WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapy current evidence

  1. Current Evidence and Recommendations for Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dewhurst, Matthew J; Linker, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    The number of people in Europe living with symptomatic heart failure is increasing. Since its advent in the 1990s, cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) has proven beneficial in terms of morbidity and mortality in selected heart failure (HF) patient populations, when combined with optimal pharmacological therapy. We review the evidence for CRT and the populations of HF patients it is currently shown to benefit, and those in which more research needs to be performed.

  2. Current evidence and applications of photodynamic therapy in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Marilyn T; Lin, Jennifer Y

    2014-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT) a photosensitizer – a molecule that is activated by light – is administered and exposed to a light source. This leads both to destruction of cells targeted by the particular type of photosensitizer, and immunomodulation. Given the ease with which photosensitizers and light can be delivered to the skin, it should come as no surprise that PDT is an increasingly utilized therapeutic in dermatology. PDT is used commonly to treat precancerous cells, sun-damaged skin, and acne. It has reportedly also been used to treat other conditions including inflammatory disorders and cutaneous infections. This review discusses the principles behind how PDT is used in dermatology, as well as evidence for current applications of PDT. PMID:24899818

  3. Target Therapies for Uterine Carcinosarcomas: Current Evidence and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Giovanni Vitale

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carcinosarcomas (CS in gynecology are very infrequent and represent only 2–5% of uterine cancers. Despite surgical cytoreduction and subsequent chemotherapy being the primary treatment for uterine CS, the overall five-year survival rate is 30 ± 9% and recurrence is extremely common (50–80%. Due to the poor prognosis of CS, new strategies have been developed in the last few decades, targeting known dysfunctional molecular pathways for immunotherapy. In this paper, we aimed to gather the available evidence on the latest therapies for the treatment of CS. We performed a systematic review using the terms “uterine carcinosarcoma”, “uterine Malignant Mixed Müllerian Tumors”, “target therapies”, “angiogenesis therapy”, “cancer stem cell therapy”, “prognostic biomarker”, and “novel antibody-drug”. Based on our results, the differential expression and accessibility of epithelial cell adhesion molecule-1 on metastatic/chemotherapy-resistant CS cells in comparison to normal tissues and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2 open up new possibilities in the field of target therapy. Nevertheless, future investigations are needed to clarify the impact of these new therapies on survival rate and medium-/long-term outcomes.

  4. [Chemonucleolysis and intradiscal electrothermal therapy: what is the current evidence?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder-Puig, R; Gyimesi, M; Mittermayr, T; Geiger-Gritsch, S

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of chemonucleolysis and intradiscal electrothermal therapy (IDET) on the basis of the data presented in recently published papers with respect to pain relief, function, and complication rates. Detailed searches for English and German articles published between 2003 and 2008 were performed in a number of electronic databases. Further publications were identified by manual search. For summarizing the evidence, we considered only systematic reviews and controlled studies. The internal validity of reviews and studies was judged by two authors independently. Data extraction was performed by one author, and the extracted data was checked for completeness and correctness by a second author. The evidence of the efficacy of chemonucleolysis using chymopapain or collagenase is summarized in two recent, high-quality systematic reviews. We found 5 controlled studies evaluating nucleolysis using an oxygen-ozone mixture (O (2)O (3)-nucleolysis). Some of those studies were of limited methodological quality, but all showed the efficacy of O (2)O (3)-nucleolysis in comparison to microdiscectomy or the use of alternative substances. There is hardly any data regarding O (2)O (3)-nucleolysis complications. Regarding IDET, the authors of the 6 identified systematic reviews come to different conclusions about the efficacy of the procedure. The results of the 3 included controlled IDET studies, of which 2 are of high methodological quality, are also conflicting. The complication rates range from 0 to 15 %. In summary, the evidence of efficacy is presently more compelling for chemonucleolysis than for IDET. This may also be because indications for chemonucleolysis are more firmly established. However, safety aspects should be better evaluated and presented in the literature. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  5. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy for inflammatory neuropathy: current evidence base and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is of proven effect in chronic inflammatory neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). In more recent years, there have been a number of anecdotal case reports and small series, followed by a few trials of variable design, of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in these neuropathies. To date, limited evidence suggests that the subcutaneous route may be a more clinically effective, better-tolerated, at least cost-equivalent and a more patient-friendly option than the still more used intravenous alternative. Long-term efficacy is not as yet established in neuropathic indications by randomised controlled clinical trial evidence, and it is likely that the subcutaneous route may not be suitable in all cases with some hints to this effect appearing from the limited data available to date. Further studies are ongoing, including those of dose comparison, and more are likely to be planned in future. The literature on the use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in chronic inflammatory neuropathy is reviewed here. The current use in clinical practice, day-to-day benefits, including quality of life measures and health economics as published thus far, are evaluated. The limitations of this form of treatment in CIDP and MMN are also analysed in the light of current literature and taking into account the remaining unknowns. Future prospects and research with this mode of immunoglobulin therapy administration are discussed.

  6. Endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with breast cancer: a critical appraisal of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemurro, Filippo; Del Mastro, Lucia; De Laurentiis, Michele; Puglisi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 60% of all breast cancer premenopausal women are diagnosed with a hormone receptor positive tumor and, therefore, are candidates for adjuvant hormonal therapy. Treatment with tamoxifen for at least 5 years has been for a long time the standard of care, as it is associated with overall positive clinical outcomes. However, in the last decade, a number of studies on adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer have been published, adding a bulk of evidence to existing knowledge in this field. A critical appraisal of their results appears necessary in order to put the recently collected data into the current framework of treatment, and to discuss the several issues that remain open. Here, we review the most recent evidence on the following: the optimal duration of tamoxifen treatment, results of the studies comparing tamoxifen alone to tamoxifen plus ovarian function suppression (OFS), results of the studies comparing tamoxifen plus OFS to aromatase inhibitors plus OFS.

  7. Current evidence of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Mittermayr, Rainer; Fuerst, Martin; Al Muderis, Munjed; Thiele, Richard; Saxena, Amol; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy has been described as the most common overuse injury in sports medicine. Several treatment modalities such as activity modification, heel lifts, arch supports, stretching exercises, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and eccentric loading are known as standard treatment mostly without proven evidence. After failed conservative therapy, invasive treatment may be considered. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been successfully used in soft-tissue pathologies like lateral epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis, tendinopathy of the shoulder and also in bone and skin disorders. Conclusive evidence recommending ESWT as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy is still lacking. In plantar fasciitis as well as in calcific shoulder tendinopathy shock wave therapy is recently the best evaluated treatment option. This article analysis the evidence based literature of ESWT in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Recently published data have shown the efficacy of focused and radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. All rights reserved.

  8. Exercise therapy is evidence-based treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome. Current practice or recommendation only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, J; Vuorenmaa, M; Paloneva, J; Kiviranta, I; Kautiainen, H; Oikari, M; Häkkinen, A

    2013-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common indication for shoulder operation. However, exercise therapy for the conservative treatment is recommended in the first instance. To evaluate the implementation of exercise therapy in impingement syndrome. Retrospective study using structured postal questionnaire and data collected from hospital archive. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone shoulder surgery due to impingement syndrome. Patients were asked about therapy modalities that they had received before and after the operation as well as pain (VAS) and functional impairment (ASES) at one-year follow-up. Before surgery 49% of patients had not received advice for shoulder muscle exercises. After operation all patients had received mobility exercises, but one quarter of patients still reported that they had not received instructions about shoulder strength exercises. At the follow-up the means of the ASES index was 85 and use of NSAID had decreased by 75%. However, 15% of patients had moderate functional impairment (ASES under 60). About half of patients reported that they had not received advice for rotator cuff exercise therapy before surgery even though with it surgery would probably have been avoided in many cases. Although symptoms in most patients had decreased after operation, several patients still suffered from pain and decreased function. Still several patients had not received advice for shoulder strengthening exercises that are important to recovery. The adherence to the current recommendations about exercise therapy is insufficient in clinical practice. Thus we recommend that it should be monitored in all institutions in which shoulder pain is treated.

  9. Can suitable candidates for levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel therapy be identified using current evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Catalán

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, strong evidence has supported the use of LCIG in treating motor fluctuations associated with APD, and several clinical studies provide emerging evidence for additional benefits of LCIG treatment in certain patients. This article provides an overview of the published literature on the benefits, limitations, and drawbacks of LCIG in relation to PD symptoms, the psychosocial impact of the disease, and the quality of life of patients, with the aim of determining candidates for whom treatment with LCIG would be beneficial. According to current evidence, patients with APD (defined as inability to achieve optimal control of the disease with conventional oral treatment, a relatively well-preserved cognitive-behavioral status, and good family/caregiver would count as suitable candidates for LCIG treatment. Contraindications in the opinion of the authors are severe dementia and active psychosis.

  10. Current evidence on physical therapy in patients with adhesive capsulitis: what are we missing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Filip; Meeus, Mira

    2014-05-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is, in most cases, a self-limiting condition of poorly understood etiology that results in shoulder pain and large mobility deficits. The socio-economic burden will increase as with continuous aging of our population. In addition, both prevalence and incidence figures of adhesive capsulitis are increasing. No literature overview solely focuses on the physiotherapeutic options in patients with adhesive capsulitis and their scientific evidence. Moreover, although some physiotherapeutic interventions show evidence regarding reducing pain or increasing mobility, there is little evidence to suggest that the disease prognosis is affected and this raises the need for new, innovative research in the area of adhesive capsulitis and its treatment. By presenting its current evidence, we hope to retrieve several gaps in the present management of adhesive capsulitis by physiotherapists and provide us with new insights for improving the physiotherapists' policy in treating adhesive capsulitis patients, e.g., continuously increasing nociceptive impulse activity, as in early stages of adhesive capsulitis, could lead to peripheral and subsequently long-lasting central sensitization, as well as to an increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. But up to now the involvement of central sensitization in adhesive capsulitis has not been studied yet and remains speculative. Finally, when selecting a physical treatment method for adhesive capsulitis, it is extremely important to consider the patient's symptoms, stage of the condition, and recognition of different patterns of motion loss. Guidelines for clinical assessment will be presented in this scoping review.

  11. Fasting therapy for treating and preventing disease - current state of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Andreas; Li, Chenying

    2013-01-01

    Periods of deliberate fasting with restriction of solid food intake are practiced worldwide, mostly based on traditional, cultural or religious reasons. There is large empirical and observational evidence that medically supervised modified fasting (fasting cure, 200-500 kcal nutritional intake per day) with periods of 7-21 days is efficacious in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, chronic pain syndromes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. The beneficial effects of fasting followed by vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis are confirmed by randomized controlled trials. Further beneficial effects of fasting are supported by observational data and abundant evidence from experimental research which found caloric restriction and intermittent fasting being associated with deceleration or prevention of most chronic degenerative and chronic inflammatory diseases. Intermittent fasting may also be useful as an accompanying treatment during chemotherapy of cancer. A further beneficial effect of fasting relates to improvements in sustainable lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthy diet, possibly mediated by fasting-induced mood enhancement. Various identified mechanisms of fasting point to its potential health-promoting effects, e.g., fasting-induced neuroendocrine activation and hormetic stress response, increased production of neurotrophic factors, reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress, general decrease of signals associated with aging, and promotion of autophagy. Fasting therapy might contribute to the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases and should be further evaluated in controlled clinical trials and observational studies. © 2014 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  12. Scientific evidence for the use of current traditional systemic therapies in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusayen, Raed; Shear, Neil H

    2015-11-01

    Traditional systemic therapies are frequently prescribed for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Clinicians consider antibiotics, retinoids, antiandrogens, immunosuppressants, and less common treatment, such as fumarates, in the management of HS. Different classes of medications have been selected to treat HS based on their ability to target various pathways of the condition. Concerns about infection, such as infection with Clostridium difficile, necessitates switching therapy or shortening the course of therapy with specific antibiotics. This review explores the outcomes with the use of numerous medical therapies and postulates explanations for their efficacy or lack of response. Data on long-term safety and efficacy with traditional systemic therapies are lacking. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti EGFR therapy in the treatment of non-metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: The current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony Benson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC accounts for a large oncologic burden in the developing countries. In patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer multimodality treatment is warranted. Radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy has long been considered the standard for patients with disease involving the oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. However, addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy increases treatment related toxicity by many folds and compliance rates decrease. In this context a systemic therapy, which when used concurrent with radiation with favorable toxicity profile is of great importance for improving disease control in locally advanced HNSCC. Anti-epithelial growth factor receptor targeted therapy emerged as a potential treatment option. In recent years many trials were conducted to find the optimum treatment option with the combination of these targeted agents. The initial trials showed excellent results with minimal morbidity and led to great enthusiasm across the globe to incorporate these regimens as a standard of care. However, subsequently many trials failed to maintain such results and now there is little agreement to the initial results achieved with these drugs. Based on the current evidence we cannot recommend the replacement of cisplatin with targeted therapy in concurrent setting. It may be considered in patients with altered renal parameters, hypersensitivity or intolerance to cisplatin. The addition of targeted therapy in addition to chemotherapy in the concurrent setting can’t also be recommended as the benefit is doubtful and is associated with a significant increase in toxicity.

  14. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Abigail T., E-mail: abigail.berman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); James, Sara St.; Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-02

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  15. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail T. Berman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT, through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  16. Evidence of Effectiveness of Current Therapies to Prevent and Treat Early Childhood Caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Dhar, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence related to self-applied and professionally applied fluorides, antimicrobial agents, fissure sealants, temporary restorations, and restorative care for the prevention and management of early childhood caries (ECC...

  17. Evidence of Effectiveness of Current Therapies to Prevent and Treat Early Childhood Caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Dhar, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence related to self-applied and professionally applied fluorides, antimicrobial agents, fissure sealants, temporary restorations, and restorative care for the prevention and management of early childhood caries (E...

  18. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Minako

    2002-01-01

    The goal of radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is to improve the survival rate of patients without increasing treatment-related toxicity and to improve patients' quality of life. Several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated a survival advantage in combined modality treatment over radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone when a cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimen is utilized in the treatment plan. Combined modality treatment of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiotherapy is standard treatment for selected patients such as those with better performance status with locally or regionally advanced lung cancer including T3-T4 or N2-N3. Determining the contribution of new agents in combined modality treatment will require carefully designed and conducted clinical trials. High-dose involved field radiation therapy using 3D-conformal radiation therapy potentially enables the use of higher doses than standard radiation therapy, because less normal tissue is irradiated, and may improve local control and survival. The combination of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and dose escalation using 3D-conformal radiation therapy is also a possibility in unresectable NSCLC. In surgery cases, the results of several Phase III trials of cisplatin-based preoperative chemotherapy have suggested survival improvement. But the concept needs to be tested in a larger Phase III trial. (author)

  19. Establishing Evidence-Based Indications for Proton Therapy: An Overview of Current Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Mark V.; Aggarwal, Sameer; Bentzen, Soren M.; Knight, Nancy; Mehta, Minesh P.; Regine, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To review and assess ongoing proton beam therapy (PBT) clinical trials and to identify major gaps. Methods and Materials: Active PBT clinical trials were identified from (clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Platform Registry. Data on clinical trial disease site, age group, projected patient enrollment, expected start and end dates, study type, and funding source were extracted. Results: A total of 122 active PBT clinical trials were identified, with target enrollment of >42,000 patients worldwide. Ninety-six trials (79%), with a median planned sample size of 68, were classified as interventional studies. Observational studies accounted for 21% of trials but 71% (n=29,852) of planned patient enrollment. The most common PBT clinical trials focus on gastrointestinal tract tumors (21%, n=26), tumors of the central nervous system (15%, n=18), and prostate cancer (12%, n=15). Five active studies (lung, esophagus, head and neck, prostate, breast) will randomize patients between protons and photons, and 3 will randomize patients between protons and carbon ion therapy. Conclusions: The PBT clinical trial portfolio is expanding rapidly. Although the majority of ongoing studies are interventional, the majority of patients will be accrued to observational studies. Future efforts should focus on strategies to encourage optimal patient enrollment and retention, with an emphasis on randomized, controlled trials, which will require support from third-party payers. Results of ongoing PBT studies should be evaluated in terms of comparative effectiveness, as well as incremental effectiveness and value offered by PBT in comparison with conventional radiation modalities.

  20. Establishing Evidence-Based Indications for Proton Therapy: An Overview of Current Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mark V., E-mail: mmishra@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aggarwal, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Knight, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute at Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To review and assess ongoing proton beam therapy (PBT) clinical trials and to identify major gaps. Methods and Materials: Active PBT clinical trials were identified from (clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Platform Registry. Data on clinical trial disease site, age group, projected patient enrollment, expected start and end dates, study type, and funding source were extracted. Results: A total of 122 active PBT clinical trials were identified, with target enrollment of >42,000 patients worldwide. Ninety-six trials (79%), with a median planned sample size of 68, were classified as interventional studies. Observational studies accounted for 21% of trials but 71% (n=29,852) of planned patient enrollment. The most common PBT clinical trials focus on gastrointestinal tract tumors (21%, n=26), tumors of the central nervous system (15%, n=18), and prostate cancer (12%, n=15). Five active studies (lung, esophagus, head and neck, prostate, breast) will randomize patients between protons and photons, and 3 will randomize patients between protons and carbon ion therapy. Conclusions: The PBT clinical trial portfolio is expanding rapidly. Although the majority of ongoing studies are interventional, the majority of patients will be accrued to observational studies. Future efforts should focus on strategies to encourage optimal patient enrollment and retention, with an emphasis on randomized, controlled trials, which will require support from third-party payers. Results of ongoing PBT studies should be evaluated in terms of comparative effectiveness, as well as incremental effectiveness and value offered by PBT in comparison with conventional radiation modalities.

  1. Techniques of tumour bed boost irradiation in breast conserving therapy: Current evidence and suggested guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Singh, Suruchi; Budrukkar, Ashwini [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2007-10-15

    Breast conservation surgery followed by external beam radiotherapy to breast has become the standard of care in management of early carcinoma breast. A boost to the tumour bed after whole breast radiotherapy is employed in view of the pattern of tumour bed recurrences in the index quadrant and was particularly considered in patients with some adverse histopathological characteristics such as positive margins, extensive intraductal carcinoma (EIC), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), etc. There is however, now, a conclusive evidence of improvement in local control rates after a boost radiotherapy dose in patients even without such factors and for all age groups. The maximum absolute reduction of local recurrences by the addition of boost is especially seen in young premenopausal patients. At the same time, the addition of boost is associated with increased risk of worsening of cosmesis and no clear cut survival advantage. Radiological modalities such as fluoroscopy, ultrasound and CT scan have aided in accurate delineation of tumour bed with increasing efficacy. A widespread application of these techniques might ultimately translate into improved local control with minimal cosmetic deficit. The present article discusses the role of radiotherapy boost and the means to delineate and deliver the same, identify the high risk group, optimal technique and the doses and fractionations to be used. It also discusses the extent of adverse cosmetic outcome after boost delivery, means to minimise it and relevance of tumour bed in present day scenario of advanced radiotherapy delivery techniques like (IMRT)

  2. Evidence-based practice in physical therapy in Austria: current state and factors associated with EBP engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diermayr, Gudrun; Schachner, Herbert; Eidenberger, Margit; Lohkamp, Monika; Salbach, Nancy M

    2015-12-01

    Research examining the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) in physical therapy in many countries has revealed positive attitudes, varying degrees of EBP use and barriers at practitioner, patient and organizational levels. In contrast to these countries, Austria does not have an academic or research tradition in physical therapy. Engagement in EBP in countries such as Austria is unknown. The objectives of the study were to describe the current state of EBP engagement and identify factors associated with EBP engagement among Austrian physical therapists (PTs). A cross-sectional online survey was conducted. Existing questionnaires and the theory of planned behaviour guided questionnaire development. Face and content validity and ease of use of the questionnaire were evaluated in pilot tests. Item-level response frequencies and percentages were determined. Simple and multiple regressions were used to identify factors associated with EBP engagement. The final sample size was 588 (response rate: 17.5%). Ten percent of participants fully agreed that they regularly use guidelines and standardized assessment tools in clinical practice. While 49.9% reported not using electronic databases for literature searching, 41.9% reported reading research articles 2-5 times per month. Most frequently cited barriers to EBP engagement were lack of scientific skills, lack of time and insufficient organizational support. Research awareness, attitude, behavioural control, involvement in research and degree level were final correlates of EBP engagement. Austrian PTs show a low level of engagement in EBP. Initiatives to advance EBP in Austria and other countries with no academic or research tradition should primarily target practitioner-level factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Evidence and evidence gaps in tinnitus therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    A nearly endless number of procedures has been tried and in particular sold for the treatment of tinnitus, unfortunately they have not been evaluated appropriately in an evidence-based way. A causal therapy, omitting the tinnitus still does not exist, actually it cannot exist because of the various mechanisms of its origin. However or perhaps because of that, medical interventions appear and reappear like fashion trends that can never be proven by stable and reliable treatment success. This contribution will discuss and acknowledge all current therapeutic procedures and the existing or non-existing evidence will be assessed. Beside external evidence, the term of evidence also encompasses the internal evidence, i.e. the experience of the treating physician and the patient’s needs shall be included. While there is no evidence for nearly all direct procedures that intend modulating or stimulating either the cochlea or specific cervical regions such as the auditory cortex, there are therapeutic procedures that are acknowledged in clinical practice and have achieved at least a certain degree of evidence and generate measurable effect sizes. Those are in particular habituation therapy and psychotherapeutic measures, especially if they are combined with concrete measures for improved audio perception (hearing aids, CI, hearing therapies). PMID:28025604

  4. Thoughts on the current management of acute aluminum phosphide toxicity and proposals for therapy: An Evidence-based review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Maryam Vasheghani; Soroosh, Davood; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The majority of aluminum phosphide (ALP) toxicity cases are suicidal attempts. Despite advances in critical care medicine, the mortality rate of ALP remains very high. Unfortunately, knowledge on the toxicokinetics of ALP is very low. An obsolete idea was proposed that inhibition of complex IV of cytochrome C oxidase is responsible for multiorgan dysfunction. However, based on human studies, this effect might be insignificant. Thus, a novel idea proposes that the main mechanism might be vascular wall integrity disruption. The low frequency of acute toxicity and unanswered questions about the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics has led to leaden advances of novel treatments. The aim of this review was to evaluate problems regarding current treatment protocols and propose new ideas based on updated information. For this purpose, we reviewed all available articles on the management of ALP poisoning published to date. Considering failure of conventional therapies on maintaining systolic blood pressure, correcting acid-base disturbances, and support cardiac function, the previous treatment protocols have been overruled. However, repudiate of conventional treatments in this deadly condition is not without penalties for the health-care provider. The introduction of new therapies including refuse of gastric lavage with water-soluble compounds, administration of a high molecular weight colloidal solution for fluid resuscitation and termination using sodium bicarbonate, and vasoactive agents has been prospected to improve patient survival. This protocol is in early clinical evaluation; nevertheless, it appears to improve patient's survival; hence, future randomized trials should be performed to support their effectiveness. PMID:28149031

  5. Role of Combination Antimicrobial Therapy for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Infections: Review of the Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Juwon; Smith, Jordan R; Rybak, Michael J

    2017-05-01

    Enterococcus species are the second most common cause of nosocomial infections in the United States and are particularly concerning in critically ill patients with preexisting comorbid conditions. Rising resistance to antimicrobials that were historically used as front-line agents for treatment of enterococcal infections, such as ampicillin, vancomycin, and aminoglycosides, further complicates the treatment of these infections. Of particular concern are Enterococcus faecium strains that are associated with the highest rate of vancomycin resistance. The introduction of antimicrobial agents with specific activity against vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) faecium including daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and tigecycline did not completely resolve this clinical dilemma. In this review, the mechanisms of action and resistance to currently available anti-VRE antimicrobial agents including newer agents such as oritavancin and dalbavancin will be presented. In addition, novel combination therapies including β-lactams and fosfomycin, and the promising results from in vitro, animal studies, and clinical experience in the treatment of VRE faecium will be discussed. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  6. Evidence on acne therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Sousa Costa

    Full Text Available Among the current treatments available for acne vulgaris, many widely practiced options lack support from studies at the best level of scientific evidence. The aim of this narrative review was to present the very latest information on topical and systemic treatments for acne vulgaris. Information from systematic reviews and well-designed clinical trials, obtained through a systematic search of the major medical databases, is emphasized. There are important issues regarding the clinical management of acne that still lack consistent grounding in scientific evidence. Among these are the optimum dose and duration of treatment with oral antibiotics that can be given without inducing bacterial resistance, and the safety of oral isotretinoin.

  7. Current systemic therapies for melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palathinkal, Darren M; Sharma, Timmie R; Koon, Henry B; Bordeaux, Jeremy S

    2014-09-01

    Systemic agents are used in melanoma for adjuvant therapy and to treat metastatic disease. Currently, interferon-α is the only agent approved for adjuvant therapy. Six drugs are FDA approved for metastatic disease: dacarbazine, interleukin-2 (IL-2), vemurafenib, ipilimumab, dabrafenib, and trametinib. Vemurafenib and ipilimumab were approved in 2011, whereas dabrafenib and trametinib were approved in 2013. This review will update the practicing dermatologist on the differences in efficacy, adverse events, and cost of systemic therapies available for the treatment of melanoma. This article is a review of the current literature on systemic therapies for advanced melanoma. Key search words included "advanced melanoma," "systemic therapy," and "adjuvant therapy" with particular focus on the past 20 years. Before 2011, dacarbazine and IL-2 were the only FDA approved therapies for metastatic melanoma, and IFN-α is the only approved agent for adjuvant therapy. The new agents vemurafenib, ipilimumab, dabrafenib, and trametinib are the first to have improved overall survival in Phase III studies in comparison with other systemic therapies. Despite new developments, there remains a significant need for better therapies with improved long-term efficacy and decreased toxicity.

  8. Improving self-regulation in adolescents: current evidence for the role of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry-Parrish C

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carisa Perry-Parrish,1 Nikeea Copeland-Linder,2 Lindsey Webb,2 Ashley Shields,1 Erica MS Sibinga2 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Pediatric Medical Psychology Program, 2Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT was introduced in 1995 to address the problem of recurrent depression. MBCT is based on the notion that meditation helps individuals effectively deploy and regulate attention to effectively manage and treat a range of psychological symptoms, including emotional responses to stress, anxiety, and depression. Several studies demonstrate that mindfulness approaches can effectively reduce negative emotional reactions that result from and/or exacerbate psychiatric difficulties and exposure to stressors among children, adolescents, and their parents. Mindfulness may be particularly relevant for youth with maladaptive cognitive processes such as rumination. Clinical experience regarding the utility of mindfulness-based approaches, including MBCT, is being increasingly supported by empirical studies to optimize the effective treatment of youth with a range of challenging symptoms. This paper provides a description of MBCT, including mindfulness practices, theoretical mechanisms of action, and targeted review of studies in adolescents. Keywords: youth, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, adolescents

  9. Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Current Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokben Hizli Sayar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the electroconvulsive therapy guidelines state that severe major depression with psychotic features, manic delirium, or catatonia are conditions where there is a clear consensus favoring early electroconvulsive therapy. The decision to administer electroconvulsive therapy is based on an evaluation of the risks and benefits for the individual patient and involves a combination of factors, including psychiatric diagnosis, type and severity of symptoms, prior treatment history and response, identification of possible alternative treatment options, and consumer preference. In this review history, mechanisms of action, side effects that have been referenced in the literature and clinical experience are discussed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 107-125

  10. Current therapy for Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Obukhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD is to correct dopamine deficiency in the nigrostriatal system. Levodopa preparations and dopamine receptor agonists (DRAs that are prescribed with regards to patient age and disease severity are mainly used now. Notwithstanding the fact that levodopa preparations are the gold standard of therapy, their long-term use gives rise to complications as motor fluctuations and drug-induced dyskinesias. The currently available DRAs are the drugs of choice for the therapy of early-stage PD as they are as effective as levodopa preparations. In extensive-stage PD, DRAs are used to enhance the therapy and correction of developed motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. Pramipexole is one of the most commonly used representatives of non-ergoline DRAs. The paper analyzes the efficacy of the medication used as both monotherapy and part of combined therapy, its effect on tremor and depression in PD. A novel extended-release formulation of pramipexole is considered separately. Both immediate- and extended-release pramipexole formulations contain the same active ingredient and have the same dopamine-receptor interaction profile, but differ in the tablet release rate of the active ingredient. The advantages of the novel formulation are its more steady-state plasma concentration and 24-hour action, which ensures continuous dopaminergic stimulation ofpostsynaptic receptors to prevent and treat already developed motor complications. The once-daily extended-release formulation of the drug makes its treatment regimen easier and patient compliance higher.

  11. The Current State of Music Therapy Theory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    An essay on themes from Ken Aigen (2014): "The Study of Music Therapy. Current Issues and Concepts"......An essay on themes from Ken Aigen (2014): "The Study of Music Therapy. Current Issues and Concepts"...

  12. Assessing the quality, efficacy, and effectiveness of the current evidence base of active self-care complementary and integrative medicine therapies for the management of chronic pain: a rapid evidence assessment of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Roxana; York, Alexandra; Lee, Courtney; Crawford, Cindy; Buckenmaier, Chester; Schoomaker, Eric; Crawford, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Chronic pain management typically consists of prescription medications or provider-based, behavioral, or interventional procedures that are often ineffective, may be costly, and can be associated with undesirable side effects. Because chronic pain affects the whole person (body, mind, and spirit), patient-centered complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) therapies that acknowledge the patients' roles in their own healing processes have the potential to provide more efficient and comprehensive chronic pain management. Active self-care CIM (ACT-CIM) therapies allow for a more diverse, patient-centered treatment of complex symptoms, promote self-management, and are relatively safe and cost-effective. To date, there are no systematic reviews examining the full range of ACT-CIM used for chronic pain symptom management. A systematic review was conducted, using Samueli Institute's Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature methodology, to rigorously assess both the quality of the research on ACT-CIM modalities and the evidence for their efficacy and effectiveness in treating chronic pain symptoms. A working group of subject matter experts was also convened to evaluate the overall literature pool and develop recommendations for the use and implementation of these modalities. Following key database searches, 146 randomized controlled trials were included in the review. This article provides an introduction and background to the review, summarizes the methodological processes involved, details the initial results, and identifies strengths and weakness of the review. Specific results of the review as well as overall recommendations for moving this field of research forward are detailed throughout the current Pain Medicine supplement. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Current clinical evidence on pioglitazone pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eKawaguchi-Suzuki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pioglitazone is the most widely used thiazolidinedione and acts as an insulin-sensitizer through activation of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ. Pioglitazone is approved for use in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but its use in other therapeutic areas is increasing due to pleiotropic effects. In this hypothesis article, the current clinical evidence on pioglitazone pharmacogenomics is summarized and related to variability in pioglitazone response. How genetic variation in the human genome affects the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pioglitazone was examined. For pharmacodynamic effects, hypoglycemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, risks of fracture or edema, and the increase in body mass index in response to pioglitazone based on genotype were examined. The genes CYP2C8 and PPARG are the most extensively studied to date and selected polymorphisms contribute to respective variability in pioglitazone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We hypothesized that genetic variation in pioglitazone pathway genes contributes meaningfully to the clinically observed variability in drug response. To test the hypothesis that genetic variation in PPARG associates with variability in pioglitazone response, we conducted a meta-analysis to synthesize the currently available data on the PPARG p.Pro12Ala polymorphism. The results showed that PPARG 12Ala carriers had a more favorable change in fasting blood glucose from baseline as compared to patients with the wild-type Pro12Pro genotype (p=0.018. Unfortunately, findings for many other genes lack replication in independent cohorts to confirm association; further studies are needed. Also, the biological functionality of these polymorphisms is unknown. Based on current evidence, we propose that pharmacogenomics may provide an important tool to individualize pioglitazone therapy and better optimize therapy in patients with T2DM or other conditions for which pioglitazone

  14. Switching from neurostimulant therapy to atomoxetine in children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder : clinical approaches and review of current available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Suyash; Steer, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This review provides practical information on and clinical reasons for switching children and young people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) from neurostimulants to atomoxetine, detailing currently available evidence, and switching options. The issue is of particular relevance following recent guidance from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and European ADHD guidelines endorsing the use of atomoxetine, along with the stimulants methylphenidate and dexamphetamine, in the management of ADHD in children and adolescents in the UK. The selective norepinephrine (noradrenaline) reuptake inhibitor, atomoxetine, is a non-stimulant drug licensed for the treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents, and in adults who have shown a response in childhood. Following the once-daily morning dose, its therapeutic effects extend through the waking hours, into late evening, and in some patients, through to early the next morning. Atomoxetine may be considered for patients who are unresponsive or incompletely responsive to stimulant treatment, have co-morbid conditions (e.g. tics, anxiety, depression), and have sleep disturbances or eating problems, for patients in whom stimulants are poorly tolerated, and for situations where there is potential for drug abuse or diversion. Atomoxetine has been shown to be effective in relapse prevention and there is suggestion that atomoxetine may have a positive effect on global functioning; specifically health-related quality of life, self-esteem, and social and family functioning. According to one study, approximately 50% of non-responders to methylphenidate will respond to atomoxetine therapy and approximately 75% of responders to methylphenidate will also respond to atomoxetine. Atomoxetine may be initiated by a schedule of dose increases and cross-tapering with methylphenidate. A slow titration schedule with divided doses minimizes the impact of adverse events within the first several weeks of

  15. Sulfonylureas in type 2 diabetes mellitus: current evidence, conflicts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: We sought to explore the current state of evidence on sulfonylurea therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and critically examine the recommendations of major practice guidelines,and the overall ramifications of the issues thereof in current clinical practice. Method: We searched PUBMED, MEDLINE and ...

  16. Dual Therapy Treatment Strategies for the Management of Patients Infected with HIV: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence in ARV-Naive or ARV-Experienced, Virologically Suppressed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Jean-Guy; Angel, Jonathan B; Gill, M John; Gathe, Joseph; Cahn, Pedro; van Wyk, Jean; Walmsley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the current literature regarding antiretroviral (ARV)-sparing therapy strategies to determine whether these novel regimens can be considered appropriate alternatives to standard regimens for the initial treatment of ARV-naive patients or as switch therapy for those patients with virologically suppressed HIV infection. A search for studies related to HIV dual therapy published from January 2000 through April 2014 was performed using Biosis, Derwent Drug File, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Medline, Pascal, SciSearch, and TOXNET databases; seven major trial registries, and the abstracts of major conferences. Using predetermined criteria for inclusion, an expert review committee critically reviewed and qualitatively evaluated all identified trials for efficacy and safety results and potential limitations. Sixteen studies of dual therapy regimens were critiqued for the ARV-naive population. Studies of a protease inhibitor/ritonavir in combination with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir or the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor lamivudine provided the most definitive evidence supporting a role for dual therapy. In particular, lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir combined with raltegravir and lopinavir/ritonavir combined with lamivudine demonstrated noninferiority to standard of care triple therapy after 48 weeks of treatment. Thirteen trials were critiqued in ARV-experienced, virologically suppressed patients. The virologic efficacy outcomes were mixed. Although overall data regarding toxicity are limited, when compared with standard triple therapy, certain dual therapy regimens may offer advantages in renal function, bone mineral density, and limb fat changes; however, some dual combinations may elevate lipid or bilirubin levels. The potential benefits of dual therapy regimens include reduced toxicity, improved tolerability and adherence, and reduced cost. Although the data reviewed here provide valuable insights into the

  17. [Current status of aphasia therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C; von Stockert, T R

    1986-04-01

    Aphasia therapy in adults has been established to a larger extent relatively lately in the history of aphasiology, i.e. after its social medical importance had been realized and one of the cardinal problems of neurology solved more satisfactorily--lesion localization by imaging techniques. In order to evaluate the efficiency of aphasia therapy--which is still not quite uncontradicted--it was necessary to acquire sufficient knowledge of the spontaneous recovery process. It takes place--e.g. after stroke--mainly during the first 3 months, coming, as a rule, to a halt during the first year. Longer recovery periods, however, have been described. Next to etiology neurological status, overall health condition, type and severity of aphasia, and time delay between onset of the disease and start of therapy have been ascertained, whereas age and handedness seem to be of minor relevance. If syndrome change occurs the boundary between Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia is not surpassed; this taken apart almost any change from a more severe to a milder form of aphasia is possible. To isolate the therapeutic effect from spontaneous recovery in larger groups is difficult. There are, however, more recent investigations which suggest, that a correctly indicated therapy, which is sufficiently intensive and lasts long enough, will be effective. One of the corner-stones of any therapeutic effort ist adequate stimulation, oriented toward the patients needs and his aphasic syndrome, and taking into account the systemic nature of language and its most important linguistic structural components. Furthermore, a phase-specific and interdisciplinary approach and integration of closely related persons play an important role. We divide the numerous therapeutic techniques into 3 groups: direct or stimulation approach, indirect or circumventory approach, compensatory or alternative strategies approach. Representatives of all 3 groups are presented briefly, e.g. auditory stimulation, divergent

  18. Neurotoxicities of current leukemia therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzo, P.A.; Poplack, D.G.; Bleyer, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    While major advances have been made in the treatment of acute leukemia, complications of therapy are significant. One of the most worrisome complications is the neurotoxicity which is related to the central nervous system. We review the clinical signs and offer recommendations for monitoring, evaluating, and treating patients with potential or proven neurotoxicity

  19. [Current views of nutritional therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogozheva, A V; Kaganov, B S

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies in the Research Institute of Nutrition showed that dietary patterns of the Russian population are on the whole at variance with the balanced feeding formula largely due to excessive consumption of animal fat, insufficient consumption of proteins, vitamins, micro- and macroelements, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and dietary fibers. It is estimated that over 70% of total lethality in this country is due to diseases directly related to improper feeding (the so-called alimentary-dependent diseases), cardiovascular disorders, some neoplasms, diabetes mellitus, etc. Dietary therapy adjusted to specific pathogenetic features, clinical picture, stage of the disease, character of metabolic disorders in individual patients is an important factor having versatile beneficial effects on the patient's health, correcting metabolic problems, and improving quality of life. Decree No 330 of August 5, 2003 "On measures to improve nutritional therapy in medical institutions of the Russian Federation" introduced a new nomenclature of standard diets based on chemical composition of separate foods and the previously used system of numbered diets. Modern dietary therapy includes not only standard and special diets but also specific products to be used in concrete clinical conditions, enteral and parenteral nutrition, biologically active food additives, etc.

  20. Current perspectives of radiation therapy. History of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itami, Jun

    2011-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the discovery of X-Strahlen by Roentgen. The history of radiation therapy has evolved under mutual stimulating relationships of the external beam radiation therapy by X-ray tubes and accelerators, and the internal radiation therapy employing radium and other radionuclides. The currently employed technologies in radiation therapy have its origin already till nineteen sixties and the development of physics and engineering have realized the original concept. (author)

  1. Current and Emerging Therapy on Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucky Aziza Bawazier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is involvement of the kidney in patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and one of the most common target organ in SLE. The diagnosis of LN will significantly impact the clinical outcome and therapy of the patient. Therapy regiment of LN is divided into two stages, induction and maintenance treatment. The main objective of the induction therapy is to achieve complete or partial remission as soon as possible since it is correlated with better prognosis and fewer relapse incidence. In the maintenance stage, the main aim of the therapy is to maintain the remission status and avoid future relapse. It is also important to evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy as it will affect the duration and the regiment therapy being used. Corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, azathrioprine, cyclosporine and tacrolimus are example of drugs used in LN therapy. Currently, studies are being conducted to evaluate and develop targeted drug therapy to further add treatment options for LN.

  2. Current therapy of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Chichasova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The data on pathogenetically significant parameters that are involved in pain perception in fibromyalgia (FM patients (increased sensitivity or density of dopamine receptors D2, enhanced pain signal due to the elevated substance P level or insufficient modification of the pain signal caused by low serotonin level; allodynia phenomenon; and the psychosomatic component are reported. New classification criteria of FM and assessment of severity of the symptoms included in these criteria are presented. The changes that have taken place in therapy of FM pain over the past decade are demonstrated: less frequent use of peripheral analgesics, tricyclic antidepressants; more frequent use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran and pregabalin. The effectiveness and fair pain tolerability of pregabalin are demonstrated. The effectiveness and tolerability of duloxetine, milnacipran, and pregabalin are compared using the data of 17 randomized controlled trials. 

  3. Current therapy of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Chichasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The data on pathogenetically significant parameters that are involved in pain perception in fibromyalgia (FM patients (increased sensitivity or density of dopamine receptors D2, enhanced pain signal due to the elevated substance P level or insufficient modification of the pain signal caused by low serotonin level; allodynia phenomenon; and the psychosomatic component are reported. New classification criteria of FM and assessment of severity of the symptoms included in these criteria are presented. The changes that have taken place in therapy of FM pain over the past decade are demonstrated: less frequent use of peripheral analgesics, tricyclic antidepressants; more frequent use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran and pregabalin. The effectiveness and fair pain tolerability of pregabalin are demonstrated. The effectiveness and tolerability of duloxetine, milnacipran, and pregabalin are compared using the data of 17 randomized controlled trials. 

  4. Somatosensory tinnitus: Current evidence and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralli, Massimo; Greco, Antonio; Turchetta, Rosaria; Altissimi, Giancarlo; de Vincentiis, Marco; Cianfrone, Giancarlo

    2017-06-01

    In some individuals, tinnitus can be modulated by specific maneuvers of the temporomandibular joint, head and neck, eyes, and limbs. Neuroplasticity seems to play a central role in this capacity for modulation, suggesting that abnormal interactions between the sensory modalities, sensorimotor systems, and neurocognitive and neuroemotional networks may contribute to the development of somatosensory tinnitus. Current evidence supports a link between somatic disorders and higher modulation of tinnitus, especially in patients with a normal hearing threshold. Patients with tinnitus who have somatic disorders seems to have a higher chance of modulating their tinnitus with somatic maneuvers; consistent improvements in tinnitus symptoms have been observed in patients with temporomandibular joint disease following targeted therapy for temporomandibular disorders. Somatosensory tinnitus is often overlooked by otolaryngologists and not fully investigated during the diagnostic process. Somatic disorders, when identified and treated, can be a valid therapeutic target for tinnitus; however, somatic screening of subjects for somatosensory tinnitus is imperative for correct selection of patients who would benefit from a multidisciplinary somatic approach.

  5. Cognitive therapy: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Aaron T; Dozois, David J A

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive therapy is a system of psychotherapy with a powerful theoretical infrastructure, which has received extensive empirical support, and a large body of research attesting to its efficacy for a wide range of psychiatric and medical problems. This article provides a brief overview of the conceptual and practical components of cognitive therapy and highlights some of the empirical evidence regarding its efficacy. Cognitive therapy (often labeled generically as cognitive behavior therapy) is efficacious either alone or as an adjunct to medication and provides a prophylaxis against relapse and recurrence.

  6. [Current therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio García Merino, J

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of interferon beta 1 b for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, there has been a progressive increase in the number of drugs available for this disease. Currently, 11 drugs have been approved in Spain, and their indications depend on specific clinical characteristics. The present article reviews these indications and also discusses other medications without official approval that have also been used in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Current therapy for cognitive impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vasilyevna Vakhnina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairments (CIs are a highly common type of neurological disorders particularly in elderly patients. Choice of a therapeutic strategy for CI is determined by the etiology of abnormalities and their degree. Measures to prevent CI progression and dementia: adequate treatment of existing cardiovascular diseases, prevention of stroke, balanced nutrition, moderate physical and intellectual exercises, and combatting overweight and low activity are of basic value in treating mild and moderate CIs. According to the data of a number of investigations, the above measures reduce the risk of dementia, including in the genetically predisposed. Pharmacotherapy for mild and moderate CIs generally comprises vasoactive, neurometabolic, and noradrenergic agents. The indication for the use of memantine and/or acetylcholinergic agents, i.e. basic therapy for the most common forms of dementia (Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body dementia, vascular, and mixed dementia, hepatic colics is severe CIs. The long-term use of memantine and/or acetylcholinergic agents alleviates the cognitive and behavioral symptoms of dementia, enhances self-dependence in patients, and prolongs their active lifetime.

  8. Evidence Considerations for Mobile Devices in the Occupational Therapy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Erickson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile app-based device utilization, including smartphones and handheld tablets, suggests a need to evaluate evidence to guide selection and implementation of these devices in the occupational therapy process. The purpose of the research was to explore the current body of evidence in relation to mobile app-based devices and to identify factors in the use of these devices throughout the occupational therapy process. Following review of available occupational therapy profession guidelines, assistive technology literature, and available mobile device research, practitioners using mobile app-based devices in occupational therapy should consider three areas: client needs, practitioner competence, and device factors. The purpose of this guideline is to identify factors in the selection and use of mobile app-based devices throughout the occupational therapy process based on available evidence. Considerations for mobile device implementation during the occupational therapy process is addressed, including evaluating outcomes needs, matching device with the client, and identifying support needs of the client.

  9. Music therapy in palliative care: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Julian

    2002-03-01

    As the music therapy profession has developed internationally over the last 25 years, so has its role in palliative care. Music is a highly versatile and dynamic therapeutic modality, lending itself to a variety of music therapy techniques used to benefit both those living with life-threatening illnesses and their family members and caregivers. This article will give a broad overview of the historical roots of music therapy and introduce the techniques that are employed in current practice. By combining a review of mainstream music therapy practice involving musical improvisation, song-writing and receptive/recreational techniques with case material from my own experience, this article aims to highlight the potential music therapy holds as an effective holistic practice for palliative care, whatever the care setting.

  10. MIRROR THERAPY: A REVIEW OF EVIDENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Aishath Najiha; Jagatheesan Alagesan; Vandana J. Rathod; Poongundran Paranthaman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify and summarize the existing evidences on mirror box therapy for the management of various musculoskeletal conditions. A systemic literature search was performed to identify studies concerning mirror therapy. The included journal articles were reviewed and assessed for its significance. Fifty one studies were identified and reviewed. Five different patient categories were studied: 24 studies focussed on mirror therapy after stroke, thirteen studies focusse...

  11. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Kulak, Wojciech; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cell therapy and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in muscular dystrophy was performed.

  12. Current Biosafety Considerations in Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavinejad, Masoumeh; Andrews, Peter W.; Shoraki, Elham Kargar

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells can be valuable model systems for drug discovery and modelling human diseases as well as to investigate cellular interactions and molecular events in the early stages of development. Controlling the differentiation of stem cells into specific germ layers provides a potential source of highly specialized cells for therapeutic applications. In recent years, finding individual properties of stem cells such as their ultimate self-renewal capacity and the generation of particular cell lines by differentiation under specific culture conditions underpins the development of regenerative therapies. These futures make stem cells a leading candidate to treat a wide range of diseases. Nevertheless, as with all novel treatments, safety issues are one of the barriers that should be overcome to guarantee the quality of a patient’s life after stem cell therapy. Many studies have pointed to a large gap in our knowledge about the therapeutic applications of these cells. This gap clearly shows the importance of biosafety concerns for the current status of cell-based therapies, even more than their therapeutic efficacy. Currently, scientists report that tumorigenicity and immunogenicity are the two most important associated cell-based therapy risks. In principle, intrinsic factors such as cell characteristics and extrinsic elements introduced by manufacturing of stem cells can result in tumor formation and immunological reactions after stem cell transplantation. Therapeutic research shows there are many biological questions regarding safety issues of stem cell clinical applications. Stem cell therapy is a rapidly advancing field that needs to focus more on finding a comprehensive technology for assessing risk. A variety of risk factors (from intrinsic to extrinsic) should be considered for safe clinical stem cell therapies. PMID:27540533

  13. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Kulak, Wojciech; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cel...

  14. Targeted alpha therapy: Applications and current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchertseifer, Frank, E-mail: frank.bruchertseifer@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    Full text: The field of targeted alpha therapy has been developed rapidly in the last decade. Besides {sup 223}Ra, {sup 211}At and {sup 212}Pb/{sup 212}Bi the alpha emitters {sup 225}Ac and {sup 213}Bi are promising therapeutic radionuclides for application in targeted alpha therapy of cancer and infectious diseases. The presentation will give a short overview about the current clinical treatments with alpha emitting radionuclides and will place an emphasis on the most promising clinical testing of peptides and antibodies labelled with {sup 225}Ac and {sup 213}Bi for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with glioma and glioblastoma multiform, PSMA-positive tumor phenotype and bladder carcinoma in situ. (author)

  15. Current and emerging therapy for the management of vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borderé, Alicia Cecile; Lambert, Jo; van Geel, Nanny

    2009-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired cutaneous disorder of pigmentation, with an incidence of 0.5% to 2% worldwide. There are three major hypotheses for the pathogenesis of vitiligo that are not exclusive of each other: biochemical/cytotoxic, neural and autoimmune. Recent data provide strong evidence supporting an autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo. As vitiligo can have a major effect on quality of life, treatment can be considered and should preferably begin early when the disease is active. Current treatment modalities are directed towards stopping progression of the disease and achieving repigmentation. Therapies include corticosteroids, topical immunomodulators, photo(chemo)therapy, surgery, combination therapies and depigmentation of normally pigmented skin. Topical class 3 corticosteroids can be used for localized vitiligo. The use of topical immunomodulators (TIMs) in vitiligo seems to be equally effective as topical steroids, especially when used in the face and neck region. In photo(chemo)therapy, narrowband ultraviolet-B therapy (NB-UVB) seems to be superior to psoralen ultraviolet-A therapy (PUVA) and broadband UVB. In surgical techniques, split-thickness grafting and epidermal blister grafting were shown to be effective methods, although the non-cultured epidermal suspension technique has many advantages and seems to be a promising development. Depigmentation therapy can be considered if vitiligo affects more than 60% to 80% of the body. Complementary therapies such as Polypodium leucotomos show promising results in combination with UVB therapy. No causative treatment for vitiligo is currently available. More randomized controlled trials on the treatment of vitiligo are necessary. PMID:21436965

  16. Current status of neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    There are about 6000 new glioblastoma multiform brain tumours diagnosed each year in the United States of America alone. This cancer is usually fatal within six months of diagnosis even with current standard treatments. Research on boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been considered as a method of potentially curing such cancers. There is a great interest at under-utilised research reactors institutions to identify new medical utilization, attractive to the general public. Neutron capture therapy is a true multidisciplinary topic with a large variety of individuals involved. This publication attempts to provide current information for all those thinking about being involved with NCT, based on the knowledge and experience of those who have pioneered the treatment. It covers the whole range of NCT from designing reactor conversions or new facilities, through to clinical trials and their effectiveness. However, since most work has been done with boron capture therapy for brain tumours using modified thermal research reactors, this tends to be the focus of the report. One of the factors which need to be addressed at the beginning is the timing of the further development of NCT facilities. It should be emphasised that all current work is still at the research stage. Many of those now involved believe that there is little need for many more research facilities until such time as the treatment shows more promising results. For this and other reasons discussed in the report, very serious consideration should be given by research reactor owners and operators before spending large sums of money converting their facilities for NCT

  17. Therapy of Human African Trypanosomiasis: Current Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Atouguia

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of the current situation of the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis. The existing approved drugs are old, toxic and/or expensive. Therapeutic failures are common. Several factors may contribute to the problems of chemotherapy, including differences in the epidemiology of the disease, difficulties in the diagnosis and staging of the infection, availability, distribution and pharmacologic properties of drugs, standardization of treatment regimens, response to therapy, follow-up period, and relapses and clinical trials. The new therapeutic approaches include the development and approval of new drugs, the use of new therapeutic regimens, the study of drug combinations, and the development of new formulations.

  18. Current and emerging therapy for the management of vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Cecile Borderé

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Alicia Cecile Borderé, Jo Lambert, Nanny van GeelUniversity Hospital of Ghent, Department of Dermatology, Ghent, BelgiumAbstract: Vitiligo is an acquired cutaneous disorder of pigmentation, with an incidence of 0.5% to 2% worldwide. There are three major hypotheses for the pathogenesis of vitiligo that are not exclusive of each other: biochemical/cytotoxic, neural and autoimmune. Recent data provide strong evidence supporting an autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo. As vitiligo can have a major effect on quality of life, treatment can be considered and should preferably begin early when the disease is active. Current treatment modalities are directed towards stopping progression of the disease and achieving repigmentation. Therapies include corticosteroids, topical immunomodulators, photo(chemotherapy, surgery, combination therapies and depigmentation of normally pigmented skin. Topical class 3 corticosteroids can be used for localized vitiligo. The use of topical immunomodulators (TIMs in vitiligo seems to be equally effective as topical steroids, especially when used in the face and neck region. In photo(chemotherapy, narrowband ultraviolet-B therapy (NB-UVB seems to be superior to psoralen ultraviolet-A therapy (PUVA and broadband UVB. In surgical techniques, split-thickness grafting and epidermal blister grafting were shown to be effective methods, although the non-cultured epidermal suspension technique has many advantages and seems to be a promising development. Depigmentation therapy can be considered if vitiligo affects more than 60% to 80% of the body. Complementary therapies such as Polypodium leucotomos show promising results in combination with UVB therapy. No causative treatment for vitiligo is currently available. More randomized controlled trials on the treatment of vitiligo are necessary.Keywords: vitiligo, non-surgical treatment, surgical treatment

  19. Complementary spiritist therapy: systematic review of scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Lucchetti, Alessandra L Granero; Bassi, Rodrigo M; Nobre, Marlene Rossi Severino

    2011-01-01

    Spiritism is the third most common religion in Brazil, and its therapies have been used by millions worldwide. These therapies are based on therapeutic resources including prayer, laying on of hands, fluidotherapy (magnetized water), charity/volunteering, spirit education/moral values, and disobsession (spirit release therapy). This paper presents a systematic review of the current literature on the relationship among health outcomes and 6 predictors: prayer, laying on of hands, magnetized/fluidic water, charity/volunteering, spirit education (virtuous life and positive affect), and spirit release therapy. All articles were analyzed according to inclusion/exclusion criteria, Newcastle-Ottawa and Jadad score. At present, there is moderate to strong evidence that volunteering and positive affect are linked to better health outcomes. Furthermore, laying on of hands, virtuous life, and praying for oneself also seem to be associated to positive findings. Nevertheless, there is a lack of studies on magnetized water and spirit release therapy. In summary, science is indirectly demonstrating that some of these therapies can be associated to better health outcomes and that other therapies have been overlooked or poorly investigated. Further studies in this field could contribute to the disciplines of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by investigating the relationship between body, mind, and soul/spirit.

  20. Complementary Spiritist Therapy: Systematic Review of Scientific Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Lucchetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spiritism is the third most common religion in Brazil, and its therapies have been used by millions worldwide. These therapies are based on therapeutic resources including prayer, laying on of hands, fluidotherapy (magnetized water, charity/volunteering, spirit education/moral values, and disobsession (spirit release therapy. This paper presents a systematic review of the current literature on the relationship among health outcomes and 6 predictors: prayer, laying on of hands, magnetized/fluidic water, charity/volunteering, spirit education (virtuous life and positive affect, and spirit release therapy. All articles were analyzed according to inclusion/exclusion criteria, Newcastle-Ottawa and Jadad score. At present, there is moderate to strong evidence that volunteering and positive affect are linked to better health outcomes. Furthermore, laying on of hands, virtuous life, and praying for oneself also seem to be associated to positive findings. Nevertheless, there is a lack of studies on magnetized water and spirit release therapy. In summary, science is indirectly demonstrating that some of these therapies can be associated to better health outcomes and that other therapies have been overlooked or poorly investigated. Further studies in this field could contribute to the disciplines of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by investigating the relationship between body, mind, and soul/spirit.

  1. Current Evidence Supporting Obstetric Fistula Prevention Strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidences from the articles were linked to prevention strategies retrieved from grey literature. The strategies were classified using an innovative target-focused method. Gaps in the literature show the need for fistula prevention research to aim at systematically measuring incidence and prevalence of the disease, identify the ...

  2. Current evidence for dark matter radiative decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, D.W.; Ralston, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper evidence for an unexplained flux of ionizing uv radiation in intergalactic space is reviewed and the case is made that dark matter tau neutrinos radiatively decaying to mu neutrinos account for the uv photon flux. A viable model of diagonal and transition magnetic moments which introduces a single charged scalar SU(2) weak singlet is described. Constraints from the Supernova 1987a, including the bearing of the recent putative pulsar signal on the problem, are briefly discussed

  3. Art Therapy, Research and Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gilroy, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Art Therapy around the world is under increasing pressure to become more "evidence-based". As a result, practitioners now need to get to grips with what constitutes "evidence", how to apply research in appropriate ways and also how to contribute to the body of evidence through their own research and other related activities.\\ud \\ud Written specifically for art therapy practitioners and students, Art Therapy, Research & Evidence Based Practice traces the background to EBP, critically reviews t...

  4. Current therapy for chronic cerebrovascular attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shmonin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic cerebrovascular attack (CCVA is a brain lesion caused by vascular factors. CCVA appears as cognitive impairments (CIs, affective (emotional disorders and focal syndromes. Treatment for CCVA requires a comprehensive approach. Effective combination therapy for CCVA involves secondary prevention of stroke and CIs; treatment of CIs; treatment of depression and other affective disorders; and neuroprotective therapy. Basic therapy for CCVA includes modification of risk factors, antihypertensive, hypolipidemic, and antithrombotic therapies. Central acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (galantamine, rivastigmine, donepezil and a reversible NMDA receptor blocker (memantine are symptomatically used at a stage of vascular and mixed dementia. There are no unique guidelines for the therapy of mild and moderate vascular nondementia-related CIs. Drug use, based on the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the development of vascular CIs, is substantiated. When choosing psychotropic agents, it is necessary to take into account the causes and clinical manifestations of neuromediator deficiency. Antidepressants are used as essential drugs. Neuroleptics and tranquilizers are additionally administered in complex-pattern syndromes, such as depression with marked anxiety. Prescription of neuroprotectors may be effective in treating both stroke and CCVA. These medicaments are most effective when a damaging factor acts, i.e. neuroprotectors should be given in a risk situation and to reduce damage. Citicoline is one of the most test drugs in a group of neuroprotectors. 

