WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapy common themes

  1. Interaction Themes in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    Based on a doctoral study, the author presents a type of music therapy interaction called ‘Interaction Themes.’ These are developed from session to session and often appear in music therapy interventions with children with severe functional limitations, especially children with autism. Although...... whose expressions are often difficult to understand. This presentation describes the characteristics and functions of Interaction Themes, compares the phenomenon with music therapy case literature and delimits it in regard to other types of music therapy interaction with this client group....... the Interaction Themes are characterised by a relatively simple and self-generated content, they have an essential function because they contain the child’s and music therapist’s joint interaction history. They make up the context within which it is possible to create meaningful interaction with a client group...

  2. Interaction Themes in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    Based on a doctoral study, the author presents a type of music therapy interaction called ‘Interaction Themes.’ These are developed from session to session and often appear in music therapy interventions with children with severe functional limitations, especially children with autism. Although...... whose expressions are often difficult to understand. The presented article describes the characteristics and functions of Interaction Themes, compares the phenomenon with music therapy case literature and delimits it in regard to other types of music therapy interaction with this client group....... the Interaction Themes are characterised by a relatively simple and self-generated content, they have an essential function because they contain the child’s and music therapist’s joint interaction history. They make up the context within which it is possible to create meaningful interaction with a client group...

  3. Interaction themes in music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2004-01-01

    Based on a doctoral study, the author presents a type of music therapyinteraction called ?Interaction Themes.? These are developed fromsession to session and often appear in music therapy interventions withchildren with severe functional limitations, especially children withautism. Although...... whoseexpressions are often difficult to understand. The article describes thecharacteristics and functions of Interaction Themes, compares thephenomenon with music therapy case literature and delimits it in regardto other types of music therapy interaction with this client group. Theresults are described through...... the Interaction Themes are characterised by arelatively simple and self-generated content, they have an essentialfunction because they contain the child?s and music therapist?s jointinteraction history. They make up the context within which it ispossible to create meaningful interaction with a client group...

  4. Canada: variations on a common theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa B. Deber

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Canada faces health care challenges common to all industrialized countries – how to ensure timely access to high quality care, close to home, at an affordable cost. Addressing these challenges is complicated by interjurisdictional variation in both how health care is managed and delivered, and in health outcomes. Canada can be described as a non-system of 10 provincial and three territorial health insurance plans which mandate publicly-funded coverage for medically necessary hospital and physician services, based upon common principles and shaped by a federal governance structure that affords substantial power and autonomy to the provinces/territories over matters of health and health care. This article first examines the structural context of the health care system in Canada, including the range of services publicly funded, the public-private mix, and the complexities of current governance arrangements. It then discusses several issues affecting health policy reform: costs versus access; questions of sustainability, quality, and performance; human resources capacity; and the provision of public and population health services.

  5. Applying Common Latino Magazine Cover Line Themes to Health Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Colleen L.; Barrios, Pamela; Lozada, Carolina; Soto-Balbuena, Kenlly; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe strategies used in magazine cover lines to capture the attention of Latino consumers. A content analysis of cover lines (n = 581) from six top-selling Latino women's and parenting magazines (n = 217 issues) sold in the United States identified 12 common themes: great/inspiring, beauty/health, bad/negative,…

  6. Common Core Themes in Geomorphic, Ecological, and Social Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen; Gerlak, Andrea K.; Poff, N. LeRoy; Chin, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Core themes of geomorphology include: open systems and connectivity; feedbacks and complexity; spatial differentiation of dominant physical processes within a landscape; and legacy effects of historical human use of resources. Core themes of ecology include: open systems and connectivity; hierarchical, heterogeneous, dynamic, and context-dependent characteristics of ecological patterns and processes; nonlinearity, thresholds, hysteresis, and resilience within ecosystems; and human effects. Core themes of environmental governance include: architecture of institutions and decision-making; agency, or ability of actors to prescribe behavior of people in relation to the environment; adaptiveness of social groups to environmental change; accountability and legitimacy of systems of governance; allocation of and access to resources; and thresholds and feedback loops within environmental policy. Core themes common to these disciplines include connectivity, feedbacks, tipping points or thresholds, and resiliency. Emphasizing these points of disciplinary overlap can facilitate interdisciplinary understanding of complex systems, as well as more effective management of landscapes and ecosystems by highlighting drivers of change within systems. We use a previously published conceptual framework to examine how these core themes can be integrated into interdisciplinary research for human-landscape systems via the example of a river.

  7. Common themes in changing vector-borne disease scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, David H

    2003-01-01

    The impact of climate change on disease patterns is controversial. However, global burden of disease studies suggest that infectious diseases will contribute a proportionately smaller burden of disease over the next 2 decades as non-communicable diseases emerge as public health problems. However, infectious diseases contribute proportionately more in the poorest quintile of the population. Notwithstanding the different views of the impact of global warming on vector-borne infections this paper reviews the conditions which drive the changing epidemiology of these infections and suggests that such change is linked by common themes including interactions of generalist vectors and reservoir hosts at interfaces with humans, reduced biodiversity associated with anthropogenic environmental changes, increases in Plasmodium falciparum: P. vivax ratios and well-described land use changes such as hydrological, urbanization, agricultural, mining and forest-associated impacts (extractive activities, road building, deforestation and migration) which are seen on a global scale.

  8. From gametogenesis and stem cells to cancer: common metabolic themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sandro L; Rodrigues, Ana Sofia; Sousa, Maria Inês; Correia, Marcelo; Perestrelo, Tânia; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2014-01-01

    Both pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and cancer cells have been described as having similar metabolic pathways, most notably a penchant for favoring glycolysis even under aerobiosis, suggesting common themes that might be explored for both stem cell differentiation and anti-oncogenic purposes. A search of the scientific literature available in the PubMed/Medline was conducted for studies on metabolism and mitochondrial function related to gametogenesis, early development, stem cells and cancers in the reproductive system, notably breast, prostate, ovarian and testicular cancers. Both PSCs and some types of cancer cells, particularly reproductive cancers, were found to obtain energy mostly by glycolysis, often reducing mitochondrial activity and oxidative phosphorylation. This strategy links proliferating cells, allowing for the biosynthesis reactions necessary for cell division. Interventions that affect metabolic pathways, and force cells to change their preferences, can lead to shifts in cell status, increasing either pluripotency or differentiation of stem cells, and causing cancer cells to become more or less aggressive. Interestingly metabolic changes in many cases seemed to lead to cell transformation, not necessarily follow it, suggesting a direct role of metabolic choices in influencing the (epi)genetic program of different cell types. There are uncanny similarities between PSCs and cancer cells at the metabolic level. Furthermore, metabolism may also play a direct role in cell status and targeting metabolic pathways could therefore be a promising strategy for both the control of cancer cell proliferation and the regulation of stem cell physiology, in terms of manipulating stem cells toward relevant phenotypes that may be important for tissue engineering, or making cancer cells become less tumorigenic. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For

  9. Epigenetic changes: a common theme in acute myelogenous leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Soraya E; Romero-Oliva, Francisco A

    2013-08-13

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rather common disease, characterized by the presence of a clonal population of hematopoietic progenitor cells with impaired differentiation. Although traditionally AML has been considered the result of genetic alterations, more recently experimental evidence have demonstrated that epigenetic modifications are important in development and maintenance of leukemia cells. In this review we summarize current scientific knowledge of epigenetic alterations involved in leukemogenesis. We also highlight the developing of new technological strategies that are based on epigenetic processes and have been registered as Patents of Inventions in the United Nations dependent World Intellectual Property Office (WIPO) and the main Patent offices worldwide.

  10. Educational fellowship programs: common themes and overarching issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppen, Larry D; Simpson, Deborah; Searle, Nancy S; Robins, Lynne; Irby, David M; Mullan, Patricia B

    2006-11-01

    The trend toward intensive faculty development programs has been driven by a variety of factors, including institutional needs for educational expertise and leadership, as well as individual faculty members' motivation to augment their educational expertise, teaching skills, and leadership skills. The nine programs described in this issue possess several common features that can be ascribed to shared perceptions of pervasive needs coupled with feasible educational resources and strategies to meet these needs. All programs identify a clear set of goals and objectives for their respective curricula. Curriculum domains include not only teaching skills but also educational research, curriculum development, and educational leadership. In spite of many similarities, each program reflects the unique character of its home institution, the faculty, educational resources, and the specific goals of the program. Each program has documented gains in such key outcomes as participant promotions, new leadership positions both locally and nationally, and scholarly productivity in the form of peer-reviewed papers and presentations. Evidence of institutional benefits includes the production of innovative curricula and a pool of educational leaders. The programs have also developed a community of knowledgeable scholars who interact with each other and serve as a catalyst for continuing change and educational improvement. Although each program was developed largely independently of the others, the common elements in their design provide opportunities to evaluate collaboratively the successful aspects of such programs and to share ideas and resources for program curricula between existing programs and with institutions considering implementing new programs.

  11. Common themes, methods, and applications in multiscale science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, G.A. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    In 1993, under the leadership of Richard Slansky, the T-Division Director, an initiative was started to facilitate cross communications and interactions between a large number of different workers who were, from their own perspectives and with regard to their own challenges, in fact working on very difficult problems which involved multiple size and time scales. The realization of this common element had the potential for valuable mutual interaction. His initiative led initially to a competency development initiative and subsequently to a broadening recognition of the importance of multiscale science and a broadening application of it to problems and concerns inherent in significant fields of endeavor at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. One of the aspects of this effort was a series of meetings which emphasizes cross communication between the workers. It was realized early on that this cross communication would be fare more effective, considering the difficult technical nature and that the range of the material was well outside the area of specialization of individual members of the group, if notes were taken, written up, and disseminated. This report represents the collection of these notes.

  12. Common Themes in the Experiences of Mother-Daughter Incest Survivors: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Beverly; Daniluk, Judith

    1995-01-01

    Studied mother-daughter incest. Common themes were extracted from in-depth interviews with survivors of mother-perpetrated sexual abuse, some of which parallel the experience of survivors of other forms of child sexual abuse, and some of which are more specific to mother-daughter incest. Discusses themes and counseling implications. (JBJ)

  13. The role of play themes in non-directive play therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Virginia; Edge, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    Describing the processes underlying play therapy is important for evidence based practice in child therapy. Employing play themes to describe children's play session contents is in widespread use by practitioners, but an adequate classification of these themes for non-directive play therapy practice has not yet been established. This article sets out to fill this gap by first describing how themes can be distinguished and distilled from the contents of play therapy contents. Second, a classification of main themes and sub-themes with exemplars to illustrate these concepts which is compatible with non-directive play therapy practice is set out. Finally a pilot project with experienced play therapists to test this classification in practice is suggested, along with the research questions that will need to be investigated in the shorter and longer terms.

  14. Common themes in nutrient acquisition by plant symbiotic microbes, described by the Gene Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibucos, Marcus C; Tyler, Brett M

    2009-01-01

    A critical function for symbionts is the acquisition of nutrients from their host. Relationships between hosts and symbionts range from biotrophic mutualism to necrotrophic parasitism, with a corresponding range of structures to facilitate nutrient flow between host and symbiont. Here, we review common themes among the nutrient acquisition strategies of a range of plant symbiotic microorganisms, including mutualistic symbionts, biotrophic pathogens that feed from living tissue, necrotrophic pathogens that kill host tissue, and hemibiotrophic pathogens that switch from biotrophy to necrotrophy. We show how Gene Ontology (GO) terms developed by the Plant-Associated Microbe Gene Ontology (PAMGO) Consortium can be used for describing commonalities in nutrient acquisition among diverse plant symbionts. Where appropriate, parallels found among animal symbionts are also highlighted. PMID:19278554

  15. Pauses in Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons: What is Revealed by Their Common Themes and Variations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Feng Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Striatal cholinergic interneurons, the so-called tonically active neurons (TANs, pause their firing in response to sensory cues and rewards during classical conditioning and instrumental tasks. The respective pause responses observed can demonstrate many commonalities, such as constant latency and duration, synchronous occurrence in a population of cells, and coincidence with phasic activities of midbrain dopamine neurons (DANs that signal reward predictions and errors. Pauses can however also show divergent properties. Pause latencies and durations can differ in a given TAN between appetitive vs. aversive outcomes in classical conditioning, initial excitation can be present or absent, and a second pause can variably follow a rebound. Despite more than 20 years of study, the functions of these pause responses are still elusive. Our understanding of pause function is hindered by an incomplete understanding of how pauses are generated. In this mini-review article, we compare pause types, as well as current key hypotheses for inputs underlying pauses that include dopamine-induced inhibition through D2-receptors, a GABA input from ventral tegmental area, and a prolonged afterhyperpolarization induced by excitatory input from the cortex or from the thalamus. We review how each of these mechanisms alone explains some but not all aspects of pause responses. These mechanisms might need to operate in specific but variable sets of sequences to generate a full range of pause responses. Alternatively, these mechanisms might operate in conjunction with an underlying control mechanism within cholinergic interneurons which could potentially provide a framework to generate the common themes and variations seen amongst pause responses.

  16. Human Rights and the Environment: In Search of a New Relationship. Synergies and Common Themes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evadne Grant

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2012 Oñati Workshop on Human Rights and the Environment sought to begin the important task of developing a new framework that could contribute to re-imagining the relationship between human rights and the environment. Doing full justice to the vibrant and sustained discussion that took place in response to the papers delivered in the Workshop is near impossible in an ex post facto account that can only convey the merest flavour of the richness and complexity of what took place. Nonetheless, the following sections briefly recollect common themes and valuable insights that emerged during the workshop discussions and attempt to reflect the energy and creativity that accompanied them, with a view to setting out the general context within which the various individual papers in this volume should be considered. We have arranged the subsequent discussion to centre on the core discrete yet interrelated themes that emerged and developed during our workshop deliberations, namely: vulnerability; the limits of the law; the limits of rights; responsibility; interconnection; and thinking ecologically. El seminario sobre Derechos Humanos y Medio Ambiente celebrado en Oñati en 2012, buscó iniciar la importante tarea de desarrollar un nuevo marco que podría contribuir a re-imaginar la relación entre los derechos humanos y el medio ambiente. Haciendo justicia a la discusión vibrante y prolongada que tuvo lugar en respuesta a las ponencias presentadas en el taller, es casi imposible en un recuento ex post facto que sólo puede transmitir una mínima parte de la riqueza y complejidad de lo acontecido en Oñati. No obstante, las siguientes secciones recogen brevemente temas comunes y valiosas ideas que surgieron durante las discusiones del taller y tratan de reflejar la energía y creatividad que los acompañaba, con el fin de establecer el marco general dentro del cual las diversas ponencias individuales de este volumen deberían ser consideradas. Hemos

  17. Risk and protective factors for sexual aggression and dating violence: common themes and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Martie P

    2014-10-01

    The primary aims of this article are to expand on three themes from the conference articles on risk and protective factors for dating and sexual violence and to offer suggestions that can guide future research. The first theme is the co-occurrence of sexual and dating violence with other forms of violence and other campus health issues. A second topic is the value of prospective studies in revealing temporal patterns of victimization and perpetration. A third theme is the role of peer norms in violence among college students. Suggestions for translating these ideas into research and action are discussed and include the need for comprehensive prevention approaches, more longitudinal research spanning the years before, during, and after college, and the application of social media technology in our interventions strategies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. The Tree Theme Method in psychosocial occupational therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, A Birgitta; Jansson, Jan-Ake; Eklund, Mona

    2006-12-01

    This study aimed to describe the Tree Theme Method (TTM) as a method for intervention in psychosocial occupational therapy. The TTM is based on theories concerning creative activities and occupational storytelling and story making. In order to exemplify the method a case study of a treatment process with follow up was undertaken. The participant was a female client suffering from anxiety and depression. During an interview the client painted symbolic trees on five different occasions with specific variations of the tree theme: a tree symbolizing her present life, her childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and, finally, a tree representing her future. The trees were used as starting points for the client to tell her life story. The intention was that she would find new strategies for how to change her daily life. Three years later there was a follow up stage where the client painted new trees and told her story. Some life themes were identified. The TTM appears suitable for intervention in psychosocial occupational therapy. In future studies the TTM should be subjected to evaluation research based on several clients in order to develop a deeper understanding of the process and what kind of results changes in the TTM intervention may provide.

  19. Panel Discussion: Common Themes Across ``Bringing Newcomers Into The Physics Community''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Angela

    2014-03-01

    I will be facilitating a discussion between the audience and the four speakers in this session: Dimitri Dounas-Frazer, Catherine Good, Casey Miller, and Katie Hinko. They will all be speaking on the same general topic of supporting newcomers to the physics community at critical transition points but come from a set of diverse contexts and perspectives. Their work spans a wide age range of STEM students and they approach their work through many different lenses: as physics faculty, program directors, education and psychology researchers, and combinations thereof. Broad themes across these contexts and perspectives will be explored such as the role of growth mindset, community, and professional development.

  20. Primary care provider reflections on common themes from special issue on ethical quandaries when delivering integrated primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Debra A

    2013-03-01

    Comments on the articles by Hudgins, Rose, Fifield, & Arnault, (see record 2013-11498-002), Reiter & Runyan, (see record 2013-11498-003), Hodgson, Mendenhall, & Lamson (see record 2013-11498-004), and Kanzler, Goodie, Hunter, Glotfelter, & Bodart (see record 2013-11498-005), regarding the topic of common themes for the special issue on ethical quandaries when delivering integrated primary care. The current author provides brief reflections on each article. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. The signaling helix: a common functional theme in diverse signaling proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2006-09-01

    signaling domains. However, upon occurrence of specific conformational changes due to binding of ligand or other sensory inputs in a linked upstream domain it transmits the signal to the downstream domain. Thus, the S-helix represents one of the most prevalent functional themes involved in the flow of signals between modules in diverse prokaryote-type multi-domain signaling proteins. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Frank Eisenhaber, Arcady Mushegian and Sandor Pongor.

  2. Core Themes in Music Therapy Clinical Improvisation: An Arts-Informed Qualitative Research Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Anthony; Wimpenny, Katherine

    2017-07-01

    Although clinical improvisation continues to be an important focus of music therapy research and practice, less attention has been given to integrating qualitative research in this area. As a result, this knowledge base tends to be contained within specific areas of practice rather than integrated across practices and approaches. This qualitative research synthesis profiles, integrates, and re-presents qualitative research focused on the ways music therapists and clients engage in, and make meaning from, clinical improvisation. Further, as a conduit for broadening dialogues, opening up this landscape fully, and sharing our response to the analysis and interpretation process, we present an arts-informed re-presentation of this synthesis. Following an eight-step methodological sequence, 13 qualitative studies were synthesized. This included reciprocal and refutational processes associated with synthesizing the primary studies, and additional steps associated with an arts-informed representation. Three themes, professional artistry, performing self, and meaning-making, are presented. Each theme is explored and exemplified through the selected articles, and discussed within a larger theoretical framework. An artistic re-presentation of the data is also presented. Music therapists use complex frameworks through which to engage clients in, and make meaning from, improvisational experiences. Artistic representation of the findings offers an added dimension to the synthesis process, challenging our understanding of representation, and thereby advancing synthesis methodology.

  3. The nuclear pore complex core scaffold and permeability barrier: variations of a common theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Ryo; Rout, Michael P; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier

    2017-06-01

    The study of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a fascinating endeavor, as it not only implies uncovering the 'engineering marvel' of its architecture and function, but also provides a key window into a significant evolutionary event: the origin of the eukaryotic cell. The combined efforts of many groups in the field, with the help of novel methodologies and new model organisms, are facilitating a much deeper understanding of this complex assembly. Here we cover recent advances on the characterization of the structure of the NPC scaffold and of the biophysical mechanisms that define the permeability barrier. We identify common architectural and functional principles between those two NPC compartments, expanding the previous protocoatomer hypothesis to suggest possible evolutionary origins for the FG nucleoporins and the NPC permeability barrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-term memory for 400 pictures on a common theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Stine; Magnussen, Svein

    2007-01-01

    Long-term memory for large numbers of color photographs with a common motif--doors--was studied using pictures with two levels of informative cues: original photographs, and edited pictures in which extraneous information on details such as vegetation, paint scratches, signs, and lamp posts was removed. In the study phase, subjects viewed 400 pictures and were subsequently tested for memory on two-alternative forced-choice discriminations between studied and distracter pictures from the same picture category, at retention intervals between 0.5 h and 9 days. When tested with the nonedited original photographs immediate memory performance was close to 85% correct; when pictorial details were removed memory performance dropped by 20%. The decay functions were shallow with parallel paths for the categories of pictures. It is concluded that specific details of visual scenes contributed to long-term memory of those scenes.

