study, the three gene panel changed the prognosis for three patients (3/11, 27%) with the detection of commonly occurring AML mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Panel and planar experimental shear behavior of wood panels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Panel shear strength along the thickness and planar shear along the length of wood panels laminated softwood oriented OSB 10 mm thick, conditioned at different moisture contents (anhydrous medium, ambient temperature and humid medium) was measured on standardized test specimens, cut in half lengthwise panel ...

  6. Miniaturized LEDs for flat-panel displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radauscher, Erich J.; Meitl, Matthew; Prevatte, Carl; Bonafede, Salvatore; Rotzoll, Robert; Gomez, David; Moore, Tanya; Raymond, Brook; Cok, Ronald; Fecioru, Alin; Trindade, António Jose; Fisher, Brent; Goodwin, Scott; Hines, Paul; Melnik, George; Barnhill, Sam; Bower, Christopher A.

    2017-02-01

    Inorganic light emitting diodes (LEDs) serve as bright pixel-level emitters in displays, from indoor/outdoor video walls with pixel sizes ranging from one to thirty millimeters to micro displays with more than one thousand pixels per inch. Pixel sizes that fall between those ranges, roughly 50 to 500 microns, are some of the most commercially significant ones, including flat panel displays used in smart phones, tablets, and televisions. Flat panel displays that use inorganic LEDs as pixel level emitters (μILED displays) can offer levels of brightness, transparency, and functionality that are difficult to achieve with other flat panel technologies. Cost-effective production of μILED displays requires techniques for precisely arranging sparse arrays of extremely miniaturized devices on a panel substrate, such as transfer printing with an elastomer stamp. Here we present lab-scale demonstrations of transfer printed μILED displays and the processes used to make them. Demonstrations include passive matrix μILED displays that use conventional off-the shelf drive ASICs and active matrix μILED displays that use miniaturized pixel-level control circuits from CMOS wafers. We present a discussion of key considerations in the design and fabrication of highly miniaturized emitters for μILED displays.

  7. LCD Panels: The Electronic Wonder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Glenn

    1994-01-01

    Describes Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panels and their use in the classroom. Topics discussed include active versus passive matrix panels; the number of pixels; projectors, including transmissive or reflective overhead projectors; costs; and vendors that supply LCDs. (LRW)

  8. FEMA DFIRM Panel Scheme Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer contains information about the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) panel areas. The spatial entities representing FIRM panels are polygons. The polygon for...

  9. Decision making for destination therapy left ventricular assist devices: "there was no choice" versus "I thought about it an awful lot".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvennan, Colleen K; Allen, Larry A; Nowels, Carolyn; Brieke, Andreas; Cleveland, Joseph C; Matlock, Daniel D

    2014-05-01

    Destination therapy left ventricular assist devices (DT LVADs) are one of the most invasive medical interventions for end-stage illness. How patients decide whether or not to proceed with device implantation is unknown. We aimed to understand the decision-making processes of patients who either accept or decline DT LVADs. Between October 2012 and September 2013, we conducted semistructured, in-depth interviews to understand patients' decision-making experiences. Data were analyzed using a mixed inductive and deductive approach. Twenty-two eligible patients were interviewed, 15 with DT LVADs and 7 who declined. We found a strong dichotomy between decision processes with some patients (11 accepters) being automatic and others (3 accepters, 7 decliners) being reflective in their approach to decision making. The automatic group was characterized by a fear of dying and an over-riding desire to live as long as possible: "[LVAD] was the only option I had…that or push up daisies…so I automatically took this." By contrast, the reflective group went through a reasoned process of weighing risks, benefits, and burdens: "There are worse things than death." Irrespective of approach, most patients experienced the DT LVAD decision as a highly emotional process and many sought support from their families or spiritually. Some patients offered a DT LVAD face the decision by reflecting on a process and reasoning through risks and benefits. For others, the desire to live supersedes such reflective processing. Acknowledging this difference is important when considering how to support patients who are faced with this complex decision. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Mounting clips for panel installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavieres, Andres; Al-Haddad, Tristan; Goodman, Joseph

    2017-07-11

    A photovoltaic panel mounting clip comprising a base, central indexing tabs, flanges, lateral indexing tabs, and vertical indexing tabs. The mounting clip removably attaches one or more panels to a beam or the like structure, both mechanically and electrically. It provides secure locking of the panels in all directions, while providing guidance in all directions for accurate installation of the panels to the beam or the like structure.

  11. Rational Design of Composite Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Hans Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    A non-linear structural model for composite panels is presented. The non-linear terms in the lateral displacements are modelled as an additional set of lateral loads acting on the panel. Hence the solution is reduced to that of an equivalent panel with small displacements In order to treat sandwich...

  12. Clinical Space Medicine Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisden, Denise L.; Billica, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The practice of space medicine is diverse. It includes routine preventive medical care of astronauts and pilots, the development of inflight medical capability and training of flight crews as well as the preflight, inflight, and postflight medical assessment and monitoring. The Johnson Space Center Medical Operations Branch is a leader in the practice of space medicine. The papers presented in this panel will demonstrate some of the unique aspects of space medicine.

  13. The SNaP Wound Care System: a case series using a novel ultraportable negative pressure wound therapy device for the treatment of diabetic lower extremity wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Bruce; Oldenbrook, Leslie; Ryu, Justin; Fong, Kenton D; Schubart, Peter J

    2010-07-01

    Although there is significant evidence supporting the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for the treatment of lower extremity diabetic ulcers, currently available electrically powered NPWT systems are not ideally suited for treating smaller diabetic foot ulcers. The Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP) Wound Care System is a novel, ultraportable device that delivers NPWT without the use of an electrically powered pump. It was specifically designed to meet the wound care needs of patients with diabetes. The SNaP System is compact, silent, mobile, easy-to-use, and available off-the-shelf. It is fully disposable and may offer other important benefits over electrically powered systems to both the clinician and patient. We review the evidence for use of NPWT for the treatment of diabetic wounds and discuss the potential benefits of this new NPWT technology for patients with diabetes. We also present a case series of four difficult lower extremity diabetic ulcers that were successfully treated with the SNaP System. This study suggests that the SNaP System may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of the diabetic wound care clinician. 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  14. Panel data analysis using EViews

    CERN Document Server

    Agung, I Gusti Ngurah

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive and accessible guide to panel data analysis using EViews software This book explores the use of EViews software in creating panel data analysis using appropriate empirical models and real datasets. Guidance is given on developing alternative descriptive statistical summaries for evaluation and providing policy analysis based on pool panel data. Various alternative models based on panel data are explored, including univariate general linear models, fixed effect models and causal models, and guidance on the advantages and disadvantages of each one is given. Panel Data Analysis

  15. Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Voice in Health Care Decisions Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Comprehensive Metabolic Panel ( ... or kidneys) is working. What Is a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)? The comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) is a ...

  16. Incore measuring device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimiya, Akira

    1997-01-28

    In an incore measuring device comprising a first function for controlling a state of a neutron flux distribution in a reactor core and a second function for analyzing, displaying and memorizing information of a state such as of a neutron flux distribution, the second function is separated from the main processing device and it is constituted in other processing device, and further a display device is connected to the other processing device. In addition, a tool for performing maintenance of memory device, touch panel, and software is disposed. Then, load on the main processing device can be reduced, high speed control of the neutron distribution state measuring and controlling portion is enabled, and high speed control of the device for displaying information on the recognized and analyzed state is also enabled. Further, it is possible for high speed data memorizing processing, and improvement of safety of indication operation such as for incore measurement and workability of the maintenance of control softwares. (N.H.)

  17. External Mechanical Devices and Vascular Surgery for Erectile Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Landon W; Munarriz, Ricardo; Wang, Run; Morey, Allen; Levine, Laurence

    2016-11-01

    The field of sexual medicine is continuously advancing, with novel outcomes reported on a regular basis. Given the rapid evolution, updated guidelines are essential to inform practicing clinicians on best practices. To summarize the current literature and provide clinical guidelines on penile traction therapy, vacuum erection devices, and penile revascularization. A consensus panel was held with leading sexual medicine experts during the 2015 International Consultation on Sexual Medicine (ICSM). Relevant literature was reviewed and graded based on Oxford criteria to develop evidence-based guideline and consensus statements. The development of clinically relevant guidelines. Penile traction therapy is a viable therapy to modestly improve penile length as a primary therapy, before penile prosthesis placement in men with decreased penile length or after surgery for Peyronie's disease. It also might have a role in the acute phase of Peyronie's disease but has inconsistent outcomes in the long-term phase. Vacuum erection devices are effective in creating an erection satisfactory for intercourse, even in difficult-to-treat populations. They also might be used in the post-prostatectomy setting to maintain penile length but have insufficient evidence as a penile rehabilitation therapy. For vasculogenic erectile dysfunction, men with suspected arterial insufficiency can be evaluated with penile Duplex Doppler ultrasonography and confirmatory angiography. Penile revascularization procedures have consistently demonstrated benefits in very select patient populations; however, inadequate data exists to suggest the superiority of one technique. Men with vascular risk factors are likely poor candidates for penile revascularization, although veno-occlusive dysfunction and age are less significant. Therapies for treating primary veno-occlusive dysfunction are not recommended and should be reserved for clinical trials. Since the prior ICSM meeting, multiple developments have

  18. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  19. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

    2013-03-19

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  20. MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors with endoluminal, intraluminal and interstitial catheter-based ultrasound devices: preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena J.; Jones, Peter; Hensley, Daniel; Holbrook, Andrew; Plata, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided thermal interventions have been proposed for potential palliative and curative treatments of pancreatic tumors. Catheter-based ultrasound devices offer the potential for temporal and 3D spatial control of the energy deposition profile. The objective of this study was to apply theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the feasibility of endogastric, intraluminal and transgastric catheter-based ultrasound for MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. The transgastric approach involves insertion of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator (array of 1.5 mm OD x 10 mm transducers, 360° or sectored 180°, ~7 MHz frequency, 13-14G cooling catheter) directly into the pancreas, either endoscopically or via image-guided percutaneous placement. An intraluminal applicator, of a more flexible but similar construct, was considered for endoscopic insertion directly into the pancreatic or biliary duct. An endoluminal approach was devised based on an ultrasound transducer assembly (tubular, planar, curvilinear) enclosed in a cooling balloon which is endoscopically positioned within the stomach or duodenum, adjacent to pancreatic targets from within the GI tract. A 3D acoustic bio-thermal model was implemented to calculate acoustic energy distributions and used a FEM solver to determine the transient temperature and thermal dose profiles in tissue during heating. These models were used to determine transducer parameters and delivery strategies and to study the feasibility of ablating 1-3 cm diameter tumors located 2-10 mm deep in the pancreas, while thermally sparing the stomach wall. Heterogeneous acoustic and thermal properties were incorporated, including approximations for tumor desmoplasia and dynamic changes during heating. A series of anatomic models based on imaging scans of representative patients were used to investigate the three approaches. Proof of concept (POC) endogastric and transgastric applicators were fabricated and experimentally

  1. Point-of-Care International Normalized Ratio (INR) Monitoring Devices for Patients on Long-term Oral Anticoagulation Therapy: An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    SUBJECT OF THE EVIDENCE-BASED ANALYSIS: The purpose of this evidence based analysis report is to examine the safety and effectiveness of point-of-care (POC) international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring devices for patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT). TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Long-term OAT is typically required by patients with mechanical heart valves, chronic atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or peripheral arterial occlusion. It is estimated that approximately 1% of the population receives anticoagulation treatment and, by applying this value to Ontario, there are an estimated 132,000 patients on OAT in the province, a figure that is expected to increase with the aging population. Patients on OAT are regularly monitored and their medications adjusted to ensure that their INR scores remain in the therapeutic range. This can be challenging due to the narrow therapeutic window of warfarin and variation in individual responses. Optimal INR scores depend on the underlying indication for treatment and patient level characteristics, but for most patients the therapeutic range is an INR score of between 2.0 and 3.0. The current standard of care in Ontario for patients on long-term OAT is laboratory-based INR determination with management carried out by primary care physicians or anticoagulation clinics (ACCs). Patients also regularly visit a hospital or community-based facility to provide a venous blood samples (venipuncture) that are then sent to a laboratory for INR analysis. Experts, however, have commented that there may be under-utilization of OAT due to patient factors, physician factors, or regional practice variations and that sub-optimal patient management may also occur. There is currently no population-based Ontario data to permit the assessment of patient care, but recent systematic reviews have estimated that less that 50% of patients receive OAT on a routine basis and that patients

  2. The "Virtual" Panel: A Computerized Model for LGBT Speaker Panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Christopher; Torres-Harding, Susan; Pedersen, Paula J

    2012-10-01

    Recent societal trends indicate more tolerance for homosexuality, but prejudice remains on college campuses. Speaker panels are commonly used in classrooms as a way to educate students about sexual diversity and decrease negative attitudes toward sexual diversity. The advent of computer delivered instruction presents a unique opportunity to broaden the impact of traditional speaker panels. The current investigation examined the influence of an interactive "virtual" gay and lesbian speaker panel on cognitive, affective, and behavioral homonegativity. Findings suggest the computer-administered panel is lowers homonegativity, particularly for affective experiential homonegativity. The implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed.

  3. Temperature Measurement and Monitoring Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    feasibility based on potential usefulness in clinical medicine ’ias explored. All information herein wasn obtained from literature rrv’iew only. No...measurements, applications for temperature measuring devices, and description of several modern body temperature monitoring devices (techniques). Finally...gynecology, drug therapy, and ophthalmology. TEMPERATURE SENSING DEVICES Hippocrates is believed to be the first person Lo associate body temperature as

  4. 78 FR 5327 - Medical Devices; Ophthalmic Devices; Classification of the Scleral Plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... of the Panel Although the Panel was informed that scleral plugs have historically been treated as... safety and effectiveness of the device: (1) Performance data must demonstrate the sterility and shelf... Tissue Reaction Biocompatibility testing. Material characterization. Performance testing to determine the...

  5. Solar Tracking System: More Efficient Use of Solar Panels

    OpenAIRE

    J. Rizk; Y. Chaiko

    2008-01-01

    This paper shows the potential system benefits of simple tracking solar system using a stepper motor and light sensor. This method is increasing power collection efficiency by developing a device that tracks the sun to keep the panel at a right angle to its rays. A solar tracking system is designed, implemented and experimentally tested. The design details and the experimental results are shown.

  6. Preoperative Proteinuria and Reduced Glomerular Filtration Rate Predicts Renal Replacement Therapy in Patients Supported With Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkara, Veli K; Coromilas, Ellie J; Garan, Arthur Reshad; Li, Randall C; Castagna, Francesco; Jennings, Douglas L; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Takeda, Koji; Takayama, Hiroo; Sladen, Robert N; Mancini, Donna M; Naka, Yoshifumi; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Colombo, Paolo C

    2016-12-01

    Renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) has detrimental effects on quality of life and survival of patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs). Current guidelines do not offer a decision-making algorithm for CF-LVAD candidates with poor baseline renal function. Objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with RRT after CF-LVAD implantation. Three hundred and eighty-nine consecutive patients underwent contemporary CF-LVAD implantation at the Columbia University Medical Center between January 2004 and August 2015. Baseline demographics, comorbid conditions, clinical risk scores, and renal function were analyzed in patients with or without RRT after CF-LVAD implantation. Time-dependent receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to define optimal cutoffs for continuous risk factors. Forty-four patients (11.6%) required RRT during a median follow-up of 9.9 months. Patients requiring RRT had significantly worse renal function, lower hemoglobin, and increased proteinuria at baseline. Low estimated glomerular filtration rate (proteinuria (urine protein to creatinine ratio ≥0.55 mg/mg) were significant predictors of RRT after CF-LVAD support. Dipstick proteinuria was also a significant predictor of RRT after CF-LVAD implantation. Patients with both low estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria had highest risk of RRT (63.6%) compared with those with either low estimated glomerular filtration rate or proteinuria (18.7%) and those with neither of these risk factors (2.7%) at 1-year follow-up (log-rank Pproteinuria are predictors RRT after CF-LVAD implantation and should be routinely assessed in CF-LVAD candidates to guide decision making. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Coronary sinus activation patterns in patients with and without left bundle branch block undergoing electroanatomic mapping system-guided cardiac resynchronization therapy device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Greco, Maurizio; Zorzi, Alessandro; Di Matteo, Irene; Cima, Anna; Maines, Massimiliano; Angheben, Carlo; Catanzariti, Domenico

    2017-02-01

    Implantation of the left ventricular (LV) lead in segments with delayed electrical activation may improve response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount and regional distribution of LV electrical delay (LVED) in patients with or without left bundle branch block (LBBB). We enrolled 60 patients who underwent electroanatomic mapping system-guided CRT device implantation. Activation mapping of the coronary sinus (CS) branches was performed using an insulated guidewire. LVED was defined as the interval between the beginning of the QRS complex on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and the local electrogram and expressed in milliseconds or as percentage of the total QRS duration (LVED%). Forty-three patients showed a LBBB and 17 a non-LBBB electrocardiographic pattern. A total of 148 CS branches (mean 2.5 per patient; range 2-4 per patient) were mapped. Patients with LBBB showed higher maximum LVED (135 ms [108-150 ms] vs 100 ms [103-110 ms]; P branches showing LVED >50% of the total QRS duration, >75% of the total QRS duration, and >85 ms was significantly higher in patients with LBBB than in patients without LBBB. Patients without LBBB showed lower LVED and more heterogeneous electrical activation of the CS than did patients with LBBB. This finding may contribute to a lower rate of response to CRT of patients without LBBB and suggests the use of activation mapping to guide LV lead placement. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reliability Study in Solar Panels

    OpenAIRE

    Español Lifante, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline silicon Modules are formed by single silicon photovoltaic cells. Since each one of these cells individually contributes to the overall electric power of the panel, the failure of one of them directly affects to its benefits and performance. To Minimize these negative effects, junction boxes with few bypass diodes are usually included in Photovoltaic Solar panels. A still experimental way to built solar panels is to integrate bypass diodes in every single cell, which would in...