  5. A systematic review of the evidence base for Schema Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masley, Samantha A; Gillanders, David T; Simpson, Susan G; Taylor, Morag A

    2012-01-01

    Schema Therapy is becoming an increasingly popular psychological model for working with individuals who have a variety of mental health and personality difficulties. The aim of this review is to look at the current evidence base for Schema Therapy and highlight directions for further research. A systematic search of the literature was conducted up until January 2011. All studies that had clinically tested the efficacy of Schema Therapy as described by Jeffrey Young (1994 and 2003) were considered. These studies underwent detailed quality assessments based on Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN-50) culminating in 12 studies being included in the review. The culminative message (both from the popularity of this model and the medium-to-large effect sizes) is of a theory that has already demonstrated clinically effective outcomes in a small number of studies and that would benefit from ongoing research and development with complex client groups. It is imperative that psychological practice be guided by high-quality research that demonstrates efficacious, evidence-based interventions. It is therefore recommended that researchers and clinicians working with Schema Therapy seek to build on these positive outcomes and further demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of this model through ongoing research.

  6. Current resistance issues in antimicrobial therapy | Senekal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The human gut contains 1013 - 1014 bacteria that are exposed to selection pressure whenever antibiotics are administered.1 The same selection pressure applies to respiratory flora, which is one of the reasons why antimicrobial therapy prescribed for the treatment of respiratory tract infection should aim to eradicate ...

  7. Current resistance issues in anti- microbial therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of otitis media, sinusitis, community-acquired pneumonia, meningitis and bacteraemia. Penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) has emerged during the last few decades, complicating therapy for such infections. However, because of a recent change in penicillin.

  8. Pleomorphic lobular carcinomain situ: Current evidence and a systemic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Umar; Wazir, Ali; Wells, Clive; Mokbel, Kefah

    2016-12-01

    Pleomorphic lobular carcinoma in situ (PLCIS) has only recently been identified as a distinct pathological entity within classic lobular carcinoma in situ (CLCIS). As such, there is currently no consensus among clinicians regarding the optimal treatment of this disease. The present study determined the risk of concomitant invasive disease and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) if PLCIS is observed on core needle biopsy (CNB) and collated the evidence regarding the risk of recurrence in relation to surgical margins and adjuvant therapy. In addition, the pertinent literature available through MedLine, PubMed, the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords was reviewed. The pooled results of studies in the literature demonstrated a concomitant presence of invasive disease of 40%, and 15% for DCIS. The studies that examined recurrence rates indicated that the risk is reduced with ample resection margins (>2 mm) and adjuvant radiotherapy. However, recent studies raise concerns regarding breast conservation when pursuing clear margins. No level 1 evidence from prospective studies, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), or meta-analyses based on such RCTs was identified. This is a clinical issue that warrants investigation in appropriately powered well designed prospective studies for a satisfactory resolution of all concerns.

  9. Intramuscular extended-release naltrexone: current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastfriend, David R

    2011-01-01

    Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol), developed to address poor adherence in addictive disorders, is approved for use in alcohol and opioid-dependence disorders. In alcohol-dependent adults with ≥ 4-day initial abstinence, XR-NTX increased initial and 6-month abstinence. An fMRI study found that XR-NTX attenuated the salience of alcohol visual and olfactory cues in the absence of alcohol, and post hoc analyses demonstrated efficacy even during high cue-exposure holiday periods. Safety and tolerability have generally been good, without adverse hepatic impact or intractable acute pain management. XR-NTX use appears feasible in primary care and public systems, and retrospective claims analyses have found cost savings and decreased intensive service utilization relative to oral agents. In opioid dependence, following detoxification, XR-NTX shows efficacy for maintaining abstinence, improving retention, decreasing craving, and preventing relapse. Trials are also exploring its use for the treatment of stimulant dependence. XR-NTX appears compatible with counseling and self-help attendance. While more research is needed, current findings suggest that a formulation of naltrexone that was sought beginning over three decades ago is fulfilling its promise as an extended-release pharmacotherapeutic. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. [Pediatric ependymomas: Current diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappaz, Didier; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Beuriat, Pierre-Aurelien; Alapetite, Claire; Grill, Jacques; Szathmari, Alexandru; Faure-Conter, Cécile

    2016-10-01

    Ependymomas represent 10% of pediatric brain tumors. In the recent WHO 2016 classification, pathology is enriched by localization and molecular biology. Whatever the age, total removal by one or several looks when required remains a major prognostic factor. In children, focal radiation remains a standard, while the role of chemotherapy is matter of randomized studies. In infants, front line chemotherapy is the standard. Inclusion in the SIOP ependymoma II protocol is encouraged. In case of relapse, further surgery and radiation are advised, while inclusion in innovative trials including re-irradiation, and phase I-II should be encouraged. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms of ependymoma cell will provide in the close future, the key to use targeted therapies at time of relapse, and very soon as first line therapy for some subgroups of patients. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Current resistance issues in antimicrobial therapy | Senekal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 28, No 2 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. Current potential of radionuclide applications in therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, L.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented of the proceedings of the 4th Boettstein Collegium held in June, 1986 in Wuerenlingen (CH), debating new possibilities in applying radionuclides in the therapy of malignant diseases. The new possibilities are open with the development of new biological carriers with high detection capacities, especially monoclonal antibodies. Therapeutical applications are characterized of some radionuclides, mainly 131 I and 123 I, and beta and alpha radionuclides are listed promising for therapeutical uses. Therapeutical prospects are also outlined for immunotherapy. (L.O.). 1 ref

  13. Current Care and Investigational Therapies in Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Sheila; Bonafé, Luisa; Gouze, Elvire

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this review is to evaluate the management options for achondroplasia, the most common non-lethal skeletal dysplasia. This disease is characterized by short stature and a variety of complications, some of which can be quite severe. Despite several attempts to standardize care, there is still no widely accepted consensus. This is in part due to absence of concrete data on the incidence of sudden unexplained death in infants with achondroplasia and the best investigation for ascertaining which individuals could benefit from foramen magnum decompression surgery. In this review, we identify the different options of care and management for the various orthopedic, neurologic, and respiratory complications. In parallel, several innovative or drug repositioning therapies are being investigated that would restore bone growth but may also prevent complications. Achondroplasia is the most common non-lethal skeletal dysplasia. It is characterized by short stature and a variety of complications, some of which can be quite severe. Despite several attempts to standardize care, there is still no widely accepted consensus. This is in part due to absence of concrete data on the incidence of sudden unexplained death in infants with achondroplasia and the best investigation for ascertaining which individuals could benefit from foramen magnum decompression surgery. In this review, we identify the different options of care and management for the various orthopedic, neurologic, and respiratory complications. In parallel, several innovative or drug repositioning therapies are being investigated that would restore bone growth but may also prevent complications.

  14. Current therapies in rheumatoid arthritis: a Latin American perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Catoggio, Luis Jose; Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Ostojich, Kasmir; Cardiel, Mario H

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease affecting the synovium of joints, tendons, and some extra-articular sites. RA prevalence in Latin America ranges from 0.4 to 1.6%. Early treatment of RA translates into a substantial reduction in the cost to society. In light of this, early disease clinics are being established in some countries. Barriers to RA management, such as delay in referral to rheumatologists and limited access to therapy, have been identified. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been adapted by countries according to their own situations. The need for keeping accurate records of biologics prescribed has been addressed by biologic registries, thereby contributing toward a better understanding of rheumatic diseases and their treatment. Current biologics include the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab), B-cell depletion agent (rituximab), interleukin-6 receptor blocker (tocilizumab), and T-cell co-stimulatory blocker (abatacept). Future therapies include kinase inhibitors (tofacitinib and fostamatinib), alternative TNF-α inhibitors (golimumab and certolizumab), and biosimilars. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Geographic atrophy: Etiopathogenesis and current therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Ibáñez, M; Barreiro-González, A; Gallego-Pinazo, R; Dolz-Marco, R; García-Armendariz, B

    2018-01-01

    Geographic atrophy is characterized by severe visual deficit whose etiology and pathophysiology are yet to be elucidated. As a working hypothesis, oxidative damage could trigger a chronic inflammation in Bruch's membrane-RPE-choriocapillaris complex, mostly due to complement pathway overactivation. Some individuals with mutations in the complement system and other factors have diminished capacity in the modulation of the inflammatory response, which results in cell damage and waste accumulation. This accumulation of intracellular and extracellular waste products manifests as drusen and pigmentary changes that precede the atrophy of photoreceptors, RPE, choriocapillaris with an ischemic process with decreased choroid flow. All these processes can be detected as tomographic findings and autofluorescence signals that are useful in the evaluation of patients with atrophic AMD, which helps to establish an individualized prognosis. Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and therapies that decrease the accumulation of toxins for the preservation of the RPE cells and photoreceptors are being investigated in order to slow down the progression of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Hormone-replacement therapy: current thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Roger A

    2017-04-01

    For several decades, the role of hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) has been debated. Early observational data on HRT showed many benefits, including a reduction in coronary heart disease (CHD) and mortality. More recently, randomized trials, including the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), studying mostly women many years after the the onset of menopause, showed no such benefit and, indeed, an increased risk of CHD and breast cancer, which led to an abrupt decrease in the use of HRT. Subsequent reanalyzes of data from the WHI with age stratification, newer randomized and observational data and several meta-analyses now consistently show reductions in CHD and mortality when HRT is initiated soon after menopause. HRT also significantly decreases the incidence of various symptoms of menopause and the risk of osteoporotic fractures, and improves quality of life. In younger healthy women (aged 50-60 years), the risk-benefit balance is positive for using HRT, with risks considered rare. As no validated primary prevention strategies are available for younger women (<60 years of age), other than lifestyle management, some consideration might be given to HRT as a prevention strategy as treatment can reduce CHD and all-cause mortality. Although HRT should be primarily oestrogen-based, no particular HRT regimen can be advocated.

  17. Parent–Child Interaction Therapy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieneman CC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Corey C Lieneman, Laurel A Brabson, April Highlander, Nancy M Wallace, Cheryl B McNeil Department of Psychology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA Abstract: Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT is an empirically supported intervention originally developed to treat disruptive behavior problems in children between the ages of 2 and 7 years. Since its creation over 40 years ago, PCIT has been studied internationally with various populations and has been found to be an effective intervention for numerous behavioral and emotional issues. This article summarizes progress in the PCIT literature over the past decade (2006–2017 and outlines future directions for this important work. Recent PCIT research related to treatment effectiveness, treatment components, adaptations for specific populations (age groups, cultural groups, military families, individuals diagnosed with specific disorders, trauma survivors, and the hearing-impaired, format changes (group and home-based, teacher–child interaction training (TCIT, intensive PCIT (I-PCIT, treatment as prevention (for externalizing problems, child maltreatment, and developmental delays, and implementation are discussed. Keywords: PCIT, adaptations, implementation, effectiveness

  18. Evidence-based music therapy practice: an integral understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The American Music Therapy Association has recently put into action a plan called its Research Strategic Priority, with one of its central purposes to advance the music therapy field through research promoting Evidence-Based Practice of music therapy. The extant literature on music therapy practice, theory, and research conveys a range of very different perspectives on what may count as the "evidence" upon which practice is based. There is therefore a need to conceptualize evidence-based music therapy practice in a multifaceted, yet coherent and balanced way. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate a framework based upon four distinct epistemological perspectives on evidence-based music therapy practice that together represent an integral understanding.

  19. Current concepts in rational therapy for haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, D H; Halliday, J W

    1991-06-01

    Genetic haemochromatosis is characterised by an inappropriately high rate of iron absorption by the small intestine. The disease is transmitted as an autosomal recessive condition. The gene frequency in the Caucasian population is approximately 1 in 20 and the disease frequency is 1 in 400. Excessive iron deposition occurs in the liver, pancreas, heart, pituitary and joints and hepatic iron concentrations above approximately 400 mumol/g dry weight are always associated with fibrosis and usually with cirrhosis and progressive liver failure. Accurate diagnosis depends upon the demonstration of elevated hepatic iron stores. An hepatic iron index [hepatic iron concentration (in mumol/g dry weight) divided by patient age] of greater than 2.0 distinguishes homozygous subjects from the other conditions in which slight increases in hepatic iron concentration may occur, e.g. in a subject heterozygous for haemochromatosis or alcoholic liver disease. If cirrhosis is present, patients are at a high risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, they should undergo regular abdominal ultrasound and alpha-fetoprotein estimation. In the absence of cirrhosis, phlebotomy restores life expectancy to normal. Venesection should be continued until all excess iron stores are removed as judged by failure of a rise in haemoglobin concentration on cessation of phlebotomy. Screening of first degree relatives should commence from a young age (e.g. 10 years). If serum ferritin or transferrin saturation are abnormal, liver biopsy should be undertaken. HLA typing of the family allows for the identification of those siblings who are most likely to develop the disease. Secondary iron overload is often multifactorial in origin. Iron chelation therapy with subcutaneous deferoxamine (desferrioxamine) should only commence after careful consideration of the potential benefits in each individual patient.

  20. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind K Makharia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAt present, strict and lifelong gluten free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50mg/day can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of compliance by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase-2, immune-modulation and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoides, budesonides and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appears very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten free diet.

  1. Current and emerging therapy for celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharia, Govind K

    2014-01-01

    At present, strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Even small amounts of gluten (50 mg/day) can be immunogenic; therefore all food and food items and drugs that contain gluten and its derivatives must be eliminated completely from the diet. While prescribing gluten-free diet is easy; the key to the success is the dietary counseling by a nutrition specialist and maintenance of adherence to GFD by the patient. In recent times, a number of targets to halt the process of immunological injury have been explored to find out alternative treatment for celiac disease. These targets include exploration of ancient wheat if they are less immunogenic, intra-luminal digestion of gluten using prolylendopeptidases, pretreatment of whole gluten with bacterial-derived peptidase before ingestion; prevention of passage of immunogenic peptides through the tight junctions such as zonulin antagonists, Blocking of HLA-DQ2 to prevent binding of immunogenic peptides, inhibition of transglutaminase 2, immune-modulation, and induction of tolerance to gluten using gluten tolerizing vaccines, use of gluten-sequestering polymers, use of anti-inflammatory drugs (glucocorticoids, budesonides) and anti-cytokines such as anti TNF-α, and anti-interleukin-15. While many of these targets are still in the pre-clinical phase, some of them including zonulin antagonist and endopeptidases have already reached phase II and phase III clinical trials. Furthermore, while these targets appear very exciting; they at best are likely to be used as adjunctive therapy rather than a complete replacement for gluten-free diet.

  2. Occupational Therapy in Preschools: A Synthesis of Current Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, Emmanuelle; Gauthier, Anne; Julien, Marjorie; Hui, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of current knowledge about occupational therapy in preschools (for 3-6 year olds) in order to provide a better understanding of this field of practice and to guide the implementation or programming of this service. In the literature, occupational therapy in preschools has been documented mainly in the USA. Results…

  3. Current oncologic applications of radiofrequency ablation therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhruvil R; Green, Sari; Elliot, Angelina; McGahan, John P; Khatri, Vijay P

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) uses high frequency alternating current to heat a volume of tissue around a needle electrode to induce focal coagulative necrosis with minimal injury to surrounding tissues. RFA can be performed via an open, laparoscopic, or image guided percutaneous approach and be performed under general or local anesthesia. Advances in delivery mechanisms, electrode designs, and higher power generators have increased the maximum volume that can be ablated, while maximizing oncological outcomes. In general, RFA is used to control local tumor growth, prevent recurrence, palliate symptoms, and improve survival in a subset of patients that are not candidates for surgical resection. It’s equivalence to surgical resection has yet to be proven in large randomized control trials. Currently, the use of RFA has been well described as a primary or adjuvant treatment modality of limited but unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, liver metastasis, especially colorectal cancer metastases, primary lung tumors, renal cell carcinoma, boney metastasis and osteoid osteomas. The role of RFA in the primary treatment of early stage breast cancer is still evolving. This review will discuss the general features of RFA and outline its role in commonly encountered solid tumors. PMID:23671734

  4. Angioedema: etiology, pathophysiology, current and emerging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lawrence M

    2013-11-01

    Angioedema (AE) is characterized by nonpitting edema of the dermis and subcutaneous layers. The most common sites of involvement are the tongue, lips, face, and throat; however, swelling can also occur in the extremities, genitalia, and viscera. Life-threatening airway swelling can also occur. AE may be allergic or nonallergic. The overall lifetime incidence of AE is reported to be as high as 15%. This article summarizes the etiology, pathophysiology, and current treatment of several forms of nonallergic AE (including hereditary, acquired, and idiopathic AE) and focuses on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema (ACEi-AE), which is responsible for 30%-40% of all AE seen in United States emergency departments. Although the triggers, which are primary biologic mechanisms, and treatments for ACEi-AE may differ from those of the hereditary and acquired forms of AE, the clinical effects of ACEi-AE are mediated through a shared pathway, the kallikrein-kinin system. Thus, although current therapeutic options for ACEi-AE are limited, recent advances in the treatment of hereditary AE (HAE) appear promising for improving the outcomes of patients with ACEi-AE. New HAE medications that correct imbalances in the kallikrein-kinin system may prove safe and efficacious in the treatment of ACEi-AE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Associations between highly active antiretroviral therapy and the presence of HPV, premalignant and malignant cervical lesions in sub-Saharan Africa, a systematic review: current evidence and directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sonia; Rossi, Rodolfo; Zdraveska, Natasha; Kariisa, Mbabazi; Acharya, Sushama D; Vanden Broeck, Davy; Callens, Steven

    2017-08-04

    In sub-Saharan Africa, substantial international funding along with evidence-based clinical practice have resulted in an unparalleled scale-up of access to antiretroviral treatment at a higher CD4 count. The role and timing of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in mediating cervical disease remains unclear. The aim of this article is to systematically review all evidence pertaining to Africa and identify research gaps regarding the epidemiological association between HAART use and the presence of premalignant/malignant cervical lesions. Five databases were searched until January 2017 to retrieve relevant literature from sub-Saharan Africa. Publications were included if they addressed prevalence, incidence or clearance of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women undergoing HAART as well as cytological or histological neoplastic abnormalities. 22 studies were included, of which seven were prospective studies. Women receiving HAART are less likely to develop squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs). There is evidence that duration of HAART along with the CD4 count may reduce the prevalence of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), suggesting that without HAART, severe immunosuppression increases the risk of becoming or remaining infected with HR-HPV. Furthermore, according to existent literature, the CD4 count, rather than HAART coverage or its duration, plays a central role in the prevalence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2 and CIN 3. Our findings suggest a positive impact of HAART duration, in conjunction and interaction with CD4 count, on reducing the prevalence of HR-HPV. The greatest treatment effect might be seen among women starting at the lowest CD4 count, which may have a more instrumental role in cervical oncogenesis than either HAART use or the treatment duration on the prevalence of CIN 2 and CIN 3. There is still insufficient evidence to show a clear association between HAART coverage and the incidence of invasive cervical cancer. Enhanced

  6. Effect of interferential current therapy on forward head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ye-Jin; Kim, Hee-Jung; Han, Sun-Young; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2018-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of interferential current therapy on the shoulder muscles of subjects with forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty volunteers (15 forward head posture, 15 control) participated in this study. Interferential current therapy treatment was conducted for 10 min, three times per week, for 3 weeks on both the upper trapezius and levator scapulae. Subjects were measured anterior both acromion distance and posterior both acromial distance using a ruler, and the forward head posture angle using an electronic application. [Results] Both groups showed significant increases in anterior acromial distance, and decreases in posterior acromial distance and forward head posture angle. [Conclusion] Subjects were concluded that electrical therapy could improve structural alignment; therefore, the implementation of interferential current therapy is expected to be effective for the treatment of forward head posture.

  7. Effectiveness of CAM therapy: understanding the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland

    2011-02-01

    By definition, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) attempts to diagnose and treat illnesses in unconventional ways. CAM has been classified as: (1) alternative medical systems (eg, traditional Chinese medicine [including acupuncture], naturopathic medicine, ayurvedic medicine, and homeopathy); (2) biologic-based therapies (eg, herbal, special dietary, and individual biologic treatments); (3) energy therapies (eg, Reiki, therapeutic touch, magnet therapy, Qi Gong, and intercessory prayer); (4) manipulative and body-based systems (eg, chiropractic, osteopathy, and massage); and (5) mind-body interventions (eg, meditation, biofeedback, hypnotherapy, and the relaxation response). This review focuses on how to assess the effectiveness of CAM therapies for chronic musculoskeletal pains, emphasizing the role of specific and nonspecific analgesic mechanisms, including placebo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence-based analysis of physical therapy in Parkinson's disease with recommendations for practice and research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, S.H.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Hendriks, E.J.M.; Bredero-Cohen, A.B.; Munneke, M.

    2007-01-01

    Physical therapy is often prescribed in Parkinson's disease. To facilitate the uniformity and efficacy of this intervention, we analyzed current evidence and developed practice recommendations. We carried out an evidence-based literature review. The results were supplemented with clinical expertise

  9. Preferences for antiretroviral therapy services: Qualitative evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is one of the interventions meant to prolong the progression from HIV to AIDS for People Living with HIV (PLHIVs). Although ART was introduced in Ghana in 2003, there is little or no information about the preferences of those on ART services. The main objective of the study therefore was to ...

  10. Evidence to Practice Commentary: Is More Therapy Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Iona

    2012-01-01

    Parents seek sustained intense "hands-on" therapy for their children based on a belief that "more is better." Since the core objective of evidence-based practice (EBP) is to do the right things, for the right child, at the right time, and to optimize intervention outcomes, it is vital to know what the literature says about how much therapy to…

  11. Music therapy in cardiac health care: current issues in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, Suzanne B

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is a service that has become more prevalent as an adjunct to medical practice-as its evidence base expands and music therapists begin to join the cardiology team in every phase of care, from the most serious cases to those maintaining good heart health. Although applications of music medicine, primarily listening to short segments of music, are capable of stabilizing vital signs and managing symptoms in the short-term, music therapy interventions by a qualified practitioner are showing promise in establishing deeper and more lasting impact. On the basis of mind-body approaches, stress/coping models, the neuromatrix theory of pain, and entrainment, music therapy capitalizes on the ability of music to affect the autonomic nervous system. Although only a limited number of randomized controlled trials pinpoint the efficacy of specific music therapy interventions, qualitative research reveals some profound outcomes in certain individuals. A depth of understanding related to the experience of living with a cardiovascular disease can be gained through music therapy approaches such as nonverbal music psychotherapy and guided imagery and music. The multifaceted nature of musical responsiveness contributes to strong individual variability and must be taken into account in the development of research protocols for future music therapy and music medicine interventions. The extant research provides a foundation for exploring the many potential psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual outcomes of a music therapy service for cardiology patients.

  12. Individualized Low-Amplitude Seizure Therapy: Minimizing Current for Electroconvulsive Therapy and Magnetic Seizure Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V; Krystal, Andrew D; Rosa, Moacyr A; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at conventional current amplitudes (800–900 mA) is highly effective but carries the risk of cognitive side effects. Lowering and individualizing the current amplitude may reduce side effects by virtue of a less intense and more focal electric field exposure in the brain, but this aspect of ECT dosing is largely unexplored. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST) induces a weaker and more focal electric field than ECT; however, the pulse amplitude is not individualized and the minimum amplitude required to induce a seizure is unknown. We titrated the amplitude of long stimulus trains (500 pulses) as a means of determining the minimum current amplitude required to induce a seizure with ECT (bilateral, right unilateral, bifrontal, and frontomedial electrode placements) and MST (round coil on vertex) in nonhuman primates. Furthermore, we investigated a novel method of predicting this amplitude-titrated seizure threshold (ST) by a non-convulsive measurement of motor threshold (MT) using single pulses delivered through the ECT electrodes or MST coil. Average STs were substantially lower than conventional pulse amplitudes (112–174 mA for ECT and 37.4% of maximum device amplitude for MST). ST was more variable in ECT than in MST. MT explained 63% of the ST variance and is hence the strongest known predictor of ST. These results indicate that seizures can be induced with less intense electric fields than conventional ECT that may be safer; efficacy and side effects should be evaluated in clinical studies. MT measurement could be a faster and safer alternative to empirical ST titration for ECT and MST. PMID:25920013

  13. Manual Therapy: The Historical, Current, and Future Role in the Treatment of Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Russell Smith

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual therapy has been an approach in the management of patients with various disorders dating back to ancient times and continues to play a significant role in current health care. The future role of manual therapy in health care is an important area of research. This paper reviews the history of manual therapy, examines the current literature related to the use of manual techniques (including manipulation, massage, and nerve manipulation, and discusses future research topics. The literature related to manual therapy has historically been anecdotal and theoretical, and current research tends to have a generic approach with broad definitions of manual therapy and inconsistencies in the classification of specific disorders. Systematic reviews of various types of manual therapy have differed on their conclusions regarding the effectiveness of this treatment modality. The current demand in health care for evidence-based practice necessitates a movement towards more specificity in the research of the effectiveness of manual therapy, with emphasis on specific patient signs and symptoms and specific manual techniques that result in effective care.

  14. Evaluation of evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Persson, Dennis; Nygren, Carita

    2010-01-01

    therapy intervention related to the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within stroke rehabilitation. Design: Systematic searches of research studies published in English during 2000-2007 in peer-reviewed journals were undertaken. Thirty-nine articles and one Cochrane review were...... after rehabilitation. There is also considerable evidence for the use of everyday life occupations in occupational therapy. Occupational therapy was evaluated as an important aspect of stroke rehabilitation improving outcomes in everyday life occupations including activities of daily living (ADL......) and participation. Discussion: As research of relevance for the profession to a large extent includes qualitative research it gives rise to reflection on including more tools than the evidence hierarchy while evaluating evidence within occupational therapy....

  15. Glycemic control in cardiac surgery: Rationale and current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Girish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies in cardiac surgical patients have shown an association of hyperglycemia with increased incidences of sepsis, mediastinitis, prolonged mechanical ventilation, cardiac arrhythmias and longer intensive care and hospital stay. There is considerable controversy regarding appropriate glycemic management in these patients and in the definition of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia or the blood sugar levels at which therapy should be initiated. There is also dilemma regarding the usage of "tight glycemic control" with studies showing conflicting evidences. Part of the controversy can be explained by the differing designs of these studies and the variable definitions of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

  16. Evidence Supporting Intralesional Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Equine Flexor Tendon Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmitha Durgam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical bottom lineCurrent experimental evidence suggests that intralesional stem cell administration improves the histological characteristics and matrix organisation of healing equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT; however, the clinical relevance of these findings are not clear. Current case-based evidence suggests that cell-based therapies improve the quality of tendon healing and reduce the recurrence rates of SDFT injuries but the lack of any randomised, controlled prospective studies with function-based outcomes is still concerning, given the widespread advocacy for and use of ‘stem cell’ therapies for the treatment of equine tendon injuries. 

  17. Complementary Spiritist Therapy: Systematic Review of Scientific Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Lucchetti, Alessandra L. Granero; Bassi, Rodrigo M.; Nobre, Marlene Rossi Severino

    2011-01-01

    Spiritism is the third most common religion in Brazil, and its therapies have been used by millions worldwide. These therapies are based on therapeutic resources including prayer, laying on of hands, fluidotherapy (magnetized water), charity/volunteering, spirit education/moral values, and disobsession (spirit release therapy). This paper presents a systematic review of the current literature on the relationship among health outcomes and 6 predictors: prayer, laying on of hands, magnetized/fl...

  18. Current recommendations for bladder instillation therapy in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc A; Evans, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Bladder instillation therapy refers to the direct introduction of medication into the bladder and is a common treatment modality for patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) who have failed conservative and oral therapies. The current American Urological Association (AUA) recommendations list three medications as options for IC/BPS instillation therapy: dimethyl sulfoxide, heparin, and lidocaine. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence behind the recommendations for these medications. We also examine several historical or experimental therapies that do not hold recommendations but are still used on rare occasion. Finally, we discuss our bladder instillation strategies as well as potential future research and development in intravesicular therapy.

  19. Systematic review of evidence underpinning non-pharmacological therapies in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olley, Richard; Morales, Andrea

    2017-05-15

    Objective Dementia is one of the most common illnesses worldwide, and is one of the most important causes of disability in older people. Currently, dementia affects over 35million people around the globe. It is expected that this number will increase to 65.7million by 2030. Early detection, diagnosis and treatment to control the principal behaviour symptoms may help reduce these numbers and delay the progression to more advanced and dangerous stages of this disorder with resultant increase quality of life for those affected. The main goal of the present systematic literature review was to examine contemporary evidence relating to non-pharmacological therapy in the treatment of dementia. Methods To achieve the study goal, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement was used. Results This study identified the five most common behaviours in patients with dementia as aggression, wandering, agitation, apathy and sleep disturbances. Two non-pharmacological therapies were the most studied treatment: music therapy and aromatherapy. Ten other non-pharmacological therapies were also identified, but these lack a sufficient evidence-base. Conclusion Although all the therapies identified could be used as part of the treatment of behavioural symptoms, there is insufficient evidence relating to the indications, appropriate use and effectiveness of these therapies to apply in each behavioural treatment. Thus, the present study has demonstrated a significant research gap. What is known about the topic? Despite the widespread use of many different types of therapies, there is limited evidence regarding the efficacy of non-pharmaceutical therapies deployed in the management of behaviours of concern manifested by some people who suffer with dementia in all its forms. What does this paper add? This systematic review examines contemporary evidence from the literature to determine whether there is an evidence base available that would

  20. Mitigation of eddy current heating during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigliano, Robert V; Shubitidze, Fridon; Petryk, James D; Shoshiashvili, Levan; Petryk, Alicia A; Hoopes, P Jack

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia therapy is a promising technology for cancer treatment, involving delivering magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into tumours then activating them using an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The system produces not only a magnetic field, but also an electric field which penetrates normal tissue and induces eddy currents, resulting in unwanted heating of normal tissues. Magnitude of the eddy current depends, in part, on the AMF source and the size of the tissue exposed to the field. The majority of in vivo MNP hyperthermia therapy studies have been performed in small animals, which, due to the spatial distribution of the AMF relative to the size of the animals, do not reveal the potential toxicity of eddy current heating in larger tissues. This has posed a non-trivial challenge for researchers attempting to scale up to clinically relevant volumes of tissue. There is a relative dearth of studies focused on decreasing the maximum temperature resulting from eddy current heating to increase therapeutic ratio. This paper presents two simple, clinically applicable techniques for decreasing maximum temperature induced by eddy currents. Computational and experimental results are presented to understand the underlying physics of eddy currents induced in conducting, biological tissues and leverage these insights to mitigate eddy current heating during MNP hyperthermia therapy. Phantom studies show that the displacement and motion techniques reduce maximum temperature due to eddy currents by 74% and 19% in simulation, and by 77% and 33% experimentally. Further study is required to optimise these methods for particular scenarios; however, these results suggest larger volumes of tissue could be treated, and/or higher field strengths and frequencies could be used to attain increased MNP heating when these eddy current mitigation techniques are employed.

  1. Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Current Indications and Unique Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Alexander L.

    2006-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a comprehensive, evidence-based treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD). The patient populations for which DBT has the most empirical support include parasuicidal women with borderline personality disorder (BPD), but there have been promising findings for patients with BPD and substance use disorders (SUDs), persons who meet criteria for binge-eating disorder, and depressed elderly patients. Although DBT has many similarities with other cognit...

  2. Current Experimental Studies of Gene Therapy in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-ya Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD was characterized by late-onset, progressive dopamine neuron loss and movement disorders. The progresses of PD affected the neural function and integrity. To date, most researches had largely addressed the dopamine replacement therapies, but the appearance of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia hampered the use of the drug. And the mechanism of PD is so complicated that it's hard to solve the problem by just add drugs. Researchers began to focus on the genetic underpinnings of Parkinson's disease, searching for new method that may affect the neurodegeneration processes in it. In this paper, we reviewed current delivery methods used in gene therapies for PD, we also summarized the primary target of the gene therapy in the treatment of PD, such like neurotrophic factor (for regeneration, the synthesis of neurotransmitter (for prolong the duration of L-dopa, and the potential proteins that might be a target to modulate via gene therapy. Finally, we discussed RNA interference therapies used in Parkinson's disease, it might act as a new class of drug. We mainly focus on the efficiency and tooling features of different gene therapies in the treatment of PD.

  3. [Current development in therapy of congenital funnel chest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kai; Luan, Jie

    2012-12-01

    To review the current development in therapy of congenital funnel chest. Recent literature concerning the development of the treatment method for congenital funnel chest was extensively reviewed and summarized. The main therapies for congenital funnel chest are thoracoplasty (Ravitch sternum elevation procedure and minimal invasive Nuss procedure) and prosthesis implantation. The magnetic mini-mover procedure and the vacuum bell are still in the research phase. Besides the improvement in function, the requirement in appearance after surgery is also improved in the treatment of congenital funnel chest. The minimally invasive surgery and non-invasive procedures could be expected in the future.

  4. Bell's palsy: a summary of current evidence and referral algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Graeme E; Tzafetta, Kallirroi

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous idiopathic facial nerve (Bell's) palsy leaves residual hemifacial weakness in 29% which is severe and disfiguring in over half of these cases. Acute medical management remains the best way to improve outcomes. Reconstructive surgery can improve long term disfigurement. However, acute and surgical options are time-dependent. As family practitioners see, on average, one case every 2 years, a summary of this condition based on common clinical questions may improve acute management and guide referral for those who need specialist input. We formulated a series of clinical questions likely to be of use to family practitioners on encountering this condition and sought evidence from the literature to answer them. The lifetime risk is 1 in 60, and is more common in pregnancy and diabetes mellitus. Patients often present with facial pain or paraesthesia, altered taste and intolerance to loud noise in addition to facial droop. It is probably caused by ischaemic compression of the facial nerve within the meatal segment of the facial canal probably as a result of viral inflammation. When given early, high dose corticosteroids can improve outcomes. Neither antiviral therapy nor other adjuvant therapies are supported by evidence. As the facial muscles remain viable re-innervation targets for up to 2 years, late referrals require more complex reconstructions. Early recognition, steroid therapy and early referral for facial reanimation (when the diagnosis is secure) are important features of good management when encountering these complex cases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The hygiene hypothesis: current perspectives and future therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiemsma LT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Leah T Stiemsma,1,2 Lisa A Reynolds,3 Stuart E Turvey,1,2,4 B Brett Finlay1,3,5 1Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of British Columbia, 2The Child and Family Research Institute, 3Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, 4Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, 5Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: Developed countries have experienced a steady increase in atopic disease and disorders of immune dysregulation since the 1980s. This increase parallels a decrease in infectious diseases within the same time period, while developing countries seem to exhibit the opposite effect, with less immune dysregulation and a higher prevalence of infectious disease. The “hygiene hypothesis”, proposed by Strachan in 1989, aimed to explain this peculiar generational rise in immune dysregulation. However, research over the past 10 years provides evidence connecting the commensal and symbiotic microbes (intestinal microbiota and parasitic helminths with immune development, expanding the hygiene hypothesis into the “microflora” and “old friends” hypotheses, respectively. There is evidence that parasitic helminths and commensal microbial organisms co-evolved with the human immune system and that these organisms are vital in promoting normal immune development. Current research supports the potential for manipulation of the bacterial intestinal microbiota to treat and even prevent immune dysregulation in the form of atopic disease and other immune-mediated disorders (namely inflammatory bowel disease and type 1 diabetes. Both human and animal model research are crucial in understanding the mechanistic links between these intestinal microbes and helminth parasites, and the human immune system. Pro-, pre-, and synbiotic, as well as treatment with live helminth and excretory/secretory helminth product therapies, are all potential

  6. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    OpenAIRE

    Abiko, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Chiba, Itsuo; Toyofuku, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i) What is the prevalence of AO in the community? (ii) What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii) A...

  7. Electrophysiological Evidence for Intrinsic Pacemaker Currents in Crayfish Parasol Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeForest Mellon

    Full Text Available I used sharp intracellular electrodes to record from parasol cells in the semi-isolated crayfish brain to investigate pacemaker currents. Evidence for the presence of the hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier potassium current was obtained in about half of the parasol cells examined, where strong, prolonged hyperpolarizing currents generated a slowly-rising voltage sag, and a post-hyperpolarization rebound. The amplitudes of both the sag voltage and the depolarizing rebound were dependent upon the strength of the hyperpolarizing current. The voltage sag showed a definite threshold and was non-inactivating. The voltage sag and rebound depolarization evoked by hyperpolarization were blocked by the presence of 5-10 mM Cs2+ ions, 10 mM tetraethyl ammonium chloride, and 10 mM cobalt chloride in the bathing medium, but not by the drug ZD 7288. Cs+ ions in normal saline in some cells caused a slight increase in mean resting potential and a reduction in spontaneous burst frequency. Many of the neurons expressing the hyperpolarization-activated inward potassium current also provided evidence for the presence of the transient potassium current IA, which was inferred from experimental observations of an increased latency of post-hyperpolarization response to a depolarizing step, compared to the response latency to the depolarization alone. The latency increase was reduced in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, a specific blocker of IA. The presence of 4-AP in normal saline also induced spontaneous bursting in parasol cells. It is conjectured that, under normal physiological conditions, these two potassium currents help to regulate burst generation in parasol cells, respectively, by helping to maintain the resting membrane potential near a threshold level for burst generation, and by regulating the rate of rise of membrane depolarizing events leading to burst generation. The presence of post-burst hyperpolarization may depend upon IA channels in

  8. Evidence-based therapies for upper extremity dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepert, Joachim

    2010-12-01

    The diversity of interventions aimed at improving upper extremity dysfunction is increasing. This article reviews the effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches that have been published in 2009 and 2010. Evidence is based on randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Application of constraint-induced movement therapy in acute stroke patients was not more effective than a control intervention, and a more intense therapy may even be harmful. Botulinum toxin injections do not only reduce spasticity but, in children, also improve motor functions if combined with occupational therapy. Strength training improves arm function but not necessarily activities of daily living. Bilateral arm training is as effective as other interventions. Extrinsic feedback and sensory training may further improve motor functions. Mirror therapy was particularly effective for patients with initial hand plegia. For some interventions (e.g. constraint-induced movement therapy, botulinum toxin), efficacy is evident, for others (e.g. mental practice, virtual reality), well designed studies with sufficient numbers of patients are needed. The ultimate goal still is to develop evidence-based therapies for all different degrees of motor impairment.

  9. Advanced therapy medicinal products: current and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cécile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are innovative therapies that encompass gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products. These therapies are expected to bring important health benefits, but also to substantially impact the pharmaceuticals budget. The aim of this study was to characterise the ATMPs in development and discuss future implications in terms of market access. Clinical trials were searched in the following databases: EudraCT (EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials), ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the World Health Organization). Trials were classified by category of ATMP as defined by European regulation EC No. 1394/2007, as well as by development phase and disease area. The database search identified 939 clinical trials investigating ATMPs (85% ongoing, 15% completed). The majority of trials were in the early stages (Phase I, I/II: 64.3%, Phase II, II/III: 27.9%, Phase 3: 6.9%). Per category of ATMP, we identified 53.6% of trials for somatic cell therapies, 22.8% for tissue-engineered products, 22.4% for gene therapies, and 1.2% for combined products (incorporating a medical device). Disease areas included cancer (24.8%), cardiovascular diseases (19.4%), musculoskeletal (10.5%), immune system and inflammation (11.5%), neurology (9.1%), and others. Of the trials, 47.2% enrolled fewer than 25 patients. Due to the complexity and specificity of ATMPs, new clinical trial methodologies are being considered (e.g., small sample size, non-randomised trials, single-arm trials, surrogate endpoints, integrated protocols, and adaptive designs). Evidence generation post-launch will become unavoidable to address payers' expectations. ATMPs represent a fast-growing field of interest. Although most of the products are in an early development phase, the combined trial phase and the potential to cure severe chronic conditions suggest that ATMPs may reach the market earlier than

  10. No evidence for the use of stem cell therapy for tendon disorders : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Haiko I M F L; Moen, Maarten H; Haisma, Hidde J; Winters, Marinus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stem cells have emerged as a new treatment option for tendon disorders. We systematically reviewed the current evidence for stem cell therapy in tendon disorders. METHODS: Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, cohort studies and case series with a minimum of 5 cases were

  11. No evidence for the use of stem cell therapy for tendon disorders: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Haiko I. M. F. L.; Moen, Maarten H.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Winters, Marinus

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells have emerged as a new treatment option for tendon disorders. We systematically reviewed the current evidence for stem cell therapy in tendon disorders. Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, cohort studies and case series with a minimum of 5 cases were searched in MEDLINE,

  12. The current evidence and implications of lingual orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to investigate the current evidence and implications of lingual orthodontics. The electronic database search was done on PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, EBSCOhost, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar reporting on appliance design, bonding, and laboratory setup, biomechanics, survey studies, case reports, and treatment outcomes to find the current evidence of lingual orthodontics. The evidence available on lingual orthodontics traces a very clear and predictable pattern. The 80′s was devoted to the limitation and progression of the concept; the 90′s to the comparison between labial and lingual and the evolution of laboratory technique and bracket system. The last decade focuses on innovations, the predictability of outcomes, the impact of white spot lesion, and the patient acceptability. This review also shows that biomechanical principles of lingual orthodontics are well understood and established today, any case that can be treated with labial orthodontic appliance, can also be treated effectively with lingual orthodontic appliance as the completely customized lingual appliance can provide predetermined treatment outcome.

  13. Pelvic floor dysfunction and sensory impairment: Current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Charlotte; Smith, Anthony; Marshall, Andy; Reid, Fiona

    2017-03-01

    To explore the role of sensory nerve impairment in women with pelvic organ prolapse, painful bladder syndrome, urinary and fecal incontinence, and sexual dysfunction. Medline and Embase were searched for articles in which sensory testing, either quantitative sensory testing or current perception thresholds, had been used to evaluate women with pelvic organ prolapse, stress and urge urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence and female sexual dysfunction. All search terms were expanded within each database prior to searching. Research to date has included small numbers of participants, used poorly matched controls, lacked a systemic sensory examination and applied non-standardized sensory testing techniques. However, the evidence suggests women with pelvic organ prolapse demonstrate sensory dysfunction. The role of sensory impairment in stress urinary incontinence is inconclusive. In women with urge urinary incontinence there is some evidence to suggest it may be urethrally mediated. Women with painful bladder syndrome may have more sensitive nerve endings which are unable to ignore repeated stimuli. Sensory impairment is common in women with sexual dysfunction, typically involving larger nerve fibres. There were no studies evaluating sensory function in women with fecal incontinence. Current evidence suggests women with pelvic floor dysfunction demonstrate sensory impairment though the causes remain unclear. Further studies are needed to investigate the different conditions of pelvic floor dysfunction using standardized sensory testing techniques, as well as evaluate the timing and mechanism by which any sensory impairment develops. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:550-556, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyles CC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cody C Wyles,1 Matthew T Houdek,2 Atta Behfar,3 Rafael J Sierra,21Mayo Medical School, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 3Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cell, osteoarthritis, treatment, regenerative medicine, cell therapy

  15. Current Treatment of Toxoplasma Retinochoroiditis: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Harrell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To perform an evidence-based review of treatments for Toxoplasma retinochoroiditis (TRC. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database and the key phrase “ocular toxoplasmosis treatment” and the filter for “controlled clinical trial” and “randomized clinical trial” as well as OVID medline (1946 to May week 2 2014 using the keyword ‘‘ocular toxoplasmosis’’. The included studies were used to evaluate the various treatment modalities of TRC. Results. The electronic search yielded a total of 974 publications of which 44 reported on the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis. There were 9 randomized controlled studies and an additional 3 comparative studies on the treatment of acute TRC with systemic or intravitreous antibiotics or on reducing the recurrences of TRC. Endpoints of studies included visual acuity improvement, inflammatory response, lesion size changes, recurrences of lesions, and adverse effects of medications. Conclusions. There was conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of systemic antibiotics for TRC. There is no evidence to support that one antibiotic regimen is superior to another so choice needs to be informed by the safety profile. Intravitreous clindamycin with dexamethasone seems to be as effective as systemic treatments. There is currently level I evidence that intermittent trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prevents recurrence of the disease.

  16. Review. Evidence-based complementary oncology. Innovative approaches to optimize standard therapy strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuth, Josef; Schierholz, Joerg Michael

    2007-01-01

    Cancer diseases demand diagnostic and therapeutic measures with proven quality, safety and efficacy. The basis for evaluation is clinical studies representing levels I or II (randomized controlled trials (RCT) or epidemiological cohort studies) in accordance with recommendations of the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine, University of Oxford, UK Regarding these claims, surgery, chemo-, radio- and hormone therapy have emerged as the gold standard in the treatment of carcinomas. These therapies have proven their cancer destructive potencies and their curative feasibilities, dependent on the particular cancer entity and stage. Complementary therapies are recommended to support and optimize the scientifically-based cancer standard treatment. Complementary medicine is currently widely debated by the oncological community, because the required scientific proof of safety and effectiveness for most of the therapeutic approaches has not yet been definitively provided. In the past years, basic research and clinical evaluation of defined complementary therapeutic concepts in oncology have been intensified in an attempt to integrate these procedures into evidence-based medicine. Scientifically-based therapies of complementary medicine cannot replace the well studied conventional cancer-destructive therapies such as surgery, chemo-, radio- or hormone therapy. Accordingly, they are by no means "alternative therapies". Complementary approaches in oncology that are recommended as additional to standard cancer destructive therapies claim to optimize this therapy. A great body of data emerging from scientifically sound clinical trials prove that defined complementary procedures are beneficial for the patients.

  17. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Haswani Embong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  18. Intermittent fasting and cardiovascular disease: current evidence and unresolved questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Grant M; Horne, Benjamin D

    2018-01-01

    Intermittent fasting has produced a variety of beneficial health effects in animal models, although high-quality research in humans has been limited. This special report examines current evidences for intermittent fasting in humans, discusses issues that require further examination, and recommends new research that can improve the knowledge base in this emerging research area. While potentially useful for health improvement, intermittent fasting requires further study prior to widespread implementation for health purposes. Randomized, longer-term studies are needed to determine whether using intermittent fasting as a lifestyle rather than a diet is feasible and beneficial for the health of some members of the human population.

  19. Current status of gene therapy for α-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, Heather S; Flotte, Terence R

    2015-03-01

    As a common monogenic disease, α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has undergone thorough investigation for the development of gene therapy. The most common pathology associated with AAT deficiency occurs in the lung, where the loss of function due to impaired secretion of mutant AAT prevents the inhibition of neutrophil elastase and leads to loss of elastin content from the alveolar interstitium. Current treatment in the USA consists of recurrent intravenous protein replacement therapy to augment serum AAT levels. In an attempt to replace recurring treatments with a single dose of gene therapy, recombinant adenovirus, plasmid, and recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have been investigated as vectors for transgene delivery. Large strides in gene therapy for AAT deficiency lung disease have led to the development of rAAV1-AAT capable of producing sustained serum AAT levels in clinical trials after intramuscular administration in humans at 3% of the target level. Further increases in levels are anticipated as limb perfusion targets greater muscle mass. The future roles of intrapleural and airway delivery, miRNA-expressing vectors, iPS cell platforms, and genome editing are anticipated.

  20. Evidence-based therapy relationships: research conclusions and clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Wampold, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    In this closing article of the special issue, we present the conclusions and recommendations of the interdivisional task force on evidence-based therapy relationships. The work was based on a series of meta-analyses conducted on the effectiveness of various relationship elements and methods of treatment adaptation. A panel of experts concluded that several relationship elements were demonstrably effective (alliance in individual psychotherapy, alliance in youth psychotherapy, alliance in family therapy, cohesion in group therapy, empathy, collecting client feedback) while others were probably effective (goal consensus, collaboration, positive regard). Three other relationship elements (congruence/genuineness, repairing alliance ruptures, and managing countertransference) were deemed promising but had insufficient evidence to conclude that they were effective. Multiple recommendations for practice, training, research, and policy are advanced. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. DIABETIC POLYNEUROPATHY: CURRENT APPROACHES TO DIAGNOSIS AND PATHOGENETIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Levin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the current views of the prevalence, clinical picture, approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of one of the most commonneurological complications of diabetes mellitus – diabetic polyneuropathy, and both its somatic and autonomous manifestations. Neuropathy ismost common in diabetic patients and its clinical forms reflect the severe course of diabetes mellitus and serve as an unfavorable prognostic signthat is associated with an approximately 5-fold increase in mortality. At the same time, the timely detection and adequate correction of the manifestations of neuropathy may substantially improve quality of life in the patients. The possibilities of pathogenetic therapy for diabetic polyneuropathy associated mainly with the use of benfotiamine and alpha-lipoic acid, as well as symptomatic therapy for its individual manifestationsare considered.

  2. Radionuclide Therapy a Targeted Internal Radiotherapy Method Currently Growing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebbou, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The internal radionuclide therapy is a therapeutic means intended to deliver adequate radiation doses to the target and as low as possible dose to non targeted tissues. Iodine 131 is the oldest element used in benign and malignant thyroid diseases due to its uptake by thyroid cells. Iodine 131 follows the same metabolic pathway than natural iodine. The metabolic process of organification begins after transfer of iodide (negative ion) inside the cell by the Nis symporter (Na+/I-). Iodine 131 being a mixed emitter beta and gamma, its therapeutic action is due to the beta particles whereas the gamma rays allow its localization by external detectors. Other proceedings of targeting were then developed, using labelled agents such as peptides, ligands targeting receptors or antibodies targeting specific antigens. The MIBG labelled with iodine 131 was introduced for the treatment of tumours up taking this agent. The somatostatin (sms) analogues are used for the treatment of the endocrine tumours expressing the sms receptor. Antigen expressed by lymphomas or other tumours have been targeted using specific antibodies or their conjugates. The same agents can be labelled by radionuclides with low dose rates, to study the quality of uptake before considering the treatment. The internal radionuclide therapy requires good radiation protection measures. Dosimetry procedures allow better management of this therapeutic method. The fields of application are widely spreading currently. In oncology, radionuclide therapies include curative and palliative procedures. In addition to beta emitters, the use of alpha emitters is expected to grow due to dosimetric reasons. Also, new agents and combination with other therapeutic procedures are under development. High cost of the majority of radionuclide therapies constitutes currently the principal limitation of their growth in several developing countries [fr

  3. Current evidence on atypical odontalgia: diagnosis and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Chiba, Itsuo; Toyofuku, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i) What is the prevalence of AO in the community? (ii) What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii) Are there any comorbidities of AO? (iv) Is local anesthesia effective for the relief of pain in AO? (v) Are there any characteristic symptoms of AO other than spontaneous pain? (vi) Are antidepressants effective for treatment of AO? (vii) Are anticonvulsants effective for treatment of AO? Our literature search provided answers for these questions; however, there is insufficient evidence-based data to establish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AO. Overall, some diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain and persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder may be applied to AO patients. The patient's psychogenic background should always be considered in the treatment and/or management of AO. The clinicians may need to treat AO patients using Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters approach.

  4. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Abiko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i What is the prevalence of AO in the community?\t(ii What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii Are there any comorbidities of AO? (iv Is local anesthesia effective for the relief of pain in AO? (v Are there any characteristic symptoms of AO other than spontaneous pain? (vi Are antidepressants effective for treatment of AO? (vii Are anticonvulsants effective for treatment of AO? Our literature search provided answers for these questions; however, there is insufficient evidence-based data to establish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AO. Overall, some diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain and persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder may be applied to AO patients. The patient's psychogenic background should always be considered in the treatment and/or management of AO. The clinicians may need to treat AO patients using Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters approach.

  5. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Ling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment. Methods Search PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance", "neurodegenerative diseases", "Parkinson's disease or PD", "Alzheimer's disease or AD", "multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words. The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale. Results A total of 35 articles, including 2 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 13 clinical controlled trials, 13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation, 13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles. Clinical evidences showed that: 1 advice on sleep hygiene, careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD. Bright light therapy (BLT may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. However, to date, very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2 treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g. melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants and non-drug therapy (e.g. BLT, behavior therapy, but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3 the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4 there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative

  6. Current status and perspectives in peptide receptor radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansquer, Catherine; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Chatal, Jean François

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory peptide receptors are overexpressed in numerous human cancers. The specific receptor binding property of peptides can be exploited by their labelling with a radionuclide and their use as carriers to guide the radioactivity to the tissues expressing their specific receptors. During the past decade, radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides have emerged as an important class of radiopharmaceuticals for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The first and most successful imaging agents to date are somatostatin analogues which are routinely used for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with (90)Y-DOTA-octreotide and (177)Lu-DOTA-octreotate in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) results in symptomatic improvement, prolonged survival, and enhanced quality of life. The results in terms of tumour regression are very encouraging with few and mostly mild side effects when patients are carefully selected and kidney protective agents are given. Nevertheless much profit can be gained from improving the available receptor-targeting strategies and developing new strategies. In this review, the current state of clinical use of radiolabelled peptides for diagnosis and therapy of NETs is presented. In addition, potential directions for optimization and future developments are discussed. These include the optimization of peptide analogues or derivatives, increasing the access and binding on specific receptors on the tumour sites, increasing radiotoxicity profile and multimodality strategies. Other peptides such as minigastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin (BN)/gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), substance P, neurotensin (NT), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and RGD peptides are promising for PRRT and currently under preclinical and clinical development.

  7. Animal Research on Nicotine Reduction: Current Evidence and Research Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracy T; Rupprecht, Laura E; Denlinger-Apte, Rachel L; Weeks, Jillian J; Panas, Rachel S; Donny, Eric C; Sved, Alan F

    2017-09-01

    A mandated reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes may improve public health by reducing the prevalence of smoking. Animal self-administration research is an important complement to clinical research on nicotine reduction. It can fill research gaps that may be difficult to address with clinical research, guide clinical researchers about variables that are likely to be important in their own research, and provide policy makers with converging evidence between clinical and preclinical studies about the potential impact of a nicotine reduction policy. Convergence between clinical and preclinical research is important, given the ease with which clinical trial participants can access nonstudy tobacco products in the current marketplace. Herein, we review contributions of preclinical animal research, with a focus on rodent self-administration, to the science of nicotine reduction. Throughout this review, we highlight areas where clinical and preclinical research converge and areas where the two differ. Preclinical research has provided data on many important topics such as the threshold for nicotine reinforcement, the likelihood of compensation, moderators of the impact of nicotine reduction, the impact of environmental stimuli on nicotine reduction, the impact of nonnicotine cigarette smoke constituents on nicotine reduction, and the impact of nicotine reduction on vulnerable populations. Special attention is paid to current research gaps including the dramatic rise in alternative tobacco products, including electronic nicotine delivery systems (ie, e-cigarettes). The evidence reviewed here will be critical for policy makers as well as clinical researchers interested in nicotine reduction. This review will provide policy makers and clinical researchers interested in nicotine reduction with an overview of the preclinical animal research conducted on nicotine reduction and the regulatory implications of that research. The review also highlights the utility of

  8. CURRENT REPERFUSION THERAPY POSSIBILITIES IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION AND ISCHEMIC STROKE

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    E. V. Konstantinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke remain to be of the greatest medical and social importance because of their high prevalence, disability, and mortality rates. Intractable thrombotic occlusion of the respective artery leads to the formation of an ischemic lesion focus in the tissue of the heart or brain. Emergency reperfusion serves to decrease a necrotic focus, makes its formation reversible, and reduces patient death rates. The paper considers main reperfusion therapy lines: medical (with thrombolytic drugs and mechanical (with primary interventions one and their combination in treating patients with acute myocardial and cerebral ischemia. Each reperfusion procedure is discussed in view of its advantages, disadvantages, available guidelines, and possibilities of real clinical practice. Tenecteplase is assessed in terms of its efficacy, safety, and capacities for bolus administration, which allows its use at any hospital and at the pre-hospital stage. Prehospital thrombolysis permits reperfusion therapy to bring much closer to the patient and therefore aids in reducing time to reperfusion and in salvaging as much the myocardial volume as possible. The rapidest recovery of myocardial and cerebral perfusion results in a decreased necrotic area and both improved immediate and late prognosis. The results of randomized clinical trials studying the possibilities of the medical and mechanical methods to restore blood flow are analyzed in the context of evidence-based medicine. The reason why despite the available contraindications, limited efficiency, and the risk of hemorrhagic complications, thrombolytic therapy remains the method of choice for prehospital reperfusion, an alternative to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI if it cannot be carried out in patients with myocardial infarction at the stated time, and the only treatment ischemic stroke treatment that has proven its efficiency and safety in clinical trials is under

  9. [Evidence-based therapy for tendinopathy of the knee joint : Which forms of therapy are scientifically proven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, H; Clausen, J D; Krettek, C; Weber-Spickschen, T S

    2017-03-01

    Tendinopathy in the region of the knee joint is a common pathological disorder. People active in sports, in particular, have a high probability of suffering from tendinopathy. Despite its high clinical relevance, the level of evidence of therapy options for tendinopathy in the knee region differs greatly. This review gives an overview of current evidence levels for therapy options in tendinopathy of the quadriceps, patellar and pes anserinus insertion tendons as well as of the distal iliotibial tract tendon. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma showed a significantly better outcome when used correctly and treatment with shock waves, operative treatment and sclerotherapy have also shown positive effects. Treatment with corticosteroid injections and with oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) showed positive short-term effects (follow-up ±4 weeks). No reasonable data are available for the treatment of tendinopathy in the knee region by acupuncture, fascial therapy or cryotherapy. The use of kinesio taping showed no significant relief from complaints compared with standard conservative treatment. The use of multimodal therapy without evidence is, therefore, particularly common in elite athletes.

  10. Body image disturbance in children and adolescents with eating disorders. Current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Thiemann, Pia; Vocks, Silja

    2014-01-01

    Body image is multifaceted and incorporates perceptual, affective, and cognitive components as well as behavioral features. Only few studies have examined the character of body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders. It is unknown whether body-image disturbances in children/adolescent with eating disturbances are comparable to those of adult patients with eating disorders. Body-image disturbance might differ quantitatively and qualitatively according to the cognitive developmental status and the age of the individual. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence for body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders, and how they compare with those adults with eating disorders. Current evidence indicates that older adolescent patients show similar deficits as adult patients with eating disorders, in particular for the attitudinal body-image component. However, evidence for a perceptual body-image disturbance in adolescent patients, in particular anorexia nervosa, is not conclusive. Reliable statements for childhood can hardly be made because clinical studies are not available. Investigations of body-image disturbance in children have focused on the predictive value for eating disorders. Limitations of the current evidence are discussed, and future directions for research and therapy are indicated.