  5. Teaching of human physiology. A study with speech therapy students about the theme ‘homeostasis’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Souza Galvão

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was made with the purpose of understanding the learning process of first-year Speech Therapy students under the discipline General Physiology. The research of the theme homeostasis involved a sample of these students and teaching actions about this subject with the use of teaching resources. The nature of the study is a qualitative one based on the Ausubelian theoretical matrix in which teaching actions involve progressive differentiation and integrative reconciliation, articulation between concepts and ideas traditionally produced and taught in a fragmentary manner. The results obtained show that students develop more scientific ideas about biological phenomena, in particular homeostasis, that they start to take a more active part in the (reconstruction of personal knowledge and in the development of a new school curriculum; that they overcome the knowledge fragmentation which makes understanding, representing and teaching knowledge itself harder nowadays.

  6. Giving structure to the biofilm matrix: an overview of individual strategies and emerging common themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobley, Laura; Harkins, Catriona; MacPhee, Cait E.; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of microbial cells that underpin diverse processes including sewage bioremediation, plant growth promotion, chronic infections and industrial biofouling. The cells resident in the biofilm are encased within a self-produced exopolymeric matrix that commonly comprises lipids, proteins that frequently exhibit amyloid-like properties, eDNA and exopolysaccharides. This matrix fulfils a variety of functions for the community, from providing structural rigidity and protection from the external environment to controlling gene regulation and nutrient adsorption. Critical to the development of novel strategies to control biofilm infections, or the capability to capitalize on the power of biofilm formation for industrial and biotechnological uses, is an in-depth knowledge of the biofilm matrix. This is with respect to the structure of the individual components, the nature of the interactions between the molecules and the three-dimensional spatial organization. We highlight recent advances in the understanding of the structural and functional role that carbohydrates and proteins play within the biofilm matrix to provide three-dimensional architectural integrity and functionality to the biofilm community. We highlight, where relevant, experimental techniques that are allowing the boundaries of our understanding of the biofilm matrix to be extended using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae, and Bacillus subtilis as exemplars. PMID:25907113

  7. Commentary on the treatment of gender variant and gender dysphoric children and adolescents: common themes and ethical reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This commentary offers preliminary ethical reflections on the range of treatments for gender variant and gender dysphoric children, adolescents, and young adults described in the preceding five clinical articles. After clarifying the terminology used to discuss these issues, this commentary reviews several common themes of the clinical articles. Focusing on ethical values of informed consent, full disclosure, the minimization or avoidance of harm, and the maximization of life options, the commentary expresses concerns about various treatment options endorsed by some of the articles. In particular, this commentary focuses on how these practices problematically reproduce social prejudices and stereotypes and how they fail to acknowledge and embrace the multiple pathways for expressing one's gender. It also compares and contrasts the ethical issues related to gender variant and gender dysphoric youths and youths who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or queer.

  8. Cognitive and Behavioral Group Therapy with Puerto Rican Women: A Comparison of Content Themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-Diaz, Lillian

    1985-01-01

    Empirically observes psychotherapeutic content themes in two distinct group psychotherapies (cognitive treatment following Beck's theory and behavioral treatment following Lewinsohn's model) conducted with 16 Puerto Rican women. Reveals no significant differences in findings between treatment groups. Discusses content themes in context of Puerto…

  9. Theming Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erb, Maribeth; Ong, Chin Ee

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a special issue on Theme Parks in Asia with reflections on how the various theoretical ideas on theming and theme parks that are found in the social science literature can help us to understand the proliferation of theming and theme parks in contemporary Asia. How does theming

  10. Resourcefulness, Desperation, Shame, Gratitude and Powerlessness: Common Themes Emerging from A Study of Food Bank Use in Northeast Scotland

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    Flora Douglas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is growing policy maker and public concern about current trends in food bank use in Scotland. Yet little is known about the experiences of those seeking help from food banks in this country. This research aimed to address this issue by studying the use and operation of a food bank situated in a rich northeast city during January and June 2014. The study aimed to establish who was seeking help from the food bank, their reasons for doing so, and what those who did thought of, and dealt with the food they received from it. Consequently, an audit of the food bank's client database, four months of participant observation based in the food bank, and seven face-to-face interviews with current and former food bank clients were conducted. The audit revealed that clients came from a range of socio-economic backgrounds, with men more likely to access it compared to women. Debt and social security benefit delays were cited as the main reasons for doing so. Qualitative data confirmed that sudden and unanticipated loss of income was a key driver of use. Resourcefulness in making donated food last as long as possible, keeping fuel costs low, and concern to minimise food waste were commonly described by participants. Desperation, gratitude, shame and powerlessness were also prevalent themes. Furthermore, clients were reluctant to ask for food they normally ate, as they were acutely aware that the food bank had little control over what it was able offer. Insights from this study suggest that recent UK policy proposals to address food poverty may have limited impact, without concomitant effort to address material disadvantage. Research is urgently required to determine the precise nature and extent of household level food insecurity in Scotland, and to consider monitoring for adverse physical and mental health outcomes for those affected by it.

  11. Old themes, new directions--occupational therapy in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madill, H M; Cardwell, M T; Robinson, I M; Brintnell, E S

    1986-11-01

    The paper begins with a brief look at directions for the future of occupational therapy as expressed in occupational therapy literature over the past six decades. The major contributions in the areas of practice, research and education, professional organization, and theory/knowledge base are highlighted. It then considers current social issues in Canadian society which have a bearing on occupational therapy and implications for its future development: population trends, health status and hospitalization, universal access to health and social services, unemployment, client expectations, multiculturism, medical ethics, family breakdown and child abuse. It looks at the occupational therapy profession in relation to these social issues and concludes with a summary of implications for occupational therapy and predictions for its future into the 21st century based on the analysis of these trends.

  12. A pilot analysis of the psychological themes found during the CARING at Columbia--Music Therapy program with refugee adolescents from North Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Carolyn Mi Hwan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the psychological themes found during the modified CARING at Columbia-Music Therapy (CAC-MT) program with refugee adolescents from North Korea. Nine students attending an alternative school participated in this study. Academically, students belong to an equivalent middle school level. Students participated in a music therapy program comprised of 25 sessions. A multiple case analysis was conducted to gather qualitative results. Students were found to be exposed to various psychosocially stressful life situations such as lack of social support system, family separation, academic difficulty, and economic hardship throughout their adaptation process to their new country. There were 5 common psychological themes--avoidance, distrust, loneliness, feelings of loss, and fear--found among the refugee students over the course of the CAC-MT treatment. For future research, studies with a larger sample size and differing types of session structure should be conducted to closely examine the effects of this program on refugee adolescents.

  13. Complete clinical responses to cancer therapy caused by multiple divergent approaches: a repeating theme lost in translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coventry BJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Brendon J Coventry, Martin L AshdownDiscipline of Surgery, University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Over 50 years of cancer therapy history reveals complete clinical responses (CRs from remarkably divergent forms of therapies (eg, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, vaccines, autologous cell transfers, cytokines, monoclonal antibodies for advanced solid malignancies occur with an approximately similar frequency of 5%–10%. This has remained frustratingly almost static. However, CRs usually underpin strong durable 5-year patient survival. How can this apparent paradox be explained?Over some 20 years, realization that (1 chronic inflammation is intricately associated with cancer, and (2 the immune system is delicately balanced between responsiveness and tolerance of cancer, provides a greatly significant insight into ways cancer might be more effectively treated. In this review, divergent aspects from the largely segmented literature and recent conferences are drawn together to provide observations revealing some emerging reasoning, in terms of "final common pathways" of cancer cell damage, immune stimulation, and auto-vaccination events, ultimately leading to cancer cell destruction. Created from this is a unifying overarching concept to explain why multiple approaches to cancer therapy can provide complete responses at almost equivalent rates. This "missing" aspect provides a reasoned explanation for what has, and is being, increasingly reported in the mainstream literature – that inflammatory and immune responses appear intricately associated with, if not causative of, complete responses induced by divergent forms of cancer therapy. Curiously, whether by chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, or other means, therapy-induced cell injury results, leaving inflammation and immune system stimulation as a final common denominator across all of these mechanisms of cancer

  14. Religion Theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrahy, Dennis J.

    One of a series of seven units designed to develop the reading and writing skills of low achievers in the social studies, this activity book focuses on the theme of religion. The booklet can be used for high school classes, individual study in alternative and continuing high schools, and adult education classes. An introduction to polytheism and…

  15. THEME SYMPOSIUM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-04

    Nov 4, 2016 ... and control non-communicable diseases. Many of the emerging causes. THEME SYMPOSIUM of visual impairment are chronic aging diseases sharing similar risk ..... missing recently developed pathologies. Surgical technique. 1. The gold standard technique for cataract surgery is Phacoemulsification.

  16. The Tree Theme Method® (TTM), an occupational therapy intervention for treating depression and anxiety : Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gunnarsson, Birgitta; Wagman, Petra; Håkansson, Carita; Hedin, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety disorders are increasing among the general population in the Western world. Individuals may need several kinds of treatment in order to maintain health, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and drug treatment. However, having an everyday life that ?works? is also important, suggesting a need for interventions based on activities that facilitate a satisfying everyday life. There is still lack of such evidence-based interventions. The Tree Theme Method? ...

  17. Accessing Transgenerational Themes Through Dreamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jennifer; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Proposes use of dreamwork to evoke historical patterns or transgenerational themes. Describes new variant of dreamwork which combines aspects of both gestalt and family systems therapies. Implications of therapeutic dramatization for couple therapy are suggested. Examples are included. (Author/NB)

  18. Drupal 7 Theming Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Part of Packt's Cookbook series, this book offers solutions to common theme design problems in the form of recipes. Each recipe contains step-by-step instructions and screenshots. The book is designed so that you can read it chapter by chapter, or you can refer to each recipe in no particular order. This book is for Drupal developers and administrators who want to refresh the look and feel of their site. We assume that readers are familiar with basic PHP, CSS, and XHTML as well as the general use of Drupal.

  19. The Tree Theme Method® (TTM), an occupational therapy intervention for treating depression and anxiety: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, A Birgitta; Wagman, Petra; Håkansson, Carita; Hedin, Katarina

    2015-11-09

    Depression and anxiety disorders are increasing among the general population in the Western world. Individuals may need several kinds of treatment in order to maintain health, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and drug treatment. However, having an everyday life that "works" is also important, suggesting a need for interventions based on activities that facilitate a satisfying everyday life. There is still lack of such evidence-based interventions. The Tree Theme Method(®) (TTM) is an occupational therapy intervention designed for a client-centred context in which an individual develops strategies to become an actor in his or her everyday life. Previous studies of the TTM have focused on process evaluation; therefore, further studies are needed to evaluate the method's effects. The aim of this paper is to outline an intervention that can evaluate the effects of the TTM in terms of psychological symptoms, as well as everyday occupations and well-being, in patients suffering from depression and anxiety. This randomized clinical trial includes patients from three Swedish counties randomized to either intervention or treatment as usual. Men and women aged 18-65 years who have been diagnosed with either depression or anxiety are eligible for inclusion. Data collection is carried out at baseline, and outcomes are assessed at the end of intervention, as well as at 3 months and 12 months after intervention ends. The outcomes measured are psychological symptoms, everyday activities, and health-related factors. Depression and anxiety may create difficulties for individuals in the activities of their everyday lives to the extent that they require diagnosis and intervention. Despite this reality, evidence-based interventions that focus on everyday activities are lacking. Therefore, it would be useful to design a specific method for occupational therapy intervention that does precisely that. This study provides insight into the effects of the TTM, comparing it to

  20. Theme: Pharmacology and Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, William; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue discusses maximizing the benefits and minimizing the risks of drug therapy for older people. It includes articles on psychoactive drugs, drug-related problems, medication compliance, geriatric psychopharmacotherapy, consumer guidelines, and outpatient prescriptions drug coverage as it relates to health care reform. (JOW)

  1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an updated review of common available therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaninejad, Arash; Valilou, Saeed Farajzadeh; Bayat, Hadi; Ebadi, Nader; Daraei, Abdolreza; Yousefi, Meysam; Nesaei, Abolfazl; Mojarrad, Majid

    2018-02-05

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal progressive pediatric muscle disorder and genetically inherited as an X-linked disease that caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD leads to progressive muscle weakness, degeneration, and wasting; finally, follows with the premature demise in affected individuals due to respiratory and/or cardiac failure typically by age of 30. For decades, scientists tried massively to find an effective therapy method, but there is no absolute cure currently for patients with DMD, nevertheless, recent advanced progressions on the treatment of DMD will be hopeful in the future. Several promising gene therapies are currently under investigation. These include gene replacement, exon skipping, suppression of stop codons. More recently, a promising gene editing tool referred to as CRISPR/Cas9 offers exciting perspectives for restoring dystrophin expression in patients with DMD. This review intents to briefly describe these methods and comment on their advances. Since DMD is a genetic disorder, it should be treated by replacing the deficient DMD copy with a functional one. However, there are different types of mutations in this gene, so such therapeutic approaches are highly mutation specific and thus are personalized. Therefore, DMD has arisen as a model of genetic disorder for understanding and overcoming of the challenges of developing personalized genetic medicines, consequently, the lessons learned from these approaches will be applicable to many other disorders. This review provides an update on the recent gene therapies for DMD that aim to compensate for dystrophin deficiency and the related clinical trials.

  2. A multi-site study of functional outcomes following a themed approach to hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy for children with hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dido; Schertz, Mitchell; Gordon, Andrew M; Moore, Amarlie; Schejter Margalit, Tamara; Farquharson, Yvonne; Ben Bashat, Dafna; Weinstein, Maya; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of a theme-based ('magic') variation of the hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy programme, in two different countries, in improving activity performance for children with hemiplegia, including those with severe movement restrictions. Twenty-three children with spastic hemiplegia (13 males, 10 females; mean age 10y 7mo, range 7-15y; Manual Ability Classification System level I, two; level II, 13; level III, eight), participated in one of three, 2-week, summer camps. A within-participant experimental design was used with the Assisting Hand Assessment and Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire as primary outcome measures. Evaluations occurred immediately before the first day, on the last day, and 3 months after intervention. Two groups underwent additional assessments 2 weeks before the camp. Significant intervention effects were seen on the Assisting Hand Assessment (p=0.002) and on the Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire (pChild Neurology © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  3. Common Ground of Two Paradigms: Incorporating Critical Theory into Current Art Therapy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Clinical art therapy and studio-based community art therapy represent two major paradigms in art therapy practice. This viewpoint explores how critical theory can be incorporated into both paradigms and result in common ground between them. Critical theory encompasses an understanding of oppression in psychological, social, and cultural contexts…

  4. Common Psycholinguistic Themes in Mass Murderer Manifestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, Laura E.

    2017-01-01

    Mass murder in the United States is increasing, yet understanding of mass murderers is still relatively limited. Many perpetrators compose manifestos, which include journals, blogs, letters, videos, and other writings. Previous research has indicated that personal messages are of great social and psychological importance; however, there remains an…

  5. Patterns of mind-body therapies in adults with common neurological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin Wells, Rebecca; Phillips, Russell S; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2011-01-01

    Over 40% of adults with common neurological conditions use complementary and alternative medicine, and mind-body therapies are the most commonly used form. Our objective was to describe mind-body use in adults with common neurological conditions. We compared mind-body use between adults with and without common neurological conditions (regular headaches, migraines, back pain with sciatica, strokes, dementia, seizures or memory loss) using the 2007 National Health Interview Survey of 23,393 sampled American adults. Adults with common neurological conditions used mind-body therapies more frequently than those without (24.5 vs. 16.6%, p after adjustment. Deep breathing exercises, meditation and yoga were used most frequently. Nearly 70% of the adults with common neurological conditions did not discuss their mind-body use with their health care provider. Those with neurological conditions used mind-body therapies more than those without these conditions because of provider recommendation (26 vs. 13%) or because conventional treatments were perceived ineffective (12 vs. 4%) or too costly (7 vs. 2%), respectively. Mind-body therapies are used more frequently among adults with common neurological conditions, more often when conventional treatments were perceived ineffective. More research is warranted on the efficacy of mind-body use for common neurological conditions. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. FURTHER THEMES IN CHRISTIAN DRAMA IN NIGERIA Abstract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imitch

    Abstract. This paper continues the exploration of themes in Christian drama in Nigeria beyond the scope we treated in an earlier paper: “A Study of Selected Themes in Christian Drama in Nigeria”. In the paper we discussed three important and common themes in Christian drama in Nigeria, namely: the theme of suffering, ...

  7. Theme: Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six theme articles discuss facilitating adult learning in agricultural education; the farm management education program in Minnesota technical colleges; a field-based model for adult education in agriculture; new directions in Texas adult agricultural education; needs, benefits, operation, and funding of adult agricultural education; and…

  8. Theme: Urban Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellibee, Margaret; And Others

    1990-01-01

    On the theme of secondary agricultural education in urban areas, this issue includes articles on opportunities, future directions, and implications for the profession; creative supervised experiences for horticulture students; floral marketing, multicultural education; and cultural diversity in urban agricultural education. (JOW)

  9. Predicting the effect of cognitive therapy for depression: a study of unique and common factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, L G; Goldfried, M R; Wiser, S; Raue, P J; Hayes, A M

    1996-06-01

    The ability of several process variables to predict therapy outcome was tested with 30 depressed clients who received cognitive therapy with or without medication. Two types of process variables were studied: 1 variable that is unique to cognitive therapy and 2 variables that this approach is assumed to share with other forms of treatment. The client's improvement was found to be predicted by the 2 common factors measured: the therapeutic alliance and the client's emotional involvement (experiencing). The results also indicated, however, that a unique aspect of cognitive therapy (i.e., therapist's focus on the impact of distorted cognitions on depressive symptoms) correlated negatively with outcome at the end of treatment. Descriptive analyses that were conducted to understand this negative correlation suggest that therapists sometimes increased their adherence to cognitive rationales and techniques to correct problems in the therapeutic alliance. Such increased focus, however, seems to worsen alliance strains, thereby interfering with therapeutic change.

  10. FY17 Strategic Themes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, Robert W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    I am pleased to present this summary of the FY17 Division 1000 Science and Technology Strategic Plan. As this plan represents a continuation of the work we started last year, the four strategic themes (Mission Engagement, Bold Outcomes, Collaborative Environment, and Safety Imperative) remain the same, along with many of the goals. You will see most of the changes in the actions listed for each goal: We completed some actions, modified others, and added a few new ones. As I’ve stated previously, this is not a strategy to be pursued in tension with the Laboratory strategic plan. The Division 1000 strategic plan is intended to chart our course as we strive to contribute our very best in service of the greater Laboratory strategy. I welcome your feedback and look forward to our dialogue about these strategic themes. Please join me as we move forward to implement the plan in the coming months.

  11. The Theme of Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua, D. K. H.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The papers in this issue of the Journal come from different industry sectors, yet there can be a common theme that ties them together. Two of the papers address explicitly the issue of risk management, while the other three may be related to it in different degrees. One of the critical factors for project success is risk identification, as determined by Chua et al. (1999. The importance of risk management cannot be overemphasized. Failure to identify crucial risk elements in a project can lead to significant project failures in terms of cost and schedule.

  12. FY16 Strategic Themes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, Robert W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    I am pleased to present this summary of the Division 1000 Science and Technology Strategic Plan. This plan was created with considerable participation from all levels of management in Division 1000, and is intended to chart our course as we strive to contribute our very best in service of the greater Laboratory strategy. The plan is characterized by four strategic themes: Mission Engagement, Bold Outcomes, Collaborative Environment, and the Safety Imperative. Each theme is accompanied by a brief vision statement, several goals, and planned actions to support those goals throughout FY16. I want to be clear that this is not a strategy to be pursued in tension with the Laboratory strategic plan. Rather, it is intended to describe “how” we intend to show up for the “what” described in Sandia’s Strategic Plan. I welcome your feedback and look forward to our dialogue about these strategic themes. Please join me as we move forward to implement the plan in the coming year.

  13. Common characteristics of improvisational approaches in music therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Carpente, John A.

    2015-01-01

    common characteristics of improvisational music therapy (IMT) with children affected by ASD as applied across various countries and theoretical backgrounds. Methods: After initial development of treatment principle items, a survey among music therapy professionals in 10 countries and focus group...... corroborated most of the initial principles for IMT in the context of children with ASD. Unique and essential principles include facilitating musical and emotional attunement, musically scaffolding the flow of interaction, and tapping into the shared history of musical interaction between child and therapist......Background: Improvisational methods of music therapy have been increasingly applied in the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) over the past decades in many countries worldwide. Objective: This study aimed at developing treatment guidelines based on the most important...