  9. Desain Panel Absorpsi Difusor Bunu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indradjaja Makainas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Panel Absorpsi Difusor Bunu adalah panel akustik yang berfungsi sebagai penyerap sekaligus pemencar bunyi yang terbuat dari sabut kelapa (bunu. Panel ini digunakan untuk mendapatkan Waktu Dengung (ReveberationTime sesuai standar kenyamanan pendengaran didalam ruang teater rumah (home theater, ruang karaoke, studio penyiaran radio, studio rekaman, ruang kelas/siding ,ruangi badah, auditorium. Bunu sebagai bahan yang melimpah di seluruh pelosok Nusantara yang dikenal dengan sebutan kepulauan Nyiur Melambai perlu dimaksimalkan pemanfaatannya. Didaerah umumnya bunu hanya dijadikan sebagai bahan bakar memasak, malah menjadi limbah dari hasil pengolahan kopra. Panel dikerjakan di AKAS desa Rantewringin kabupaten Kebumen provinsi Jawa Tengah dengan cara manua lkecual idalam menguraikan sabut kelapa menjadi serat (coirfibre dan serbuk (cocopeat. Bahan pembuat panel adalah seratnya yang disusun berlapis. Panel dibuat dalam 2 (dua jenis terdiri dari yang datar yang disebut panel indrabunu 01 dan piramida disebut indrabunu 02, untuk mendapatkan nilai koefisien serap αyang berbeda. Pengujian nilai α dari panel dilakukan di Laboratorium Akustik Pusat Penelitian Metrologi LIPI Serpong. Kata Kunci : bunu,panel,absorpsi,difusor

  10. ALDS 1978 panel review. [PNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, D.L. (ed.)

    1979-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is examining the analysis of large data sets (ALDS). After one year's work, a panel was convened to evaluate the project. This document is the permanent record of that panel review. It consists of edited transcripts of presentations made to the panel by the PNL staff, a summary of the responses of the panel to these presentations, and PNL's plans for the development of the ALDS project. The representations of the PNL staff described various aspects of the project and/or the philosophy surrounding the project. Supporting materials appear in appendixes. 20 figures, 4 tables. (RWR)

  11. Proficiency testing for sensory profile panels : measuring panel performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mcewan, J.A.; Hunter, E.A.; Gemert, L.J. van; Lea, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proficiency testing in sensory analysis is an important step towards demonstrating that results from one sensory panel are consistent with the results of other sensory panels. The uniqueness of sensory analysis poses some specific problems for measuring the proficiency of the human instrument

  12. A Novel Lighting OLED Panel Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enyang Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel OLED (organic light emitting diode lighting panel, which uses a special layout design, can reduce the photolithography cycles and process costs and is more reliable. It only needs two steps of photolithography cycles, which include an ITO (InSnO compound transparent oxide pattern and insulator pattern. There is no need for the metal bus pattern of the ordinary design. The OLED device structure is a type of red–green–blue (RGB-stacked emitting layer that has a good color index and greater adjustability, which improves the performance of the device. This novel design has the same equipment and material requirement compared to the ordinary design, and it is very beneficial in terms of high volume and low-cost production. It uses a hyper driving method because the entire OLED lighting panel is divided into many sub-emitting units; if one of the sub-emitting units is burned out, it has no effect on the adjacent sub-emitting unit, so the reliability is markedly better than the ordinary design.

  13. Plane and parabolic solar panels

    OpenAIRE

    Sales, J. H. O.; Suzuki, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a plane and parabolic collector that absorbs radiant energy and transforms it in heat. Therefore we have a panel to heat water. We study how to increment this capture of solar beams onto the panel in order to increase its efficiency in heating water.

  14. Panel Smooth Transition Regression Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González, Andrés; Terasvirta, Timo; Dijk, Dick van

    We introduce the panel smooth transition regression model. This new model is intended for characterizing heterogeneous panels, allowing the regression coefficients to vary both across individuals and over time. Specifically, heterogeneity is allowed for by assuming that these coefficients are bou...

  15. Mounting clips for panel installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, Andres; Al-Haddad, Tristan; Goodman, Joseph; Valdes, Francisco

    2017-02-14

    An exemplary mounting clip for removably attaching panels to a supporting structure comprises a base, spring locking clips, a lateral flange, a lever flange, and a spring bonding pad. The spring locking clips extend upwardly from the base. The lateral flange extends upwardly from a first side of the base. The lateral flange comprises a slot having an opening configured to receive at least a portion of one of the one or more panels. The lever flange extends outwardly from the lateral flange. The spring bonding flange extends downwardly from the lever flange. At least a portion of the first spring bonding flange comprises a serrated edge for gouging at least a portion of the one or more panels when the one or more panels are attached to the mounting clip to electrically and mechanically couple the one or more panels to the mounting clip.

  16. Improving escape panel selectivity in Nephrops directed fisheries by actively stimulating fish behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Ludvig Ahm; Herrmann, Bent; Feekings, Jordan P.

    2017-01-01

    with it. To increase the efficiency of such panels, the contact probability needs to be improved. In this study, we investigate to what extent the efficiency of escape panels can be improved by actively stimulating the escape behaviour of fish. The performance of two identical panel sections was compared...... in a twin-trawl system, one with and one without a stimulation device. A new coupled analysis method was used to explicitly quantify the improvements in contact probability and release efficiency for the escape panel. The results demonstrate that by actively stimulating escape behaviour, the contact...

  17. Socio-Economic Status: A Barrier to Access to Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy for Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in France.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Fleury

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a major public health problem which affects between 5 to 10% of the general population. OSAS is known to be associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality mainly due to cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The burden of illness is high for the individual and society. There are 2 treatment options for OSAS, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP and Mandibular Advancement Device therapy (MAD. CPAP is known to be an effective but very constraining treatment. Patients are usually poorly adherent. MAD is a more recent treatment easier to use and consequently better tolerated, but MAD can only be prescribed to patients with satisfactory oral hygiene. Oral health constitutes a real issue particularly among underprivileged groups in France. Through this link, the question of whether low socio-economic status constitutes a barrier to access to care for patients with OSAS is raised.In a multicenter prospective cohort of 2822 consecutive OSAS patients in whom MAD has been proposed as an alternative to CPAP between May 15, 2007 and December 1st, 2014, we identified the factors that lead to a patient diagnosed with OSAS to be treated by MAD instead of CPAP. A logistic regression was performed using a stepwise forward procedure. The main outcome of the study was that treatment by MAD was significantly associated with both educational attainment, as determined by the age at which the patient left full-time education, ≥18 years compared with <18 (adjusted odds ratio (aOR: 1.64, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.20, and the patient's occupational category. Executives and higher intellectual professions, intermediate professions, technicians, foremen and employees were significantly more likely to be treated by MAD than workers (aOR: 2.21, 95% CI 1.88 to 2.58; aOR: 1.74, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.63; aOR: 1.96, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.47, respectively.Overall, these results suggest that low socio-economic status constitutes a

  18. Socio-Economic Status: A Barrier to Access to Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy for Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marion; Le Vaillant, Marc; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a major public health problem which affects between 5 to 10% of the general population. OSAS is known to be associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality mainly due to cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The burden of illness is high for the individual and society. There are 2 treatment options for OSAS, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) and Mandibular Advancement Device therapy (MAD). CPAP is known to be an effective but very constraining treatment. Patients are usually poorly adherent. MAD is a more recent treatment easier to use and consequently better tolerated, but MAD can only be prescribed to patients with satisfactory oral hygiene. Oral health constitutes a real issue particularly among underprivileged groups in France. Through this link, the question of whether low socio-economic status constitutes a barrier to access to care for patients with OSAS is raised. In a multicenter prospective cohort of 2822 consecutive OSAS patients in whom MAD has been proposed as an alternative to CPAP between May 15, 2007 and December 1st, 2014, we identified the factors that lead to a patient diagnosed with OSAS to be treated by MAD instead of CPAP. A logistic regression was performed using a stepwise forward procedure. The main outcome of the study was that treatment by MAD was significantly associated with both educational attainment, as determined by the age at which the patient left full-time education, ≥18 years compared with <18 (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.64, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.20), and the patient's occupational category. Executives and higher intellectual professions, intermediate professions, technicians, foremen and employees were significantly more likely to be treated by MAD than workers (aOR: 2.21, 95% CI 1.88 to 2.58; aOR: 1.74, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.63; aOR: 1.96, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.47, respectively). Overall, these results suggest that low socio-economic status constitutes a barrier to access

  19. Impact of an electronic monitoring device and behavioral feedback on adherence to multiple sclerosis therapies in youth: results of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, E Ann; Grover, Stephanie A; Powell, Victoria E; Alper, Gulay; Banwell, Brenda L; Edwards, Kim; Gorman, Mark; Graves, Jennifer; Lotze, Timothy E; Mah, Jean K; Mednick, Lauren; Ness, Jayne; Obadia, Maya; Slater, Ruth; Waldman, Amy; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Schwartz, Carolyn E

    2017-09-01

    To report the results of a randomized controlled trial using an electronic monitoring device (EM) plus a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention to enhance adherence to disease-modifying therapies (DMT) in pediatric MS. Fifty-two youth with MS (16.03 ± 2.2 years) were randomized to receive either MI (n = 25) (target intervention) or a MS medication video (n = 27) (attention control). Primary endpoint was change in adherence. Secondary outcomes included changes in quality of life, well-being and self-efficacy. Random effects modeling and Cohen's effect size computation evaluated intervention impact. Longitudinal random effect models revealed that the MI group decreased their EM adherence (GroupxTime interaction = -0.19), while increasing frequency of parental DMT reminder (26.01)/administration (11.69). We found decreased EM use in the MI group at 6 months (Cohen's d = -0.61), but increased pharmacy refill adherence (d = 0.23). Parental reminders about medication increased in MI subjects vs controls (d = 0.59 at 3 months; d = 0.70 at 6 months). We found increases in self-reported adherence (d = 0.21) at 3 but not 6 months, fewer barriers to adherence at three (d = -0.58) and six months (d = -0.31), better physical (d = 0.23 at 3 months; d = 0.45 at 6 months), emotional (d = 0.25 at 3 months) and self-efficacy function (d = 0.55 at 3 months; 0.48 at 6 months), but worse well-being, including self-acceptance (d = -0.53 at 6 months) and environmental mastery (d = -0.42 at 3 and 6 months) in intervention as compared to control patients. Participants receiving MI + EM experienced worsening on objective measures of adherence and increased parental involvement, but improved on some self- and parent-reported measures. MI participants reported improvements in quality of life and self-efficacy, but worsened well-being.

  20. Socio-Economic Status: A Barrier to Access to Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy for Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marion; Le Vaillant, Marc; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a major public health problem which affects between 5 to 10% of the general population. OSAS is known to be associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality mainly due to cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The burden of illness is high for the individual and society. There are 2 treatment options for OSAS, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) and Mandibular Advancement Device therapy (MAD). CPAP is known to be an effective but very constraining treatment. Patients are usually poorly adherent. MAD is a more recent treatment easier to use and consequently better tolerated, but MAD can only be prescribed to patients with satisfactory oral hygiene. Oral health constitutes a real issue particularly among underprivileged groups in France. Through this link, the question of whether low socio-economic status constitutes a barrier to access to care for patients with OSAS is raised. Methods and Principal Findings In a multicenter prospective cohort of 2822 consecutive OSAS patients in whom MAD has been proposed as an alternative to CPAP between May 15, 2007 and December 1st, 2014, we identified the factors that lead to a patient diagnosed with OSAS to be treated by MAD instead of CPAP. A logistic regression was performed using a stepwise forward procedure. The main outcome of the study was that treatment by MAD was significantly associated with both educational attainment, as determined by the age at which the patient left full-time education, ≥18 years compared with <18 (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.64, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.20), and the patient's occupational category. Executives and higher intellectual professions, intermediate professions, technicians, foremen and employees were significantly more likely to be treated by MAD than workers (aOR: 2.21, 95% CI 1.88 to 2.58; aOR: 1.74, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.63; aOR: 1.96, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.47, respectively). Conclusions Overall, these results suggest that low

  1. Artabilitation ICMC Panel paper Denmark 2007:Non-Formal Rehabilitation via Immersiveinteractive Music Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony; Petersson, Eva; Eaglestone, Barry

    2007-01-01

    This paper brings together perspectives of the ICMC 2007 ArtAbilitation Panel on non-formal rehabilitation via immersive interactive music environments. Issues covered are sound therapy, musical topologies, brainwave control and research methodology.......This paper brings together perspectives of the ICMC 2007 ArtAbilitation Panel on non-formal rehabilitation via immersive interactive music environments. Issues covered are sound therapy, musical topologies, brainwave control and research methodology....

  2. Insertion devices

    CERN Document Server

    Bahrdt, J

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of an insertion device with the electron beam in a storage ring is discussed. The radiation property including brightness, ux and polarization of an ideal and real planar and helical / elliptical device is described. The magnet design of planar, helical, quasiperiodic devices and of devices with a reduced on axis power density are resumed.

  3. 7 CFR 1940.968 - Rural Economic Development Review Panel Grant (Panel Grant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Rural Economic Development Review Panel Grant (Panel... of Certain Rural Development Programs § 1940.968 Rural Economic Development Review Panel Grant (Panel... associated with a State rural economic development review panel. (b) Objective. The objective of the Panel...

  4. Glass/Epoxy Door Panel for Automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J. L. JR.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight panel cost-effective. Integrally-molded intrusion strap key feature of composite outer door panel. Strap replaces bulky and heavy steel instrusion beam of conventional door. Standard steel inner panel used for demonstration purposes. Door redesigned to exploit advantages of composite outer panel thinner. Outer panel for automobilie door, made of glass/epoxy composite material, lighter than conventional steel door panel, meets same strength requirements, and less expensive.

  5. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  6. Testing panels in shear and biaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    Hydraulic jacks simultaneously apply torsion, axial compression, and lateral compression to structural panels. Jacks are suitable for testing large panels used in aircraft, lightweight trucks, and buses.

  7. Pressurized waterproof case electronic device

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-31

    A pressurized waterproof case for an electronic device is particularly adapted for fluid-tight containment and operation of a touch-screen electronic device or the like therein at some appreciable water depth. In one example, the case may be formed as an enclosure having an open top panel or face covered by a flexible, transparent membrane or the like for the operation of the touchscreen device within the case. A pressurizing system is provided for the case to pressurize the case and the electronic device therein to slightly greater than ambient in order to prevent the external water pressure from bearing against the transparent membrane and pressing it against the touch screen, thereby precluding operation of the touch screen device within the case. The pressurizing system may include a small gas cartridge or may be provided from an external source.

  8. Our experience of 200 patients: usage and maintenance of long-term oxygen therapy and non-invasive ventilation devices at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulger, A Füsun; Poyraz, Barış; Gulec Balbay, Ege; Binay, Songül

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the patients' attitudes about the devices, of which they use for long-term respiratory support at home. 200 consecutive patients were questioned about the treatment and devices of respiratory support at home by face to face questionnaire. Their records were taken from the archives of Social Security Agency. 123 (61.5%) of the patients were men and 77 (38.5%) were women. The mean age was 65.8 ± 11.9 (15-92) years. The most frequently prescribed device was oxygen concentrator and BIPAP was the one that follows. The most common indications were hypoxic and hypercapnic respiratory failure due to COPD. The devices were prescribed by the state university hospitals, most commonly. The average daily oxygen usage duration was 16.3 ± 3.1 hours, the average duration was 7.4 ± 3.1 hours, for BIPAP. Twenty one (11.4%) of the patients, who were treated with LTOT, stated that they were taking oxygen less than 15 hours a day. Higher education levels of the patients was correlated with the higher rates of visiting the companies - that they bought the devices- both for information about and control of the devices (p=0.002). The rate of visiting companies/firms was significantly higher in patients, who use BIPAP and respiratory support combined with it (p=0.010). Twenty three (47.9%) of the 48 patients, who notified that their devices were impaired, waited for repairment by the firm, 20 (41.6%) investigated special repair facilities and the rest (10.5%) rented a new device. Effective and continuous technical maintenance support must be provided to the patients, who are treated with long-term respiratory support at home.

  9. Development and first use of a novel cylindrical ball bearing phantom for 9-DOF geometric calibrations of flat panel imaging devices used in image-guided ion beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, A.; Stock, M.; Kellner, D.; Ziegler, I.; Keuschnigg, P.; Huber, P.; Mayer, U.; Sedlmayer, F.; Deutschmann, H.; Steininger, P.