  11. [Current concepts on hemodynamic support and therapy in septic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Pereira, Adriano José; de Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock represent a major healthcare challenge. Much of the improvement in mortality associated with septic shock is related to early recognition combined with timely fluid resuscitation and adequate antibiotics administration. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include intravascular replenishment, maintenance of adequate perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery to tissues. To achieve those goals, fluid responsiveness evaluation and complementary interventions - i.e. vasopressors, inotropes and blood transfusion - may be necessary. This article is a literature review of the available evidence on the initial hemodynamic support of the septic shock patients presenting to the emergency room or to the intensive care unit and the main interventions available to reach those targets, focusing on fluid and vasopressor therapy, blood transfusion and inotrope administration. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Current concepts on hemodynamic support and therapy in septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Pereira, Adriano José; de Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Silva, Eliézer

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock represent a major healthcare challenge. Much of the improvement in mortality associated with septic shock is related to early recognition combined with timely fluid resuscitation and adequate antibiotics administration. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include intravascular replenishment, maintenance of adequate perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery to tissues. To achieve those goals, fluid responsiveness evaluation and complementary interventions - i.e. vasopressors, inotropes and blood transfusion - may be necessary. This article is a literature review of the available evidence on the initial hemodynamic support of the septic shock patients presenting to the emergency room or to the intensive care unit and the main interventions available to reach those targets, focusing on fluid and vasopressor therapy, blood transfusion and inotrope administration. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Current concepts on hemodynamic support and therapy in septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Lima Rocha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTSevere sepsis and septic shock represent a major healthcare challenge. Much of the improvement in mortality associated with septic shock is related to early recognition combined with timely fluid resuscitation and adequate antibiotics administration. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include intravascular replenishment, maintenance of adequate perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery to tissues. To achieve those goals, fluid responsiveness evaluation and complementary interventions - i.e. vasopressors, inotropes and blood transfusion - may be necessary. This article is a literature review of the available evidence on the initial hemodynamic support of the septic shock patients presenting to the emergency room or to the intensive care unit and the main interventions available to reach those targets, focusing on fluid and vasopressor therapy, blood transfusion and inotrope administration.

  14. Fetal gene therapy: recent advances and current challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Citra N; Choolani, Mahesh; Biswas, Arijit; Waddington, Simon N; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2011-10-01

    Fetal gene therapy (FGT) can potentially be applied to perinatally lethal monogenic diseases for rescuing clinically severe phenotypes, increasing the probability of intact neurological and other key functions at birth, or inducing immune tolerance to a transgenic protein to facilitate readministration of the vector/protein postnatally. As the field is still at an experimental stage, there are several important considerations regarding the practicality and the ethics of FGT. Here, through a review of FGT studies, the authors discuss the role and applications of FGT, the progress made with animal models that simulate human development, possible adverse effects in the recipient fetus and the mother and factors that affect clinical translation. Although there are valid safety and ethical concerns, the authors argue that there may soon be enough convincing evidence from non-human primate models to take the next step towards clinical trials in the near future. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  15. Updated Evidence on the Oncoplastic Approach to Breast Conservation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losken, Albert; Hart, Alexandra M; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2017-11-01

    The oncoplastic approach to breast conservation therapy has become a useful and popular option for women with breast cancer who wish to preserve their breast. The initial driving forces were aimed at minimizing the potential for a breast conservation therapy deformity; however, various other benefits have been identified that include broadening the indications for breast conservation therapy in some patients and improved margin control. The various techniques can be categorized into glandular rearrangement techniques such as breast reductions usually in patients with larger breasts or flap reconstruction such as the latissimus dorsi muscle usually in patients with smaller breasts. As the acceptance continues to increase, we are starting to see more outcomes evidence in terms of patient satisfaction, quality of life, complications, and recurrence, to further support the safety and efficacy of the oncoplastic approach.

  16. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy clinical evidence and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Successful clinical use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) represents a significant advance in radiation oncology. Because IMRT can deliver high-dose radiation to a target with a reduced dose to the surrounding organs, it can improve the local control rate and reduce toxicities associated with radiation therapy. Since IMRT began being used in the mid-1990s, a large volume of clinical evidence of the advantages of IMRT has been collected. However, treatment planning and quality assurance (QA) of IMRT are complicated and difficult for the clinician and the medical physicist. This book, by authors renowned for their expertise in their fields, provides cumulative clinical evidence and appropriate techniques for IMRT for the clinician and the physicist. Part I deals with the foundations and techniques, history, principles, QA, treatment planning, radiobiology and related aspects of IMRT. Part II covers clinical applications with several case studies, describing contouring and dose distribution with cl...

  17. [Multiple Myeloma - Current Status in Diagnostic Testing and Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrer, Michael; Koob, Sebastian; Strauss, Andreas; Wirtz, Dieter Christian; Schmolders, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is a haematological blood cancer of the bone marrow and is classified by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as a plasma cell neoplasm. In multiple myeloma, normal plasma cells transform into malignant myeloma cells and produce large quantities of an abnormal immunoglobulin called monoclonal protein or M protein. This ultimately causes multiple myeloma symptoms such as bone damage or kidney problems. The annual worldwide incidence of multiple myeloma is estimated to be 6 - 7/100,000 and accounts for 1% of all cancer. In Germany, there are about 6,000 cases of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma per annum. In the current era of new agents, such as immunomodulatory drugs and proteasome inhibitors and antibodies, enormous progress has been achieved in the therapy of multiple myeloma. In orthopaedics, it is essential to be able to recognise the of alarming symptoms of multiple myeloma in clinical routine and to be aware of basic diagnostic features to confirm this disease. Surgical treatment of myeloma-related bone lesions - such as stabilisation of pathological fractures - is an important domain of tumour orthopaedic surgery. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed in PubMed using the keywords "multiple myeloma" and "diagnostic" or "therapy". This served to evaluate the available primary and secondary literature on the current status of the diagnostic testing and therapy of multiple myeloma. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses and clinical studies as well as international recommendations in therapy were included until the spring of 2016. Results There are now very sensitive screening methods for the diagnosis of multiple myeloma. Accurate diagnosis is generally based on several factors, including physical evaluation, patient history, symptoms, and diagnostic testing results. The standards for initial diagnostic tests are determined by blood and urine tests as well as a bone marrow biopsy and skeletal imaging, such as X

  18. Ketogenic dietary therapy for epilepsy and other disorders: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal EG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth G Neal 1Matthew's Friends Clinics, Lingfield, UK, 2UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UK Abstract: The ketogenic diet (KD is a high-fat, restricted-carbohydrate regime, originally designed to mimic metabolic responses to fasting and has been used since the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy. Modified variants of the KD include the addition of medium-chain triglyceride and less-restrictive modified Atkins and low glycemic index protocols. Scientifically proven as treatment for intractable seizures in children, these ketone-generating diets are increasingly also being used in adults. They are the treatment of choice in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome and pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Evidence for the potential of KD therapy to be included within the treatment options for cancer and neurodegenerative disorders is more limited, albeit an exciting area of research with future clinical potential. This review discusses the key aspects of KD therapy, including the efficacy of treatments and clinical implementation. The importance of appropriate initiation, adequate clinical supervision, regular monitoring, and assessment of nutritional needs is highlighted. Keywords: diet, seizures, ketosis

  19. Current knowledge on evidence-based shockwave treatments for shoulder pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Daniel; Ramón, Silvia; Guiloff, Leonardo; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger

    2015-12-01

    Shoulder pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal pathologies. Treatment by ESWT (extracorporeal shockwave therapy) has emerged as an alternative when conservative treatment fails in rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, prior to invasive procedures. The clinical efficacy of ESWT in non-calcific tendinopathy remains controversial. The good results in the treatment of rotator cuff calcifications, have led to indications of ESWT being expanded to other shoulder pathologies. We review the current state of indications and evidence based practice. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Current evidence for histone deacetylase inhibitors in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsounas, Ioannis; Giaginis, Constantinos; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2013-02-14

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human cancers, with more than 200 000 deaths worldwide every year. Despite recent efforts, conventional treatment approaches, such as surgery and classic chemotherapy, have only slightly improved patient outcomes. More effective and well-tolerated therapies are required to reverse the current poor prognosis of this type of neoplasm. Among new agents, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are now being tested. HDACIs have multiple biological effects related to acetylation of histones and many non-histone proteins that are involved in regulation of gene expression, apoptosis, cell cycle progression and angiogenesis. HDACIs induce cell cycle arrest and can activate the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. In the present review, the main mechanisms by which HDACIs act in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, as well as their antiproliferative effects in animal models are presented. HDACIs constitute a promising treatment for pancreatic cancer with encouraging anti-tumor effects, at well-tolerated doses.

  1. [Acute bronchiolitis: evaluation of evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, F; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Martinón Sánchez, J M

    2001-10-01

    Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants and produces significant morbidity. Limited progress has been made in the treatment of this disease and, in many cases, the therapy employed is controversial and mainly based on general recommendations and not on evidence-based strategies. This report uses evidence-based methodology to provide a critical review of the data available on the treatment of acute bronchiolitis (understood as the first episode of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in a previously healthy infant). After this analysis, we conclude that the only justifiable therapeutic interventions in these patients are supportive treatment, nebulized epinephrine and mechanical ventilation. Other therapies such us physiotherapy, nebulization, heliox, anticholinergics or exogenous surfactant, among others, require further randomized controlled trials to determine their utility. No evidence supports the routine use of corticosteroids, beta-adrenergic drugs, antibiotics, immunoglobulins, interferon, vitamin A or ribavirin in these patients. Finally, we consider that a national consensus review for the implementation of evidence-based clinical practical guidelines on the management of acute bronchiolitis would be of great interest.

  2. Current Molecular Targeted Therapies for Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nakano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic treatment options for bone and soft tissue sarcomas remained unchanged until the 2000s. These cancers presented challenges in new drug development partly because of their rarity and heterogeneity. Many new molecular targeting drugs have been tried in the 2010s, and some were approved for bone and soft tissue sarcoma. As one of the first molecular targeted drugs approved for solid malignant tumors, imatinib’s approval as a treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs has been a great achievement. Following imatinib, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs have been approved for GISTs such as sunitinib and regorafenib, and pazopanib was approved for non-GIST soft tissue sarcomas. Olaratumab, the monoclonal antibody that targets platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR-α, was shown to extend the overall survival of soft tissue sarcoma patients and was approved in 2016 in the U.S. as a breakthrough therapy. For bone tumors, new drugs are limited to denosumab, a receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL inhibitor, for treating giant cell tumors of bone. In this review, we explain and summarize the current molecular targeting therapies approved and in development for bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  3. Review of Current Immunologic Therapies for Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria K. Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS is a chronic, recurrent, inflammatory disease of apocrine gland-bearing skin which affects approximately 1–4% of the population. The disease is more common in women and patients of African American descent and approximately one-third of patients report a family history. Obesity and smoking are known risk factors, but associations with other immune disorders, especially inflammatory bowel disease, are also recognized. The pathogenesis of HS is poorly understood and host innate or adaptive immune response, defective keratinocyte function, and the microbial environment in the hair follicle and apocrine gland have all been postulated to play a role in disease activity. While surgical interventions can be helpful to reduce disease burden, there is a high recurrence rate. Increasingly, data supports targeted immune therapy for HS, and longitudinal studies suggest benefit from these agents, both when used alone and as an adjunct to surgical treatments. The purpose of this review is to outline the current data supporting use of targeted immune therapy in HS management.

  4. Current and Emerging Detoxification Therapies for Critical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Howell

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxicity resulting from prescription drugs such as tricyclic antidepressants and cardioactive steroids, as well as drugs of abuse and exposure to environmental chemicals, represents a major need for detoxification treatments. Particles and colloids, antibody fragments (Fab, and indirect treatment methods such as macroemulsions, are currently being developed or employed as detoxification therapies. Colloids, particles, and protein fragments typically mitigate toxicity by binding to the toxin and reducing its concentration in vital organs. Indirect methods such as macroemulsions and sodium bicarbonate act directly on the affected organs, rather than the toxin. In this review, key design parameters (i.e. binding affinity, biocompatibility, pharmacokinetics are discussed for each type of detoxification treatment. In addition, some of the latest research in each area is reviewed.

  5. [Current possibilities in the therapy of hepatic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, P J; Bansky, G

    1990-04-14

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with acute or chronic liver disease. It is generally considered a metabolic and potentially reversible syndrome. An important component of HE is increased neuro-inhibition caused by reduced hepatic metabolism of gut-derived nitrogenous substances and by activation of the postsynaptic GABAA-receptor complex in the central nervous system. Effective conventional therapy of HE includes prevention of precipitating factors, restriction of dietary protein an administration of lactulose (or lactitol) and possibly also of antibiotics. In addition, animal studies and uncontrolled clinical studies indicate that the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil effectively diminishes the increased neuroinhibition in certain patients with HE. However, these favourable flumazenil effects must be confirmed in larger randomized and placebo-controlled multicenter studies before flumazenil can be regarded as a useful new addition to current management of patients with acute or chronic hepatic encephalopathy.

  6. Current status of lectin-based cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fohona S. Coulibaly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are carbohydrate recognizing proteins originating from diverse origins in nature, including animals, plants, viruses, bacteria and fungus. Due to their exceptional glycan recognition property, they have found many applications in analytical chemistry, biotechnology and surface chemistry. This manuscript explores the current use of lectins for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Moreover, novel drug delivery strategies aiming at improving lectin’s stability, reducing their undesired toxicity and controlling their non-specific binding interactions are discussed. We also explore the nanotechnology application of lectins for cancer targeting and imaging. Although many investigations are being conducted in the field of lectinology, there is still a limited clinical translation of the major findings reported due to lectins stability and toxicity concerns. Therefore, new investigations of safe and effective drug delivery system strategies for lectins are warranted in order to take full advantage of these proteins.

  7. Current evidence on the anticancer potential of Chios mastic gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2011-11-01

    Chios mastic gum derived from the plant Pistacia lentiscus L. variation chia has been shown to exert beneficial effects on a wide range of human disorders. The most comprehensive data so far have indicated that mastic gum provides protection against gastrointestinal malfunctions and bacterial infections. Substantial evidence has also suggested that mastic gum exhibits hepatoprotective and cardioprotective, antiinflammatory/antioxidant, and antiatherogenic properties. In the last decade, an increasing number of studies further evaluated the potential antiproliferative properties of mastic gum against several types of human neoplasia. The present review aims to summarize the current data concerning the anticancer activities of mastic gum and their major constituents, highlighting also the molecular mechanisms through which they exert anticancer function. Mastic gum constituents that belong to the chemical class of triterpenoids appear to be mainly responsible for its anticancer potential. Thus, a brief discussion is dedicated to the anticancer activity of synthetic and naturally occurring triterpenoid analogues with similar chemical structure to mastic gum constituents. Taking into consideration the available data so far, Chios mastic gum could be considered as a conglomeration of effective anticancer drugs.

  8. Infant Nutrition and Later Health: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fall

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing recognition of the need for a lifecourse approach to understanding the aetiology of adult disease, and there is now significant evidence that links patterns of infant feeding to differences in health outcomes, both in the short and longer term. Breastfeeding is associated with lower rates of infection in infancy; in high-income populations, it is associated with reductions in blood pressure and total blood cholesterol, and lower risks of obesity and diabetes in adult life. Breastfeeding rates are suboptimal in many countries, and strategies to promote breastfeeding could therefore confer important benefits for health at a population level. However, there are particular challenges in defining nutritional exposures in infancy, including marked social gradients in initiation and duration of breastfeeding. In recent studies of low and middle-income populations of children and young adults, where the influences on infant feeding practice differ, beneficial effects of breastfeeding on blood pressure, BMI and risk of diabetes have not been confirmed, and further information is needed. Little is currently known about the long-term consequences of differences in the timing and nature of the weaning diet. Future progress will depend on new studies that provide detailed prospective data on duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding together with appropriate characterisation of the weaning diet.

  9. [Hierarchy of evidence: levels of evidence and grades of recommendation from current use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola, Carlos; Asenjo-Lobos, Claudla; Otzen, Tamara

    2014-12-01

    There are multiple proposals and classifications that hierarchize evidence, which may confuse those who are dedicated to generate it both in health technology assessments, as for the development of clinical guidelines, etc. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the most commonly used classifications of levels of evidence and grades of recommendation, analyzing their main differences and applications so that the user can choose the one that better suits your needs and take this health decisions basing their practice on the best available evidence. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and MEDLINE databases and in Google, Yahoo and Ixquick search engines. A wealth of information concerning levels of evidence and degrees recommendation was obtained. It was summarized the information of the 11 proposals more currently used (CTFPHC, Sackett, USPSTF, CEBM, GRADE, SIGN, NICE, NHMRC, PCCRP, ADA y ACCF/AHA), between which it emphasizes the GRADE WORKING GROUP, incorporated by around 90 national and international organizations such as the World Health Organization, The Cochrane Library, American College of Physicians, American Thoracic Society, UpToDate, etc.; and locally by the Ministry of Health to create clinical practice guidelines.

  10. Clinical translation of photobiomodulation therapy using evidences from precision molecular pathway analyses (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arany, Praveen

    2017-02-01

    Can `light' be a Drug? To satisfy this definition as a pharmaceutical agent, light must be absorbed and change bodily function. Much evidence from our understanding of our visual cycle and Vitamin D metabolism have all noted this phenomenon. Advances in optophotonic technologies along with a better understanding of light-tissue interactions, especially in in vivo optical imaging and optogenetics, are spearheading the popularity of biophotonics in biology and medicine. The use of lasers and light devices at high doses in dermatology, ophthalmology, oncology and dentistry are now considered mainstream for certain clinical applications such as surgery, skin rejuvenation, ocular and soft tissue recontouring, anti-tumor and anti-microbial photodynamic therapy. In contrast, therapeutic use of low dose biophotonics devices is called Low Level Light / Laser Therapy (LLLT), now termed Photobiomodulation (PBM) Therapy. This therapy is defined as a non-thermal use of non-ionizing forms of electromagnetic radiation to alleviate pain, inflammation, modulating the immune responses and promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration. Surprisingly, despite vast volumes of scientific literature from both clinical and laboratory studies noting the phenomenological evidences for this innovative therapy, limited mechanistic insights have prevented the development of rigorous, reproducible clinical protocols. This presentation will outline our current efforts at ongoing efforts in our group to assess molecular pathways and precisely define clinical treatment variables to enable clinical translation with PBM therapies.

  11. Pharmacotherapy for dyslipidaemia--current therapies and future agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold; Stein, Evan A

    2003-11-01

    Current lipid-altering agents that lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) primarily through increased hepatic LDL receptor activity include statins, bile acid sequestrants/resins and cholesterol absorption inhibitors such as ezetimibe, plant stanols/sterols, polyphenols, as well as nutraceuticals such as oat bran, psyllium and soy proteins; those currently in development include newer statins, phytostanol analogues, squalene synthase inhibitors, bile acid transport inhibitors and SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) activating ligands. Other current agents that affect lipid metabolism include nicotinic acid (niacin), acipimox, high-dose fish oils, antioxidants and policosanol, whilst those in development include microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) inhibitors, acylcoenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors, gemcabene, lifibrol, pantothenic acid analogues, nicotinic acid-receptor agonists, anti-inflammatory agents (such as Lp-PLA(2) antagonists and AGI1067) and functional oils. Current agents that affect nuclear receptors include PPAR-alpha and -gamma agonists, while in development are newer PPAR-alpha, -gamma and -delta agonists, as well as dual PPAR-alpha/gamma and 'pan' PPAR-alpha/gamma/delta agonists. Liver X receptor (LXR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) are also nuclear receptor targets of investigational agents. Agents in development also may affect high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) blood levels or flux and include cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors (such as torcetrapib), CETP vaccines, various HDL 'therapies' and upregulators of ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1, lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and scavenger receptor class B Type 1 (SRB1), as well as synthetic apolipoprotein (Apo)E-related peptides. Fixed-dose combination lipid-altering drugs are currently available such as extended-release niacin/lovastatin, whilst

  12. Stem cell-transplantation therapy for adrenoleukodystrophy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller W

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Weston Miller Department of Pediatrics, Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD is a rare, X-linked peroxisomal disorder of impaired very long-chain fatty-acid metabolism. It results from various mutations in the ABCD1 gene (Xq28. All males with the biochemical defect of ALD are at risk of developing cerebral white-matter disease (cALD during their lifetime. Thirty-five percent of ALD patients develop cALD in boyhood, a life-threatening phenotype characterized by rapidly expanding, neuroinflammatory demyelination and irreversible clinical neurologic decline. The ABCD1 genotype does not predict susceptibility to or protection from the childhood cALD phenotype; therefore, clinicians must remain ever vigilant for its development when monitoring ALD patients. Currently, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is the standard of care for boyhood cALD. While HCT provides dramatic functional survival benefit in boys with early, presymptomatic cALD, outcomes are less favorable and less predictable for those with more advanced disease. Furthermore, little is known about how successful HCT in childhood might impact the onset of central nervous system disease in adulthood. Finally, investigations of experimental gene-therapy strategies are ongoing. This review explores current perspectives of stem cell transplantation in cALD. Keywords: adrenoleukodystrophy, cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy, stem cell transplantation, bone marrow transplantation, umbilical cord-blood transplantation, hematopoietic cell transplantation 

  13. Craniofacial Wound Healing with Photobiomodulation Therapy: New Insights and Current Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arany, P R

    2016-08-01

    The fundamental pathophysiologic response for the survival of all organisms is the process of wound healing. Inadequate or lack of healing constitutes the etiopathologic basis of many oral and systemic diseases. Among the numerous efforts to promote wound healing, biophotonics therapies have shown much promise. Advances in photonic technologies and a better understanding of light-tissue interactions, from parallel biophotonics fields such as in vivo optical imaging and optogenetics, are spearheading their popularity in biology and medicine. Use of high-dose lasers and light devices in dermatology, ophthalmology, oncology, and dentistry are now popular for specific clinical applications, such as surgery, skin rejuvenation, ocular and soft tissue recontouring, and antitumor and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. However, a less well-known clinical application is the therapeutic use of low-dose biophotonics termed photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy, which is aimed at alleviating pain and inflammation, modulating immune responses, and promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration. Despite significant volumes of scientific literature from clinical and laboratory studies noting the phenomenological evidence for this innovative therapy, limited mechanistic insights have prevented rigorous and reproducible PBM clinical protocols. This article briefly reviews current evidence and focuses on gaps in knowledge to identify potential paths forward for clinical translation with PBM therapy with an emphasis on craniofacial wound healing. PBM offers a novel opportunity to examine fundamental nonvisual photobiological processes as well as develop innovative clinical therapies, thereby presenting an opportunity for a paradigm shift from conventional restorative/prosthetic approaches to regenerative modalities in clinical dentistry. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  14. Dutch evidence statement for pelvic physical therapy in patients with anal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghmans, L C M; Groot, J A M; van Heeswijk-Faase, I C; Bols, E M J

    2015-04-01

    To promote agreement among and support the quality of pelvic physiotherapists' skills and clinical reasoning in The Netherlands, an Evidence Statement Anal Incontinence (AI) was developed based on the practice-driven problem definitions outlined. We present a summary of the current state of knowledge and formulate recommendations for a methodical assessment and treatment for patients with AI, and place the evidence in a broader perspective of current developments. Electronic literature searches were conducted in relevant databases with regard to prevalence, incidence, costs, etiological and prognostic factors, predictors of response to therapy, prevention, assessment, and treatment. The recommendations have been formulated on the basis of scientific evidence and where no evidence was available, recommendations were consensus-based. The evidence statement incorporates a practice statement with corresponding notes that clarify the recommendations, and accompanying flowcharts, describing the steps and recommendations with regard to the diagnostic and therapeutic process. The diagnostic process consists of history-taking and physical examination supported by measurement instruments. For each problem category for patients with AI, a certain treatment plan can be distinguished dependent on the presence of pelvic floor dysfunction, awareness of loss of stools, comorbidity, neurological problems, adequate anorectal sensation, and (in)voluntary control. Available evidence and expert opinion support the use of education, pelvic floor muscle training, biofeedback, and electrostimulation in selected patients. The evidence statement reflects the current state of knowledge for a methodical and systematic physical therapeutic assessment and treatment for patients with AI.

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric morbidity: current evidence and therapeutic prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toker L

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lilach Toker,1 Galila Agam2,3 1Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 3Mental Health Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel Abstract: Cumulating evidence for the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders leaves little to no doubt regarding the involvement of this pathology in mood disorders. However, mitochondrial abnormalities are also observed in a wide range of disorders spanning from cancer and diabetes to various neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, autism, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The apparent lack of specificity questions the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders, in general, and in mood disorders, in particular. Is mitochondrial dysfunction a general phenomenon, simplistically rendering brain cells to be more vulnerable to a variety of disease-specific perturbations? Or is it an epiphenomenon induced by various disease-specific factors? Or possibly, the severity and the anatomical region of the dysfunction are the ones responsible for the distinct features of the disorders. Whichever of the aforementioned ones, if any, is correct, “mitochondrial dysfunction” became more of a cliché than a therapeutic target. In this review, we summarize current studies supporting the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in different psychiatric disorders. We address the question of specificity and causality of the different findings and provide an alternative explanation for some of the aforementioned questions. Keywords: bipolar disorder, psychiatric disorders, schizophrenia, Stanley Foundation Brain Collection

  16. Troponin elevations in patients with chronic cardiovascular disease: An analysis of current evidence and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archer K Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum troponin elevation above the 99th percentile of the upper reference limit in healthy subjects (<0.01 ng/ml measured using currently available high-sensitivity cardiac troponin laboratory assays is required to establish the diagnosis the diagnosis of myocardial necrosis in acute cardiovascular syndromes, as well as guide prognosis and therapy. In the perioperative period, for patients with cardiac disease undergoing noncardiac surgery, it is a particularly critical biomarker universally used to assess the myocardial damage. The value of troponin testing and elevation (as well as its significance in patients with chronic cardiac valvular, vascular, and renal disease is relatively less well understood. This evidence-based review seeks to examine the currently available data assessing the significance of troponin elevation in certain chronic valvular and other disease states.

  17. Advances in evidence-based cancer adoptive cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chunlei; Li, Ruilei; Song, Xin; Qin, Shukui

    2017-04-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has been developed in cancer treatment by transferring/infusing immune cells into cancer patients, which are able to recognize, target, and destroy tumor cells. Recently, sipuleucel-T and genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) show a great potential to control metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and hematologic malignancies in clinic. This review summarized some of the major evidence-based ACT and the challenges to improve cell quality and reduce the side effects in the field. This review also provided future research directions to make sure ACT widely available in clinic.

  18. Developing evidence-based physical therapy clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Sandra L; Coulter, Colleen; Fetters, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Recommended strategies for developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are provided. The intent is that future CPGs developed with the support of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association would consistently follow similar developmental processes to yield consistent quality and presentation. Steps in the process of developing CPGs are outlined and resources are provided to assist CPG developers in carrying out their task. These recommended processes may also be useful to CPG developers representing organizations with similar structures, objectives, and resources.

  19. Childhood nephrotic syndrome--current and future therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Larry A; Benndorf, Rainer; Smoyer, William E

    2012-06-12

    The introduction of corticosteroids more than 50 years ago dramatically improved the prognosis of children with nephrotic syndrome. Corticosteroids remain the standard initial treatment for children with this disease, but a considerable proportion of patients do not respond and are therefore at risk of progressing to end-stage renal disease. Because of this risk, new therapeutic strategies are needed for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. These strategies have historically focused on identifying effective alternative immunosuppressive agents, such as ciclosporin and tacrolimus, yet evidence now indicates that nephrotic syndrome results from podocyte dysfunction. Even conventional immunosuppressive agents, such as glucocorticoids and ciclosporin, directly affect podocyte structure and function, challenging the 'immune theory' of the pathogenesis of childhood nephrotic syndrome in which disease is caused by T cells. This Review summarizes the currently available treatments for childhood nephrotic syndrome, and discusses selected novel pathways in podocytes that could be targeted for the development of next-generation treatments for children with this syndrome.

  20. Evidence for Resistance Training as a Treatment Therapy in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, investigators have paid increasing attention to the effects of resistance training (RT on several metabolic syndrome variables. Evidence suggests that skeletal muscle is responsible for up to 40% of individuals' total body weight and may be influential in modifying metabolic risk factors via muscle mass development. Due to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. The purpose of this review is to (1 evaluate the potential clinical effectiveness and biological mechanisms of RT in the treatment of obesity and (2 provide up-to-date evidence relating to the impact of RT in reducing major cardiovascular disease risk factors (including dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes. A further aim of this paper is to provide clinicians with recommendations for facilitating the use of RT as therapy in obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders.

  1. The 'antisocial' person: an insight in to biology, classification and current evidence on treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajapakse Senaka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review analyses and summarises the recent advances in understanding the neurobiology of violence and empathy, taxonomical issues on defining personality disorders characterised by disregard for social norms, evidence for efficacy of different treatment modalities and ethical implications in defining 'at-risk' individuals for preventive interventions. Methods PubMed was searched with the keywords 'antisocial personality disorder', 'dissocial personality disorder' and 'psychopathy'. The search was limited to articles published in English over the last 10 years (1999 to 2009 Results Both diagnostic manuals used in modern psychiatry, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual published by the American Psychiatric Association and the International Classification of Diseases published by the World Health Organization, identify a personality disorder sharing similar traits. It is termed antisocial personality disorder in the diagnostic and statistical manual and dissocial personality disorder in the International Classification of Diseases. However, some authors query the ability of the existing manuals to identify a special category termed 'psychopathy', which in their opinion deserves special attention. On treatment-related issues, many psychological and behavioural therapies have shown success rates ranging from 25% to 62% in different cohorts. Multisystemic therapy and cognitive behaviour therapy have been proven efficacious in many trials. There is no substantial evidence for the efficacy of pharmacological therapy. Currently, the emphasis is on early identification and prevention of antisocial behaviour despite the ethical implications of defining at-risk children. Conclusions Further research is needed in the areas of neuroendocrinological associations of violent behaviour, taxonomic existence of psychopathy and efficacy of treatment modalities.

  2. Current and future pharmacological therapies for NAFLD/NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Yoshio; Yoneda, Masashi

    2018-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent liver disease worldwide, and there is no approved pharmacotherapy. The efficacy of vitamin E and pioglitazone has been established in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a progressive form of NAFLD. GLP-1RA and SGLT2 inhibitors, which are currently approved for use in diabetes, have shown early efficacy in NASH, and also have beneficial cardiovascular or renal effects. Innovative NASH therapies include four main pathways. The first approach is targeting hepatic fat accumulation. Medications in this approach include modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activator receptors (e.g., pemafibrate, elafibranor), medications targeting farnesoid X receptor axis [obeticholic acid; OCA)], inhibitors of de novo lipogenesis (aramchol, ACC inhibitor), and fibroblast growth factor-21 analogues. A second target is oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This class of drug includes apoptosis signaling kinase 1 (ASK1) inhibitor and emricasan (an irreversible caspase inhibitor). A third target is intestinal microbiomes and metabolic endotoxemia. Several agents are in ongoing trials, including IMMe124, TLR4 antagonist, and solithromycin (macrolide antibiotics). The final target is hepatic fibrosis, which is strongly associated with all-cause or liver-related mortality in NASH. Antifibrotic agents are a cysteine-cysteine motif chemokine receptor-2/5 antagonist (cenicriviroc; CVC) and galectin 3 antagonist. Among a variety of medications in development, four agents such as OCA, elafibranor, ASK1 inhibitor, and CVC are currently being evaluated in an international phase 3 trial for the treatment of NASH. Within the next few years, the availability of therapeutic options for NASH will hopefully curb the rising trend of NASH-related diseases.

  3. Breast-Feeding Analgesia in Infants: An Update on the Current State of Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Britney; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Latimer, Margot; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha

    To provide an updated synthesis of the current state of the evidence for the effectiveness of breast-feeding and expressed breast milk feeding in reducing procedural pain in preterm and full-term born infants. A systematic search of key electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE) was completed. Of the 1032 abstracts screened, 21 were found eligible for inclusion. Fifteen studies reported on the use of breast-feeding or expressed breast milk in full-term infants and 6 reported on preterm infants. Direct breast-feeding was more effective than maternal holding, maternal skin-to-skin contact, topical anesthetics, and music therapy, and was as or more effective than sweet tasting solutions in full-term infants. Expressed breast milk was not consistently found to reduce pain response in full-term or preterm infants. Studies generally had moderate to high risk of bias. There is sufficient evidence to recommend direct breast-feeding for procedural pain management in full-term infants. Based on current evidence, expressed breast milk alone should not be considered an adequate intervention.

  4. Current Status and Future Directions of Targeted Peptide Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkema, R.

    2009-01-01

    Current status: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is currently almost exclusively targeted at the somatostatin receptor (sst). Of the 5 receptor subtypes, sst2 is frequently very highly expressed at the cell surface of neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Octreotide is a small and stable derivative of native somatostatin, which can be very well labeled with therapeutic radionuclides such as the beta-emitters ''9''0Y, ''1''7''7Lu or the Auger emitter ''1''1''1In, chelated in DTPA or DOTA, linked to the peptide. All current therapeutic octreotide derivatives are agonists that are internalized in the cell. The affinity for the sst2 receptor is better for [DOTA,Tyr''3]octreotate than for [DOTA,Tyr''3]octreotide or [DTPA]octreotide. ''9''0Y is a pure beta-emitter, with a half-life of 2.7 days, a high energy of 2.270 MeV, and a maximum penetration in tissue of 12mm. ''1''7''7Lu with a half-life of 6.7 days emits a low abundance of gamma photons as well as beta particles of 497 keV, with a maximum tissue penetration of 2 mm. ''1''7''7Lu-[DOTA,Tyr''3]octreotate (Lu-DOTATE), ''9''0Y-[DOTA,Tyr''3]octreotate (Y-DOTATATE) and ''9''0Y-[DOTA,Tyr''3]octreotide (Y-DOTATOC) are today the most frequently used therapeutic radiopeptides. Main inclusion criteria: inoperable and/or metastatic NET, receptor-positivity in all known lesions demonstrated by sufficient uptake on ''1''1''1In-octreotide scintigraphy (intensity > liver parenchyma), life expectancy at least 3-6 months, sufficient bone marrow reserve (hemoglobin (HGB) ≥ 5 mmol/L, white blood cells (WBC) ≥ 2*10 9 /L, platelets (PLT) ≥ 75*10 12 /L), sufficient renal function (serum creatinine 40 mL/min), sufficient hepatic and cardiac reserve. Karnofski score ≥50. Efficacy: several groups have reported objective response rates (RECIST or WHO/SWOG; CT or MRI based). Complete remission (CR) is rarely seen, partial remission (PR; >50% shrinkage SWOG) in 7% - 37%, minor remission (MR, 25% - 50% shrinkage) in 13% - 17

  5. Current status of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreiner, A. J.; Bergueiro, J.; Di Paolo, H.; Castell, W.; Vento, V. Thatar; Cartelli, D.; Kesque, J.M.; Valda, A.A.; Ilardo, J.C.; Baldo, M.; Erhardt, J.; Debray, M.E.; Somacal, H.R.; Estrada, L.; Sandin, J.C. Suarez; Igarzabal, M.; Huck, H.; Padulo, J.; Minsky, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    The direct use of proton and heavy ion beams for radiotherapy is a well established cancer treatment modality, which is becoming increasingly widespread due to its clear advantages over conventional photon-based treatments. This strategy is suitable when the tumor is spatially well localized. Also the use of neutrons has a long tradition. Here Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) stands out, though on a much smaller scale, being a second-generation promising alternative for tumors which are diffuse and infiltrating. On this sector, so far only nuclear reactors have been used as neutron sources. In this paper we describe the current situation worldwide as far as the use of accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT is concerned (so-called Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT). In particular we discuss the present status of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams to perform BNCT for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. (author)

  6. [Current research status of drug therapy for apnea of prematurity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Shu, Xian-Xiao; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Jing; Tang, Jun; Mu, De-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the current status of studies on drug therapy for apnea of prematurity (AOP) in the past decade in China and abroad, and to describe the research trends in the field. CNKI and MEDLINE were searched with the key words "apnea of prematurity" and "treatment" for articles published in the past decade (January 2006 to December 2015). The articles were screened and the key words were extracted to establish the co-occurrence matrix. Ucinet 6.2 was used to plot the knowledge map. A total of 26 Chinese key words and 20 English key words were included. Those in the center of the co-existent knowledge map of Chinses keywords were "preterm infants", "apnea", "primary apnea", "naloxone" and "aminophylline"; while "apnea", "preterm infants" and "caffeine" located in the central place of the co-existent knowledge map of English keywords. Methylxanthines are still the major drugs for AOP; however, aminophylline is mainly used in China, while caffeine is mainly used in foreign countries. Other drugs such as naltrexone are also used in the clinical treatment of AOP.

  7. Angelman syndrome: Current and emerging therapies in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wen-Hann; Bird, Lynne M

    2016-12-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a loss of the maternally-inherited UBE3A; the paternal UBE3A is silenced in neurons by a mechanism involving an antisense transcript (UBE3A-AS) at the unmethylated paternal locus. We reviewed all published information on the clinical trials that have been completed as well as the publicly available information on ongoing trials of therapies in AS. To date, all clinical trials that strove to improve neurodevelopment in AS have been unsuccessful. Attempts at hypermethylating the maternal locus through dietary compounds were ineffective. The results of an 8-week open-label trial using minocycline as a matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitor were inconclusive, while a subsequent randomized placebo-controlled trial suggested that treatment with minocycline for 8 weeks did not result in any neurodevelopmental gains. A 1-year randomized placebo-controlled trial using levodopa to alter the phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II did not lead to any improvement in neurodevelopment. Topoisomerase inhibitors and antisense oligonucleotides are being developed to directly inhibit UBE3A-AS. Artificial transcription factors are being developed to "super activate" UBE3A or inhibit UBE3A-AS. Other strategies targeting specific pathways are briefly discussed. We also reviewed the medications that are currently used to treat seizures and sleep disturbances, which are two of the more common complications of AS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Targeted therapy of brain metastases: latest evidence and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Rodica; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S

    2017-12-01

    Brain metastases (BM) occur in 20-40% of patients with cancer and 60-75% of patients with BM become symptomatic. Due to an aging population and advances in the treatment of primary cancers, patients are living longer and are more likely to experience complications from BM. The diagnosis of BM drastically worsens long-term survival rates, with multiple metastases being a poor prognostic factor. Until recently, the mainstay of treatment consisted of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), surgical resection, whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), or a combination of these modalities. Systemic chemotherapy has been felt largely ineffective in the treatment of BM due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which includes efflux pumps on brain capillaries. Over the past decade however, researchers have identified therapeutic agents that are able to cross the BBB. These findings could make a multimodality treatment approach possible, consisting of surgery, radiation, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, which could lead to better disease control in this patient population and prolong survival. In this review, we discuss present evidence on available targeted therapies and their role in the treatment of BM from primary tumors with the highest prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement, specifically non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), breast cancer melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma.

  9. Effectiveness of manual therapies: the UK evidence report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfort, Gert; Haas, Mitch; Evans, Roni; Leininger, Brent; Triano, Jay

    2010-02-25

    The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct but comprehensive summary of the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual treatment for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions. The conclusions are based on the results of systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), widely accepted and primarily UK and United States evidence-based clinical guidelines, plus the results of all RCTs not yet included in the first three categories. The strength/quality of the evidence regarding effectiveness was based on an adapted version of the grading system developed by the US Preventive Services Task Force and a study risk of bias assessment tool for the recent RCTs. By September 2009, 26 categories of conditions were located containing RCT evidence for the use of manual therapy: 13 musculoskeletal conditions, four types of chronic headache and nine non-musculoskeletal conditions. We identified 49 recent relevant systematic reviews and 16 evidence-based clinical guidelines plus an additional 46 RCTs not yet included in systematic reviews and guidelines.Additionally, brief references are made to other effective non-pharmacological, non-invasive physical treatments. Spinal manipulation/mobilization is effective in adults for: acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain; migraine and cervicogenic headache; cervicogenic dizziness; manipulation/mobilization is effective for several extremity joint conditions; and thoracic manipulation/mobilization is effective for acute/subacute neck pain. The evidence is inconclusive for cervical manipulation/mobilization alone for neck pain of any duration, and for manipulation/mobilization for mid back pain, sciatica, tension-type headache, coccydynia, temporomandibular joint disorders, fibromyalgia, premenstrual syndrome, and pneumonia in older adults. Spinal manipulation is not effective for asthma and dysmenorrhea when compared to sham manipulation, or for Stage 1

  10. Effectiveness of manual therapies: the UK evidence report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leininger Brent

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct but comprehensive summary of the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual treatment for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions. Methods The conclusions are based on the results of systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs, widely accepted and primarily UK and United States evidence-based clinical guidelines, plus the results of all RCTs not yet included in the first three categories. The strength/quality of the evidence regarding effectiveness was based on an adapted version of the grading system developed by the US Preventive Services Task Force and a study risk of bias assessment tool for the recent RCTs. Results By September 2009, 26 categories of conditions were located containing RCT evidence for the use of manual therapy: 13 musculoskeletal conditions, four types of chronic headache and nine non-musculoskeletal conditions. We identified 49 recent relevant systematic reviews and 16 evidence-based clinical guidelines plus an additional 46 RCTs not yet included in systematic reviews and guidelines. Additionally, brief references are made to other effective non-pharmacological, non-invasive physical treatments. Conclusions Spinal manipulation/mobilization is effective in adults for: acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain; migraine and cervicogenic headache; cervicogenic dizziness; manipulation/mobilization is effective for several extremity joint conditions; and thoracic manipulation/mobilization is effective for acute/subacute neck pain. The evidence is inconclusive for cervical manipulation/mobilization alone for neck pain of any duration, and for manipulation/mobilization for mid back pain, sciatica, tension-type headache, coccydynia, temporomandibular joint disorders, fibromyalgia, premenstrual syndrome, and pneumonia in older adults. Spinal manipulation is not effective for asthma and

  11. Complementary Medicine, Exercise, Meditation, Diet, and Lifestyle Modification for Anxiety Disorders: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sarris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary medicines and therapies (CAM and modification of lifestyle factors such as physical activity, exercise, and diet are being increasingly considered as potential therapeutic options for anxiety disorders. The objective of this metareview was to examine evidence across a broad range of CAM and lifestyle interventions in the treatment of anxiety disorders. In early 2012 we conducted a literature search of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library, for key studies, systematic reviews, and metaanalyses in the area. Our paper found that in respect to treatment of generalized anxiety or specific disorders, CAM evidence revealed current support for the herbal medicine Kava. One isolated study shows benefit for naturopathic medicine, whereas acupuncture, yoga, and Tai chi have tentative supportive evidence, which is hampered by overall poor methodology. The breadth of evidence does not support homeopathy for treating anxiety. Strong support exists for lifestyle modifications including adoption of moderate exercise and mindfulness meditation, whereas dietary improvement, avoidance of caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine offer encouraging preliminary data. In conclusion, certain lifestyle modifications and some CAMs may provide a beneficial role in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  12. The current state of cognitive therapy: a 40-year retrospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Aaron T

    2005-09-01

    The basic framework of the cognitive theory of psychopathology and cognitive therapy of specific psychiatric disorders was developed more than 40 years ago. Since that time, there has been continuing progress in the development of cognitive theory and therapy and in the empirical testing of both. A substantial body of research supports the cognitive model of depression and, to a somewhat lesser extent, the various anxiety disorders. Cognitive therapy (CT), often labeled as the generic term cognitive behavior therapy, has been shown to be effective in reducing symptoms and relapse rates, with or without medication, in a wide variety of psychiatric disorders. Suggestions for future research and applications are presented.

  13. Current situation and problems of cancer-reproductive therapy from the standpoint of male reproductive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Takeshi; Tanaka, Takashi; Nishio, Koujiro; Arai, Manabu; Okada, Horoshi; Nozaki, Miwako; Kaji, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviewed the current situation and problems of cancer - reproductive therapy from the standpoint of male reproductive therapy. Common causes for male infertility include spermatogenic dysfunction, seminal duct dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction. Causes of male infertility in cancer patients include the presence of cancer itself, as well as pathological conditions due to surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy for cancer, namely spermatogenic dysfunction, seminal duct dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) presents the risk classification of infertility due to anti-cancer drugs or radiotherapy. Cancer treating physicians evaluate infertility risk associated with treatment according to this risk classification and provide patients with information. If a patient wishes to preserve fertility, it is recommended in ASCO's fertility preservation guidelines to introduce the facilities that can store frozen sperm. Questionnaire surveys on sperm cryopreservation to blood physician show that the description of sperm cryopreservation is made at only about two-thirds of facilities and there is a problem that the systemization of cryopreservation has not progressed. The only way to acquire a baby in a patient who has undergone cancer treatment without cryopreservation and became permanent azoospermia is microscopic testis sperm collection and microinsemination. (A.O.)

  14. Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Assessing the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez de Arellano, Michael A.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; George, Preethy; Dougherty, Richard H.; Daniels, Allen S.; Ghose, Sushmita Shoma; Huang, Larke; Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) is a conjoint parent-child treatment developed by Cohen, Mannarino, and Deblinger that uses cognitive-behavioral principles and exposure techniques to prevent and treat posttraumatic stress, depression, and behavioral problems. This review defined TF-CBT, differentiated it from other models, and assessed the evidence base. Methods Authors reviewed meta-analyses, reviews, and individual studies (1995 to 2013). Databases surveyed were PubMed, PsycINFO, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, PILOTS, the ERIC, and the CINAHL. They chose from three levels of research evidence (high, moderate, and low) on the basis of benchmarks for number of studies and quality of their methodology. They also described the evidence of effectiveness. Results The level of evidence for TF-CBT was rated as high on the basis of ten RCTs, three of which were conducted independently (not by TF-CBT developers). TF-CBT has demonstrated positive outcomes in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, although it is less clear whether TF-CBT is effective in reducing behavior problems or symptoms of depression. Limitations of the studies include concerns about investigator bias and exclusion of vulnerable populations. Conclusions TF-CBT is a viable treatment for reducing trauma-related symptoms among some children who have experienced trauma and their nonoffending caregivers. Based on this evidence, TF-CBT should be available as a covered service in health plans. Ongoing research is needed to further identify best practices for TF-CBT in various settings and with individuals from various racial and ethnic backgrounds and with varied trauma histories, symptoms, and stages of intellectual, social, and emotional development. PMID:24638076

  15. Psychological Therapies for Auditory Hallucinations (Voices): Current Status and Key Directions for Future Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, N.; Hayward, M.; Peters, E; van der Gaag, M.; Bentall, R.P.; Jenner, J.; Strauss, C.; Sommer, I.E.; Johns, L.C.; Varese, F.; Gracia-Montes, J.M.; Waters, F.; Dodgson, G.; McCarthy-Jones, S.

    2014-01-01

    This report from the International Consortium on Hallucinations Research considers the current status and future directions in research on psychological therapies targeting auditory hallucinations (hearing voices). Therapy approaches have evolved from behavioral and coping-focused interventions,

  16. Insulin and Its Cardiovascular Effects: What Is the Current Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongerkery, Sahana Pai; Schroeder, Pamela R; Shomali, Mansur E

    2017-10-23

    In this article, we examine the nature of the complex relationship between insulin and cardiovascular disease. With metabolic abnormalities comes increased risk for cardiovascular complications. We discuss the key factors implicated in development and progression of cardiovascular disease, its relationship to insulin therapy, and what can be learned from large, recent cardiovascular outcome studies. Preclinical studies suggest that insulin has positive effects of facilitating glucose entry into cells and maintaining euglycemia and negative effects of favoring obesity and atherogenesis under certain conditions. Confounding this relationship is that cardiovascular morbidity is linked closely to duration and control of diabetes, and insulin is often used in patients with diabetes of longer duration. However, more recent clinical studies examining the cardiovascular safety of insulin therapy have been reassuring. Diabetes and cardiovascular outcomes are closely linked. Many studies have implicated insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia as a major factor for poor cardiovascular outcomes. Additional studies link the anabolic effects of therapeutic insulin to weight gain, along with hypoglycemia, which may further aggravate cardiovascular risk in this population. Though good glycemic control has been shown to improve microvascular risks in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, what are the known cardiovascular effects of insulin therapy? The ORIGIN trial suggests at least a neutral effect of the basal insulin glargine on cardiovascular outcomes. Recent studies have demonstrated that ultra-long-acting insulin analogs like insulin degludec are non-inferior to insulin glargine with regard to cardiovascular outcomes.

  17. Evidence for intrinsic critical current density in high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freltoft, T.; Minnhagen, P.; Jeldtoft Jensen, H.

    1991-01-01

    We present measurements of the voltage-current characteristics of high quality epitaxial YBaCuO films in zero magnetic field. According to the predictions of a current induced vortex pair breaking picture the voltage should follow the functional form V∝I(I-I c ) a-1 . An analysis designed to test this functional behavior is carried out. Consistency is found. (orig.)

  18. Postpartum family planning: current evidence on successful interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazer C

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cassandra Blazer, Ndola Prata Bixby Center for Population, Health, and Sustainability, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract: We reviewed existing evidence of the efficacy of postpartum family planning interventions targeting women in the 12 months postpartum period in low- and middle-income countries. We searched for studies from January 1, 2004 to September 19, 2015, using the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations to assess evidence quality. Our search resulted in 26 studies: 11 based in sub-Saharan Africa, six in the Middle East and North Africa, and nine in Asia. Twenty of the included studies assessed health facility-based interventions. Three were focused on community interventions, two had community and facility components, and one was a workplace program. Overall quality of the evidence was moderate, including evidence for counseling interventions. Male partner involvement, integration with other service delivery platforms, such as prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and immunization, and innovative product delivery programs may increase knowledge and use during the postpartum period. Community-based and workplace strategies need a much stronger base of evidence to prompt recommendations. Keywords: postpartum period, family planning, birth spacing, interventions, systematic review, contraception, less developed countries

  19. Overview of physical therapy graduation courses in Brazil: current scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Baroni de Góes

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: After the regulation of Physical Therapy (PT in 1969, there were only six undergraduate courses in Brazil. In the 90s, higher education underwent major expansion in all professions and the same occurred to PT, with consequent increase in the number of professionals in the labor market and privatization of education. Objective: To describe the current situation of PT courses in Brazil offered by Higher Education Institutions (IES. Methods: The data for the region, academic organization, situation, period, school system, administrative category, vacancies, course hours and duration were obtained from the website of the Ministry of Education (MEC and refer to the year of 2013. The descriptive analyzes of central tendency, dispersion and percentage were performed in Stata 9®. Results: From the total of 550 IES registered in the MEC, 281 (51% were in the Southeast. Regarding the academic organization, 341 (62% corresponded to universities and 483 (87.9% of the IES were private. Of the courses, 521 (94.7% are active, the predominant school system was the semiannual (91.5% and 438 were part-time. The average vacancies authorized by the IES were 129 ± 102, with at least 44,900 vacancies available in the country. Of the courses, 75% had 4,000 hours of duration with the minimum of seven semesters and a maximum of fourteen. Conclusion: The data show a higher offer of PT courses in the private sector compared to the public. There was a progressive concentration of courses and vacancies in the Southeast, especially in São Paulo.

  20. Current state of orthodontic patients under bisphosphonate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Elena; Jacobs, Collin; Walter, Christian; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2013-04-04

    Bisphosphonates are a common medication for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, but are also applied for tumor diseases. They affect bone metabolism, and therefore also orthodontic treatments, but how it does has yet not been definitively clarified. Therefore, the aim of this research was to evaluate and demonstrate the reported effects and the current state of scientific research regarding orthodontic treatment and bisphosphonate medication exclusively in humans. A systematic research of the literature for selected keywords in the Medline database (Pubmed) as well as a manual search was conducted. The following search terms were used: 'Bisphosphonate' in combination with: orthodontic, orthodontic treatment, tooth movement. To date, only nine reported patients (case reports/series) and one original article (retrospective cohort study) regarding orthodontic treatment under bisphosphonate medication in humans have been published. Decelerated tooth movement with increased side effects (especially in high-risk patients) and longer treatment duration was reported in some articles. Patients with initial spacing or extraction cases had a higher risk of incomplete space closure and poor root parallelism. Orthodontic tooth movement under bisphosphonate medication is possible, especially in low-risk patients (low dose and short period of intake). But the treatment is still not predictable, especially in high-risk patients. Therefore, the altered bone metabolism and higher extent of side effects should be considered in treatment planning, especially in extraction cases or high-risk patients. Regardless, longer treatment duration, decelerated tooth movement, and more side effects, e.g., incomplete space closure and poor root parallelism, should be expected, especially in extraction cases or space closure.

  1. Current state of orthodontic patients under Bisphosphonate therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are a common medication for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, but are also applied for tumor diseases. They affect bone metabolism, and therefore also orthodontic treatments, but how it does has yet not been definitively clarified. Therefore, the aim of this research was to evaluate and demonstrate the reported effects and the current state of scientific research regarding orthodontic treatment and bisphosphonate medication exclusively in humans. Material and methods A systematic research of the literature for selected keywords in the Medline database (Pubmed) as well as a manual search was conducted. The following search terms were used: ‘Bisphosphonate’ in combination with: orthodontic, orthodontic treatment, tooth movement. Findings To date, only nine reported patients (case reports/series) and one original article (retrospective cohort study) regarding orthodontic treatment under bisphosphonate medication in humans have been published. Decelerated tooth movement with increased side effects (especially in high-risk patients) and longer treatment duration was reported in some articles. Patients with initial spacing or extraction cases had a higher risk of incomplete space closure and poor root parallelism. Conclusions Orthodontic tooth movement under bisphosphonate medication is possible, especially in low-risk patients (low dose and short period of intake). But the treatment is still not predictable, especially in high-risk patients. Therefore, the altered bone metabolism and higher extent of side effects should be considered in treatment planning, especially in extraction cases or high-risk patients. Regardless, longer treatment duration, decelerated tooth movement, and more side effects, e.g., incomplete space closure and poor root parallelism, should be expected, especially in extraction cases or space closure. PMID:23556517

  2. Current trends in nuclear medicine metabolic therapy - international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavdarova, L.; Tsonevska, A.; Piperkova, E.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Modern nuclear medicine (NM) metabolic therapy involves treatment with radionuclides sources mainly β-, and lately more often and α- rays and aims target specificity to the disease process with minimal damage to healthy surrounding tissues. Materials and Methods: We present some of the most important clinically significant contemporary trends in metabolic therapy in the light of international experience, including low-known in Bulgaria peptide radioreceptor therapy, radioimmunotherapy and so called SIRT (Selective internal radiation therapy) for liver metastases. Results: The ability of NM therapy range from definitive treatment of benign thyroid disease and differentiated thyroid cancer by achieving partial response or complete remission to a temporary palliative analgesic and symptom reducing effect in different, mainly cancer, diseases. Conclusion: The principle of 'terradiagnostic' - the interdependence of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine approaches is crucial for individualizing treatment and achieving better results in extending survival and improving the quality of life of patients

  3. Current status of evidence-based sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Erickson, Brandon J; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Gupta, Anil K; McCormick, Frank M; Bach, Bernard R

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the proportion of sports medicine studies that are labeled as Level I Evidence in 5 journals and compare the quality of surgical and nonsurgical studies using simple quality assessment tools (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials [CONSORT] and Jadad). By use of PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines over the prior 2 years in the top 5 (citation and impact factor based) sports medicine journals, only Level I Evidence studies were eligible for inclusion and were analyzed. All study types (therapeutic, prognostic, diagnostic, and economic) were analyzed. Study quality was assessed with the level of evidence, Jadad score, and CONSORT 2010 guidelines. Study demographic data were compared among journals and between surgical and nonsurgical studies by use of χ(2), 1-way analysis of variance, and 2-sample Z tests. We analyzed 190 Level I Evidence studies (10% of eligible studies) (119 randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). Therapeutic, nonsurgical, single-center studies from the United States were the most common studies published. Sixty-two percent of studies reported a financial conflict of interest. The knee was the most common body part studied, and track-and-field/endurance sports were the most common sports analyzed. Significant differences (P .05) were shown among journals based on the proportion of Level I studies or appropriate randomization. Significant strengths and limitations of RCTs were identified. This study showed that Level I Evidence and RCTs comprise 10% and 6% of contemporary sports medicine literature, respectively. Therapeutic, nonsurgical, single-center studies are the most common publications with Level I Evidence. Significant differences across sports medicine journals were found in study quality. Surgical studies appropriately described randomization, blinding, and patient enrollment significantly more than nonsurgical studies. Level I

  4. Cancer and Radiation Therapy: Current Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, Rajamanickam; Lee, Kuo Ann; Yeo, Richard; Yeoh, Kheng-Wei

    2012-01-01

    In recent years remarkable progress has been made towards the understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer development and treatment. However with its increasing incidence, the clinical management of cancer continues to be a challenge for the 21st century. Treatment modalities comprise of radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy remains an important component of cancer treatment with approximately 50% of all cancer patients receiving radiation therapy during their course of illness; it contributes towards 40% of curative treatment for cancer. The main goal of radiation therapy is to deprive cancer cells of their multiplication (cell division) potential. Celebrating a century of advances since Marie Curie won her second Nobel Prize for her research into radium, 2011 has been designated the Year of Radiation therapy in the UK. Over the last 100 years, ongoing advances in the techniques of radiation treatment and progress made in understanding the biology of cancer cell responses to radiation will endeavor to increase the survival and reduce treatment side effects for cancer patients. In this review, principles, application and advances in radiation therapy with their biological end points are discussed. PMID:22408567

  5. Polyphenol nanoformulations for cancer therapy: experimental evidence and clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davatgaran-Taghipour Y

    2017-04-01

    bioavailability. Different types of formulations have been designed for the improvement of bioavailability of these compounds, nanonization being one of the most notable approaches among them. This study aimed to review current data on the nanoformulations of natural polyphenols as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents and to discuss their molecular anticancer mechanisms of action. Nanoformulations of natural polyphenols as bioactive agents, including resveratrol, curcumin, quercetin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, chrysin, baicalein, luteolin, honokiol, silibinin, and coumarin derivatives, in a dose-dependent manner, result in better efficacy for the prevention and treatment of cancer. The impact of nanoformulation methods for these natural agents on tumor cells has gained wider attention due to improvement in targeted therapy and bioavailability, as well as enhancement of stability. Today, several nanoformulations are designed for delivery of polyphenolic compounds, including nanosuspensions, solid lipid nanoparticles, liposomes, gold nanoparticles, and polymeric nanoparticles, which have resulted in better antineoplastic activity, higher intracellular concentration of polyphenols, slow and sustained release of the drugs, and improvement of proapoptotic activity against tumor cells. To conclude, natural polyphenols demonstrate remarkable anticancer potential in pharmacotherapy; however, the obstacles in terms of their bioavailability in and toxicity to normal cells, as well as targeted drug delivery to malignant cells, can be overcome using nanoformulation-based technologies, which optimize the bioefficacy of these natural drugs. Keywords: natural products, flavonoid, anthocyanin, tumor, malignancy

  6. Evidence from the Cochrane Collaboration for Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Susan; Kimbrough, Elizabeth; Cheng, Ker; Berman, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The Cochrane Collaboration, an international not-for-profit organization that prepares and maintains systematic reviews of randomized trials of health care therapies, has produced reviews summarizing much of the evidence on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Our objective was to review the evidence base according to Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods In order to detect reviews focusing on TCM, we searched the titles and abstracts of all reviews in Issue 4, 2008 of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. For each review, we extracted data on the number of trials included and the total number of participants. We provided an indication of the strength of the review findings by assessing the reviewers' abstract conclusions statement. We supplemented our assessment of the abstract conclusions statements with a listing of the comparisons and outcomes showing statistically significant meta-analyses results. Results We identified 70 Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM, primarily acupuncture (n = 26) and Chinese herbal medicine (n = 42), and 1 each of moxibustion and t'ai chi. Nineteen (19) of 26 acupuncture reviews and 22/42 herbal medicine reviews concluded that there was not enough good quality trial evidence to make any conclusion about the efficacy of the evaluated treatment, while the remaining 7 acupuncture and 20 herbal medicine reviews and each of the moxibustion and t'ai chi reviews indicated a suggestion of benefit, which was qualified by a caveat about the poor quality and quantity of studies. Most reviews included many distinct interventions, controls, outcomes, and populations, and a large number of different comparisons were made, each with a distinct forest plot. Conclusions Most Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM are inconclusive, due specifically to the poor methodology and heterogeneity of the studies reviewed. Some systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence of Chinese medicine's benefits to certain patient populations

  7. Prevention of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder After Trauma: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Gevonden, Martin; Shalev, Arieh

    2016-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a frequent, tenacious, and disabling consequence of traumatic events. The disorder's identifiable onset and early symptoms provide opportunities for early detection and prevention. Empirical findings and theoretical models have outlined specific risk factors and pathogenic processes leading to PTSD. Controlled studies have shown that theory-driven preventive interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or stress hormone-targeted pharmacological interventions, are efficacious in selected samples of survivors. However, the effectiveness of early clinical interventions remains unknown, and results obtained in aggregates (large groups) overlook individual heterogeneity in PTSD pathogenesis. We review current evidence of PTSD prevention and outline the need to improve the disorder's early detection and intervention in individual-specific paths to chronic PTSD.