  14. Instant premium Drupal themes

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A step-by-step guide filled with recipes that will show you how to create your very own Drupal themes using HTML.This book is great for developers who are new to Drupal. It is assumed that you have some experience in HTML, PHP, and CSS. You'll need a PHP (LAMP/WAMP) environment to install Drupal. It is also assumed that you know how to install Drupal. Some familiarity with CMS will be useful but is not essential.

  15. Body Awareness: a phenomenological inquiry into the common ground of mind-body therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing body awareness has been described as a key element or a mechanism of action for therapeutic approaches often categorized as mind-body approaches, such as yoga, TaiChi, Body-Oriented Psychotherapy, Body Awareness Therapy, mindfulness based therapies/meditation, Feldenkrais, Alexander Method, Breath Therapy and others with reported benefits for a variety of health conditions. To better understand the conceptualization of body awareness in mind-body therapies, leading practitioners and teaching faculty of these approaches were invited as well as their patients to participate in focus groups. The qualitative analysis of these focus groups with representative practitioners of body awareness practices, and the perspectives of their patients, elucidated the common ground of their understanding of body awareness. For them body awareness is an inseparable aspect of embodied self awareness realized in action and interaction with the environment and world. It is the awareness of embodiment as an innate tendency of our organism for emergent self-organization and wholeness. The process that patients undergo in these therapies was seen as a progression towards greater unity between body and self, very similar to the conceptualization of embodiment as dialectic of body and self described by some philosophers as being experienced in distinct developmental levels. PMID:21473781

  16. Body Awareness: a phenomenological inquiry into the common ground of mind-body therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silow Theresa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enhancing body awareness has been described as a key element or a mechanism of action for therapeutic approaches often categorized as mind-body approaches, such as yoga, TaiChi, Body-Oriented Psychotherapy, Body Awareness Therapy, mindfulness based therapies/meditation, Feldenkrais, Alexander Method, Breath Therapy and others with reported benefits for a variety of health conditions. To better understand the conceptualization of body awareness in mind-body therapies, leading practitioners and teaching faculty of these approaches were invited as well as their patients to participate in focus groups. The qualitative analysis of these focus groups with representative practitioners of body awareness practices, and the perspectives of their patients, elucidated the common ground of their understanding of body awareness. For them body awareness is an inseparable aspect of embodied self awareness realized in action and interaction with the environment and world. It is the awareness of embodiment as an innate tendency of our organism for emergent self-organization and wholeness. The process that patients undergo in these therapies was seen as a progression towards greater unity between body and self, very similar to the conceptualization of embodiment as dialectic of body and self described by some philosophers as being experienced in distinct developmental levels.

  17. Body Awareness: a phenomenological inquiry into the common ground of mind-body therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehling, Wolf E; Wrubel, Judith; Daubenmier, Jennifer J; Price, Cynthia J; Kerr, Catherine E; Silow, Theresa; Gopisetty, Viranjini; Stewart, Anita L

    2011-04-07

    Enhancing body awareness has been described as a key element or a mechanism of action for therapeutic approaches often categorized as mind-body approaches, such as yoga, TaiChi, Body-Oriented Psychotherapy, Body Awareness Therapy, mindfulness based therapies/meditation, Feldenkrais, Alexander Method, Breath Therapy and others with reported benefits for a variety of health conditions. To better understand the conceptualization of body awareness in mind-body therapies, leading practitioners and teaching faculty of these approaches were invited as well as their patients to participate in focus groups. The qualitative analysis of these focus groups with representative practitioners of body awareness practices, and the perspectives of their patients, elucidated the common ground of their understanding of body awareness. For them body awareness is an inseparable aspect of embodied self awareness realized in action and interaction with the environment and world. It is the awareness of embodiment as an innate tendency of our organism for emergent self-organization and wholeness. The process that patients undergo in these therapies was seen as a progression towards greater unity between body and self, very similar to the conceptualization of embodiment as dialectic of body and self described by some philosophers as being experienced in distinct developmental levels.

  18. Body Awareness: a phenomenological inquiry into the common ground of mind-body therapies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mehling, Wolf E; Wrubel, Judith; Daubenmier, Jennifer J; Price, Cynthia J; Kerr, Catherine E; Silow, Theresa; Gopisetty, Viranjini; Stewart, Anita L

    2011-01-01

    ... Psychotherapy, Body Awareness Therapy, mindfulness based therapies/meditation, Feldenkrais, Alexander Method, Breath Therapy and others with reported benefits for a variety of health conditions...

  19. Content Themes in Marital Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillars, Alan L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Suggests that prominent themes in the conversations of spouses are metacommunication about relationships. Compares content themes of different marital types (traditional, separate, and independent) and more or less satisfied spouses. Finds marital satisfaction tends to be positively associated with communal and impersonal themes and negatively…

  20. Integrative Families and Systems Treatment: A Middle Path toward Integrating Common and Specific Factors in Evidence-Based Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, J. Scott; Solovey, Andrew D.; Grove, David; Lee, Mo Yee; Greene, Gilbert J.

    2012-01-01

    A moderate common factors approach is proposed as a synthesis or middle path to integrate common and specific factors in evidence-based approaches to high-risk youth and families. The debate in family therapy between common and specific factors camps is reviewed and followed by suggestions from the literature for synthesis and creative flexibility…

  1. New thoughts on the treatment of common complications of advanced liver cancer by external therapy of traditional Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Shasha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancerous pain, hepatic ascites and intractable hiccups are common complications in patients with advanced liver cancer, but clinical symptomatic treatment cannot achieve satisfactory results. This article reviews the application of external therapy of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of common complications in patients with advanced liver cancer and analyzes the clinical effect and feasibility of common therapeutic methods used in treatment, such as plaster sticking therapy, tumor thermotherapy, interventional therapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine, and sonophoresis of traditional Chinese medicine.

  2. Skills use and common treatment processes in dialectical behaviour therapy for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnicot, Kirsten; Gonzalez, Rafael; McCabe, Rosemarie; Priebe, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) trains participants to use behavioural skills for managing their emotions. The study aimed to evaluate whether skills use is associated with positive treatment outcomes independently of treatment processes that are common across different therapeutic models. Use of the DBT skills and three common treatment processes (therapeutic alliance, treatment credibility and self-efficacy) were assessed every 2 months for a year in 70 individuals with borderline personality disorder receiving DBT. Mixed-multilevel modelling was used to determine the association of these factors with frequency of self-harm and with treatment dropout. Participants who used the skills less often at any timepoint were more likely to drop out of DBT in the subsequent two months, independently of their self-efficacy, therapeutic alliance or perceived treatment credibility. More frequent use of the DBT skills and higher self-efficacy were each independently associated with less frequent concurrent self-harm. Treatment credibility and the alliance were not independently associated with self-harm or treatment dropout. The skills use measure could not be applied to a control group who did not receive DBT. The sample size was insufficient for structural equation modelling. Practising the DBT skills and building an increased sense of self-efficacy may be important and partially independent treatment processes in dialectical behaviour therapy. However, the direction of the association between these variables and self-harm requires further evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Positive and Negative Themes Found in Superhero Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthew; Georgeson, Andrew; McNamara, Caitlin; Wakefield, Bryan H; King, Tonya S; Olympia, Robert P

    2017-12-01

    Superhero films have become incredibly popular. The objective of this study was to determine the positive and negative themes found in a select number of superhero films. A total of 30 superhero films were analyzed. The average numbers of positive and negative themes were 19.4 and 29.5 mean events per hour for all included films, respectively. The most common positive themes were "assisting others/protecting the public," "positive relationships with family/friends," and "teamwork/collaboration." The most common negative themes were "acts of violence/fighting," "use of guns/knives/lethal weapons," and "bullying/intimidation/torture." Based on the superhero films included in our study, the number of negative themes, especially acts of violence, outweighs positive themes. Although an exposure to positive themes found in superhero films may be beneficial to the development of children, pediatric health care providers should counsel children and their families in an attempt to limit their exposure to violence.

  4. Common factors of cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy in the treatment of social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangier, Ulrich; Von Consbruch, Katrin; Schramm, Elisabeth; Heidenreich, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The comparison of active ingredients across different psychotherapeutic approaches is impeded by the specificity of the theoretical concepts explaining change mechanisms. This study aims to shed light on effective components of the therapeutic process in a trial comparing cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in the treatment of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Sixty-two outpatients with SAD were included in the study. Patients and therapists rated common efficacy factors after each session according to the generic model developed by Grawe (2004). Results show significant differences between treatment conditions on several therapist-rated subscales. Therapist ratings revealed a significantly greater focus on behavioral coping strategies in CT as compared with IPT. In addition, CT therapists also reported greater use of resource activation and motivational clarification. No differences were found with regard to problem activation or the therapeutic relationship. Therapeutic outcome was predicted by resource activation and problem activation. Implications of the findings for research and practice are discussed.

  5. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The safety of interrupting maintenance therapy for previous opportunistic infections other than Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia among patients with HIV infection who respond to potent antiretroviral therapy has not been well documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety of interrupting...... patients taking potent antiretroviral therapy (> or =3 drugs) who interrupted maintenance therapy at a CD4 lymphocyte count greater than 50 x 10(6) cells/L. MEASUREMENTS: Recurrence of opportunistic infection after interruption of maintenance therapy. RESULTS: 379 interruptions of maintenance therapy were...... maintenance therapy for cytomegalovirus (CMV) end-organ disease, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and extrapulmonary cryptococcosis in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Seven European HIV cohorts. PATIENTS: 358...

  6. Hypothyroidism risk compared among nine common bipolar disorder therapies in a large US cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Christophe G; Mazurie, Aurélien J; Lauve, Nicolas R; Hurwitz, Nathaniel G; Young, S Stanley; Obenchain, Robert L; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Perkins, Douglas J; Tohen, Mauricio; Kerner, Berit

    2016-05-01

    Thyroid abnormalities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have been linked to lithium treatment for decades, yet other drugs have been less well studied. Our objective was to compare hypothyroidism risk for lithium versus the anticonvulsants and second-generation antipsychotics commonly prescribed for BD. Administrative claims data on 24,574 patients with BD were analyzed with competing risk survival analysis. Inclusion criteria were (i) one year of no prior hypothyroid diagnosis nor BD drug treatment, (ii) followed by at least one thyroid test during BD monotherapy on lithium carbonate, mood-stabilizing anticonvulsants (lamotrigine, valproate, oxcarbazepine, or carbamazepine) or antipsychotics (aripiprazole, olanzapine, risperidone, or quetiapine). The outcome was cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism per drug, in the presence of the competing risk of ending monotherapy, adjusted for age, sex, physician visits, and thyroid tests. Adjusting for covariates, the four-year cumulative risk of hypothyroidism for lithium (8.8%) was 1.39-fold that of the lowest risk therapy, oxcarbazepine (6.3%). Lithium was non-statistically significantly different from quetiapine. While lithium conferred a higher risk when compared to all other treatments combined as a group, hypothyroidism risk error bars overlapped for all drugs. Treatment (p = 3.86e-3), age (p = 6.91e-10), sex (p = 3.93e-7), and thyroid testing (p = 2.79e-87) affected risk. Patients taking lithium were tested for hypothyroidism 2.26-3.05 times more frequently than those on other treatments. Thyroid abnormalities occur frequently in patients with BD regardless of treatment. Therefore, patients should be regularly tested for clinical or subclinical thyroid abnormalities on all therapies and treated as indicated to prevent adverse effects of hormone imbalances on mood. © 2016 The Authors. Bipolar Disorders Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Architectural heritage or theme park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasi Solà-Morales

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing parallelism between the perception and the consumer use of theme parks and architectural heritage gives rise to a reflection about the fact that the architectural object has been turned into a museum piece, stripped  of its original value and its initial cultural substance to become images exposed to multiple gazes, thus producing what the author calis the "Theme Park effect", with consequences on protected architecture.

  8. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina

    2002-01-01

    maintenance therapy for cytomegalovirus (CMV) end-organ disease, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and extrapulmonary cryptococcosis in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Seven European HIV cohorts. PATIENTS: 358...... identified: 162 for CMV disease, 103 for MAC infection, 75 for toxoplasmosis, and 39 for cryptococcosis. During 781 person-years of follow-up, five patients had relapse. Two relapses (one of CMV disease and one of MAC infection) were diagnosed after maintenance therapy was interrupted when the CD4 lymphocyte....... One relapse (toxoplasmosis) was diagnosed after maintenance therapy interruption at a CD4 lymphocyte count greater than 200 x 10(6) cells/L for 15 months. The overall incidences of recurrent CMV disease, MAC infection, toxoplasmosis, and cryptococcosis were 0.54 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 0.07 to 1...

  9. A Retrospective Assessment of Return to Function in Dance After Physical Therapy for Common Dance Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junck, Emily; Richardson, Megan; Dilgen, Faye; Liederbach, Marijeanne

    2017-12-15

    An injury that causes a dancer to take time away from training or performance can be career ending, and thus it is important for dancers to have accurate expectations when considering treatment options. Thus far, few studies have reported functional outcomes after injury in dancers, which may be different than for the general athletic population. Therefore, our study sought to determine functional outcomes in dancers after operative and non-operative treatment for common dance injuries. Our outcome measures included a subjective assessment of the degree to which a dancer had returned to his or her previous level of dance, the SF-12 survey, and the WHO functional outcome scale modified for dance. We also compared these as outcome measurement tools for return to full function in dance. Secondarily, we sought to assess factors that may have contributed to poorer functional outcomes. We reviewed the charts of 675 dancers seen at our physical therapy facilities between 2006 and 2010 and identified 416 adult dancers who had experienced a dance-related injury that we categorized as "common," based on surveys of injuries among dancers (with back injuries excluded). One hundred and sixty-four dancers completed a tele- phone survey about their recovery after injury. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and linear regression were then used to identify factors associated with poor functional outcomes. Sixty-three percent of the participants had a full return to their pre-injury level. No variables were found to be significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with poorer outcomes by linear re- gression. However, there was a trend to- ward better outcomes when dancers were younger, their injuries were not chronic, and their recovery was not limited by fear. The three measurement tools were all highly correlated with one another (p = 0.000) and found to be useful determinants of functional return to dance. Given that there were few strongly correlated outcome factors, we concluded that

  10. Commonly Prescribed Antiretroviral Therapy Regimens and Incidence of AIDS-Defining Neurological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniglia, Ellen C; Phillips, Andrew; Porter, Kholoud; Sabin, Caroline A; Winston, Alan; Logan, Roger; Gill, John; Vandenhende, Marie-Anne; Barger, Diana; Lodi, Sara; Moreno, Santiago; Arribas, José Ramón; Pacheco, Antonio; Cardoso, Sandra W; Chrysos, George; Gogos, Charalabos; Abgrall, Sophie; Costagliola, Dominique; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Remonie; van Sighem, Ard; Reiss, Peter; Muga, Roberto; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; Braun, Dominique; Hauser, Christoph; Barrufet, Pilar; Leyes, Maria; Tate, Janet; Justice, Amy; Hernán, Miguel A

    2018-01-01

    The differential effects of commonly prescribed combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimens on AIDS-defining neurological conditions (neuroAIDS) remain unknown. Prospective cohort studies of HIV-positive individuals from Europe and the Americas included in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration. Individuals who initiated a first-line cART regimen in 2004 or later containing a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone and either atazanavir, lopinavir, darunavir, or efavirenz were followed from cART initiation until death, lost to follow-up, pregnancy, the cohort-specific administrative end of follow-up, or the event of interest, whichever occurred earliest. We evaluated 4 neuroAIDS conditions: HIV dementia and the opportunistic infections toxoplasmosis, cryptococcal meningitis, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. For each outcome, we estimated hazard ratios for atazanavir, lopinavir, and darunavir compared with efavirenz via a pooled logistic model. Our models were adjusted for baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Twenty six thousand one hundred seventy-two individuals initiated efavirenz, 5858 initiated atazanavir, 8479 initiated lopinavir, and 4799 initiated darunavir. Compared with efavirenz, the adjusted HIV dementia hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.72 (1.00 to 2.96) for atazanavir, 2.21 (1.38 to 3.54) for lopinavir, and 1.41 (0.61 to 3.24) for darunavir. The respective hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the combined end point were 1.18 (0.74 to 1.88) for atazanavir, 1.61 (1.14 to 2.27) for lopinavir, and 1.36 (0.74 to 2.48) for darunavir. The results varied in subsets defined by calendar year, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone, and age. Our results are consistent with an increased risk of neuroAIDS after initiating lopinavir compared with efavirenz, but temporal changes in prescribing trends and confounding by indication could explain our findings.

  11. Clinical heterogeneity was a common problem in Cochrane reviews of physiotherapy and occupational therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Steultjens, E.M.J.; Bouter, L.M.; Dekker, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To identify the strategies used to deal with the clinical heterogeneity of interventions and multiple outcome measures used in Cochrane reviews on physiotherapy and occupational therapy. METHODS: A search for systematic reviews on physiotherapy and occupational therapy in

  12. Common Characteristics of Improvisational Approaches in Music Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Developing Treatment Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Carpente, John A; Elefant, Cochavit; Kim, Jinah; Gold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Improvisational methods of music therapy have been increasingly applied in the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) over the past decades in many countries worldwide. This study aimed at developing treatment guidelines based on the most important common characteristics of improvisational music therapy (IMT) with children affected by ASD as applied across various countries and theoretical backgrounds. After initial development of treatment principle items, a survey among music therapy professionals in 10 countries and focus group workshops with experienced clinicians in three countries were conducted to evaluate the items and formulate revised treatment guidelines. To check usability, a treatment fidelity assessment tool was subsequently used to rate therapy excerpts. Survey findings and feedback from the focus groups corroborated most of the initial principles for IMT in the context of children with ASD. Unique and essential principles include facilitating musical and emotional attunement, musically scaffolding the flow of interaction, and tapping into the shared history of musical interaction between child and therapist. Raters successfully used the tool to evaluate treatment adherence and competence. Summarizing an international consensus about core principles of improvisational approaches in music therapy for children with ASD, these treatment guidelines may be applied in diverse theoretical models of music therapy. They can be used to assess treatment fidelity, and may be applied to facilitate future research, clinical practice, and training. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Hormone replacement therapy and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery: the Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C.D. Westendorp (Iris); B.A. in 't Veld; M.L. Bots (Michiel); J.M. Akkerhuis (Jurgen); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Observational data suggest that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in healthy postmenopausal women. The mechanisms underlying this protection are not entirely clear but may

  14. Neuropsychologie et Neurolinguistique. Themes de recherche commune (Neuropsychology and Neurolinguistics. Themes of Common Research)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Egon; Bierwisch, Manfred

    1976-01-01

    By presenting preliminary results of joint experiments conducted by speech pathologists and linguists, this article discusses the possibility of further neuropsycholinguistic research. (Text is in French.) (CLK)

  15. Common platform of Monte Carlo dose calculation on universal grid interface with Geant4 based particle therapy simulation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, G.; Takase, W.; Aso, T.; Watase, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Akagi, T.; Yamashita, T.; Maeda, Y.; Nishio, T.

    2014-03-01

    While Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is believed to be the most reliable method of dose calculation in particle therapy, the simulation time is critical in attaining sufficient statistical accuracy for clinical applications. Therefore, parallelization of simulations is essential. This paper describes a common platform of MC dose calculation in grid-distributed computing environments. The platform is flexible and effective for dose calculation in both clinical and research applications for particle therapy. The platform consists of the universal grid interface (UGI) and the Geant4-based particle therapy simulation framework (PTSIM). The UGI, written in Python, provides a command-line interface for job submission, file manipulation, and monitoring in multiple-grid middleware environments. The PTSIM is a single software application for modeling a treatment port with patient data obtained from CT images. The common platform was constructed in grid computing environments using the computing resources in five institutions. The platform utilized these resources through the NAREGI grid middleware under UGI to provide stable computing resources and a common environment for MC dose calculation in particle therapy.

  16. BuddyPress theme development

    CERN Document Server

    Lister, Tammie

    2013-01-01

    This book is a hands-on tutorial guide to using BuddyPress.This book is great for designers and developers who are looking to learn how to develop BuddyPress themes. It's assumed that the reader has some understanding of Wordpress and is familiar with CSS and HTML.