    2016-11-01

    Image guidance during highly conformal radiotherapy requires accurate geometric calibration of the moving components of the imager. Due to limited manufacturing accuracy and gravity-induced flex, an x-ray imager’s deviation from the nominal geometrical definition has to be corrected for. For this purpose a ball bearing phantom applicable for nine degrees of freedom (9-DOF) calibration of a novel cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner was designed and validated. In order to ensure accurate automated marker detection, as many uniformly distributed markers as possible should be used with a minimum projected inter-marker distance of 10 mm. Three different marker distributions on the phantom cylinder surface were simulated. First, a fixed number of markers are selected and their coordinates are randomly generated. Second, the quasi-random method is represented by setting a constraint on the marker distances in the projections. The third approach generates the ball coordinates helically based on the Golden ratio, ϕ. Projection images of the phantom incorporating the CBCT scanner’s geometry were simulated and analysed with respect to uniform distribution and intra-marker distance. Based on the evaluations a phantom prototype was manufactured and validated by a series of flexmap calibration measurements and analyses. The simulation with randomly distributed markers as well as the quasi-random approach showed an insufficient uniformity of the distribution over the detector area. The best compromise between uniform distribution and a high packing fraction of balls is provided by the Golden section approach. A prototype was manufactured accordingly. The phantom was validated for 9-DOF geometric calibrations of the CBCT scanner with independently moveable source and detector arms. A novel flexmap calibration phantom intended for 9-DOF was developed. The ball bearing distribution based on the Golden section was found to be highly advantageous. The phantom showed satisfying results for calibrations of the CBCT scanner and provides the basis for further flexmap correction and reconstruction developments.

  10. Exascale Workshop Panel Report Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Exascale Review Panel consists of 12 scientists and engineers with experience in various aspects of high-performance computing and its application, development, and management. The Panel hear presentations by several representatives of the workshops and town meetings convened over the past few years to examine the need for exascale computation capability and the justification for a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop such capability. This report summarizes information provided by the presenters and substantial written reports to the Panel in advance of the meeting in Washington D.C. on January 19-20, 2010. The report also summarizes the Panel's conclusions with regard to the justification of a DOE-led exascale initiative.

  11. OLED panel with fuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levermore, Levermore; Pang, Huiqing; Rajan, Kamala

    2014-09-16

    Embodiments may provide a first device that may comprise a substrate, a plurality of conductive bus lines disposed over the substrate, and a plurality of OLED circuit elements disposed on the substrate, where each of the OLED circuit elements comprises one and only one pixel electrically connected in series with a fuse. Each pixel may further comprise a first electrode, a second electrode, and an organic electroluminescent (EL) material disposed between the first and the second electrodes. The fuse of each of the plurality of OLED circuit elements may electrically connect each of the OLED circuit elements to at least one of the plurality of bus lines. Each of the plurality of bus lines may be electrically connected to a plurality of OLED circuit elements that are commonly addressable and at least two of the bus lines may be separately addressable.

  12. Microminiature thermionic vacuum flat panel display prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadwick, L.P.; Baker, B.; Chen, C.C.; Petersen, R.; Johnson, S.; Hwu, R.J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The authors report on the fabrication and electrical characteristics of low work microminiature thermionic vacuum (MTV) diodes for use in flat panel display applications. In this work advances in the technology and performance of a novel thermionic analog to field emission vacuum microelectronic emitters that will be referred to by the descriptive name microminiature thermionic vacuum (MTV) emitters will be presented. The salient feature of MTV emitter technology is the use of an air-bridge (suspended) filament that greatly reduces the thermal load and stress on the system. MTV devices can be fabricated using conventional semiconductor and micromachining processing techniques on any thermally stable, vacuum compatible substrate for which a high temperature stable insulating layer can be grown or deposited on. In addition, the small (micron to sub-micron) distances between the cathode and anode allow the possibility of intrinsic operation to high frequencies comparable to that of field emitters since these devices will not suffer from solid-state electron transport effects that limit the upper frequency of operation for all semiconductor devices.

  13. Low-cost photodynamic therapy devices for global health settings: Characterization of battery-powered LED performance and smartphone imaging in 3D tumor models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hempstead, Joshua; Jones, Dustin P; Ziouche, Abdelali; Cramer, Gwendolyn M; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    .... Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based treatment modality that has exhibited safety and efficacy in the clinic using wavelengths and irradiances achievable with light-emitting diodes (LEDs...

  14. The Use of PCs, Smartphones, and Tablets in a Probability-Based Panel Survey : Effects on Survey Measurement Error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtig, Peter; Toepoel, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Respondents in an Internet panel survey can often choose which device they use to complete questionnaires: a traditional PC, laptop, tablet computer, or a smartphone. Because all these devices have different screen sizes and modes of data entry, measurement errors may differ between devices. Using

  15. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  16. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  17. Concentration device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A concentration device (2) for filter filtration concentration of particles (4) from a volume of a fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises a filter (8) configured to filter particles (4) of a predefined size in the volume of the fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises...

  18. The Influence of Restraint Systems on Panel Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    2011-01-01

    When a panel is tested in uniaxial compression in a test machine, the boundary conditions are not quite the same as they would be if it were part of a complete structure. A restraint system may be used to simulate conditions found in a complete vehicle. Quantifying the quality of the restraint with only point-measurement devices can leave an inadequate characterization of the out-of-plane behavior. However, today s full-field displacement monitoring techniques allow for much more accurate views of the global panel deformation and strain, and therefore allow for a better understanding of panel behavior. In the current study, the behavior of a hat-stiffened and two rod-stiffened carbon-epoxy panels is considered. Panels were approximately 2 meters tall and 0.76 to 1.06 m wide. Unloaded edges were supported by knife edges and stiffeners were attached to a support structure at selected locations to restrain out-of-plane motion. A comparison is made between test results based on full-field measurements and analyses based on assumptions of boundary conditions of a completely rigid edge restraint and the absence of any edge restraint. Results indicate that motion at the restrained edges must be considered to obtain accurate test-analysis correlation.

  19. 7 CFR 2902.19 - Composite panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Composite panels. 2902.19 Section 2902.19 Agriculture... Composite panels. (a) Definitions. (1) Plastic lumber composite panels. Engineered products suitable for non... composite panels. Engineered products designed for use as structural and sound deadening material suitable...

  20. Restraint Age Forming Of Machined Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rebecca

    1993-01-01

    Panels bent permanently without cracking. In restraint age forming, panel wrapped onto mandrel having necessary curved contour, restrained on mandrel clamps and vacuum, and heat treated. When panel released after end of heat treatment, retains contour of mandrel except for small springback. Process repeatable: panels subsequently processed under same mechanical and thermal conditions on same contour emerge with same final contour.

  1. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  2. High temperature structural sandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Christos G.

    High strength composites are being used for making lightweight structural panels that are being employed in aerospace, naval and automotive structures. Recently, there is renewed interest in use of these panels. The major problem of most commercial available sandwich panels is the fire resistance. A recently developed inorganic matrix is investigated for use in cases where fire and high temperature resistance are necessary. The focus of this dissertation is the development of a fireproof composite structural system. Sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices have an excellent potential for use in applications where exposure to high temperatures or fire is a concern. Commercial available sandwich panels will soften and lose nearly all of their compressive strength temperatures lower than 400°C. This dissertation consists of the state of the art, the experimental investigation and the analytical modeling. The state of the art covers the performance of existing high temperature composites, sandwich panels and reinforced concrete beams strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The experimental part consists of four major components: (i) Development of a fireproof syntactic foam with maximum specific strength, (ii) Development of a lightweight syntactic foam based on polystyrene spheres, (iii) Development of the composite system for the skins. The variables are the skin thickness, modulus of elasticity of skin and high temperature resistance, and (iv) Experimental evaluation of the flexural behavior of sandwich panels. Analytical modeling consists of a model for the flexural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels, and a model for deflection calculations of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP subjected to fatigue loading. The experimental and analytical results show that sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices and ceramic spheres do not lose their load bearing capability during severe fire exposure, where temperatures reach several

  3. Characteristics of a wind-actuated aerodynamic braking device for high-speed trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, H.; Maekawa, H.

    2017-04-01

    To shorten the stopping distance of the high speed trains in case of emergency, we developed a small-sized aerodynamic braking unit without use of the friction between a rail and a wheel. The developed device could actuate a pair of two drag panels with a travelling wind. However, after the drag panel fully opened, vibrational movements of the drag panel characterized by its slight flutter were repeated. In this study, to stabilize the opened panel, matters pertaining to the angle of attack with respect to the drag panel and pertaining to the arrangement of the two panels were examined by a wind tunnel experiment using a scale model. As a result, to stabilize the opened panel and to keep the good performance of the braking device, it is found out that an angle of attack of 75 to 80 degrees is suitable provided that the interval of the two panels is narrow enough.

  4. A controlled trial of the Litebook light-emitting diode (LED) light therapy device for treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desan, Paul H.; Weinstein, Andrea J.; Michalak, Erin E.; Tam, Edwin M.; Meesters, Ybe; Ruiter, Martine J.; Horn, Edward; Telner, John; Iskandar, Hani; Boivin, Diane B.; Lam, Raymond W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Recent research has emphasized that the human circadian rhythm system is differentially sensitive to short wavelength light. Light treatment devices using efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) whose output is relatively concentrated in short wavelengths may enable a more convenient

  5. 77 FR 30044 - Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration... Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel (Panel) is a discretionary panel, established under the... Information Development Advisory Panel, Social Security Administration, 6401 Security Boulevard, Robert M...

  6. Water equivalent thickness of immobilization devices in proton therapy planning - Modelling at treatment planning and validation by measurements with a multi-layer ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellin, Francesco; Righetto, Roberto; Fava, Giovanni; Trevisan, Diego; Amelio, Dante; Farace, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the range errors made in treatment planning due to the presence of the immobilization devices along the proton beam path. The measured water equivalent thickness (WET) of selected devices was measured by a high-energy spot and a multi-layer ionization chamber and compared with that predicted by treatment planning system (TPS). Two treatment couches, two thermoplastic masks (both un-stretched and stretched) and one headrest were selected. At TPS, every immobilization device was modelled as being part of the patient. The following parameters were assessed: CT acquisition protocol, dose-calculation grid-sizes (1.5 and 3.0mm) and beam-entrance with respect to the devices (coplanar and non-coplanar). Finally, the potential errors produced by a wrong manual separation between treatment couch and the CT table (not present during treatment) were investigated. In the thermoplastic mask, there was a clear effect due to beam entrance, a moderate effect due to the CT protocols and almost no effect due to TPS grid-size, with 1mm errors observed only when thick un-stretched portions were crossed by non-coplanar beams. In the treatment couches the WET errors were negligible (0.5mm with a 3.0mm grid-size. In the headrest, WET errors were negligible (0.2mm). With only one exception (un-stretched mask, non-coplanar beams), the WET of all the immobilization devices was properly modelled by the TPS. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Documentation of Appliances & Interaction Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    The interaction devices and appliances explored in the WorkSPACE project, address spatial computing in the context of work. We have developed and explored a range of appliances and interaction devices. The scope has been to develop tools for support of collaboration by mixing digital and physical...... materials and environments. This has been done by the use of existing hardware technologies in novel combinations, controlled and mediated in the software applications we have developed. These developments, (the SpacePanel, the TagTable and ProjecTable , the SitePack and the software application Topos...

  8. Solar Panel based Milk Pasteurization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Pedersen, Tom Søndergaard

    This paper treats the subject of analysis, design and development of the control system for a solar panel based milk pasteurization system to be used in small villages in Tanzania. The analysis deals with the demands for an acceptable pasteurization, the varying energy supply and the low cost, low...... complexity, simple user interface and high reliability demands. Based on these demands a concept for the pasteurization system is established and a control system is developed. A solar panel has been constructed and the energy absorption has been tested in Tanzania. Based on the test, the pasteurization...... system is dimensioned. A functional prototype of the pasteurization facility with a capacity of 200 l milk/hour has been developed and tested. The system is prepared for solar panels as the main energy source and is ready for a test in Tanzania....

  9. Solar Panel based Milk Pasteurization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Pedersen, Tom Søndergaard

    2002-01-01

    This paper treats the subject of analysis, design and development of the control system for a solar panel based milk pasteurization system to be used in small villages in Tanzania. The analysis deals with the demands for an acceptable pasteurization, the varying energy supply and the low cost, low...... complexity, simple user interface and high reliability demands. Based on these demands a concept for the pasteurization system is established and a control system is developed. A solar panel has been constructed and the energy absorption has been tested in Tanzania. Based on the test, the pasteurization...... system is dimensioned. A functional prototype of the pasteurization facility with a capacity of 200 l milk/hour has been developed and tested. The system is prepared for solar panels as the main energy source and is ready for a test in Tanzania....

  10. 76 FR 22805 - Medical Devices; Reclassification of the Topical Oxygen Chamber for Extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ...) submissions to the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel (GPS Panel) for their recommendation on the..., environmental, public health and safety, and other advantages; distributive impacts; and equity). The agency... amended as follows: PART 878--GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES 0 1. The authority citation for 21 CFR...

  11. The "Virtual" Panel: A Computerized Model for LGBT Speaker Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Christopher; Torres-Harding, Susan; Pedersen, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent societal trends indicate more tolerance for homosexuality, but prejudice remains on college campuses. Speaker panels are commonly used in classrooms as a way to educate students about sexual diversity and decrease negative attitudes toward sexual diversity. The advent of computer-delivered instruction presents a unique opportunity to…

  12. A review of sensing technologies for small and large-scale touch panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Humza; Kemao, Qian; Kakarala, Ramakrishna

    2017-06-01

    A touch panel is an input device for human computer interaction. It consists of a network of sensors, a sampling circuit and a micro controller for detecting and locating a touch input. Touch input can come from either finger or stylus depending upon the type of touch technology. These touch panels provide an intuitive and collaborative workspace so that people can perform various tasks with the use of their fingers instead of traditional input devices like keyboard and mouse. Touch sensing technology is not new. At the time of this writing, various technologies are available in the market and this paper reviews the most common ones. We review traditional designs and sensing algorithms for touch technology. We also observe that due to its various strengths, capacitive touch will dominate the large-scale touch panel industry in years to come. In the end, we discuss the motivation for doing academic research on large-scale panels.

  13. Transcranial laser therapy in acute stroke treatment: results of neurothera effectiveness and safety trial 3, a phase III clinical end point device trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Werner; Schellinger, Peter D; Albers, Gregory W; Bornstein, Natan M; Dahlof, Bjorn L; Fulton, Rachael; Kasner, Scott E; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Richieri, Steven P; Dilly, Stephen G; Zivin, Justin; Lees, Kennedy R

    2014-11-01

    On the basis of phase II trials, we considered that transcranial laser therapy could have neuroprotective effects in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We studied transcranial laser therapy in a double-blind, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial intended to enroll 1000 patients with acute ischemic stroke treated ≤24 hours after stroke onset and who did not undergo thrombolytic therapy. The primary efficacy measure was the 90-day functional outcome as assessed by the modified Rankin Scale, with hierarchical Bayesian analysis incorporating relevant previous data. Interim analyses were planned after 300 and 600 patients included. The study was terminated on recommendation by the Data Monitoring Committee after a futility analysis of 566 completed patients found no difference in the primary end point (transcranial laser therapy 140/282 [49.6%] versus sham 140/284 [49.3%] for good functional outcome; modified Rankin Scale, 0-2). The results remained stable after inclusion of all 630 randomized patients (adjusted odds ratio, 1.024; 95% confidence interval, 0.705-1.488). Once the results of the interim futility analysis became available, all study support was immediately withdrawn by the capital firms behind PhotoThera, and the company was dissolved. Proper termination of the trial was difficult but was finally achieved through special efforts by former employees of PhotoThera, the CRO Parexel and members of the steering and the safety committees. We conclude that transcranial laser therapy does not have a measurable neuroprotective effect in patients with acute ischemic stroke when applied within 24 hours after stroke onset. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01120301. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Implementation of a program of quality assurance of image in an imaging system of flat panel portal; Puesta en marcha de un programa de garantia de calidad de imagen en un sistema de imagen portal de panel plano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Sanchez Jimenez, E.; Benitez, J. A.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    (IGRT) image-guided radiation therapy is the one in which images are used to locate the area of treatment. Modern irradiation systems are equipped with different modalities for obtaining images, such as flat panel systems, systems conebeam, tomoimagen, etc. This paper describes the start-up and the experience of a quality assurance program based on a flat panel portal Imaging System. (Author)

  15. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2015-10-20

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  16. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  17. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2018-01-30

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  18. 2010 Panel on the biomaterials grand challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, William Monty; Ratner, Buddy D; Anderson, James; Coury, Art; Hoffman, Allan S; Laurencin, Cato T; Tirrell, David