  8. The Therapeutic Role of Interleukin-1 Inhibition in Idiopathic Recurrent Pericarditis: Current Evidence and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaros, George; Antonatou, Katerina; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent pericarditis is a common complication of acute pericarditis (15–30%) for which, in most cases, no underlying etiology is found [idiopathic recurrent pericarditis (IRP)]. IRP is currently viewed as an autoinflammatory disease with characteristic recurrent episodes of sterile inflammation. According to the most recent Guidelines, the initial treatment regimen consists of a combination of aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with colchicine followed by the addition of corticosteroids in resistant or intolerant cases. Despite this treatment approach, a number of patients either do not respond or cannot tolerate the above therapies. For this refractory group, small case series and a recent randomized controlled trial have shown that interleukin-1 inhibition with anakinra is a rapidly acting, highly efficient, steroid-sparing, and safe therapeutic intervention. In this perspective, we discuss the available clinical evidence and our own clinical experience as well as the future prospects of this novel therapeutic approach for patients with IRP. PMID:28660191

  9. [Pathogenesis, clinical picture, and current therapy of rosacea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonser, L I; Gonser, C E; Schaller, M

    2016-01-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory disease, especially in patients with fair skin and positive family history. Typical locations are forehead, nose, cheeks and chin; the periorbital region is usually not involved. Clinical features can be very heterogeneous. Besides different subtypes (erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, papulopustular rosacea, phymatous rosacea), which often overlap, various special forms of rosacea exist. Up to 60% of patients with cutaneous rosacea suffer from ocular rosacea. In Germany, brimonidine, metronidazol, azelaic acid, and ivermectin are approved for topical therapy of rosacea; for systemic therapy, doxycycline at a subantimicrobial dose (40 mg/day) is the only approved substance. In case of resistance to this therapy, contraindications or side effects, various alternative therapies are available, however off-label.

  10. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Shankar Kodali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO 2 . Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO 2 (PETCO 2 and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO 2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA. There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO 2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes.

  11. Nonpharmacological therapy for the management of neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer's disease: linking evidence to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staedtler, Amber V; Nunez, Diane

    2015-04-01

    Behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia affect up to 90% of all patients at some point during their dementing illness. Today, many of these symptoms are treated with pharmacological therapy alone, incongruent with clinical recommendations. Barriers to the use of nonpharmacological interventions with dementia include a lack of education among caregivers on available options, shortage of time for implementation, lack of education on effects of nonpharmacological therapy, poor staff to resident ratios, and unmodifiable physical environments. The purpose of this paper is to explore current literature regarding the implementation of nonpharmacological therapy as an adjunct treatment to manage agitation in dementia, to identify practice discrepancies seen commonly among formal and informal caregivers, and to make recommendations for implementing evidence into practice. A systematic review of the literature published between 2009 and 2014 was conducted. Four databases were searched including CINAHL, Pubmed, the Cochrane Library, and PsycInfo. The most prevalent and substantial conclusion among the 10 studies evaluated is that nonpharmacological therapy is safe and effective. Although not every study was able to show statistically significant outcomes when compared to controls, all studies demonstrated a positive trend toward decreasing agitation without any adverse side effects. A multicomponent caregiver education program focused on evidence-based nonpharmacological strategies for addressing agitation in persons with Alzheimer's disease has the potential to decrease agitation, improve patient outcomes, and increase caregiver satisfaction. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. [The current situation of the internationalization of the Naikan therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Ryuzo

    2003-01-01

    In Japan, there are 27 Naikan medical institutions in which are included 5 clinics, 5 general hospitals and 17 mental hospitals. As for Naikan meditation center, there are 32 places. Generally, Naikan medical institutions and Naikan meditation center coexist in Japan. It is rare to see institutions for Naikan therapy in more north than Kanto area. Around Nara prefecture, which is Naikan therapy cradle, fairly numbers of Naikan meditation center are located. Surprisingly, no Naikan medical institutions are located. Naikan medical institutions and Naikan meditation center are distributed over the world. Total Naikan medical institutions are 32 and it only located in Japan and China. Total Naikan meditation center are 38 and 32 in Japan, 3 in Austria, 2 in Germany, and 1 in U.S.A. I would like to make suggestions as follows. At first, it is important to make cooperating with Naikan medical institution and Naikan meditation center. Also, it is necessary to enhance the technique ability of Naikan therapy. Secondary, we should guide medical workers to make understand useful of Naikan therapy as many as possible. Third, in order to do so, it is desirable to establish international Naikan Medical Association. Fourthly, it is necessary to systematize theory of the disease, therapeutic theory and therapeutic mechanism in Naikan therapy.

  13. Current evidence on dietary pattern and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Bernice H K; Ho, Ivan C H; Chan, Ruth S M; Sea, Mandy M M; Woo, Jean

    2014-01-01

    With global aging population, age-related cognitive decline becomes epidemic. Lifestyle-related factor is one of the key preventative measures. Dietary pattern analysis which considers dietary complexity has recently used to examine the linkage between nutrition and cognitive function. A priori approach defines dietary pattern based on existing knowledge. Results of several dietary pattern scores were summarized. The heterogeneity of assessment methods and outcome measurements lead to inconsistent results. Posteriori approach derives a dietary pattern independently of the existing nutrition-disease knowledge. It showed a dietary pattern abundant with plant-based food, oily fish, lower consumption of processed food, saturated fat, and simple sugar which appears to be beneficial to cognitive health. Despite inconclusive evidence from both approaches, diet and exercise, beneficial for other diseases, remains to be the two key modifiable factors for cognitive function. Large-scale prospective studies in multiethics population are required to provide stronger evidence in the future. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ebola Virus Shedding and Transmission: Review of Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Pauline; Fischer, William A; Schibler, Manuel; Jacobs, Michael; Bausch, Daniel G; Kaiser, Laurent

    2016-10-15

     The magnitude of the 2013-2016 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa was unprecedented, with >28 500 reported cases and >11 000 deaths. Understanding the key elements of Ebola virus transmission is necessary to implement adequate infection prevention and control measures to protect healthcare workers and halt transmission in the community.  We performed an extensive PubMed literature review encompassing the period from discovery of Ebola virus, in 1976, until 1 June 2016 to evaluate the evidence on modes of Ebola virus shedding and transmission.  Ebola virus has been isolated by cell culture from blood, saliva, urine, aqueous humor, semen, and breast milk from infected or convalescent patients. Ebola virus RNA has been noted in the following body fluids days or months after onset of illness: saliva (22 days), conjunctiva/tears (28 days), stool (29 days), vaginal fluid (33 days), sweat (44 days), urine (64 days), amniotic fluid (38 days), aqueous humor (101 days), cerebrospinal fluid (9 months), breast milk (16 months [preliminary data]), and semen (18 months). Nevertheless, the only documented cases of secondary transmission from recovered patients have been through sexual transmission. We did not find strong evidence supporting respiratory or fomite-associated transmission. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Evidence for explosive volcanic density currents on certain Martian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, C. E.; Komar, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    The morphologies of certain of the smaller Martian volcanoes are discussed as possible results of explosive volcanic density currents. An examination of newly-photographed flank and caldera features of the Martian volcanoes Ceraunius Tholus, Uranius Tholus, Uranius Patera and Hecates Tholus, including steep slope angles, Krakatoa-type caldera morphologies, erosional features (radial channels and anastamosing gullies) and constructional features (blanketed flanks and possible lava deltas) reveals their similarity to terrestrial cones and composite volcanoes such as Barcena Volcano. Crater age data from the surface of Martian domes and shields indicates that such explosive activity occurred more frequently early in Martian geologic history, consistent with the view that the volcanic density currents were base surges rather than nuees ardentes, with the melting of permafrost supplying the water required in base surge generation.

  16. Evidence-based use of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in clinical plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Berish; Herman, Charles; Dabb, Richard; Ignarro, Louis J; Pilla, Arthur A

    2009-01-01

    The initial development of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy and its evolution over the last century for use in clinical surgery has been slow, primarily because of lack of scientifically-derived, evidence-based knowledge of the mechanism of action. Our objective was to review the major scientific breakthroughs and current understanding of the mechanism of action of PEMF therapy, providing clinicians with a sound basis for optimal use. A literature review was conducted, including mechanism of action and biologic and clinical studies of PEMF. Using case illustrations, a holistic exposition on the clinical use of PEMF in plastic surgery was performed. PEMF therapy has been used successfully in the management of postsurgical pain and edema, the treatment of chronic wounds, and in facilitating vasodilatation and angiogenesis. Using scientific support, the authors present the currently accepted mechanism of action of PEMF therapy. This review shows that plastic surgeons have at hand a powerful tool with no known side effects for the adjunctive, noninvasive, nonpharmacologic management of postoperative pain and edema. Given the recent rapid advances in development of portable and economical PEMF devices, what has been of most significance to the plastic surgeon is the laboratory and clinical confirmation of decreased pain and swelling following injury or surgery.

  17. Clinical evidence on high flow oxygen therapy and active humidification in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotera, C; Díaz Lobato, S; Pinto, T; Winck, J C

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been growing interest in an alternative to conventional oxygen therapy: the heated, humidified high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC). A number of physiological effects have been described with HFNC: pharyngeal dead space washout, reduction of nasopharyngeal resistance, a positive expiratory pressure effect, an alveolar recruitment, greater humidification, more comfort and better tolerance by the patient, better control of FiO2 and mucociliary clearance. There is limited experience of HFNC in adults. There are no established guidelines or decision-making pathways to guide use of the HFNC therapy for adults. In this article we review the existing evidence of HFNC oxygen therapy in adult patients, its advantages, limitations and the current literature on clinical applications. Further research is required to determine the long-term effect of this therapy and identify the adult patient population to whom it is most beneficial. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Cellular phones and their hazards: the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Anusheel; Jalali, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    The past decade has seen an exponential increase globally in the use of cellular phones (popularly known as mobile or cell phones). These phones are convenient and trendy. Discarding the wire means that the communication is through electromagnetic waves, which could have potential hazards. Alarmist reports in the lay press and high profile lawsuits, particularly in the West, have attracted attention to the possible harmful effects of cellular phones. Adverse effects investigated by various clinical trials include the possible link to increased risk of vehicular accidents, leukaemias, sleep disturbances and the more serious brain tumours. Available level II evidence suggests that the only proven side-effect is an increased risk of vehicular accidents. So far, all studies have consistently negated any association between cellular phones and brain tumours. Yet, the final word remains to be said.

  19. Social class and prosocial behavior: current evidence, caveats, and questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piff, Paul K; Robinson, Angela R

    2017-12-01

    This review synthesizes research on social class and prosocial behavior. Individuals of lower social class display increased attention to others and greater sensitivity to others' welfare compared to individuals of higher social class, who exhibit more self-oriented patterns of social cognition. As a result, lower-class individuals are more likely to engage in other-beneficial prosocial behavior, whereas higher-class individuals are more prone to engage in self-beneficial behavior. Although the extant evidence indicates that higher social class standing may tend to undermine prosocial impulses, we propose that the effects of social class on prosocial behavior may also depend on three crucial factors: motivation, identity, and inequality. We discuss how and why these factors may moderate class differences in prosociality and offer promising lines of inquiry for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioresorbable scaffolds: current evidence and ongoing clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourantas, Christos V; Zhang, Yaojun; Farooq, Vasim; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W

    2012-10-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) represent a novel approach in coronary stent technology. In contrast to the metallic stents, they provide transient scaffolding, thereby safeguarding early vessel patency and acute gain. Subsequently a process of "decomposition" occurs, that results in the complete absorption of the scaffold. This reduces the risk of late complications, allowing the vessel to maintain its integrity and physiological function. This unique ability has attracted interest and nowadays several BRS are available. The aim of this review article is to describe the advances in the field, present the evidence from the preclinical and clinical evaluation of these devices, and provide an overview of the ongoing clinical trials that were designed to examine the effectiveness of BRS in the clinical setting.

  1. Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia do Carmo Silva Parreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Questions: Is Kinesio Taping more effective than a sham taping/placebo, no treatment or other interventions in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Is the addition of Kinesio Taping to other interventions more effective than other interventions alone in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Design: Systematic review of randomised trials. Participants: People with musculoskeletal conditions. Intervention: Kinesio Taping was compared with sham taping/placebo, no treatment, exercises, manual therapy and conventional physiotherapy. Outcome measures: Pain intensity, disability, quality of life, return to work, and global impression of recovery. Results: Twelve randomised trials involving 495 participants were included in the review. The effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping was tested in participants with: shoulder pain in two trials; knee pain in three trials; chronic low back pain in two trials; neck pain in three trials; plantar fasciitis in one trial; and multiple musculoskeletal conditions in one trial. The methodological quality of eligible trials was moderate, with a mean of 6.1 points on the 10-point PEDro Scale score. Overall, Kinesio Taping was no better than sham taping/placebo and active comparison groups. In all comparisons where Kinesio Taping was better than an active or a sham control group, the effect sizes were small and probably not clinically significant or the trials were of low quality. Conclusion: This review provides the most updated evidence on the effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping for musculoskeletal conditions. The current evidence does not support the use of this intervention in these clinical populations. PROSPERO registration: CRD42012003436. [Parreira PdCS, Costa LdCM, Hespanhol Junior LC, Lopes AD, Costa LOP (2014 Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 31–39

  2. Current minimally invasive and endourological therapy in pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N. Khater

    Abstract. Introduction: Children with complex urinary tract stones present a treatment challenge. There is still no clear consensus regarding their management. Therefore, our goal was to review the endourological therapies in children presenting with complex nephrolithiasis, updated to 2013. Methods: This was a review of ...

  3. Focal therapy for prostate cancer: current status and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miano, R.; Asimakopoulos, A. D.; Da Silva, R. D.; Bove, P.; Jones, S. J.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Kim, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Focal therapy is a relatively new and extremely attractive option of treatment for prostate cancer. It has been described as the "middle approach" between active surveillance and radical treatment, aiming to destroy the tumor itself or the region containing the tumor in order to preserve surrounding

  4. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxious children: from evidence to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Monique C; Nunez, Diane E

    2014-02-01

    Anxiety is the most common mental health problem in children, yet less than one third of children with anxiety disorders seek treatment. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is recommended as a first-line treatment for childhood anxiety. However, current practice generally does not include CBT due to issues of feasibility, affordability, and transportability. The primary purpose of this review was to appraise current literature regarding the effectiveness of individual CBT for childhood anxiety. Secondary purposes were to identify reasons for the discrepancy between current evidence and practice as well as to offer suggestions to overcome this dilemma. A systematic review of the literature published between 2007 and 2012 was conducted, searching four databases--Cochrane, PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. In all 10 studies reviewed, individual CBT significantly reduced rates of anxiety diagnoses when compared with controls, and was equally effective or superior to comparison therapies. The only exception was when CBT was compared to a combination of CBT and pharmacological management, in which case the latter was more effective. Each study included in this review employed hour-long sessions over a minimum of 12 visits. In order to meet clinical demands and patient preferences, affordability, and feasibility of CBT interventions must be addressed. A brief, manualized CBT program that can be supported to be clinically effective is proposed as an evidence-based solution for anxious children in outpatient mental health and primary care settings. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Scapulothoracic bursitis and snapping scapula syndrome: a critical review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Ryan J; Spiegl, Ulrich J; Millett, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic scapulothoracic disorders, such as painful scapular crepitus and/or bursitis, are uncommon; however, they can produce significant pain and disability in many patients. To review the current knowledge pertaining to snapping scapula syndrome and to identify areas of further research that may be helpful to improve clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. Systematic review. We performed a preliminary search of the PubMed and Embase databases using the search terms "snapping scapula," "scapulothoracic bursitis," "partial scapulectomy," and "superomedial angle resection" in September 2013. All nonreview articles related to the topic of snapping scapula syndrome were included. The search identified a total of 167 unique articles, 81 of which were relevant to the topic of snapping scapula syndrome. There were 36 case series of fewer than 10 patients, 16 technique papers, 11 imaging studies, 9 anatomic studies, and 9 level IV outcomes studies. The level of evidence obtained from this literature search was inadequate to perform a formal systematic review or meta-analysis. Therefore, a critical review of current evidence is presented. Snapping scapula syndrome, a likely underdiagnosed condition, can produce significant shoulder dysfunction in many patients. Because the precise origin is typically unknown, specific treatments that are effective for some patients may not be effective for others. Nevertheless, bursectomy with or without partial scapulectomy is currently the most effective primary method of treatment in patients who fail nonoperative therapy. However, many patients experience continued shoulder disability even after surgical intervention. Future studies should focus on identifying the modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes after operative and nonoperative management for snapping scapula syndrome in an effort to improve clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. © 2014 The Author(s).

  6. Micronutrients and Leptospirosis: A Review of the Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Heather S; Mehta, Saurabh; Cárdenas, Washington B; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M; Finkelstein, Julia L

    2016-07-01

    Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses and represents a major threat to human health. Due to the high burden of disease, limitations in diagnostics, and limited coverage and availability of effective human and veterinary vaccines, leptospirosis remains an important neglected zoonotic disease. Improved surveillance and identification of modifiable risk factors for leptospirosis are urgently needed to inform preventive interventions and reduce the risk and severity of Leptospira infection. This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links micronutrient status and Leptospira infection. A total of 56 studies were included in this review: 28 in vitro, 17 animal, and 11 observational human studies. Findings indicated that Leptospira infection is associated with higher iron and calcium concentrations and hypomagnesemia. Few prospective studies and no randomized trials have been conducted to date to examine the potential role of micronutrients in Leptospira infection. The limited literature in this area constrains our ability to make specific recommendations; however, the roles of iron, calcium, and magnesium in leptospirosis represent important areas for future research. The role of micronutrients in leptospirosis risk and severity needs to be elucidated in larger prospective human studies to inform public health interventions.

  7. Micronutrients and Leptospirosis: A Review of the Current Evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather S Herman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses and represents a major threat to human health. Due to the high burden of disease, limitations in diagnostics, and limited coverage and availability of effective human and veterinary vaccines, leptospirosis remains an important neglected zoonotic disease. Improved surveillance and identification of modifiable risk factors for leptospirosis are urgently needed to inform preventive interventions and reduce the risk and severity of Leptospira infection.This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links micronutrient status and Leptospira infection. A total of 56 studies were included in this review: 28 in vitro, 17 animal, and 11 observational human studies. Findings indicated that Leptospira infection is associated with higher iron and calcium concentrations and hypomagnesemia.Few prospective studies and no randomized trials have been conducted to date to examine the potential role of micronutrients in Leptospira infection. The limited literature in this area constrains our ability to make specific recommendations; however, the roles of iron, calcium, and magnesium in leptospirosis represent important areas for future research. The role of micronutrients in leptospirosis risk and severity needs to be elucidated in larger prospective human studies to inform public health interventions.

  8. Team working in intensive care: current evidence and future endeavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joanne; West, Michael A; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2010-12-01

    It has recently been argued that the future of intensive care medicine will rely on high quality management and teamwork. Therefore, this review takes an organizational psychology perspective to examine the most recent research on the relationship between teamwork, care processes, and patient outcomes in intensive care. Interdisciplinary communication within a team is crucial for the development of negotiated shared treatment goals and short-team patient outcomes. Interventions for maximizing team communication have received substantial interest in recent literature. Intensive care coordination is not a linear process, and intensive care teams often fail to discuss how to implement goals, trigger and align activities, or reflect on their performance. Despite a move toward interdisciplinary team working, clinical decision-making is still problematic and continues to be perceived as a top-down and authoritative process. The topic of team leadership in intensive care is underexplored and requires further research. Based on findings from the most recent research evidence in medicine and management, four principles are identified for improving the effectiveness of team working in intensive care: engender professional efficacy, create stable teams and leaders, develop trust and participative safety, and enable frequent team reflexivity.

  9. Hormones and tumour therapy: current clinical status and future developments in endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szepesi, T.; Schratter-Sehn, A.U.

    1982-01-01

    Postoperative adjuvant hormone therapy and hormone therapy in disseminated breast cancer will be discussed systematically. The classical ablative and additive endocrine therapeutic measures - with the exception of ovarectomy and gestagen therapy - are increasinlgy being replaced by antagonists. Individual chapters discuss recent experience with combined hormone-radiotherapy or hormone-chemotherapy. In addition, a successful therapy scheme for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer will be presented. (Author)

  10. Current electroconvulsive therapy practice and research in the geriatric population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Nancy; Prudic, Joan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is utilized worldwide for various severe and treatment-resistant psychiatric disorders. Research studies have shown that ECT is the most effective and rapid treatment available for elderly patients with depression, bipolar disorder and psychosis. For patients who suffer from intractable catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, ECT can be life saving. For elderly patients who cannot tolerate or respond poorly to medications and who are at a high risk for drug-induced toxicity or toxic drug interactions, ECT is the safest treatment option. Organic causes are frequently associated with late-life onset of neuropsychiatric conditions, such as parkinsonism, dementia and stroke. ECT has proven to be efficacious even when these conditions are present. During the next decade, research studies should focus on the use of ECT as a synergistic therapy, to enhance other biological and psychological treatments, and prevent symptom relapse and recurrence. PMID:24778709

  11. Current status of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    External-beam radiation therapy has been one of the treatment options for prostate cancer. The dose response has been observed for a dose range of 64.8-81 Gy. The problem of external-beam radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer is that as the dose increases, adverse effects also increase. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) has enabled us to treat patients with up to 72-76 Gy to the prostate, with a relatively acceptable risk of late rectal bleeding. Recently, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to deliver a higher dose to the target with acceptable low rates of rectal and bladder complications. The most important things to keep in mind when using an IMRT technique are that there is a significant trade-off between coverage of the target, avoidance of adjacent critical structures, and the inhomogeneity of the dose within the target. Lastly, even with IMRT, it should be kept in mind that a ''perfect'' plan that creates completely homogeneous coverage of the target volume and zero or small dose to the adjacent organs at risk is not always obtained. Participating in many treatment planning sessions and arranging the beams and beam weights create the best approach to the best IMRT plan. (author)

  12. Management of salivary gland malignancies: current and developing therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Agulnik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Salivary gland tumors are rare, clinically diverse neoplasms that represent less than 1% of all malignancies. In locoregional recurrent or metastatic disease, systemic therapy is the standard approach. While numerous small phase II studies have evaluated the activity of cytotoxic agents, either alone or in combination, the response rates are generally modest with objective response rates ranging from 15%–50%. Duration of response is cited in the range of 6–9 months. Given this, further evaluation of novel therapies is mandatory in these diseases. With the emergence of molecular targeted therapy, these tumors become optimal candidates for trials of investigational drugs and established drugs for new indications. Of note, given the often indolent nature of disease, only patients with progressive disease should be enrolled and treated on these clinical trials. Study designs must incorporate stringent inclusion criteria to enable accurate reporting of disease response and stabilization. With dedication and co-operation, patients with these rare neoplasms can be accrued to clinical trials and the establishment of new treatment guidelines will be forthcoming.

  13. Current Trends in Targeted Therapies for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiharu Ohka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is one of the most frequently occurring tumors in the central nervous system and the most malignant tumor among gliomas. Despite aggressive treatment including surgery, adjuvant TMZ-based chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, GBM still has a dismal prognosis: the median survival is 14.6 months from diagnosis. To date, many studies report several determinants of resistance to this aggressive therapy: (1 O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, (2 the complexity of several altered signaling pathways in GBM, (3 the existence of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs, and (4 the blood-brain barrier. Many studies aim to overcome these determinants of resistance to conventional therapy by using various approaches to improve the dismal prognosis of GBM such as modifying TMZ administration and combining TMZ with other agents, developing novel molecular-targeting agents, and novel strategies targeting GSCs. In this paper, we review up-to-date clinical trials of GBM treatments in order to overcome these 4 hurdles and to aim at more therapeutical effect than conventional therapies that are ongoing or are about to launch in clinical settings and discuss future perspectives.

  14. Current therapy of the right ventricle myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orozović Vjekoslav

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute myocardial infarction of the right ventricle (AMI-RV is a separate subgroup within the scope of inferoposterior infarction of the left ventricle. It still represents the population of patients at high risk due to numerous, often hardly predictable complications and high mortality rate. Methods. In fifteen-year period (1987-2001 3 765 patients with the acute myocardial infarction (AMI of different localizations of both sexes – 2 283 males and 1 482 females of the average age 61.4 ± 4.6 years were treated in our institution. Anterior myocardial infarction was diagnosed in 2 146 (56.9% patients, inferior in 1 619 (43.1% patients, out of whom right ventricular infarction (RVI was confirmed in 384 (23.7%. Thrombolytic therapy was administered in 163 (42.4% patients with RVI, and in 53 (41.7% of these patients balloon dilatation was performed with coronary stent implantation in 24 (45.2%. Results. Favorable clinical effect of the combined thrombolytic therapy and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA was achieved in 51 (96.1%, and in only 2 (3.9% of patients the expected effect wasn't achieved. Myocardial revascularization was accomplished in 6 (3.6% and 1 patient died. In 3 (3.4% patients primary balloon dilatation with the implantation of intracoronary stent was performed within 6 hours from the onset of anginal pain. In the other group of 221 (57.5% patients with RVI who did not receive thrombolytic therapy, or it had no effect, 26 (11.7% patients died, which indicated the validity and the efficacy of this treatment (p<0,01. In the whole group of patients with myocardial infarction of the right ventricle 31 (8.1% died; in the group that received thrombolytic therapy and PTCA 5 (3.1% died, while in the group treated in a conservative way 26 (11.7% died. Conclusion. Combined therapy was successful in the treatment of patients with RVI and should be administered whenever possible, since it was the best

  15. Current perspectives on Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with anxiety and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewton, Louise; Smith, Jessica; Rossouw, Pieter; Andrews, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current review is to provide a summary of research into Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for anxiety disorders. We include 37 randomized controlled trials that examined the efficacy of iCBT programs in adults (aged over 18 years), as compared with waiting list or active control. The included studies were identified from Medline searches and from reference lists, and only published data were included. Several trials of iCBT for generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social phobia were identified. Two trials of iCBT for obsessive-compulsive disorder were identified, whilst one trial each was identified for hypochondriasis, specific phobia (spiders), and post-traumatic stress disorder. Finally, there were five trials that focused on transdiagnostic therapy for either a range of comorbid anxiety disorders or comorbid anxiety and depression. Between-group effect sizes were moderate to large for all disorders, and ranged from 0.30 to 2.53. iCBT was found to be commensurate with face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy whether delivered individually or in group format. Guidance may not be necessary for iCBT to be effective for immediate gains, but may be more important in longer-term maintenance of symptom improvement and maximizing patient adherence. The clinical experience of the individual providing guidance does not appear to impact treatment outcomes. Future research needs to focus on the optimal level of guidance required to generate maximum patient benefits, whilst balancing the efficient use of clinician time and resources. Evidence-based contraindications to iCBT should also be developed so that the choice of treatment modality accurately reflects patients' needs. Further research should be conducted into the effective elements of iCBT, as well as the extent to which therapy enhancers and advancing technology can be accommodated into established iCBT frameworks.

  16. [Compulsive shopping--current considerations on classification and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croissant, B; Croissant, D

    2007-05-01

    Compulsive shopping is classified by ICD-10 (F63.8) as an "impulse control disorder, not otherwise classified". Several authors consider compulsive shopping rather as a variety of dependence disorder. It is characterized by the impulsive or compulsive buying of unneeded things, personal distress, impaired social and vocational functioning, and/or financial problems. In this case, we discuss a two-way therapy consisting of addiction-specific psychological education and high dose selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We further point to compliance problems caused by SSRI side effects.

  17. Equine-Facilitated Therapy and Trauma: Current Knowledge, Future Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Marlys Staudt; Donna Cherry

    2017-01-01

    Equine-facilitated therapy (EFT) is a relatively new treatment for trauma and PTSD. EFT as well as animal assisted interventions in general have been introduced and implemented in mental health treatment for children and adults, though the research in support of these interventions has not kept up with practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the use of EFT for clients suffering from trauma/PTSD. Studies were included if PTSD/trauma was assessed and/or was measured as an outcome. A ...

  18. Evaluating current trends in psychiatric music therapy: a descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 21% of music therapists report working in the mental health field, more so than another other specific client population category (AMTA, 2005). The purpose of this study was to descriptively evaluate psychiatric music therapists and their institutions, philosophies, interventions, and clinical objectives. A survey was designed and posted online or mailed to music therapists who did not have email addresses in the 2005 Member Sourcebook (AMTA, 2005). A total of 176 psychiatric music therapists completed various parts of the survey for an overall response rate of 42.9%. Respondents reported working a mean of 11.3 years in the psychiatric setting, being Board-Certified Music Therapists for 13.3 years, and working at their institution for 8.4 years. Most respondents (90.6%) indicated they did not have a music therapist as a supervisor. Group music therapy was the dominant modality in psychiatric institutions for music therapists. Respondents indicated they read music therapy journals (80%) and other types of psychiatric periodicals (57.1%), presented educational sessions at conferences (44.6%), conducted in-services for hospital staff (64.8%), worked with an interdisciplinary treatment team (77.9%), and trained practica students (43.5%) and interns (37.4%). Respondents also indicated that although most were not bilingual (85.7%), they still worked with non-English speaking consumers (58.2%). Participants noted that they enjoyed working with the psychiatric population and felt they had a positive influence on treatment as indicated by Likert-type scales. Respondents reported using primarily behavioral or psychodynamic approaches but considered their primary psychological philosophy as eclectic. Participants predominantly indicated they addressed goal areas such as socialization, communication, self-esteem, coping skills, and stress reduction/management. Participants noted they employed a variety of music therapy techniques such as music assisted relaxation

  19. Fetal imaging and therapy for CDH-Current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluyomi-Obi, Titilayo; Van Mieghem, Tim; Ryan, Greg

    2017-06-01

    In congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), herniation of the abdominal organs into the fetal chest causes pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension, the main causes of neonatal mortality. As antenatal ultrasound screening improves, the risk of postnatal death can now be better predicted, allowing for the identification of fetuses that might most benefit from a prenatal intervention. Fetoscopic tracheal occlusion is being evaluated in a large international randomized controlled trial. We present the antenatal imaging approaches that can help identify fetuses that might benefit from antenatal therapy, and review the evolution of fetal surgery for CDH to date. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Forensic Occupational Therapy in Canada: The Current State of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Adora L Y; Wong, Chantal Isabelle; Maraj, Sara A; Fry, Danielle; Jecker, Justine; Jung, Bonny

    2016-09-01

    Although occupational therapists have been practicing in forensic settings for many years, there is a paucity of literature regarding the nature of this practice in Canada. The purpose of this study was to describe the practices of Canadian occupational therapists in forensic mental health. An online survey was designed based on the Canadian Practice Process Framework. Following purposive and snowball sampling, responses were analysed with descriptive statistics and content analysis. Twenty-seven clinicians responded (56% response rate). Respondents indicated commonalities in workplaces, client caseloads and practice challenges. The outstanding need in Canada to demonstrate client outcomes through the use of evaluation instruments reflects those practice gaps identified internationally. Education, advocacy and research are critical areas for the development of Canadian forensic occupational therapy. Although findings heavily reflect one provincial context and may not be generalizable to nonhospital settings, a number of priority areas were identified. Future efforts should clarify the role of forensic occupational therapy to stakeholders, and validate their contributions through research that evaluates intervention efficacy and meaningful outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Cardiac gene therapy: therapeutic potential and current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizana, E; Alexander, I E

    2003-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in modern societies. While contemporary treatment modalities are making steady inroads to reduce this disease burden there remains a pressing need to vigorously explore novel therapeutic strategies. Rapid advances in our understanding of molecular pathology and the evolution of increasingly efficient gene transfer technology offer the imminent prospect of gene-based approaches to, at least, a subset of cardiovascular pathophysiologies. Initially envisaged as a treatment strategy for inherited monogenic disorders, it is now apparent that gene therapy has broader potential that encompasses acquired polygenic diseases, including many that affect the cardiovascular system. Extensive in vitro and animal studies are providing an increasingly sound scientific basis for cautious human evaluation. This review focuses on gene therapy of diseases primarily afflicting the heart, and provides an overview of gene and vector delivery systems with particular emphasis on systems suited to individual cardiac conditions. The pathophysiology underlying these conditions and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention are also reviewed.

  2. Equine-Facilitated Therapy and Trauma: Current Knowledge, Future Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlys Staudt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Equine-facilitated therapy (EFT is a relatively new treatment for trauma and PTSD. EFT as well as animal assisted interventions in general have been introduced and implemented in mental health treatment for children and adults, though the research in support of these interventions has not kept up with practice. The purpose of this review is to examine the use of EFT for clients suffering from trauma/PTSD. Studies were included if PTSD/trauma was assessed and/or was measured as an outcome. A search of relevant databases resulted in nine peer-reviewed studies that met criteria. Studies are summarized and implications for future research are discussed. In general, findings suggest that EFT is a promising intervention for trauma/PTSD. Recommendations include a call for more research that includes veterans as well as for research that explicates the mechanisms by which EFT may be effective.      Key words: trauma, PTSD, equine, equine therapy

  3. Occupational therapy for elderly : evidence mapping of randomised controlled trials from 2004-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voigt-Radloff, S; Ruf, G.; Vogel, A.; van Nes, F.; Hüll, M.

    OBJECTIVE: Previous systematic reviews on occupational therapy for elderly included studies until 2003. The present evidence mapping summarizes recent evidence for the efficacy of occupational therapy with older persons based on randomised controlled trials from 2004-2012. METHOD: An electronic

  4. Current status and prospect of therapy with advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, Tsutomu

    1979-01-01

    Symtomatic or palliative therapy of the patients with advanced cancer must be directed to the relief of specific distressing symptoms caused by or associated with neoplasm. The radiotherapy must have a clear concepts of the potential accomplishments of other treatment modalities, such as neurosurgery, anesthesiology, chemotherapy, pharmacology and psychotherapy, so that he may use his own method in proper perspective. I discussed following is an list of contents in this papers. Relief of pain, Psychotherapy, SVC obstruction, Obstructive jaundice, Brain and lung metastasis, prevention of fracture, Skin metastasis, Liver metastasis and treatment of advanced pediaric tumor etc. For the future: 1) Establishment of Stage and Grade of advanced cancer. 2) Development of new chemotherapeutic drug and immunotherapy. 3) Combination of multidisciplinary team and multidisciplinary treatment. (author)

  5. Therapeutic potential of snake venom in cancer therapy: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Vivek Kumar; Brahmbhatt, Keyur; Bhatt, Hardik; Parmar, Utsav

    2013-01-01

    Many active secretions produced by animals have been employed in the development of new drugs to treat diseases such as hypertension and cancer. Snake venom toxins contributed significantly to the treatment of many medical conditions. There are many published studies describing and elucidating the anti-cancer potential of snake venom. Cancer therapy is one of the main areas for the use of protein peptides and enzymes originating from animals of different species. Some of these proteins or peptides and enzymes from snake venom when isolated and evaluated may bind specifically to cancer cell membranes, affecting the migration and proliferation of these cells. Some of substances found in the snake venom present a great potential as anti-tumor agent. In this review, we presented the main results of recent years of research involving the active compounds of snake venom that have anticancer activity. PMID:23593597

  6. Current Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Gold

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infects approximately 50% of the world’s population and is a definitive cause of gastroduodenal disease (ie, gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcers in children and adults. Four consensus conferences held around the globe have brought together clinicians, scientists, epidemiologists and health care economists to discuss the role of the gastric pathogen H pylori in human gastroduodenal disease. At each of these conferences, the overriding objective was to reach a consensus on the development of practical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of H pylori-infected individuals. However, it was not until the Canadian H pylori Consensus Conference, held in November 1997, that the issues of H pylori infection in children were addressed. Therapies for H pylori infection in children, presented in part at the First Canadian Paediatric H pylori Consensus Conference, held in Victoria, British Columbia, November 1998, are reviewed in this paper.

  7. CURRENT ROLE OF RADIATION THERAPY FOR MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo eTalamo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiation therapy (RT is a treatment modality traditionally used in patients with multiple myeloma (MM, but little is known regarding the role and effectiveness of RT in the era of novel agents, i.e, immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs and proteasome inhibitors (PIs. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed data from 449 consecutive MM patients seen at our institute in 2010-12 to assess indications for RT as well as its effectiveness. Pain response was scored similarly to RTOG 0631 and used the numerical rating pain scale (NRPS.RESULTS: Among 442 evaluable patients, 149 (34% patients and 262 sites received RT. The most common indication for RT was palliation of bone pain (n=109, 42%, followed by prevention/treatment of pathological fractures (n=73, 28%, spinal cord compression (n=26, 10%, and involvement of vital organs/extramedullary disease (n=25, 10%. Of the 55 patients evaluable for pain relief, complete and partial responses were obtained in 76.4% and 7.2% respectively. Prior RT did not significantly decrease the median number of peripheral blood stem cells collected for autologous transplant, even when prior RT was given to both the spine and pelvis. Inadequacy of stem cell collection for autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT was not significantly different and it occurred in 9% and 15% of patients receiving no RT and spine/pelvic RT, respectively. None of the 3 cases of therapy-induced AML/MDS occurred in the RT group.CONCLUSIONS: Despite the introduction of novel effective agents in the treatment of MM, RT remains a major therapeutic component for the management in 34% of patients, and it effectively provides pain relief while not interfering with successful peripheral blood stem cell collection for ASCT.

  8. Superheroes in autoimmune warfare: Biologic therapies in current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biologic drugs targeting immune cells or cytokines underlying systemic inflammation have dramatically improved outcomes in patients with rheumatological and autoimmune diseases. Nine biologic drugs are currently available in South Africa (SA) – all showing good efficacy and safety profiles. Their high cost and potential ...

  9. Current concepts on posterior meniscal root lesion: A treatment algorithm based on the currently available evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Guan-Yang Song; Jin Zhang; Xu Li; Yue Li; Hua Feng

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal root lesion is defined as an avulsion of the tibial insertion of the meniscus or a radial tear close to the meniscal insertion, which is commonly observed at the posterior region in the clinical practice. Although a number of biomechanical and clinical studies have shown the importance of the integrity of the posterior meniscal roots, the appropriate treatment is still controversial. The purposes of this review are to develop a current understanding of how the posterior meniscal root...

  10. WE-D-BRB-03: Current State of Volumetric Image Guidance for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, C.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  11. Comparison of low level laser therapy and interferential current on post stroke shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Fahmida; Naeem, Aamir; Malik, Arshad Nawaz; Amjad, Imran; Malik, Tariq

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the effects of LASER therapy and Interferential current on post stroke shoulder pain. Diagnosed patients (n=38) of post stroke shoulder pain were randomly divided into two groups i.e., LASER group (LG =20 patients) and Interferential current group (IFCG=18 patients). The variables under study were pain, satisfaction, disability, and function level before and after treatment. Improvement in pain and satisfaction level after LASER therapy was significant (p 0.05). The study findings revealed that LASER therapy is more effective than Interferential current in decreasing pain and increasing satisfaction level of stroke patients having shoulder pain.

  12. [Current status of therapy of subtrochanteric femoral fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, R; Südkamp, N P; Schütz, M; Raschke, M; Haas, N P

    1996-04-01

    Operative treatment of subtrochanteric femur fractures is demanding. The implants available follow different biomechanical and surgical principles. Extramedullary implants like the condylar blade plate and the dynamic condylar screw require subtle surgical and indirect reduction techniques. Intramedullary implants like intramedullary hip screws and interlocking nails are biomechanically advantageous. In contrast to the extramedullary implants these fixations can stand postoperative weight-bearing. The different operative techniques for the fixation of subtrochanteric fractures are presented and evaluated. Current trends in treatment rationales are outlined.

  13. Current concepts on posterior meniscal root lesion: A treatment algorithm based on the currently available evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Yang Song

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal root lesion is defined as an avulsion of the tibial insertion of the meniscus or a radial tear close to the meniscal insertion, which is commonly observed at the posterior region in the clinical practice. Although a number of biomechanical and clinical studies have shown the importance of the integrity of the posterior meniscal roots, the appropriate treatment is still controversial. The purposes of this review are to develop a current understanding of how the posterior meniscal root functions and to review the available treatment options for posterior meniscal root lesion.

  14. Glycolic acid peel therapy – a current review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jaishree Sharad Skinfiniti Aesthetic Skin and Laser Clinic, Mumbai, India Abstract: Chemical peels have been time-tested and are here to stay. Alpha-hydroxy peels are highly popular in the dermatologist's arsenal of procedures. Glycolic acid peel is the most common alpha-hydroxy acid peel, also known as fruit peel. It is simple, inexpensive, and has no downtime. This review talks about various studies of glycolic acid peels for various indications, such as acne, acne scars, melasma, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, photoaging, and seborrhea. Combination therapies and treatment procedure are also discussed. Careful review of medical history, examination of the skin, and pre-peel priming of skin are important before every peel. Proper patient selection, peel timing, and neutralization on-time will ensure good results, with no side effects. Depth of the glycolic acid peel depends on the concentration of the acid used, the number of coats applied, and the time for which it is applied. Hence, it can be used as a very superficial peel, or even a medium depth peel. It has been found to be very safe with Fitzpatrick skin types I–IV. All in all, it is a peel that is here to stay. Keywords: acne scar, melasma, photoaging, chemical peel, alpha-hydroxy peel

  15. [Current aspects of the therapy of complex regional pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birklein, F; Schlereth, T

    2013-12-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) constitutes an enigmatic post-traumatic pain disorder. The paper provides state of the art knowledge about CRPS. The typical constellation of symptoms of CRPS includes pain, sensory disturbances, motor symptoms, disturbances of the autonomic control of the limbs and trophic changes. These symptoms generalize distally and go beyond single nerve innervation territories. Diagnosis is made based on clinical findings. Three-phase bone scintigraphy may be the best supporting technical investigation. Symptoms typically change during the course of CRPS. In the acute stage inflammatory symptoms prevail and during chronic stages the most expressed findings are related to central neuroplasticity. These findings include hyperalgesia, sensory loss, CRPS movement disorder, body perception disturbances and autonomic symptoms. Medical treatment with anti-inflammatory agents (steroids) or bisphosphonates is most effective in the early stages and DMSO cream might also be beneficial. Administration of i.v. ketamine has been proven effective against CRPS pain and physical therapy with behavioral components, such as pain exposure helps to overcome central reorganization and functional impairment. Psychotherapy should be offered if there are significant comorbidities. All other forms of treatment are more or less empirical. Invasive treatment should be restricted to selected cases and should only be offered in specialized centers. If these recommendations are followed the prognosis for CRPS is not as poor as commonly assumed. Whether this means a return to the previous quality of life is unclear and often depends on very personal factors.

  16. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegazza, Renato; Bonanno, Silvia; Camera, Giorgia; Antozzi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmmune disease in which autoantibodies to different antigens of the neuromuscular junction cause the typical weakness and fatigability. Treatment includes anticholinesterase drugs, immunosuppression, immunomodulation, and thymectomy. The autoimmune response is maintained under control by corticosteroids frequently associated with immunosuppressive drugs, with improvement in the majority of patients. In case of acute exacerbations with bulbar symptoms or repeated relapses, modulation of autoantibody activity by plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulins provides rapid improvement. Recently, techniques removing only circulating immunoglobulins have been developed for the chronic management of treatment-resistant patients. The rationale for thymectomy relies on the central role of the thymus. Despite the lack of controlled studies, thymectomy is recommended as an option to improve the clinical outcome or promote complete remission. New videothoracoscopic techniques have been developed to offer the maximal surgical approach with the minimal invasiveness and hence patient tolerability. The use of biological drugs such as anti-CD20 antibodies is still limited but promising. Studies performed in the animal model of MG demonstrated that several more selective or antigen-specific approaches, ranging from mucosal tolerization to inhibition of complement activity or cellular therapy, might be feasible. Investigation of the transfer of these therapeutic approaches to the human disease will be the challenge for the future. PMID:21552317

  17. Evidence Based Therapeutic Outcome of Multimodal Therapy on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    info

    Abstract. Previous efforts at remediating sexual decision of adolescents in Nigeria have been based on unimodal therapies. Therefore, this study investigated the effectiveness of. Multimodal Therapy (MMT) on sexual decisions of adolescents studying in Remedial. Centres in Rivers state, Nigeria. Pre-test post control group ...

  18. Polyphenol nanoformulations for cancer therapy: experimental evidence and clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatgaran-Taghipour, Yasamin; Masoomzadeh, Salar; Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Bahramsoltani, Roodabeh; Karimi-Soureh, Zahra; Rahimi, Roja; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is defined as the abnormal cell growth that can cause life-threatening malignancies with high financial costs for patients as well as the health care system. Natural polyphenols have long been used for the prevention and treatment of several disorders due to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, antineoplastic, and immunomodulatory effects discussed in the literature; thus, these phytochemicals are potentially able to act as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in different types of cancer. One of the problems regarding the use of polyphenolic compounds is their low bioavailability. Different types of formulations have been designed for the improvement of bioavailability of these compounds, nanonization being one of the most notable approaches among them. This study aimed to review current data on the nanoformulations of natural polyphenols as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents and to discuss their molecular anticancer mechanisms of action. Nanoformulations of natural polyphenols as bioactive agents, including resveratrol, curcumin, quercetin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, chrysin, baicalein, luteolin, honokiol, silibinin, and coumarin derivatives, in a dose-dependent manner, result in better efficacy for the prevention and treatment of cancer. The impact of nanoformulation methods for these natural agents on tumor cells has gained wider attention due to improvement in targeted therapy and bioavailability, as well as enhancement of stability. Today, several nanoformulations are designed for delivery of polyphenolic compounds, including nanosuspensions, solid lipid nanoparticles, liposomes, gold nanoparticles, and polymeric nanoparticles, which have resulted in better antineoplastic activity, higher intracellular concentration of polyphenols, slow and sustained release of the drugs, and improvement of proapoptotic activity against tumor cells. To conclude, natural polyphenols demonstrate remarkable anticancer potential in

  19. Molecular Pathogenesis and Current Therapy in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Dan Taksony Solyom; O'Rourke, Colm J; Taranta, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) comprises one of the most rapidly evolving cancer types. An underlying chronic inflammatory liver disease that precedes liver cancer development for several decades and creates a pro-oncogenic microenvironment frequently impairs progress in therapeutic...... approaches. Depending on the cellular target of malignant transformation, a large spectrum of molecular and morphological patterns is observed. As such, it is crucial to advance our existing understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of iCCA, particularly its genomic heterogeneity, to improve current...

  20. Current perspectives on Internet delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with anxiety and related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mewton L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Louise Mewton, Jessica Smith, Pieter Rossouw, Gavin Andrews Clinical Research Unit for Anxiety and Depression, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: The aim of the current review is to provide a summary of research into Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT for anxiety disorders. We include 37 randomized controlled trials that examined the efficacy of iCBT programs in adults (aged over 18 years, as compared with waiting list or active control. The included studies were identified from Medline searches and from reference lists, and only published data were included. Several trials of iCBT for generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social phobia were identified. Two trials of iCBT for obsessive-compulsive disorder were identified, whilst one trial each was identified for hypochondriasis, specific phobia (spiders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Finally, there were five trials that focused on transdiagnostic therapy for either a range of comorbid anxiety disorders or comorbid anxiety and depression. Between-group effect sizes were moderate to large for all disorders, and ranged from 0.30 to 2.53. iCBT was found to be commensurate with face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy whether delivered individually or in group format. Guidance may not be necessary for iCBT to be effective for immediate gains, but may be more important in longer-term maintenance of symptom improvement and maximizing patient adherence. The clinical experience of the individual providing guidance does not appear to impact treatment outcomes. Future research needs to focus on the optimal level of guidance required to generate maximum patient benefits, whilst balancing the efficient use of clinician time and resources. Evidence-based contraindications to iCBT should also be developed so that the choice of treatment modality accurately reflects patients’ needs. Further research should be conducted into the effective elements of

  1. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds...... factors, and biomaterials - are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources.The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently...... in controlled clinical trials in equine patients to be regarded as evidence-based medicine. In the meantime, the medical mantra "do no harm" should prevail, and the application of stem cell-based therapies in the horse should be done critically and cautiously, and treatment outcomes (good and bad) should...

  2. Current Thinking In Pediatric Peri-operative Fluid Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh MC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Proper perioperative fluid management is critical to maintain cardiovascular stability and adequate tissue perfusion. The volume and composition of fluid should be adapting to the physiology of the child and compensating for the peri-operative events. Traditionally physicians were calculating pediatric maintenance fluid requirements based on studies conducted on healthy children more than 50 years ago by Holliday and Segar. But a search of literature failed to reveal a relevant prospective study critically evaluating the content and volume of Holliday and Segar prescription. But off late there has been a major debate and re-evaluation about this concept because of serious concerns regarding development of hyponatremia and hyperglycemia. This can result in serious neurological damage or even death in a sick child. This brief review is an attempt to explain how the original concept was formed and what is the current thinking?

  3. Histone deacetylases in hearing loss: Current perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daishi Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is one of the most frequent health issues in industrialized countries. The pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms of hearing loss are still unclear. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are emerging as key enzymes in many physiological processes, including chromatin remodeling, regulation of transcription, DNA repair, metabolism, genome stability and protein secretion. Recent studies indicated that HDACs are associated with the development and progression of hearing loss. Dysfunction of HDACs could promote the oxidative stress and aging in the inner ear. In light of considering the current stagnation in the development of therapeutic options, the need for new strategies in the treatment of hearing loss has never been so pressing. In this review, we will summarize the reported literatures for HDACs in hearing loss and discuss how HDAC family members show different performances for the possibility of process of diseases development. The possibility of pharmacological intervention on hearing loss opens a novel path in the treatment of hearing loss.

  4. Quantum Dots in the Therapy: Current Trends and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots are an emerging nanomaterial with broad use in technical disciplines; however, their application in the field of biomedicine becomes also relevant and significant possibilities have appeared since the discovery in 1980s. The current review is focused on the therapeutic applications of quantum dots which become an emerging use of the particles. They are introduced as potent carriers of drugs and as a material well suited for the diagnosis of disparate pathologies like visualization of cancer cells or pathogenic microorganisms. Quantum dots toxicity and modifications for the toxicity reduction are discussed here as well. Survey of actual papers and patents in the field of quantum dots use in the biomedicine is provided. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Congenital hyperinsulinism: current trends in diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellanné-Chantelot Christine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital hyperinsulinism (HI is an inappropriate insulin secretion by the pancreatic β-cells secondary to various genetic disorders. The incidence is estimated at 1/50, 000 live births, but it may be as high as 1/2, 500 in countries with substantial consanguinity. Recurrent episodes of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia may expose to high risk of brain damage. Hypoglycemias are diagnosed because of seizures, a faint, or any other neurological symptom, in the neonatal period or later, usually within the first two years of life. After the neonatal period, the patient can present the typical clinical features of a hypoglycemia: pallor, sweat and tachycardia. HI is a heterogeneous disorder with two main clinically indistinguishable histopathological lesions: diffuse and focal. Atypical lesions are under characterization. Recessive ABCC8 mutations (encoding SUR1, subunit of a potassium channel and, more rarely, recessive KCNJ11 (encoding Kir6.2, subunit of the same potassium channel mutations, are responsible for most severe diazoxide-unresponsive HI. Focal HI, also diazoxide-unresponsive, is due to the combination of a paternally-inherited ABCC8 or KCNJ11 mutation and a paternal isodisomy of the 11p15 region, which is specific to the islets cells within the focal lesion. Genetics and 18F-fluoro-L-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET help to diagnose diffuse or focal forms of HI. Hypoglycemias must be rapidly and intensively treated to prevent severe and irreversible brain damage. This includes a glucose load and/or a glucagon injection, at the time of hypoglycemia, to correct it. Then a treatment to prevent the recurrence of hypoglycemia must be set, which may include frequent and glucose-enriched feeding, diazoxide and octreotide. When medical and dietary therapies are ineffective, or when a focal HI is suspected, surgical treatment is required. Focal HI may be definitively cured when the partial pancreatectomy removes the whole lesion. By

  6. Current Evidence on Treatment of Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Renal Insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Felker, G. Michael; Lassus, Johan; Zannad, Faiez; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Therefore, evidence-based therapies are more and more being used in patients with some degree of renal dysfunction. However, most pivotal randomized clinical trials specifically excluded patients

  7. Management of Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: The Current Evidence Base and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowers, Simon; Bryant-Waugh, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Although eating disorders in children and adolescents remain a serious cause of morbidity and mortality, the evidence base for effective interventions is surprisingly weak. The adult literature is growing steadily, but this is mainly with regard to psychological therapies for bulimia nervosa and to some extent in the field of pharmacotherapy. This…

  8. Determination of effective treatment duration of interferential current therapy using electromyography

    OpenAIRE

    Youn, Jong-In; Lee, Ho Sub; Lee, Sangkwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study used electromyography to measure the effective treatment duration of interferential current therapy for muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy adult men volunteered to participate in the study (age: 24.2 ? 1.3?years; weight: 67.6 ? 4.92?kg; height: 176.4 ? 4.92?cm). All subjects performed 5?min of isometric back extension exercise to produce muscle fatigue, and were then treated with interferential current therapy for 15?min, with electromyography monitori...

  9. Quick evidence reviews using Epistemonikos: a thorough, friendly and current approach to evidence in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rada

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Those who make decisions on healthcare should do so informed by the best scientific evidence at one’s disposal. During the last few years, it has become undeniable that identifying and synthesizing all scientific studies that respond a question constitutes an unapproachable challenge for a clinician. The quantity of information has increased excessively, some facts are not available, investigations are of either bad quality or even fraudulent, and the methods for achieving a combination and synthesis of all studies are each time more sophisticated. Moreover, if this inaccurate process is carried out, there exists a high risk of arriving at a biased conclusion.

  10. Current and future challenges in therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nandini; Ball, Timothy; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2011-06-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to present a challenge for the survival of the cardiac allograft. AMR appears to be on the rise, likely secondary to changing trends in clinical practice, including selection of patients for transplantation on mechanical circulatory support and development of more effective combinations of immunosuppressive drugs against acute cellular rejection. Most current strategies are aimed at treating acute AMR, but the treatment of chronic AMR is still not well defined. Clinically, AMR can often be more severe than cellular rejection and more difficult to treat, often not responding to typical protocols of increased immunosuppression. Complex steps involved in the antibody response allows for several potential targets for therapeutic intervention, including suppression of T and B cells, elimination of circulating antibodies, and inhibition of residual antibodies. Existing evidence suggests a multiregimen approach is the best option. Sustenance of accommodation and induction of tolerance could be viewed as viable options if adequate immune surveillance can be achieved in this setting. This review discusses the challenges in treating AMR and provides a critical analysis of current and possible future therapies. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence-based diabetes nutrition therapy recommendations are effective: the key is individualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz MJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marion J Franz,1 Jackie L Boucher,2 Alison B Evert3 1Nutrition Concepts by Franz, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, 2Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, 3Diabetes Care Center, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Current nutrition therapy recommendations for the prevention and treatment of diabetes are based on a systematic review of evidence and answer important nutrition care questions. First, is diabetes nutrition therapy effective? Clinical trials as well as systematic and Cochrane reviews report a ~1%–2% lowering of hemoglobin A1c values as well as other beneficial outcomes from nutrition therapy interventions, depending on the type and duration of diabetes and level of glycemic control. Clinical trials also provide evidence for the effectiveness of nutrition therapy in the prevention of diabetes. Second, are weight loss interventions important and when are they beneficial? Modest weight loss is important for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and early in the disease process. However, as diabetes progresses, weight loss may or may not result in beneficial glycemic and cardiovascular outcomes. Third, are there ideal percentages of macronutrients and eating patterns that apply to all persons with diabetes? There is no ideal percentage of macronutrients and a variety of eating patterns has been shown to be effective for persons with diabetes. Treatment goals, personal preferences (eg, tradition, culture, religion, health beliefs, economics, and the individual's ability and willingness to make lifestyle changes must all be considered by clinicians and/or educators when counseling and educating individuals with diabetes. A healthy eating pattern emphasizing nutrient-dense foods in appropriate portion sizes, regular physical activity, and support are priorities for all individuals with diabetes. Reduced energy intake for persons with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes as well as matching insulin to planned

  12. [Evidence-based therapy guideline of the German Working Group on Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, A; Kunze, D; Wabitsch, M

    2011-05-01

    Obesity in childhood and adolescence has increased worldwide in recent years. A consensus guideline (S2) for treating obesity in childhood and adolescence in Germany was first published by the German Working Group on Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence (AGA) in 2000. The intention is to gradually replace this consensus-based (S2) guideline with an evidence-based (S3) guideline. Following a systematic literature search, 21 recommendations were predominantly approved with "strong consensus" (agreement >95%). Body weight and body fat mass can be significantly influenced by conventional behavior-based measures and also by the currently available drug therapies. However, the extent of the achieved weight reduction is small. Surgical measures (unproven, experimental therapy) to reduce body weight, in contrast, are very successful. In addition to the long version of this evidence-based guideline, an abbreviated version exists and a practice guideline is planned. This guideline should be further developed within the competence network on obesity of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The guideline will be published in the scholarly journals of the professional associations concerned, will be available via the Internet, and will also be distributed through periodicals, congress events, and information at facilities.