  17. Interpretive Themes in Relational Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, William Foster

    Approximately 100 adults participated in a study that investigated the themes of communication people use to characterize their relationships. The subjects produced 55 self-reports: 29 audiotaped dyadic discussions, 12 audiotaped group discussions, and 14 written logs. Dyadic discussants were romantic couples (dating or married), roommates,…

  18. Theme: Staying Current--Horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shry, Carroll L., Jr.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This theme issue on staying current in horticulture includes articles on sex equity in horticulture, Future Farmers of America, career opportunities in horticulture, staying current with your school district's needs, staying current in horticulture instruction, staying current with landscape trade associations, emphasizing the basics in vocational…

  19. [The effect of zinc therapy on common cold--a survey of a Cochrane review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentiner-Branth, Palle

    2012-01-09

    The Cochrane review "Zinc and the common cold" included 15 randomized controlled double-blind trials. It was concluded, that zinc would shorten the duration of the episode of common cold and also could be used as a prevention so that the risk of developing an episode of common cold would be decreased. It is too early to give general recommendations for the use of zinc as we do not have sufficient knowledge about the optimal dose, formulation and duration of treatment. Further research should focus on the effect of zinc in patients who are at increased risk of developing complications after common cold.

  20. Molecular pathology and targeted therapy of common tumors in central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei YANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to cure central nervous system tumors using traditional method, due to chemotherapy drugs lack of specificity. They kill the tumor cells, and damage normal tissues and organs at the same time. The latest hotspot is targeted therapy on the specific molecules in the molecular pathway of central nervous system tumor cells. This review introduces the relationship between molecularly biological characteristics of medulloblastoma, oligodendrocytoma, glioblastoma and the prognosis in the view of critical intracellular pathway and genetic mutation. Furthermore, it reviews the current situation and progress of targeted therapy of tumors. As a consequence, it offers some new information for the individualized therapy of central nervous system tumors. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.12.017

  1. Cutaneous Adverse Events of Targeted Anticancer Therapy: A Review of Common Clinical Manifestations and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Han Kao

    2015-12-01

    The management of these side effects can be categorized into prophylaxis and reactive treatment. Systemic antibiotics and topical corticosteroid could possibly prevent or alleviate symptoms caused by EGFR inhibitors. The prevention of sun exposure is recommended to all patients on targeted therapy, and emollients and lubricants can be used to relieve and improve the hand-foot skin reaction.

  2. Spring Framework 5: Themes & Trends

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Spring Framework 5.0/5.1, scheduled for release in early/late 2017, focuses on several key themes: reactive web applications based on Reactive Streams, comprehensive support for JDK 9 and HTTP/2, as well as the latest API generations in the Enterprise Java ecosystem. This talk presents the overall story in the context of wider industry trends, highlighting Spring’s unique programming model strategy.

  3. Ethical Dilemmas of Swedish School Leaders: Contrasts and Common Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Katarina; Johansson, Olof

    2007-01-01

    Being a skillful school leader presumes the competence to judge the ethical consequences of actions. This implies a need for all school agents to discover and analyze what values are at stake and, in turn, reconcile didactic rationality with ethical rationality. This article aims to explore ethical dilemmas in daily school practice, experienced…

  4. Universal processes and common factors in couple therapy and relationship education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, W Kim; Snyder, Douglas K

    2012-03-01

    Across nearly all cultures, sharing a lifelong committed relationship with an intimate partner comprises an almost universal and strongly held ambition. Nevertheless, cross-national data reliably indicate a high prevalence of relationship distress and dissolution, with adverse emotional and physical health consequences for adult partners and their children. This introduction to the special section summarizes findings regarding the effectiveness of couple therapy for treating general relationship distress, couple-based interventions for individual mental or physical health problems, and couple relationship education programs aimed at helping couples sustain a healthy committed relationship. Within each of these approaches, evidence regarding potential mediators of interventions' effectiveness is reviewed, and critical unanswered questions are highlighted. Discussion concludes with a brief introduction to each of the articles comprising this special section on universal processes in couple therapy and relationship education. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The sensitivities to first-line antibiotic therapy of the common urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common human infections. Many urinary tract bacteria are capable of expressing drug resistance. Resistant bacteria may be present from the commencement of the infection or may develop during treatment. This study focused on the problem of antibiotic ...

  6. The sensitivities to first-line antibiotic therapy of the common urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unlike the Staphylococcus species that were significantly resistant to nitrofurantoin, Streptococcus species were moderately susceptible to the drug. Conclusion: The common urinary tract bacteria detected in Rubaga hospital in Uganda were most sensitive to Ciprofloxacin and Nitrofurantoin. African Health Sciences Vol.

  7. Discussion of selected themes of life

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The master thesis discusses three selected themes of life (divorce, death and homosexual partnership) and how to deal those themes at school. The first part of the master thesis discusses family, themes of life (divorce, death and homosexual partnership), stress, cooperation between school and family and the sensibility of the mentioned themes. There is also presented a connection between selected themes of life and teaching contents from the first to the sixth grade in two school subjects: ...

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Sera from Common Variable Immunodeficiency Patients Undergoing Replacement Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Spadaro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Common variable immunodeficiency is the most common form of symptomatic primary antibody failure in adults and children. Replacement immunoglobulin is the standard treatment of these patients. By using a differential proteomic approach based on 2D-DIGE, we examined serum samples from normal donors and from matched, naive, and immunoglobulin-treated patients. The results highlighted regulated expression of serum proteins in naive patients. Among the identified proteins, clusterin/ApoJ serum levels were lower in naive patients, compared to normal subjects. This finding was validated in a wider collection of samples from newly enrolled patients. The establishment of a cellular system, based on a human hepatocyte cell line HuH7, allowed to ascertain a potential role in the regulation of CLU gene expression by immunoglobulins.

  9. Embryonic stem cell research and therapy: the need for a common European legal framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M

    2002-11-01

    The possibility of obtaining stem cells from human embryos has given rise to an intensive legal and ethical debate. In this paper, attention is paid to the normative disparity and ambiguity in Europe. An argument for the need for a minimum legal harmonization is made; and a prudent and flexible way to reach this successfully is suggested. Establishing a common legal framework seems to be the only way to guarantee true competitiveness for the European scientific community.

  10. Effect of oil gum massage therapy on common pathogenic oral microorganisms - A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishu Singla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: (i To assess reduction in Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species count in saliva sample after ten minutes of oil gum massage therapy (massage of gingival tissues per day for three weeks with sesame oil, olive oil, and coconut oil in three different groups of subjects. (ii To compare the efficacy between three different oils and the "gold standard" chlorhexidine gel. (iii To assess reduction in gingival scores and plaque scores of study subjects. Materials and Methods: Study design - Single center, parallel design, and triple blind randomized clinical study with four treatment groups. Participants: 32 of the 40 study subjects working as housekeeping personnel at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal; aged 18-55 years completed the three-week study period. Interventions: Subjects were randomly assigned to massage their gingiva everyday for three weeks with sesame oil, olive oil, coconut oil (tests, and Chlorhexidine gel (control. Oral health status and paraffin stimulated saliva samples were obtained at baseline and after three weeks of oil gum massage therapy. Outcome measures: Microbial culture, plaque index, and gingival index. Statistical analysis: Paired t test and Kruskal Wallis test. Results: There was a significant reduction in mean Streptococcus mutans count, Lactobacillus count, plaque scores, and gingival scores in all four groups after the study. However, there was no significant difference found in percentage reduction of these variables between the four groups. Conclusion: These oils can be used as valuable preventive agents in maintaining and improving oral health in low socioeconomic status population. However, it is recommended that further research should be conducted in other populations with a larger sample and longer duration of follow-up period.

  11. Themes in Spirit Possession in Ugandan Christianity | James ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . This paper discerns a number of common themes that run through many of these experiences. In particular, sex as a motif for deviance and evil is noted as a common feature of many of the possession stories and all contact with spirits is seen ...

  12. Three exploratory studies of college theme parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, John D; Ketchie, Julie M; Reed, Mark B; Shillington, Audrey M; Lange, James E; Holmes, Megan R

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this exploratory research were to (1) explore the characteristics and risks associated with college theme parties, (2) assess differences in risk associated with college theme parties compared to non-theme parties and (3) to assess differences in risk associated with risqué theme parties as compared to non-risqué theme parties. We used a mixed methods design. Results are presented from three exploratory studies of alcohol consumption in college theme parties: (1) four qualitative focus groups of students who have attended such events, (2) a web-based survey and (3) a multi-level (observational, survey, breath blood alcohol samples) study of 226 college parties, 29 of which were themed events. Focus group participants included a convenience sample of 17 college students aged 18-24 years; participants for the web survey included a convenience sample of 407 college students; participants for the multi-level study of college parties included 1725 randomly selected individuals at college parties. Themes tended to be highly sexualized. Compared to non-themed parties, theme parties have been observed to be more rowdy, louder, involve drinking games, feature kegs and feature hard liquor. Themed parties are associated with heavy drinking and are consistent with environments sought by heavy drinkers. As a result, themed parties are marked by a greater number of alcohol-related problems. Further research is needed to understand more clearly the risks involved in themed and risqué themed events.

  13. Massage therapy has short-term benefits for people with common musculoskeletal disorders compared to no treatment: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diederik C Bervoets

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: Is massage therapy effective for people with musculoskeletal disorders compared to any other treatment or no treatment? Design: Systematic review of randomised clinical trials. Participants: People with musculoskeletal disorders. Interventions: Massage therapy (manual manipulation of the soft tissues as a stand-alone intervention. Outcome: The primary outcomes were pain and function. Results: The 26 eligible randomised trials involved 2565 participants. The mean sample size was 95 participants (range 16 to 579 per study; 10 studies were considered to be at low risk of bias. Overall, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage reduces pain in the short term compared to no treatment in people with shoulder pain and osteoarthritis of the knee, but not in those with low back pain or neck pain. Furthermore, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage improves function in the short term compared to no treatment in people with low back pain, knee arthritis or shoulder pain. Low-to-very-low-level evidence from single studies indicated no clear benefits of massage over acupuncture, joint mobilisation, manipulation or relaxation therapy in people with fibromyalgia, low back pain and general musculoskeletal pain. Conclusions: Massage therapy, as a stand-alone treatment, reduces pain and improves function compared to no treatment in some musculoskeletal conditions. When massage is compared to another active treatment, no clear benefit was evident. [Bervoets DC, Luijsterburg PAJ, Alessie JJN, Buijs MJ, Verhagen AP (2015 Massage therapy has short-term benefits for people with common musculoskeletal disorders compared to no treatment: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 61: 106–116

  14. Metronidazole or Cotrimoxazole therapy is associated with a decrease in intestinal bioavailability of common antiretroviral drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Dossou-Yovo

    Full Text Available Metronidazole (MTZ and Cotrimoxazole (CTX are used in HIV/AIDS patients eligible for antiretroviral treatment. The objective of this animal study was to determine whether pre-treatment with antibiotics affects the intestinal bioavailability of Atazanavir (ATV and Ritonavir (RTV. After oral administration of 1 mg MTZ and CTX for 7 days, the rat colonic mucosa were analyzed for mucus thickness or placed in Ussing chambers to measure ATV and RTV net transepithelial fluxes (Jnet. 1. In control rats, the mucus thickness was 43.3±7.6 µm and 40.7±6.9 µm, in proximal and distal colon, respectively. In proximal colon, the thickness was 57.2±8.8 and 58.2±6.9 µm after MTZ and CTX, respectively whereas in distal colon, the thickness was 121.1±38.4 and 170.5±35.0 µm (P<0.05 respectively. 2. Transepithelial conductance was reduced after MTZ or CTX in the proximal and distal colon. 3. In control, net ATV secretion was observed both in proximal (-0.36±0.02 µg.hr(-1 cm(-2 and distal colon (-0.30±0.08 µg.hr(-1 cm(-2. After MTZ and CTX, it was increased in the proximal colon by two 2 fold and 4 fold, respectively and in the distal colon by 3 fold and 5 fold, respectively. 4. In control, there was no net active RTV transport either in proximal (+0.01±0.01 µg.hr(-1 cm(-2 or distal colon (+0.04±0.01 µg.hr(-1 cm(-2. After MTZ and CTX, secretion was increased 5 fold and 10 fold, respectively, in the proximal colon and two fold and 5 fold, respectively in the distal colon (p<0.001. In conclusion, after MTZ and CTX therapy, the mucus layer was enlarged, passive permeability was decreased and ATV and RTV were actively secreted by the colonic epithelium suggesting that, in rat, the intestinal bioavailability of ATV and RTV is impaired after antibiotic therapy.

  15. True and false incomplete duplications of the common bile duct and their impact on therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brãtucu, E; Stãnescu, A; Straja, D N; Cirimbei, C; Marincas, M; Rãdoi, S; Fãtoi, D; Huwood Al Jabouri, Abdul Kariem H; Stefan, I; Ionescu, S

    2012-01-01

    The congenital anomalies of the common bile duct (CBD) represent a real challenge for the surgeon, and not recognizing them may have two consequences: either generate incomplete or incorrect surgical solutions, or, even worse, lead to iatrogenic pathology. The association between the anomalies of the CBD and biliary lithiasis, biliary cancer or other hepatobiliopancreatic pathology may lead to a pre/perioperative diagnosis; frequently, the incertitude persists. We present 2 cases: one with an incomplete duplication of the CBD and the other with a false duplication. We wish to underline the sovereign value of cholangio-MRI with 3 D reconstructions in the diagnosis and description of the anatomy of the biliary ducts, superior, in some cases, to the intraoperative cholangiography or ERCP. RevistaChirurgia.

  16. Evaluation of testicular dose and associated risk from common pelvis radiation therapy in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanei, Ahmad; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate testicular dose (TD) and the associated risk of heritable disease from common pelvis radiotherapy of male patients in Iran. In this work, the relation between TD and changes in beam energy, pelvis size, source to skin distance (SSD) and beam directions (anterior or posterior) was also evaluated. The values of TDs were measured on 67 randomly selected male patients during common pelvis radiotherapy using 1.17 and 1.33 MeV, Theratron Cobalt-60 unit at SSD of 80 cm and 9 MV, Neptun 10 PC and 18 MV, GE Saturne 20 at SSD of 100 cm at Seyed-Al Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. Results showed that, the maximum TD was up to 12% of the tumor dose. Considering the risk factor for radiation-induced heritable disorders of 0.1% per Sv, an excess risk of hereditary disorders of 72 per 10,000 births was conservatively calculated. There was a significant difference in the measured TD using different treatment machines and energies (P pelvis size (r = 0.275, P < 0.001). Using the student's t-tests, it was found that, there was not a significant difference between TD and beam direction (P = 0.231). Iranian male patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy have the potential of receiving a TD of more than 1 Gy which might result in temporary azoospermia. The risk for induction of hereditary disorders in future generations should be considered as low but not negligible in comparison with the correspondent nominal risk. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Theory and Utility-Key Themes in Evidence-Based Assessment: Comment on the Special Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Richard M.

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on two key themes in the four featured reviews on evidence-based assessment. The first theme is the essential role of theory in psychological assessment. An overview of this complex, multilayered role is presented. The second theme is the need for a common metric with which to gauge the utility of specific psychological tests…

  18. Connection of European particle therapy centers and generation of a common particle database system within the European ULICE-framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessel Kerstin A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To establish a common database on particle therapy for the evaluation of clinical studies integrating a large variety of voluminous datasets, different documentation styles, and various information systems, especially in the field of radiation oncology. Methods We developed a web-based documentation system for transnational and multicenter clinical studies in particle therapy. 560 patients have been treated from November 2009 to September 2011. Protons, carbon ions or a combination of both, as well as a combination with photons were applied. To date, 12 studies have been initiated and more are in preparation. Results It is possible to immediately access all patient information and exchange, store, process, and visualize text data, any DICOM images and multimedia data. Accessing the system and submitting clinical data is possible for internal and external users. Integrated into the hospital environment, data is imported both manually and automatically. Security and privacy protection as well as data validation and verification are ensured. Studies can be designed to fit individual needs. Conclusions The described database provides a basis for documentation of large patient groups with specific and specialized questions to be answered. Having recently begun electronic documentation, it has become apparent that the benefits lie in the user-friendly and timely workflow for documentation. The ultimate goal is a simplification of research work, better study analyses quality and eventually, the improvement of treatment concepts by evaluating the effectiveness of particle therapy.

  19. Connection of European particle therapy centers and generation of a common particle database system within the European ULICE-framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kerstin A; Bougatf, Nina; Bohn, Christian; Habermehl, Daniel; Oetzel, Dieter; Bendl, Rolf; Engelmann, Uwe; Orecchia, Roberto; Fossati, Piero; Pötter, Richard; Dosanjh, Manjit; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2012-07-24

    To establish a common database on particle therapy for the evaluation of clinical studies integrating a large variety of voluminous datasets, different documentation styles, and various information systems, especially in the field of radiation oncology. We developed a web-based documentation system for transnational and multicenter clinical studies in particle therapy. 560 patients have been treated from November 2009 to September 2011. Protons, carbon ions or a combination of both, as well as a combination with photons were applied. To date, 12 studies have been initiated and more are in preparation. It is possible to immediately access all patient information and exchange, store, process, and visualize text data, any DICOM images and multimedia data. Accessing the system and submitting clinical data is possible for internal and external users. Integrated into the hospital environment, data is imported both manually and automatically. Security and privacy protection as well as data validation and verification are ensured. Studies can be designed to fit individual needs. The described database provides a basis for documentation of large patient groups with specific and specialized questions to be answered. Having recently begun electronic documentation, it has become apparent that the benefits lie in the user-friendly and timely workflow for documentation. The ultimate goal is a simplification of research work, better study analyses quality and eventually, the improvement of treatment concepts by evaluating the effectiveness of particle therapy.

  20. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Carel; Wensing, Michel; Franssen, Jo Lm; Oostendorp, Rob Ab

    2007-11-05

    Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation) are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis), but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle). It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders.The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 - September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects have unilateral shoulder pain for at least six months

  1. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franssen Jo LM

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis, but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle. It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. Methods/Design This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 – September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects

  2. Positive and Negative Themes Found in Sport-Related Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Hannah M; Olympia, Robert P; King, Tonya S; Wakefield, Bryan H; Weber, Chris J

    2017-06-01

    Sport participation is an important part of the development of children and adolescents in the United States. The objective of this study was to determine positive and negative themes found in a selected number of sport-related films. A total of 44 sport-related films were independently viewed and analyzed by four reviewers. The most common sports depicted were baseball (27%) and football (25%). The most common positive themes were positive interactions with the coach, positive interactions with family and friends, and positive interactions with teammates (2.04, 1.42, 1.2 mean events per hour). The most common negative themes were taunting/fighting/poor sportsmanship, negative interactions with the coach, and drinking/smoking/drug use (2.13, 1.10, 0.94 mean events per hour). In conclusion, the coviewing of sport films among pediatric athletes and their coaches, athletic trainers, and/or parents in order to focus on "teachable moments" may encourage the acquisition and development of positive themes and the avoidance and de-emphasis of negative themes.

  3. Eradication of common pathogens at days 2, 3 and 4 of moxifloxacin therapy in patients with acute bacterial sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Alice

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS is a common infection in clinical practice. Data on time to bacteriologic eradication after antimicrobial therapy are lacking for most agents, but are necessary in order to optimize therapy. This was a prospective, single-arm, open-label, multicenter study to determine the time to bacteriologic eradication in ABS patients (maxillary sinusitis treated with moxifloxacin. Methods Adult patients with radiologically and clinically confirmed ABS received once-daily moxifloxacin 400 mg for 10 days. Middle meatus secretion sampling was performed using nasal endoscopy pre-therapy, and repeated on 3 consecutive days during treatment. Target enrollment was 30 bacteriologically evaluable patients (pre-therapy culture positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae or Moraxella catarrhalis and evaluable cultures for at least Day 2 and Day 3 during therapy visits, including at least 10 each with S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae. Results Of 192 patients enrolled, 42 were bacteriologically evaluable, with 48 pathogens isolated. Moxifloxacin was started on Day 1. Baseline bacteria were eradicated in 35/42 (83.3% patients by day 2, 42/42 (100% patients by day 3, and 41/42 (97.6% patients by day 4. In terms of individual pathogens, 12/18 S. pneumoniae, 22/23 H. influenzae and 7/7 M. catarrhalis were eradicated by day 2 (total 41/48; 85.4%, and 18/18 S. pneumoniae and 23/23 H. influenzae were eradicated by day 3. On Day 4, S. pneumoniae was isolated from a patient who had negative cultures on Days 2 and 3. Thus, the Day 4 eradication rate was 47/48 (97.9%. Clinical success was achieved in 36/38 (94.7% patients at the test of cure visit. Conclusion In patients with ABS (maxillary sinusitis, moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily for 10 days resulted in eradication of baseline bacteria in 83.3% of patients by Day 2, 100% by Day 3 and 97.6% by Day 4.