    2011-02-01

    In 2009, the National Academy for Engineering issued the Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century comprised of 14 technical challenges that must be addressed to build a healthy, profitable, sustainable, and secure global community (http://www.engineeringchallenges.org). Although crucial, none of the NEA Grand Challenges adequately addressed the challenges that face the biomaterials community. In response to the NAE Grand Challenges, Monty Reichert of Duke University organized a panel entitled Grand Challenges in Biomaterials at the at the 2010 Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting in Seattle. Six members of the National Academies-Buddy Ratner, James Anderson, Allan Hoffman, Art Coury, Cato Laurencin, and David Tirrell-were asked to propose a grand challenge to the audience that, if met, would significantly impact the future of biomaterials and medical devices. Successfully meeting these challenges will speed the 60-plus year transition from commodity, off-the-shelf biomaterials to bioengineered chemistries, and biomaterial devices that will significantly advance our ability to address patient needs and also to create new market opportunities. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. 2010 Panel on the Biomaterials Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, William “Monty”; Ratner, Buddy D.; Anderson, James; Coury, Art; Hoffman, Allan S.; Laurencin, Cato T.; Tirrell, David

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the National Academy for Engineering issued the Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century comprised of 14 technical challenges that must be addressed to build a healthy, profitable, sustainable, and secure global community (http://www.engineeringchallenges.org). Although crucial, none of the NEA Grand Challenges adequately addressed the challenges that face the biomaterials community. In response to the NAE Grand Challenges, Monty Reichert of Duke University organized a panel entitled Grand Challenges in Biomaterials at the at the 2010 Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting in Seattle. Six members of the National Academies—Buddy Ratner, James Anderson, Allan Hoffman, Art Coury, Cato Laurencin, and David Tirrell—were asked to propose a grand challenge to the audience that, if met, would significantly impact the future of biomaterials and medical devices. Successfully meeting these challenges will speed the 60-plus year transition from commodity, off-the-shelf biomaterials to bioengineered chemistries, and biomaterial devices that will significantly advance our ability to address patient needs and also to create new market opportunities. PMID:21171147

  20. The NTI-tss device for the therapy of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders, and headache – Where do we stand? A qualitative systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelmann, Henrike; Türp, Jens C

    2008-01-01

    Background The NTI-tss device is an anterior bite stop, which, according to the manufacturer, is indicated for the prevention and treatment of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), tension-type headaches, and migraine. The aim of this systematic review was to appraise the currently available evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of the NTI-tss splint. Methods We performed a systematic search in nine electronic databases and in NTI-tss-associated websites (last update: December 31, 2007). The reference lists of all relevant articles were perused. Five levels of scientific quality were distinguished. Reporting quality of articles about randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was evaluated using the Jadad score. To identify adverse events, we searched in the identified publications and in the MAUDE database. Results Nine of 68 relevant publications reported about the results of five different RCTs. Two RCTs concentrated on electromyographic (EMG) investigations in patients with TMDs and concomitant bruxism (Baad-Hansen et al 2007, Jadad score: 4) or with bruxism alone (Kavaklı 2006, Jadad score: 2); in both studies, compared to an occlusal stabilization splint the NTI-tss device showed significant reduction of EMG activity. Two RCTs focused exclusively on TMD patients; in one trial (Magnusson et al 2004, Jadad score: 3), a stabilization appliance led to greater improvement than an NTI-tss device, while in the other study (Jokstad et al 2005, Jadad score: 5) no difference was found. In one RCT (Shankland 2002, Jadad score: 1), patients with tension-type headache or migraine responded more favorably to the NTI-tss splint than to a bleaching tray. NTI-tss-induced complications related predominantly to single teeth or to the occlusion. Conclusion Evidence from RCTs suggests that the NTI-tss device may be successfully used for the management of bruxism and TMDs. However, to avoid potential unwanted effects, it should be chosen only if certain a patient will be

  1. The NTI-tss device for the therapy of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders, and headache – Where do we stand? A qualitative systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Türp Jens C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NTI-tss device is an anterior bite stop, which, according to the manufacturer, is indicated for the prevention and treatment of bruxism, temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, tension-type headaches, and migraine. The aim of this systematic review was to appraise the currently available evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of the NTI-tss splint. Methods We performed a systematic search in nine electronic databases and in NTI-tss-associated websites (last update: December 31, 2007. The reference lists of all relevant articles were perused. Five levels of scientific quality were distinguished. Reporting quality of articles about randomized controlled trials (RCTs was evaluated using the Jadad score. To identify adverse events, we searched in the identified publications and in the MAUDE database. Results Nine of 68 relevant publications reported about the results of five different RCTs. Two RCTs concentrated on electromyographic (EMG investigations in patients with TMDs and concomitant bruxism (Baad-Hansen et al 2007, Jadad score: 4 or with bruxism alone (Kavaklı 2006, Jadad score: 2; in both studies, compared to an occlusal stabilization splint the NTI-tss device showed significant reduction of EMG activity. Two RCTs focused exclusively on TMD patients; in one trial (Magnusson et al 2004, Jadad score: 3, a stabilization appliance led to greater improvement than an NTI-tss device, while in the other study (Jokstad et al 2005, Jadad score: 5 no difference was found. In one RCT (Shankland 2002, Jadad score: 1, patients with tension-type headache or migraine responded more favorably to the NTI-tss splint than to a bleaching tray. NTI-tss-induced complications related predominantly to single teeth or to the occlusion. Conclusion Evidence from RCTs suggests that the NTI-tss device may be successfully used for the management of bruxism and TMDs. However, to avoid potential unwanted effects, it should be chosen only if certain a

  2. System and Device with Three-Dimensional Image Display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a binocular device (44) and a system (40) including a binocular device (44) configured for displaying one or more labels for an input device (2), such as a keyboard or a control panel, comprising a plurality of parts (4, 6) configured for activation and registration...... by depression. The binocular device (44) is configured for displaying a label of an activation part (4) as a three-dimensional label at the activation part (4)....

  3. Risk-based decisionmaking (Panel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    By means of a panel discussion and extensive audience interaction, explore the current challenges and progress to date in applying risk considerations to decisionmaking related to low-level waste. This topic is especially timely because of the proposed legislation pertaining to risk-based decisionmaking and because of the increased emphasis placed on radiological performance assessments of low-level waste disposal.

  4. Panel: RFID Security and Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kevin

    The panel on RFID security and privacy included Ross Anderson, Jon Callas, Yvo Desmedt, and Kevin Fu. Topics for discussion included the "chip and PIN" EMV payment systems, e-Passports, "mafia" attacks, and RFID-enabled credit cards. Position papers by the panelists appear in the following pages, and the RFID-enabled credit card work appears separately in these proceedings.

  5. EXTREMAL CONTROL FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve DAPHIN TANGUY

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a methodology for extremal control of photovoltaic panels has been designed through the use of an embedded polynomial controller using robust approaches and algorithms. Also, a framework for testing solar trackers in a hard ware in the loop (HIL configuration has been established. Efficient gradient based optimization methods were put in place in order to determine the parameters of the employed photovoltaic panel, as well as for computing the Maximum Power Point (MPP. Further a numerical RST controller has been computed in order to allow the panel to follow the movement of the sun to obtain a maximum energetic efficiency. A robustness analysis and correction procedure has been done on the RST polynomial algorithm. The hardware in the loop configuration allows for the development of a test and development platform which can be used for bringing improvements to the current design and also test different control approaches. For this, a microcontroller based solution was chosen. The achieved performances of the closed loop photovoltaic panel (PP system are validated in simulation using the MATLAB / SIMULINK environment and the WinPim & WinReg dedicated software. As it will be seen further in this paper, the extremal control of this design resides in a sequential set of computations used for obtaining the new Maximum Power Point at each change in the system.

  6. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  7. NAS Panel faults export controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A study prepared by a top-level panel says that current export controls on militarily sensitive U.S. technology may be “overcorrecting” previous weaknesses in that system, resulting in “a complex and confusing control system” that makes it more difficult for U.S. businesses to compete in international markets. Moreover, this control system has “an increasingly corrosive effect” on U.S. relations with allies. The panel recommended that the United States concentrate more effort on bringing about uniformity in the export control policies of countries belonging to the Coordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls (CoCom), i.e., most of the member nations in NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) and Japan.The 21-member panel was appointed by the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), a joint unit of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The panel, composed of administrators, researchers, and former government officials, was chaired by AGU member Lew Allen, Jr., director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, Calif.) and former chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force. Their report was supported by NAS funds, by a number of private organizations (including AGU), by the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and State, by the National Science Foundation, and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. ASIST 2003: Part II: Panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Forty-six panels address topics including women in information science; users and usability; information studies; reference services; information policies; standards; interface design; information retrieval; information networks; metadata; shared access; e-commerce in libraries; knowledge organization; information science theories; digitization;…

  9. Mobile response in web panels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijne, M.A.; Wijnant, A.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates unintended mobile access to surveys in online, probability-based panels. We find that spontaneous tablet usage is drastically increasing in web surveys, while smartphone usage remains low. Further, we analyze the bias of respondent profiles using smartphones and tablets

  10. Large Scale Glazed Concrete Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Anja Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    and finally Lene Tranberg and Bøje Lungård’s Elsinore water purification plant. These buildings have qualities that I would like applied, perhaps transformed or most preferably, if possible, interpreted anew, for the large glazed concrete panels I shall develop. The article is ended and concluded...

  11. The Role of a Mental Model in Learning to Operate a Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieras, David E.; Bovair, Susan

    1984-01-01

    Describes three studies concerned with learning to operate a control panel device and how this learning is affected by understanding a device model that describes its internal mechanism. Results indicate benefits of a device model depend on whether it supports direct inference of exact steps required to operate the device. (Author/MBR)

  12. Retaining Ring Fastener for Solar Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Simple articulating linkage secures solar panels into supporting framework. Five element linkage collapses into W-shape for easy placement into framework, then expands to form rectangle of same dimensions as those of panel.

  13. El Salvador - Rural Electrification - Solar Panels

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — This is a summative qualitative performance evaluation (PE) of the solar panel component of the solar panel component of the RE Sub-Activity. The final report will...

  14. Grounds of two positions photovoltaic panels

    OpenAIRE

    Castán Fortuño, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this Master Thesis is to find the optimum positioning for a two positions photovoltaic panel. Hence, it will be implemented a model in order to optimize the energy of the sun that the photovoltaic panel is receiving by its positioning. Likewise this project will include the comparison with other photovoltaic panel systems as the single position photovoltaics panels. Ultimately, it is also going to be designed a system array for the optimized model of two positions photovoltai...

  15. PV panel model based on datasheet values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso; Teodorescu, Remus; Rodriguez, Pedro

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the construction of a model for a PV panel using the single-diode five-parameters model, based exclusively on data-sheet parameters. The model takes into account the series and parallel (shunt) resistance of the panel. The equivalent circuit and the basic equations of the PV cell....... Based on these equations, a PV panel model, which is able to predict the panel behavior in different temperature and irradiance conditions, is built and tested....

  16. Lightweight composites for modular panelized construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Amol S.

    Rapid advances in construction materials technology have enabled civil engineers to achieve impressive gains in the safety, economy, and functionality of structures built to serve the common needs of society. Modular building systems is a fast-growing modern, form of construction gaining recognition for its increased efficiency and ability to apply modern technology to the needs of the market place. In the modular construction technique, a single structural panel can perform a number of functions such as providing thermal insulation, vibration damping, and structural strength. These multifunctional panels can be prefabricated in a manufacturing facility and then transferred to the construction site. A system that uses prefabricated panels for construction is called a "panelized construction system". This study focuses on the development of pre-cast, lightweight, multifunctional sandwich composite panels to be used for panelized construction. Two thermoplastic composite panels are proposed in this study, namely Composite Structural Insulated Panels (CSIPs) for exterior walls, floors and roofs, and Open Core Sandwich composite for multifunctional interior walls of a structure. Special manufacturing techniques are developed for manufacturing these panels. The structural behavior of these panels is analyzed based on various building design codes. Detailed descriptions of the design, cost analysis, manufacturing, finite element modeling and structural testing of these proposed panels are included in this study in the of form five peer-reviewed journal articles. The structural testing of the proposed panels involved in this study included flexural testing, axial compression testing, and low and high velocity impact testing. Based on the current study, the proposed CSIP wall and floor panels were found satisfactory, based on building design codes ASCE-7-05 and ACI-318-05. Joining techniques are proposed in this study for connecting the precast panels on the construction

  17. SU-F-BRA-16: Development of a Radiation Monitoring Device Using a Low-Cost CCD Camera Following Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, S; Fru, L Che; Desai, V; Lentz, J; Lin, C; Scarpelli, M; Simiele, E; Trestrail, A; Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is now commonplace to handle treatments of hyperthyroidism using iodine-131 as an outpatient procedure due to lower costs and less stringent federal regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has currently updated release guidelines for these procedures, but there is still a large uncertainty in the dose to the public. Current guidelines to minimize dose to the public require patients to remain isolated after treatment. The purpose of this study was to use a low-cost common device, such as a cell phone, to estimate exposure emitted from a patient to the general public. Methods: Measurements were performed using an Apple iPhone 3GS and a Cs-137 irradiator. The charge-coupled device (CCD) camera on the phone was irradiated to exposure rates ranging from 0.1 mR/hr to 100 mR/hr and 30-sec videos were taken during irradiation with the camera lens covered by electrical tape. Interactions were detected as white pixels on a black background in each video. Both single threshold (ST) and colony counting (CC) methods were performed using MATLAB®. Calibration curves were determined by comparing the total pixel intensity output from each method to the known exposure rate. Results: The calibration curve showed a linear relationship above 5 mR/hr for both analysis techniques. The number of events counted per unit exposure rate within the linear region was 19.5 ± 0.7 events/mR and 8.9 ± 0.4 events/mR for the ST and CC methods respectively. Conclusion: Two algorithms were developed and show a linear relationship between photons detected by a CCD camera and low exposure rates, in the range of 5 mR/hr to 100-mR/hr. Future work aims to refine this model by investigating the dose-rate and energy dependencies of the camera response. This algorithm allows for quantitative monitoring of exposure from patients treated with iodine-131 using a simple device outside of the hospital.

  18. 76 FR 56242 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities, The National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Cancellation of panel meeting. Notice is hereby given of the cancellation of the following meeting of the Humanities Panel at the Old...

  19. 77 FR 17102 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities ACTION: Cancellation of Panel Meeting. Notice is hereby given of the cancellation of the following meeting of the Humanities Panel at the Old Post...

  20. Panel 4 - applications to transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Au, J. [Sundstrand Aerospace, Rockford, IL (United States); Bhattacharya, R. [Universal Energy Systems, Inc., Dayton, OH (United States); Bhushan, B. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States); Blunier, D. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States); Boardman, B. [Deere & Co., Moline, IL (United States); Brombolich, L. [Compu-Tec Engineering, Chesterfield, MO (United States); Davidson, J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Graham, M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Hakim, N. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States); Harris, K. [Dubbeldee Harris Diamond Corp., Mt. Arlington, NJ (United States); Hay, R. [Norton Diamond Film, Northboro, MA (United States); Herk, L. [Southwest Research Inst., Southfield, MI (United States); Hojnacki, H.; Rourk, D. [Intelligent Structures Incorporated, Canton, MI (United States); Kamo, R. [Adiabatics, Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Nieman, B. [Allied-Signal Inc., Des Plaines, IL (United States); O`Neill, D. [3M, St. Paul, MN (United States); Peterson, M.B. [Wear Sciences, Arnold, MD (United States); Pfaffenberger, G. [Allison Gas Turbine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Pryor, R.W. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Russell, J. [Superconductivity Publications, Inc., Somerset, NJ (United States); Syniuta, W. [Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Newton, MA (United States); Tamor, M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States); Vojnovich, T. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Yarbrough, W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States); Yust, C.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this group was to compile a listing of current and anticipated future problem areas in the transportation industry where the properties of diamond and DLC films make them especially attractive and where the panel could strongly endorse the establishment of DOE/Transportation Industry cooperative research efforts. This section identifies the problem areas for possible applications of diamond/DLC technology and presents indications of current approaches to these problems.

  1. Paneles de aluminio para cerramiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Perraudin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available La sociedad suiza Grande Dixence, S. A., está construyendo una presa de gran altura, en alta montaña, que lleva el mismo nombre. A fin de acomodar al personal obrero al pie de obra se ha construido una estructura metálica de nueve plantas, cerrada por medio de paneles prefabricados, que, en la parte de fachada, llevan chapa ondulada de aluminio.

  2. 20020113: Rock (1), panel (1)

    OpenAIRE

    None

    2002-01-01

    Rock Art photograph, Panel 1, glyph [cam element='coordinate' qualifier='longitude']W 70deg34'55.9"[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='latitude']S 32deg49'49.0"[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='altitude']924[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='bearing']125[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='inclination']0[/cam][cam element='coordinate' qualifier='cartesian'](1.950,1.640,2.190)[/cam

  3. Keuringspanele ("Screening Panels") as Gepaste ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several objections have been raised by critics in this regard, for instance, a screening panel infringes on: the right of equal protection/the right of access to the courts/the right to a jury trial/the right to a due process as well as on the trias politica doctrine. These so-called infringements are attended to and eventually a positive ...

  4. 77 FR 19293 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    .../AdvisoryCommittees/Calendar/default.htm . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Avena Russell, Center for.... 1535, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-3805, Avena[email protected] , or FDA Advisory Committee...