  13. Current pathogenic Escherichia coli foodborne outbreak cases and therapy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Chun; Lin, Chih-Hung; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Fang, Jia-You

    2017-08-01

    Food contamination by pathogenic microorganisms has been a serious public health problem and a cause of huge economic losses worldwide. Foodborne pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) contamination, such as that with E. coli O157 and O104, is very common, even in developed countries. Bacterial contamination may occur during any of the steps in the farm-to-table continuum from environmental, animal, or human sources and cause foodborne illness. To understand the causes of the foodborne outbreaks by E. coli and food-contamination prevention measures, we collected and investigated the past 10 years' worldwide reports of foodborne E. coli contamination cases. In the first half of this review article, we introduce the infection and symptoms of five major foodborne diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes: enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli/enterohemorrhagic E. coli (STEC/EHEC), Shigella/enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). In the second half of this review article, we introduce the foodborne outbreak cases caused by E. coli in natural foods and food products. Finally, we discuss current developments that can be applied to control and prevent bacterial food contamination.

  14. Current drug therapy and pharmaceutical challenges for Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, José; Davies, Carolina; Simonazzi, Analía; Real, Juan Pablo; Palma, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    One of the most significant health problems in the American continent in terms of human health, and socioeconomic impact is Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection was originally transmitted by reduviid insects, congenitally from mother to fetus, and by oral ingestion in sylvatic/rural environments, but blood transfusions, organ transplants, laboratory accidents, and sharing of contaminated syringes also contribute to modern day transmission. Likewise, Chagas disease used to be endemic from Northern Mexico to Argentina, but migrations have earned it global. The parasite has a complex life cycle, infecting different species, and invading a variety of cells - including muscle and nerve cells of the heart and gastrointestinal tract - in the mammalian host. Human infection outcome is a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, and gastrointestinal tract lesions. In absence of a vaccine, vector control and treatment of patients are the only tools to control the disease. Unfortunately, the only drugs now available for Chagas' disease, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole, are relatively toxic for adult patients, and require prolonged administration. Benznidazole is the first choice for Chagas disease treatment due to its lower side effects than Nifurtimox. However, different strategies are being sought to overcome Benznidazole's toxicity including shorter or intermittent administration schedules-either alone or in combination with other drugs. In addition, a long list of compounds has shown trypanocidal activity, ranging from natural products to specially designed molecules, re-purposing drugs commercialized to treat other maladies, and homeopathy. In the present review, we will briefly summarize the upturns of current treatment of Chagas disease, discuss the increment on research and scientific publications about this topic, and give an overview of the state-of-the-art research aiming to produce an alternative medication to treat T. cruzi infection

  15. Androgen replacement therapy in late-onset hypogonadism: current concepts and controversies - a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Juuso I; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2011-01-01

    Normal testicular function is essential for the maintenance of male physical strength and behaviour irrespective of age. A new term of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) has been coined for the condition of decreased testosterone (T) and hypogonadal symptoms in ageing men. The most important testicular hormone, T, is responsible for the gender-specific androgenic-anabolic effects in men. Testicular T production remains stable until around the age of 40 years after which it declines by 1-2% annually. Despite this age-related decline, serum T levels in most older men remain within the reference range of younger men. The decreasing androgen levels are paralleled by well-defined objective biological and nonspecific subjective signs and symptoms of ageing. Because these symptoms are similar to those observed in young men with documented hypogonadism, androgen replacement therapy (ART) has been considered a logical way to treat them. A thorough review of the existing literature was performed to evaluate the current concepts and controversies related to ageing men and ART. Although it is intuitively logical that the symptoms of LOH are due to the ageing-related deficiency of T, and that they can be reversed by ART, the evidence for this is still variable and often weak. In particular, evidence-based information about long-term benefits and risks of ART in ageing men is largely missing. Despite widespread use, evidence-based proof for the objective benefits and side effects of ART of elderly men is still scanty, and such treatments should be considered experimental. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Educating physicians in evidence based medicine: current practices and curricular strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” The practice of EBM is an expectation of professional healthcare and requisite component in many medical school curricula. Yet, despite

  17. Topical therapies in the management of chronic rhinosinusitis: an evidence-based review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke; Hoy, Monica; Schlosser, Rodney J; Harvey, Richard J; Welch, Kevin C; Lund, Valerie; Smith, Timothy L

    2013-04-01

    Topical therapies have become an integral component in the management plan for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Several topical therapy strategies have been evaluated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the utilization of topical therapies in the management of CRS. A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria were: adult population >18 years old; chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) based on published diagnostic criteria; and clearly defined primary clinical end-point. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2b or higher), but reported on lower-level studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. We excluded drug-eluting spacer and stent therapy from this review. This review identified and evaluated the literature on 5 topical therapy strategies for CRS: saline irrigation, topical steroid, topical antibiotic, topical antifungal, and topical alternatives (surfactant, manuka honey, and xylitol irrigations). Based on the available evidence, sinonasal saline irrigation and standard topical nasal steroid therapy are recommended in the topical treatment of CRS. Nonstandard (off-label) topical sinonasal steroid therapies can be an option for managing CRS. The evidence recommends against the use of topical antifungal therapy and topical antibiotic therapy delivered using nebulized and spray techniques in routine cases of CRS. There is insufficient clinical research to provide recommendations for alternative therapies or topical antibiotic therapy delivered using other delivery methods (eg, irrigations). © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  18. Anti-tumor activities of direct current (DC) therapy combined with fractionated radiation or chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Toshitake; Ito, Hisao; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1988-01-01

    Anti-tumor activities of direct current (DC) therapy combined with fractionated radiation or cyclophosphamide were studied in mice which were transplanted with murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) in the right thighs. Using TCD 50 assay, DC therapy, given in a single fraction, enhanced the effect of a single dose of radiation with the dose-modifying factor of 1.3. Tumor control rates were more improved by the combination therapy with the smaller doses of radiation than the larger ones. When DC therapy was applied one time immediately after the first radiation of fractionated ones, the combination therapy still showed the enhanced effect. However, both of DC therapy and radiation were divided in three fractions and DC therapy was applied everytime after radiation, tumor growth retardation were not different between the combination therapy and radiation alone. This result suggests that there is a minimum amount of Coulombs to improve the effect of radiation alone. On the other hand, DC therapy combined with cyclophosphamide given in one fraction showed the same enhancement effect as those divided in three fractions. These results suggest that DC therapy combined with radiation or cyclophosphamide is effective to improve tumor control, but the mechanisms to enhance the effect of radiation or cyclophosphamide are different. (author)

  19. Evidence based practice and techniques in aquatic therapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquatic therapy (AT) is a holistic method of treatment that involves activity or passive activity to produce healthcare outcomes. The push for holistic treatment in rehabilitation is emphasized by the World Health Organization (WHO) (2009). The WHO suggested that healthcare organizations should turn their attention from ...

  20. Single case design studies in music therapy: resurrecting experimental evidence in small group and individual music therapy clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Hitchcock, John H

    2014-01-01

    The profession would benefit from greater and routine generation of causal evidence pertaining to the impact of music therapy interventions on client outcomes. One way to meet this goal is to revisit the use of Single Case Designs (SCDs) in clinical practice and research endeavors in music therapy. Given the appropriate setting and goals, this design can be accomplished with small sample sizes and it is often appropriate for studying music therapy interventions. In this article, we promote and discuss implementation of SCD studies in music therapy settings, review the meaning of internal study validity and by extension the notion of causality, and describe two of the most commonly used SCDs to demonstrate how they can help generate causal evidence to inform the field. In closing, we describe the need for replication and future meta-analysis of SCD studies completed in music therapy settings. SCD studies are both feasible and appropriate for use in music therapy clinical practice settings, particularly for testing effectiveness of interventions for individuals or small groups. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Clinical evidence on high flow oxygen therapy and active humidification in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gotera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been growing interest in an alternative to conventional oxygen therapy: the heated, humidified high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC. A number of physiological effects have been described with HFNC: pharyngeal dead space washout, reduction of nasopharyngeal resistance, a positive expiratory pressure effect, an alveolar recruitment, greater humidification, more comfort and better tolerance by the patient, better control of FiO2 and mucociliary clearance. There is limited experience of HFNC in adults. There are no established guidelines or decision-making pathways to guide use of the HFNC therapy for adults. In this article we review the existing evidence of HFNC oxygen therapy in adult patients, its advantages, limitations and the current literature on clinical applications. Further research is required to determine the long-term effect of this therapy and identify the adult patient population to whom it is most beneficial. Resumo: Recentemente, uma alternativa à oxigenoterapia convencional tem recebido atenção crescente: trata-se da oxigenoterapia humidificada de alto débito com cânulas nasais (HFNC. Um número de efeitos fisiológicos têm sido descritos: «lavagem» do espaço morto faríngeo, redução da resistência da nasofarige, efeito tipo «CPAP», recrutamento alveolar, maior humidificação, maior conforto e melhor tolerância do doente, melhor controle do FiO2 e do «clearance» mucociliar. A experiência com HFNC em adultos ainda é limitada e de momento não há «guidelines» para o seu uso. Neste artigo revemos a evidência existente do uso da HFNC em adultos, as suas vantagens, limitações e a literatura mais recente sobre as suas aplicações clínicas. Mais investigação será necessária para determinar os efeitos a longo prazo desta terapêutica e identificar quais as populações em que é mais benéfica. Keywords: High flow nasal cannula, Non-invasive ventilation, Gas exchange, Respiratory

  2. Pharmacogenomics of anti-platelet therapy: how much evidence is enough for clinical implementation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Christina G; Shuldiner, Alan R

    2013-06-01

    Pharmacogenomics, the study of the genomics of drug response and adverse effects, holds great promise for more effective individualized (personalized) medicine. Recent evidence supports a role of loss-of-function (LOF) variants in the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2C19 as a determinant of clopidogrel response. Patients given clopidogrel after percutaneous coronary intervention who carry LOF variants do not metabolize clopidogrel, a prodrug, into its active form resulting in decreased inhibition of platelet function and a higher likelihood of recurrent cardiovascular events. Despite a large body of evidence supporting clinical utility, adoption of anti-platelet pharmacogenetics into clinical practice has been slow. In this review, we summarize the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and clinical evidence, identify gaps in knowledge and other barriers that appear to be slowing adoption, and describe CYP2C19 pharmacogenetics implementation projects currently underway. Only when we surmount these barriers will clinicians be able to use pharmacogenetic information in conjunction with the history, physical examination and other medical tests and information to choose the most efficacious anti-platelet therapy for each individual patient.

  3. Where current pharmacological therapies fall short in COPD: symptom control is not enough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Roche

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common and progressive condition that is currently the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. There is now a large body of evidence indicating that both pulmonary and systemic inflammation are present in patients with stable COPD and may underlie both respiratory symptoms and common comorbidities of this disease. Smoking cessation and long-term oxygen therapy have been shown to change the course of COPD and recent results obtained with the combination of fluticasone and salmeterol have indicated that it could decrease mortality and slow the decline in lung function in patients with this disease. However, some pharmacological treatments can significantly improve dyspnoea, exercise tolerance, limitations in activity, rate of exacerbations and quality of life (e.g. long-acting bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroids combined with a long-acting beta2-agonist. The ability of these agents to modify the rate of disease progression remains to be firmly established in large-scale, long-term trials. The concept of disease modification itself in COPD may need to be revisited and more precisely defined in terms of markers and clinical outcomes, including extrarespiratory manifestations: agents that durably affect symptoms, activities, exacerbations and quality of life should probably be considered as disease modifiers. It is also reasonable to suggest that early diagnosis and treatment of patients with COPD might be the first and potentially most important disease-modifying intervention. There is clearly a need for new therapies that directly target the specific inflammatory processes underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations.

  4. Clinical research evidence of cupping therapy in China: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Huijuan; Han, Mei; Li, Xun; Dong, Shangjuan; Shang, Yongmei; Wang, Qian; Xu, Shu; Liu, Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Though cupping therapy has been used in China for thousands of years, there has been no systematic summary of clinical research on it. This review is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of cupping therapy using evidence-based approach based on all available clinical studies. Methods We included all clinical studies on cupping therapy for all kinds of diseases. We searched six electronic databases, all searches ended in December 2008. We extracted data on the type of cupping...

  5. An overview of systematic reviews of clinical evidence for cupping therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Huijuan; Han, Mei; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Liu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Background: As a traditional treatment method, cupping therapy is widely used in Asian countries. This overview of systematic reviews (SRs) investigated the effectiveness and safety of cupping therapy through an evidence-based approach. Methods: SRs that assessed the effectiveness of cupping therapy for any type of disease were searched through 6 electronic databases. Target diseases, cupping methods, numbers and types of included studies, quality of included trials, main results (includin...

  6. Effectiveness of manual therapies: the UK evidence report

    OpenAIRE

    Bronfort, Gert; Haas, Mitch; Evans, Roni; Leininger, Brent; Triano, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct but comprehensive summary of the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual treatment for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions. Methods The conclusions are based on the results of systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), widely accepted and primarily UK and United States evidence-based clinical guidelines, plus the results of all RCTs not yet incl...

  7. Long-term antibiotic treatment for non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis in adults: evidence, current practice and future use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N; Loebinger, M R; Wilson, R

    2016-12-01

    Bronchiectasis is defined pathologically by the permanent dilation of the bronchi and bronchioles and chronic airway inflammation. This is the outcome of a number of different aetiologies but up to half of bronchiectasis cases are labelled idiopathic. It is characterised by a chronic productive cough, haemoptysis, shortness of breath and recurrent infective exacerbations. Long-term antibiotics are used with the aim of reducing symptom severity and exacerbation frequency, improving quality of life and preventing disease progression. Areas covered: This perspective provides an overview of evidence and current practice for long-term oral, inhaled and pulsed intravenous antibiotic therapy in adults with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Evidence was drawn from a recent systemic literature review. Expert commentary: An approach to long-term antibiotic treatment is provided. Side effects of treatment, methods of monitoring treatment success and actions to be considered if treatment fails are discussed. Emerging long-term antibiotic treatments and strategies are considered.

  8. Targeted Therapy Database (TTD): a model to match patient's molecular profile with current knowledge on cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Shrager, Jeff; Scolyer, Richard; Pasquali, Sandro; Verdi, Daunia; Marincola, Francesco M; Briarava, Marta; Gobbel, Randy; Rossi, Carlo; Nitti, Donato

    2010-08-10

    The efficacy of current anticancer treatments is far from satisfactory and many patients still die of their disease. A general agreement exists on the urgency of developing molecularly targeted therapies, although their implementation in the clinical setting is in its infancy. In fact, despite the wealth of preclinical studies addressing these issues, the difficulty of testing each targeted therapy hypothesis in the clinical arena represents an intrinsic obstacle. As a consequence, we are witnessing a paradoxical situation where most hypotheses about the molecular and cellular biology of cancer remain clinically untested and therefore do not translate into a therapeutic benefit for patients. To present a computational method aimed to comprehensively exploit the scientific knowledge in order to foster the development of personalized cancer treatment by matching the patient's molecular profile with the available evidence on targeted therapy. To this aim we focused on melanoma, an increasingly diagnosed malignancy for which the need for novel therapeutic approaches is paradigmatic since no effective treatment is available in the advanced setting. Relevant data were manually extracted from peer-reviewed full-text original articles describing any type of anti-melanoma targeted therapy tested in any type of experimental or clinical model. To this purpose, Medline, Embase, Cancerlit and the Cochrane databases were searched. We created a manually annotated database (Targeted Therapy Database, TTD) where the relevant data are gathered in a formal representation that can be computationally analyzed. Dedicated algorithms were set up for the identification of the prevalent therapeutic hypotheses based on the available evidence and for ranking treatments based on the molecular profile of individual patients. In this essay we describe the principles and computational algorithms of an original method developed to fully exploit the available knowledge on cancer biology with the

  9. The Client-Centred Evidence-Based Practice of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; von Zweck, Claudia; Vallerand, Josee

    1998-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is therapy guided by the results of scientifically sound, relevant research. The Occupational Performance Process Model outlines the occupational therapy problem-solving process to assist occupational therapists in integrating information about individual clients into research findings to implement EBP. (SK)

  10. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  11. Current perspectives on the use of ancillary materials for the manufacture of cellular therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Jennifer; Csontos, Lynn; Clarke, Dominic; Bonyhadi, Mark; Zylberberg, Claudia; McNiece, Ian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Bell, Rosemarie; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Continued growth in the cell therapy industry and commercialization of cell therapies that successfully advance through clinical trials has led to increased awareness around the need for specialized and complex materials utilized in their manufacture. Ancillary materials (AMs) are components or reagents used during the manufacture of cell therapy products but are not intended to be part of the final products. Commonly, there are limitations in the availability of clinical-grade reagents used as AMs. Furthermore, AMs may affect the efficacy of the cell product and subsequent safety of the cell therapy for the patient. As such, AMs must be carefully selected and appropriately qualified during the cell therapy development process. However, the ongoing evolution of cell therapy research, limited number of clinical trials and registered cell therapy products results in the current absence of specific regulations governing the composition, compliance, and qualification of AMs often leads to confusion by suppliers and users in this field. Here we provide an overview and interpretation of the existing global framework surrounding AM use and investigate some common misunderstandings within the industry, with the aim of facilitating the appropriate selection and qualification of AMs. The key message we wish to emphasize is that in order to most effectively mitigate risk around cell therapy development and patient safety, users must work with their suppliers and regulators to qualify each AM to assess source, purity, identity, safety, and suitability in a given application. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Beta-lactam combination therapy for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species bacteremia: A summary and appraisal of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bartash

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal bacteremia and enterococcal bacteremia are prevalent in hospitalized or recently instrumented patients, and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. They are often difficult to treat due to the pathogenicity of the organisms, poor response to antibiotics, and increasing development of multidrug resistance. Therefore, there has been increasing interest in combination therapy for the treatment of these infections. The aim of this review was to summarize and assess the evidence supporting combination beta-lactam therapy for both Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species blood stream infections. Currently, there is promising in vitro data but little clinical evidence supporting combination beta-lactam therapy for this indication. Further clinical investigations are needed to elucidate the potential benefits of beta-lactam combination therapy over monotherapy for Gram-positive bacteremia, although combination therapy may be useful in refractory cases of bacteremia that do not respond to standard antibiotic therapy.

  13. The evidence-base for couple therapy, family therapy and systemic interventions for adult-focused problems

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This review updates similar articles published in JFT in 2000 and 2009. It presents evidence from meta-analyses, systematic literature reviews and controlled trials for the effectiveness of couple and family therapy for adults with various relationship and mental health problems. The evidence supports the effectiveness of systemic interventions, either alone or as part of multi-modal programmes, for relationship distress, psychosexual problems, intimate partner violence, anxiety disorders, mo...

  14. Cognitive-behavior therapy for problem gambling: a critique of current treatments and proposed new unified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolchard, Barry

    2017-06-01

    There is evidence supporting the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of problem gambling. Despite this, little is known about how CBT works and which particular approach is most effective. This paper aims to synthesize the evidence for current CBT and propose a more unified approach to treatment. A literature review and narrative synthesis of the current research evidence of CBT for the treatment of problem gambling was conducted, focusing on the underlying mechanisms within the treatment approach. Several CBT approaches were critiqued. These can be divided into forms of exposure therapy (including aversion techniques, systematic desensitization and other behavioral experiments) those focusing on cognitive restructuring techniques (such as reinforcement of nongambling activity, use of diaries, motivational enhancement and audio-playback techniques and third wave techniques including mindfulness. Findings, in relation to the treatment actions, from this synthesis are reported. The debate surrounding the treatment of problem gambling has been conducted as an either/or rather than a both/and discourse. This paper proposes a new, unified approach to the treatment of problem gambling that incorporates the best elements of both exposure and cognitive restructuring techniques, alongside the use of techniques borrowed from mindfulness and other CBT approaches.

  15. The current status of clinics providing private practice cell therapy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Misao; Hatta, Taichi; Ozeki, Reina; Akabayashi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the current state of clinics in Japan that offer unproven cell therapies. Google searches were performed to collect and analyze what kind of clinics provide what kind of cell therapies. A total of 74 clinics and 247 cases of cell therapies were identified. Various cell therapies, including allograft, were provided not only to seriously ill patients but also to patients with other therapeutic options and healthy individuals. Although the practices revealed by our study seem to deviate from international standard, some of these can be construed as legal under the Japanese new act established in 2014. Considering many patients travel to foreign countries to seek therapy, more research from non-English-speaking countries is needed.

  16. Current status and future prospects of radiation therapy and medical accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.

    2004-01-01

    Progress of radiation therapy is remarkable in cancer treatment. Ten years ago, one out of eight cancer patients in Japan received this, but nowadays, a quarter of cancer patients undergo this modality. Furthermore, in ten years, the ratio will be nearly half, which is similar to western countries. In particular highly precise irradiation is actualized to pinpoint a cancer lesion owing to technological innovations. Radiation therapy is expected to play a major role in aging society of this country. Some examples of ''hi-tech'' radiation therapy is presented. On the other hand, several malpractices in radiation therapy are reported recently. It is caused mainly be the lack of hospital physicists in this field. In addition to it, there is no domestic company who manufactures medical accelerators. Current status and future prospects of radiation therapy and medical accelerator are addressed. (author)

  17. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells in gastrointestinal cancers – current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jiwei Qin,1 Yue Zhao,2 Yan Wang,1 Christopher Betzler,2 Felix C Popp,2 Arvid Sen Gupta,2 Daniela Augsburger,2 Peter Camaj,2 Peter J Nelson,3 Christiane J Bruns2 1Department of Surgery, University of Munich, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Surgery, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; 3Clinical Biochemistry Group, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik IV, University of Munich, Munich, Germany Abstract: Mesenchymal stem (or stromal cells (MSCs are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow and adipose tissue. Due to the ability of MSCs to migrate to damaged and cancerous tissue, this behavior of MSCs has been exploited as a tumor-targeting strategy for cell-based cancer therapy to improve the efficacy and minimize the toxicity of current gene therapy approaches in the treatment of cancers. In this review, we focus on the current developments of MSC-based gene therapy in gastrointestinal cancer studies, in particular, the role of MSCs as tumor-targeted therapy vehicles and the prospects in their clinical application. Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, gastrointestinal cancers, cancer therapy

  18. Complementary Medicine, Exercise, Meditation, Diet, and Lifestyle Modification for Anxiety Disorders: A Review of Current Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Sarris, J.; Moylan, S.; Camfield, D. A.; Pase, M. P.; Mischoulon, D.; Berk, M.; Jacka, F. N.; Schweitzer, I.

    2012-01-01

    Use of complementary medicines and therapies (CAM) and modification of lifestyle factors such as physical activity, exercise, and diet are being increasingly considered as potential therapeutic options for anxiety disorders. The objective of this metareview was to examine evidence across a broad range of CAM and lifestyle interventions in the treatment of anxiety disorders. In early 2012 we conducted a literature search of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Lib...

  19. Treatment of Hypogonadism: Current and Future Therapies [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthi Thirumalai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of hypogonadism in men is of great interest to both patients and providers. There are a number of testosterone formulations currently available and several additional formulations under development. In addition, there are some lesser-used alternative therapies for the management of male hypogonadism, which may have advantages for certain patient groups. The future of hypogonadism therapy may lie in the development of selective androgen receptor modulators that allow the benefits of androgens whilst minimizing unwanted side effects.

  20. Biofield Therapies: Helpful or Full of Hype? A Best Evidence Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Biofield therapies (such as Reiki, therapeutic touch, and healing touch) are complementary medicine modalities that remain controversial and are utilized by a significant number of patients, with little information regarding their efficacy. Purpose This systematic review examines 66 clinical studies with a variety of biofield therapies in different patient populations. Method We conducted a quality assessment as well as a best evidence synthesis approach to examine evidence for biofield therapies in relevant outcomes for different clinical populations. Results Studies overall are of medium quality, and generally meet minimum standards for validity of inferences. Biofield therapies show strong evidence for reducing pain intensity in pain populations, and moderate evidence for reducing pain intensity hospitalized and cancer populations. There is moderate evidence for decreasing negative behavioral symptoms in dementia and moderate evidence for decreasing anxiety for hospitalized populations. There is equivocal evidence for biofield therapies' effects on fatigue and quality of life for cancer patients, as well as for comprehensive pain outcomes and affect in pain patients, and for decreasing anxiety in cardiovascular patients. Conclusion There is a need for further high-quality studies in this area. Implications and future research directions are discussed. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12529-009-9062-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19856109

  1. Enhancing Photodynamyc Therapy Efficacy by Combination Therapy: Dated, Current and Oncoming Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postiglione, Ilaria; Chiaviello, Angela; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Combination therapy is a common practice in many medical disciplines. It is defined as the use of more than one drug to treat the same disease. Sometimes this expression describes the simultaneous use of therapeutic approaches that target different cellular/molecular pathways, increasing the chances of killing the diseased cell. This short review is concerned with therapeutic combinations in which PDT (Photodynamyc Therapy) is the core therapeutic partner. Besides the description of the principal methods used to assess the efficacy attained by combinations in respect to monotherapy, this review describes experimental results in which PDT was combined with conventional drugs in different experimental conditions. This inventory is far from exhaustive, as the number of photosensitizers used in combination with different drugs is very large. Reports cited in this work have been selected because considered representative. The combinations we have reviewed include the association of PDT with anti-oxidants, chemotherapeutics, drugs targeting topoisomerases I and II, antimetabolites and others. Some paragraphs are dedicated to PDT and immuno-modulation, others to associations of PDT with angiogenesis inhibitors, receptor inhibitors, radiotherapy and more. Finally, a look is dedicated to combinations involving the use of natural compounds and, as new entries, drugs that act as proteasome inhibitors

  2. Contemporary Cognitive Behavior Therapy: A Review of Theory, History, and Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Nathan; Pilecki, Brian; McKay, Dean

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has come to be a widely practiced psychotherapy throughout the world. The present article reviews theory, history, and evidence for CBT. It is meant as an effort to summarize the forms and scope of CBT to date for the uninitiated. Elements of CBT such as cognitive therapy, behavior therapy, and so-called "third wave" CBT, such as dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) are covered. The evidence for the efficacy of CBT for various disorders is reviewed, including depression, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, substance abuse, schizophrenia, chronic pain, insomnia, and child/adolescent disorders. The relative efficacy of medication and CBT, or their combination, is also briefly considered. Future directions for research and treatment development are proposed.

  3. The theories underpinning rational emotive behaviour therapy: where's the supportive evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnes, Douglas

    2004-08-01

    This paper examines the underlying theoretical philosophy of one of the most widely used cognitive behaviour therapies, rational emotive behaviour therapy. It examines whether two central theoretical principles are supported by research evidence: firstly, that irrational beliefs lead to dysfunctional emotions and inferences and that rational beliefs lead to functional emotions and inferences and, secondly, that demand beliefs are the primary core irrational belief. The established criteria for evaluating the efficacy of the theories are detailed and used to evaluate the strength of evidence supporting these two assumptions. The findings indicate there is limited evidence to support these theories. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Pharmacological basis and clinical evidence of dabigatran therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redondo Santiago

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dabigatran is an emerging oral anticoagulant which is a direct inhibitor of thrombin activity. It has been approved in the European Union and the United States of America for the prevention of thrombosis after major orthopedic surgery. It has also been approved by the American Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the prevention of stroke in chronic atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran provides a stable anticoagulation effect without any need to perform periodical laboratory controls. Of note, there is a growing amount of clinical evidence which shows its safety and efficacy. For these reasons, dabigatran may suppose a revolution in oral anticoagulation. However, two important limitations remain. First, it is contraindicated in patients with end-stage renal disease. Second, there is no evidence of the prevention of thrombosis in mechanical heart valves.

  5. Cardiovascular Considerations in Antidepressant Therapy: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibeh Yekehtaz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a definite correlation between cardiovascular diseases and depressive disorders. Nevertheless, many aspects of this association have yet to be fully elucidated. Up to half of coronary artery disease patients are liable to suffer from some depressive symptoms, with approximately 20% receiving a diagnosis of major depressive disorders. Pharmacotherapy is a key factor in the management of major depression, not least in patients with chronic diseases who are likely to fail to show proper compliance and response to non-pharmacological interventions. Antidepressants are not deemed completely safe. Indeed, numerous side effects have been reported with the administration of antidepressants, among which cardiovascular adverse events are of paramount importance owing to their disabling and life-threatening nature. We aimed to re-examine some of the salient issues in antidepressant therapy vis-à-vis cardiovascular considerations, which should be taken into account when prescribing such medications.

  6. Structured exercise interventions for type 2 diabetes mellitus: Strength of current evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Ejas Hussain; MY Shereef; Unaise Abdul Hameed

    2011-01-01

    Exercise, along with medical nutrition therapy and pharmacological interventions, is an important component in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Current clinical guidelines on type 2 diabetes provide no detailed information on the modalities of effective exercise intervention in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Both endurance and resistance types of exercise seem to be equally effective in improving metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Determining the ...

  7. Psychological therapies for auditory hallucinations (voices): current status and key directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Hayward, Mark; Peters, Emmanuelle; van der Gaag, Mark; Bentall, Richard P; Jenner, Jack; Strauss, Clara; Sommer, Iris E; Johns, Louise C; Varese, Filippo; García-Montes, José Manuel; Waters, Flavie; Dodgson, Guy; McCarthy-Jones, Simon

    2014-07-01

    This report from the International Consortium on Hallucinations Research considers the current status and future directions in research on psychological therapies targeting auditory hallucinations (hearing voices). Therapy approaches have evolved from behavioral and coping-focused interventions, through formulation-driven interventions using methods from cognitive therapy, to a number of contemporary developments. Recent developments include the application of acceptance- and mindfulness-based approaches, and consolidation of methods for working with connections between voices and views of self, others, relationships and personal history. In this article, we discuss the development of therapies for voices and review the empirical findings. This review shows that psychological therapies are broadly effective for people with positive symptoms, but that more research is required to understand the specific application of therapies to voices. Six key research directions are identified: (1) moving beyond the focus on overall efficacy to understand specific therapeutic processes targeting voices, (2) better targeting psychological processes associated with voices such as trauma, cognitive mechanisms, and personal recovery, (3) more focused measurement of the intended outcomes of therapy, (4) understanding individual differences among voice hearers, (5) extending beyond a focus on voices and schizophrenia into other populations and sensory modalities, and (6) shaping interventions for service implementation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  8. Psychological Therapies for Auditory Hallucinations (Voices): Current Status and Key Directions for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Hayward, Mark; Peters, Emmanuelle; van der Gaag, Mark; Bentall, Richard P.; Jenner, Jack; Strauss, Clara; Sommer, Iris E.; Johns, Louise C.; Varese, Filippo; García-Montes, José Manuel; Waters, Flavie; Dodgson, Guy; McCarthy-Jones, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This report from the International Consortium on Hallucinations Research considers the current status and future directions in research on psychological therapies targeting auditory hallucinations (hearing voices). Therapy approaches have evolved from behavioral and coping-focused interventions, through formulation-driven interventions using methods from cognitive therapy, to a number of contemporary developments. Recent developments include the application of acceptance- and mindfulness-based approaches, and consolidation of methods for working with connections between voices and views of self, others, relationships and personal history. In this article, we discuss the development of therapies for voices and review the empirical findings. This review shows that psychological therapies are broadly effective for people with positive symptoms, but that more research is required to understand the specific application of therapies to voices. Six key research directions are identified: (1) moving beyond the focus on overall efficacy to understand specific therapeutic processes targeting voices, (2) better targeting psychological processes associated with voices such as trauma, cognitive mechanisms, and personal recovery, (3) more focused measurement of the intended outcomes of therapy, (4) understanding individual differences among voice hearers, (5) extending beyond a focus on voices and schizophrenia into other populations and sensory modalities, and (6) shaping interventions for service implementation. PMID:24936081

  9. Third-degree burns incurred as a result of interferential current therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satter, Elizabeth K

    2008-06-01

    As an ancillary part of physical therapy, ice, heat, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and interferential currents are often used as nonpharmacological modalities to treat pain and reduce edema. Although medical electrical stimulation devices are touted as having few side effects, cutaneous irritation, contact dermatitis, and burns have been noted. The following article describes a patient who incurred third-degree burns in an area treated with interferential currents.

  10. Maternal and Congenital Toxoplasmosis, Currently Available and Novel Therapies in Horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helieh S Oz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Over one billion people worldwide are predicted to harbor Toxoplasma infection frequently with unknown lifelong health consequences. Toxoplasmosis is an important cause of foodborne, inflammatory illnesses, as well as congenital abnormalities. Ubiquitous Toxoplasma has a unique tropism for central nervous system with a mind bugging effect and is transmitted sexually through semen. Current available therapies are ineffective for persistent chronic disease and congenital toxoplasmosis or have severe side effects which may result in life threatening complications. There is an urgent need for safe and effective therapies to eliminate or treat this cosmopolitan infectious and inflammatory disease. This investigation will discuss pathogenesis of maternal and congenital toxoplasmosis, the current available therapies in practice, and the experimental therapeutic modalities for promising future trials.

  11. The Current Evidence for Hayek’s Cultural Group Selection Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Lowell Stone

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article I summarize Friedrich Hayek’s cultural group selection theory and describe the evidence gathered by current cultural group selection theorists within the behavioral and social sciences supporting Hayek’s main assertions. I conclude with a few comments on Hayek and libertarianism.

  12. Evidence of current impact of climate change on life : A walk from genes to the biosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penuelas, Josep; Sardans, Jordi; Estiarte, Marc; Ogaya, Roma; Carnicer, Jofre; Coll, Marta; Barbeta, Adria; Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Llusia, Joan; Garbulsky, Martin; Filella, Iolanda; Jump, Alistair S.

    We review the evidence of how organisms and populations are currently responding to climate change through phenotypic plasticity, genotypic evolution, changes in distribution and, in some cases, local extinction. Organisms alter their gene expression and metabolism to increase the concentrations of

  13. Treatment of intracerebral haemorrhage with tranexamic acid – A review of current evidence and ongoing trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, Zhe Kang; Meretoja, Atte; Engelter, Stefan T

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Haematoma expansion is a devastating complication of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) with no established treatment. Tranexamic acid had been an effective haemostatic agent in reducing post-operative and traumatic bleeding. We review current evidence examining the efficacy of tranexamic ac...

  14. Using Integrative Medicine in Pain Management: An Evaluation of Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Chi; Wan, Limeng; Jamison, Robert N

    2017-12-01

    Complementary medicine therapies are frequently used to treat pain conditions such as headaches and neck, back, and joint pain. Chronic pain, described as pain lasting longer than 3-6 months, can be a debilitating condition that has a significant socioeconomic impact. Pharmacologic approaches are often used for alleviating chronic pain, but recently there has been a reluctance to prescribe opioids for chronic noncancer pain because of concerns about tolerance, dependence, and addiction. As a result, there has been increased interest in integrative medicine strategies to help manage pain and to reduce reliance on prescription opioids to manage pain. This article offers a brief critical review of integrative medical therapies used to treat chronic pain, including nutritional supplements, yoga, relaxation, tai chi, massage, spinal manipulation, and acupuncture. The goal of this article is to identify those treatments that show evidence of efficacy and to identify gaps in the literature where additional studies and controlled trials are needed. An electronic search of the databases of PubMed, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Science Citation Index Expanded was conducted. Overall, weak positive evidence was found for yoga, relaxation, tai chi, massage, and manipulation. Strong evidence for acupuncture as a complementary treatment for chronic pain that has been shown to decrease the usage of opioids was found. Few studies were found in which integrative medicine approaches were used to address opioid misuse and abuse among chronic pain patients. Additional controlled trials to address the use of integrative medicine approaches in pain management are needed.

  15. Understanding the molecular target therapy and it's approved synchronous use with radiation therapy in current Indian oncology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Puneet; Dohhen, Umesh Kumar; Romana; Srivastava, Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    The molecular targeted drugs (MTD) are of two types; large and small. The large molecular targeted drugs (LMTD) cannot cross the cancer cell membrane whereas those that cross the cancer cell membrane are nicknamed small molecular target drugs (SMTD). India has availability of almost all MTD originals approved by USA Food and Drug administration. However a few LMTD like inj vectibix, inj Zevalin, Inj Bexar etc.; and SMTD like cap Tipifarnib approved for AML, are not available in India currently although approved and available in USA. The MTD may he used alone as singlet; along with chemotherapy as doublet or triplet; or along with radiation and chemotherapy combo (nicknamed chemo-radiation-bio therapy). The molecular target therapy approved by USA and/or European FDA and currently available in India and used along with radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy, indication wise are; Brain Tumor Inj Nimotuzumab (LMTD) and Inj bevacizumab (LMTD) in Glioblasoma Multiforme; for Carcinoma Head and neck Inj Cetuximab and Inj Nimotuzumab (LMTT), Tab Geftinib (SMTD). (author)

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Cutaneous Wound Healing: Current Evidence and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isakson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is a remarkable organ that sustains insult and injury throughout life. The ability of skin to expeditiously repair wounds is paramount to survival. With an aging global population, coupled with a rise in the prevalence of conditions such as diabetes, chronic wounds represent a significant biomedical burden. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, a progenitor cell population of the mesoderm lineage, have been shown to be significant mediators in inflammatory environments. Preclinical studies of MSC in various animal wound healing models point towards a putative therapy. This review examines the body of evidence suggesting that MSC accelerate wound healing in both clinical and preclinical studies and also the possible mechanisms controlling its efficacy. The delivery of a cellular therapy to the masses presents many challenges from a safety, ethical, and regulatory point of view. Some of the issues surrounding the introduction of MSC as a medicinal product are also delineated in this review.

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease. Current concepts of pathogenesis and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, C

    2002-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) still presents major challenges to the understanding of its cause, mechanisms of inflammation, and therapeutic choices to control the damaged tissue. Both types of IBD, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, have been known and investigated for over half century but neither one is fully understood nor can be satisfactorily managed. While many gaps in our knowledge still exist, the last two decades have witnessed an unprecedented progress not only in the etiology but mainly in the mechanisms underlying the chronic inflammatory response. The pattern of IBD epidemiology has drastically changed since World War II, with an increased frequency in countries that have adopted a ''westernized'' life style. A parallel and important phenomenon is the continuous drop in age of onset in children. Unfortunately, only few epidemiological clues are available, with the exception of smoking and diet. What in smoking alters the course of IBD is still a mystery and which, among thousands of additives, could represent a risk factor will remain unknown for the foreseeable future. The current emphasis on the study of the enteric flora as the source of potential antigens against which the mucosal immune system reacts appear well justified. The data from animal models appears particularly convincing. Thus, after decades of relying almost exclusively on patient-derived information, numerous animal models are generating precious new information on IBD pathogenesis. In experimental IBD the genetic background of the animal markedly influences the course of the disease, and the same is probably true in humans. The identification of NOD2 as the first mutated gene associated with a subgroup of Crohn's disease patients is the first evidence that genetics are pointing to the right direction for understanding how the environment interacts with genes to cause IBD. For many years immunology has been the main source of scientific information on mechanisms of IBD

  18. Iron chelation therapy in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients: current strategies and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliba AN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antoine N Saliba, Afif R Harb, Ali T Taher Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon Abstract: Transfusional iron overload is a major target in the care of patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia (TDT and other refractory anemias. Iron accumulates in the liver, heart, and endocrine organs leading to a wide array of complications. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of the approved iron chelators, deferoxamine, deferiprone, and deferasirox, and the evidence behind the use of each, as monotherapy or as part of combination therapy. We also review the different guidelines on iron chelation in TDT. This review also discusses future prospects and directions in the treatment of transfusional iron overload in TDT whether through innovation in chelation or other therapies, such as novel agents that improve transfusion dependence. Keywords: thalassemia, transfusion-dependent thalassemia, iron overload, iron chelation therapy, transfusion

  19. Current evidence and biological plausibility linking periodontitis to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Tabeta, DDS,PhD

    2014-08-01

    The accumulation of multiple individual epidemiological studies has paved the way for subsequent systematic reviews that have demonstrated that periodontitis can be considered as an emerging risk factor for ACVD. Although the causal mechanisms by which periodontitis accelerates ACVD have not been fully elucidated, plausible evidence regarding the inflammatory response due to inflammatory mediators and bacterial etiologies, and the recognition of altered lipid metabolism in patients with periodontitis suggest that infection with periodontopathic bacteria can influence atherogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Animal model studies have strengthened this evidence. However, there have been a lack of interventional studies that show the effects of periodontal treatment on the future risk of ACVD; this lack of evidence critically weakens the importance of the relationship between the two diseases. This review presents a summary of the current evidence and biological plausibility that link periodontitis to ACVD.

  20. Eddy current analysis and optimization of fast scanning magnet for a proton therapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Qin, Bin; Liu, Kaifeng; Chen, Wei; Liang, Zhikai; Chen, Qushan; Chen, Dezhi; Fan, Mingwu

    2017-08-01

    Proton therapy is now recognized as one of the most effective radiation therapy methods for cancers. A proton therapy facility with multiple gantry treatment rooms is under development in HUST (Huazhong University of Science and Technology), which is based on isochronous superconducting cyclotron scheme. In the beam line, the scanning system spreads out the proton beam on the target according to the complex tumour shape by two scanning magnets for horizontal and vertical scanning independently. Since these two magnets are excited by alternating currents and the maximum repetition frequency is up to 100 Hz, eddy currents and losses are expected to be significant. Slits are proven to be an effective way to reduce the eddy currents. To evaluate the heat distribution due to eddy losses in the pole end of the scanning magnet, the transient electromagnetic analysis and steady-state thermal analysis are performed. This paper describes design considerations of the scanning system and mainly analyses the eddy current effect of the scanning magnets. Different coil shapes and slit arrangements are simulated and compared to obtain the optimal configuration. The maximum temperatures of two magnets are optimized below 70 °C. In addition, the lag effect due to eddy currents is also discussed.

  1. Phytothermotherapy in osteoarthritis: new evidence for an old therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheleschi S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sara Cheleschi, Sara Tenti, Mauro Galeazzi, Antonella FioravantiRheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Surgery, and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyIntroduction: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common disabling joint disease worldwide. Moreover, its incidence and prevalence are increasing because of aging, higher life expectancy, and lifestyle changes, leading to a growing population of patients with OA. Current treatment of OA includes nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic modalities. Phytothermotherapy (PTT is a singular crenotherapic treatment consisting of immersing oneself in pools of fermenting alpine grass, to exploit its heat and rich, aromatic components. The efficacy of PTT in OA is bolstered by ancient tradition. However, there is a marked lack of clinical validation of its efficacy and tolerability in current literature. The aim of this review was to evaluate the currently available knowledge of possible clinical effects and mechanisms of action of PTT in OA.Methodology: We searched PubMed and Scopus (the period examined was 1980–2012 for clinical trials examining the effect of PTT in OA. MedLine was searched using the term “phytothermotherapy” and “hay baths” in combination with “osteoarthritis.” We included only papers published in English or Italian and in peer-reviewed journals.Results: We identified three trials describing the results of PTT in OA. The available data demonstrate that PTT is efficacious in decreasing pain and disability and improving function in patients with OA. Moreover, the tolerability of PTT is excellent. The mechanisms of action of PTT are not yet completely known, although it is probably due to different combined mechanical, physical, and chemical effects.Discussion: PTT could represent a useful aid in the treatment of OA or a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacologic treatments. However, further studies on a larger number of patients are needed to

  2. Intranasal Insulin Therapy for Cognitive Impairment and Neurodegeneration: Current State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Monte, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Growing evidence supports the concept that insulin resistance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, including in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The metabolic hypothesis has led to the development and utilization of insulin- and insulin agonist-based treatments. Therapeutic challenges faced include the ability to provide effective treatments that do not require repeated injections and also minimize potentially hazardous off-target effects. Areas covered This review covers the role of intra-nasal insulin therapy for cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, particularly Alzheimer's disease. The literature reviewed focuses on data published within the past 5 years as this field is evolving rapidly. The author provides evidence that brain insulin resistance is an important and early abnormality in Alzheimer's disease, and that increasing brain supply and utilization of insulin improves cognition and memory. Emphasis was placed on discussing outcomes of clinical trials and interpreting discordant results to clarify the benefits and limitations of intranasal insulin therapy. Expert Opinion Intranasal insulin therapy can efficiently and directly target the brain to support energy metabolism, myelin maintenance, cell survival, and neuronal plasticity, which begin to fail in the early stages of neurodegeneration. Efforts must continue toward increasing the safety, efficacy, and specificity of intranasal insulin therapy. PMID:24215447

  3. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Implementing evidence-based models in community settings

    OpenAIRE

    Szapocznik, José; Muir, Joan A.; Duff, Johnathan H.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2013-01-01

    Reflecting a nearly 40-year collaborative partnership between clinical researchers and clinicians, the present article reviews the authors’ experience in developing, investigating, and implementing the Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) model. The first section of the article focuses on the theory, practice, and studies related to this evidence-based family therapy intervention targeting adolescent drug abuse and delinquency. The second section focuses on the implementation model created f...

  4. Current progress of human trials using stem cell therapy as a treatment for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shuk Kei; Park, Elisse Y; Pehar, Andjela; Rooney, Alexandra C; Gallicano, G Ian

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects millions of people worldwide, and is associated with serious complications that affect nearly all body systems. Because of the severity of this global health concern, there is a great deal of research being performed on alternative treatments and possible cures. Previous treatments for diabetes have included exogenous insulin injection and pancreatic islet transplantations. These treatment methods have several limitations; thus, the use of stem cells in treating diabetes is currently a significant area of research. This review outlines current research on stem cell therapy for diabetes mellitus. Numerous studies have been performed on animals using various types of stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells and embryonic stem cells. Moreover, results and limitations of animal studies have been confirmed in various clinical trials. Overall, stem cell treatment shows prospective advantages over insulin injections and other current treatment options, and ongoing clinical trials suggest that this therapy may be a viable treatment option for diabetics in the near future.

  5. Aerobic exercise in anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity: a systematic review of current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joseph J; Wu, Pei-Tzu; Middlekauff, Holly R; Nguyen, Kim-Lien

    2017-02-01

    Cancer and cardiovascular disease are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Older cancer patients often wrestle with underlying heart disease during cancer therapy, whereas childhood cancer survivors are living long enough to face long-term unintended cardiac consequences of cancer therapies, including anthracyclines. Although effective and widely used, particularly in the pediatric population, anthracycline-related side effects including dose-dependent association with cardiac dysfunction limit their usage. Currently, there is only one United States Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, dexrazoxane, available for the prevention and mitigation of cardiotoxicity related to anthracycline therapy. While aerobic exercise has been shown to reduce cardiovascular complications in multiple diseases, its role as a therapeutic approach to mitigate cardiovascular consequences of cancer therapy is in its infancy. This systematic review aims to summarize how aerobic exercise can help to alleviate unintended cardiotoxic side effects and identify gaps in need of further research. While published work supports the benefits of aerobic exercise, additional clinical investigations are warranted to determine the effects of different exercise modalities, timing, and duration to identify optimal aerobic training regimens for reducing cardiovascular complications, particularly late cardiac effects, in cancer survivors exposed to anthracyclines.

  6. Synthesis of Findings, Current Investigations, and Future Directions: Operation Brain Trauma Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Patrick M; Bramlett, Helen M; Shear, Deborah A; Dixon, C Edward; Mondello, Stefania; Dietrich, W Dalton; Hayes, Ronald L; Wang, Kevin K W; Poloyac, Samuel M; Empey, Philip E; Povlishock, John T; Mountney, Andrea; Browning, Megan; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Yan, Hong Q; Jackson, Travis C; Catania, Michael; Glushakova, Olena; Richieri, Steven P; Tortella, Frank C

    2016-03-15

    Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT) is a fully operational, rigorous, and productive multicenter, pre-clinical drug and circulating biomarker screening consortium for the field of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this article, we synthesize the findings from the first five therapies tested by OBTT and discuss both the current work that is ongoing and potential future directions. Based on the results generated from the first five therapies tested within the exacting approach used by OBTT, four (nicotinamide, erythropoietin, cyclosporine A, and simvastatin) performed below or well below what was expected based on the published literature. OBTT has identified, however, the early post-TBI administration of levetiracetam as a promising agent and has advanced it to a gyrencephalic large animal model--fluid percussion injury in micropigs. The sixth and seventh therapies have just completed testing (glibenclamide and Kollidon VA 64), and an eighth drug (AER 271) is in testing. Incorporation of circulating brain injury biomarker assessments into these pre-clinical studies suggests considerable potential for diagnostic and theranostic utility of glial fibrillary acidic protein in pre-clinical studies. Given the failures in clinical translation of therapies in TBI, rigorous multicenter, pre-clinical approaches to therapeutic screening such as OBTT may be important for the ultimate translation of therapies to the human condition.

  7. Evaluation of current trends and recent development in insulin therapy for management of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Muhammad Sarfraz; Shah, Kifayat Ullah; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Rehman, Asim Ur; Rashid, Haroon Ur; Mahmood, Sajid; Khan, Shahzeb; Farrukh, Muhammad Junaid

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem in developing countries. There are various insulin therapies to manage diabetes mellitus. This systematic review evaluates various insulin therapies for management of diabetes mellitus worldwide. This review also focuses on recent developments being explored for better management of diabetes mellitus. We reviewed a number of published articles from 2002 to 2016 to find out the appropriate management of diabetes mellitus. The paramount parameters of the selected studies include the insulin type & its dose, type of diabetes, duration and comparison of different insulin protocols. In addition, various newly developed approaches for insulin delivery with potential output have also been evaluated. A great variability was observed in managing diabetes mellitus through insulin therapy and the important controlling factors found for this therapy include; dose titration, duration of insulin use, type of insulin used and combination therapy of different insulin. A range of research articles on current trends and recent advances in insulin has been summarized, which led us to the conclusion that multiple daily insulin injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pump) is the best method to manage diabetes mellitus. In future perspectives, development of the oral and inhalant insulin would be a tremendous breakthrough in Insulin therapy. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Ablin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques.

  9. Somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and therapy: basic science, current knowledge, limitations and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breeman, W.A.P.; Jong, M. de; Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Valkema, R.; Bakker, W.H.; Kooij, P.P.M.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P.

    2001-01-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor-mediated scintigraphy has proven to be a valuable method for the visualisation of neuroendocrine tumours and their metastases. A new application is the use of radiolabelled analogues for somatostatin receptor-mediated therapy. This paper presents a review on the basic science, historical background and current knowledge of somatostatin receptor subtypes and their expression in neuroendocrine tumours. New somatostatin analogues, new chelators, ''new'' radionuclides and combinations thereof are also discussed. Due attention is given to limitations and future perspectives of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and therapy. (orig.)

  10. Childhood central nervous system leukemia: historical perspectives, current therapy, and acute neurological sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laningham, Fred H.; Kun, Larry E.; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Ogg, Robert J.; Morris, E.B.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2007-01-01

    During the past three decades, improvements in the treatment of childhood leukemia have resulted in high cure rates, particularly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Unfortunately, successful therapy has come with a price, as significant morbidity can result from neurological affects which harm the brain and spinal cord. The expectation and hope is that chemotherapy, as a primary means of CNS therapy, will result in acceptable disease control with less CNS morbidity than has been observed with combinations of chemotherapy and radiotherapy over the past several decades. In this review we discuss the poignant, historical aspects of CNS leukemia therapy, outline current methods of systemic and CNS leukemia therapy, and present imaging findings we have encountered in childhood leukemia patients with a variety of acute neurological conditions. A major objective of our research is to understand the neuroimaging correlates of acute and chronic effects of cancer and therapy. Specific features related to CNS leukemia and associated short-term toxicities, both disease- and therapy-related, are emphasized in this review with the specific neuroimaging findings. Specific CNS findings are similarly important when treating acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and details of leukemic involvement and toxicities are also presented in this entity. Despite contemporary treatment approaches which favor the use of chemotherapy (including intrathecal therapy) over radiotherapy in the treatment of CNS leukemia, children still occasionally experience morbid neurotoxicity. Standard neuroimaging is sufficient to identify a variety of neurotoxic sequelae in children, and often suggest specific etiologies. Specific neuroimaging findings frequently indicate a need to alter antileukemia therapy. It is important to appreciate that intrathecal and high doses of systemic chemotherapy are not innocuous and are associated with acute, specific, recognizable, and often serious neurological

  11. Bacteriophage-based therapy in cystic fibrosis-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: rationale and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hraiech, Sami; Brégeon, Fabienne; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the leading causes of the deterioration of the respiratory status of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains in such populations, favored by iterative antibiotic cures, has led to the urgent need for new therapies. Among them, bacteriophage-based therapies deserve a focus. One century of empiric use in the ex-USSR countries suggests that bacteriophages may have beneficial effects against a large range of bacterial infections. Interest in bacteriophages has recently renewed in Western countries, and the in vitro data available suggest that bacteriophage-based therapy may be of significant interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections in CF patients. Although the clinical data concerning this specific population are relatively scarce, the beginning of the first large randomized study evaluating bacteriophage-based therapy in burn infections suggests that the time has come to assess the effectiveness of this new therapy in CF P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Consequently, the aim of this review is, after a brief history, to summarize the evidence concerning bacteriophage efficacy against P. aeruginosa and, more specifically, the in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical trials targeting CF. PMID:26213462

  12. Current challenges in optimizing systemic therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer: expert perspectives from the Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) with invited international faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelov, Eva; Lordick, Florian; Goldstein, David; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Croagh, Daniel; Lawrence, Ben; Arnold, Dirk; Chau, Ian; Obermannova, Radka; Price, Timothy Jay

    2017-10-01

    Despite recent progress, the outlook for most patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor. There is variation in how patients are managed globally due to differing interpretations of the evidence, partly because studies in this disease are challenging to undertake. This article collates the evidence upon which current best practice is based and offers an expert opinion from an international faculty on how latest developments should influence current treatment paradigms. Areas covered: Optimal chemotherapy for first and subsequent lines of therapy; optimal management of locally advanced, non-metastatic cancer including the role of neoadjuvant chemo(radio)therapy, current evidence for adjuvant chemotherapy, major advances in pancreatic cancer genomics and challenges in supportive care particularly relevant to patients with pancreatic cancer. For each section, literature was reviewed by comprehensive search techniques, including clinical trial websites and abstracts from international cancer meetings. Expert commentary: For each section, a commentary is provided. Overall the challenges identified were: difficulties in diagnosing pancreatic cancer early, challenges for performing randomised clinical trials in all stages of the disease, some progress in systemic therapy with new agents and in identifying molecular subtypes that may be clinically relevant and move towards personalized therapy, but still, pancreatic cancer remains a very poor prognosis cancer with significant palliative care needs.

  13. Evidence and effects of a wave-driven nonlinear current in the equatorial electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oppenheim

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric two-stream waves and gradient-drift waves nonlinearly drive a large-scale (D.C. current in the E-region ionosphere. This current flows parallel to, and with a comparable magnitude to, the fundamental Pedersen current. Evidence for the existence and magnitude of wave-driven currents derives from a theoretical understanding of E-region waves, supported by a series of nonlinear 2D simulations of two-stream waves and by data collected by rocket instruments in the equatorial electrojet. Wave-driven currents will modify the large-scale dynamics of the equatorial electrojet during highly active periods. A simple model shows how a wave-driven current appreciably reduces the horizontally flowing electron current of the electrojet. This reduction may account for the observation that type-I radar echoes almost always have a Doppler velocity close to the acoustic speed, and also for the rocket observation that electrojet regions containing gradient-drift waves do not appear also to contain horizontally propagating two-stream waves. Additionally, a simple model of a gradient-drift instability shows that wave-driven currents can cause nonsinusoidal electric fields similar to those measured in situ.