  4. How Effective is Physical Therapy for Common Low Back Pain Diagnoses?: A Multivariate Analysis of 4597 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleswarapu, Ananth S; Divi, Srikanth N; Dirschl, Douglas R; Mok, James M; Stout, Christopher; Lee, Michael J

    2016-08-15

    A retrospective review. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether the treatment of low back pain with physical therapy results in clinically significant improvements in patient-reported pain and functional outcomes. Low back pain is a major cause of morbidity and disability in health care. Previous studies have found poor efficacy for surgery in the absence of specific indications. A variety of nonoperative treatments are available; however, there is scant evidence to guide the practitioner as to the efficacy of these treatments. Four thousand five hundred ninety-seven patients who underwent physical therapy for the nonoperative treatment of low back pain were included. The primary outcome measures were pre-and post-treatment scores on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) during activity, and NPRS during rest. Previously published thresholds for minimal clinically important difference (MCID) were used to determine the proportion of patients meeting MCID for each of our outcomes. Patients with starting values below the MCID for each variable were excluded from analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine patient risk factors predictive of treatment failure. About 28.5% of patients met the MCID for improvement in ODI. Presence of night symptoms, obesity, and smoking were predictors of treatment failure for ODI. Fifty-nine percent of patients met the MCID for improvement in resting NPRS, with a history of venous thromboembolism, night symptoms, psychiatric disease, workers' compensation status, smoking, and obesity predictive of treatment failure. Sixty percent of patients met the MCID for improvement in activity NPRS, with night symptoms, workers' compensation status, and smoking predictive of treatment failure. We observed that a substantial percentage of the population did not meet MCID for pain and function following treatment of low back pain with physical therapy. Common risk factors for treatment failure

  5. When Parties become Racialized: Deconstructing Racially Themed Parties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gina A.; Johnston, Marc P.; Garibay, Juan C.; Herrera, Felisha A.; Giraldo, Luis G.

    2011-01-01

    Racially themed parties are all-too-common occurrences on college campuses. Using critical race theory as a lens, this article provides a contemporary overview of these events and deconstructs these incidents as examples of overt forms of racism often emanating from subtle, everyday occurrences of covert racism or racial microaggressions.…

  6. Summary of small group discussions: Regional themes and next steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick Turner

    2013-01-01

    At the conclusion of the workshop, a breakout group session discussed common themes that had emerged regarding forest degradation monitoring in the Southeast Asia region. The participants were also asked to list any important issues that may not have been sufficiently addressed during the workshop and that may require further discussion, and recommendations for next...

  7. An Empirical Examination of the Role of Common Factors of Therapy During a Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy Intervention for Headache Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Melissa A; Halpin, James; Thorn, Beverly E

    2016-05-01

    It is often assumed that psychosocial pain treatments work because of specific active components of the intervention. The degree to which common factors may contribute to improved pain outcomes is not well researched. The purpose of this study was to examine patient-related and therapist-related common factors during a Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for headache pain trial. This study was a secondary analysis of a parallel group, unblinded, randomized controlled trial in which MBCT was compared with a control. A series of linear regression models and 1 bootstrap mediation model were conducted with the sample of participants that completed MBCT (N=21). In-session participant engagement was positively associated with treatment dose indicators of session attendance (P=0.038) and at-home meditation practice (P=0.027). Therapist adherence and quality were both significant predictors of posttreatment client satisfaction (P=0.038 and 0.034, respectively). Therapist appropriateness was not significantly associated with any of the variables of interest (P>0.05). Baseline pain intensity was positively associated with pretreatment expectations and motivations (P=0.049) and working alliance (P=0.048), and working alliance significantly predicted posttreatment patient satisfaction (Psuccess.

  8. An investigation into frequency and reasons why patients switch antiretroviral therapy and which antiretrovirals are commonly implicated in toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study Previous investigation into antiretroviral (ARV therapy switches in our HIV cohort suggested an annual switch rate of 20% in 2006 with 60% of switches being secondary to toxicity [1]. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this switch rate has changed in recent years, determine reasons why patients change regimens, and identify which ARVs are most likely to be switched for toxicity concerns. Methods The electronic patient database was reviewed to identify all patients within our HIV cohort who switched ARV therapy between 1st December 2009 and 31st May 2011. Details of which ARVs were switched and the reasons why were recorded. Any switches due to toxicity were investigated further to identify the actual or perceived adverse effect. Summary of results Nine hundred and twenty-three regimens were switched over 18 months affecting 12% (n = 722 of patients on treatment during this time. The most common reason for switching medication was due to toxicity, occurring in 452 (49% cases. Other reasons included simplification (15%, clinical trials (8%, virological failure (8% and drug interactions (4%. The remaining 16% switched for various reasons including pregnancy and co-morbidities. Of 452 switches for toxicity (or perceived toxicity, 122 (27% were due to CNS side effects (89 out of a total of 122 were related to efavirenz, 64 (14% gastrointestinal disturbances (38/64 related to protease inhibitors, 54 (12% actual/perceived cardiovascular risk (21/54 related to abacavir and 21/54 related to saquinavir, 54 (12% hepatotoxicity (21/54 related to atazanavir and 14/54 related to efavirenz, 42 (9% metabolic concerns (24/42 related to protease inhibitors and 38 (8% renal toxicity (28/38 related to tenofovir. Other toxicities accounted for 78 (18% switches. An observed toxicity switch rate (OTSR per 1000 patient years (95% CI was calculated for each ARV. Conclusions 12% of patients switched therapy in 18 months, predicting

  9. Instruction and Delight: Theme Parks and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret J.

    Education continues to operate as an enclave of elite culture and is battling for interest and respect with the mass media, technology, and the popular arts. These cultures must be brought together. Using the creative ideas generated by theme parks is an effective method of importing popular culture into the schools. Theme parks provide a total…

  10. Theme Parks: Program Variety and Employment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Jack B.

    1983-01-01

    This article describes a number of privately operated theme parks, explains why the parks have been successful, and looks at career opportunities for leisure professionals in this expanding area. Implications for recreation education are pointed out, and names and addresses of major companies in the theme park business are provided. (PP)

  11. Massage therapy has short-term benefits for people with common musculoskeletal disorders compared to no treatment: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Bervoets (Diederik C.); P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); J.J.N. Alessie (Jeroen J.N.); M.J. Buijs (Martijn J.); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractQuestion: Is massage therapy effective for people with musculoskeletal disorders compared to any other treatment or no treatment? Design: Systematic review of randomised clinical trials. Participants: People with musculoskeletal disorders. Interventions: Massage therapy (manual

  12. Bridging epidemiology and demography: theories and themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, R B

    2001-12-01

    Epidemiology and demography, although both encumbering several theoretical constructs, are generally applied, problem-solving disciplines concerned with the nature and trajectories of defined groups. There are differences between the two disciplines in substantive interests and methodological traditions, however both have comprehensive perspectives and both are deeply concerned with the health, social, and economic well-being of human populations. One way to promote productive interdisciplinary research is to apply or develop scientific theories that exploit the complementary interests and methods of the two disciplines. Several candidate theories and themes are suggested here, including (1) the life course approach as applied to the biology of longevity; (2) the "modernized" Malthusian dilemma; (3) the demographic transition within developing countries; (4) the theory of evolution and its social and biological implications; (5) reciprocal effects of ecological and environmental characteristics on population health and well-being; and (6) systems theory as an approach to population complexity. Other approaches to fostering interdisciplinary investigation between these disciplines include joint course work, specifically targeted research funding initiatives and collaborative development of new population theory. The latter may be particularly important from several perspectives: uniting disciplines to jointly approach common and important scientific problems, providing existing frameworks with which to generate new scientific questions, and promoting enhanced scientific rigor by more tightly linking methods with hypotheses.

  13. Total and High Molecular Weight Adiponectin Expression Is Decreased in Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency: Correlation with Ig Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pecoraro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Adiponectin (Acrp30 is an adipokine widely studied for its beneficial metabolic properties. It circulates as low molecular weight (LMW, medium molecular weight (MMW, and high molecular weight (HMW oligomers. The latter exerts the most potent biological effects. Acrp30 attracted renewed interest with the finding that it was associated with the development and progression of immune disorders. The mechanisms underlying this association and the role of Acrp30 in the pathophysiology of immune-mediated conditions remain unknown. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by chronic activation of the immune system, impaired antibody production, and imbalanced cytokine production. In the attempt to shed light on the expression of Acrp30 in CVID, we: (a investigated total Acrp30 and its oligomerization state in CVID patients undergoing maintenance Ig replacement therapy; (b assessed the effects of Ig replacement therapy on Acrp30 expression in treatment-naïve CVID patients, namely, patients not treated before diagnosis, before and after the first Ig administration; and (c evaluated the correlation between Acrp30 levels and clinical phenotypes of the disease. As controls, we analyzed healthy subjects and patients affected by a non-immunodeficiency chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP, before and after Ig infusion. We found that total Acrp30 and HMW oligomers were decreased in CVID but not in CIDP patients versus controls. Moreover, Acrp30 levels were correlated with IgA levels and were associated with two CVID phenotypes, namely, autoimmune cytopenia and enteropathy. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that Acrp30 modulation is specific for CVID patients. Acrp30 and HMW levels quickly and dramatically increased after Ig infusion only in eight treatment-naïve CVID patients but not in five CIDP patients. This finding indicates that Ig administration per se is not able to

  14. Health-related quality of life in patients with common variable immunodeficiency switching from intravenous to subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Al-Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency disease (PID among adults. CVID consists of two phenotypes – one in which infections are the characteristic and another in which impressive inflammatory and/or hematological complications also develop, including lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias, enteropathy, and granulomatous disease. These phenotypes appear to be stable, are related to immunological and inflammatory markers, and are predictive of outcomes. Both subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG are equally effective for replacement therapy. No data are available about specific factors affecting the quality of life related to switching from IVIG to SCIG in the Arabian Gulf area. We present the case reports of three adult CVID patients, who were shifted from IVIG to SCIG by the US conversion method (1 : 1.5. We followed-up patients for clinical outcomes, side-effects, immunoglobulin G (IgG trough levels, annual infection rate, and quality of life using questionnaires (RAND-36 over a 3-year period. Three patients (two females and one male, with a mean age of 26 years, had received IVIG [Gamunex-C (Grifols Therapeutics Inc., NC, 27709 USA 10%; Grifols] treatment for an average duration of 4 years and had average IgG trough levels of 7.7±2.9 g/dl. Patients were shifted to SCIG [Subcuvia (Baxalta Innovation GmbH, Vienna, Austria 10%; Baxter] for different reasons. SCIG was administered, using an infusion pump, under medical supervision at the hospital, on a weekly basis. The average IgG trough level on SCIG was 10.4±1.5 g/dl. The annual infection rate of pneumonias, sinusitis, otitis media, and others significantly declined after switching to SCIG in all three patients. However, while on IVIG treatment, some patients reported headache and malaise, but when on the SCIG treatment the reactions were mild and infusion site-related such as erythema

  15. On the emergence theme of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The book surveys mathematical relations between classical and quantum mechanics, gravity, time and thermodynamics from various points of view and many sources (with appropriate attribution). The emergence theme is developed with an emphasis on the meaning via mathematics. A background theme of Bohemian mechanics and connections to the quantum equivalence principle of Matone et al. is also developed in great detail. Some original work relating the quantum potential and Ricci flow is also included.

  16. Future Research Themes in Supply Chain Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Guest post on research results published in the article "Mapping the Landscape of Future Research Themes in Supply Chain Management" by Andreas Wieland, Robert Handfield and Christian Durach ( Journal of Business Logistics (2016). Vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 205-212).......Guest post on research results published in the article "Mapping the Landscape of Future Research Themes in Supply Chain Management" by Andreas Wieland, Robert Handfield and Christian Durach ( Journal of Business Logistics (2016). Vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 205-212)....

  17. “I was thinking too much”: experiences of HIV-positive adults with common mental disorders and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Bere, Tarisai; Macpherson, Kirsty; Nyamayaro, Primrose; Potter, Lucy; Makadzange, Tariro; Munjoma, Ronald; Marufu, Marshall; Araya, Ricardo; Safren, Steven; O'Cleirgh, Conall; Chibanda, Dixon; Abas, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To document the lived experiences of people with both poor mental health and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in high HIV prevalence settings. Methods In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 (female =31) HIV-positive adults who scored above the cut-point on a locally-validated scale for common mental disorders. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants with evidence of poor adherence. Six additional key informant interviews (female = 6) were conducted with healthcare workers. Data were collected and analysed inductively by an interdisciplinary coding team. Results The major challenges faced by participants were stressors (poverty, stigma, marital problems) and symptoms of common mental disorders (“thinking too much”, changes to appetite and sleep, “burdened heart”, and low energy levels). Thinking too much, which appears closely related to rumination, was the symptom with the greatest negative impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults with common mental disorders. In turn, thinking too much was commonly triggered by the stressors faced by people living with HIV/AIDS, especially poverty. Finally, participants desired private counselling, access to income generating activities, and family engagement in mental health care. Conclusions Better understanding of the local expression of mental disorders and of underlying stressors can inform the development of culturally sensitive interventions to reduce common mental disorders and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25754063

  18. Universal design characteristic on themed streets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsritanto, Bangun IR; Indriastjario; Wijayanti

    2017-12-01

    People around the world can access the streets to fulfil their daily activities regardless of their gender, age, and abilities. The streetscape is an urban public space which is built to facilitate the basic needs of people as social being. The themed street is an urban streetscape designed and built in detail with a theme or special purpose in an of urban development process. Universal design facilitates the full range of human diversity as physical appearance, perception, cognitive abilities, sizes, and shapes. By designing for the diversity, the specialized streets become more functional and user-friendly. The purpose of this study is to examine several design characteristics of themed streets in several countries from three different continents using universal design principles for giving proper directions to develop more user-friendly streets. Literature review and case study were used as research methods. The literature review was extracted and compiled from manuscripts, streetscape design books, and from universal design principles. Furthermore, the constructed theory were used to examine the case studies of themed streets. The findings indicated that themed streets’ character design were strongly influenced by local cultural aspect even though the basic guidelines were universal design principles; the resumed design direction can be suggested universal along with the richness of local aspects.

  19. Improvement of Theme Park Marketing Mode: A Case Study of Theme Parks in Chengdu

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Min; Xiong, Gaoli

    2013-01-01

    Construction of theme park has been launched since the early 1990s in Chengdu City, but ended up as a losing proposition after its short-term prosperity because of similar scale and theme with those in other cities. As more international well-known theme parks enter the market, theme parks in Chengdu have been faced with the transition, and novel concepts introduced into the operation of these parks. T o adapt to the market, it is imperative to make marketing strategies and combine marketing ...

  20. Themes on a Variation, Op.3

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    This work derives most of its melodic and motivic material from the notes G, B flat, C, D and E flat – to which the timpani are tuned. This enables the timpani to participate in much of the melodic material that emerges from the given notes.\\ud \\ud The most prominent theme to emerge can best be heard on the two solo glockenspiels – this theme itself being a variation of the old English carol, "This is the truth sent from above".\\ud \\ud The work is scored for 2 trumpets, horn, euphonium, tromb...

  1. The Theme of Daedalus and Icarus in European Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Tasevski-Paj

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the recurrence of the theme of Daedalus and Icarus within European and Slovene literature. It is possible to discern common characteristics in this theme in literary works belonging to various historical periods. Thus in Antiquity authors generally emphasised the relationship between father and son in the mythological tale of Daedalus and Icarus; in the Middle Ages, the character of Icarus was mainly seen in a moralizing light, as an allegory of human vanity and conceit, while the Renaissance bestowed upon Icarus the role of a hero in love songs. In the period between Baudelaire and Joyce, both Icarus and Daedalus were primarily associated with the idea of the modern artist, who contemplates questions of life with great intensity, while the period after 1945 brought about new contextualizations of the mythological tale. Just as in the original mythological tale, subsequent literary portrayals of Daedalus and Icarus generally portray the two characters independently from one another. The difference between them manifests itself primarily through the contrast between youth and old age, and the contrast between the creative nature of poetry, on the one hand, which brings emotions to the fore, and science, on the other hand, which is based on reason. From this perspective, then, the character of Icarus is endowed with enthusiasm, ambition, courage, impetuosity, irrationality and sometimes even madness. He represents an extraordinary individual, who strives for an exalted ideal, which in turn becomes the very reason for his physical demise. He has an ambivalent nature: one can perceive him either as an arrogant figure or a hero. In contrast to Icarus, his father Daedalus is a skilled craftsman and artisan. He represents prudence, balance and reason, while striving for freedom of creation. In Slovene literature, a portrayal of the theme of Daedalus can be found in the poem of Janez Mihelič from the period of Enlightenment

  2. Light in Architecture as an Inspired Theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dębowska, Danuta

    2017-10-01

    The theme of the article is to highlight the important role of natural light in architecture. Natural light, or solar radiation absorbed by our sense of sight was a strong inspiration from ancient times. Originally constituted as a link between heaven and earth. It played a major role in shaping the places of worship, such as even Stonehenge. In the church architecture it was and still is the guiding element, the main matrix around builds an architecture narrative. Over the centuries, the study of the role of light in architecture, and in fact chiaroscuro, led to the culmination of solutions full of fantasy and “quirks” in the Baroque era (Baroque with Italian barocco: strange, exaggerated). Enamored of carved body and the use of multipurpose ornament topped was the discovery of a concave-convex façade parete ondulata created by Francesca Borrromini. Conscious manipulation of light developed, at the time, to a maximum of the art illusion and optical illusions in architectural buildings. Changing the perception of privilege in detail and introduce the principle of “beauty comes from functionality” in times of modernism meant that architects started to look for the most extreme simplicity. Sincerity of forms, and thus the lack of ornamentation, however, did not result in a lack of interest in light. On the contrary, the light became detail, eye-catching element against a smooth surface of the wall. The continuation of this concept of creating a strong password exposing Mies van der Rohe’s „less is more” took over the architecture created in the current minimalism. To minimize the detail with the introduction of large glazing resulted in strengthening the effect of opening the flow of light and penetrating the interior to the exterior. The principle of deep reflection on the light is certainly used in the design of monumental buildings, such as galleries, museums. It could be used more widely in the common architecture, noting the heritage and

  3. Prevalence and Predicting Factors for Commonly Neglected Sexual Side Effects to External-Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anders; Pedersen, Christian; Lindberg, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Changes in sexual function other than erectile dysfunction are sparsely investigated after radiation therapy for prostate cancer. AIM: To investigate orgasmic dysfunction, urinary incontinence during sexual activity, changes in penile morphology, and sensory disturbances in the penis...... the Erection Hardness Scale. All patients had received a radiation dose of 78 Gy. Androgen deprivation therapy was administered according to disease characteristics. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measurements were prevalence rates and predictors of these side effects as identified by multivariate logistic...... regression analyses. RESULTS: One hundred nine patients were eligible (sexually active and had completed androgen deprivation therapy) for inclusion. Twenty-four percent reported anorgasmia, 44% reported a decreased intensity of their orgasms, and 40% reported that the time it took to reach orgasm had...

  4. FY16 Strategic Themes White Paper.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, Robert W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Science and Technology (S&T) Division 1000 Strategic Plan includes the Themes, Goals, and Actions for FY16. S&T will continue to support the Labs Strategic plan, Mission Areas and Program Management Units by focusing on four strategic themes that align with the targeted needs of the Labs. The themes presented in this plan are Mission Engagement, Bold Outcomes, Collaborative Environment, and the Safety Imperative. Collectively they emphasize diverse, collaborative teams and a self-reliant culture of safety that will deliver on our promise of exceptional service in the national interest like never before. Mission Engagement focuses on increasing collaboration at all levels but with emphasis at the strategic level with mission efforts across the labs. Bold Outcomes seeks to increase the ability to take thoughtful risks with the goal of achieving transformative breakthroughs more frequently. Collaborative environment strives for a self-aware, collaborative working environment that bridges the many cultures of Sandia. Finally, Safety Imperative aims to minimize the risk of serious injury and to continuously strengthen the safety culture. Each of these themes is accompanied by a brief vision statement, several goals, and planned actions to support those goals throughout FY16 and leading into FY17.