  5. 77 FR 61768 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Pkwy., Gaithersburg, MD 20877. The hotel's telephone number is 301-977-8900. Contact Person: LCDR Avena...., Bldg. 66, rm. 1535, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-3805, Avena[email protected] , or FDA...

  6. 77 FR 7589 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ...., Gaithersburg, MD 20877. The hotel telephone number is 301-977-8900. Contact Person: Avena Russell, Center for.... 1535, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-3805, Avena[email protected] , or FDA Advisory Committee...

  7. 76 FR 71045 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Perry Pkwy., Gaithersburg, MD 20877. The hotel telephone number is (301) 977-8900. Contact Person: Avena...., Bldg. 66, Rm. 1535, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, Avena[email protected] , (301) 796-3805, or FDA...

  8. 77 FR 68788 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... diverting cardiac output to the cerebral vasculature via partial occlusion of the descending aorta... partial occlusion of the descending aorta, including patients with acute ischemic stroke within 14 hours... endovascular intervention for patients who have failed maximal medical management. Of note, the CoAxia NeuroFlo...

  9. 78 FR 19717 - Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... as phencyclidine (PCP) enzyme immunoassays and PCP radioimmunoassays. PCP enzyme immunoassays and PCP... regulated under the heading of ``Enzyme Immunoassay, Phencyclidine,'' Product Code LCM, and ``Radioimmunoassay, Phencyclidine,'' Product Code LCL, as unclassified under the 510(k) premarket notification...

  10. 77 FR 66847 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ...: (1) Centrifugal type pumps utilize a rotor to impart energy to the blood in an extracorporeal circuit... cardiopulmonary blood pumps for use in cardiopulmonary bypass circuits for periods of up to six hours. Micro... blood pumps for use in cardiopulmonary bypass circuits for periods of up to six hours, but FDA did not...

  11. 78 FR 13350 - Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... eye for visual correction of aphakia and postoperative refractive astigmatism secondary to removal of... spectacles. FDA intends to make background material available to the public no later than 2 business days...

  12. 76 FR 63928 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... patients who meet the following classification: NYHA Functional Class II who remain symptomatic despite... public hearing session, FDA may conduct a lottery to determine the speakers for the scheduled open public...

  13. 78 FR 21129 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ...)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) (21 U.S.C. 360e(b)(2)(B)) requesting a... www.regulations.gov under docket number FDA-2012- N-0378. The prior regulatory history of shortwave...

  14. 75 FR 81282 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... neurological symptoms and >50 percent stenosis of the common or internal carotid artery or patients without neurological symptoms and >80 percent (high risk) or >70 percent (standard risk) stenosis of the common or internal carotid artery and 2. Patients must have a reference vessel diameter within the range of 4.0 and 9...

  15. 78 FR 55081 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... indications for use was studied under the BLOCK HF trial. The trial was a prospective, multisite, randomized... approval application regarding the expansion of indications supported by the BLOCK HF trial to apply to all... Monitoring System. The CardioMEMS HF System is a permanently implantable pressure measurement system designed...

  16. Noise Reduction in Double‿Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‿panel structure. The double‿panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective

  17. Comparisons between various cavity and panel noise reduction control in double-panel structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Kalverboer, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents comparisons between various panel and cavity resonance control methods to reduce the transmitted sound in a double-panel structure. The double-panel, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, has the advantages of low weight and effective transmission-loss at high

  18. Cavity Control and Panel Control Strategies in Double-Panel Structures for Transmitted Noise Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Kalverboer, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation and comparisons of the cavity control and the panel control in a double-panel structure are presented in this paper. The double-panel structure, which comprises two panels with air in the gap, provides the advantages of low sound-transmission at high frequency, low heat-transmission

  19. Panel Resonance Control and Cavity Control in Double-Panel Structures for Active Noise Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of panel resonance control and cavity control in a double-panel structure is presented in this paper. The double-panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its low

  20. Panel urges cloning ethics boards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, E.

    1997-01-03

    A 7-month review of the system that guides U.S. policy on the ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project has concluded that it is time for a radical overhaul. A report completed last month recommends that a high-level policy board be created in the office of the Secretary of Health and Human Services to help develop policies on such sensitive issues as genetic privacy, antidiscrimination legislation, public education on genetic risks, and the regulation of genetic testing. If accepted, the proposal-from a review panel chaired by attorney Mark Rothstein of the University of Houston and geneticist M. Anne Spence of the University of California, Irvine-would create a new panel of 15 to 18 members to serve as {open_quotes}a public forum for discussion of ... critical issues.{close_quotes} This panel would replace the current advisory body, known as the ELSI Working Group, and end what the report calls a {open_quotes}discordance{close_quotes} between the broad scope of the Working Group and the {open_quotes}very limited focus{close_quotes} of the research program under which it operates.

  1. [Innovation of characteristic medicinal cupping devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianping; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Jianmei; Xu, Xinchun; Niu, Yanxia; Cai, Jun

    2015-08-01

    To compare the differences in the characteristic medicinal cupping therapy between the traditional cupping device and the innovated cupping device. Fifty patients of neck and low back pain were selected. The self-comparison was adopted. The cupping therapy was applied to the acupoints located on the left or right side with the traditional cupping device and the innovated cupping device. The cupping sites were centered at bilateral Quyuan (SI 13) and Dachangshu (BL 25). The cups were retained for 10 min. The traditional cupping device was the glass with smooth border, 100mL. The innovated cupping device was the vacuum-sucking cup. The operative time, medicinal leakage, comfort and cupping marks were observed for the two different cupping devices. The operative time with the innovated medicinal cupping device was shorter obviously compared with the traditional one at Quyuan (SI 13) and Dachangshu (BL 25, both Pcupping device was remarkably improved as compared with the traditional one at the two acupoints (both Pcupping operation (both P>0. 05). The cupping marks with the innovated medicinal cupping device were much deeper than those with the traditional one after cupping therapy. The innovated cupping device is more convenent and comfortable in operation during the characteristic medicinal cupping therapy.

  2. Ferroelectric devices

    CERN Document Server

    Uchino, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Updating its bestselling predecessor, Ferroelectric Devices, Second Edition assesses the last decade of developments-and setbacks-in the commercialization of ferroelectricity. Field pioneer and esteemed author Uchino provides insight into why this relatively nascent and interdisciplinary process has failed so far without a systematic accumulation of fundamental knowledge regarding materials and device development.Filling the informational void, this collection of information reviews state-of-the-art research and development trends reflecting nano and optical technologies, environmental regulat

  3. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  4. SU-F-T-163: Improve Proton Therapy Efficiency: Report of a Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Flanz, J [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Pankuch, M; Kreydick, B [Northwestern Medicine Proton Center, Warrenville, IL (United States); Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Robison, B; Schreuder, A [Provision Healthcare Partners, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The technology of proton therapy, especially the pencil beam scanning technique, is evolving very quickly. However, the efficiency of proton therapy seems to lag behind conventional photon therapy. The purpose of the abstract is to report on the findings of a workshop on improvement of QA, planning and treatment efficiency in proton therapy. Methods: A panel of physicists, clinicians, and vendor representatives from over 18 institutions in the United States and internationally were convened in Knoxville, Tennessee in November, 2015. The panel discussed several topics on how to improve proton therapy efficiency, including 1) lean principle and failure mode and effects analysis, 2) commissioning and machine QA, 3) treatment planning, optimization and evaluation, 4) patient positioning and IGRT, 5) vendor liaison and machine availability, and 6) staffing, education and training. Results: The relative time needed for machine QA, treatment planning & check in proton therapy was found to range from 1 to 2.5 times of that in photon therapy. Current status in proton QA, planning and treatment was assessed. Key areas for efficiency improvement, such as elimination of unnecessary QA items or steps and development of efficient software or hardware tools, were identified. A white paper to summarize our findings is being written. Conclusion: It is critical to improve efficiency by developing reliable proton beam lines, efficient software tools on treatment planning, optimization and evaluation, and dedicated proton QA device. Conscious efforts and collaborations from both industry leaders and proton therapy centers are needed to achieve this goal and further advance the technology of proton therapy.

  5. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device intended to permit an...

  6. Long-term benefit of transoral incisionless fundoplication using the esophyx device for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease responsive to medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Gerasimos; Viazis, Nikos; Kotsikoros, Nikolaos; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Lala, Eythymia; Theocharis, Loukas; Fassaris, Andreas; Manolakopoulos, Spilios

    2017-02-01

    Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) using the EsophyX device has been shown to be effective and safe in patients with Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); however, the subset of patients that would mostly benefit from this technique remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of the TIF procedure in patients with a history of esophagitis or proven chronic GERD who have achieved symptom control with the administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) but did not wish to continue receiving medications for life. Forty-five patients with typical GERD symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain) and a history of esophagitis grade A and B or proven GERD by esophageal pH monitoring underwent TIF using Esophyx. Patients with eosphagitis C and D or those with large hiatal hernias (>2 cm in length) were excluded. The primary clinical effectiveness measure was GERD symptom elimination at follow up based on normalization of the GERD health related quality of life (GERD-HRQL) questionnaire. After a median follow up period of 59 months (36-75) the median GERD-HRQL scores improved significantly from 27 (2-45) at baseline to 4 (0-26) (P < 0.001) in the 44 patients completing the study. Heartburn was eliminated in 12 out of the 21 patients included (57.1%), regurgitation was eliminated in 15 out of the 17 patients included (88.2%) and finally chest pain was eliminated in 5 patients out of the six patients included (83.3%). Overall, 32 patients out of the 44 patients (72.7%) that completed the study follow up reported elimination of their main symptom, without the need for PPI administration (none PPI usage). Furthermore, six more patients (13.6%), five with heartburn, and one with regurgitation reported half PPI dose taken for <50% of the preceding follow up period (occasional PPI usage), while six more patients (four with heartburn, one with regurgitation, and one with chest pain) reported full or half PPI dose taken

  7. 77 FR 13172 - Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration... Information Development Advisory Panel Chair and subcommittee reports; public comment; panel discussion and... Officer, Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel. BILLING CODE 4191-02-P ...

  8. 75 FR 41919 - Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration... Information System Development (OID) project activities and the proposed integration with Panel milestones... further information should contact the Panel staff at: Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel...

  9. Flat panel display - Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu [Advanced Technology Planning, Sumitomo Eaton Nova Corporation, SBS Tower 9F, 10-1, Yoga 4-chome, Setagaya-ku, 158-0097 Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: suzuki_tsh@senova.co.jp

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  10. Molecular panel for detection of sepsis-related microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leslie Ecker; Dalposso, Karilene; Hackbarth, Bruna Barbosa; Gonçalves, Anderson R; Westphal, Glauco Adrieno; França, Paulo Henrique Condeixa de; Pinho, Mauro de Souza Leite

    2011-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response related to high mortality rates in the hospital environment. Delayed etiological diagnosis and inadequate antimicrobial therapy are associated with treatment failures. Molecular tests based on polymerase chain reaction are regarded as faster and more accurate procedures than culture techniques for microbial identification, providing a higher rate of therapeutic success. To develop a panel of primers for DNA fragments of sepsis-related microorganisms. Primers for amplification of Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida spp. were designed and tested for sensitivity and specificity on the basis of their respective standard strains. The intended specificity was obtained for P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and Candida spp primers. Sensitivity tests showed a threshold for detection from 5 ng to 500 fg in blood samples contaminated with microbial DNA. The molecular panel presented offers the advantage of a flexible 'open' system when compared to other multiplex detection methods.

  11. Hypercholesterolemia. The NCEP Adult Treatment Panel III Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John M; Capuzzi, David M

    2003-08-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. Therefore, its treatment and prevention is vital to improving the length and quality of life for the geriatric population at large. Clinical trial data have demonstrated that patients age 65 and older derive the same benefit from blood cholesterol reduction as younger adults. As a result, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) recommends appropriate therapeutic lifestyle changes and drug therapy for older individuals with established CHD or for those at high risk for CHD. Drug therapy in this population, while safe, requires careful monitoring and dose adjustment due to potentially altered drug metabolism and concomitant medications. These factors lead to use of lower starting doses of lipid-lowering medications in older patients. Prudent individualized evaluation and customized therapy provide optimal cardiovascular outcomes.

  12. Numerical prediction of the non-linear behaviour of perforated metal shear panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Formisano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Steel plate shear walls (SPSWs are innovative systems able to confer to either new or existing structures a significant capacity to resist earthquake and wind loads. Many tests have shown that these devices may exhibit high strength, initial stiffness and ductility, as well as an excellent ability to dissipate energy. When full SPSWs are used as bracing devices of buildings, they may induce excessive stresses in the surrounding main structure where they are inserted, so to require the adoption of large cross section profiles. For this reason, perforated steel panels, which are weakened by holes aiming at limiting the actions transmitted to the surrounding frame members, represent a valid alternative to full panels. In this work, aiming at showing the advantages of such devices, a FEM model of perforated panels has been calibrated on the basis of recent experimental tests. Subsequently, a parametric FEM analysis on different series of perforated panels, by changing the number and diameter of the holes, the plate thickness and the metal material, has been carried out. Finally, the achieved numerical results have been used to set up design charts to correctly estimate the strength and stiffness of perforated metal shear panels.

  13. Identification device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-Shian; Su, Chih-Chieh; Chou, Ta-Hsin; Wu, Mount-Learn; Lai, Chieh-Lung; Hsu, Che-Lung; Lan, Hsiao-Chin; Huang, Hung-I.; Liu, Yung-Chih; Tu, Zong-Ru; Lee, Chien-Chieh; Chang, Jenq-Yang

    2007-09-01

    In this Letter, the identification device disclosed in the present invention is comprised of: a carrier and a plurality of pseudo-pixels; wherein each of the plural pseudo-pixels is formed on the carrier and is further comprised of at least a light grating composed of a plurality of light grids. In a preferred aspect, each of the plural light grids is formed on the carrier while spacing from each other by an interval ranged between 50nm and 900nm. As the aforesaid identification device can present specific colors and patterns while it is being viewed by naked eye with respect to a specific viewing angle, the identification device is preferred for security and anti-counterfeit applications since the specific colors and patterns will become invisible when it is viewed while deviating from the specific viewing angle.

  14. Report on Multiphase Flow Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on a multiphase flow panel. The topics include: 1) Discussion of Priorities; 2) Critical Issues Reduced Gravity Instabilities; 3) Severely Limiting Phase Separation; 4) Severely-Limiting Phase Change; 5) Enhancements; 6) Awareness Instabilities; 7) Awareness; 8) Methods of Resolution; 9) 2008 Space Flight; 10) 2003-2008 Ground-Based Microgravity Facilities; 11) 2003-2008 Other; 12) 2009-2015 Space Flight; 13) 2009-2015 Ground-Based Microgravity Facilities; 14) 2009-2015 Other; and 15) 2016.

  15. Microclimate boxes for panel paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadum, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    The use of microclimate boxes to protect vulnerable panel paintings is, therefore, not a new phenomenon of the past two or three decades. Rather, it has been a concern for conservators and curators to protect these objects of art at home and in transit since the end of the nineteenth century....... The increased number of travelling exhibitions in recent years has heightened the need to protect paintings during circulation (Thomson 1961; Mecklenburg 1991). The use and design of microclimate boxes have been evolving since 1892. These boxes may be divided into three broad groups: those using an active...

  16. Inspection of panel paintings beneath gilded finishes using terahertz time-domain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Cosentino, Antonino; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2014-01-01

    Scientific analysis of panel paintings could provide key information to art historians and conservators about the composition and condition of the constituent layers. Knowledge of the structure, stratigraphy, and condition of the subsurface layers of these objects is highly relevant to conservation...... of subsurface 3D images and stratigraphic images (B-scans). The technique is contactless and non-invasive, and has been successfully applied to investigation of panel paintings. Regarding gilded panel paintings, the extremely high reflectivity of metals at submillimeter wavelengths generally precludes...... in the terahertz range, due to the skin effect. The thickness of gold leaf, a fraction of a micrometer, matches the skin depth of gold in the terahertz frequency range covered by THz-TDI devices. We therefore investigated and imaged subsurface features of panel paintings through gilded finishes with THz...

  17. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption......A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect...... of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well...