  14. Transcatheter embolization therapy in liver cancer: an update of clinical evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; De Baere, Thierry; Idée, Jean-Marc; Ballet, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a form of intra-arterial catheter-based chemotherapy that selectively delivers high doses of cytotoxic drug to the tumor bed combining with the effect of ischemic necrosis induced by arterial embolization. Chemoembolization and radioembolization are at the core of the treatment of liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who cannot receive potentially curative therapies such as transplantation, resection or percutaneous ablation. TACE for liver cancer has been proven to be useful in local tumor control, to prevent tumor progression, prolong patients' life and control patient symptoms. Recent evidence showed in patients with single-nodule HCC of 3 cm or smaller without vascular invasion, the 5-year overall survival (OS) with TACE was similar to that with hepatic resection and radiofrequency ablation. Although being used for decades, Lipiodol(®) (Lipiodol(®) Ultra Fluid(®), Guerbet, France) remains important as a tumor-seeking and radio-opaque drug delivery vector in interventional oncology. There have been efforts to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors. Drug-eluting bead (DEB) is a relatively novel drug delivery embolization system which allows for fixed dosing and the ability to release the anticancer agents in a sustained manner. Three DEBs are available, i.e., Tandem(®) (CeloNova Biosciences Inc., USA), DC-Beads(®) (BTG, UK) and HepaSphere(®) (BioSphere Medical, Inc., USA). Transarterial radioembolization (TARE) technique has been developed, and proven to be efficient and safe in advanced liver cancers and those with vascular complications. Two types of radioembolization microspheres are available i.e., SIR-Spheres(®) (Sirtex Medical Limited, Australia) and TheraSphere(®) (BTG, UK). This review describes the basic procedure of TACE, properties and efficacy of some chemoembolization systems and radioembolization agents which are commercially available and/or currently under clinical

  15. Current trend of research on 131I therapy for thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tizhang

    2000-01-01

    At present time, there are two current trends of research on 131 I therapy for thyroid diseases. The first is extension of the application on the field of thyroid diseases. Formerly, the authors use the 131 I only on the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease, plummer's disease or toxic nodular goiter as well as thyroid cancer, but now, also for some thyroid diseases with normal thyroid function, such as nontoxic multi-nodular goiter, simple diffuse goiter even the thyroid cyst. It seems quite rational to use the 131 I more widely, because it is really safe, easy and cheaper than others. The second trend is using 131 I combined together with other drugs in order to reduce the occurrence of hypothyroidism and enhance the therapeutic effect. Authors call it as combined therapy. Drugs recommended for such therapy are antithyroid drugs, β-adrenergic receptor blocking agents, thyroid hormone, gtucocorticoid as well as Chinese herb drugs and so on

  16. Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlon ML

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael L Scanlon,1,2 Rachel C Vreeman1,21Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2USAID, Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH Partnership, Eldoret, KenyaAbstract: The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world’s HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a

  17. Targeted Therapy Database (TTD: a model to match patient's molecular profile with current knowledge on cancer biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Mocellin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The efficacy of current anticancer treatments is far from satisfactory and many patients still die of their disease. A general agreement exists on the urgency of developing molecularly targeted therapies, although their implementation in the clinical setting is in its infancy. In fact, despite the wealth of preclinical studies addressing these issues, the difficulty of testing each targeted therapy hypothesis in the clinical arena represents an intrinsic obstacle. As a consequence, we are witnessing a paradoxical situation where most hypotheses about the molecular and cellular biology of cancer remain clinically untested and therefore do not translate into a therapeutic benefit for patients. OBJECTIVE: To present a computational method aimed to comprehensively exploit the scientific knowledge in order to foster the development of personalized cancer treatment by matching the patient's molecular profile with the available evidence on targeted therapy. METHODS: To this aim we focused on melanoma, an increasingly diagnosed malignancy for which the need for novel therapeutic approaches is paradigmatic since no effective treatment is available in the advanced setting. Relevant data were manually extracted from peer-reviewed full-text original articles describing any type of anti-melanoma targeted therapy tested in any type of experimental or clinical model. To this purpose, Medline, Embase, Cancerlit and the Cochrane databases were searched. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: We created a manually annotated database (Targeted Therapy Database, TTD where the relevant data are gathered in a formal representation that can be computationally analyzed. Dedicated algorithms were set up for the identification of the prevalent therapeutic hypotheses based on the available evidence and for ranking treatments based on the molecular profile of individual patients. In this essay we describe the principles and computational algorithms of an original method

  18. Current management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: evidence in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Mena, Luis Diego

    2013-01-01

    Available literary evidence is reviewed on the current management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The bibliographical search is carried out in physical and online texts, cardiology journals, databases (MEDLINE), original studies, reviews and metaanalysis. Literature in English and Spanish is included from the first descriptions of the disease in the fifties, until the date of the investigation. Clinical management of patients is compared and recommendations published by consensus groups of international associations [es

  19. Impact of technique of left ventricular aneurysm repair on clinical outcomes: current best available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Shahzad G; Salehi, Salim; Bahrami, Toufan T

    2009-01-01

    Postinfarction left ventricular aneurysm is a serious disorder that can lead to congestive heart failure, lethal ventricular arrhythmia, and premature death. Surgical treatment is indicated in established cases of congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, malignant ventricular arrhythmia, or recurrent embolization from the left ventricle. The goal of surgical intervention is to correct the size and geometry of the left ventricle, reduce wall tension and paradoxical movement, and improve systolic function. Surgical techniques for repair of left ventricular aneurysm have evolved over the last five decades. Aneurysmectomy and linear repair of the left ventricle was introduced by Cooley and colleagues in 1958 and remained the standard procedure until the late 1980s. Endoventricular patch plasty (EVPP) was then introduced as a more physiologic repair than the linear closure technique, especially when the aneurysm extends into the septum. However, there is still controversy whether EVPP is superior to simple linear resection in terms of impact on early and late clinical outcomes. In the current era of evidence-based medicine, the best strategy to resolve a controversy is through the explicit and conscientious assessment of current best evidence. This review article attempts to evaluate the current best available evidence on the impact of technique of left ventricular aneurysm repair on postoperative clinical outcomes.

  20. PRESCRIBING OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AGENTS IN PUBLIC PRIMARY CARE CLINICS – IS IT IN ACCORDANCE WITH CURRENT EVIDENCE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAJARI J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large population surveys in Malaysia have consistently shown minimal improvement of blood pressure control rates over the last 10 years. Poor adherence to antihypertensive medication has been recognized as a major reason for poor control of hypertension. This study aimed to describe the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive agents in 2 public primary care clinics and assess its appropriateness in relation to current evidence and guidelines. Methods: A cross-sectional survey to describe the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive agents was carried out in 2 publicprimary care clinics in Selangor from May to June 2009. Hypertensive patients on pharmacological treatment for ≥1 year who attended the clinics within the study period of 7 weeks were selected. Appropriate use of antihypertensive agents was defined based on current evidence and the recommendations by the Malaysian Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG on the Management of Hypertension, 2008. Data were obtained from patients’ medical records and were analysed using the SPSS software version 16.0. Results: A total of 400 hypertensive patients on treatment were included. Mean age was 59.5 years (SD ±10.9, range 28 to91 years, of which 52.8% were females and 47.2% were males. With regards to pharmacotherapy, 45.7% were on monotherapy,43.3% were on 2 agents and 11.0% were on ≥3 agents. Target blood pressure of <140/90mmHg was achieved in 51.4% of patients on monotherapy, and 33.2% of patients on combination of ≥2 agents. The commonest monotherapy agents being prescribed were β-blockers (atenolol or propranolol, followed by the short-acting calcium channel blocker (nifedipine. The commonest combination of 2-drug therapy prescribed was β-blockers and short-acting calcium channel blocker. Conclusion: This study shows that the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive agents in the 2 primary care clinics was not in accordance with current evidence and guidelines.

  1. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS: THE ROLE IN CURRENT THERAPY OF CARDIO-VASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shilova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of calcium antagonists (CA is presented. Results of the large clinical trials (STONE, STOP-Hypertension-2, ALLHAT, ASCOT-BPLA etc. devoted to estimation of CA effects on the risk of cardiovascular complications are analyzed. The significant place of dihydropyridine CA in current guidelines on arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease therapy is underlined. Results of a pilot study on comparison of two amlodipines (original Norvasc and generic Stamlo M are discussed.

  2. Effectiveness of exercise therapy: a best-evidence summary of systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, N.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Bouter, L.M.; Dekker, J.; Arendzen, J.H.; Bie, R.A. de; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.; Helders, P.J.M.; Keus, S.H.J.; Kwakkel, G.; Lenssen, T.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Reijman, M.; Terwee, C.B.; Theunissen, C.; Thomas, S.; Baar, M.E. van; Hul, A. van 't; Peppen, R.P. van; Verhagen, A.; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to summarise the available evidence on the effectiveness of exercise therapy for patients with disorders of the musculoskeletal, nervous, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems. Systematic reviews were identified by means of a comprehensive search strategy in 11

  3. Teaching evidence-based speech and language therapy: Influences from formal and informal curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on influences from formal and informal curriculum on the effectiveness of teaching evidence-based speech and language therapy. A study showed that while EBP knowledge and skills increase during the years of study, motivational beliefs such as EBP task value and

  4. Insufficient scientific evidence for efficacy of widely used electrotherapy, laser therapy, and ultrasound treatment in physiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouter, L M

    2000-01-01

    The Dutch Health Council recently published a report on the efficacy of electrotherapy, laser therapy and ultrasound treatment for musculoskeletal disorders. The assessment was based on three systematic reviews, including 169 randomized clinical trials, and focused on a best-evidence synthesis.

  5. Evidence of the efficacy for occupational therapy in different conditions: an overview of systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the research evidence available from systematic reviews of the efficacy of occupational therapy (OT) for practitioners, researchers, purchasing organizations and policy-makers. DATA SOURCE: The search for systematic reviews was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library

  6. Mandatory Personal Therapy: Does the Evidence Justify the Practice? In Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Surabhi

    2013-01-01

    The article addresses the question of whether the practice of mandatory personal therapy, followed by several training organisations, is justified by existing research and evidence. In doing so, it discusses some implications of this training requirement from an ethical and ideological standpoint, raising questions of import for training…

  7. Correction to: The hidden therapist: evidence for a central role of music in psychedelic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelen, Mendel; Giribaldi, Bruna; Raine, Jordan; Evans, Lisa; Timmermann, Christopher; Rodriguez, Natalie; Roseman, Leor; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David; Carhart-Harris, Robin

    2018-05-01

    The article The hidden therapist: evidence for a central role of music in psychedelic therapy, written by Mendel Kaelen, Bruna Giribaldi, Jordan Raine, Lisa Evans, Christopher Timmerman, Natalie Rodriguez, Leor Roseman, Amanda Feilding, David Nutt, Robin Carhart-Harris, was originally published electronically on the publisher's internet portal.

  8. Ilaj bil hijamah (cupping therapy) in the Unani system of medicine: anecdotal practice to evidence based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Zaidi, S M; Jameel, S S; Jafri, Kehkashan; Khan, Shariq A; Ahmad, Ehsan

    2016-08-01

    Cupping (Hijamah) therapy is very well documented as a result of several thousand years of clinical experiences in Unani medicine. In this procedure, suction is created by various means either with or without bloodletting. Though this therapy is being widely practiced across the globe for treating many chronic and intractable ailments but many reports reveal its unscientific and improper practices which results in many complications. Therefore to develop standard operative procedures and to propose protocols of cupping therapy in various diseases is the need of hour. A thorough literature review of relevant journals and textbooks was performed to gather the maximum available data on cupping therapy. This paper seeks to introduce the general concepts of cupping therapy in Unani medicine and other traditional systems of medicine, shortcomings and limitations of the currently published studies and suggest ways to improve these technical/methodological flaws. In addition, the authors have also attempted to provide the cupping related materials, hypotheses, observations which will provide the researchers the base for evaluating their usefulness in future clinical trials.

  9. Penile traction therapy and Peyronie's disease: a state of art review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eric; Brock, Gerald

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, penile traction therapy (PTT) has gained considerable interest as a novel nonsurgical treatment option for men with Peyronie's disease (PD) and short penises. The current published literature suggests that selected cases of PD may benefit from a conservative approach with PTT, resulting in increased penile length and reduction of penile deformity. It appears to be safe and well tolerated but requires a great deal of patient compliance and determination. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the use of PTT in men with PD, short penises and in the setting of pre- and postprosthesis corporal fibrosis.

  10. Spontaneous (Autoimmune) Chronic Urticaria in Children: Current Evidences, Diagnostic Pitfalls and Therapeutic Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Dimitri; De Amici, Mara; Marseglia, Gian L

    2016-01-01

    Etiologic diagnosis of pediatric chronic urticaria is quite challenging, as few cases can be associated to specific triggers. Thus, more than 50% of chronic urticaria in children are labeled as idiopathic. Several evidences supported an autoimmune pathogenesis in 30-40% of patients with idiopathic (or spontaneous) chronic urticaria in adults, where the diagnosis of autoimmune chronic urticaria included in vivo and in vitro tests, revealing the presence of autoantibodies against high-affinity IgE receptors mainly. This review aimed at collecting and analyzing all the available evidences on the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune chronic urticaria in children, including most recent developments and patents. Most pediatric studies relied on autologous serum skin test only, in order to evidence autoimmune urticaria. A complete diagnostic assessment of pediatric autoimmune chronic urticaria, demonstrating an antibodymediated mechanism of disease, might ameliorate the therapeutic management of spontaneous (autoimmune) chronic urticaria in children, supporting the use of omalizumab rather than immuno-suppressive therapy in cases resistant to the firstline treatments.

  11. Male circumcision for HIV prevention: current evidence and implementation in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Heterosexual exposure accounts for most HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa, and this mode, as a proportion of new infections, is escalating globally. The scientific evidence accumulated over more than 20 years shows that among the strategies advocated during this period for HIV prevention, male circumcision is one of, if not, the most efficacious epidemiologically, as well as cost-wise. Despite this, and recommendation of the procedure by global policy makers, national implementation has been slow. Additionally, some are not convinced of the protective effect of male circumcision and there are also reports, unsupported by evidence, that non-sex-related drivers play a major role in HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. Here, we provide a critical evaluation of the state of the current evidence for male circumcision in reducing HIV infection in light of established transmission drivers, provide an update on programmes now in place in this region, and explain why policies based on established scientific evidence should be prioritized. We conclude that the evidence supports the need to accelerate the implementation of medical male circumcision programmes for HIV prevention in generalized heterosexual epidemics, as well as in countering the growing heterosexual transmission in countries where HIV prevalence is presently low. PMID:22014096

  12. Current status and future perspectives of PSMA-targeted therapy in Europe: opportunity knocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfestroff, A.; Luster, M. [University Hospital Marburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany); Jilg, C.A. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Urology, Freiburg (Germany); Olbert, P.J. [University Hospital Marburg, Department of Urology, Marburg (Germany); Ohlmann, C.H. [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Urology, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Lassmann, M. [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Maecke, H.R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy, Freiburg (Germany); Ezziddin, S. [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Bodei, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Collaboration: on behalf of the Radionuclide Therapy Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine

    2015-12-15

    {sup 177}Lu-based PSMA-targeted therapy appears to be a promising treatment for advanced PCA. However, lessons should be learned from PRRT of neuroendocrine tumours, which was referred to as a ''promising'' tool for 15 years before the advent of evidence-based comparative studies. This experience strongly suggests that the communities involved with PSMA-targeted therapy, namely nuclear medicine, urology, radiochemistry, and medical physics, should capitalize without delay on the great opportunity to conduct well-designed prospective studies. Doing so should advance this modality from the proof-of principle stage to the potential standard-of-Care-stage. From our perspective, crucial components of this process are: - Harmonization of therapy protocols - Implementation of a patient selection algorithm into clinical routine - Standardization of toxicity assessment - Establishment of standardized dosimetry protocols to assess safety and efficacy - Transfer of expertise in PSMA therapy throughout Europe - Regulatory approval of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-targeted compounds.

  13. The evidence-based principles of negative pressure wound therapy in trauma & orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice.

  14. The Evidence-Based Principles of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Trauma & Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice. PMID:25067971

  15. Structured exercise interventions for type 2 diabetes mellitus: Strength of current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ejas Hussain

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Exercise, along with medical nutrition therapy and pharmacological interventions, is an important component in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D. Current clinical guidelines on type 2 diabetes provide no detailed information on the modalities of effective exercise intervention in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Both endurance and resistance types of exercise seem to be equally effective in improving metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Determining the best method of providing exercise is clinically relevant to this population. This paper reviews the epidemiology of diabetes and problems of physical function associated with type 2 diabetes and discuss the benefits of exercise therapy on the parameters of glycemic control and function in type 2 diabetes patients, with special reference to Asian Indians. Based on the currently available literature, it is concluded that type 2 diabetes patients should be encouraged to participate in specifically designed exercise intervention programs. Attention should be paid to the avoidance of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning. More clinical research is warranted to establish the efficacy of different dosages of exercise intervention in a holistic approach for type 2 diabetes subpopulations within different stages of the disease and various levels of co-morbidity.

  16. Taking Brief Strategic Family Therapy from Bench to Trench: Evidence Generation Across Translational Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigian, Viviana E; Anderson, Austen R; Szapocznik, José

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we review the research evidence generated over 40 years on Brief Strategic Family Therapy illustrating the NIH stages of intervention development and highlighting the translational process. Basic research (Stage 0) led to the discovery of the characteristics of the population and the nature of the problems that needed to be addressed. This step informed the selection of an intervention model that addressed the problems presented by the population, but in a fashion that was congruent with the population's culture, defined in terms of its value orientations. From this basic research, an intervention that integrated structural and strategic elements was selected and refined through testing (Stage I). The second stage of translation (Stage II) included efficacy trials of a specialized engagement module that responded to challenges to the provision of services. It also included several other efficacy trials that documented the effects of the intervention, mostly in research settings or with research therapists. Stages III/IV in the translational process led to the testing of the effectiveness of the intervention in real-world settings with community therapists and some oversight from the developer. This work revealed that an implementation/organizational intervention was required to achieve fidelity and sustainability of the intervention in real-world settings. The work is currently in Stage V in which new model development led to an implementation intervention that can ensure fidelity and sustainability. Future research will evaluate the effectiveness of the current implementation model in increasing adoption, fidelity, and long-term sustainability in real-world settings. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  17. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brian Savino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results: The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either, as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine. Prehospital 12- Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion: Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols.

  18. Osteoradionecrosis in cancer patients: the evidence base for treatment-dependent frequency, current management strategies, and future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Douglas E; Doerr, Wolfgang; Hovan, Allan; Pinto, Andres; Saunders, Debbie; Elting, Linda S; Spijkervet, Fred K L; Brennan, Michael T

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the evidence base from 1990 to 2008 to (1) clarify the impact of cancer therapies on prevalence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in head and neck cancer patients, and to (2) evaluate management strategies and their consequences on quality of life and cost of care. Articles were selected for the time period beginning after 1989, excluding the 1990 NCI monograph articles from the 1989 NIH-sponsored Oral Complications in Cancer Therapy Symposium that was published in 1990. The search included both Medline/PubMed and Embase and was limited to humans. The search was limited to publications in the English language. No abstracts were utilized in the current review. Each article was evaluated by two reviewers. A weighted prevalence was calculated for the prevalence of ORN while incorporating predetermined quality measures. The level of evidence, recommendation grade, and guideline (if possible) were provided for published preventive and management strategies for ORN. A total of 43 articles between 1990 and 2008 were reviewed. The weighted prevalence for ORN included conventional radiotherapy (RT) = 7.4%, intensity modulated RT (IMRT) = 5.1%, chemoradiotherapy (CRT) = 6.8%, and brachytherapy = 5.3%. Hyperbaric oxygen may contribute a role in management of ORN. However, no clear guideline recommendations could be established for the prevention or treatment of ORN based on the literature reviewed. New cancer treatment modalities such as IMRT and concomitant CRT have had minimal effect on prevalence of ORN. No studies to date have systematically addressed impact of ORN on either quality of life or cost of care.

  19. Current evidence for postoperative monitoring of microvascular free flaps: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren Matthew; Whitaker, Iain S; Chubb, Daniel; Grinsell, Damien; Ashton, Mark W; Hunter-Smith, David J; Lineaweaver, William C

    2015-05-01

    Despite a plethora of monitoring techniques reported in the literature, only a small number of studies directly address clinical relevant end points, such as the flap salvage rate and false-positive rate. We conducted a systematic review of current evidence regarding the postoperative monitoring of microvascular free-tissue transfer via extensive electronic and manual search and perusing databases, such as PubMed, Cochrane, American College of Physicians (ACP) Journal Club, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and Ovid MEDLINE. The included literature (n = 184 publications) was critically appraised using March 2009 Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine definitions, focusing on the evidence for the efficacy of each technique in improving the flap salvage rate of compromised flaps. There is a paucity of outcome-based studies, with only implanted Doppler probes, near-infrared spectroscopy, laser Doppler flowmetry, quantitative fluorimetry, and digital photography assessment using smartphones having been demonstrated in comparative studies to improve flap salvage rate. Currently, the implantable Doppler probe is the technique with the largest number of comparative studies and case series to demonstrate its effectiveness compared with clinical monitoring. Future studies need to evaluate the most promising monitoring techniques further with a focus on assessing clinically relevant outcomes, such as the flap salvage rate and the false-positive rate, and not simple clinical series reporting patient and physician satisfaction.

  20. Current and emerging therapies in the management of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karri, Veera Venkata Satyanarayana Reddy; Kuppusamy, Gowthamarajan; Talluri, Siddhartha Venkata; Yamjala, Karthik; Mannemala, Sai Sandeep; Malayandi, Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the major causes of mortality in diabetic patients. Very few drugs and therapies have regulatory approval for this indication and several agents from diverse pharmacological classes are currently in various phases of clinical trials for the management of diabetic foot ulcers. The purpose of this review is to provide concise information of the drugs and therapies which are approved and present in clinical trials. This review was carried out by systematic searches of relevant guidelines, patents, published articles, reviews and abstracts in PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, clinicaltrials.gov, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar of all English language articles up to 1 March 2015. The following search terms were used: diabetes, diabetic foot, diabetic foot ulcer, diabetic wound, diabetic foot infections, wound management, randomized controlled trials, approved treatments, new treatments and clinical trials. The various drugs and therapies for the management of diabetic foot ulcers comprise antibiotics, neuropathic drugs, wound dressings, skin substitutes, growth factors and inflammatory modulators. The majority of these therapies target the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers to address the altered biochemical composition of the diabetic wound. However, no single treatment can be definitively recommended for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

  1. Determination of effective treatment duration of interferential current therapy using electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jong-In; Lee, Ho Sub; Lee, Sangkwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study used electromyography to measure the effective treatment duration of interferential current therapy for muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy adult men volunteered to participate in the study (age: 24.2 ± 1.3 years; weight: 67.6 ± 4.92 kg; height: 176.4 ± 4.92 cm). All subjects performed 5 min of isometric back extension exercise to produce muscle fatigue, and were then treated with interferential current therapy for 15 min, with electromyography monitoring (treatment group). After sufficient rest, the exercise was repeated for 5 min and an electromyography signal was acquired for 15 min with no treatment (control group). [Results] In the treatment group, the median frequency shifted to a higher level; the root mean square decreased over time, and then maintained a minimum amplitude. However, there were few changes in the electromyography signal after exercise in the control group. [Conclusion] Electromyography signals can provide information about the effective duration for muscle fatigue treatment as well as the muscle characteristics during treatment. This study should be helpful for clinicians by demonstrating the appropriate duration of therapy for relief of muscle stiffness. PMID:27630443

  2. Current application of phytocompound-based nanocosmeceuticals for beauty and skin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Palanivel; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Phytocompounds have been used in cosmeceuticals for decades and have shown potential for beauty applications, including sunscreen, moisturizing and antiaging, and skin-based therapy. The major concerns in the usage of phyto-based cosmeceuticals are lower penetration and high compound instability of various cosmetic products for sustained and enhanced compound delivery to the beauty-based skin therapy. To overcome these disadvantages, nanosized delivery technologies are currently in use for sustained and enhanced delivery of phyto-derived bioactive compounds in cosmeceutical sectors and products. Nanosizing of phytocompounds enhances the aseptic feel in various cosmeceutical products with sustained delivery and enhanced skin protecting activities. Solid lipid nanoparticles, transfersomes, ethosomes, nanostructured lipid carriers, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes are some of the emerging nanotechnologies currently in use for their enhanced delivery of phytocompounds in skin care. Aloe vera, curcumin, resveratrol, quercetin, vitamins C and E, genistein, and green tea catechins were successfully nanosized using various delivery technologies and incorporated in various gels, lotions, and creams for skin, lip, and hair care for their sustained effects. However, certain delivery agents such as carbon nanotubes need to be studied for their roles in toxicity. This review broadly focuses on the usage of phytocompounds in various cosmeceutical products, nanodelivery technologies used in the delivery of phytocompounds to various cosmeceuticals, and various nanosized phytocompounds used in the development of novel nanocosmeceuticals to enhance skin-based therapy.

  3. Determination of effective treatment duration of interferential current therapy using electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jong-In; Lee, Ho Sub; Lee, Sangkwan

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study used electromyography to measure the effective treatment duration of interferential current therapy for muscle fatigue. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy adult men volunteered to participate in the study (age: 24.2 ± 1.3 years; weight: 67.6 ± 4.92 kg; height: 176.4 ± 4.92 cm). All subjects performed 5 min of isometric back extension exercise to produce muscle fatigue, and were then treated with interferential current therapy for 15 min, with electromyography monitoring (treatment group). After sufficient rest, the exercise was repeated for 5 min and an electromyography signal was acquired for 15 min with no treatment (control group). [Results] In the treatment group, the median frequency shifted to a higher level; the root mean square decreased over time, and then maintained a minimum amplitude. However, there were few changes in the electromyography signal after exercise in the control group. [Conclusion] Electromyography signals can provide information about the effective duration for muscle fatigue treatment as well as the muscle characteristics during treatment. This study should be helpful for clinicians by demonstrating the appropriate duration of therapy for relief of muscle stiffness.

  4. Occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings: Evidence from a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2015-12-01

    Increased accountability and growing fiscal limitations in global health care continue to challenge how occupational therapy practices are undertaken. Little is known about how these changes affect current practice in acute hospital settings. This article reviews the relevant literature to further understanding of occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings. A scoping review of five electronic databases was completed using the keywords Occupational therapy, acute hospital settings/acute physical hospital settings, acute care setting/acute care hospital setting, general medicine/general medical wards, occupational therapy service provision/teaching hospitals/tertiary care hospitals. Criteria were applied to determine suitability for inclusion and the articles were analysed to uncover key themes. In total 34 publications were included in the review. Analysis of the publications revealed four themes: (1) Comparisons between the practice of novice and experienced occupational therapists in acute care (2) Occupational therapists and the discharge planning process (3) Role of occupation in the acute care setting and (4) Personal skills needed and organisation factors affecting acute care practice. The current literature has highlighted the challenges occupational therapists face in practicing within an acute setting. Findings from this review enhance understanding of how occupational therapy department managers and educators can best support staff that practise in acute hospital settings. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  5. Cranberry as promising natural source of potential anticancer agents: current evidence and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsargyris, Athanasios; Tampaki, Ekaterini-Christina; Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2012-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that dietary modification can lower the risk for several cancer types' development. Cranberry in particular, has been shown to have anti-oxidative, -inflammatory and -proliferative properties in vitro. To present the latest knowledge regarding the role of cranberry extracts against human cancer several types. A review of the literature documenting both in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects of whole cranberry and/or its extracts is conducted. Current data provide evidence for several anti-cancer properties of either whole cranberry and/or its extracts. The discovery of the specific cranberry components and the appropriate concentrations that exert such beneficial effects along with verification of the preliminary in vitro results in in vivo settings could potentially lead to the invention of novel safer and efficient anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  6. Foot orthoses for pediatric flexible flatfoot: evidence and current practices among Canadian physical therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the evidence for flatfoot intervention in children with gross motor delay of neurological origin, and to understand how physical therapists use foot orthoses (FOs) to treat this population. Thirty-four physical therapists employed in Canadian publicly funded pediatric centers were surveyed to explore current practices and beliefs related to FOs. Responses are discussed in the context of the research literature. Objective physical examination and differentiation between developmental and pathological flatfeet can help clinicians to identify suitable FO candidates, monitor foot posture over time, and evaluate treatment effectiveness. An evidence-informed approach to assessment and intervention has the potential to improve clinical outcomes for clients with pediatric flatfoot.

  7. Whole dairy matrix or single nutrients in assessment of health effects: current evidence and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorning, Tanja Kongerslev; Bertram, Hanne Christine; Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; de Groot, Lisette; Dupont, Didier; Feeney, Emma; Ipsen, Richard; Lecerf, Jean Michel; Mackie, Alan; McKinley, Michelle C; Michalski, Marie-Caroline; Rémond, Didier; Risérus, Ulf; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; Tholstrup, Tine; Weaver, Connie; Astrup, Arne; Givens, Ian

    2017-05-01

    Foods consist of a large number of different nutrients that are contained in a complex structure. The nature of the food structure and the nutrients therein (i.e., the food matrix) will determine the nutrient digestion and absorption, thereby altering the overall nutritional properties of the food. Thus, the food matrix may exhibit a different relation with health indicators compared to single nutrients studied in isolation. The evidence for a dairy matrix effect was presented and discussed by an expert panel at a closed workshop, and the following consensus was reached: 1 ) Current evidence does not support a positive association between intake of dairy products and risk of cardiovascular disease (i.e., stroke and coronary heart disease) and type 2 diabetes. In contrast, fermented dairy products, such as cheese and yogurt, generally show inverse associations. 2 ) Intervention studies have indicated that the metabolic effects of whole dairy may be different than those of single dairy constituents when considering the effects on body weight, cardiometabolic disease risk, and bone health. 3 ) Different dairy products seem to be distinctly linked to health effects and disease risk markers. 4 ) Different dairy structures and common processing methods may enhance interactions between nutrients in the dairy matrix, which may modify the metabolic effects of dairy consumption. 5 ) In conclusion, the nutritional values of dairy products should not be considered equivalent to their nutrient contents but, rather, be considered on the basis of the biofunctionality of the nutrients within dairy food structures. 6 ) Further research on the health effects of whole dairy foods is warranted alongside the more traditional approach of studying the health effects of single nutrients. Future diet assessments and recommendations should carefully consider the evidence of the effects of whole foods alongside the evidence of the effects of individual nutrients. Current knowledge gaps and

  8. Fried Food Consumption and Cardiovascular Health: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka V. Gadiraju

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fried food consumption and its effects on cardiovascular disease are still subjects of debate. The objective of this review was to summarize current evidence on the association between fried food consumption and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and obesity and to recommend directions for future research. We used PubMed, Google Scholar and Medline searches to retrieve pertinent publications. Most available data were based on questionnaires as a tool to capture fried food intakes, and study design was limited to case-control and cohort studies. While few studies have reported a positive association between frequencies of fried food intake and risk of coronary artery disease, heart failure, diabetes or hypertension, other investigators have failed to confirm such an association. There is strong evidence suggesting a higher risk of developing chronic disease when fried foods are consumed more frequently (i.e., four or more times per week. Major gaps in the current literature include a lack of detailed information on the type of oils used for frying foods, stratification of the different types of fried food, frying procedure (deep and pan frying, temperature and duration of frying, how often oils were reused and a lack of consideration of overall dietary patterns. Besides addressing these gaps, future research should also develop tools to better define fried food consumption at home versus away from home and to assess their effects on chronic diseases. In summary, the current review provides enough evidence to suggest adverse health effects with higher frequency of fried food consumption. While awaiting confirmation from future studies, it may be advisable to the public to consume fried foods in moderation while emphasizing an overall healthy diet.

  9. Provision of school-based physical therapy services: a survey of current practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Heather K; Wilmarth, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    To compare current patterns of school system practice with "best practice" recommendations in the literature. Additional variables examined were the effects of perceived barriers to inclusion, years of practice, and rural location. A survey was developed, and a link was e-mailed to members of the APTA's Section on Pediatrics members of the School-Based Special Interest Group, and to personal contacts of the researchers. A total of 226 clinicians responded to more than 50% of survey questions. Respondents reported they practiced inclusively and integrated/inclusive practice patterns were beneficial, yet a high incidence of "private therapy room" use was reported. Wide variability was noted in use of standardized assessments as well as inconsistencies in clinician definition of inclusive/integrated services. Further research is needed to examine aide/teacher training; clinicians' understanding of "inclusion"; as well as practice patterns versus years of experience, rural versus urban/suburban districts; and private therapy room use.

  10. Current Status of Immunomodulatory and Cellular Therapies in Preclinical and Clinical Islet Transplantation

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    Preeti Chhabra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical islet transplantation is a -cell replacement strategy that represents a possible definitive intervention for patients with type 1 diabetes, offering substantial benefits in terms of lowering daily insulin requirements and reducing incidences of debilitating hypoglycemic episodes and unawareness. Despite impressive advances in this field, a limiting supply of islets, inadequate means for preventing islet rejection, and the deleterious diabetogenic and nephrotoxic side effects associated with chronic immunosuppressive therapy preclude its wide-spread applicability. Islet transplantation however allows a window of opportunity for attempting various therapeutic manipulations of islets prior to transplantation aimed at achieving superior transplant outcomes. In this paper, we will focus on the current status of various immunosuppressive and cellular therapies that promote graft function and survival in preclinical and clinical islet transplantation with special emphasis on the tolerance-inducing capacity of regulatory T cells as well as the -cells regenerative capacity of stem cells.

  11. Eletroconvulsoterapia na depressão maior: aspectos atuais Electroconvulsive therapy in major depression: current aspects

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    Paula Barros Antunes

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A eficácia da eletroconvulsoterapia em tratar sintomas depressivos está estabelecida por meio de inúmeros estudos desenvolvidos durante as últimas décadas. A eletroconvulsoterapia é o tratamento biológico mais efetivo para depressão atualmente disponível. O objetivo deste estudo foi demonstrar o papel da eletroconvulsoterapia no tratamento da depressão e destacar aspectos atuais relativos à sua prática. MÉTODO: Foram revisados na literatura estudos de eficácia, remissão de sintomas, fatores preditores de resposta, assim como aspectos atuais acerca da qualidade de vida, percepção dos pacientes, mecanismo de ação, técnica e prejuízo cognitivos. RESULTADOS: Os principais achados desta revisão foram: 1 a eletroconvulsoterapia é mais efetiva do que qualquer medicação antidepressiva; 2 a remissão da depressão com a eletroconvulsoterapia varia, em geral, de 50 a 80%; 3 Ainda é controverso o efeito da eletroconvulsoterapia nos níveis de fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro (acho que aqui pode colocar entre parenteses o "BNDF"; 4 a eletroconvulsoterapia tem efeito positivo na melhora da qualidade de vida; 5 os pacientes submetidos à eletroconvulsoterapia, em geral, têm uma percepção positiva do tratamento. CONCLUSÃO: A eletroconvulsoterapia permanece sendo um tratamento altamente eficaz em pacientes com depressão resistente. Com o avanço da sua técnica, a eletroconvulsoterapia tornou-se um procedimento ainda mais seguro e útil tanto para a fase aguda, quanto para a prevenção de novos episódios depressivos.OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in treating depressive symptoms has been established by means of innumerable studies developed along the last decades. Electroconvulsive therapy is the most effective biological treatment for depression currently available. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the role of electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of depression and

  12. Current evidence of epidermal barrier dysfunction and thymic stromal lymphopoietin in the atopic march

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    Mei Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It has long been observed that the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy are frequently preceded by atopic dermatitis, a phenomenon known as the “atopic march”. Clinical, genetic and experimental studies have supported the fact that atopic dermatitis could be the initial step of the atopic march, leading to the subsequent development of other atopic diseases. This brief review will focus on the current evidence showing that epidermal barrier dysfunction and the keratinocyte-derived cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin play critical roles in the onset of the atopic march.

  13. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

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    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  14. Current Perspectives on Therapy Dog Welfare in Animal-Assisted Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenk, Lisa Maria

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary In animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) animals are used as adjuncts to therapy to positively affect human health. The practice of implementing dogs into therapeutic environments is emerging and as a result, there has been a growing scientific interest on human health outcomes over the past decades. Research efforts into the canine perspective of AAIs have been scarce. Accordingly, there is little consensus on the impact of such interventions on the animals involved. This paper aimed to contribute to the limited body of knowledge by reviewing available studies on therapy dogs’ welfare during AAIs. Moreover, discussion of theoretical and methodological issues, implications for practice and suggestions for future research are provided. Abstract Research into the effects of animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) has primarily addressed human health outcomes. In contrast, only few publications deal with the therapy dog experience of AAIs. This paper provides an overview on potential welfare threats that therapy dogs may encounter and presents the results of a review of available studies on welfare indicators for therapy dogs during AAIs. Previous investigations used physiological and behavioral welfare indicators and dog handler surveys to identify work-related stress. Research outcomes are discussed in the light of strengths and weaknesses of the methods used. Study results suggest that frequency and duration of AAI sessions, novelty of the environment, controllability, age and familiarity of recipients modulate animal welfare indicators. However, this review reveals that currently, clear conclusions on how the well-being of dogs is influenced by the performance in AAIs are lacking due to the heterogeneity of programs, recipient and session characteristics, small dog sample sizes and methodological limitations. This paper further aimed to identify unresolved difficulties in previous research to pave the way for future investigations supporting the

  15. Specific features of current intraperitoneal therapy in patients with ovarian cancer

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    A. G. Kedrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Today there are 3 trends in favor of intraperitoneal (IP chemotherapy: maintenance of its potential 5- and 10-year survival benefit in patients with ovarian cancer (OC; advantages of the IP administration of drugs even after nonoptimal surgery; enhancement of the efficiency of chemotherapy irrespective of the number of IP treatment cycles. There is also an expanded list of possible IP medicines and incorporation of novel targeted drugs into treatment regimens. However, the long-expected data of the most recent randomized trial GOG 0252 have proven deplorable and led to the activation of discussions on the role of IP therapy.Objective: to generalize the experience of 4 oncology departments with IP therapy in patients with disseminated OC and to compare the findings with those obtained by the world’s leading medical centers.Materials and methods. The retrospective analysis included 76 patients with Stage IIIC OC who had received IP chemotherapy in accordance with 3 regimens. For standardization of IP treatment procedures, the investigators assessed the following indicators: age; tumor morphological type; surgical radicality; catheter model and port placement procedure; drug administration route; number of treatment cycles; efficiency of therapy from expert ultrasonographic findings and CA-124, HE4, CA-19.9 marker levels, time to disease progression. The analysis also involved adverse manifestations, methods of their correction and the reasons for early treatment discontinuation were separately reported. The obtained data were processed using standard statistical programs.Results. 55 of the 76 patients could complete more than 4 IP therapy cycles. Among them, only 4 patients were observed to have disease progression at follow-ups lasting over 24 months.Conclusion. Current IP therapy is a safe and convenient drug treatment in patients with OC after optimal cytoreductive surgery. The mastery and standardization of the

  16. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge

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    Ali Habib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF. Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique.

  17. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Ali; Smith, Zachary A.; Lawton, Cort D.; Fessler, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique. PMID:22928099

  18. Cancer rehabilitation with a focus on evidence-based outpatient physical and occupational therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Gilchrist, Laura S

    2011-05-01

    Cancer rehabilitation is an important part of survivorship as a distinct phase of treatment. Although cancer rehabilitation may involve many disciplines, this article specifically covers evidence-based treatment in physical and occupational therapy. Patients may need physical and occupational therapy services for a variety of cancer-related or cancer-treatment-related problems, including pain, fatigue, deconditioning, and difficulty with gait. They may also have problems resuming their previous level of function, which can impact on activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, return to previous home and community activity levels, and return to work. This review discusses the role of physical and occupational therapy in helping cancer patients improve pain and musculoskeletal issues, deconditioning and endurance effects, fatigue, balance and falls, and lymphedema and psychosocial problems.

  19. Melatonin therapy for REM sleep behavior disorder: a critical review of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, Ian R; Leung, Jonathan G; St Louis, Erik K; Boeve, Bradley F

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia associated with dream enactment often involving violent or potentially injurious behaviors during REM sleep that is strongly associated with synucleinopathy neurodegeneration. Clonazepam has long been suggested as the first-line treatment option for RBD. However, evidence supporting melatonin therapy is expanding. Melatonin appears to be beneficial for the management of RBD with reductions in clinical behavioral outcomes and decrease in muscle tonicity during REM sleep. Melatonin also has a favorable safety and tolerability profile over clonazepam with limited potential for drug-drug interactions, an important consideration especially in elderly individuals with RBD receiving polypharmacy. Prospective clinical trials are necessary to establish the evidence basis for melatonin and clonazepam as RBD therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Striding Out With Parkinson Disease: Evidence-Based Physical Therapy for Gait Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Clarissa L.; Schenkman, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is common throughout the world, the evidence for physical therapy interventions that enable long-term improvement in walking is still emerging. This article critiques the major physical therapy approaches related to gait rehabilitation in people with PD: compensatory strategies, motor skill learning, management of secondary sequelae, and education to optimize physical activity and reduce falls. The emphasis of this review is on gait specifically, although balance and falls are of direct importance to gait and are addressed in that context. Although the researchers who have provided the evidence for these approaches grounded their studies on different theoretical paradigms, each approach is argued to have a valid place in the comprehensive management of PD generally and of gait in particular. The optimal mix of interventions for each individual varies according to the stage of disease progression and the patient's preferred form of exercise, capacity for learning, and age. PMID:20022998

  1. Striding out with Parkinson disease: evidence-based physical therapy for gait disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meg E; Martin, Clarissa L; Schenkman, Margaret L

    2010-02-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is common throughout the world, the evidence for physical therapy interventions that enable long-term improvement in walking is still emerging. This article critiques the major physical therapy approaches related to gait rehabilitation in people with PD: compensatory strategies, motor skill learning, management of secondary sequelae, and education to optimize physical activity and reduce falls. The emphasis of this review is on gait specifically, although balance and falls are of direct importance to gait and are addressed in that context. Although the researchers who have provided the evidence for these approaches grounded their studies on different theoretical paradigms, each approach is argued to have a valid place in the comprehensive management of PD generally and of gait in particular. The optimal mix of interventions for each individual varies according to the stage of disease progression and the patient's preferred form of exercise, capacity for learning, and age.

  2. Vitamin E in Sarcopenia: Current Evidences on Its Role in Prevention and Treatment

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    Shy Cian Khor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that is characterized by gradual loss of muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Although the underlying mechanism is still unknown, the contribution of increased oxidative stress in advanced age has been recognized as one of the risk factors of sarcopenia. Thus, eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS can be a strategy to combat sarcopenia. In this review, we discuss the potential role of vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases. Although there are evidences suggesting an association between vitamin E and muscle health, they are still inconclusive compared to other more extensively studied chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies.

  3. Vitamin E in Sarcopenia: Current Evidences on Its Role in Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that is characterized by gradual loss of muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Although the underlying mechanism is still unknown, the contribution of increased oxidative stress in advanced age has been recognized as one of the risk factors of sarcopenia. Thus, eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be a strategy to combat sarcopenia. In this review, we discuss the potential role of vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases. Although there are evidences suggesting an association between vitamin E and muscle health, they are still inconclusive compared to other more extensively studied chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:25097722

  4. Timing of Medically Indicated Delivery in Diabetic Pregnancies: A Perspective on Current Evidence-Based Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteri, Oscar A; Dinis, Jenifer; Roman, Tania; Sibai, Baha M

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes complicates 6 to 7% of all pregnancies in the United States. Poor glycemic control is associated with multiple immediate and long-term adverse effects on both the mother and fetus. Although uniformity exists in the antenatal management of this disease, there is a paucity of evidence-based studies upon which to dictate the optimal time of delivery among affected women. The potential risks of delayed neonatal pulmonary maturation including respiratory distress syndrome and transient tachypnea of the newborn associated with early delivery must be balanced with the increased incidence of fetal demise, overgrowth, and birth injury related to diabetes in late gestations. Even among diabetic women with optimal glycemic control, the risk of stillbirth in the third trimester is considerably higher than their normal counterparts. The current paradigm of delaying delivery to 39 weeks in women with controlled and uncomplicated diabetes has been challenged by recent evidence advocating delivery by 38 weeks to improve perinatal outcomes. However, additional well-designed and adequately powered prospective studies are needed to better understand the short- and long-term implications of the optimal timing of delivery in this high-risk population. This article reviews the most current literature regarding the optimal timing of delivery in pregnancies complicated by diabetes mellitus and gestational diabetes mellitus. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Asthma and obesity in children: current evidence and potential systems biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, U; Latzin, P; Usemann, J; Maccora, J; Zumsteg, U; Kriemler, S

    2015-01-01

    Both obesity and asthma are highly prevalent, complex diseases modified by multiple factors. Genetic, developmental, lung mechanical, immunological and behavioural factors have all been suggested as playing a causal role between the two entities; however, their complex mechanistic interactions are still poorly understood and evidence of causality in children remains scant. Equally lacking is evidence of effective treatment strategies, despite the fact that imbalances at vulnerable phases in childhood can impact long-term health. This review is targeted at both clinicians frequently faced with the dilemma of how to investigate and treat the obese asthmatic child and researchers interested in the topic. Highlighting the breadth of the spectrum of factors involved, this review collates evidence regarding the investigation and treatment of asthma in obese children, particularly in comparison with current approaches in 'difficult-to-treat' childhood asthma. Finally, the authors propose hypotheses for future research from a systems-based perspective. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sugars and health: a review of current evidence and future policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Charlotte Elizabeth Louise

    2017-08-01

    The automation of the process of extracting sugars in the 1900s reduced cost and increased availability of sugars leading to a dramatic rise in consumption, which reached a peak in the 1970s. There are different definitions for sugars not naturally available in foods, and free sugars is the term used by WHO. The epidemiological evidence of the associations between sugars and obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus is fairly strong and consistent, particularly for sugar sweetened drinks in adults. The Department of Health in the UK and many other countries have recently updated their recommendations for free sugars as a result of this scientific evidence. In the UK the recommended amount of free sugars is currently 5 % of energy (reduced from 10 %), which is difficult to meet and very different from current British dietary patterns. Reducing intakes of free sugars is a challenge and will necessitate a range of different actions and policies. Public Health England has put forward eight suggestions but the four most likely to improve dietary behaviour based on available evidence are social marketing, reduction of marketing of high sugar foods and drinks to children, reformulation and reductions in portion size and a sugar excise tax. Any action taken needs to be evaluated to check inequalities are not widened. The new childhood obesity strategy has incorporated some but not all of these strategies and may not go far enough. It is likely that government policies alone will not be sufficient and a change in the food culture is necessary to see real progress.

  7. Identifying an evidence-based model of therapy for the pre-hospital emergency management of supraventricular tachycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    This thesis provides a comprehensive reporting of the work undertaken to identify evidence supporting pre-hospital management of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), delivering an evidence base for paramedic treatment of these patients. The literature search identified absences in evidence supporting therapies used within existing clinical guidelines. The vagal manoeuvres, the simplest and least invasive therapy to employ in the stable patient, were insufficiently evidenced regarding technique...

  8. The Quest for Evidence for Proton Therapy: Model-Based Approach and Precision Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schaaf, Arjen van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marijnen, Corrie A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rasch, Coen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Reducing dose to normal tissues is the advantage of protons versus photons. We aimed to describe a method for translating this reduction into a clinically relevant benefit. Methods and Materials: Dutch scientific and health care governance bodies have recently issued landmark reports regarding generation of relevant evidence for new technologies in health care including proton therapy. An approach based on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models has been adopted to select patients who are most likely to experience fewer (serious) adverse events achievable by state-of-the-art proton treatment. Results: By analogy with biologically targeted therapies, the technology needs to be tested in enriched cohorts of patients exhibiting the decisive predictive marker: difference in normal tissue dosimetric signatures between proton and photon treatment plans. Expected clinical benefit is then estimated by virtue of multifactorial NTCP models. In this sense, high-tech radiation therapy falls under precision medicine. As a consequence, randomizing nonenriched populations between photons and protons is predictably inefficient and likely to produce confusing results. Conclusions: Validating NTCP models in appropriately composed cohorts treated with protons should be the primary research agenda leading to urgently needed evidence for proton therapy.

  9. Current Perspectives on Therapy Dog Welfare in Animal-Assisted Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Maria Glenk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research into the effects of animal-assisted interventions (AAIs has primarily addressed human health outcomes. In contrast, only few publications deal with the therapy dog experience of AAIs. This paper provides an overview on potential welfare threats that therapy dogs may encounter and presents the results of a review of available studies on welfare indicators for therapy dogs during AAIs. Previous investigations used physiological and behavioral welfare indicators and dog handler surveys to identify work-related stress. Research outcomes are discussed in the light of strengths and weaknesses of the methods used. Study results suggest that frequency and duration of AAI sessions, novelty of the environment, controllability, age and familiarity of recipients modulate animal welfare indicators. However, this review reveals that currently, clear conclusions on how the well-being of dogs is influenced by the performance in AAIs are lacking due to the heterogeneity of programs, recipient and session characteristics, small dog sample sizes and methodological limitations. This paper further aimed to identify unresolved difficulties in previous research to pave the way for future investigations supporting the applicability of scientific findings in practice.

  10. Current Perspective of Stem Cell Therapy in Neurodegenerative and Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Chaudhary, Ravi Kumar; Mishra, Sachin; Kumar, Sundramurthy; Vinoth, Kumar Jayaseelan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Gulyás, Balázs

    2017-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases have been an unsolved riddle for quite a while; to date, there are no proper and effective curative treatments and only palliative and symptomatic treatments are available to treat these illnesses. The absence of therapeutic treatments for neurodegenerative ailments has huge economic hit and strain on the society. Pharmacotherapies and various surgical procedures like deep brain stimulation are being given to the patient, but they are only effective for the symptoms and not for the diseases. This paper reviews the recent studies and development of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. Stem cell-based treatment is a promising new way to deal with neurodegenerative diseases. Stem cell transplantation can advance useful recuperation by delivering trophic elements that impel survival and recovery of host neurons in animal models and patients with neurodegenerative maladies. Several mechanisms, for example, substitution of lost cells, cell combination, release of neurotrophic factor, proliferation of endogenous stem cell, and transdifferentiation, may clarify positive remedial results. With the current advancements in the stem cell therapies, a new hope for the cure has come out since they have potential to be a cure for the same. This review compiles stem cell therapy recent conceptions in neurodegenerative and neurometabolic diseases and updates in this field. Graphical Absract ᅟ.

  11. Current Perspectives on Therapy Dog Welfare in Animal-Assisted Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenk, Lisa Maria

    2017-02-01

    Research into the effects of animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) has primarily addressed human health outcomes. In contrast, only few publications deal with the therapy dog experience of AAIs. This paper provides an overview on potential welfare threats that therapy dogs may encounter and presents the results of a review of available studies on welfare indicators for therapy dogs during AAIs. Previous investigations used physiological and behavioral welfare indicators and dog handler surveys to identify work-related stress. Research outcomes are discussed in the light of strengths and weaknesses of the methods used. Study results suggest that frequency and duration of AAI sessions, novelty of the environment, controllability, age and familiarity of recipients modulate animal welfare indicators. However, this review reveals that currently, clear conclusions on how the well-being of dogs is influenced by the performance in AAIs are lacking due to the heterogeneity of programs, recipient and session characteristics, small dog sample sizes and methodological limitations. This paper further aimed to identify unresolved difficulties in previous research to pave the way for future investigations supporting the applicability of scientific findings in practice.

  12. Superheroes in autoimmune warfare: biologic therapies in current South African practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, G; Hodkinson, B; Reuter, H

    2014-11-01

    Biologic drugs targeting immune cells or cytokines underlying systemic inflammation have dramatically improved outcomes in patients with rheumatological and autoimmune diseases. Nine biologic drugs are currently available in South Africa (SA)--all showing good efficacy and safety profiles. Their high cost and potential adverse events preclude them from being used as first-line agents. They are therefore indicated for severe disease refractory to standard therapies, and their use must be initiated by a specialist. The most important adverse effect of this class of drugs is infection and, in SA, tuberculosis is of particular concern. As new targets in the immune system are identified, new biologics will be developed. The current challenges are to optimise standard care for all patients with autoimmune diseases, and to offer the appropriate biologic to patients with refractory disease.

  13. Selection of patients for heart transplantation in the current era of heart failure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Javed; Khadim, Ghazanfar; Paul, Kimberly M; Davis, Stacy F; Kronenberg, Marvin W; Chomsky, Don B; Pierson, Richard N; Wilson, John R

    2004-03-03

    We sought to assess the relationship between survival, peak exercise oxygen consumption (VO(2)), and heart failure survival score (HFSS) in the current era of heart failure (HF) therapy. Based on predicted survival, HF patients with peak VO(2) 14 ml/min/kg (p = 0.04). Of the patients with peak VO(2) of 10 to 14 ml/min/kg, 55% had low-risk HFSS and exhibited 88% one-year event-free survival. One-year survival after transplantation was 88%, which is similar to the 85% rate reported by the United Network for Organ Sharing for 1999 to 2000. Survival for HF patients in the current era has improved significantly, necessitating re-evaluation of the listing criteria for heart transplantation.

  14. Factors affecting the complexity of dental implant restoration - what is the current evidence and guidance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S P; Hayden, J; Lynd, J A; Walker-Finch, K; Willett, J; Ucer, C; Speechley, S D

    2016-11-18

    Objectives The aim of this paper is to identify the factors that affect the complexity of implant restoration and to explore the indices that help us to assess it. With this knowledge the growing number of clinicians restoring dental implants will have a better understanding of the available guidance and evidence base, and the differing levels of competence required.Study design A literature review was conducted. The selection of publications reporting on complexity was based on predetermined criteria and was agreed upon by the authors. After title and abstract screening 17 articles were reviewed. The articles that were utilised to form the ITI SAC tool and Cologne Risk Assessment we also included.Assessing complexity Two key guides are available: International Team for Implantology's Straight-forward Advanced Complex tool and the Cologne ABC risk score. While these guides help identify treatment complexity they do not provide a strong enough evidence base from which to solely base clinical decisions. The key patient factors are expectation, communication, the oral environment, aesthetic outcome, occlusion, soft tissue profile and the intra-arch distance, whereas the key technical factors are impression taking, type of retention, loading protocol and the need for provisional restorations. Human factors also have a significant effect on complexity, specifically, the experience and training of the clinician, team communication and the work environment.Conclusions There are many interconnecting factors that affect the complexity of dental implant restoration. Furthermore the two widely used indices for the assessment of complexity have been investigated, and although these offer a good guideline as to the level of complexity, there is a lack evidence to support their use. The development of evidence-based treatment and protocols is necessary to develop the current indices further, and these need to be expanded to include other critical areas, such as human factors. A

  15. How well are GIC product labels related to current systematic review evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickenautsch, Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Systematic reviews have been recommended as providing the best source of evidence to guide clinical decisions in dentistry. They appraise evidence from trials focused on investigating clinical effects of dental material categories, such as conventional glass-ionomer cements (GIC) or resin-modified GIC. In contrast, the general dental practitioner is introduced to these categories of materials in the form of branded or private product labels that are marketed during dental conventions or through advertisements. Difficulties may arise in recognizing material categories that have been subjected to systematic reviews, because of the multitude of product labels on the current market. Thus, the value and relevance of published systematic review evidence concerning the material categories represented by these labels may remain obscure. Based on a systematic literature search, this article identifies glass-ionomer cement product labels used during clinical trials which, in turn, were subsequently reviewed in systematic review articles (published between 15 April 2009 and 14 April 2011). This article further clarifies how these product labels relate to the systematic review conclusions. The results show that the conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements that were used in most trials were marketed by GC and 3M ESPE, respectively. The conventional GICs used in most of the reviewed trials were Fuji III and Fuji IX, while Vitremer was the most commonly used resin-modified GIC. Evidence from the reviewed trials suggests that GIC provides beneficial effects for preventive and restorative dentistry. However, more trials of higher internal validity are needed in order to confirm (or disprove) these findings. Only GIC products of branded labels and none of private labels were identified, suggesting that private label GIC products have little or no research back-up. Dental products, such as glass-ionomers cements (GIC), can only be judged as effective when they are based

  16. Combined therapy (ultrasound and interferential current) in patients with fibromyalgia: once or twice in a week?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Felipe Azevedo; Marcondes, Freddy Beretta; Provenza, José Roberto; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo Antunes; Roizenblatt, Suely

    2012-09-01

    Combined Therapy (CT) composed of ultrasound and Interferential Therapy has been reported as a cost-effective, local analgesic intervention on tender points in Fibromyalgia (FM). This study aims to investigate the difference between CT applied once a week and twice a week in patients with FM. Fifty patients with the diagnosis of FM were randomized into two groups (G1 = once a week treatment and G2 = twice a week treatment) with each group containing 25 patients. All eighteen tender points were assessed and treated with CT during each session, over a three-month time period. Interferential Therapy was modulated at 4,000 Hz of current carrier, 100 Hz of amplitude modulated frequency and at a bearable sensorial threshold of intensity. Pulsed ultrasound of 1 MHz at 20% of 2.5 W/cm² was used. For evaluation, the Visual Analogue Scale, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Post Sleep Inventory and the tender point count were utilized, and the examiner was blinded to the group assignments. G1 and G2 showed a significant improvement in Visual Analogue Scale (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0005, respectively), Tender Points (p < 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and Post Sleep Inventory (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in all performed analyses. There is no advantage in increasing the number of sessions of combined therapy in terms of reducing generalized pain, quality of life and sleep quality for patients with FM. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Profile of everolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capal JK

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jamie K Capal, David Neal Franz Department of Neurology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a relatively rare genetic disorder, affecting one in 6,000 births. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, such as everolimus, which have been previously used to prevent solid organ transplant rejection, augment anticancer treatment regimens, and prevent neovascularization of artificial cardiac stents, are now approved for treating TSC-related manifestations, such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas. The use of everolimus in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytomas is supported by long-term Phase II and III clinical trials. Seizures are a common feature in TSC, occurring in up to 96% of patients. While mTOR inhibitors currently do not have regulatory approval in treating this manifestation, small clinical studies have demonstrated beneficial outcomes with everolimus. Further evidence from a forthcoming Phase III clinical study may provide additional support for the use of everolimus for this indication. Also, there are no approved treatments for TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders, which include intellectual disability, behavioral difficulties, and autism spectrum disorder, but preclinical data and small studies have suggested that some neuropsychiatric symptoms may be improved through mTOR inhibition therapy. More evidence is needed, particularly regarding safety in young infants. This review focuses on the current evidence supporting the use of everolimus in neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations of TSC, and the place of everolimus in therapy. Keywords: everolimus, tuberous sclerosis complex, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, seizures, TAND

  18. The cytokines and micro-environment of fracture haematoma: Current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Gavin; Pountos, Ippokratis; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2018-03-01

    Fracture haematoma formation is the first and foremost important stage of fracture healing. It orchestrates the inflammatory and cellular processes leading to the formation of callus and the restoration of the continuity of the bone. Evidence suggests that blocking this initial stage could lead to an impairment of the overall bone healing process. This review aims to analyse the existing evidence of molecular contributions to bone healing within fracture haematoma and to determine the potential to modify the molecular response to fracture in the haematoma with the aim of improving union times. A comprehensive search of literature documenting fracture haematoma cytokine content was performed. Suitable papers according to prespecified criteria were identified and analysed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. A total of 89 manuscripts formed the basis of this analysis. Low oxygen tension, high acidity, and high calcium characterised initially the fracture haematoma micro-environment. In addition, a number of cytokines have been measured with concentrations significantly higher than those found in peripheral circulation. Growth factors have also been isolated, with an observed increase in bone morphogenetic proteins, platelet-derived growth factor, and transforming growth factor. Although molecular modification of fracture haematoma has been attempted, more research is required to determine a suitable biological response modifier leading to therapeutic effects. The cytokine content of fracture haematoma gives insight into processes occurring in the initial stages of fracture healing. Manipulation of signalling molecules represents a promising pathway to target future therapies aiming to upregulate the osteogenesis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Clinical research evidence of cupping therapy in China: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Han, Mei; Li, Xun; Dong, Shangjuan; Shang, Yongmei; Wang, Qian; Xu, Shu; Liu, Jianping

    2010-11-16

    Though cupping therapy has been used in China for thousands of years, there has been no systematic summary of clinical research on it.This review is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of cupping therapy using evidence-based approach based on all available clinical studies. We included all clinical studies on cupping therapy for all kinds of diseases. We searched six electronic databases, all searches ended in December 2008. We extracted data on the type of cupping and type of diseases treated. 550 clinical studies were identified published between 1959 and 2008, including 73 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 22 clinical controlled trials, 373 case series, and 82 case reports. Number of RCTs obviously increased during past decades, but the quality of the RCTs was generally poor according to the risk of bias of the Cochrane standard for important outcome within each trials. The diseases in which cupping was commonly employed included pain conditions, herpes zoster, cough or asthma, etc. Wet cupping was used in majority studies, followed by retained cupping, moving cupping, medicinal cupping, etc. 38 studies used combination of two types of cupping therapies. No serious adverse effects were reported in the studies. According to the above results, quality and quantity of RCTs on cupping therapy appears to be improved during the past 50 years in China, and majority of studies show potential benefit on pain conditions, herpes zoster and other diseases. However, further rigorous designed trials in relevant conditions are warranted to support their use in practice.