  5. Global Organizing Themes for Biology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresti, Vin; Garafalo, Fred

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how the use of organizing themes can help to convey to students a sense of internal continuity within the discipline of biology and at the same time emphasize to them that viewing the study of biology as merely applied chemistry and physics is inaccurate and overly simplistic. (ZWH)

  6. Endangered Species & Biodiversity: A Classroom Project & Theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, Brook

    2012-01-01

    Students discover the factors contributing to species losses worldwide by conducting a project about endangered species as a component of a larger classroom theme of biodiversity. Groups conduct research using online endangered- species databases and present results to the class using PowerPoint. Students will improve computer research abilities…

  7. After Love: Attachment Styles and Grief Themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistole, M. Carole

    1996-01-01

    Examines the association of attachment organization and recalled grief responses following the dissolution of a romantic relationship. Data based on college students' (N=118) responses resulted in four interpretable grief themes. Preoccupied attachment predicted self-reproach, fearful attachment predicted partner blame, whereas both fearful and…

  8. peacebuilding and reconciliation contemporary themes and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mkhonto

    It is said that the reader of any book brings his or her own reality to that book, which then generates a new, richer reality. This book review of Peacebuilding and reconciliation: Contemporary themes and challenges has been written from the. Centre for Trust, Peace and Reconciliation (CTPSR), Coventry University, by a.

  9. Recent Themes in Social Networking Service Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S Liu

    Full Text Available The body of literature addressing the phenomenon related to social networking services (SNSs has grown rather fast recently. Through a systematic and quantitative approach, this study identifies the recent SNS research themes, which are the issues discussed by a coherent and growing subset of this literature. A set of academic articles retrieved from the Web of Science database is used as the basis for uncovering the recent themes. We begin the analysis by constructing a citation network which is further separated into groups after applying a widely used clustering method. The resulting clusters all consist of articles coherent in citation relationships. This study suggests eight fast growing recent themes. They span widely encompassing politics, romantic relationships, public relations, journalism, and health. Among them, four focus their issues largely on Twitter, three on Facebook, and one generally on both. While discussions on traditional issues in SNSs such as personality, motivations, self-disclosure, narcissism, etc. continue to lead the pack, the proliferation of the highlighted recent themes in the near future is very likely to happen.

  10. Massage therapy has short-term benefits for people with common musculoskeletal disorders compared to no treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bervoets, Diederik C; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Alessie, Jeroen J N; Buijs, Martijn J; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2015-07-01

    Is massage therapy effective for people with musculoskeletal disorders compared to any other treatment or no treatment? Systematic review of randomised clinical trials. People with musculoskeletal disorders. Massage therapy (manual manipulation of the soft tissues) as a stand-alone intervention. The primary outcomes were pain and function. The 26 eligible randomised trials involved 2565 participants. The mean sample size was 95 participants (range 16 to 579) per study; 10 studies were considered to be at low risk of bias. Overall, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage reduces pain in the short term compared to no treatment in people with shoulder pain and osteoarthritis of the knee, but not in those with low back pain or neck pain. Furthermore, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage improves function in the short term compared to no treatment in people with low back pain, knee arthritis or shoulder pain. Low-to-very-low-level evidence from single studies indicated no clear benefits of massage over acupuncture, joint mobilisation, manipulation or relaxation therapy in people with fibromyalgia, low back pain and general musculoskeletal pain. Massage therapy, as a stand-alone treatment, reduces pain and improves function compared to no treatment in some musculoskeletal conditions. When massage is compared to another active treatment, no clear benefit was evident. Copyright © 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Common Factors of Meditation, Focusing, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Longitudinal Relation of Self-Report Measures to Worry, Depressive, and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Among Nonclinical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, Tomoko; Sugiura, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Meditation has a long tradition with substantial implications for many psychotherapies. It has been postulated that meditation may cultivate therapeutic processes similar to various psychotherapies. A previous study used joint factor analysis to identify five common factors of items of scales purported to capture psychological states cultivated by meditation, focusing, and cognitive behavioral therapy, namely, refraining from catastrophic thinking, logical objectivity, self-observation, accep...

  12. Lack of proton pump inhibitor trial prior to commencing therapy for eosinophilic esophagitis is common in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, M J; Lynch, K L; Yang, Y-X; Metz, D C; Falk, G W

    2017-12-22

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by eosinophil inflammation restricted to the esophagus and the resulting symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. Critical to the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis is a trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy to exclude alternative causes of esophageal eosinophilia such as proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia. While consensus guidelines recommend a proton pump inhibitor trial prior to diagnosis, little is known about its implementation in clinical practice. The primary aim of this study is to assess the frequency of proton pump inhibitor trial prior to the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis in community practice. The secondary aim is to assess the frequency of other treatments for eosinophilic esophagitis, including topical steroids and/or dietary therapy, in patients who did not undergo a proton pump inhibitor trial prior to diagnosis or who had an alternative diagnosis to eosinophilic esophagitis upon completed workup. We conducted a single-center, case series of patients referred to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for eosinophilic esophagitis management between 2010 and 2015. This case series consisted of 125 patients who were referred from community practitioners with a presumptive diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. Upon review, 90 out of 125 (72%) patients had not had a proton pump inhibitor trial or esophageal pH testing prior to the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis being made. Of these patients, 77.8% (70/90) had already received either topical steroid or dietary therapy for presumed eosinophilic esophagitis. Of the 125 patients initially diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis, 32 (25.6%) were found to have an alternative diagnosis, and 79.2% of this subset of patients (25/32) had previously received topical steroid or dietary therapy. This study demonstrates that a substantial number of patients with presumed eosinophilic esophagitis have not had a proton pump inhibitor

  13. Meaning and Theme in Indian Style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojahed Gholami

    2016-12-01

    With a glimpse on what was said and a pause on the poems of Saeb Tabrizi, as one of the most seasoned poets in Indian style, it demonstrates part of his art and also illuminates the relation among word, meaning and theme in his poetry and viewpoint. He established multiple proportions among the concepts in his poem: sometimes he expressed a semantic unit as a content with diversities in word, or in some occasions, he expressed a semantic unit by different contents, with similar or dissimilar content maker elements, or even sometimes he use content maker elements for expressing multiple meanings and so on. Also it is necessary to be noted that when Saeb and the other poets of Indian style, measure the meaning by words, their meant is subjective matter and if the meaning comes with adjectives such as unfamiliar, narrow, distant, and so on, these words have used mainly in order to replace theme.

  14. The Internet Marketing of Disney Theme Parks

    OpenAIRE

    Carol J. Auster; Margaret A. Michaud

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the portrayal of gender and race in the images on the official Disney websites used to market five theme parks: the Disneyland Parks in California, Paris, Tokyo, and Hong Kong, and the Magic Kingdom in Florida. This is important because of the growth of e-commerce, Disney’s global influence, and the potential impact on those who view the images. The 452 images that had Disney hu...

  15. Emerging themes in international business research

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, David A.; Salih Tamer Cavusgil; Shichun Xu

    2008-01-01

    This study is motivated by two research questions: (1) Which recent contributions have been driving the research agenda in international business? (2) Which emerging themes in the literature are likely to set the stage for future work? To examine these questions, the study examined scholarly work in international business over the time period 1996–2006 in six leading international business journals (Journal of International Business Studies, Management International Review, Journal of World B...

  16. Inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes are common among survivors of breast cancer who develop therapy-related leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churpek, Jane E; Marquez, Rafael; Neistadt, Barbara; Claussen, Kimberly; Lee, Ming K; Churpek, Matthew M; Huo, Dezheng; Weiner, Howard; Bannerjee, Mekhala; Godley, Lucy A; Le Beau, Michelle M; Pritchard, Colin C; Walsh, Tom; King, Mary-Claire; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Larson, Richard A

    2016-01-15

    Risk factors for the development of therapy-related leukemia (TRL), an often lethal late complication of cytotoxic therapy, remain poorly understood and may differ for survivors of different malignancies. Survivors of breast cancer (BC) now account for the majority of TRL cases, making the study of TRL risk factors in this population a priority. Subjects with TRL after cytotoxic therapy for a primary BC were identified from the TRL registry at The University of Chicago. Those with an available germline DNA sample were screened with a comprehensive gene panel covering known inherited BC susceptibility genes. Clinical and TRL characteristics of all subjects and those with identified germline mutations were described. Nineteen of 88 survivors of BC with TRL (22%) had an additional primary cancer and 40 of the 70 survivors with an available family history (57%) had a close relative with breast, ovarian, or pancreatic cancer. Of the 47 subjects with available DNA, 10 (21%) were found to carry a deleterious inherited mutation in BRCA1 (3 subjects; 6%), BRCA2 (2 subjects; 4%), TP53 (tumor protein p53) (3 subjects; 6%), CHEK2 (checkpoint kinase 2) (1 subject; 2%), and PALB2 (partner and localizer of BRCA2) (1 subject; 2%). Survivors of BC with TRL have personal and family histories suggestive of inherited cancer susceptibility and frequently carry germline mutations in BC susceptibility genes. The data from the current study support the role of these genes in TRL risk and suggest that long-term follow-up studies of women with germline mutations who are treated for BC and functional studies of the effects of heterozygous mutations in these genes on bone marrow function after cytotoxic exposures are warranted. Cancer 2016;122:304-311. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  17. A Synthesis of Spiritual Intelligence Themes from Islamic and Western Philosophical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefar, Shamsiah Banu; Sa'ari, Che Zarrina; Siraj, Saedah

    2016-12-01

    Spiritual intelligence is an emerging term that is widely discussed and accepted as one of the main components that addresses and solves many life problems. Nonetheless there is no specific study being done to synthesize the spiritual intelligence themes from Western and Islamic philosophical perspectives. This research aimed to identify common spiritual intelligence themes from these two perspectives and elucidated its contents by the view of two well-known Islamic scholars; al-Ghazali and Hasan Langgulung. Seven spiritual intelligence themes were identified through thematic analysis; meaning/purpose of life, consciousness, transcendence, spiritual resources, self-determination, reflection-soul purification and spiritual coping with obstacles. These findings will be the groundwork for centered theory of spiritual intelligence themes that synthesize the Islamic and Western philosophical perspectives. It is hoped that this study will contribute significantly to the development of valid and reliable spiritual intelligence themes beyond the social and cultural boundaries.

  18. 'I was thinking too much': experiences of HIV-positive adults with common mental disorders and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Bere, Tarisai; Macpherson, Kirsty; Nyamayaro, Primrose; Potter, Lucy; Makadzange, Tariro; Munjoma, Ronald; Marufu, Marshall; Araya, Ricardo; Safren, Steven; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Chibanda, Dixon; Abas, Melanie

    2015-07-01

    To document the lived experiences of people with both poor mental health and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in high HIV prevalence settings. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 47 (female = 31) HIV-positive adults who scored above the cut-point on a locally validated scale for common mental disorders (CMDs). Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants with evidence of poor adherence. Six additional key informant interviews (female = 6) were conducted with healthcare workers. Data were collected and analysed inductively by an interdisciplinary coding team. The major challenges faced by participants were stressors (poverty, stigma, marital problems) and symptoms of CMDs ('thinking too much', changes to appetite and sleep, 'burdened heart' and low energy levels). Thinking too much, which appears closely related to rumination, was the symptom with the greatest negative impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults with CMDs. In turn, thinking too much was commonly triggered by the stressors faced by people living with HIV/AIDS, especially poverty. Finally, participants desired private counselling, access to income-generating activities and family engagement in mental health care. Better understanding of the local expression of mental disorders and of underlying stressors can inform the development of culturally sensitive interventions to reduce CMDs and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Treatment of Acute Cough Due to the Common Cold: Multi-component, Multi-symptom Therapy is Preferable to Single-Component, Single-Symptom Therapy--A Pro/Con Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Ronald; Turner, Ronald B; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2016-02-01

    Acute viral upper respiratory tract infection, or, the common cold, affects essentially every human being, and cough is reported as its most frequent associated symptom. Billions of dollars are spent worldwide annually by individuals seeking relief from this multi-symptom syndrome. Thousands of non-prescription, over-the-counter products are available worldwide, aimed at relieving the various bothersome symptoms induced by the common cold. Differences of opinion exist as to whether optimal therapy for cough associated with the common cold consists of multi-component, multi-symptom cough/cold preparations, or, whether single-component medications, aimed at relief of specific symptoms, represent the optimal therapeutic approach. The 5th American Cough Conference, held in Washington, D.C. in June, 2015, provided an ideal forum for discussion and debate of this issue between two internationally recognized experts in the field of the common cold and its treatment.

  20. The Current State of Music Therapy Theory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    An essay on themes from Ken Aigen (2014): "The Study of Music Therapy. Current Issues and Concepts"......An essay on themes from Ken Aigen (2014): "The Study of Music Therapy. Current Issues and Concepts"...

  1. Lay Health Workers' Experience of Delivering a Problem Solving Therapy Intervention for Common Mental Disorders Among People Living with HIV: A Qualitative Study from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibanda, Dixon; Cowan, Frances; Verhey, Ruth; Machando, Debra; Abas, Melanie; Lund, Crick

    2017-02-01

    There is growing evidence supporting the use of lay health workers (LHWs) to address the treatment gap for common mental disorders (CMD) through task-shifting. This study looks at the experience of LHWs delivering a problem solving therapy (PST) intervention for CMD for people living with HIV (PLWH) in a primary health care setting. Semi-structured interviews of LHWs (n = 7) and PLWH (10) who received PST were carried out using thematic content analysis. Over a 4 year period LHWs developed indigenous concepts of PST which were: Opening the mind (Kuvhura pfungwa), uplifting (kusimudzira), strengthening and strengthening further (kusimbisa and kusimbisisa) respectively. Using terms locally conceived through knowledge sharing amongst LHWs made it acceptable to deliver PST as part of their daily work. Indigenous terms conceived and developed by LWHs to describe components and processes of PST contribute to the therapy's acceptability and continued use in primary care facilities.

  2. Disease-modifying therapy in multiple sclerosis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: common and divergent current and future strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, N; Meuth, S G

    2014-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) represent chronic, autoimmune demyelinating disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system. Although both disorders share some fundamental pathogenic elements, treatments do not provide uniform effects across both disorders. We aim at providing an overview of current and future disease-modifying strategies in these disorders to demonstrate communalities and distinctions. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) have demonstrated short- and long-term beneficial effects in CIDP but are not effective in MS. Dimethyl fumarate (BG-12), teriflunomide and laquinimod are orally administered immunomodulatory drugs that are already approved or likely to be approved in the near future for the basic therapy of patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) due to positive results in Phase III clinical trials. However, clinical trials with these drugs in CIDP have not (yet) been initiated. Natalizumab and fingolimod are approved for the treatment of RRMS, and trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy in CIDP are now planned. Alemtuzumab, ocrelizumab and daclizumab respresent monoclonal antibodies in advanced stages of clinical development for their use in RRMS patients. Attempts to study the safety and efficacy of alemtuzumab and B cell-depleting anti-CD20 antibodies, i.e. rituximab, ocrelizumab or ofatumumab, in CIDP patients are currently under way. We provide an overview of the mechanism of action and clinical data available on disease-modifying immunotherapy options for MS and CIDP. Enhanced understanding of the relative effects of therapies in these two disorders may aid rational treatment selection and the development of innovative treatment approaches in the future. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Prevention and Treatment of Influenza, Influenza-Like Illness, and Common Cold by Herbal, Complementary, and Natural Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Haider Abdul-Lateef

    2017-01-01

    In recent years viral respiratory tract infections, especially influenza viruses, have had a major impact on communities worldwide as a result of unavailability of effective treatment or vaccine. The frequent alterations in the antigenic structures of respiratory viruses, particularly for RNA viruses, pose difficulties in production of effective vaccines. The unavailability of optimal medication and shortage of effective vaccines suggests the requirement for alternative natural therapies. Several herbal remedies were used for prevention and treatment viral respiratory illnesses. Among those that were found effective included maoto, licorice roots, antiwei, North American ginseng, berries, Echinacea, plants extracted carnosic acid, pomegranate, guava tea, and Bai Shao. There is scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of several complementary therapies for colds. Oral zinc may reduce the length and severity of a cold. Taking vitamin C supplements on a regular basis only slightly reduces the length and severity of colds. Probiotics were found better than placebo in reducing the number episodes of acute upper respiratory tract infections, the rate of episodes of acute upper respiratory tract infection and reducing antibiotic use. Alkaline diets or drinks might have antiviral properties as in vitro studies demonstrated inactivation effect of alkaline medium on respiratory virus. Earthing might have a natural anti-inflammatory effect for human body. It is now accepted that an overwhelming inflammatory response is the cause of human deaths from avian H5N1 influenza infection. Earthing accelerates immune response following vaccination, as demonstrated by increases of gamma globulin concentration. No in vivo or clinical studies were found that investigate the role of alkalization or earthing on respiratory viral infections. Thus, future studies are recommended to reveal any potential curative effects. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Gene expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with common variable immunodeficiency: modulation of adaptive immune response following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Dolcino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regular intravenous immunoglobulin treatment is used to replace antibody deficiency in primary immunodeficiency diseases; however the therapeutic effect seems to be related not only to antibody replacement but also to an active role in the modulation of the immune response. Common variable immunodeficiency is the most frequent primary immunodeficiency seen in clinical practice. METHODS: We have studied the effect of intravenous immunoglobulin replacement in patients with common variable immunodeficiency by evaluating the gene-expression profiles from Affimetrix HG-U133A. Some of the gene array results were validated by real time RT-PCR and by the measurement of circulating cytokines and chemokines by ELISA. Moreover we performed FACS analysis of blood mononuclear cells from the patients enrolled in the study. RESULTS: A series of genes involved in innate and acquired immune responses were markedly up- or down-modulated before therapy. Such genes included CD14, CD36, LEPR, IRF-5, RGS-1, CD38, TNFRSF25, IL-4, CXCR4, CCR3, IL-8. Most of these modulated genes showed an expression similar to that of normal controls after immunoglobulin replacement. Real time RT-PCR of selected genes and serum levels of IL-4, CXCR4 before and after therapy changed accordingly to gene array results. Interestingly, serum levels of IL-8 remained unchanged, as the corresponding gene, before and after treatment. FACS analysis showed a marked decrease of CD8+T cells and an increase of CD4+T cells following treatment. Moreover we observed a marked increase of CD23⁻CD27⁻IgM⁻IgG⁻ B cells (centrocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are in accordance with previous reports and provide further support to the hypothesis that the benefits of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy are not only related to antibody replacement but also to its ability to modulate the immune response in common variable immunodeficiency.

  5. Ten themes of viscous liquid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    simplifies the theory by allowing for an ultra-local Hamiltonian (free energy), but also explains the observed general independence of chemistry. Whereas there are no long-ranged static (i.e., equal-time) correlations in the model, there are important long-ranged dynamic correlations on the alpha timescale.......Ten ‘themes' of viscous liquid physics are discussed with a focus on how they point to a general description of equilibrium viscous liquid dynamics (i.e., fluctuations) at a given temperature. This description is based on standard time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations for the density fields...

  6. Themes in human work interaction design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Mark Pejtersen, Annelise; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. This paper raises themes that are seen as some of the challenges facing the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design. The paper has its offset in the discussions and writings that have been dominant within the IFIP Working Group on Human Work Interaction...... Design (name HWID) through the last two and half years since the commencement of this Working Group. The paper thus provides an introduction to the theory and empirical evidence that lie behind the combination of empirical work studies and interaction design. It also recommends key topics for future...... research in Human Work Interaction Design....

  7. Variations on a theme of Grothendieck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Johan; Thaddeus, Michael

    variations on this theme, we prove corresponding results for principal bundles over the following schemes and stacks: (1) a line modulo the group of nth roots of unity; (2) a football, that is, an orbifold of genus zero with two marked points; (3) a gerbe over a football whose structure group is the nth...... roots of unity; (4) a line modulo an action of a split torus; (5) a chain of lines meeting in nodes; and (6) a chain modulo an action of a split torus. We also prove that the automorphism groups of such bundles are smooth, affine, and connected....

  8. Strategic Themes in the Haulier Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgström, Benedikte; Gammelgaard, Britta; Wieland, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    : In highly ranked transport journals, only two per cent of the published articles concern haulier strategizing, thus, knowledge development concerning the socio-economic and managerial problems of practitioners and policy makers is delimited. Original/value: The study contributes to a strategic perspective...... and 2016 in international peer‐reviewed journals. 55 selected articles deal with strategic elements concerning hauliers, such as service offerings, costs and revenues. Findings: Themes of hauliers’ strategizing that are discussed in the literature, namely carrier selection revisited, professionalism...