  18. Optimum design of composite panel with photovoltaic-thermo module. Absorbing effect of cooling panel; Hikari netsu fukugo panel no saiteki sekkei. Reikyaku panel no kyunetsu koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Kikuchi, S.; Tani, T. [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Kadotani, K.; Imaizumi, H. [Komatsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    The composite panel with photovoltaic-thermo module becomes higher in energy-saving than the conventional air-conditioning system by the independent radiational heating and cooling effect obtained when the generating panel using a solar cell module is combined with the heating and cooling panel using a thermo-element module. The output of a solar cell module can be directly used because the solar cell module operates in AC. This paper reports the relation between the absorbed value and power consumption of the cooling panel, while paying attention to the cooling panel. The performance coefficient of the maximum absorbed value from an non-absorbing substance to a cooling panel is 2 to 3. Assume that the cooling panel during non-adiabatic operation is operated using a solar cell module of 800 W/m{sup 2} in solar intensity and 15% in conversion efficiency. The cooling-surface temperature difference is 12.12 K, and the maximum absorbed value of a non-absorbing substance to a cooling panel is 39.12 W/m{sup 2}. The absorbed value of the outer temperature to the cooling panel is 74.4 W/m{sup 2}, and each performance coefficient is 3.26 and 0.62. The absorbed value must be calculated for evaluation from the cooling-surface temperature difference measured directly from the cooling panel. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  20. Medical Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Mahieu, H.F.; Geertsema, A.A.; Hermann, I.F.; van Horn, J.R.; Hummel, J. Marjan; van Loon, J.P.; Mihaylov, D.; van der Plaats, A.; Schraffordt Koops, H.; Schutte, H.K.; Veth, R.P.H.; de Vries, M.P.; Rakhorst, G.; Shi, Donglu

    2004-01-01

    The development of new medical devices is a very time-consuming and costly process. Besides the time between the initial idea and the time that manufacturing and testing of prototypes takes place, the time needed for the development of production facilities, production of test series, marketing,

  1. Printing Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.J.; Markies, P.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2014-01-01

    An ink jetprinting device includes a pressure chamber formed by a plurality of wall segments, a first aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink jet orifice and a second aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink supply duct. The pressure

  2. Portable Source Identification Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.; Gervais, Kevin L.

    2005-08-01

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the primary enforcement agency protecting the nation’s ports of entry. CBP is enhancing its capability to interdict the illicit import of nuclear and radiological materials and devices that may be used by terrorists. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing scientific and technical support to CBP in their goal to enable rapid deployment of nuclear and radiation detection systems at U. S. ports of entry to monitor 100% of the incoming international traffic and cargo while not adversely impacting the operations or throughput of the ports. As the deployment of radiation detection systems proceeds, there is a need to adapt the baseline radiation portal monitor (RPM) system technology to operations at these diverse ports of entry. When screening produces an alarm in the primary inspection RPM, the alarming vehicle is removed from the flow of commerce and the alarm is typically confirmed in a secondary inspection RPM. The portable source identification device (PSID) is a radiation sensor panel (RSP), based on thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detector and gamma spectroscopic analysis hardware and software, mounted on a scissor lift on a small truck. The lift supports a box containing a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) sodium iodide detector that provides real-time isotopic identification, including neutron detectors to interdict Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and radiation dispersion devices (RDD). The scissor lift will lower the detectors to within a foot off the ground and raise them to approximately 24 feet in the air, allowing a wide vertical scanning range.

  3. Portable source identification device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.; Gervais, Kevin L.

    2005-05-01

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the primary enforcement agency protecting the nation"s ports of entry. CBP is enhancing its capability to interdict the illicit import of nuclear and radiological materials and devices that may be used by terrorists. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing scientific and technical support to CBP in their goal to enable rapid deployment of nuclear and radiation detection systems at U. S. ports of entry to monitor 100% of the incoming international traffic and cargo while not adversely impacting the operations or throughput of the ports. As the deployment of radiation detection systems proceeds, there is a need to adapt the baseline radiation portal monitor (RPM) system technology to operations at these diverse ports of entry. When screening produces an alarm in the primary inspection RPM, the alarming vehicle is removed from the flow of commerce and the alarm is typically confirmed in a secondary inspection RPM. The portable source identification device (PSID) is a radiation sensor panel (RSP), based on thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detector and gamma spectroscopic analysis hardware and software, mounted on a scissor lift on a small truck. The lift supports a box containing a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) sodium iodide detector that provides real-time isotopic identification, including neutron detectors to interdict Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and radiation dispersion devices (RDD). The scissor lift will lower the detectors to within a foot off the ground and raise them to approximately 24 feet (7.3 m) in the air, allowing a wide vertical scanning range.

  4. Naturopathic Oncology Modified Delphi Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jacob; Hodsdon, Wendy; Schor, Jacob; McKinney, Neil; Rubin, Daniel; Seely, Dugald; Parmar, Gurdev; Birdsall, Tim; Alschuler, Lise; Lamson, Davis; Birdsall, Shauna; Zwickey, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Naturopathic oncology is a relatively new and emerging field capable of providing professional integrative or alternative services to cancer patients. Foundational research is critical to identify topics in the clinical and research development of naturopathic oncology for future growth of the field. This study implements a modified Delphi protocol to develop expert consensus regarding ethics, philosophy, and research development in naturopathic oncology. The modified protocol implements a nomination process to select a panel of 8 physicians and to assist in question formulation. The protocol includes an in-person discussion of 6 questions with multiple iterations to maintain the concept of the Delphi methodology as well as a postdiscussion consensus survey. The protocol identified, ranked, and established consensus for numerous themes per question. Underlying key topics include integration with conventional medicine, evidence-based medicine, patient education, patient safety, and additional training requirements for naturopathic oncologists. The systematic nomination and questioning of a panel of experts provides a foundational and educational resource to assist in clarification of clinical ethics, philosophy, and research development in the emerging field of naturopathic oncology. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Volumetry of human molars with flat panel-based volume CT in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannig, C.; Krieger, E.; Dullin, C.; Merten, H.A.; Attin, T.; Grabbe, E.; Heidrich, G.

    2006-01-01

    The flat panel-based volume computed tomography (fpVCT) is a new CT device applicable for experimental, three-dimensional evaluation of teeth at a resolution of about 150 microm in the high contrast region. The aim of this study was to investigate whether fpVCT was suitable for quantification of the

  6. Microcontroller-based system for analyzing and characterizing solar panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbar, Muhandis Abdul, E-mail: muhandis.abdul@sci.ui.ac.id; Prawito [System and Instrumentation, Departemen Fisika, FMIPA Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    A solar cell is one of many alternative energy which is still being developed and it works by converting sunlight into electricity. In order to use a solar cell, a deep knowledge about the solar cell’s characteristics is needed. The current and voltage (I-V) produced when the light hits the solar cell surface with a certain value of intensity and at a certain value of temperature becomes the basic study to determine solar cell characteristics. In the past decade, there were so many developments of devices to characterize solar cells and solar panels. One of them used a MOSFET device for varying electronic load to observe solar cell current and voltage responses. However, many devices which have been developed even device on the market using many expensive tools and quite complex. Therefore in this research, a simple low cost electronic controlled device for solar cell characterization is built based on MOSFET method and a microcontroller but still has high reliability and accuracy.

  7. Solar-Panel Dust Accumulation and Cleanings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Air-fall dust accumulates on the solar panels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers, reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the solar arrays. Pre-launch models predicted steady dust accumulation. However, the rovers have been blessed with occasional wind events that clear significant amounts of dust from the solar panels. This graph shows the effects of those panel-cleaning events on the amount of electricity generated by Spirit's solar panels. The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after Spirit's Jan. 4, 2005, (Universal Time) landing on Mars. The vertical scale indicates output from the rover's solar panels as a fraction of the amount produced when the clean panels first opened. Note that the gradual declines are interrupted by occasional sharp increases, such as a dust-cleaning event on sol 420.

  8. Geothermal Technologies Program Blue Ribbon Panel Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-06-17

    The Geothermal Technologies Program assembled a geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel on March 22-23, 2011 in Albuquerque, New Mexico for a guided discussion on the future of geothermal energy in the United States and the role of the DOE Program. The Geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel Report captures the discussions and recommendations of the experts. An addendum is available here: http://www.eere.energy.gov/geothermal/pdfs/gtp_blue_ribbon_panel_report_addendum10-2011.pdf

  9. SU-F-T-587: Quality Assurance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Patient Specific Plans: A Comparison Between MATRIXX and Delta4 QA Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, YC; Lu, SH; Chen, LH; Kuo, SH; Wang, CW [National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific quality assurance (QA) is necessary to accurately deliver high dose radiation to the target, especially for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Unlike previous 2 dimensional (D) array QA devices, Delta{sup 4} can verify the dose delivery in 3D. In this study, the difference between calculated and measured dose distribution was compared with two QA devices (MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4}) to evaluate the delivery accuracy. Methods: Twenty-seven SRS/SBRT plans with VMAT were verified with point-dose and dose-map analysis. We use an ion chamber (A1SL, 0.053cc) for point-dose measurement. For verification of the dose map, the differences between the calculated and measured doses were analyzed with a gamma index using MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4} devices. The passing criteria for gamma evaluation were set at 3 mm for distance-to-agreement (DTA) and 3% for dose-difference. A gamma index less than 1 was defined as the verification passing the criteria and satisfying at least 95% of the points. Results: The mean prescribed dose and fraction was 40 ± 14.41 Gy (range: 16–60) and 10 ± 2.35 fractions (range: 1–8), respectively. In point dose analysis, the differences between the calculated and measured doses were all less than 5% (mean: 2.12 ± 1.13%; range: −0.55% to 4.45%). In dose-map analysis, the average passing rates were 99.38 ± 0.96% (range: 95.31–100%) and 100 ± 0.12% (range: 99.5%–100%) for MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4}, respectively. Even using criteria of 2%/2 mm, the passing rate of Delta{sup 4} was still more than 95% (mean: 99 ± 1.08%; range: 95.6%–100%). Conclusion: Both MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4} offer accurate and efficient verification for SRS/SBRT plans. The results measured by MATRIXX and Delta{sup 4} dosimetry systems are similar for SRS/SBRT performed with the VMAT technique.

  10. Uncertainties in predicting solar panel power output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspaugh, B.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of calculating solar panel power output at launch and during a space mission is considered. The major sources of uncertainty and error in predicting the post launch electrical performance of the panel are considered. A general discussion of error analysis is given. Examples of uncertainty calculations are included. A general method of calculating the effect on the panel of various degrading environments is presented, with references supplied for specific methods. A technique for sizing a solar panel for a required mission power profile is developed.

  11. Development of Electrostatically Clean Solar Array Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    Certain missions require Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) panels to establish a favorable environment for the operation of sensitive scientific instruments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ECSA panel that minimizes panel surface potential below 100mV in LEO and GEO charged particle environments, prevents exposure of solar cell voltage and panel insulating surfaces to the ambient environment, and provides an equipotential, grounded structure surrounding the entire panel. An ECSA panel design was developed that uses a Front Side Aperture-Shield (FSA) that covers all inter-cell areas with a single graphite composite laminate, composite edge clips for connecting the FSA to the panel substrate, and built-in tabs that interconnect the FSA to conductive coated coverglasses using a conductive adhesive. Analysis indicated the ability of the design to meet the ECSA requirements. Qualification coupons and a 0.5m x 0.5m prototype panel were fabricated and tested for photovoltaic performance and electrical grounding before and after exposure to acoustic and thermal cycling environments. The results show the feasibility of achieving electrostatic cleanliness with a small penalty in mass, photovoltaic performance and cost, with a design is structurally robust and compatible with a wide range of current solar panel technologies.

  12. Interagency Security Classification Appeals Panel (ISCAP) Decisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — This online collection includes documents decided upon by the Interagency Security Classification Appeals Panel (ISCAP) starting in Fiscal Year 2012. The documents...

  13. Orbiter radiator panel solar focusing test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, H. R.; Rankin, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Test data are presented which define the area around the Orbiter radiator panels for which the solar reflections are concentrated to one-sun or more. The concave shape of the panels and their specular silver/Teflon coating causes focusing of the reflected solar energy which could have adverse heating effects on equipment or astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) in the vicinity of the radiator panels. A room ambient test method was utilized with a one-tenth scale model of the radiator panels.

  14. Guía terapéutica del Dispositivo Grupos de Terapia Focalizada- GTF para adolescentes violentos Therapeutic guide of the Focalised Therapy Group device - FTG for violent adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Quiroga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available En el Programa de Psicología Clínica para Adolescentes, Sede Regional Sur, UBA se creó un dispositivo diagnóstico-terapéutico denominado Grupo de Terapia Focalizada-GTF. Este dispositivo consiste en la conformación de grupos cerrados, con temática focalizada y orientación psicodinámica que constan de diez sesiones de una vez por semana de una hora y media de duración. En este trabajo presentaremos: 1- la importancia del desarrollo de guías clínicas a nivel internacional, 2- la caracterización intrapsíquica e intersubjetiva de los adolescentes violentos y las dificultades que presentan para los abordajes terapéuticos psicodinámicos clásicos. 3- las características del dispositivo GTF, 4- la guía terapéutica del dispositivo GTF que incluye los objetivos específicos, el desarrollo de los mismos y la técnica específica para cada una de las sesiones. Esta guía terapéutica fue aplicada a 9 GTF para adolescentes tempranos violentos. El Análisis de Resultados y Proceso Terapéutico de esta muestra a la que se aplicó la guía permite pensar que este dispositivo con objetivos predeterminados y con actividades específicas para cada una de las sesiones, constituye un marco de contención estable en contrasposición a la realidad disruptiva, cambiante y con alto riesgo psicosocial en la que viven estos adolescentes.Within the framework of the Program of Clinical Psychology for Adolescents, Southern Branch of the School of Psychology, UBA, a diagnostic-therapeutic device called Focalised Therapy Group- FTG has been created. This device involves forming closed groups with focalised topics and psychodynamic orientation, which consists of ten sessions that last an hour and a half each and are held once a week. In this research work we will present: 1- the importance of developing a clinic guide at an international level; 2- the intrapsychic and intersubjective description of the violent adolescents and the dificulties they have to be

  15. Laser device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  16. "Distinvar" device

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The alignment of one of the accelerator magnets being checked by the AR Division survey group. A "distinvar" device, invented by the group, using calibrated invar wires stretched between the fixed survey pillar (on the left) and a fixed point on the magnet. In two days it is thus possible to measure the alignment of the 100 magnets with an accuracy better than 1/10.

  17. Use of precast concrete deck panels : summary of research panel types I, II, and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using precast concrete deck panels in place of traditional formwork for AASHTO girder type bridges. The precast deck panels span between girders, support the weight of a topping sla...

  18. The Conservation of Panel paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Until the early 17th century almost all portable paintings were created on wood supports, including masterpieces by famous painters, ranging from Giotto to Dürer to Rembrandt. The structural conservation of these paintings requires specific knowledge and skills as the supports are susceptible...... to damage caused by unstable environmental conditions. Unfortunately, past structural interventions often caused significant damage due to insufficient knowledge of the behaviour of the wood panels, glue and paint layers. Over the last fifty years, the field has developed treatment strategies based...... on interdisciplinary collaboration and on the knowledge of specialist conservators. Most current conservation protocols rely on empirical knowledge of conservators and are not necessarily based on a scientific understanding of the nature and behaviour of wood and paint layers. In order to move the field forward...

  19. AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTORTECHNICAL PANEL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D.J.; Bajorek, S.; Bakel, A.; Flanagan, G.; Mubayi, V.; Skarda, R.; Staudenmeier, J.; Taiwo, T.; Tonoike, K.; Tripp, C.; Wei, T.; Yarsky, P.

    2010-12-03

    Considerable interest has been expressed for developing a stable U.S. production capacity for medical isotopes and particularly for molybdenum- 99 (99Mo). This is motivated by recent re-ductions in production and supply worldwide. Consistent with U.S. nonproliferation objectives, any new production capability should not use highly enriched uranium fuel or targets. Conse-quently, Aqueous Homogeneous Reactors (AHRs) are under consideration for potential 99Mo production using low-enriched uranium. Although the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has guidance to facilitate the licensing process for non-power reactors, that guidance is focused on reactors with fixed, solid fuel and hence, not applicable to an AHR. A panel was convened to study the technical issues associated with normal operation and potential transients and accidents of an AHR that might be designed for isotope production. The panel has produced the requisite AHR licensing guidance for three chapters that exist now for non-power reactor licensing: Reac-tor Description, Reactor Coolant Systems, and Accident Analysis. The guidance is in two parts for each chapter: 1) standard format and content a licensee would use and 2) the standard review plan the NRC staff would use. This guidance takes into account the unique features of an AHR such as the fuel being in solution; the fission product barriers being the vessel and attached systems; the production and release of radiolytic and fission product gases and their impact on operations and their control by a gas management system; and the movement of fuel into and out of the reactor vessel.

  20. Fixture for assembling solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, P. A.; Fritz, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Vacuum fixture attaches array of silicon solar cells to mounting plate made of clear glass which holds and protects cells. Glass plate transmits, rather than absorbs, solar energy thus cooling cells for efficient operation. Device therefore reduces handling of cells and interconnecting conductors to one operation.