  20. Therapy development in Huntington disease: From current strategies to emerging opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Audrey S; La Spada, Albert R

    2018-04-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder in which patients typically present with uncontrolled involuntary movements and subsequent cognitive decline. In 1993, a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the coding region of the huntingtin (HTT) gene was identified as the cause of this disorder. This extended CAG repeat results in production of HTT protein with an expanded polyglutamine tract, leading to pathogenic HTT protein conformers that are resistant to protein turnover, culminating in cellular toxicity and neurodegeneration. Research into the mechanistic basis of HD has highlighted a role for bioenergetics abnormalities stemming from mitochondrial dysfunction, and for synaptic defects, including impaired neurotransmission and excitotoxicity. Interference with transcription regulation may underlie the mitochondrial dysfunction. Current therapies for HD are directed at treating symptoms, as there are no disease-modifying therapies. Commonly prescribed drugs for involuntary movement control include tetrabenazine, a potent and selective inhibitor of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 that depletes synaptic monoamines, and olanzapine, an atypical neuroleptic that blocks the dopamine D2 receptor. Various drugs are used to treat non-motor features. The HD therapeutic pipeline is robust, as numerous efforts are underway to identify disease-modifying treatments, with some small compounds and biological agents moving into clinical trials. Especially encouraging are dosage reduction strategies, including antisense oligonucleotides, and molecules directed at transcription dysregulation. Given the depth and breadth of current HD drug development efforts, there is reason to believe that disease-modifying therapies for HD will emerge, and this achievement will have profound implications for the entire neurotherapeutics field. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Current application of phytocompound-based nanocosmeceuticals for beauty and skin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesan P

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Palanivel Ganesan,1,2 Dong-Kug Choi1,2 1Department of Applied Life Science, Nanotechnology Research Center, 2Department of Biotechnology, College of Biomedical and Health Science, Konkuk University, Chungju, Republic of Korea Abstract: Phytocompounds have been used in cosmeceuticals for decades and have shown potential for beauty applications, including sunscreen, moisturizing and antiaging, and skin-based therapy. The major concerns in the usage of phyto-based cosmeceuticals are lower penetration and high compound instability of various cosmetic products for sustained and enhanced compound delivery to the beauty-based skin therapy. To overcome these disadvantages, nanosized delivery technologies are currently in use for sustained and enhanced delivery of phyto-derived bioactive compounds in cosmeceutical sectors and products. Nanosizing of phytocompounds enhances the aseptic feel in various cosmeceutical products with sustained delivery and enhanced skin protecting activities. Solid lipid nanoparticles, transfersomes, ethosomes, nanostructured lipid carriers, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes are some of the emerging nanotechnologies currently in use for their enhanced delivery of phytocompounds in skin care. Aloe vera, curcumin, resveratrol, quercetin, vitamins C and E, genistein, and green tea catechins were successfully nanosized using various delivery technologies and incorporated in various gels, lotions, and creams for skin, lip, and hair care for their sustained effects. However, certain delivery agents such as carbon nanotubes need to be studied for their roles in toxicity. This review broadly focuses on the usage of phytocompounds in various cosmeceutical products, nanodelivery technologies used in the delivery of phytocompounds to various cosmeceuticals, and various nanosized phytocompounds used in the development of novel nanocosmeceuticals to enhance skin-based therapy. Keywords: nanodelivery technologies, skincare

  2. Treatment of gastric outlet obstruction that results from unresectable gastric cancer: Current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Takiguchi, Shuji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Makino, Tomoki; Yamasaki, Makoto; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a common condition that results from locally advanced malignancies in the upper gastrointestinal tract, such as pancreatic, gastric, and other carcinomas. Two types of procedures for malignant GOO, namely, gastrojejunostomy (GJ) with laparotomy or a laparoscopic approach and endoscopic stenting (ES), are currently available. Although numerous previous reports have clarified the benefits and drawbacks of each procedure, whether GJ or ES should be used in patients with GOO that results from gastric cancer who may have a longer life expectancy than patients with other malignancies has not been determined. In this review, which focuses on gastric cancer-induced GOO, we analyzed the two systematic reviews and a meta-analysis that compared GJ and ES and outlined the current status of GOO treatment. We also provide an updated review that includes laparoscopic GJ. Various data from 13 studies in one review and 6 studies in another review were analyzed. Although the main results of the present review indicated that both GJ and ES were efficacious treatments in patients with GOO that resulted from gastric cancer, current evidence suggests that GJ may be the preferable procedure given its good performance status and improved prognosis in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26862366

  3. Strategies to promote evidence-based practice in pediatric physical therapy: a formative evaluation pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Joe; Stern, Perri; Marchetti, Gregory; Provident, Ingrid

    2009-09-01

    The physical therapy profession has been perceived as one that bases its practice largely on anecdotal evidence and that uses treatment techniques for which there is little scientific support. Physical therapists have been urged to increase evidence-based practice behaviors as a means to address this perception and to enhance the translation of knowledge from research evidence into clinical practice. However, little attention has been paid to the best ways in which to support clinicians' efforts toward improving evidence-based practice. The purpose of this study was to identify, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of strategies aimed at enhancing the ability of 5 pediatric physical therapists to integrate scientific research evidence into clinical decision making. This study was a formative evaluation pilot project. The participants in this study collaborated with the first author to identify and implement strategies and outcomes aimed at enhancing their ability to use research evidence during clinical decision making. Outcome data were analyzed with qualitative methods. The participants were able to implement several, but not all, of the strategies and made modest self-reported improvements in evidence-based practice behaviors, such as reading journal articles and completing database searches. They identified several barriers, including a lack of time, other influences on clinical decision making, and a lack of incentives for evidence-based practice activities. The pediatric physical therapists who took part in this project had positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice and made modest improvements in this area. It is critical for the profession to continue to investigate optimal strategies to aid practicing clinicians in applying research evidence to clinical decision making.

  4. The Use of Music Therapy During the Treatment of Cancer Patients: A Collection of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Constance; Linden, Ulrike; Boehm, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Background: Music therapy is one of the oldest forms of creative art therapy and has been shown to have effects in different clinical and therapeutic settings, such as schizophrenia, pain, cardiovascular parameters, and dementia. This article provides an overview of some of the recent findings in this field and also reports two single case vignettes that offer insight into day-to-day applications of clinical music therapy. Material and Methods: For the collection of clinical studies of music therapy in oncology, the databases AMED, CAIRSS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and PSYNDEX were searched with the terms “Study OR Trial” AND “Music Therapy” AND “Cancer OR Oncolog$.” Studies were analyzed with respect to their design, setting and interventions, indications, patients, and outcomes. In addition, two case vignettes present the application of music therapy for a child with leukemia and an adult patient with breast cancer. Results: We found a total of 12 clinical studies conducted between 2001 and 2011 comprised of a total of 922 patients. Eight studies had a randomized controlled design, and four studies were conducted in the field of pediatric oncology. Studies reported heterogeneous results on short-term improvements in patients' mood and relaxation and reduced exhaustion and anxiety as well as in coping with the disease and cancer-related pain. Case descriptions showed similar effects in expressing emotions, opening up new goals, and turning the mind toward a healthy process and away form a disease-centered focus. Conclusion: The use of music therapy in the integrative treatment of cancer patients is a therapeutic option whose salutogenetic potential is shown in many case studies such as those presented here. Study results, however, did not draw a conclusive picture of the overall effect of music therapy. In addition to further clinical trials, the evidence mosaic should be complemented with qualitative studies, single case descriptions, and basic

  5. [Evaluation of low level laser and interferential current in the therapy of complex regional pain syndrome by infrared thermographic camera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocić, Mirjana; Lazović, Milica; Dimitrijević, Irena; Mancić, Dragan; Stanković, Anita

    2010-09-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM; Complex regional pain syndrom type I (CRPS I) is characterised by continuous regional pain, disproportional according to duration and intensity and to the sort of trauma or other lesion it was caused by. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare, by using thermovison, the effects of low level laser therapy and therapy with interferential current in treatment of CRPS I. The prospective randomized controlled clinical study included 45 patients with unilateral CRPS 1, after a fracture of the distal end of the radius, of the tibia and/or the fibula, treated in the Clinical Centre in Nis from 2004 to 2007. The group A consisted of 20 patients treated by low level laser therapy and kinesy-therapy, while the patients in the group B (n = 25) were treated by interferential current and kinesy-therapy. The regions of interest were filmed by a thermovision camera on both sides, before and after the 20 therapeutic procedures had been applied. Afterwards, the quantitative analysis and the comparing of thermograms taken before and after the applied therapy were performed. There was statistically significant decrease of the mean maximum temperature difference between the injured and the contralateral extremity after the therapy in comparison to the status before the therapy, with the patients of the group A (p interferential current therapy.

  6. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a critical review of current evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Santolaria, Santos; Montoro, Miguel; Esteve, María; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is an emerging disorder characterized by intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in non-celiac patients. Its prevalence has been estimated to be six to ten-times higher than that of celiac disease (CD). A gluten-free diet is the most widely recommended therapy, but the causative agent remains unknown and there are no consensus diagnostic criteria. Recent studies on NCGS have included patients with possibly overlooked minor CD and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome without self-reported gluten intolerance, but showing a response to a gluten-free diet. Furthermore, FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) have recently been postulated as the culprit component for NCGS in wheat, instead of gluten. This review updates evidence on the pathophysiology of NCGS and the efficacy of different dietary interventions in its treatment, stressing the need for proper screening for CD before a diagnosis of NCGS is made. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  7. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalyga, V., E-mail: skalyga.vadim@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Sidorov, A. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Maslennikova, A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy, 10/1 Minina Sq., 603005 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Volovecky, A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, PO Box 35 (YFL), 40500 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2014-12-21

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D–D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm{sup 2} is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  8. Delivering patient decision aids on the Internet: definitions, theories, current evidence, and emerging research areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2005, the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration identified twelve quality dimensions to guide assessment of patient decision aids. One dimension—the delivery of patient decision aids on the Internet—is relevant when the Internet is used to provide some or all components of a patient decision aid. Building on the original background chapter, this paper provides an updated definition for this dimension, outlines a theoretical rationale, describes current evidence, and discusses emerging research areas. Methods An international, multidisciplinary panel of authors examined the relevant theoretical literature and empirical evidence through 2012. Results The updated definition distinguishes Internet-delivery of patient decision aids from online health information and clinical practice guidelines. Theories in cognitive psychology, decision psychology, communication, and education support the value of Internet features for providing interactive information and deliberative support. Dissemination and implementation theories support Internet-delivery for providing the right information (rapidly updated), to the right person (tailored), at the right time (the appropriate point in the decision making process). Additional efforts are needed to integrate the theoretical rationale and empirical evidence from health technology perspectives, such as consumer health informatics, user experience design, and human-computer interaction. Despite Internet usage ranging from 74% to 85% in developed countries and 80% of users searching for health information, it is unknown how many individuals specifically seek patient decision aids on the Internet. Among the 86 randomized controlled trials in the 2011 Cochrane Collaboration’s review of patient decision aids, only four studies focused on Internet-delivery. Given the limited number of published studies, this paper particularly focused on identifying gaps in the empirical evidence base and

  9. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for patients with irritable bowel syndrome: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinsinger SW

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sarah W Kinsinger Behavioral Medicine for Digestive Health, Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a chronic gastrointestinal (GI condition associated with significant health care utilization and quality-of-life impairment. Latest research indicates that the brain–gut axis plays a key role in the disorder, and the presence of psychological factors and central processing deficits contribute to symptom severity and disability. Psychological therapies as a whole have demonstrated good efficacy in reducing the severity of IBS symptoms. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT has been tested most rigorously in multiple randomized controlled trials and consistently demonstrates significant and durable effects on IBS symptoms and quality of life. Various protocols for treating IBS have been developed, and most recent advances in the field include exposure-based treatments to target symptom-specific anxiety as well as modified delivery methods, including internet-based treatment models. Despite the well-documented advantages of CBT for IBS, it has been poorly disseminated and few patients have access to this treatment. The primary barrier to dissemination is the limited number of therapists with adequate training in GI psychology to provide this evidence-based intervention. Future developments in the field need to focus on training opportunities to equip more therapists to competently provide CBT for this population. Further efforts to develop telemedicine platforms for delivering this intervention will also improve accessibility for patients. Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, functional gastrointestinal disorders, cognitive-behavioral therapy

  10. Critical review of current clinical practice guidelines for antifungal therapy in paediatric haematology and oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica E; Hassan, Hadeel; Cockle, Julia V; Lethaby, Christopher; James, Beki; Phillips, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD) is rising, but its treatment in paediatric haematology and oncology patients is not yet standardised. This review aimed to critically appraise and analyse the clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) that are available for paediatric IFD. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, MEDLINE in-Process & Other non-Indexed Citations, the Guidelines International Network (GIN), guideline.gov and Google were performed and combined fungal disease (Fung* OR antifung*OR Candida* OR Aspergill*) with prophylaxis or treatment (prophyl* OR therap* OR treatment). All guidelines were assessed using the AGREE II tool and recommendations relating to prophylaxis, empirical treatment and specific therapy were extracted. Nineteen guidelines met the inclusion criteria. The AGREE II scores for the rigour of development domain ranged from 11 to 92 % with a median of 53 % (interquartile range 32-69 %). Fluconazole was recommended as antifungal prophylaxis in all nine of the included guidelines which recommended a specific drug. Liposomal amphotericin B was recommended in all five guidelines giving empirical therapy recommendations. Specific therapy recommendations were given for oral or genital candidiasis, invasive candida infection, invasive aspergillosis and other mould infections. In many areas, recommendations were clear about appropriate practice but further clarity was required, particularly relating to the decision to discontinue empirical antifungal treatment, the relative benefits of empiric and pre-emptive strategies and risk stratification. Future CPGs could consider working to published guideline production methodologies and sharing summaries of evidence appraisal to reduce duplication of effort, improving the quality and efficiency of CPGs in this area.

  11. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for the treatment of cellulite--A current metaanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Karsten; Kraemer, Robert

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this metaanalysis was to investigate the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in cellulite. Electronic databases (such as Ovid MEDLINE, Scopus and Ovid) as well as reference lists of the available studies were evaluated in June 2015 by two expert examiners. Assessment of each study's methodological quality was performed with the help of the published quality index tool by Downs and Black. This metanalysis included a total of eleven clinical trials on the effects of ESWT on cellulite with a total of 297 included females. Among the eleven clinical trials five randomized controlled trials on ESWT in cellulite with a total number of 123 females have been published so far. Both, focused as well as radial ESWT devices have been found effective in treating cellulite so far. Typically, one or two sessions per week and six to eight sessions overall were studied in the published clinical trials. Overall, outcome parameters mainly focused on digital standardized photographs, circumference measurements and specific ultrasound examinations. Reporting quality showed substantial heterogenity from 22 to 82 points with a mean of 57 points. This metanalysis identified eleven published clinical studies on ESWT in cellulite with five randomized-controlled trials among them. There is growing evidence that both, radial as well as focused ESWT and the combination of both are able to improve the degree of cellulite. Typically, six to eight treatments once or twice a week have been studied. Long-term follow-up data beyond one year are lacking as well as details on potential combination therapies in cellulite such as with low level laser therapy (LLLT), cryolipolysis and others. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT: Current Perspectives and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee P. Reiss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT has gained considerable popularity as a treatment technique for upper extremity rehabilitation among patients with mild-to-moderate stroke. While substantial evidence has emerged to support its applicability, issues remain unanswered regarding the best and most practical approach. Following the establishment of what can be called the “signature” CIMT approach characterized by intense clinic/laboratory-based practice, several distributed forms of training, collectively known as modified constraint therapy (mCIMT, have emerged. There is a need to examine the strengths and limitations of such approaches, and based upon such information, develop the components of a study that would compare the signature approach to the best elements of mCIMT, referred to here as “alternative” CIMT. Based upon a PEDro review of literature, limitations in mCIMT studies for meeting criteria were identified and discussed. A suggestion for a “first effort” at a comparative study that would both address such limitations while taking practical considerations into account is provided.

  13. Oral Antibacterial Therapy for Acne Vulgaris: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienenfeld, Amanda; Nagler, Arielle R; Orlow, Seth J

    2017-08-01

    To some degree, acne vulgaris affects nearly every individual worldwide. Oral antibiotic therapy is routinely prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe inflammatory acne; however, long-term use of oral antibiotics for acne may have unintended consequences. The aim of this study was to provide a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence on the efficacy and appropriate use of oral antibiotics in the treatment of acne. A systematic search of MEDLINE was conducted to identify randomized controlled clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses evaluating the efficacy of oral antibiotics for acne. Overall, 41 articles that examined oral antibiotics compared with placebo, another oral therapy, topical therapy, alternate dose, or duration were included in this study. Tetracyclines, macrolides, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole are effective and safe in the treatment of moderate to severe inflammatory acne. Superior efficacy of one type or class of antibiotic could not be determined, therefore the choice of antibiotic is generally based on the side-effect profile. Although different dosing regimens have been studied, there is a lack of standardized comparator trials to determine optimal dosing and duration of each oral antibiotic used in acne. The combination of oral antibiotics with a topical therapy is superior to oral antibiotics alone. This article provides a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence of the efficacy of oral antibiotics for acne. Due to heterogeneity in the design of the trials, there is insufficient evidence to support one type, dose, or duration of oral antibiotic over another in terms of efficacy; however, due to increasing resistance to antibiotics, dermatologists should heed consensus guidelines for their appropriate use.

  14. An evidence-based clinical guideline for the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Christopher M; Watters, William C; Heggeness, Michael H; Resnick, Daniel K; Shaffer, William O; Baisden, Jamie; Ben-Galim, Peleg; Easa, John E; Fernand, Robert; Lamer, Tim; Matz, Paul G; Mendel, Richard C; Patel, Rajeev K; Reitman, Charles A; Toton, John F

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the North American Spine Society (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline on antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery was to provide evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions surrounding the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery. The guideline is intended to address these questions based on the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of February 2008. The goal of the guideline recommendations was to assist in delivering optimum, efficacious treatment with the goal of preventing thromboembolic events. To provide an evidence-based, educational tool to assist spine surgeons in minimizing the risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This report is from the Antithrombotic Therapies Work Group of the NASS Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group was composed of multidisciplinary spine care specialists, all of whom were trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. Each member of the group was involved in formatting a series of clinical questions to be addressed by the group. The final questions agreed on by the group are the subject of this report. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English language references found in MEDLINE, EMBASE (Drugs and Pharmacology), and four additional, evidence-based databases. The relevant literature was then independently rated by at least three reviewers using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final grades of recommendation for the answers to each clinical question were arrived at via Web casts among members of the work group using standardized grades of recommendation. When Level I to IV evidence was insufficient to support a recommendation to answer a specific clinical question, expert consensus was arrived at by

  15. Review of Virtual Reality Treatment in Psychiatry: Evidence Versus Current Diffusion and Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkind, Matthew C; Norr, Aaron M; Katz, Andrea C; Reger, Greg M

    2017-09-18

    This review provides an overview of the current evidence base for and clinical applications of the use of virtual reality (VR) in psychiatric practice, in context of recent technological developments. The use of VR in psychiatric practice shows promise with much of the research demonstrating clinical effectiveness for conditions including post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and phobias, chronic pain, rehabilitation, and addictions. However, more research is needed before the use of VR is considered a clinical standard of practice in some areas. The recent release of first generation consumer VR products signals a change in the viability of further developing VR systems and applications. As applications increase so will the need for good quality research to best understand what makes VR effective, and when VR is not appropriate for clinical services. As the field progresses, it is hopeful that the flexibility afforded by this technology will yield superior outcomes and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms impacting those outcomes.

  16. Cognitive rehabilitation after severe acquired brain injury: current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Rosaria; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido

    2016-07-25

    Severe acquired brain injury (SABI) is damage to the brain, occurring after birth from traumatic or non-traumatic causes, and often resulting in deterioration of physical, cognitive, and emotional functions. Cognitive rehabilitation (CR) is aimed to help brain-injured or otherwise cognitively impaired individuals to restore normal functioning, or to compensate for cognitive deficits. Over the last years, the development of new technologies in the field of CR has led to a growing use of computer-based cognitive tools in patients with SABI. This review aims to investigate the efficacy of CR in individuals suffering from SABI, and evaluates the role of virtual reality and other innovative technologies in improving behavioural and functional outcomes. The current evidence for CR in the treatment of SABI-related deficits does not allow conclusive results to be achieved and further research is needed to identity the patient and treatment factors that contribute to successful outcomes.

  17. Operationalising ethical challenges in dementia research-a systematic review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Emily; Stuckelberger, Astrid; Pautex, Sophie; Staaks, Janneke; Gysels, Marjolein

    2017-07-01

    the worldwide number of dementia cases is increasing, and this is a trend that is expected to continue as a growing proportion of the population ages. However, conducting research with persons suffering from dementia can be fraught due to fears surrounding research risks in vulnerable populations. This can make seeking approval for studies difficult. As research directly involving persons with dementia is key for the development of evidence-based best practice, the development of a coherent ethical strategy to perform such research feasibly and effectively is of paramount importance. this paper aims to review and synthesise ethical challenges in performing research with persons who have dementia. in undertaking a systematic review of the current research literature, we will identify the central issues and arguments characterising research that concerns the ethical dimensions of research participation in the dementia population. Data were analysed using both inductive and deductive content analysis. Ethical considerations in research involving persons with dementia primarily concern the representation of the interests of the person with dementia and protection of their vulnerabilities and rights. a total of 2,894 results were returned from initial searches, following deduplication. In total, 2,458 were excluded at title review, and following abstract review 158 papers remained; 29 papers were included for analysis after full paper review and data extraction. Papers ranged between 1995 and 2013. this review has highlighted a lack of consensus in current research and guidelines addressing these concerns; a clear stance on ethical governance of studies is important for future research and best evidence-based practice in dementia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Perioperative Skin Preparation and Draping in Modern Total Joint Arthroplasty: Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markatos, Konstantinos; Kaseta, Maria; Nikolaou, Vasileios S

    2015-06-01

    Besides the vast success and reliability of lower extremity joint replacement, deep and periprosthetic infection remains a serious complication of such operations. Many publications addressing periprosthetic infection have remarked about this "devastating" complication, with a risk around 1% after total hip arthroplasty and between 1% and 2% after total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study is to assess current trends in prevention of contamination with improved up-to-date pre-operative skin preparation methods and intra-operative draping. A literature review was conducted in MEDLINE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane database, looking for high-quality papers summarizing the most widely held and up-to-date concepts of perioperative measures for reducing infection, focusing on the best available evidence concerning skin preparation for joint arthroplasty (THR and THR) and surgical draping. Current evidence suggests the use of alcohol solutions for pre-operative painting with emphasis on the use of chlorhexidine gluconate solutions beginning the night before surgery. Hair removal should be performed in the operating room with electric clippers, not razor blades. In order to enhance drape adhesion to the skin, the use of iodophor-in-alcohol solutions is recommended over the traditional scrub-and-paint technique. Disposable non-woven drapes are superior to reusable woven cotton/linen drapes in resisting bacterial penetration. Finally, the use of adherent plastic adhesive incision drapes for the prophylaxis of post-operative surgical site infections is considered not necessary in orthopedic surgery. The importance of skin preparation and adequate and reliable draping cannot be overemphasized for infection prevention, especially in clean operations such as THR and TKR. Thorough and strict protocols are mandatory for every department, as well as education curricula for operating room personnel. Further randomized studies are mandatory to specify the effect of the

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Modern Parenteral Nutrition: A Review of the Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Klek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous lipid emulsions are an essential component of parenteral nutrition regimens. Originally employed as an efficient non-glucose energy source to reduce the adverse effects of high glucose intake and provide essential fatty acids, lipid emulsions have assumed a larger therapeutic role due to research demonstrating the effects of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA on key metabolic functions, including inflammatory and immune response, coagulation, and cell signaling. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that the effects of omega-3 PUFA on inflammation and immune response result in meaningful therapeutic benefits in surgical, cancer, and critically ill patients as well as patients requiring long-term parenteral nutrition. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms of action through which omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA modulate the immune-inflammatory response and summarizes the current body of evidence regarding the clinical and pharmacoeconomic benefits of intravenous n-3 fatty acid-containing lipid emulsions in patients requiring parenteral nutrition.

  20. Role of Environmental Chemicals in Obesity: A Systematic Review on the Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Kelishadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the experimental and human studies on obesogenic chemicals and their mechanisms of action to provide a comprehensive view on the multifactorial aspects of obesity. The literatures were searched in available databases. The relevant papers were selected in three phases. After quality assessment, two reviewers extracted the data while another checked their extracted data. In this review, we summarized information regarding environmental chemicals that can be associated with obesity. Most evidence comes from experimental and laboratory studies; however a growing number of human studies also support the role of obesogenic chemicals. The current evidence proposes that the systemic responses to exposure to environmental factors could potentially increase the risk of excess weight. The effects of exposure to these chemicals are of crucial importance during developmental phases of life, when preprogramming for an adipogenic outcome may occur. By considering the adverse transgenerational effects of obesogen chemicals on human health, the global obesity epidemic should be considered as a multifactorial complex disorder necessitating the emphasis of public health interventions for environmental protection.

  1. Agomelatine beyond Borders: Current Evidences of Its Efficacy in Disorders Other than Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico De Berardis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Agomelatine, a melatonergic antidepressant with a rapid onset of action, is one of the most recent drugs in the antidepressant category. Agomelatine’s antidepressant actions are attributed to its sleep-promoting and chronobiotic actions mediated by MT1 and MT2 receptors present in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, as well as to its effects on the blockade of 5-HT2c receptors. Blockade of 5-HT2c receptors causes release of both noradrenaline and dopamine at the fronto-cortical dopaminergic and noradrenergic pathways. The combined actions of agomelatine on MT1/MT2 and 5-HT2c receptors facilitate the resynchronization of altered circadian rhythms and abnormal sleep patterns. Agomelatine appeared to be effective in treating major depression. Moreover, evidence exists that points out a possible efficacy of such drug in the treatment of bipolar depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol dependence, migraines etc. Thus, the aim of this narrative review was to elucidate current evidences on the role of agomelatine in disorders other than major depression.

  2. Smoke exposure as a risk factor for asthma in childhood: a review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Giuliana; Antona, Roberta; Malizia, Velia; Montalbano, Laura; Corsello, Giovanni; La Grutta, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic multifactorial disease that affects >300 million people worldwide. Outdoor and indoor pollution exposure has been associated with respiratory health effects in adults and children. Smoking still represents a huge public health problem and millions of children suffer the detrimental effects of passive smoke exposure. This study was designed to review the current evidences on exposure to passive smoke as a risk factor for asthma onset in childhood. A review of the most recent studies on this topic was undertaken to provide evidence about the magnitude of the effect of passive smoking on the risk of incidence of asthma in children. The effects of passive smoking are different depending on individual and environmental factors. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is one of the most important indoor air pollutants and can interact with other air pollutants in eliciting respiratory outcomes during childhood. The increased risk of respiratory outcomes in children exposed to prenatal and early postnatal passive smoke might be caused by an adverse effect on both the immune system and the structural and functional development of the lung; this may explain the subsequent increased risk of incident asthma. The magnitude of the exposure is quite difficult to precisely quantify because it is significantly influenced by the child's daily activities. Because exposure to ETS is a likely cause for asthma onset in childhood, there is a strong need to prevent infants and children from breathing air contaminated with tobacco smoke.

  3. Symptom Signatures and Diagnostic Timeliness in Cancer Patients: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjoung M. Koo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis is an important aspect of contemporary cancer prevention and control strategies, as the majority of patients are diagnosed following symptomatic presentation. The nature of presenting symptoms can critically influence the length of the diagnostic intervals from symptom onset to presentation (the patient interval, and from first presentation to specialist referral (the primary care interval. Understanding which symptoms are associated with longer diagnostic intervals to help the targeting of early diagnosis initiatives is an area of emerging research. In this Review, we consider the methodological challenges in studying the presenting symptoms and intervals to diagnosis of cancer patients, and summarize current evidence on presenting symptoms associated with a range of common and rarer cancer sites. We propose a taxonomy of cancer sites considering their symptom signature and the predictive value of common presenting symptoms. Finally, we consider evidence on associations between symptomatic presentations and intervals to diagnosis before discussing implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of public health or health system interventions to achieve the earlier detection of cancer.

  4. Maintenance therapy following induction chemoimmunotherapy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, N M; Thieblemont, C

    2017-11-01

    Maintenance therapy has proven efficacy in indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), yet its role in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an area of ongoing investigation. While DLBCL is potentially curable, >30% of patients relapse following front-line therapy and have a poor prognosis, especially those with refractory disease. Maintenance therapy holds promise to maintain response post-induction. Keyword searches were carried out in PubMed and congress abstracts of 'diffuse large B-cell lymphoma' and 'maintenance' and focused on phase II/III studies of maintenance following front-line induction. Although used in indolent forms of NHL, studies of maintenance therapy with rituximab in patients with DLBCL responding to front-line R-CHOP (rituximab/cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisone) have not improved efficacy and are not recommended. Targeted agents enzastaurin and everolimus reported results from the phase III studies PRELUDE and PILLAR-2, respectively, both of which showed no proven maintenance benefit following front-line chemoimmunotherapy induction. Overall, the reported efficacy results with these agents in the maintenance setting do not outweigh the risks. Lenalidomide for maintenance has been reported in three studies. Results from two phase II trials on lenalidomide maintenance revealed positive outcomes in higher-risk patients following induction, resulting in improved progression-free survival in relapsed DLBCL patients who were ineligible for transplantation. First analysis from the phase III REMARC trial showed a significant improvement in progression-free survival for lenalidomide versus placebo, with no difference in overall survival, following front-line R-CHOP induction in elderly patients. Based on currently available studies of DLBCL maintenance therapies, initial results in front-line, as well as the relapsed setting, with immunomodulators such as lenalidomide show promise for further research to identify appropriate patients

  5. An online community of practice to support evidence-based physiotherapy practice in manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cathy; Yeung, Euson; Markoulakis, Roula; Guilcher, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how a community of practice promoted the creation and sharing of new knowledge in evidence-based manual therapy using Wenger's constructs of mutual engagement, joint enterprise, and shared repertoire as a theoretical framework. We used a qualitative approach to analyze the discussion board contributions of the 19 physiotherapists who participated in the 10-week online continuing education course in evidence-based practice (EBP) in manual therapy. The course was founded on community of practice, constructivism, social, and situated learning principles. The 1436 postings on 9 active discussion boards revealed that the community of practice was a social learning environment that supported strong participation and mutual engagement. Design features such as consistent facilitation, weekly guiding questions, and collaborative assignments promoted the creation and sharing of knowledge. Participants applied research evidence to the contexts in which they worked through reflective comparison of what they were reading to its applicability in their everyday practice. Participants' shared goals contributed to the common ground established in developing collective knowledge about different study designs, how to answer research questions, and the difficulties of conducting sound research. An online longitudinal community of practice utilized as a continuing education approach to deliver an online course based on constructivist and social learning principles allowed geographically dispersed physiotherapists to be mutually engaged in a joint enterprise in evidence-based manual therapy. Advantages included opportunity for reflection, modeling, and collaboration. Future studies should examine the impact of participation on clinical practice. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital

  6. Energy Therapies in Advanced Practice Oncology: An Evidence-Informed Practice Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions in cancer care; a description of the author’s professional experience with TT, HT, and Reiki in practice and research; an overview of the three energy healing modalities; a review of nine clinical studies related to oncology; and recommendations for EIP. These studies demonstrate a response to previous research design critiques. Findings indicate a positive benefit for oncology patients in the realms of pain, quality of life, fatigue, health function, and mood. Directionality of healing in immune response and cell line studies affirms the usual explanation that these therapies bring harmony and balance to the system in the direction of health. Foremost, the research literature demonstrates the safety of these therapies. In order to consider the varieties of evidence for TT, HT, and Reiki, EIP requires a qualitative examination of patient experiences with these modalities, exploration of where these modalities have been integrated into cancer care and how the practice works in the oncology setting, and discovery of the impact of implementation on provider practice and self-care. Next steps toward EIP require fleshing out the experience of these modalities by patients and health-care providers in the oncology care setting. PMID:25031994

  7. Osteoradionecrosis in cancer patients : the evidence base for treatment-dependent frequency, current management strategies, and future studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, Douglas E.; Doerr, Wolfgang; Hovan, Allan; Pinto, Andres; Saunders, Debbie; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    The purpose of this study is to review the evidence base from 1990 to 2008 to (1) clarify the impact of cancer therapies on prevalence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in head and neck cancer patients, and to (2) evaluate management strategies and their consequences on quality of life and cost of care.

  8. Liver ultrastructural morphology and mitochondrial DNA levels in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfection: no evidence of mitochondrial damage with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Motoi; Chu, Fanny F S; Au, May; Lu, Helen; Chen, Jennifer; Rietkerk, Sonja; Barrios, Rolando; Farley, John D; Montaner, Julio S; Montessori, Valentina C; Walker, David C; Côté, Hélène C F

    2008-06-19

    Liver mitochondrial toxicity is a concern, particularly in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. Liver biopsies from HIV/HCV co-infected patients, 14 ON-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and nine OFF-HAART, were assessed by electron microscopy quantitative morphometric analyses. Hepatocytes tended to be larger ON-HAART than OFF-HAART (P = 0.05), but mitochondrial volume, cristae density, lipid volume, mitochondrial DNA and RNA levels were similar. We found no evidence of increased mitochondrial toxicity in individuals currently on HAART, suggesting that concomitant HAART should not delay HCV therapy.

  9. Cupping therapy for treating knee osteoarthritis: The evidence from systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Quan; Guo, Wen; Sun, Ze-Gan; Huang, Qing-Song; Lee, En Yeong; Wang, Ying; Yao, Xiao-Dong

    2017-08-01

    Cupping therapy is widely used in East Asia, the Middle East, or Central and North Europe to manage the symptom of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of cupping therapy for treating patients with KOA. The following databases were searched from their inception until January 2017: PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and four Chinese databases [WanFang Med Database, Chinese BioMedical Database, Chinese WeiPu Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI)]. Only the RCTs related to the effects of cupping therapy on KOA were included in this systematic review. A quantitative synthesis of RCTs will be conducted using RevMan 5.3 software. Study selection, data extraction, and validation was performed independently by two reviewers. Cochrane criteria for risk-of-bias were used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. Seven RCTs met the inclusion criteria, and most were of low methodological quality. Study participants in the dry cupping therapy plus the Western medicine therapy group showed significantly greater improvements in the pain [MD = -1.01, 95%CI (-1.61, -0.41), p therapy group, with low heterogeneity (Chi 2  = 0.00 p = 1.00, I 2  = 0% in pain; Chi 2  = 0.45 p = 0.50, I 2  = 0% in stiffness; Chi 2  = 1.09 p = 0.30, I 2  = 9% in physical function). However, it failed to do so on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) [MD = -0.32, 95%CI (-0.70, 0.05), p = 0.09]. In addition, when compared with Western medicine therapy alone, meta-analysis of four RCTs suggested favorable statistically significant effects of wet cupping therapy plus western medicine on response rate [MD = 1.06, 95%CI (1.01, 1.12), p = 0.03; heterogeneity: Chi 2  = 1.13, p = 0.77, I 2  = 0%] and Lequesne Algofunctional Index (LAI) [MD = -2.74, 95%CI (-3.41, -2.07), p cupping therapy can effectively improve the

  10. The evidence-based topical therapies for management of minor burns in outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siphora Dien

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Burns are often seen in clinics or hospitals. Majority of burns are minor burns, which can be managed in outpatient setting with satisfactory result. The healing outcome depends on physician’s knowledge and competencies in burn pathogenesis and basic principles of burn care. Initial treatment of burns consists of emergency evaluation, assessment of depth and severity of burns and considerations for referral. The principles of minor wound therapy include cooling, cleansing, pain management, and topical therapy. Recently, many topical agents are available and indicated for first to second degree burn. Silver sulfadiazine (SSD is the standard treatment; however, it has some limitations. Scientific evidences showed that topical antibiotics do not reduce the incidence of local infection, invasive infection, and mortality of infection. Burns heal faster with hydrogel dressings and some other dressings compared to SSD. There are insufficient evidences to support the use of aloe vera, honey, and negative pressure wound therapy in burns. Moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO® has been demonstrated to have equal efficacy to SSD.

  11. Clinical utility of ulipristal acetate for the treatment of uterine fibroids: current evidence

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    Trefoux Bourdet A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alice Trefoux Bourdet, Dominique Luton, Martin Koskas Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bichat University Hospital, Paris Diderot University, Paris, France Abstract: Uterine myoma is the most common benign uterine tumor in women of reproductive age and occurs in 20%–25% of the worldwide population. No currently approved medical treatment is able to completely eliminate fibroids. Surgery, particularly hysterectomy, predominates as the treatment strategy of choice, even though it is associated with risks and complications and causes infertility. Until recently, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists were the only available drugs for the preoperative treatment of fibroids. However, ulipristal acetate (UPA, an oral selective progesterone receptor modulator, was recently licensed in Europe for the same indication. Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of UPA in the medical management of fibroids before surgery, with a better tolerability profile than leuprolide acetate. Analyzing the literature, we identified new management strategies involving UPA and surgery, considering advantages of both medical and surgical therapy. The advent of UPA will undoubtedly modify the surgical approach to fibroids, but the heterogeneity of these possible indications now requires various original clinical studies to identify the optimal indications for UPA in patients with symptomatic fibroid(s. Keywords: uterine fibroids, medical treatment, selective progesterone receptor modulator, ulipristal acetate, surgery

  12. Is Parkinson’s Disease Truly a Prion-Like Disorder? An Appraisal of Current Evidence

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    Aneesha Chauhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is the world’s second most common neurodegenerative disease and most common movement disorder. Characterised by a loss of dopaminergic neurons and the development of intraneuronal inclusions known as Lewy bodies, it has classically been thought of as a cell-autonomous disease. However, in 2008, two groups reported the startling observation of Lewy bodies within embryonic neuronal grafts transplanted into PD patients little more than a decade previously, suggesting that PD pathology can be propagated to neighbouring cells and calling basic assumptions of our understanding of the disease into question. Subsequent research has largely served to confirm this interpretation, pointing towards a prion-like intercellular transfer of misfolded α-synuclein, the main component of Lewy bodies, as central to PD. This shift in thinking offers a revolutionary approach to PD treatment, potentially enabling a transition from purely symptomatic therapy to direct targeting of the pathology that drives disease progression. In this short review, we appraise current experimental support for PD as a prion-like disease, whilst highlighting areas of controversy or inconsistency which must be resolved. We also offer a brief discussion of the therapeutic implications of these discoveries.

  13. Current evidence on the transmissibility of chronic wasting disease prions to humans-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, L; Greig, J; Mascarenhas, M; Otten, A; Corrin, T; Hierlihy, K

    2018-02-01

    A number of prion diseases affect humans, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; most of these are due to genetic mutations in the affected individual and occur sporadically, but some result from transmission of prion proteins from external sources. Of the known animal prion diseases, only bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions have been shown to be transmissible from animals to humans under non-experimental conditions. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion disease that affects cervids (e.g., deer and elk) in North America and isolated populations in Korea and Europe. Systematic review methodology was used to identify, select, critically appraise and analyse data from relevant research. Studies were evaluated for adherence to good conduct based on their study design following the Cochrane collaboration's approach to grading the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations (GRADE). Twenty-three studies were included after screening 800 citations from the literature search and evaluating 78 full papers. Studies examined the transmissibility of CWD prions to humans using epidemiological study design, in vitro and in vivo experiments. Five epidemiological studies, two studies on macaques and seven studies on humanized transgenic mice provided no evidence to support the possibility of transmission of CWD prions to humans. Ongoing surveillance in the United States and Canada has not documented CWD transmission to humans. However, two studies on squirrel monkeys provided evidence that transmission of CWD prions resulting in prion disease is possible in these monkeys under experimental conditions and seven in vitro experiments provided evidence that CWD prions can convert human prion protein to a misfolded state. Therefore, future discovery of CWD transmission to humans cannot be entirely ruled out on the basis of current studies, particularly in the light of possible decades-long incubation periods for CWD prions in humans. It would be prudent to continue

  14. Review of Current Cell-Penetrating Antibody Developments for HIV-1 Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Alif Che Nordin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996 has significantly reduced the global mortality and morbidity caused by the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. However, the therapeutic strategy of HAART that targets multiple viral proteins may render off-target toxicity and more importantly results in drug-resistant escape mutants. These have been the main challenges for HAART and refinement of this therapeutic strategy is urgently needed. Antibody-mediated treatments are emerging therapeutic modalities for various diseases. Most therapeutic antibodies have been approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA mainly for targeting cancers. Previous studies have also demonstrated the promising effect of therapeutic antibodies against HIV-1, but there are several limitations in this therapy, particularly when the viral targets are intracellular proteins. The conventional antibodies do not cross the cell membrane, hence, the pathogenic intracellular proteins cannot be targeted with this classical therapeutic approach. Over the years, the advancement of antibody engineering has permitted the therapeutic antibodies to comprehensively target both extra- and intra-cellular proteins in various infections and diseases. This review aims to update on the current progress in the development of antibody-based treatment against intracellular targets in HIV-1 infection. We also attempt to highlight the challenges and limitations in the development of antibody-based therapeutic modalities against HIV-1.

  15. Current trends in local antibacterial therapy of periprosthetic infection and osteomyelitis

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    S. A. Bozhkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rational use of antibiotics in the treatment of orthopedic infection still presents a significant problem. Local antibiotic delivery systems enable to achieve effective concentrations of drugs in the focus of bone infection without the development of toxicity. It is the important accompaniment to systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periprosthetic infection and osteomyelitis. The data collected through the PubMed and eLIBRARY databases (http://www.ncbi.nlm. nih.gov/pubmed, 1995-2015; http://elibrary.ru, 2005-2015 years present the information about bone substitutes used for local antibiotic therapy in scientific investigations and in clinical practice. The information is submitted in accordance with the groups of materials: cements based on polymethylmethacrylate, bone grafts, demineralized bone matrix, bioceramics, natural and synthetic polymers, combined antibiotic delivery systems. The majority of these materials have only been studied experimentally and only a limited range of them is registered for use in clinical practice. Informing orthopedic surgeons about current methods of local antibiotic use is the key to the development of a modern integrated approach to the therapy of infectious complications after orthopedic surgery.

  16. From Inflammation to Current and Alternative Therapies Involved in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Barreto Serra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex event that develops in three overlapping phases: inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling. These phases are distinct in function and histological characteristics. However, they depend on the interaction of cytokines, growth factors, chemokines, and chemical mediators from cells to perform regulatory events. In this article, we will review the pathway in the skin healing cascade, relating the major chemical inflammatory mediators, cellular and molecular, as well as demonstrating the local and systemic factors that interfere in healing and disorders associated with tissue repair deficiency. Finally, we will discuss the current therapeutic interventions in the wounds treatment, and the alternative therapies used as promising results in the development of new products with healing potential.

  17. Current Perspectives Regarding Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Liver Cirrhosis

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    Kyeong-Ah Kwak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cirrhosis is a major cause of mortality and a common end of various progressive liver diseases. Since the effective treatment is currently limited to liver transplantation, stem cell-based therapy as an alternative has attracted interest due to promising results from preclinical and clinical studies. However, there is still much to be understood regarding the precise mechanisms of action. A number of stem cells from different origins have been employed for hepatic regeneration with different degrees of success. The present review presents a synopsis of stem cell research for the treatment of patients with liver cirrhosis according to the stem cell type. Clinical trials to date are summarized briefly. Finally, issues to be resolved and future perspectives are discussed with regard to clinical applications.

  18. Towards clinical evidence in particle therapy: ENLIGHT, PARTNER, ULICE and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Combs, Stephanie E; Pötter, Richad; Orrechia, Roberto; Haberer, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Fossati, Piero; Parodi, Katia; Balosso, Jacques; Amaldi, Ugo; Baumann, Michael; Debus, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Since the middle of the 20th century, particle therapy has been in focus for patient treatments. In 1946, Robert Wilson proposed the use of charged particles for tumor therapy, and since then, the clinical use of protons and heavier ions, mainly carbon ions, has become more widespread. The first clinical evidence was obtained in Berkeley, treating radiation-resistant targets with various ion species. The main advantage of particle beams derive from their physical properties: through an inverted dose profile, regions within the entry channel of the beam can be spared of dose, while a steep dose deposition can be directed in an energydependent manner into the defined treatment volume (Bragg Peak). The following dose fall-off spares tissue behind the target volume, thus reducing integral dose significantly compared to when using photons. Heavier charged particles, such as carbon ions or oxygen, are additionally associated with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), while the RBE of protons is comm...

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy for depression in Parkinson's disease: systematic review of evidence and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisovskaya, Anna; Bryson, William Culbertson; Buchholz, Jonathan; Samii, Ali; Borson, Soo

    2016-04-01

    We performed a systematic review of evidence regarding treatment of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) utilizing electroconvulsive therapy. The search led to the inclusion of 43 articles, mainly case reports or case series, with the largest number of patients totaling 19. The analysis included 116 patients with depression and PD; depression improved in 93.1%. Where motor symptoms' severity was reported, 83% of patients improved. Cognition did not worsen in the majority (94%). Many patients experienced delirium or transient confusion, sometimes necessitating discontinuation of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Little is known about maintenance ECT in this population. ECT can benefit patients suffering from PD and depression. We recommend an algorithm for treatment of depression in PD, utilizing ECT sooner rather than later.

  20. Information literacy skills of occupational therapy graduates: promoting evidence-based practice in the MOT curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Carol A; Case-Smith, Jane

    2010-10-01

    Are Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) graduates more successful than BS graduates in accessing and analyzing research literature? This retrospective cohort study used a survey sent to Ohio State University MOT graduates, asking why they need information for their practice, what types of information they seek, and how they search for and use it. Results suggest that the MOT program has fostered higher-level skills than did the BS program in independent writing, a greater focus on evidence-based practice, and the use of bibliographic databases. The MOT graduates report high confidence in their ability to apply research to practice and high satisfaction with the lifelong learning skills they learned. The survey findings support the importance of collaboration between Occupational Therapy faculty and medical librarians in developing MOT educational programs.

  1. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Implementing evidence-based models in community settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szapocznik, José; Muir, Joan A.; Duff, Johnathan H.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2014-01-01

    Reflecting a nearly 40-year collaborative partnership between clinical researchers and clinicians, the present article reviews the authors’ experience in developing, investigating, and implementing the Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) model. The first section of the article focuses on the theory, practice, and studies related to this evidence-based family therapy intervention targeting adolescent drug abuse and delinquency. The second section focuses on the implementation model created for the BSFT intervention– a model that parallels many of the recommendations furthered within the implementation science literature. Specific challenges encountered during the BSFT implementation process are reviewed, along with ways of conceptualizing and addressing these challenges from a systemic perspective. The implementation approach that we employ uses the same systemic principles and intervention techniques as those that underlie the BSFT model itself. Recommendations for advancing the field of implementation science, based on our on-the-ground experiences, are proposed. PMID:24274187

  2. The evidence for present-centered therapy as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Nickolas D; Laska, Kevin M; Wampold, Bruce E

    2014-02-01

    To examine the evidence for present-centered therapy (PCT) as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 5 randomized clinical trials that compared PCT to an existing evidence-based treatment for PTSD were reviewed. A meta-analysis was used to estimate between-treatment differences on targeted measures, secondary measures, and dropout. PCT was found to be as efficacious as the comparison evidence-based treatment in 3 of the 5 trials, and in the 2 cases where a no-treatment condition was included, PCT was superior, with large effect sizes for targeted variables (d = 0.88, 0.74, and 1.27). When results were aggregated using meta-analysis, effects for PCT versus an evidence-based treatment for both targeted and secondary measures were small and nonsignificant (d = 0.13 and d = 0.09, respectively). As well, the dropout rate for PCT was significantly less than for the comparison evidence-based treatments (14.3% and 31.3%, respectively). It appears that PCT is an efficacious and acceptable treatment for PTSD. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  3. Cognitive-behavioral therapy: How medical providers can increase patient and family openness and access to evidence-based multimodal therapy for pediatric migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michelle M.; O’Brien, Hope; Powers, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    While evidence supports the recommendation for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric migraine, few children actually receive this evidence-based intervention. In this article we briefly review the most recent empirical evidence supporting CBT. We then identify both provider/system-related barriers as well as patient-related barriers. Finally, we provide practical solutions to addressing these barriers in the service of facilitating children receiving optimal comprehensive management of their headaches. PMID:26198185

  4. State of the Art on the Evidence Base in Cardiac Regenerative Therapy: Overview of 41 Systematic Reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peruzzi, Mariangela; de Falco, Elena; Abbate, Antonio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Chimenti, Isotta; Lotrionte, Marzia; Benedetto, Umberto; Delewi, Ronak; Marullo, Antonino G. M.; Frati, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive appraisal of the evidence from secondary research on cardiac regenerative therapy. Overview of systematic reviews of controlled clinical trials concerning stem cell administration or mobilization in patients with cardiovascular disease. After a systematic database search,

  5. Future directions for ICT in aphasia therapy for older adults: enhancing current practices through interdisciplinary perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Kötteritzsch, Anna; Gerling, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Growing numbers of older adults requiring aphasia therapy create challenges for the health care system. Information and communication technology (ICT) has the potential to provide computer-mediated, self-administered aphasia therapy that complements conventional therapy. We explore overlaps in ICT for older adults and aphasia therapy applications with the goal of integrating innovative ICT in aphasia therapy. Based on a case study, we explain how results of different disciplines developing IC...

  6. Clinical Evidence of Chinese Massage Therapy (Tui Na) for Cervical Radiculopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangquan; Li, Linghui

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The review is to assess the current evidence of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na) for cervical radiculopathy. Methods. Seven databases were searched. Randomised controlled trials incorporating Tui Na alone or Tui Na combined with conventional treatment were enrolled. The authors in pairs independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Results. Five studies involving 448 patients were included. The pooled analysis from the 3 trials indicated that Tui Na alone showed a significant lowering immediate effects on pain score (SMD = −0.58; 95% CI: −0.96 to −0.21; Z = 3.08, P = 0.002) with moderate heterogeneity compared to cervical traction. The meta-analysis from 2 trials revealed significant immediate effects of Tui Na plus cervical traction in improving pain score (MD = −1.73; 95% CI: −2.01 to −1.44; Z = 11.98, P cervical traction alone. No adverse effect was reported. There was very low quality or low quality evidence to support the results. Conclusions. Tui Na alone or Tui Na plus cervical traction may be helpful to cervical radiculopathy patients, but supportive evidence seems generally weak. Future clinical studies with low risk of bias and adequate follow-up design are recommended. PMID:28303163

  7. Clinical Evidence of Chinese Massage Therapy (Tui Na for Cervical Radiculopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The review is to assess the current evidence of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na for cervical radiculopathy. Methods. Seven databases were searched. Randomised controlled trials incorporating Tui Na alone or Tui Na combined with conventional treatment were enrolled. The authors in pairs independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Results. Five studies involving 448 patients were included. The pooled analysis from the 3 trials indicated that Tui Na alone showed a significant lowering immediate effects on pain score (SMD = −0.58; 95% CI: −0.96 to −0.21; Z=3.08, P=0.002 with moderate heterogeneity compared to cervical traction. The meta-analysis from 2 trials revealed significant immediate effects of Tui Na plus cervical traction in improving pain score (MD = −1.73; 95% CI: −2.01 to −1.44; Z=11.98, P<0.00001 with no heterogeneity compared to cervical traction alone. No adverse effect was reported. There was very low quality or low quality evidence to support the results. Conclusions. Tui Na alone or Tui Na plus cervical traction may be helpful to cervical radiculopathy patients, but supportive evidence seems generally weak. Future clinical studies with low risk of bias and adequate follow-up design are recommended.

  8. The efficacy of surfactant replacement therapy in the growth restricted preterm infant: what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul eMalhotra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surfactant replacement therapy (SRT is an integral part of management of preterm surfactant deficiency (respiratory distress syndrome, RDS. Its role in the management of RDS has been extensively studied. However its efficacy in the management of lung disease in preterm infants born with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR has not been systematically studied.Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of exogenous surfactant replacement therapy in the management of preterm IUGR lung disease. Methods: A systematic search of all available randomised clinical trials (RCT of surfactant replacement therapy in preterm IUGR infants was done according to the standard Cochrane collaboration search strategy. Neonatal respiratory outcomes were compared between the preterm IUGR and appropriately-grown for gestational age (AGA preterm infant populations in eligible studies. Results: No study was identified which evaluated the efficacy or responsiveness of exogenous surfactant replacement therapy in preterm IUGR infants as compared to preterm AGA infants. The only study identified through the search strategy used small for gestational age (SGA; defined as less than 10th centile for birth weight as a proxy for IUGR. The RCT evaluated the efficacy or responsiveness of SRT in preterm SGA group as compared to AGA infants. The rate of intubation, severity of RDS, rate of surfactant administration, pulmonary air leaks and days on the ventilator did not differ between both groups. However, the requirement for prolonged nasal CPAP (p< 0.001, supplemental oxygen therapy (p <0.01 and the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia at 28 days and 36 weeks (both p<0.01 was greater in SGA infants. Discussion: There is currently insufficient data available to evaluate the efficacy of SRT in preterm IUGR lung disease. A variety of research strategies will be needed to enhance our understanding of the role and rationale for use of surfactant replacement therapy in preterm

  9. [Oligometastasis in pancreatic cancer : Current state of knowledge and spectrum of local therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, F; Damanakis, A I; Bruns, C

    2018-03-20

    Several case series reported results of surgical resection in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in a metastasized stage. A summarized overview of the current state of knowledge and a summary of the results of currently available studies. A systematic search was carried out in MEDLINE and PubMed with respect to metastasized pancreatic cancer and surgical resection. The evidence level for surgical resection in the metastasized stage is weak and so far no prospective trials are available. The largest single-arm trial included 85 patients with hepatic metastasis. In cases of hepatic oligometastasis an overall survival of 11-14 months was observed. In the presence of pulmonary metastasis, overall survival seems to be prolonged compared to intra-abdominal metastasis, although the evidence level is relatively weak. According to the available results, a general recommendation for surgical resection in a metastasized stage cannot be given; however, the results show a possible benefit for some well-selected patient subgroups. Prospective trials must validate these data and investigate the use of combined surgical and systemic treatments in the case of resectable metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  10. The Current Status and Future Directions of Heavy Charged Particle Therapy in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Richard P.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chu, William T.; Coutrakon, George B.; Hug, Eugen B.; Kraft, Gerhard; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-03-01

    will require: (1) sophisticated target delineation that integrates CT, MRI and PET imaging; (2) reliable RBE modeling algorithms; (3) efficient beam-scanning technology that compensates for organ movements; (4) online beam control proximal to and within the patient; and (5) better understanding of dose-fractionation parameters. The current status and the anticipated future directions of the role of particle therapy in medicine is a complex subject that involves a very intimate interplay of radiobiology, accelerator physics and radiation oncology. The intention of this relatively brief manuscript is to describe the underlying principles, present the historical developments, highlight the clinical results, focus on the technical advances, and suggest likely future directions. We have also attempted to present a balanced, consensus view of the past achievements and current strategies in particle therapy, in a manner of interest both to long-term experts and to educated newcomers to this field.