  9. Wioski tematyczne w powiecie tucholskim = Theme villages in powiat tucholski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawska Paulina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kawska Paulina, Gotowski Rafał. Wioski tematyczne w powiecie tucholskim = Theme villages in powiat tucholski. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(11:46-53. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.163526 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/3960 The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation. Part B item 755 (23.12.2015. 755 Journal of Education, Health and Sport eISSN 2391-8306 7 © The Author (s 2016; This article is published with open access at Licensee Open Journal Systems of Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz, Poland Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s and source are credited. This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ which permits unrestricted, non commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited. This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ which permits unrestricted, non commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited. The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the publication of this paper. Received: 02.10.2016. Revised 12.10.2016. Accepted: 27.10.2016. Wioski tematyczne w powiecie tucholskim Theme villages in powiat tucholski Paulina Kawska, Rafał Gotowski Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego w Bydgoszczy, Polska Słowa kluczowe: wioska tematyczna, odnowa wsi, specjalizacja. Key words: theme village, village renewal, specialization. Streszczenie Artykuł koncentruje się na zagadnieniu wiosek

  10. Molecular strategies to design an escape-proof antiviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2011-01-01

    Two antiviral approaches against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were presented at the Antivirals Congress in Amsterdam. The common theme among these two separate therapeutic research lines is the wish to develop a durable therapy that prevents viral escape. We will present a brief

  11. Themes of suffering in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Helen K; Rubinstein, Robert L

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative research study explored the personal meaning of suffering to a group of 40 community-dwelling elders, stratified by gender and race. We recruited 40 informants who were 70 years old or older from the Philadelphia, PA, area for extended qualitative interviews, which elicited their life story and experiences and philosophies about suffering. Cells contained 10 African American men and women and 10 European American men and women each (N = 40). Through analysis of data, we placed elders' experiences of suffering under three general themes: suffering as lack of control, suffering as loss, and the value of suffering. Informants developed a unique definition, attribution, theory, and theodicy about suffering based on the particularity of the experience as well as how they "fit" suffering into their lives as a whole. Brief case studies illustrate how themes emerged in elders' stories of suffering. On the basis of this research, it appears that, although they have some similarities, elders' experiences of suffering are unique and incomparable. Similarities concern informants' connection of suffering with finitude. The incomparability of suffering experiences relate to informants' unique personal histories, perceptions, and "cause" of suffering. Through the process of the interview, elders connect the suffering experience to the entirety of the life lived and the story of suffering to the life story.

  12. Echinacea purpurea therapy for the treatment of the common cold: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yale, Steven H; Liu, Kejian

    2004-06-14

    Echinacea purpurea stimulates the immune response and is promoted to reduce symptom severity and the duration of upper respiratory tract infections. We sought to determine the efficacy of a standardized preparation of E purpurea in reducing symptom severity and duration of the common cold. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was used. Patients received either 100 mg of E purpurea (freeze-dried pressed juice from the aerial portion of the plant) or a lactose placebo 3 times daily until cold symptoms were relieved or until the end of 14 days, whichever came first. Symptoms (sneezing, nasal discharge, nasal congestion, headache, sore or scratchy throat, hoarseness, muscle aches, and cough) were scored subjectively by the patient and recorded daily in a diary. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate the survival function of time to resolution in each group. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare time to resolution between the 2 groups. One hundred twenty-eight patients were enrolled within 24 hours of cold symptom onset. Group demographic distribution was comparable for sex, age, time from symptom onset to enrollment in the study, average number of colds per year, and smoking history. No statistically significant difference was observed between treatment groups for either total symptom scores (P range,.29-.90) or mean individual symptom scores (P range,.09-.93). The time to resolution of symptoms was not statistically different (P =.73). Some studies have concluded that Echinacea effectively reduces the symptoms and duration of the common cold. We were unable to replicate such findings. Further studies using different preparations and dosages of E purpurea are necessary to validate previous claims.

  13. Energy metabolism disorders in rare and common diseases. Toward bioenergetic modulation therapy and the training of a new generation of European scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Rodrigue

    2015-06-01

    Energy metabolism alterations are found in a large number of rare and common diseases of genetic or environmental origin. The number of patients that could benefit from bioenergetic modulation therapy (BIOMET) is therefore very important and includes individuals with pathologies as diverse as mitochondrial diseases, acute coronary syndrome, chronic kidney disease, asthma or even cancer. Although, the alteration of energy metabolism is disease specific and sometimes patient specific, the strategies for BIOMET could be common and target a series of bioenergetic regulatory mechanisms discussed in this article. An excellent training of scientists in the field of energy metabolism, related human diseases and drug discovery is also crucial to form a young generation of MDs, PHDs and Pharma or CRO-group leaders who will discover novel personalized bioenergetic medicines, through pharmacology, genetics, nutrition or adapted exercise training. The Mitochondrial European Educational Training (MEET) consortium was created to pursue this goal, and we dedicated here a special issue of Organelle in Focus (OiF) to highlight their objectives. A total of 10 OiFs articles constitute this Directed Issue on Mitochondrial Medicine. As part of this editorial article, we asked timely questions to the PR. Jan W. Smeitink, professor of Mitochondrial Medicine and CEO of Khondrion, a mitochondrial medicine company. He shared with us his objectives and strategies for the study of mitochondrial diseases and the identification of future treatments. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The risk-benefit profile of commonly used herbal therapies: Ginkgo, St. John's Wort, Ginseng, Echinacea, Saw Palmetto, and Kava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Edzard

    2002-01-01

    Because use of herbal remedies is increasing, a risk-benefit profile of commonly used herbs is needed. This article provides a clinically oriented overview of the efficacy and safety of ginkgo, St. John's wort, ginseng, echinacea, saw palmetto, and kava. Wherever possible, assessments are based on systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials. Encouraging data support the efficacy of some of these popular herbal medicinal products, and the potential for doing good seems greater than that for doing harm. The published evidence suggests that ginkgo is of questionable use for memory loss and tinnitus but has some effect on dementia and intermittent claudication. St. John's wort is efficacious for mild to moderate depression, but serious concerns exist about its interactions with several conventional drugs. Well-conducted clinical trials do not support the efficacy of ginseng to treat any condition. Echinacea may be helpful in the treatment or prevention of upper respiratory tract infections, but trial data are not fully convincing. Saw palmetto has been shown in short-term trials to be efficacious in reducing the symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Kava is an efficacious short-term treatment for anxiety. None of these herbal medicines is free of adverse effects. Because the evidence is incomplete, risk-benefit assessments are not completely reliable, and much knowledge is still lacking.

  15. Identifying potential themes for the Child Amblyopia Treatment Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Jill

    2013-08-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments are increasingly common in both clinical practice and research. The data obtained from these instruments can be used to help inform decision making and policy-making decisions. The methodological approaches undertaken in developing PROs is not frequently reported. Literature on the development of the descriptive systems for PROs is sparse in comparison with that on the assessment of the psychometric properties of such instruments. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of qualitative interviews conducted to identify potential themes for the Child Amblyopia Treatment Questionnaire (CAT-QoL), a pediatric disease-specific health-related quality of life instrument for amblyopia designed for children aged 4 to 7 years. Semistructured interviews were undertaken with 59 children (aged 3 years 9 months to 9 years 11 months; average, 6 years 3 months) with amblyopia. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and imported into QSR NVivo 8. Interview transcripts were analyzed to identify potential items to be included in the descriptive system. Thematic content analysis was undertaken using Framework. Eleven potential themes were identified for inclusion in the CAT-QoL instrument, namely, physical sensation of the treatment, pain, being able to play with other children, how other children have treated them, ability to undertake schoolwork, ability to undertake other tasks, sad or unhappy, cross, worried, frustrated, and feelings toward family members. Children are able to identify their thoughts and opinions of their own health and to describe what impact their amblyopia treatment has had on their daily lives. Themes for the draft descriptive system for a pediatric self-reported amblyopia QoL instrument have been identified. A draft version of the CAT-QoL instrument has been developed. Further research is required to refine and assess the psychometric properties of the instrument.

  16. Creation of meanings on the theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Borges

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Investments in policies for science teachers, as well as their adaptation to new realities and technologies are essential, since the teacher is the key to changing mindsets and attitudes of their students. Thus, conceptual discussions are proposed between chemistry teachers in a virtual environment on the Moodle platform on topics previously chosen by the education teacher. The objective is to analyze the process of creating meanings of participants of the forum on the theme "nature of science." It was noticed that new media can help building students' knowledge and motivate them to expand their research and scientific readings; however, rules must be preestablished so that a real interaction and mediation could occur. Initiatives like these are useful for the understanding of scientific and technical fields, and may also facilitate communication and interaction between teachers and students.

  17. [Mercosur's regional health agenda: architecture and themes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Luisa Guimaraes; Giovanella, Ligia

    2011-08-01

    This article describes the shaping of institutional health spaces in the Mercosur, with analysis of themes and results and considerations on the construction of the regional agenda and on the effects of regional economic integration processes on health policies and systems. We discuss the organization, operation, focus topics, and results achieved in specific health forums (Meeting of Ministers of Health and Sub-Working Group 11), seeking to analyze the architecture and issues addressed by the regional agenda and drawing parallels with the European experience. The aim of this reflection is to identify how the work done by Mercosur structures contributes to building a regional agenda, with the expectation that the integration can contribute to reducing inequalities in access to health care in the region.

  18. Mercosur's regional health agenda: architecture and themes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Guimaraes Queiroz

    Full Text Available This article describes the shaping of institutional health spaces in the Mercosur, with analysis of themes and results and considerations on the construction of the regional agenda and on the effects of regional economic integration processes on health policies and systems. We discuss the organization, operation, focus topics, and results achieved in specific health forums (Meeting of Ministers of Health and Sub-Working Group 11, seeking to analyze the architecture and issues addressed by the regional agenda and drawing parallels with the European experience. The aim of this reflection is to identify how the work done by Mercosur structures contributes to building a regional agenda, with the expectation that the integration can contribute to reducing inequalities in access to health care in the region.

  19. The Internet Marketing of Disney Theme Parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol J. Auster

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the portrayal of gender and race in the images on the official Disney websites used to market five theme parks: the Disneyland Parks in California, Paris, Tokyo, and Hong Kong, and the Magic Kingdom in Florida. This is important because of the growth of e-commerce, Disney’s global influence, and the potential impact on those who view the images. The 452 images that had Disney human characters, human-like characters, animals, cast members, or guests were coded for gender. The main gender hypothesis, that the percentage of male-dominated images would exceed the percentage of female-dominated images, was tested using gender disparity values, which measured the gap between the percentage of male-dominated and female-dominated images. The hypothesis tended to be supported overall, and for most of the resorts (e.g., Florida, lands (e.g., Adventureland, and activities (attractions, entertainment, dining for human characters, human-like characters, animals, and cast members, but not for guests. Furthermore, the hypotheses that gender disparity values would be highest for images of animals and lowest for images of guests was supported for all five resorts, six of eight lands, and all three activities. Additional analysis also revealed the preponderance of same-sex pairings in parent–child combinations in the images. With regard to race, while the images of some theme parks displayed more racial diversity among their guests than others, in some images, individuals of different races were shown interacting whereas in others they were not. Explanations for these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  20. Faecal retention: a common cause in functional bowel disorders, appendicitis and haemorrhoids--with medical and surgical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raahave, Dennis

    2015-03-01

    as defecation improved overall. The novel knowledge of faecal retention in the patients does not explain why faecal retention occurs. However, it may be inferred from the present results that a constipated or irritable bowel may belong to the same underlying disease dimension, where faecal retention is a common factor. Thus, measuring CTT and faecal load is suggested as a guide to a positive functional diagnosis of bowel disorders compared to the constellation of symptoms alone. Thirty-five patients underwent surgery after being refractory to the conservative treatment for constipation. They had a significantly prolonged CTT and heavy faecal loading, which was responsible for the aggravated abdominal and defaecatory symptoms. The operated patients presented with a redundant colon (dolichocolon) significantly more often. These patients also had an extremely high rate of previous appendectomy. Twenty-one patients underwent hemicolectomy, and 11 patients had a subtotal colectomy with an ileosigmoidal anastomosis; three patients received a stoma. However, some patients had to have the initial segmental colectomy converted to a final subtotal colectomy because of persisting symptoms. Six more subtotal colectomies have been performed and the leakage rate of all colectomies is then 4.9 % (one patient died). After a mean follow-up of 5 years, the vast majority of patients were without abdominal pain and bloating, having two to four defecations daily with control and their quality of life had increased considerably. A faecalith is often located in the appendix, the occlusion of which is responsible for many cases of acute appendicitis, which is infrequent in all except white populations. An effort to trace the origin of the faecalith to faecal retention in the colon was made in a case control study (56 patients and 44 random controls). The CTT was longer and faecal load greater in patients with appendicitis compared to controls, though the difference was not significant

  1. Cultural concepts and themes of suicidal attempt among Iranian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafshan, Mohammad Rafi; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Molazem, Zahra; Mani, Arash

    2015-03-01

    Suicide attempts are more common among adolescents than other age groups. Although suicide is considered a worldwide problem, but the related factors, to suicidal behavior are different in various cultures. The purpose of this study is to identify themes that explain suicide attempt process among adolescents in Iran. This is a qualitative study carried out based on grounded theory. Key informants were 16 adolescents referred to two hospitals in Shiraz after suicide attempts. Also, 4 family members, a nurse, a psychologist, and a psychiatrist participated in this study. Sampling started with purposive sampling method and continued with theoretical sampling. Data were collected using semi-structured in-depth interviews. Data analysis was carried out using Strauss and Corbin approach and constant comparative method until the point of data saturation. Five main categories, including personal factors and life experiences; family factors, social and educational factors, psychological-emotional problems, and stress control strategies were extracted from the data. The central concept in the data was to escape the painful psychological condition, which was in connection with other concepts describing the process of suicide attempts in adolescents. This study identified 5 categories of concepts as main themes that can be used to explain suicidal attempt process among Iranian adolescents.

  2. Deriving Multicultural Themes from Bibliotherapeutic Literature: A Neglected Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Robert; Ottens, Allen; Gross, Carl

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the content of 24 fictional bibliotherapeutic children's books (12 German and 12 U.S.) for divorce themes. G. Allport's (1979) statistics were used to categorize the results. Results reveal that emic and etic themes were uncovered. (Author)

  3. Recent advances in the biologic therapy of lupus: the 10 most important areas to look for common pitfalls in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Rosas, Jorge; Al-Rayes, Hanan; Moustafa, Ahmed T; Touma, Zahi

    2016-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease affecting different organs. The improved knowledge of the disease's pathogenesis has contributed to the emergence of immune targets and new biologic drugs directed at them. Although rheumatologists continue to use off-label biologics in SLE resistant to other immunosuppressants, only belimumab has been approved as a biological therapy since 2011. In this review, an overview is provided on: 1) the classification of the biologic drugs in clinical trials and of those under research; 2) the results of clinical trials of biologic therapy with an interpretation of pitfalls and syntheses of potential approaches to overcome these pitfalls and, 3) the commonly used disease activity metrics and composite indices for assessing response to drugs. Some drugs that have failed in previous drug trials have shown to be efficacious in the treatment of lupus in observational studies. Moreover, the post-hoc analyses of the data of negative drug trials have shown that results of the same trials could be altered with the modification of some pitfalls. For future clinical trials, the consideration of these pitfalls is crucial when designing clinical trials. This could potentially enhance the approval of novel drugs for SLE.

  4. Commonalities and Differences Between Max Weber and Michael Foucault on the Theme of “Rationalization of the Body”(“Bedenin Ussallaşması” Teması Üzerinde Max Weber ve Michael Foucault Arasındaki Yakınsamalar ve Farklılıklar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buğra ÖZER

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to elucidate the very nature of ‘the rationalization of the body’ in regard to the convergence and divergences as envisioned in the works of Max Weber and Michael Foucault. While both of the thinkers may be deemed to be important critiques of the modernity process, their insights reveal certain commonalities as the came to deal with the rationalization of the body and individuation of the body along with differences that can be traced back to their roots in their critiques about the modernity project. In such respect, the study emphasizes that rationalization of the body has been a complex process and it italicizes that different dynamics came to redefine the body and individuate the individual along with the continuation of the process.

  5. Pain Flare Is a Common Adverse Event in Steroid-Naïve Patients After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Zeng, Liang; Zhang, Liying; Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Loblaw, Andrew; Chow, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of pain flare after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in steroid-naïve patients and identify predictive factors. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients were treated with spine SBRT between February 2010 and April 2012. All patients had their pain assessed at baseline, during, and for 10 days after SBRT using the Brief Pain Inventory. All pain medications were recorded daily and narcotics converted to an oral morphine equivalent dose. Pain flare was defined as a 2-point increase in worst pain score as compared with baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake, a 25% increase in analgesic intake as compared with baseline with no decrease in worst pain score, or if corticosteroids were initiated at any point during or after SBRT because of pain. Results: The median age and Karnofsky performance status were 57.5 years (range, 27-80 years) and 80 (range, 50-100), respectively. Eighteen patients were treated with 20-24 Gy in a single fraction, whereas 23 patients were treated with 24-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions. Pain flare was observed in 68.3% of patients (28 of 41), most commonly on day 1 after SBRT (29%, 8 of 28). Multivariate analysis identified a higher Karnofsky performance status (P=.02) and cervical (P=.049) or lumbar (P=.02) locations as significant predictors of pain flare. In those rescued with dexamethasone, a significant decrease in pain scores over time was subsequently observed (P<.0001). Conclusions: Pain flare is a common adverse event after spine SBRT and occurs most commonly the day after treatment completion. Patients should be appropriately consented for this adverse event.

  6. Blues You Can Use: Teaching the Faust Theme through Music, Literature, and Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Matt; Goering, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Uses the blues to teach the universal Faust theme, which was a common motif expressed in many lyrics coming out of the Mississippi Delta region in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. Uses this opportunity to open students' eyes to a musical form often overlooked and misinterpreted in mainstream culture, and to improve students' critical…

  7. The diabetic neuropathies: practical and rational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, J Robinson; Smith, A Gordon

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes is associated with a variety of chronic and acute neuropathies. In this article, the authors summarize the clinical features of the most common diabetic neuropathies, focusing on those for which therapy is available or under active investigation. Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common form. Potential treatments for DSP are discussed in four broad themes: (1) medication and lifestyle therapy to improve hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and attendant features of metabolic syndrome, including obesity and dyslipidemia; (2) pharmacologic therapy to alter neuropathy natural history aimed at rational targets from known pathophysiology; (3) symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain; and (4) treatment to prevent complications of neuropathy, including stasis ulcers and falls. The approach to the most common acute diabetic neuropathies is also reviewed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Bibliography of Papers Published in the Journal Migration Themes / Migration and Ethnic Themes (1985 – 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Klempić Bogadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To mark the 30th anniversary of the publication of the journal Migracijske i etničke teme / Migration and Ethnic Themes (up to 2000 it was issued under the title Migration Themes: a Journal for Migration and Ethic Studies, we consider it important and necessary to provide an overview in one place of the papers published in the journal from its first issue in 1985 to the last one in 2014. The most important aim of this bibliography is to introduce the scientific and professional public, especially new researchers, to the topics covered by this journal as well as to enable easier access to the journal and its more convenient use. The bibliography is selective. It includes scientific papers (the original scientific paper, preliminary communication and review paper professional papers, conference papers, panel discussions, discussions, reviews and bibliographies, while reviews of books and periodicals (i.e. papers from the sections Books, Reviews, From Foreign Periodicals and Movie as well as Introductions, Memories, In Memoriam and Conference Reviews (from the sections Reviews and Conferences are not included. All the papers are available at Hrčak – Portal of Scientific Journals of Croatia. Given that all kinds of papers are not included, but primarily in order to provide its better examination and insight into published papers according to specific topics and dealing with various issues, as well as to provide easier and faster access, we have decided to make a subject bibliography, and not a chronological one. (On the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the Migration Themes journal, the chronological bibliography prepared by Josip Kumper was published in the 3-4/1994 issue. From the very first issue, migration and ethnicity have been the main themes represented in the journal, but the emphasis on the basic issues in previous papers, which involved external migration, internal migration, emigration and minorities/nationalities, have gradually

  9. A Framework for Mobile User Experiences in Theme Parks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Claus Møller

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework, which contributes to a better theoretical understanding of mobile user experience in theme parks that is not limited to (a) personal smartphones, (b) a specific theme park, or (c) specific mobile content. Thus, the paper contributes to the field of mobile user...... experience in theme parks within HCI. The identified aspects constituting the mobile user experience in theme parks are the environmental context, the social context, the functional context, the mobile interface, and of course the mobile content. The framework is developed based on five diverse case studies...