  1. Repeated buckling of composite shear panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Josef; Weller, Tanchum

    1990-01-01

    Failures in service of aerospace structures and research at the Technion Aircraft Structures Laboratory have revealed that repeatedly buckled stiffened shear panels might be susceptible to premature fatigue failures. Extensive experimental and analytical studies have been performed at Technion on repeated buckling, far in excess of initial buckling, for both metal and composite shear panels with focus on the influence of the surrounding structure. The core of the experimental investigation consisted of repeated buckling and postbuckling tests on Wagner beams in a three-point loading system under realistic test conditions. The effects of varying sizes of stiffeners, of the magnitude of initial buckling loads, of the panel aspect ratio and of the cyclic shearing force, V sub cyc, were studied. The cyclic to critical shear buckling ratios, (V sub cyc/V sub cr) were on the high side, as needed for efficient panel design, yet all within possible flight envelopes. The experiments were supplemented by analytical and numerical analyses. For the metal shear panels the test and numerical results were synthesized into prediction formulas, which relate the life of the metal shear panels to two cyclic load parameters. The composite shear panels studied were hybrid beams with graphite/epoxy webs bonded to aluminum alloy frames. The test results demonstrated that composite panels were less fatigue sensitive than comparable metal ones, and that repeated buckling, even when causing extensive damage, did not reduce the residual strength by more than 20 percent. All the composite panels sustained the specified fatigue life of 250,000 cycles. The effect of local unstiffened holes on the durability of repeatedly buckled shear panels was studied for one series of the metal panels. Tests on 2024 T3 aluminum panels with relatively small unstiffened holes in the center of the panels demonstrated premature fatigue failure, compared to panels without holes. Preliminary tests on two graphite

  2. Optimal management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Highlights from a European Expert Consensus Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Fitzpatrick (John); J. Bellmunt (Joaquim); K. Fizazi (Karim); A. Heidenreich (Axel); C.N. Sternberg (Cora); B. Tombal (Bertrand); A. Alcaraz (Antonio); A. Bahl (Amit); S. Bracarda (Sergio); G. Di Lorenzo (Giuseppe); E. Efstathiou (Eleni); S.P. Finn (Stephen); S.D. Fossa (Sophie); S. Gillessen (Silke); P.-L. Kellokumpu-Lehtinen (Pirkko-Liisa); F.E. Lecouvet (Frédéric); S. Oudard (Stéphane); T.M. de Reijke (Theo); C.N. Robson (Craig); M. de Santis (Maria); B. Seruga (Bostjan); R. de Wit (Ronald)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe exponential growth of novel therapies for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) over the last decade has created an acute need for education and guidance of clinicians regarding optimal strategies for patient management. A multidisciplinary panel of

  3. Outgassing tests on iras solar panel samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premat, G.; Zwaal, A.; Pennings, N. H.

    1980-01-01

    Several outgassing tests were carried out on representative solar panel samples in order to determine the extent of contamination that could be expected from this source. The materials for the construction of the solar panels were selected as a result of contamination obtained in micro volatile condensable materials tests.

  4. Air loads on solar panels during launch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, W.M.; van der Hoogt, Peter; Spiering, R.M.E.J.; Tijdeman, H.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamical behaviour of solar panels during launch is significantly affected by the thin layers of air trapped between the panels. For narrow gaps the air manifests itself not only as a considerable added mass, but its viscosity can result in a substantial amount of damping. A model has been

  5. Research challenges for energy data management (panel)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lehner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    This panel paper aims at initiating discussion at the Second International Workshop on Energy Data Management (EnDM 2013) about the important research challenges within Energy Data Management. The authors are the panel organizers, extra panelists will be recruited before the workshop...

  6. 76 FR 1462 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of additional meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory... Humanities Panel will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20506...

  7. 76 FR 41826 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... Humanities Panel will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20506... Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals...

  8. 76 FR 77559 - Meeting of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meeting of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Humanities Panel will...

  9. 75 FR 6729 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), notice is hereby given that the following meetings of Humanities Panels... Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised that...

  10. 76 FR 14434 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant... hereby given that the following meetings of Humanities Panels will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100...

  11. 76 FR 70168 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... Humanities Panel will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20506. FOR... Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals...

  12. 76 FR 27671 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of additional meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory... Humanities Panel will be held via telephone conference call from the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania...

  13. 76 FR 20375 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... Humanities Panel will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20506... Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals...

  14. 78 FR 69455 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that twelve meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held... and Humanities Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 951-960, as amended). DATES: See SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  15. 75 FR 63514 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), notice is hereby given that the following meetings of Humanities Panels... Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised that...

  16. 77 FR 48552 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that 10 meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held during... recommendation of applications for financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities...

  17. 77 FR 75198 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that 4 meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held during... recommendation of applications for financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities...

  18. 77 FR 37073 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-15087] NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to...-four meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held during July 2012, as follows. The purpose of the...

  19. 76 FR 59173 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... Humanities Panel will be held via telephone conference call from the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania... Committee Management Officer, National Endowment for the Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202...

  20. 76 FR 52697 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), notice is hereby given that the following meetings of Humanities Panels... Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised that...

  1. 78 FR 74174 - Humanities Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Humanities Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Charter Renewal for Humanities Panel Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: Pursuant to... CFR 102-3.65, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) gives notice that the Charter for the...

  2. 75 FR 70032 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities... (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), notice is hereby given that the following meetings of Humanities Panels... Humanities, Washington, DC 20506; telephone (202) 606-8322. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised that...

  3. 78 FR 22345 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. . ACTION: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to... meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held during May, 2013 as follows. The purpose of the meetings is...

  4. 78 FR 74175 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that three meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held... and Humanities Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 951-960, as amended). DATES: See SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  5. 77 FR 68153 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: National Endowment for the Humanities... (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that 10 meetings of the Humanities Panel will be held during... recommendation of applications for financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities...

  6. 76 FR 70765 - Meetings of Humanities Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Meetings of Humanities Panel AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the... the following meetings of Humanities Panels will be held at the Old Post Office, 1100 Pennsylvania...

  7. Delamination tolerance studies in laminated composite panels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Determination of levels of tolerance in delaminated composite panels is an important issue in composite structures technology. The primary intention is to analyse delaminated composite panels and estimate Strain. Energy Release Rate (SERR) parameters at the delamination front to feed into acceptability criteria.

  8. Behaviour of Metal Foam Sandwich Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhudery, Hayder; Virdi, Kuldeep

    2011-01-01

    Sandwich panels as used in structures comprise of a foam core enclosed by thin high strength steel faces. This paper discusses currently design formulae of local buckling behaviour of such panels using the finite element method. Multiple wave finite element models were adopted to investigate...

  9. 77 FR 41808 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  10. 78 FR 26399 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held by teleconference at...

  11. 77 FR 67836 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  12. 77 FR 49026 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  13. 78 FR 64026 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meeting SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of the... of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks Center...

  14. 78 FR 68099 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of...- one meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy...

  15. 78 FR 28244 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meetings SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  16. 75 FR 56146 - Arts Advisory Panel; Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts Arts Advisory Panel; Meetings Pursuant to... given that four meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at... are approximate): Arts Education (application review): October 4-5, 2010 in Room 716. A portion of...

  17. 78 FR 17942 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  18. 77 FR 13367 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held by teleconference at the...

  19. 78 FR 50451 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  20. 78 FR 42982 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meetings SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks Center...

  1. 78 FR 21978 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  2. 77 FR 27803 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  3. 76 FR 50499 - Arts Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts Arts Advisory Panel Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks... financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, as amended...

  4. 77 FR 75672 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  5. 78 FR 38410 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  6. 76 FR 63664 - Arts Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26421] NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts Arts Advisory Panel Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), as amended, notice is hereby given that thirteen meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National...

  7. 78 FR 59978 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  8. 76 FR 23845 - Arts Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts Arts Advisory Panel Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks..., evaluation, and recommendations on financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and the...

  9. 78 FR 76660 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  10. 77 FR 56875 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held by teleconference from...

  11. 78 FR 5213 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  12. 77 FR 22613 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  13. 77 FR 35067 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  14. 77 FR 61643 - Arts Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: National Endowment for the Arts, National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2) of... meetings of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks...

  15. 76 FR 3677 - Arts Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES National Endowment for the Arts Arts Advisory Panel Pursuant to Section 10(a)(2... meeting of the Arts Advisory Panel to the National Council on the Arts will be held at the Nancy Hanks..., discussion, evaluation, and recommendations on financial assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts...

  16. Structural detailing of openings in sandwich panels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomà, T.; Courage, W.

    1996-01-01

    European Recommendations exist which provide calculation rules to determine the strength and stiffness of sandwich panels composed of two metal faces with a foam in between. In case of openings in such panels (e.g. for windows) an influence will appear with regard to the stiffness and loadbearing

  17. Option Panels in Pure-Jump Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Gustav; Fusari, Nicola; Todorov, Viktor

    We develop parametric inference procedures for large panels of noisy option data in the setting where the underlying process is of pure-jump type, i.e., evolve only through a sequence of jumps. The panel consists of options written on the underlying asset with a (different) set of strikes...

  18. 49 CFR 845.22 - Technical panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technical panel. 845.22 Section 845.22... Technical panel. The Director, Bureau of Accident Investigation, or the Director, Bureau of Field Operations, shall designate members of the Board's technical staff to participate in the hearing and initially...

  19. 78 FR 79300 - Cardiovascular Devices; Reclassification of Intra-Aortic Balloon and Control Systems for Acute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... recommendation from a device classification panel (an FDA advisory committee); (2) published the panel's... upon ``valid scientific evidence'' in the classification process to determine the level of regulation... and/or confidential commercial information, e.g., the contents of a pending PMA. (See section 520(c...

  20. Report of the Federal Internetworking Requirements Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-31

    The Federal Internetworking Requirements Panel (FIRP) was established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to reassess Federal requirements for open systems networks and to recommend policy on the Government`s use of networking standards. The Panel was chartered to recommend actions which the Federal Government can take to address the short and long-term issues of interworking and convergence of networking protocols--particularly the Internet Protocol Suite (IPS) and Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) protocol suite and, when appropriate, proprietary protocols. The Panel was created at the request of the Office of Management and Budget in collaboration with the Federal Networking Council and the Federal Information Resources Management Policy Council. The Panel`s membership and charter are contained in an appendix to this report.

  1. Stabilization of LCD devices via geometric alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Il; Yoon, MinSung; Lee, Je-Hoon

    2013-02-20

    Glass bending in LCD displays is an inherent problem that has challenged many engineers. As a solution to this problem, we propose a methodology that can tackle the root of the phenomenon in terms of linear elastic beam theory. Using this hypothesis, we devised a background theory and a solution. In this paper, we present a glass panel to which geometrical changes, such as furrow, groove, and curb have been applied. These geometrical changes are applied to the nonactive area of the glass panel. To confirm the validity of our approach, we conducted simulation tests as well as hands-on experiments to observe the thermo-mechanical behavior of the device under various conditions. The simulation results using the Ansys simulator show that the proposed technique can reduce the deformation level of panel bending by 40%. In the experiment using a bare cell with polarizer films attached and with performing the high temperature reliability test, the deformation level of panel bending is reduced by half compared to the reference glass panel without any geometric alteration.

  2. Panel fabrication utilizing GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the GaAs solar cells for space applications is described. The activities in the fabrication of GaAs solar panels are outlined. Panels were fabricated while introducing improved quality control, soldering laydown and testing procedures. These panels include LIPS II, San Marco Satellite, and a low concentration panel for Rockwells' evaluation. The panels and their present status are discussed.

  3. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaus B M Császár; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Stefan Milz; Sprecher, Christoph M.; Philippe Kobel; Mohamed Farhat; Furia, John P.; Christoph Schmitz

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. Methods and Findings We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical...

  4. Acoustically Tailored Composite Rotorcraft Fuselage Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambric, Stephen; Shepherd, Micah; Koudela, Kevin; Wess, Denis; Snider, Royce; May, Carl; Kendrick, Phil; Lee, Edward; Cai, Liang-Wu

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft roof sandwich panel has been redesigned to optimize sound power transmission loss (TL) and minimize structure-borne sound for frequencies between 1 and 4 kHz where gear meshing noise from the transmission has the most impact on speech intelligibility. The roof section, framed by a grid of ribs, was originally constructed of a single honeycomb core/composite face sheet panel. The original panel has coincidence frequencies near 700 Hz, leading to poor TL across the frequency range of 1 to 4 kHz. To quiet the panel, the cross section was split into two thinner sandwich subpanels separated by an air gap. The air gap was sized to target the fundamental mass-spring-mass resonance of the double panel system to less than 500 Hz. The panels were designed to withstand structural loading from normal rotorcraft operation, as well as 'man-on-the-roof' static loads experienced during maintenance operations. Thin layers of VHB 9469 viscoelastomer from 3M were also included in the face sheet ply layups, increasing panel damping loss factors from about 0.01 to 0.05. Measurements in the NASA SALT facility show the optimized panel provides 6-11 dB of acoustic transmission loss improvement, and 6-15 dB of structure-borne sound reduction at critical rotorcraft transmission tonal frequencies. Analytic panel TL theory simulates the measured performance quite well. Detailed finite element/boundary element modeling of the baseline panel simulates TL slightly more accurately, and also simulates structure-borne sound well.

  5. Scalable devices

    KAUST Repository

    Krüger, Jens J.

    2014-01-01

    In computer science in general and in particular the field of high performance computing and supercomputing the term scalable plays an important role. It indicates that a piece of hardware, a concept, an algorithm, or an entire system scales with the size of the problem, i.e., it can not only be used in a very specific setting but it\\'s applicable for a wide range of problems. From small scenarios to possibly very large settings. In this spirit, there exist a number of fixed areas of research on scalability. There are works on scalable algorithms, scalable architectures but what are scalable devices? In the context of this chapter, we are interested in a whole range of display devices, ranging from small scale hardware such as tablet computers, pads, smart-phones etc. up to large tiled display walls. What interests us mostly is not so much the hardware setup but mostly the visualization algorithms behind these display systems that scale from your average smart phone up to the largest gigapixel display walls.

  6. Features of fire and explosion safety of buildings from a sandwich of panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salymova Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently in Russia about 100% of buildings of an oil and gas complex are built with use triplex a sandwich of panels (S.P. Almost all these buildings are explosive and increase in their exploisure-resistance requires application of easily thrown off or safety designs. A sandwich of the panel is an ideal applicant for a role of safety designs according to the weight characteristics. Except inertial properties extremely important characteristic is opening pressure. This size remains acritical in view of a variety of their sizes, thickness of metal sheets, a variety of their fastening to metal designs. In work opening pressure at explosion for a sandwich of panels of 2×1,2 m in size for various options of fastening is experimentally received. We suspect that load of one knot of fastening does not depend on the panel sizes, only on the knot device. For various ways of fastening design pressure of opening in case of a normal distribution of durability of clusters is defined. The criterion for assessment of effectiveness of the panels used as safety designs is received. This criterion determines the maximal pressure upon dive during opening. The received criterion confirms effectiveness a sandwich of panels as a safety design.

  7. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  8. Drugs and Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail A. Van Norman, MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of medical drugs and devices involves competing goals of assuring safety and efficacy while providing rapid movement of innovative therapies through the investigative and regulatory processes as quickly as possible. The United States and the European Union approach these challenges in different ways. Whereas the United States has always relied on a strictly centralized process through 1 agency, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA, the European Commission synchronized the regulations of 28 different countries as they combined to create the European Union. The FDA historically developed as a consumer protection agency, whereas the regulations from the European Commission arose out of a need to harmonize inter-state commercial interests while preserving national “autonomy.” Thus, whereas the FDA has the advantages of centralization and common rules, the European Union regulates medical drug and device approvals through a network of centralized and decentralized agencies throughout its member states. This study explores some of the similarities and differences in European and U.S. regulation of drugs and devices, and discusses challenges facing each.

  9. Physics of semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prew, B.A.

    1975-09-01

    The properties of semiconductors which make them important in the electronic devices industry, and how these properties are controlled by doping, are described. The physics and applications of p-n and other junction devices, and of bulk effect devices are discussed. Avalanche devices, optical devices, solar cells, Schottky barriers, MOS devices, heterojunctions, photoconductors, and transferred electron devices are considered.

  10. Practical microwave electron devices

    CERN Document Server

    Meurant, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Practical Microwave Electron Devices provides an understanding of microwave electron devices and their applications. All areas of microwave electron devices are covered. These include microwave solid-state devices, including popular microwave transistors and both passive and active diodes; quantum electron devices; thermionic devices (including relativistic thermionic devices); and ferrimagnetic electron devices. The design of each of these devices is discussed as well as their applications, including oscillation, amplification, switching, modulation, demodulation, and parametric interactions.

  11. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic x-ray...

  12. Monitoring and control system of charging batteries connected to a photovoltaic panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idzkowski, Adam; Leoniuk, Katarzyna; Walendziuk, Wojciech; Budzynski, Lukasz

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the off-grid photovoltaic system consisting of a PV panel, MMPT charge controller and battery is described. The realization of a laboratory stand for charging or discharging batteries is presented. Original monitoring and control system, which is based on LabVIEW software and LabJack DAQ device, has been built. Data acquisition part, arithmetic part and front panel of program created in LabVIEW are described. Some problems with implementation of this system, providing the monitoring of electrical parameters, are mentioned.