  11. Non-medical prescribing by physiotherapists: issues reported in the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Joanne H; Grimmer, Karen

    2014-02-01

    Physiotherapists should be proactive in preparing themselves to participate in innovative models of health care, which are emerging from the healthcare workforce reforms in Australia. One challenging outcome of workforce change is physiotherapy (non-medical) prescribing (NMP), which is part of the extension of scope of physiotherapy practice. This paper summarises the current evidence base for Australian physiotherapists seeking to obtain prescribing rights. A targeted literature review was undertaken through EBSCO Host, Cochrane, Medline, SportsDiscus, Cinahl, Healthsource and Google.com using broad search terms to identify peer-reviewed and grey literature pertaining to NMP by physiotherapists, nationally and internationally. No critical appraisal was undertaken however literature was structured into the NHMRC hierarchy of evidence. Themes raised in the included literature were reported descriptively. There were six relevant peer-reviewed articles, of hierarchy levels III_3 and IV. There was however, comprehensive and recent grey literature to inform Australian physiotherapy NMP initiatives. Themes included the need for standard National action in relation to legislative and regulatory/registration issues, appropriate education, credentialing and supervisory requirements for physiotherapy prescribing. Many lessons can be learnt from the literature, including the importance of planned, uniform National action (rather than piecemeal state-by-state initiatives). Essential elements include appropriate training and skills-based recognition within the discipline and the broader health team, and the need to overtly demonstrate effectiveness and safety. Regularly-evaluated service-delivery models which support NMP by physiotherapists are further required, to demonstrate efficiency, timeliness, patient centredness and equity. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Does Complementarity Promote or Hinder Client Change in Brief Therapy? A Review of the Evidence from Two Theoretical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Mynra L.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews and contrasts 23 interpersonal personality theory (IPT) and 19 relational control theory (RCT) studies of observable client-therapist interactions in brief individual and family therapy. Notes that, although results do not consistently confirm either model, evidence tends to support IPT in context of individual therapy and RCT in context…

  13. Current evidence for a role of the Kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Lovelace

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The kynurenine pathway (KP is the major metabolic pathway of the essential amino acid tryptophan (TRP. Stimulation by inflammatory molecules such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ is the trigger for induction of the KP, driving a complex cascade of production of both neuroprotective and neurotoxic metabolites and in turn, regulation of the immune response and responses of brain cells to the KP metabolites. Consequently, substantial evidence has accumulated over the past couple of decades that dysregulation of the KP and the production of neurotoxic metabolites are associated with many neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, AIDS-related dementia, motor neurone disease (MND, schizophrenia, Huntington’s disease and brain cancers. In the past decade, evidence of the link between the KP and multiple sclerosis (MS has rapidly grown and has implicated the KP in MS pathogenesis. KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1 and tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO; highest expression in hepatic cells are the principal enzymes triggering activation of the KP to produce kynurenine from TRP. This is in preference to other routes such as serotonin and melatonin production. In neurological disease, degradation of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB, even if transient, allows the entry of blood monocytes into the brain parenchyma. Like microglia and macrophages, these cells are highly responsive to IFN-γ, which upregulates the expression of enzymes including IDO-1, producing neurotoxic KP metabolites such as quinolinic acid (QUIN. These metabolites circulate systemically or are released locally in the brain, and can contribute to the excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes and neurons in neurological disease principally by virtue of their agonist activity at NMDA receptors. The latest evidence is presented and discussed. The enzymes that control the checkpoints in the KP represent an attractive therapeutic target, and consequently several

  14. Clinical research evidence of cupping therapy in China: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though cupping therapy has been used in China for thousands of years, there has been no systematic summary of clinical research on it. This review is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of cupping therapy using evidence-based approach based on all available clinical studies. Methods We included all clinical studies on cupping therapy for all kinds of diseases. We searched six electronic databases, all searches ended in December 2008. We extracted data on the type of cupping and type of diseases treated. Results 550 clinical studies were identified published between 1959 and 2008, including 73 randomized controlled trials (RCTs, 22 clinical controlled trials, 373 case series, and 82 case reports. Number of RCTs obviously increased during past decades, but the quality of the RCTs was generally poor according to the risk of bias of the Cochrane standard for important outcome within each trials. The diseases in which cupping was commonly employed included pain conditions, herpes zoster, cough or asthma, etc. Wet cupping was used in majority studies, followed by retained cupping, moving cupping, medicinal cupping, etc. 38 studies used combination of two types of cupping therapies. No serious adverse effects were reported in the studies. Conclusions According to the above results, quality and quantity of RCTs on cupping therapy appears to be improved during the past 50 years in China, and majority of studies show potential benefit on pain conditions, herpes zoster and other diseases. However, further rigorous designed trials in relevant conditions are warranted to support their use in practice.

  15. Mechanisms of action of spa therapies in rheumatic diseases: what scientific evidence is there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Cantarini, Luca; Guidelli, Giacomo Maria; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Spa therapy represents a popular treatment for many rheumatic diseases. The mechanisms by which immersion in mineral or thermal water or the application of mud alleviates suffering in rheumatic diseases are not fully understood. The net benefit is probably the result of a combination of factors, with mechanical, thermal and chemical effects among the most prominent ones. Buoyancy, immersion, resistance and temperature all play important roles. According to the gate theory, pain relief may be due to the pressure and temperature of the water on skin; hot stimuli may influence muscle tone and pain intensity, helping to reduce muscle spasm and to increase the pain threshold. Mud-bath therapy increases plasma β-endorphin levels and secretion of corticotrophin, cortisol, growth hormone and prolactin. It has recently been demonstrated that thermal mud-pack therapy induces a reduction in the circulating levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), important mediators of inflammation and pain. Spa therapy has been found to cause an increase in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), which stimulates cartilage metabolism, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). There is also evidence of the positive action of mud-packs and thermal baths on the oxidant/antioxidant system, with a reduction in the release of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species. Overall, thermal stress has an immunosuppressive effect. Many other non-specific factors may also contribute to the beneficial effects observed after spa therapy in some rheumatic diseases, including effects on cardiovascular risk factors, and changes in the environment, pleasant surroundings and the absence of work duties.

  16. Evaluation of low level laser and interferential current in the therapy of complex regional pain syndrome by infrared thermographic camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocić Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I is characterized by continuous regional pain, disproportional according to duration and intensity and to the sort of trauma or other lesion it was caused by. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare, by using thermovison, the effects of low level laser therapy and therapy with interferential current in treatment of CRPS I. Methods. The prospective randomized controlled clinical study included 45 patients with unilateral CRPS I, after a fracture of the distal end of the radius, of the tibia and/or the fibula, treated in the Clinical Centre in Nis from 2004 to 2007. The group A consisted of 20 patients treated by low level laser therapy and kinesy-therapy, while the patients in the group B (n = 25 were treated by interferential current and kinesy-therapy. The regions of interest were filmed by a thermovision camera on both sides, before and after the 20 therapeutic procedures had been applied. Afterwards, the quantitative analysis and the comparing of thermograms taken before and after the applied therapy were performed. Results. There was statistically significant decrease of the mean maximum temperature difference between the injured and the contralateral extremity after the therapy in comparison to the status before the therapy, with the patients of the group A (p < 0.001 as well as those of the group B (p < 0.001. The decrease was statistically significantly higher in the group A than in the group B (p < 0.05. Conclusions. By the use of the infrared thermovision we showed that in the treatment of CRPS I both physical medicine methods were effective, but the effectiveness of laser therapy was statistically significantly higher compared to that of the interferential current therapy.

  17. Adjunctive drug therapies for treatment of respiratory diseases in the newborn: based on evidence or habit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sunil; Tin, Win

    2014-04-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of prematurity and is caused by a relative deficiency of endogenous surfactant production. Respiratory distress syndrome is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity in the newborn population and the standard of care is to provide exogenous surfactant therapy. This saves lives and reduces respiratory complications but, despite treatment, a significant proportion of these infants go onto develop chronic lung disease, the severest form of which is bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Once developed, this is a multisystem disease and treatment is mostly supportive by using various therapeutic adjuncts. Some of these have been proven to be safe and effective in large randomized, controlled trials but similar evidence for other drugs is lacking. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview and critically appraise the available scientific evidence for or against their use in routine practice.

  18. Brain PET imaging in obesity and food addiction: current evidence and hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iozzo, Patricia; Guiducci, Letizia; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Pagotto, Uberto

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing epidemics of obesity is one main health concern of the present time. Overeating in some obese individuals shares similarities with the loss of control and compulsive behavior observed in drug-addicted subjects, suggesting that obesity may involve food addiction. Here, we review the contributions provided by the use of positron emission tomography to the current understanding of the cerebral control of obesity and food intake in humans. The available studies have shown that multiple areas in the brain are involved with the reward properties of food, such as prefrontal, orbitofrontal, somatosensory cortices, insula, thalamus, hypothalamus, amygdala, and others. This review summarizes the current evidence, supporting the concepts that i) regions involved in the somatosensory response to food sight, taste, and smell are activated by palatable foods and may be hyperresponsive in obese individuals, ii) areas controlling executive drive seem to overreact to the anticipation of pleasure during cue exposure, and iii) those involved in cognitive control and inhibitory behavior may be resistant to the perception of reward after food exposure in obese subjects. All of these features may stimulate, for different reasons, ingestion of highly palatable and energy-rich foods. Though these same regions are similarly involved in drug abusers and game-addicted individuals, any direct resemblance may be an oversimplification, especially as the heterogeneities between studies and the prevalent exclusion of sensitive groups still limit a coherent interpretation of the findings. Further work is required to comprehensively tackle the multifaceted phenotype of obesity and identify the role of food dependency in its pathophysiology. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  19. Current Evidence for Clinical Efficacy of Platelet Rich Plasma in Aesthetic Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frautschi, Russell S; Hashem, Ahmed M; Halasa, Brianna; Cakmakoglu, Cagri; Zins, James E

    2017-03-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) has attracted attention in a number of surgical fields due to a wide variety of potential clinical benefits. Yet PRP has not gained wide popularity in aesthetic surgery as a result of uncertainty surrounding objective clinical evidence. We aim to describe the current applications, define preparation and activation, explore effectiveness, and propose a classification system to facilitate comparisons across studies. A comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of platelet rich plasma in aesthetic surgery was performed. Data gathered included: PRP application, study type, subject number, centrifugation, anticoagulation, activation, PRP composition, and outcomes. Thirty-eight reports were identified. Applications included injection into aging skin (29%), scalp alopecia (26%), lipofilling (21%), fractional laser (13%), and facial surgery (11%). The majority of studies (53%) were case series without controls. Leucocytes were sparsely defined (32%). The concentration of injected and/or baseline platelets was rarely clarified (18%). The mechanism of activation was described in 27 studies (71%), while anticoagulation was uncommonly elucidated (47%). While most studies (95%) claim effectiveness, objective measures were only utilized in 17 studies (47%). Current studies produce context-dependent results with a lack of consistent reporting of PRP preparation, composition, and activation in aesthetic applications, making meaningful meta-analysis unrealistic. Thus the method of PRP preparation warrants increased attention. We recommend a set of descriptors, FIT PAAW (described below), to produce scientifically grounded conclusions, facilitating a clearer understanding of the situations in which PRP is effective. 4 © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Current status and developments in gene therapy for thalassemia and sickle cell disease

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    Evangelia Yannaki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available β-thalassemias and sickle cell anemia (SCA are the most common monogenic diseases worldwide for which curative treatments remain a desired goal. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT, - the only curative treatment currently available for hemoglobinopaties-, has a narrow application window whereas it incurs several immunological risks. Gene therapy (GT, that is the autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+, represents a promising new therapeutic strategy which is anticipated to reestablish effective hemoglobin production and render patients transfusion- and drug- independent without the immunological complications that normally accompany allo-HCT. Prior to the application of GT for hemoglobinopathies in the clinic, many years of extensive preclinical research were spent for the optimization of the gene transfer tools and conditions. To date, three GT clinical trials for β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD have been conducted or are in progress and 3 cases of transfusion independence in thalassemic β0/βΕ patients have been reported. In the present review, the prerequisites for successful implementation of GT, the tough pathway of GT for hemoglobinopathies towards the clinic and the knowledge gained from the first clinical trials as well as the remaining questions and challenges, will be discussed. Overall, after decades of research including achievements but pitfalls as well, the path to GT of human patients with hemoglobinopathies is currently open and highly promising...

  1. Current Practice and the Future of Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Leonardo; Deeb, Wissam; Spears, Chauncey; Opri, Enrico; Molina, Rene; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Gunduz, Aysegul; Hess, Christopher W; Okun, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective therapy for Parkinson's disease patients experiencing motor fluctuations, medication-resistant tremor, and/or dyskinesia. Currently, the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus internus are the two most widely used targets, with individual advantages and disadvantages influencing patient selection. Potential DBS patients are selected using the few existing guidelines and the available DBS literature, and many centers employ an interdisciplinary team review of the individual's risk-benefit profile. Programmed settings vary based on institution- or physician-specific protocols designed to maximize benefits and limit adverse effects. Expectations should be realistic and clearly defined during the evaluation process, and each bothersome symptom should be addressed in the context of building the risk-benefit profile. Current DBS research is focused on improved symptom control, the development of newer technologies, and the improved efficiency of stimulation delivery. Techniques deliver stimulation in a more personalized way, and methods of adaptive DBS such as closed-loop approaches are already on the horizon. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. The current status of oncolytic viral therapy for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew O. Old

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cancer affects the head and neck region frequently and leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Oncolytic viral therapy has the potential to make a big impact in cancers that affect the head and neck. We intend to review the current state of oncolytic viruses in the treatment of cancers that affect the head and neck region. Method: Data sources are from National clinical trials database, literature, and current research. Results: There are many past and active trials for oncolytic viruses that show promise for treating cancers of the head and neck. The first oncolytic virus was approved by the FDA October 2015 (T-VEC, Amgen for the treatment of melanoma. Active translational research continues for this and many other oncolytic viruses. Conclusion: The evolving field of oncolytic viruses is impacting the treatment of head and neck cancer and further trials and agents are moving forward in the coming years. Keywords: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, Oncolytic viruses, Clinical trials, Novel therapeutics

  3. PD-1 and PD-L1 as emerging therapeutic targets in gastric cancer: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran PN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phu N Tran,1* Sarmen Sarkissian,1* Joseph Chao,2 Samuel J Klempner3,4 1Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of California Irvine, Orange, 2Department of Medical Oncology and Developmental Therapeutics, City of Hope, Duarte, 3Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 4The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of global cancer-related morbidity and mortality, and new therapeutic approaches are needed. Despite the improved outcomes with monoclonal antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, durable responses are uncommon. Targeting immune checkpoints including PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 have led to improved survival across several tumor types, frequently characterized by prolonged benefit in responding patients. Tumoral and lymphocyte-derived immunohistochemical staining for PD-1, PD-L1, and tumor mutational burden have shown potential as predictive response biomarkers in several tumor types. Optimal incorporation of immune-mediated therapies into gastric cancer (GC is an area of intense ongoing investigation and benefit has been demonstrated in smaller studies of advanced patients. Important questions of biomarker selection, roles for molecular characterization, optimal combinatorial approaches, and therapeutic sequencing remain. In this study, current data are reviewed for immune checkpoint inhibitors in GC, and putative biomarkers, ongoing trials, and future considerations are discussed. Keywords: immunotherapy, stomach cancer, checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, tumor mutational burden

  4. Methodology for the development of antithrombotic therapy and prevention of thrombosis guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyatt, Gordon H; Norris, Susan L; Schulman, Sam; Hirsh, Jack; Eckman, Mark H; Akl, Elie A; Crowther, Mark; Vandvik, Per Olav; Eikelboom, John W; McDonagh, Marian S; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Gutterman, David D; Cook, Deborah J; Schünemann, Holger J

    2012-02-01

    To develop the Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: ACCP Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (AT9), the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) assembled a panel of clinical experts, information scientists, decision scientists, and systematic review and guideline methodologists. Clinical areas were designated as articles, and a methodologist without important intellectual or financial conflicts of interest led a panel for each article. Only panel members without significant conflicts of interest participated in making recommendations. Panelists specified the population, intervention and alternative, and outcomes for each clinical question and defined criteria for eligible studies. Panelists and an independent evidence-based practice center executed systematic searches for relevant studies and evaluated the evidence, and where resources and evidence permitted, they created standardized tables that present the quality of the evidence and key results in a transparent fashion. One or more recommendations relate to each specific clinical question, and each recommendation is clearly linked to the underlying body of evidence. Judgments regarding the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations were based on approaches developed by the Grades of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Working Group. Panel members constructed scenarios describing relevant health states and rated the disutility associated with these states based on an additional systematic review of evidence regarding patient values and preferences for antithrombotic therapy. These ratings guided value and preference decisions underlying the recommendations. Each topic panel identified questions in which resource allocation issues were particularly important and, for these issues, experts in economic analysis provided additional searches and guidance. AT9 methodology reflects the current science of evidence-based clinical practice guideline

  5. Antibiotics versus appendectomy in the management of acute appendicitis: a review of the current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Gerard J.; McWilliams, Billy; Hurreiz, Hisham; Epanomeritakis, Emanuel

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis remains the most common cause of the acute abdomen in young adults, and the mainstay of treatment in most centres is an appendectomy. However, treatment for other intra-abdominal inflammatory processes, such as diverticulitis, consists initially of conservative management with antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine the role of antibiotics in the management of acute appendicitis and to assess if appendectomy remains the gold standard of care. Methods A literature search using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library identified studies published between 1999 and 2009, and we reviewed all relevant articles. The articles were critiqued using the Public Health Resource Unit (2006) appraisal tools. Results Our search yielded 41 papers, and we identified a total of 13 papers within the criteria specified. All of these papers, while posing pertinent questions and demonstrating the role of antibiotics as a bridge to surgery, failed to adequately justify their findings that antibiotics could be used as a definitive treatment of acute appendicitis. Conclusion Appendectomy remains the gold standard of treatment for acute appendicitis based on the current evidence. PMID:21651835

  6. Role of oral zinc supplementation for reduction of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia: a systematic review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Sharma, Pradeep; Shastri, Sweta

    2017-08-01

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is frequently seen condition in the NICU. Oral zinc has been tried for the prevention of hyperbilirubinemia. To evaluate the role of oral zinc supplementation for reduction of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in term and preterm infants. The literature search was done for various randomized control trial (RCT) by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, Index Copernicus, African Index Medicus (AIM), Thomson Reuters (ESCI), Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) and other data base. This review included six RCT that fulfilled inclusion criteria. One study evaluated the role of zinc in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants and remaining enrolled neonates  ≥35 weeks of gestation. The dose of zinc varied from 5 to 20 mg/day and duration from 5-7 days. All the studies used zinc sulfate, only one study used zinc gluconate. The total neonates enrolled in these different RCT are 749. Role of zinc in the prevention of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is not supported by the current evidence. Only one study was able to show reduction in the mean TSB level and requirement of phototherapy with zinc, and the remaining studies did not report any positive effect. None of the studies showed any effect on the duration of phototherapy, incidence of phototherapy, age of starting of phototherapy and any serious adverse effect.

  7. Effects of Polyphenol Intake on Metabolic Syndrome: Current Evidences from Human Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors which severely increases the risk of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Several epidemiological studies have observed a negative association between polyphenol intake and MetS rates. Nevertheless, there are relatively small numbers of interventional studies evidencing this association. This review is focused on human interventional trials with polyphenols as polyphenol-rich foods and dietary patterns rich in polyphenols in patients with MetS. Current evidence suggests that polyphenol intake has the potential to alleviate MetS components by decreasing body weight, blood pressure, and blood glucose and by improving lipid metabolism. Therefore, high intake of polyphenol-rich foods such as nuts, fruits, vegetables, seasoning with aromatic plants, spices, and virgin olive oil may be the cornerstone of a healthy diet preventing the development and progression of MetS, although there is no polyphenol or polyphenol-rich food able to influence all MetS features. However, inconsistent results have been found in different trials, and more long-term randomized trials are warranted to develop public health strategies to decrease MetS rates. PMID:28894509

  8. How Is Working Memory Training Likely to Influence Academic Performance? Current Evidence and Methodological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of our core cognitive functions, allowing us to keep information in mind for shorter periods of time and then work with this information. It is the gateway that information has to pass in order to be processed consciously. A well-functioning WM is therefore crucial for a number of everyday activities including learning and academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2003; Bull et al., 2008), which is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will review the research investigating whether improving WM capacity using Cogmed WM training can lead to improvements on academic performance. Emphasis is given to reviewing the theoretical principles upon which such investigations rely, in particular the complex relation between WM and mathematical and reading abilities during development and how these are likely to be influenced by training. We suggest two possible routes in which training can influence academic performance, one through an effect on learning capacity which would thus be evident with time and education, and one through an immediate effect on performance on reading and mathematical tasks. Based on the theoretical complexity described we highlight some methodological issues that are important to take into consideration when designing and interpreting research on WM training and academic performance, but that are nonetheless often overlooked in the current research literature. Finally, we will provide some suggestions for future research for advancing the understanding of WM training and its potential role in supporting academic attainment.

  9. Panel Conditioning in Longitudinal Studies: Evidence from Labor Force Items in the Current Population Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern-Manners, Andrew; Warren, John Robert

    2013-01-01

    Does participating in a longitudinal survey affect respondents’ answers to subsequent questions about their labor force characteristics? In this article, we investigate the magnitude of “panel conditioning” or “time in survey” biases for key labor force questions in the monthly Current Population Survey (CPS). Using linked CPS records for household heads first interviewed between January 2007 and June 2010, our analyses are based on strategic within-person comparisons across survey months and between-person comparisons across CPS rotation groups. We find considerable evidence for panel conditioning effects in the CPS. Panel conditioning downwardly biases the CPS-based unemployment rate, mainly by leading people to remove themselves from its denominator. Across surveys, CPS respondents (claim to) leave the labor force in greater numbers than otherwise equivalent respondents who are participating in the CPS for the first time. The results cannot be attributed to panel attrition or mode effects. We discuss implications for CPS-based research and policy as well as for survey methodology more broadly. PMID:22893185

  10. Rehabilitation for post-stroke cognitive impairment: an overview of recommendations arising from systematic reviews of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, David C; Bowen, Audrey; Chung, Charlie S; Cockburn, Janet; Knapp, Peter; Pollock, Alex

    2015-02-01

    Although cognitive impairments are common following stroke, there is considerable uncertainty about the types of interventions that can reduce activity restrictions and improve quality of life. Indeed, a recent project to identify priorities for research into life after stroke determined that the top priority for patients, carers and health professionals was how to improve cognitive impairments. To provide an overview of the evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for patients with stroke and to determine the main gaps in the current evidence base. Evidence was synthesised for the six Cochrane reviews relating to rehabilitation for post-stroke cognitive impairment and any subsequently published randomized controlled trials to February 2012. Data arising from 44 trials involving over 1500 patients was identified. Though there was support for the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for some cognitive impairments, significant gaps were found in the current evidence base. All of the Cochrane reviews identified major limitations within the evidence they identified. There is currently insufficient research evidence, or evidence of insufficient quality, to support clear recommendations for clinical practice. Recommendations are made as to the research required to strengthen the evidence base, and so facilitate the delivery of effective interventions to individuals with cognitive impairment after stroke. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Professional Development for Sessional Staff in Higher Education: A Review of Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Danielle; Mahoney, Paige; Macfarlane, Susie

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an integrated review of evidence published in the past decade around professional development for sessional staff in higher education. Using the Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method, the review analysed recent evidence using the three principles of the Benchmarking Leadership and Advancement of…

  12. Current advances in biomarkers for targeted therapy in triple-negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleisher B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brett Fleisher,1 Charlotte Clarke,2 Sihem Ait-Oudhia1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Center for Pharmacometrics and Systems Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Orlando, FL, 2Department of Translational Research, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a complex heterogeneous disease characterized by the absence of three hallmark receptors: human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor. Compared to other breast cancer subtypes, TNBC is more aggressive, has a higher prevalence in African-Americans, and more frequently affects younger patients. Currently, TNBC lacks clinically accepted targets for tailored therapy, warranting the need for candidate biomarkers. BiomarkerBase, an online platform used to find biomarkers reported in clinical trials, was utilized to screen all potential biomarkers for TNBC and select only the ones registered in completed TNBC trials through clinicaltrials.gov. The selected candidate biomarkers were classified as surrogate, prognostic, predictive, or pharmacodynamic (PD and organized by location in the blood, on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm, or in the nucleus. Blood biomarkers include vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and interleukin-8 (IL-­8; cell surface biomarkers include EGFR, insulin-like growth factor binding protein, c-Kit, c-Met, and PD-L1; cytoplasm biomarkers include PIK3CA, pAKT/S6/p4E-BP1, PTEN, ALDH1, and the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR-related metabolites; and nucleus biomarkers include BRCA1, the glucocorticoid receptor, TP53, and Ki67. Candidate biomarkers were further organized into a “cellular protein network” that demonstrates potential connectivity. This review provides an inventory and reference point for promising biomarkers for breakthrough targeted therapies in TNBC. Keywords: anti-cancer directed pharmacotherapy, difficult

  13. Current data on radio chemotherapy and potential of targeted therapies for cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magne, N.; Deutsch, E.; Haie-Meder, C.

    2008-01-01

    The present review represents an up-to-date focus on the particular topic of cervix carcinoma. An exhaustive description of the actual data and the near-future combination of radiotherapy and drugs with the specific potential of targeted therapies are presented. This approach represents one of the next challenges to improve results. Studies conducted in 1999, 2000, and 2002 reported the results of six large-scale prospective randomized trials using concomitant chemo radiation with a significant progression-free and overall survival rate improvement compared to radiotherapy only. These results were confirmed by the two last meta-analyses. Nowadays, the concurrent radio chemotherapy schedule used in the treatment of high risk cervical cancer is a standard practice. More growing evidences suggest that intracellular signal pathways play a significant role in radiation response. Several prognostic factors on tumoral radiosensitivity have been identified, including intracellular signal pathways, in the particular case of cervix carcinoma. Promising results have been obtained in experimental studies assessing the combined use of specific inhibitors and radiotherapy. Based on these data, a number of clinical trials have been started to enhance tumor responses and thus, to decrease the rate of recurrences. (authors)

  14. Evidence for a Detrimental Effect of Bicarbonate Therapy in Hypoxic Lactic Acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Helmut; Leach, William; Arieff, Allen I.

    1985-02-01

    Lactic acidosis, a clinical syndrome caused by the accumulation of lactic acid, is characterized by lactate concentration in blood greater than 5 mM. Therapy usually consists of intravenous sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), but resultant mortality is greater than 60 percent. The metabolic and systemic effects of NaHCO3 therapy of hypoxic lactic acidosis in dogs were studied and compared to the effects of sodium chloride or no therapy. Sodium bicarbonate elevated blood lactate concentrations to a greater extent than did either sodium chloride or no treatment. Despite the infusion of NaHCO3, both arterial pH and bicarbonate concentration decreased by a similar amount in all three groups of dogs. Additional detrimental effects of NaHCO3 were observed on the cardiovascular system, including decreases in cardiac output and blood pressure that were not observed with either sodium chloride or no treatment. Thus there is evidence for a harmful effect of NaHCO3 in the treatment of hypoxic lactic acidosis.

  15. Integrating evidence-based practice and information literacy skills in teaching physical and occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruff, Jill T; Thomas, Aliki

    2011-12-01

    To ensure that physical and occupational therapy graduates develop evidence-based practice (EBP) competencies, their academic training must promote EBP skills, such as posing a clinical question and retrieving relevant literature, and the information literacy skills needed to practice these EBP skills. This article describes the collaborative process and outcome of integrating EBP and information literacy early in a professional physical therapy and occupational therapy programme. The liaison librarian and a faculty member designed an instructional activity that included a lecture, workshop and assignment that integrated EBP skills and information literacy skills in the first year of the programme. The assignment was designed to assess students' ability to conduct a search independently. The lecture and workshop were successful in their objectives, as 101 of the 104 students received at least 8 out of 10 points on the search assignment. The teaching activities developed for the students in this course appear to have achieved the goal of teaching students the EBP research cycle so that they might begin to emulate it. The collaboration between the faculty member and the librarian was integral to the success of this endeavour. Future work will include the evaluation of students' long-term retention of information literacy objectives. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  16. Multidimensional Family Therapy: Evidence Base for Transdiagnostic Treatment Outcomes, Change Mechanisms, and Implementation in Community Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Howard A

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes the 30+-year evidence base of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT), a comprehensive treatment for youth substance abuse and antisocial behaviors. Findings from four types of MDFT studies are discussed: hybrid efficacy/effectiveness randomized controlled trials, therapy process studies, cost analyses, and implementation trials. This research has evaluated various versions of MDFT. These studies have systematically tested adaptations of MDFT for diverse treatment settings in different care sectors (mental health, substance abuse, juvenile justice, and child welfare), as well as adaptations according to treatment delivery features and client impairment level, including adolescents presenting with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Many published scientific reviews, including meta-analyses, national and international government publications, and evidence-based treatment registries, offer consistent conclusions about the clinical effectiveness of MDFT compared with standard services as well as active treatments. The diverse and continuing MDFT research, the favorable, multi-source independent evaluations, combined with the documented receptivity of youth, parents, community-based clinicians and administrators, and national and international MDFT training programs (U.S.-based organization is MDFT International, www.mdft.org; and Europe-based organization is www.mdft.nl) all support the potential for continued transfer of MDFT to real-world clinical settings. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  17. Results of conservative treatment of achillodynia with application micro-current therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyev, R; Muslimov, Q; Geiger, G

    2010-10-01

    Achillodynia describes it as an expression of chronic pain in the Achilles tendon. Pain in the Achilles tendon can be the cause of wear and tear in the tendon tissue, or following an inflammation of the peritendineum, the underlying bursa and/or the tendon insertion at the heel bone. It often occurs after sporting unusual stress and heal after complex conservative treatment by rest, (partial) relief and physical exercise within several weeks to months. The aim was to turn knowledge on the effectiveness of complex conservative treatment measures, in particular to gain by additional stimulation in the treatment of Achilles tendon. 20 patients with a diagnosis of achillodynia were treated 05-2009 to 12-2009 in the orthopedic outpatient therapy center with the help of the extra, micro-current therapy (CellVAS® device) and a complex conservative treatment measures. The analysis was conducted using a questionnaire, clinical examinations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a radiological examination of the Achilles tendon with the ankle joint. At the beginning and end of the intervention to the Board of subjective symptoms scores (NRS scale) and assessment of treatment results by the doctor for 4-step rating scale were collected. The study compares the treatment response in Achillodynia from a control group. The average age of patients was 46.3 years at the time of treatment. Of these patients: 14 (70%) were females and 6 (30%) male. Of 20 patients were 8 (40%) patients with very good, 7 (35%) patients with good, two (10%) patients with satisfactory and three (15%) patients with poor results. In addition, 17 of 20 patients (85%) with conservative treatment measures were satisfied, 3 patients (15%) were dissatisfied. The subjective assessment of the complaints numerical rating scale (NRS scale) improved significantly (p sports development but also the health history (this is not inevitably always the same) is an advantage. The conservative treatment seems to be

  18. Landscape of current and emerging cell therapy clinical trials in the UK: current status, comparison to global trends and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Isabelle; Green, Emma; Sharpe, Michaela; Herbert, Chris; Hyllner, Johan; Mount, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Cell Therapy Clinical Trial and Preclinical Research databases have been established by the Cell Therapy Catapult to document current and future cell therapy clinical trials in the UK. We identified 41 ongoing trials in April 2014, an increase of seven trials from April 2013. In addition, we identified 45 late-stage preclinical research projects. The majority of the clinical trials are early phase, primarily led by academic groups. The leading therapeutic areas are cancer, cardiology and neurology. The trends in the UK are also seen globally. As the field matures, more later phase and commercial studies will emerge and the challenges will likely evolve into how to manufacture sufficient cell quantities, manage complex logistics for multi-center trials and control cost.

  19. Cognitive intervention therapy as treatment for behaviour disorders in Alzheimer disease: evidence on efficacy and neurobiological correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alberca, J M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPS) is very high among patients with Alzheimer disease (AD); more than 90% of AD patients will present such symptoms during the course of the disease. These symptoms result in poorer quality of life for both patients and caregivers and increased healthcare costs. BPS are the main factors involved in increases to the caregiver burden, and they often precipitate the admission of patients to residential care centres. Current consensus holds that intervention models combining pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments are the most effective for AD patients. Several studies have shown cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine combined with cognitive intervention therapy (CIT) to be effective for improving patients' cognitive function and functional capacity for undertaking daily life activities. However, the efficacy of CIT as a treatment for BPS has not yet been clearly established, which limits its use for this purpose in clinical practice. The objective of this review is to gather available evidence on the efficacy of cognitive intervention therapy (CIT) on BPS in patients with AD. The results of this review suggest that CIT may have a beneficial effect on BPS in patients with AD and should therefore be considered a treatment option for patients with AD and BPS. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha R.; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A.; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna; Boyce, Lindsay; Tripathy, Debu

    2018-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. PMID:28436999

  1. Common Ground of Two Paradigms: Incorporating Critical Theory into Current Art Therapy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Clinical art therapy and studio-based community art therapy represent two major paradigms in art therapy practice. This viewpoint explores how critical theory can be incorporated into both paradigms and result in common ground between them. Critical theory encompasses an understanding of oppression in psychological, social, and cultural contexts…

  2. When to Wait for More Evidence? Real Options Analysis in Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Keith R.; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Peters, Hans J.M.; Beutner, Eric; Lambin, Philippe; Joore, Manuela A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Trends suggest that cancer spending growth will accelerate. One method for controlling costs is to examine whether the benefits of new technologies are worth the extra costs. However, especially new and emerging technologies are often more costly, while limited clinical evidence of superiority is available. In that situation it is often unclear whether to adopt the new technology now, with the risk of investing in a suboptimal therapy, or to wait for more evidence, with the risk of withholding patients their optimal treatment. This trade-off is especially difficult when it is costly to reverse the decision to adopt a technology, as is the case for proton therapy. Real options analysis, a technique originating from financial economics, assists in making this trade-off. Methods. We examined whether to adopt proton therapy, as compared to stereotactic body radiotherapy, in the treatment of inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Three options are available: adopt without further research; adopt and undertake a trial; or delay adoption and undertake a trial. The decision depends on the expected net gain of each option, calculated by subtracting its total costs from its expected benefits. Results. In The Netherlands, adopt and trial was found to be the preferred option, with an optimal sample size of 200 patients. Increase of treatment costs abroad and costs of reversal altered the preferred option. Conclusion. We have shown that real options analysis provides a transparent method of weighing the costs and benefits of adopting and/or further researching new and expensive technologies. PMID:22147003

  3. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence Based Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Silverman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS agencies in California. Methods: We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results: Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33 of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33 for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33 have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33 of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33 have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33 allow benzodiazepines to be

  4. The metabolic stress response to burn trauma: current understanding and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Craig; Tompkins, Ronald G; Finnerty, Celeste C; Sidossis, Labros S; Suman, Oscar E; Herndon, David N

    2016-10-01

    Major burns provoke a profound stress response, which is unrivalled in terms of its magnitude and duration. Evidence suggests that the pathophysiological stress response to severe burn trauma persists for several years after injury. Thus, there is a pressing need for novel strategies that mitigate this response and restore normal metabolic function in patients with burns. This is the first in a Series of three papers about the care of people with burns. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the stress response to burn trauma, with a focus on hypermetabolism, muscle wasting, and stress-induced diabetes. We highlight recent developments and important knowledge gaps that need to be pursued to develop novel therapeutic strategies to improve outcomes in burn survivors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in chronic wound management: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggleton P

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Paul Eggleton,1 Alexandra J Bishop,2 Gary R Smerdon21Institute of Biomedical & Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, 2DDRC Healthcare, Plymouth, UKAbstract: The breathing of pure oxygen under pressure to treat tissue damage has been employed for almost 45 years and has been investigated in prospective, retrospective, and randomized controlled trials. The physiological effects of oxygen treatment on wound tissue are profound, and include activation of immune cells, changes in cytokine production, and modulation of inflammatory and bactericidal mediators. Hyperbaric oxygen influences the biochemistry of whole cells, altering cell proliferation, angiogenesis, clotting, and tissue regeneration. The precise effects of hyperbaric oxygen on individual cell types and tissues are only beginning to be revealed in both animal and human studies. Many independent studies using hyperbaric oxygen adjunctively with standard wound care have observed improved healing, in particular for diabetic foot ulcers, and can result in a significant reduction in major amputations. Side effects occur infrequently, but myopia, ear barotrauma, and rarely oxygen toxicity have been reported. As antibiotics become less available, and clinician time and complex dressings become more expensive, use of hyperbaric oxygen as a means of treating a variety of wound types may become an increasingly appropriate option for treatment.Keywords: clinical trials, foot ulceration, non-healing wounds, oxygen

  6. Can dogs prime autistic children for therapy? Evidence from a single case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Karine; Correia, Rita; Lima, Mariely; Magalhães, Ana; de Sousa, Liliana

    2011-07-01

    Canine-assisted therapy has been receiving growing attention as a means of aiding children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Yet, only limited studies have been done and a great deal of literature related to this intervention is anecdotal. The present study aims at providing additional quantitative evidence on the potential of dogs to positively modulate the behavior of children with ASD. A 12-year-old boy diagnosed with ASD was exposed, at his usual treatment location (the Portuguese Association for Developmental Disorders and Autism at Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal), to the following treatment conditions: (1) one-to-one structured activities with a therapist assisted by a certified therapy dog, and (2) one-to-one structured activities with the same therapist alone (as a control). To accurately assess differences in the behavior of the participant between these treatment conditions, the therapist followed a strict research protocol. The behavior of the participant was continuously video-recorded during both treatment conditions for further analysis and comparison. Treatment outcomes: In the presence of the dog, the participant exhibited more frequent and longer durations of positive behaviors (such as smiling and positive physical contacting) as well as less frequent and shorter durations of negative behaviors (such as aggressive manifestations). These findings are in accordance with previous experimental work and provide additional support for the assertion that dogs can prime autistic children for therapy. Ultimately, this study may contribute toward a change for full acceptance of canine-assisted therapy programs within the medical milieu. Additional studies using a similar research protocol on more autistic children will certainly help professionals to work on the most effective methods to individually serve this population through canine-assisted interventions.

  7. Health technology assessment of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT): A systematic review of current evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Arabloo, Jalal; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Mousavinezhad, Seyedeh Maryam; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Pooyandjoo, Morvarid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Image-guided radiotherapy used multiple imaging during the radiation therapy course to improve the precision and accuracy of health care provider's treatment. Objectives: This study aims to assess the safety, effectiveness and economic aspects of image-guided radiation therapy for decision-making about this technology in Iran. Methods: In this study, the most important medical databases such as PubMed and Cochrane Library were searched until November 2014. The systematic reviews, ...

  8. Effects of Combined Resistive Underwater Exercises and Interferential Current Therapy in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaggar, Ragab K; Elshafey, Mohammed A

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to verify the effects of combined resistive underwater exercises and interferential current on the peak torque of the quadriceps and hamstrings and pain levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is a randomized controlled study; 30 children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis were randomly distributed into two groups: the control group (n = 15) received the traditional physical therapy program and the study group (n = 15) received resistive underwater exercises and interferential current therapy. Peak torque of the quadriceps and hamstrings and pain levels were evaluated before treatment, 1 mo later, and after 3 mos using the HUMAC NORM, CSMI Testing and Rehabilitation Isokinetic System and visual analog scale, respectively. In the control group, all measures showed significant differences (P interferential current therapy is a potentially valuable treatment for patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  9. Promoting Undergraduate Surgical Education: Current Evidence and Students' Views on ESMSC International Wet Lab Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideris, Michail; Papalois, Apostolos; Theodoraki, Korina; Dimitropoulos, Ioannis; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Georgopoulou, Efstratia-Maria; Staikoglou, Nikolaos; Paparoidamis, Georgios; Pantelidis, Panteleimon; Tsagkaraki, Ismini; Karamaroudis, Stefanos; Potoupnis, Michael E; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas; Papalois, Vassilios; Zografos, Georgios; Triantafyllou, Aggeliki; Tsoulfas, Georgios

    2017-04-01

    Undergraduate Surgical Education is becoming an essential element in the training of the future generation of safe and efficient surgeons. Essential Skills in the Management of Surgical Cases (ESMSC), is an international, joint applied surgical science and simulation-based learning wet lab course. We performed a review of the existing literature on the topic of undergraduate surgical education. Following that, we analyzed the feedback questionnaire received 480 from 2 recent series of ESMSC courses (May 2015, n = 49 and November 2015, n = 40), in order to evaluate European Union students' (UK, Germany, Greece) views on the ESMSC course, as well as on the undergraduate surgical education. Results Using a 10 point graded scale, the overall ESMSC concept was positively evaluated, with a mean score of 9.41 ± 0.72 (range: 8-10) and 8.94 ± 1.1 (range: 7-10). The majority of delegates from both series [9.86 ± 0.43 (range: 8-10) and 9.58 ± 0.91 (range: 6-10), respectively] believed that ESMSC should be incorporated in the undergraduate surgical curriculum. Comparison of responses from the UK to the Greek Medical Student, as well as the findings from the third and fourth year versus the fifth and sixth year Medical Students, revealed no statistically significant differences pertaining to any of the questions (p > 0.05). Current evidence in the literature supports the enhancement of surgical education through the systematic use of various modalities that provide Simulation-Based Training (SBT) hands-on experience, starting from the early undergraduate level. The findings of the present study are in agreement with these previous reports.

  10. Thrombolytic treatment in the oldest-old patient with acute ischemic stroke: an update on current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Maioli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ischemic stroke rises exponentially with age, with a steep increase in the age interval between 75 and 85 years. Thrombolytic therapy restores cerebral blood flow in patients with acute ischemic stroke of any etiology by using drugs that dissolve blood clots. Infusion for 1 h of alteplase at the dose of 0.9 mg/kg within 3 h of the start of the symptoms is associated to a 30% increase in the likelihood of gaining a favorable outcome with respect to placebo. There is strong evidence that selected patients with ischemic stroke may benefit from intravenous thrombolysis when treated within 3 h. The aim of the study was to evaluate available evidence for the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy in patients with ischemic stroke aged 80 years and over. Compared to younger stroke patients treated with thrombolytic therapy, those aged 80 years and over have higher acute mortality due to symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. However, functional outcome at six months is significantly better for over-80-year-olds than younger patients. There is a need for screening tools that take into account pre-stroke functional and cognitive status that are able to identify those over-80-year-old patients with ischemic stroke who can most benefit from thrombolytic treatment. Available evidence supports further recruitment of oldest-old patients into ongoing trials of thrombolysis.

  11. N-terminal pro B type natriuretic peptide in high cardiovascular-risk patients for noncardiac surgery: What is the current prognostic evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita K Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As millions of surgical procedures are performed worldwide on an aging population with multiple comorbidities, accurate and simple perioperative risk stratification is critical. The cardiac biomarker, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, has generated considerable interest as it is easy to obtain and appears to have powerful predictive and prognostic capabilities. BNP is currently being used to guide medical therapy for heart failure and has been added to several algorithms for perioperative risk stratification. This review examines the current evidence for the use of BNP in the perioperative period in patients who are at high-cardiovascular risk for noncardiac surgery. In addition, we examined the use of BNP in patients with pulmonary embolism and left ventricular assist devices. The available data strongly suggest that the addition of BNP to perioperative risk calculators is beneficial; however, whether this determination of risk will impact outcomes, remains to be seen.

  12. Cognitive behavioral therapy to aid weight loss in obese patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castelnuovo G

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gianluca Castelnuovo,1,2 Giada Pietrabissa,1,2 Gian Mauro Manzoni,1,3 Roberto Cattivelli,1,2 Alessandro Rossi,1 Margherita Novelli,1 Giorgia Varallo,1 Enrico Molinari1,2 1Psychology Research Laboratory, Istituto Auxologico Italiano IRCCS, San Giuseppe Hospital, Verbania, 2Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Milan, Milan, 3Faculty of Psychology, eCampus University, Novedrate, Italy Abstract: Obesity is a chronic condition associated with risk factors for many medical ­complications and comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases, some types of cancer, osteoarthritis, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, type-2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and different psychosocial issues and psychopathological disorders. Obesity is a highly complex, multifactorial disease: genetic, biological, psychological, behavioral, familial, social, cultural, and environmental factors can influence in different ways. Evidence-based strategies to improve weight loss, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce related comorbidities typically integrate different interventions: dietetic, nutritional, physical, behavioral, psychological, and if necessary, pharmacological and surgical ones. Such treatments are implemented in a multidisciplinary context with a clinical team composed of endocrinologists, nutritionists, dietitians, physiotherapists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and sometimes surgeons. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT is traditionally recognized as the best established treatment for binge eating disorder and the most preferred intervention for obesity, and could be considered as the first-line treatment among psychological approaches, especially in a long-term perspective; however, it does not necessarily produce a successful weight loss. Traditional CBT for weight loss and other protocols, such as enhanced CBT, enhanced focused CBT, behavioral weight loss treatment, therapeutic education, acceptance and commitment therapy

  13. Radical Prostatectomy Versus Radiation and Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: How Good Is the Evidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Mack, E-mail: mroach@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Ceron Lizarraga, Tania L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Lazar, Ann A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Division of Oral Epidemiology and Dental Public Health, Division of Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: The optimal treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer is controversial. Most studies focus on biochemical (PSA) failure when comparing radical prostatectomy (RP) with radiation therapy (RT), but this endpoint has not been validated as predictive of overall survival (OS) or cause-specific survival (CSS). We analyzed the available literature to determine whether reliable conclusions could be made concerning the effectiveness of RP compared with RT with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), assuming current treatment standards. Methods: Articles published between February 29, 2004, and March 1, 2015, that compared OS and CSS after RP or RT with or without ADT were included. Because the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) system emphasis is on randomized controlled clinical trials, a reliability score (RS) was explored to further understand the issues associated with the study quality of observational studies, including appropriateness of treatment, source of data, clinical characteristics, and comorbidity. Lower RS values indicated lower reliability. Results: Fourteen studies were identified, and 13 were completely evaluable. Thirteen of the 14 studies (93%) were observational studies with low-quality evidence. The median RS was 12 (range, 5-18); the median difference in 10-year OS and CSS favored RP over RT: 10% and 4%, respectively. In studies with a RS ≤12 (average RS 9) the 10-year OS and CSS median differences were 17% and 6%, respectively. For studies with a RS >12 (average RS 15.5), the 10-year OS and CSS median differences were 5.5% and 1%, respectively. Thus, we observed an association between low RS and a higher percentage difference in OS and CSS. Conclusions: Reliable evidence that RP provides a superior CSS to RT with ADT is lacking. The most reliable studies suggest that the differences in 10-year CSS between RP and RT are small, possibly <1%.

  14. Management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: current state-of-the-art care for optimizing visual outcomes and therapies in development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Rhoades, William R; Hanout, Mostafa; Soliman, Mohamed Kamel; Sarwar, Salman; Sadiq, Mohammad Ali; Sepah, Yasir Jamal; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has evolved significantly over the last few years. The goal of treatment is shifting from merely salvaging vision to maintaining a high quality of life. There have been significant breakthroughs in the identification of viable drug targets and gene therapies. Imaging tools with near-histological precision have enhanced our knowledge about pathophysiological mechanisms that play a role in vision loss due to AMD. Visual, social, and vocational rehabilitation are all important treatment goals. In this review, evidence from landmark clinical trials is summarized to elucidate the optimum modern-day management of neovascular AMD. Therapeutic strategies currently under development, such as gene therapy and personalized medicine, are also described. PMID:26089632

  15. Application and outcomes of therapy combining transcranial direct current stimulation and virtual reality: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massetti, Thais; Crocetta, Tânia Brusque; Silva, Talita Dias da; Trevizan, Isabela Lopes; Arab, Claudia; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida; Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira de Mello

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the methods and major outcomes of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) combined with virtual reality (VR) therapy in randomized controlled trials. A systematic review was performed following PRISMA guidelines using PubMed, PubMed Central, Web of Science and CAPES periodic databases, with no time restriction. The studies were screened for the following inclusion criteria: human subjects, combination of VR and tDCS methods, and randomized controlled study design. All potentially relevant articles were independently reviewed by two researchers, who reached a consensus on which articles met the inclusion criteria. The PEDro scale was used to evaluate the studies. Eleven studies were included, all of which utilized a variety of tDCS and VR application methods. The main outcomes were found to be beneficial in intervention groups of different populations, including improvements in body sway, gait, stroke recovery, pain management and vegetative reactions. The use of tDCS combined with VR showed positive results in both healthy and impaired patients. Future studies with larger sample sizes and homogeneous participants are required to confirm the benefits of tDCS and VR. Implications for Rehabilitation tDCS with VR intervention can be an alternative to traditional rehabilitation programs. tDCS with VR is a promising type of intervention with a variety of positive effects. Application of tDCS with VR is appropriated to both healthy and impaired patients. There is no consensus of tDCS with VR application.

  16. Measuring retrograde autobiographical amnesia following electroconvulsive therapy: historical perspective and current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkovska, Maria; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2013-06-01

    Retrograde amnesia following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a major concern for both patients and clinicians. In contemporary ECT research, retrograde autobiographical amnesia (RAA) is commonly measured with instruments assessing autobiographical memory (AM) consistency over time. However, normal AM recall loses in consistency with the passage of time, and time has a differential effect on stability of personal memories. In addition, experiencing depression is associated with a decreased ability to recall specific AMs, and this difficulty may persist in the euthymic phase of recurrent depression. Despite these scientific facts, relatively few attempts have been made to accurately measure the specific effect of ECT on AM independent of both normal and mood-associated forgetting over time. This major gap in our knowledge prevents us at present from objectively quantifying the nature and extent of RAA associated with ECT. In turn, this hinders our identifying and implementing strategies for prevention or remediation of AM deficits. The present article aims to provide an up-to-date review and historical perspective of this major methodological conundrum for ECT research, highlight current issues in retrograde amnesia assessment following ECT, and propose directions for future studies. In conclusion, we suggest methods to reliably and specifically measure the extent and progression over time of ECT-associated RAA independently from persistent depressive symptoms' contribution and normal loss in AM consistency over time.

  17. Merkel cell carcinoma: An update and review: Current and future therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Tiffany L; Coggshall, Kathleen; Yom, Sue S; Yu, Siegrid S

    2018-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumor of the skin associated with a high risk of local recurrence and distant metastases. It most commonly occurs on sun-exposed areas of white patients >65 years of age. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) is thought to be responsible for malignant transformation in approximately 80% of cases in the northern hemisphere, while ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage is implicated in MCV-negative tumors. The overall incidence of MCC is low, with approximately 1600 cases diagnosed annually in the United States. The rate is much higher in patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies, solid organ transplants, and HIV infection. The low overall incidence of this tumor makes it challenging to conduct prospective clinical trials with sufficient power. As a result, most management recommendations are based on case series, retrospective reviews, and expert opinion. The pathogenesis, diagnosis, and staging of MCC was discussed in the first article in this continuing medical education series. This article focuses on current management guidelines and promising new therapies in development. Because of the complexity, aggressive nature, and individuality of each case, MCC is best treated by a multidisciplinary team. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The complex biology and contribution of Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis, current and future therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, L; Hijnen, D J; Sellman, B R; Mustelin, T; Sleeman, M A; May, R D; Strickland, I

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex, chronic inflammatory skin disorder affecting more than 10% of U.K. children and is a major cause of occupation-related disability. A subset of patients, particularly those with severe AD, are persistently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus and exacerbation of disease is commonly associated with this bacterium by virtue of increased inflammation and allergic sensitization, aggravated by skin barrier defects. Understanding the complex biology of S. aureus is an important factor when developing new drugs to combat infection. Staphylococcus aureus generates exoproteins that enable invasion and dissemination within the host skin but can also damage the skin and activate the host immune system. Antibiotics are often used by dermatologists to aid clearance of S. aureus; however, these are becoming less effective and chronic usage is discouraged with the emergence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New ways to target S. aureus using monoclonal antibodies and vaccines are now being developed. This review will attempt to evaluate the key biology of S. aureus, current treatment of S. aureus infections in AD and recent advances in developing new anti-S. aureus therapies that have potential in severe AD. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Prescribing upper limb exercises after stroke: a survey of current UK therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Louise A; McMahon, Naoimh E; Eng, Janice J; Watkins, Caroline L

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the current practice of physiotherapists and occupational therapists in prescribing upper limb exercises to people after stroke and to explore differences between professions and work settings. A cross-sectional survey design. Occupational therapists and physiotherapists working in UK stroke rehabilitation. The survey's response rate was 21.0% (n = 322); with 295 valid responses. Almost two thirds of therapists (64.7%, n = 191) agreed that they always prescribe upper limb exercises to a person with stroke if they can actively elevate their scapula and have grade 1 finger/wrist extension. Most therapists (98.6%, n = 278) prescribed exercises to be completed outside of therapy time, with exercises verbally communicated to family. Standardised upper limb specific outcome measures were used to evaluate the prescribed exercises by 21.9% (n = 62) OF THERAPISTS. DIFFERENCES WERE FOUND BETWEEN PROFESSIONS AND ACROSS WORK SETTINGS. The majority of prescribed upper limb exercises were of low intensity (range of motion or stretching exercises) rather than repetitive practice or strengthening exercises. The use of standardised outcome measures was low. Progression of exercises and the provision of written instructions on discharge occur less frequently in inpatient settings than outpatient and community settings.

  20. [Current status and treatment results of combined modality therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Motoi; Murata, Akihiro; Sakamoto, Yoshiyuki; Morohashi, Hajime; Akasaka, Harue; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the current status of combined modality therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer. Between 2000 and 2011, 43 patients(26 men and 17 women; mean age, 60 years) developed local pelvic recurrence after curative surgery. The recurrence pattern was almost equally distributed as 53% (23/43) pelvic, and 47% (20/43) pelvic and metastatic disease. Regarding the form of local recurrence, localized type and lateral spread type were present in 25 and 18 patients, respectively. In all, 24 patients underwent surgical resection for recurrent disease, and 87% of these patients underwent potentially curative surgery. The 3- and 5-year overall survival rates for patients who were treated with surgical resection were 42% and 29%, respectively. These results were significantly favorable when compared to the non-surgical group of patients who were treated with chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy. Localized type recurrence is a statistically significant prognostic factor for improved survival compared to lateral spread type recurrence. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and surgical resection should be a standard treatment option for patients with localized type recurrence, and chemoradiotherapy is better indicated for patients with lateral spread type recurrence.

  1. Evidence informed management of chronic low back pain with cognitive behavioral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatchel, Robert J.; Rollings, Kathryn H.

    2011-01-01

    Editors’ preface The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing amongst available non-surgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited healthcare resources to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used non-surgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this supplement to The Spine Journal, titled Evidence informed management of chronic low back pain without surgery. Articles in this supplement were contributed by leading spine practitioners and researchers, who were invited to summarize the best available evidence for a particular intervention and encouraged to make this information accessible to non-experts. Each of the articles contains five sections (description, theory, evidence of efficacy, harms, and summary) with common subheadings to facilitate comparison across the 24 different interventions profiled in this supplement, blending narrative and systematic review methodology as deemed appropriate by the authors. It is hoped that articles in this supplement will be informative and aid in decision making for the many stakeholders evaluating non-surgical interventions for CLBP. PMID:18164452

  2. Absence of evidence for enhanced benefit of antibiotic therapy on recurrent acute rhinosinusitis episodes: a systematic review of the evidence base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaper, N.M.; Breukel, L.; Venekamp, R.P.; Grolman, W.; van der Heijden, G.J.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the evidence base on the effectiveness of short-course antibiotic therapy in adult patients with a recurrent episode of acute rhinosinusitis as part of a disease pattern on severity and duration of symptoms and recurrences. Data Sources PubMed, EMBASE, and the

  3. Shared decision making and patient choice for growth hormone therapy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Belinda George, Vageesh Ayyar Department of Endocrinology, St. John’s Medical College Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Growth hormone has now been available in medical practice for close to 50 years. Its use has provided dramatic results in patients with growth hormone deficiency and it is associated with an overall favorable safety profile. Over the years, the utility of growth hormone has expanded to include treatment for short stature associated with conditions other than growth hormone deficiency, and this situation warrants greater involvement of the child and parents in the shared decision-making process. Shared decision making is in good conformance to the principle of informed consent, and it also improves the compliance and adherence to therapy as the patient fully understands the benefit and safety of the treatment. In the pediatric-care setting, the decision-making interactions usually occur between the health care provider, patient, and parents. The process may range from an autonomous decision-making pattern, where the patient or parents are fully responsible for the decision taken, to the paternalistic decision-making pattern, where the health care provider assumes full responsibility for the decision taken. However, the ideal situation is one where a truly shared decision-making process happens, in which the doctor and patient/parents work together to choose an evidence-based option, in line with the patient’s preferences and wishes. The limited data available on shared decision making with regard to growth hormone replacement, however, is not very encouraging and suggests that the actual involvement of the parents as perceived by them is less than optimal. Introduction of a simple structured model for a shared decision-making process that can be easily incorporated into clinical practice and familiarization of health care providers with the same is essential to improve our shared decision-making practices

  4. Towards Evidence-Based Initial Teacher Education in Singapore: A Review of Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ee-Ling; Hui, Chenri; Taylor, Peter G.; Ng, Pak Tee

    2012-01-01

    Initial teacher education (ITE) in Singapore is shifting towards evidence-based practice. Despite a clear policy orientation, ITE in Singapore has not yet produced the evidence base that it is anticipating. This paper presents an analytical review of previous research into ITE in Singapore and makes comparisons to the larger international context.…

  5. Hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase - Target of current antiviral therapy and future drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel N; Hu, Jianming

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections rely on the proper functioning of the viral polymerase enzyme, a specialized reverse transcriptase (RT) with multiple activities. All currently approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of chronic HBV infection, except for interferon, target the RT and belong to the same chemical class - they are all nucleoside analogs. Viral DNA synthesis is carried out by the RT enzyme in several different steps, each with distinct RT conformational requirements. In principle, each stage may be targeted by distinct antiviral drugs. In particular, the HBV RT has the unique ability to initiate viral DNA synthesis using itself as a protein primer in a novel protein priming reaction. In order to help identify RT inhibitors and study their mechanisms of action, a number of experimental systems have been developed, each varying in its ability to dissect the protein priming stage and subsequent stages of viral DNA synthesis at the molecular level. Two of the most effective drugs to date, entecavir and tenofovir, can inhibit both the protein priming and the subsequent DNA elongation stages of HBV DNA synthesis. Interestingly, clevudine, a thymidine analog, can inhibit both protein priming and DNA elongation in a non-competitive manner and without being incorporated into the viral DNA. Thus, a nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) can functionally mimic a non-NRTI (NNRTI) in its inhibition of the HBV RT. Therefore, novel NRTIs as well as NNRTIs may be developed to inhibit the DNA synthesis activity of the HBV RT. Furthermore, additional activities of the RT that are also essential to HBV replication, including specific recognition of the viral RNA and its packaging into viral nucleocapsids, may be exploited for antiviral development. To achieve a more potent inhibition of viral replication and ultimately cure chronic HBV infection, the next generation of anti-HBV therapies will likely need to include NRTIs, NNRTIs, and other agents that target the viral RT as

  6. Inhaled therapies in patients with moderate COPD in clinical practice: current thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel A

    2017-12-01

    to a reduction in exercise capacity and changes that correlate with long-term patient outcomes and mortality. Implementation of an effective management strategy is required to reduce symptoms, preserve lung function, quality of life, and exercise capacity, and prevent exacerbations. However,