  13. Characterizing the reflectivity of handheld display devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peter; Badano, Aldo

    2014-08-01

    With increased use of handheld and tablet display devices for viewing medical images, methods for consistently measuring reflectivity of the devices are needed. In this note, the authors report on the characterization of diffuse reflections for handheld display devices including mobile phones and tablets using methods recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 18 (TG18). The authors modified the diffuse reflectance coefficient measurement method outlined in the TG18 report. The authors measured seven handheld display devices (two phones and five tablets) and three workstation displays. The device was attached to a black panel with Velcro. To study the effect of the back surface on the diffuse reflectance coefficient, the authors created Styrofoam masks with different size square openings and placed it in front of the device. Overall, for each display device, measurements of illuminance and reflected luminance on the display screen were taken. The authors measured with no mask, with masks of varying size, and with display-size masks, and calculated the corresponding diffuse reflectance coefficient. For all handhelds, the diffuse reflectance coefficient measured with no back panel were lower than measurements performed with a mask. The authors found an overall increase in reflectivity as the size of the mask decreases. For workstations displays, diffuse reflectance coefficients were higher when no back panel was used, and higher than with masks. In all cases, as luminance increased, illuminance increased, but not at the same rate. Since the size of handheld displays is smaller than that of workstation devices, the TG18 method suffers from a dependency on illumination condition. The authors show that the diffuse reflection coefficients can vary depending on the nature of the back surface of the illuminating box. The variability in the diffuse coefficient can be as large as 20% depending on the size of the mask. For all measurements

  14. Medical devices regulatory aspects: a special focus on polymeric material based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Pliszka, Damian; Luo, He-Kuan; Chin Lim, Keith Hsiu; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2015-01-01

    Medical devices form a broad range of appliances from a basic nanoparticle coating or surgical gloves to a complicated laser therapy device. These devices are designed to support patients, surgeons and healthcare personnel in meeting patients' healthcare needs. Regulatory authorities of each country regulate the process of approval, manufacturing and sales of these medical devices so as to ensure safety and quality to patients or users. Recent recalls of medical devices has increased importance of safety, awareness and regulation of the devices. Singapore and India have strong presence and national priorities in medical devices development and use. Herein we capture the rationale of each of these national regulatory bodies and compare them with the medical devices regulatory practices of USA and European nations. Apart from the comparison of various regulatory aspects, this review will specifically throw light on the polymer material based medical devices and their safety.

  15. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  16. Clinical Implementation of a Model-Based In Vivo Dose Verification System for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy–Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatments Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, Peter M., E-mail: pmccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Asuni, Ganiyu [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Van Uytven, Eric [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); VanBeek, Timothy [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); McCurdy, Boyd M.C. [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Loewen, Shaun K. [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ahmed, Naseer; Bashir, Bashir; Butler, James B.; Chowdhury, Amitava; Dubey, Arbind; Leylek, Ahmet; Nashed, Maged [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To report findings from an in vivo dosimetry program implemented for all stereotactic body radiation therapy patients over a 31-month period and discuss the value and challenges of utilizing in vivo electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry clinically. Methods and Materials: From December 2013 to July 2016, 117 stereotactic body radiation therapy–volumetric modulated arc therapy patients (100 lung, 15 spine, and 2 liver) underwent 602 EPID-based in vivo dose verification events. A developed model-based dose reconstruction algorithm calculates the 3-dimensional dose distribution to the patient by back-projecting the primary fluence measured by the EPID during treatment. The EPID frame-averaging was optimized in June 2015. For each treatment, a 3%/3-mm γ comparison between our EPID-derived dose and the Eclipse AcurosXB–predicted dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and the ≥20% isodose volume were performed. Alert levels were defined as γ pass rates <85% (lung and liver) and <80% (spine). Investigations were carried out for all fractions exceeding the alert level and were classified as follows: EPID-related, algorithmic, patient setup, anatomic change, or unknown/unidentified errors. Results: The percentages of fractions exceeding the alert levels were 22.6% for lung before frame-average optimization and 8.0% for lung, 20.0% for spine, and 10.0% for liver after frame-average optimization. Overall, mean (± standard deviation) planning target volume γ pass rates were 90.7% ± 9.2%, 87.0% ± 9.3%, and 91.2% ± 3.4% for the lung, spine, and liver patients, respectively. Conclusions: Results from the clinical implementation of our model-based in vivo dose verification method using on-treatment EPID images is reported. The method is demonstrated to be valuable for routine clinical use for verifying delivered dose as well as for detecting errors.

  17. Pressurized waterproof case for electronic device

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-31

    The pressurized waterproof case for an electronic device is particularly adapted for the waterproof containment and operation of a touch-screen computer or the like therein at some appreciable water depth. The case may be formed as an enclosure having an open top panel or face covered by a flexible, transparent membrane or the like for the operation of the touch-screen device within the case. A pressurizing system is provided for the case to pressurize the case and the electronic device therein to slightly greater than ambient in order to prevent the external water pressure from bearing against the transparent membrane and pressing it against the touch screen, thereby precluding operation of the touch screen device within the case. The pressurizing system may be a small gas cartridge (e.g., CO2), or may be provided from an external source, such as the diver\\'s breathing air. A pressure relief valve is also provided.

  18. CLOSURE DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzell, S.M.; Dorcy, D.J.

    1958-08-26

    A quick opening type of stuffing box employing two banks of rotatable shoes, each of which has a caraming action that forces a neoprene sealing surface against a pipe or rod where it passes through a wall is presented. A ring having a handle or wrench attached is placed eccentric to and between the two banks of shoes. Head bolts from the shoes fit into slots in this ring, which are so arranged that when the ring is rotated a quarter turn in one direction the shoes are thrust inwardly to cramp the neopnrene about the pipe, malting a tight seal. Moving the ring in the reverse direction moves the shoes outwardly and frees the pipe which then may be readily removed from the stuffing box. This device has particular application as a closure for the end of a coolant tube of a neutronic reactor.

  19. 76 FR 21786 - Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration... project and research activities currently underway; Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel... at: Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel, Social Security Administration, 6401...

  20. 75 FR 57102 - Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... ADMINISTRATION Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting; Correction AGENCY: Social Security... Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel. The document contained an incorrect timeframe for the...: Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel, Social Security Administration, 6401 Security Boulevard...

  1. 76 FR 70804 - Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... ADMINISTRATION Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration... regarding the panel should contact the staff by: Mail addressed to the Occupational Information Development..., Designated Federal Officer, Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel. BILLING CODE 4191-02-P ...

  2. 75 FR 71787 - Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration... SSA FY 2010 Occupational Information System Development (OID) project activities and the proposed... should contact the Panel staff at: Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel, Social Security...

  3. 76 FR 53993 - Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration... research activities currently underway; Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel Chair and... at: Occupational Information Development Advisory Panel, Social Security Administration, 6401...

  4. KUALITAS AKUSTIK PANEL DINDING BERBAHAN BAKU JERAMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina E. Mediastika

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of study to explore possibility in using paddy-straw as main material to construct cheap and high quality panels has been developed. Prior to this study, laboratory research to examine strength of compression and tensile of the panels have been conducted, which is showed a significant value for a non-structural panel. The compression is 15 N/mm2 and tensile averaged at 0,5 N/mm2 . In this study, acoustic properties of the panels is to be examined, i.e.: transmission loss (TL, absorption coefficient (, and reverberation time (RT60. The test showed TL of 10 dB and 16 dB,  of 0,4 and 0,8 and improve RT60 from 0,88 sec to 0,35 sec and 0,16 sec (500 Hz is used for reference. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Ketersediaan panel pelapis dinding yang bersifat akustik dengan harga yang lebih terjangkau seperti yang terbuat dari bahan limbah sangatlah penting. Pada penelitian awal telah diselidiki penggunaan jerami sebagai bahan baku pembuatan panel akustik, sekaligus telah dilakukan pengujian terhadap kareakteristik struktural (uji desak dan lentur dari panel tersebut. Dari uji kekuatan struktural, panel memiliki kekuatan desak mencapai 15 N/mm2 dan kuat lentur reta-rata 0,5 N/mm2. Kekuatan ini dianggap mencukupi bagi panel non-struktural yang hanya bertugas untuk memikul beban sendiri. Oleh karena tujuan awal pembuatan panel adalah untuk kepentingan akustik, maka pada penelitian lanjutan, dilakukan uji laboratorium dan lapangan untuk melihat karakterisktik akustiknya. Adapun pengujian meliputi: redaman/insulasi (TL, koefisien serap ( dan waktu dengung (RT60. Dari hasil pengujian, panel mempunyai TL 10 dB dan 16 dB,  0,4 dan 0,8, serta mampu memperbaiki RT60 ruangan dari 0,88 detik menjadi 0,35 detik dan 0,16 detik. Kesemua pengujian menggunakan band frekuensi 500 Hz sebagai acuan. Kata kunci: panel jerami, insulasi, koefisien serap, waktu dengung.

  5. Behavioral Model of Photovoltaic Panel in Simulink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAPLATILEK, K.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with creation and application of a model of photovoltaic panel in the MATLAB and Simulink environments. An original model of the real PV panel is applied using the model based design technique. A so-called physical model is also developed using the SimPowerSystems library. The described PV panel model is applied for maximum power optimization in the one-shot and the continuous modes. A few illustrating examples and source code parts are also presented.

  6. Advanced Ultrasupercritical (AUSC) Tube Membrane Panel Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pschirer, James [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Burgess, Joshua [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Schrecengost, Robert [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States)

    2017-08-16

    Alstom Power Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Electric Company (GE), has completed the project “Advanced Ultrasupercritical (AUSC) Tube Membrane Panel Development” under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Award Number DE-FE0024076. This project was part of DOE’s Novel Crosscutting Research and Development to Support Advanced Energy Systems program. AUSC Tube Membrane Panel Development was a two and one half year project to develop and verify the manufacturability and serviceability of welded tube membrane panels made from high performance materials suitable for the AUSC steam cycles, defined as high pressure steam turbine inlet conditions of 700-760°C (1292-1400°F) and 24.5-35MPa (3500-5000psi). The difficulty of this challenge lies in the fact that the membrane-welded construction imposes demands on the materials that are unlike any that exist in other parts of the boiler. Tube membrane panels have been designed, fabricated, and installed in boilers for over 50 years with relatively favorable experience when fabricated from carbon and Cr-Mo low alloy steels. The AUSC steam cycle requires membrane tube panels fabricated from materials that have not been used in a weldment with metal temperatures in the range of 582-610°C (1080-1130°F). Fabrication materials chosen for the tubing were Grade 92 and HR6W. Grade 92 is a creep strength enhanced ferritic Cr-Mo alloy and HR6W is a high nickel alloy. Once the materials were chosen, GE performed the engineering design of the panels, prepared shop manufacturing drawings, and developed manufacturing and inspection plans. After the materials were purchased, GE manufactured and inspected the tube membrane panels, determined if post fabrication heat treatment of the tube membrane panels was needed, performed pre- and post-weld heat treatment on the Grade 92 panels, conducted final nondestructive inspection of any heat treated tube membrane panels, conducted destructive inspection of the completed tube

  7. Predicting panel scores by linguistic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Besselaar, P.; Stout, L.; Gou, X

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we explore the use of text analysis for deriving quality indicators of project proposals. We do full text analysis of 3030 review reports. After term extraction, we aggregate the term occurrences to linguistic categories. Using thse linguistic categories as independent variables, we study how well these predict the grading by the review panels. Together, the different linguistic categories explain about 50% of the variance in the grading of the applications. The relative importance of the different linguistic categories inform us about the way the panels work. This can be used to develop altmetrics for the quality of the peer and panel review processes. (Author)

  8. Physiotherapy devices able to generate ethical dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Nadinne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical therapy is a medical specialty where the professionals help restore movement and function when someone is affected by injury, illness or disability. This paper wishes to establish the connection between ethics, physiotherapy and bioengineering. The research method was achieved using academic database searches based on specific keywords. A SWOT analysis of the physiotherapy devices utilization and design was made, for extracting ethical considerations. The main results suggest that physiotherapy devices are able to generate ethical dilemmas, classified in 4 main items: (1 Bioengineering in physical therapy, ethical and clinical standards for manufacturers; (2 Social impact of physical therapy devices and ethical issues; (3 Inter-professional lack of communication and ethical concerns; (4 Bioengineering ethical research and education. As conclusions, for the physical therapy or electrotherapy research equipment development, a multidisciplinary team is needed. The equipment used in rehabilitation must fulfil specific technical and scientific requirements drafted by the professionals.

  9. Investigation of panel-to-panel connections and block-outs for full-depth precast concrete bridge decks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Experimental tests were performed at Virginia Tech to investigate transverse panel-to-panel connections and horizontal shear : connector block-outs for full-depth precast concrete bridge deck panels. The connections were designed for a deck replaceme...

  10. 75 FR 82376 - North American Free Trade Agreement, Article 1904 NAFTA Panel Reviews; Request for Panel Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... International Trade Administration North American Free Trade Agreement, Article 1904 NAFTA Panel Reviews; Request for Panel Review AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section, International Trade... the NAFTA Secretariat pursuant to Article 1904 of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Panel...

  11. 76 FR 16728 - North American Free Trade Agreement, Article 1904; NAFTA Panel Reviews; Request for Panel Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... International Trade Administration North American Free Trade Agreement, Article 1904; NAFTA Panel Reviews; Request for Panel Review AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section, International Trade... the NAFTA Secretariat pursuant to Article 1904 of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Panel...

  12. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended to generate high-energy neutrons for radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal...

  13. Modelling Firm Innovation using Panel Probit Estimators.

    OpenAIRE

    Mark N. Harris; Mark Rogers; Anthony Siouclis

    2001-01-01

    Firm-level innovation is investigated using three probit panel estimators, which control for unobserved heterogeneity, and a standard probit estimator. Results indicate the standard probit model is misspecified and that inter-firm networks are important for innovation.

  14. ATR FTIR Mapping of Leather Fiber Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondi, G.; Grünewald, T.; Petutschnigg, A.; Schnabel, T.

    2015-01-01

    Leather fiber panels are very promising materials for many applications, not only for the easy availability of the constituents but also for their outstanding fi re-retardant properties. These innovative composite panels can be an excellent material for building insulation, and in recent times, the interest of industries in this composite board has considerably arisen. For this reason the discrimination of the components in the leather fiber panels is becoming fundamental in order to ensure their homogeneous properties. A method to characterize the surface of these materials is then required. An ATR FTIR mapping system for the leather fiber panels has been performed with a Perkin-Elmer microscope coupled with a Frontier FTIR spectrometer. The system has successfully allowed transforming the optical image to a chemical one. This technique can be considered as a right tool for routine controls of the surface quality, especially when the leather shavings cannot be optically distinguished.

  15. Panel data analysis of cardiotocograph (CTG) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2013-01-01

    Panel data analysis is a statistical method, widely used in econometrics, which deals with two-dimensional panel data collected over time and over individuals. Cardiotocograph (CTG) which monitors fetal heart rate (FHR) using Doppler ultrasound and uterine contraction by strain gage is commonly used in intrapartum treatment of pregnant women. Although the relationship between FHR waveform pattern and the outcome such as umbilical blood gas data at delivery has long been analyzed, there exists no accumulated FHR patterns from large number of cases. As time-series economic fluctuations in econometrics such as consumption trend has been studied using panel data which consists of time-series and cross-sectional data, we tried to apply this method to CTG data. The panel data composed of a symbolized segment of FHR pattern can be easily handled, and a perinatologist can get the whole FHR pattern view from the microscopic level of time-series FHR data.

  16. Characteristics of DSSC Panels with Silicone Encapsulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Gu Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC allow light transmission and the application of various colors that make them especially suitable for building-integrated PV (BIPV application. In order to apply DSSC modules to windows, the module has to be panelized: a DSSC module should be protected with toughened glass on the entire surface. Up to the present, it seems to be common to use double glazing with DSSC modules, with air gaps between the glass pane and the DSSC modules. Few studies have been conducted on the characteristics of various glazing methods with DSSC modules. This paper proposes a paneling method that uses silicone encapsulant, analyzing the performance through experimentation. Compared to a multilayered DSSC panel with an air gap, the encapsulant-applied panel showed 6% higher light transmittance and 7% higher electrical efficiency. The encapsulant also prevented electrolyte leakage by strengthening the seals in the DSSC module.

  17. Moonshot Panel Moving Toward Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog from acting NCI Director Dr. Doug Lowy providing an update on the activities of the National Cancer Moonshot Initiative’s Blue Ribbon Panel and its work to develop a final report.

  18. Scientific Advisory Panel Report for Glyphosate Available

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP) met December 13-16, 2016, to consider a set of scientific issues being evaluated by the Environmental Protection Agency

  19. Maximum Power from a Solar Panel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael Miller

    2010-01-01

    .... Solar panels are used to collect solar radiation and convert it into electricity. One of the techniques used to maximize the effectiveness of this energy alternative is to maximize the power output of the solar collector...

  20. JTEC panel on display technologies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannas, Lawrence E., Jr.; Glenn, William E.; Credelle, Thomas; Doane, J. William; Firester, Arthur H.; Thompson, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that describes research and development efforts in Japan in the area of display technologies. The following are included in this report: flat panel displays (technical findings, liquid crystal display development and production, large flat panel displays (FPD's), electroluminescent displays and plasma panels, infrastructure in Japan's FPD industry, market and projected sales, and new a-Si active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) factory); materials for flat panel displays (liquid crystal materials, and light-emissive display materials); manufacturing and infrastructure of active matrix liquid crystal displays (manufacturing logistics and equipment); passive matrix liquid crystal displays (LCD basics, twisted nematics LCD's, supertwisted nematic LCD's, ferroelectric LCD's, and a comparison of passive matrix LCD technology); active matrix technology (basic active matrix technology, investment environment, amorphous silicon, polysilicon, and commercial products and prototypes); and projection displays (comparison of Japanese and U.S. display research, and technical evaluation of work).