  10. Theme-Based Bidisciplinary Chemistry Laboratory Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Phyllis A.; Szczerbicki, Sandra K.

    1996-12-01

    A thematic approach to each of the two introductory chemistry laboratory sequences, general and organic chemistry, not only provides an element of cohesion but also stresses the role that chemistry plays as the "central science" and emphasizes the intimate link between chemistry and other science disciplines. Thus, in general chemistry the rubric "Environmental Chemistry" affords connections to the geosciences, whereas experiments on the topic of "Plant Assays" bridge organic chemistry and biology. By establishing links with other science departments, the theme-based laboratory experiments will satisfy the following multidisciplinary criteria: (i) to demonstrate the general applicability of core methodologies to the sciences, (ii) to help students relate concepts to a broader multidisciplinary context, (iii) to foster an attitude of both independence and cooperation that can transcend the teaching laboratory to the research arena, and (iv) to promote greater cooperation and interaction between the science departments. Fundamentally, this approach has the potential to impact the chemistry curriculum significantly by including student decision-making in the experimental process. Furthermore, the incorporation of GC-MS, a powerful tool for separation and identification as well as a state-of-the-art analytical technique, in the modules will enhance the introductory general and organic chemistry laboratory sequences by making them more instrument-intensive and by providing a reliable and reproducible means of obtaining quantitative analyses. Each multifaceted module has been designed to meet the following criteria: (i) a synthetic protocol including full spectral characterization of products, (ii) quantitative and statistical analyses of data, and (iii) construction of a database of results. The database will provide several concrete functions. It will foster the idea that science is a continuous incremental process building on the results of earlier experimentalists

  11. THEME: a web tool for loop-design microarray data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaang-Ray; Shu, Wun-Yi; Tsai, Min-Lung; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Hsu, Ian C

    2012-02-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that loop-design is more efficient than reference control design. Data analysis for loop-design microarray experiments is commonly undertaken using linear models and statistical tests. These techniques require specialized knowledge in statistical programming. However, limited loop-design web-based tools are available. We have developed the THEME (Tsing Hua Engine of Microarray Experiment) that exploits all necessary data analysis tools for loop-design microarray studies. THEME allows users to construct linear models and to apply multiple user-defined statistical tests of hypotheses for detection of DEG (differentially expressed genes). Users can modify entries of design matrix for experimental design as well as that of contrast matrix for statistical tests of hypotheses. The output of multiple user-defined statistical tests of hypotheses, DEG lists, can be cross-validated. The web platform provides data assessment and visualization tools that significantly assist users when evaluating the performance of microarray experimental procedures. THEME is also a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment) compliant system, which enables users to export formatted files for GEO (Gene Expression Omnibus) submission. THEME offers comprehensive web services to biologists for data analysis of loop-design microarray experiments. This web-based resource is especially useful for core facility service as well as collaboration projects when researchers are not at the same site. Data analysis procedures, starting from uploading raw data files to retrieving DEG lists, can be flexibly operated with natural workflows. These features make THEME a reliable and powerful on-line system for data analysis of loop-design microarrays. The THEME server is available at http://metadb.bmes.nthu.edu.tw/theme/. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Attitudes toward Tobacco, Alcohol, and Non-Alcoholic Beverage Advertisement Themes among Adolescent Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Katherine L; Roberts, Megan E; Keller-Hamilton, Brittney; Yates, Katherine A; Paskett, Electra D; Berman, Micah L; Slater, Michael D; Lu, Bo; Ferketich, Amy K

    2018-02-13

    Previous studies have examined what adolescents find appealing in tobacco and alcohol advertisements and how different themes in advertisements are used to manipulate consumer behaviors. Yet, we know little about the relationship between the themes portrayed in advertisements and youth attitudes towards those themes. This study compared attitudes towards advertisements for different consumer products in a sample of urban and rural adolescent boys in order to examine how key marketing themes impact adolescent attitudes towards those advertisements. Participants were 11- to 16-year-old boys (N = 1220) residing in either urban or rural Ohio Appalachian counties. Each participant viewed five print advertisements (one each for cigarettes, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), smokeless tobacco (SLT), non-alcoholic beverages, and alcohol), presented in a random order, for eight seconds each. All advertisements had appeared in magazines that adolescent males commonly read. Attitudes towards each of the five advertisements were assessed. The advertisements were then coded for the presence of various themes, including social acceptance and masculinity. Analyses were conducted to determine associations between advertisement type and the attitude measure, and between the presence of a theme and the attitude measure. Overall, participants preferred non-tobacco advertisements to tobacco advertisements, rural participants had less positive attitudes and participants who had peers who used tobacco had more positive attitudes. Social acceptance and entertainment themes increased the appeal of SLT advertisements, and sex appeal increased the appeal of e-cigarette advertisements. Conclusions/Importance: Findings suggest that advertisements that promote the social nature of use in SLT advertisements may be of particular concern for their influence on adolescent boys.

  13. Rehabilitation of torture survivors in five countries: common themes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Helen; Higson-Smith, Craig; Gjerding, Sarah; Omar, Mostafa H; Rahman, Basma Abdel; Hamed, Mona; El Dawla, Aida S; Fredericks, Miriam; Paulsen, Nicole; Shabalala, Gugu; Low-Shang, Carmen; Perez, Fernando Valadez; Colin, Liliana S; Hernandez, Aurora D; Lavaire, Eliomara; Zuñiga, Arely Pa; Calidonio, Lucia; Martinez, Carmen L; Jamei, Yasser Abu; Awad, Zeyad

    2010-06-18

    Torture continues to be a global problem and there is a need for prevention and rehabilitation efforts. There is little available data on torture survivors from studies designed and conducted by health professionals in low income countries. This study is a collaboration between five centres from Gaza, Egypt, Mexico, Honduras and South Africa who provide health, social and legal services to torture survivors, advocate for the prevention of torture and are part of the network of the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT). Socio-demographic, clinical and torture exposure data was collected on the torture survivors attending the five centres at presentation and then at three and six month follow-up periods. This sample of torture survivors is presented using a range of descriptive statistics. Change over time is demonstrated with repeated measures analysis of variance. Of the 306 torture survivors, 23% were asylum seekers or refugees, 24% were socially isolated, 11% in prison. A high level of traumatic events was experienced. 64% had suffered head injury whilst tortured and 24% had ongoing torture injury problems. There was high prevalence of symptoms of anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress as well as medically unexplained somatic symptoms. The analysis demonstrates a modest drop in symptoms over the six months of the study. Data showed that the torture survivors seen in these five centres had high levels of exposure to torture events and high rates of clinical symptoms. In order to provide effective services to torture survivors, health professionals at torture rehabilitation centres in low income countries need to be supported to collect relevant data to document the needs of torture survivors and to evaluate the centres' interventions.

  14. Rehabilitation of torture survivors in five countries: common themes and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuñiga Arely PA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Torture continues to be a global problem and there is a need for prevention and rehabilitation efforts. There is little available data on torture survivors from studies designed and conducted by health professionals in low income countries. This study is a collaboration between five centres from Gaza, Egypt, Mexico, Honduras and South Africa who provide health, social and legal services to torture survivors, advocate for the prevention of torture and are part of the network of the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT. Methods Socio-demographic, clinical and torture exposure data was collected on the torture survivors attending the five centres at presentation and then at three and six month follow-up periods. This sample of torture survivors is presented using a range of descriptive statistics. Change over time is demonstrated with repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Of the 306 torture survivors, 23% were asylum seekers or refugees, 24% were socially isolated, 11% in prison. A high level of traumatic events was experienced. 64% had suffered head injury whilst tortured and 24% had ongoing torture injury problems. There was high prevalence of symptoms of anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress as well as medically unexplained somatic symptoms. The analysis demonstrates a modest drop in symptoms over the six months of the study. Conclusions Data showed that the torture survivors seen in these five centres had high levels of exposure to torture events and high rates of clinical symptoms. In order to provide effective services to torture survivors, health professionals at torture rehabilitation centres in low income countries need to be supported to collect relevant data to document the needs of torture survivors and to evaluate the centres' interventions.

  15. Sexual selection in language, music and birdsong - common themes and issues

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Sexual selection plays a major role in evolutionary biology, shaping some of nature's most spectacular beauties and intricate systems. The interplay between competition, display and choice is a major driving force in shaping the world around us Human beings are very sexual creatures, and display competition, selectiveness and jealousy when it comes to our partners. To what extent did sexual choice shape our evolutionary history ? Studies in the evolution of language have considered a ...

  16. From limbs to leaves: common themes in evolutionary diversification of organ form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco Anton Mentink

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An open problem in biology is to derive general principles that capture how morphogenesis evolved to generate diverse forms in different organisms. Here we discuss recent work investigating the morphogenetic basis for digit loss in vertebrate limbs and variation in form of marginal outgrowths of angiosperm (flowering plant leaves. Two pathways underlie digit loss in vertebrate limbs. First, alterations to digit patterning arise through modification of expression of the Patched 1 receptor, which senses the Sonic Hedgehog morphogen and limits its mobility in the limb bud. Second, evolutionary changes to the degree of programmed cell death between digits influence their development after their initiation. Similarly, evolutionary modification of leaf margin outgrowths occurs via two broad pathways. First, species-specific transcription factor expression modulates outgrowth patterning dependent on regulated transport of the hormone auxin. Second, species-specific expression of the newly discovered REDUCED COMPLEXITY homeodomain transcription factor influences growth between individual outgrowths after their initiation. These findings demonstrate that in both plants and animals tinkering with either patterning or post-patterning processes can cause morphological change. They also highlight the considerable flexibility of morphological evolution and indicate that it may be possible to derive broad principles that capture how morphogenesis evolved across complex eukaryotes.

  17. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L

    2015-07-06

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  18. Regulation of Energy Balance by Inflammation: Common Theme in Physiology and Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation regulates energy metabolism in both physiological and pathological conditions. Pro-inflammatory cytokines involves in energy regulation in several conditions, such as obesity, aging (calorie restriction), sports (exercise), and cancer (cachexia). Here, we introduce a view of integrative physiology to understand pro-inflammatory cytokines in the control of energy expenditure. In obesity, chronic inflammation is derived from energy surplus that induces adipose tissue expansion and ...

  19. Regulation of energy balance by inflammation: common theme in physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation regulates energy metabolism in both physiological and pathological conditions. Pro-inflammatory cytokines involves in energy regulation in several conditions, such as obesity, aging (calorie restriction), sports (exercise), and cancer (cachexia). Here, we introduce a view of integrative physiology to understand pro-inflammatory cytokines in the control of energy expenditure. In obesity, chronic inflammation is derived from energy surplus that induces adipose tissue expansion and adipose tissue hypoxia. In addition to the detrimental effect on insulin sensitivity, pro-inflammatory cytokines also stimulate energy expenditure and facilitate adipose tissue remodeling. In caloric restriction (CR), inflammatory status is decreased by low energy intake that results in less energy supply to immune cells to favor energy saving under caloric restriction. During physical exercise, inflammatory status is elevated due to muscle production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which promote fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissue to meet the muscle energy demand. In cancer cachexia, chronic inflammation is elevated by the immune response in the fight against cancer. The energy expenditure from chronic inflammation contributes to weight loss. Immune tolerant cancer cells gains more nutrients during the inflammation. In these conditions, inflammation coordinates energy distribution and energy demand between tissues. If the body lacks response to the pro-inflammatory cytokines (Inflammation Resistance), the energy metabolism will be impaired leading to an increased risk for obesity. In contrast, super-induction of the inflammation activity leads to weight loss and malnutrition in cancer cachexia. In summary, inflammation is a critical component in the maintenance of energy balance in the body. Literature is reviewed in above fields to support this view.

  20. Using Common Themes: Cost-Effectiveness of Permanent Supported Housing for People with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Thomas Chalmers

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the cost-effectiveness of providing permanent supported housing to homeless people with mental illness. Through the use of billing records and frequency of use charts, researchers were able to map the service usage of a cohort of 268 homeless individuals from both urban and rural communities. The results suggest that…

  1. Nurturing Writing Proficiency through Theme-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Siti Rafizah Fatimah; Ahmad, Erny Arniza; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the effectiveness of theme-based instructional (TBI) method as a means of honing the writing skills and the motivation for writing of 36 pre-degree ESL learners in a Malaysian tertiary institution. The method which focused on development of language skills through discussion of themes provided the teacher a direct and effective…

  2. Research themes, authors and methodologies in the South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the primary and secondary research themes and ascertained the prolific authors and the research methods and designs that were prevalent in the SAJAE issues published from 1999 to 2014. A total of 177 articles were reviewed and a total of 33 primary research themes (PRTs) and 36 secondary ...

  3. Complex, Dynamic Systems: A New Transdisciplinary Theme for Applied Linguistics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2012-01-01

    In this plenary address, I suggest that Complexity Theory has the potential to contribute a transdisciplinary theme to applied linguistics. Transdisciplinary themes supersede disciplines and spur new kinds of creative activity (Halliday 2001 [1990]). Investigating complex systems requires researchers to pay attention to system dynamics. Since…

  4. New Themes in Physics Teaching: A Personal Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Dewey I., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    For a little over 40 years, what we label now physics education research has been conducted. As a result, a new type of theme in the research and in physics education has emerged. Some of these themes are cognitivism, research as qualitative, learning as construction of knowledge, theoretical underpinnings that are not realist, student-centered…

  5. Dewey and Husserl: A Surprising Convergence of Themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, James W.; Shargel, Emanuel I.

    1988-01-01

    The authors find many shared themes in the epistemologies of Dewey and Husserl which are important to the philosophy of education. Agreement is found in three themes: the real life world; the origin of thinking in experience; and the possibility of expanding meaning from experience. (JL)

  6. Supernatural Themes in Selected Children's Stories of Isaac Bashevis Singer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, June H.; Vanderryst, June D.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the impact of the traditional folklore theme of good versus evil on children's development and analyzes the development of this theme using magical and supernatural situations in the work of Isaac Bashevis Singer. A selected bibliography of work by and literary criticisms of Singer's writings is provided. (five references) (CLB)

  7. In silico search for multi-target therapies for osteoarthritis based on 10 common Huoxue Huayu herbs and potential applications to other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chun-Song; Zhuang, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Xiao-Jie; Ye, Jin-Xia; Ye, Hong-Zhi; Li, Xi-Hai; Wu, Guang-Wen; Xu, Hui-Feng; Liu, Xian-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    Huoxue Huayu (HXHY) has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as a key therapeutic principle for osteoarthritis (OA), and related herbs have been widely prescribed to treat OA in the clinic. The aims of the present study were to explore a multi-target therapy for OA using 10 common HXHY herbs and to investigate their potential applications for treatment of other diseases. A novel computational simulation approach that integrates chemical structure, ligand clusters, chemical space and drug‑likeness evaluations, as well as docking and network analysis, was used to investigate the properties and effects of the herbs. The compounds contained in the studied HXHY herbs were divided into 10 clusters. Comparison of the chemical properties of these compounds to those of other compounds described in the DrugBank database indicated that the properties of the former are more diverse than those of the latter and that most of the HXHY-derived compounds do not violate the 'Lipinski's rule of five'. Docking analysis allowed for the identification of 39 potential bioactive compounds from HXHY herbs and 11 potential targets for these compounds. The identified targets were closely associated with 49 diseases, including neoplasms, musculoskeletal, nervous system and cardiovascular diseases. Ligand‑target (L‑T) and ligand‑target‑disease (L‑T‑D) networks were constructed in order to further elucidate the pharmacological effects of the herbs. Our findings suggest that a number of compounds from HXHY herbs are promising candidates for mult‑target therapeutic application in OA and may exert diverse pharmacological effects, affecting additional diseases besides OA.

  8. Common Factors of Meditation, Focusing, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Longitudinal Relation of Self-Report Measures to Worry, Depressive, and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Among Nonclinical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tomoko; Sugiura, Yoshinori

    Meditation has a long tradition with substantial implications for many psychotherapies. It has been postulated that meditation may cultivate therapeutic processes similar to various psychotherapies. A previous study used joint factor analysis to identify five common factors of items of scales purported to capture psychological states cultivated by meditation, focusing, and cognitive behavioral therapy, namely, refraining from catastrophic thinking, logical objectivity, self-observation, acceptance, and detached coping. The present study aimed to extend previous research on these five factors by examining their longitudinal relationship to symptoms of depression, obsession and compulsion, and worrying, with two correlational surveys without intervention. Potential mediators of their effect on worrying were also explored. Longitudinal questionnaire studies from two student samples (n = 157 and 232, respectively) found that (a) detached coping was inversely related to obsessive-compulsive symptoms about 5 weeks later; (b) detached coping was inversely related to depressive symptoms about 5 weeks later; (c) refraining from catastrophic thinking was inversely related to worrying, while self-observation was positively related to worrying about 2 months later; and (d) the relation of refraining from catastrophic thinking to worrying was mediated by negative beliefs about worrying, while the relation of self-observation to worrying was mediated by negative beliefs about worrying and monitoring of one's cognitive processes. As refraining from catastrophic thinking involves being detached from one's negative thinking and detached coping involves distancing oneself from external circumstances and problems, the results suggest that distancing attitudes are useful for long-term reduction of various psychological symptoms.

  9. Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  10. A Foundation for Mobile User Experiences in Theme Parks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Claus Møller

    2013-01-01

    Based on case studies, this paper proposes a theoretical understanding of three essential aspects, which affect mobile user experiences in theme parks. The aspect are (a) the controllability of the mobile content, (b) the balance in the hybrid space of proximate physical place and remote digital...... space, and (c) the social space. Furthermore, the social space is exceptionally important in understanding mobile user experiences in theme parks. Thus, this paper proposes to extract the social space from the physical place. This means, that mobile user experiences in theme parks can be understood...

  11. Mapping the Terrain of Homosexually-Themed Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I present a new model for understanding homosexually-themed language. By detailing how old conceptualizations of homophobic language no longer maintain heuristic utility in explaining the social dynamics of many sport and educational settings, I situate other conceptualizations of homosexually-themed language depending on the cultural context. I argue that whether language is considered homophobic, or whether it is better conceptualized as fag discourse, gay discourse or pro-gay language, is primarily dependent on the homohysteria of a setting. This model should enable scholars and educators to understand the operation of homosexually-themed language in society and properly evaluate the homophobia of a setting. PMID:21534076

  12. Mapping the terrain of homosexually-themed language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I present a new model for understanding homosexually-themed language. By detailing how old conceptualizations of homophobic language no longer maintain heuristic utility in explaining the social dynamics of many sport and educational settings, I situate other conceptualizations of homosexually-themed language depending on the cultural context. I argue that whether language is considered homophobic, or whether it is better conceptualized as fag discourse, gay discourse or pro-gay language, is primarily dependent on the homohysteria of a setting. This model should enable scholars and educators to understand the operation of homosexually-themed language in society and properly evaluate the homophobia of a setting.

  13. The emerging role of occupational therapy in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Catherine A; Brenchley, Christie L; Crawford, Candace N; Letts, Lori J

    2014-02-01

    Few studies have examined the role of occupational therapy working in a primary care setting. The objective of the study was to describe the emerging role of occupational therapy in Family Health Teams, a model of interprofessional primary care. A multiple case study design was used to provide in-depth description of the occupational therapy role. Data collection included interviews, document analyses, and questionnaires. Each case was first analyzed individually, followed by cross-case analyses to determine common themes. The role of occupational therapy in Family Health Teams epitomizes that of a generalist, whose overarching focus is on function. Occupational therapists are working across the life span with a wide range of client populations. Older adults and individuals with complex chronic conditions are two prominent areas of occupational therapy focus. Understanding the impact of health conditions on daily function and enabling participation in activities are unique and important contributions of occupational therapy.

  14. Measuring the operational efficiency of individual theme park attractions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Changhee; Kim, Soowook

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the operation efficiency of theme park attractions using the data envelopment analysis, utilizing actual data on 15 attractions at Samsung Everland located in Yongin-si, Republic of Korea...

  15. Ray Bradbury's Dandelion Wine: Themes, Sources, and Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengeling, Marvin E.

    1971-01-01

    Defends Bradbury as a major prose writer. Places Dandelion Wine's major theme, initiation, in American literary tradition. Explores the novel's structure, and notes the influence of Mark Twain and Melville, among others, on Bradbury. (JB)

  16. Theme: Staying Current--Small Animals and Specialty Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, James A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Six theme articles examine ways that vocational agriculture teachers can keep current, including related hobbies, resource persons, beekeeping as a supervised occupational experience, specialty crops such as fruits and nuts, an inservice poultry project, and trade and industry organizations. (SK)

  17. Underdeveloped Themes in Qualitative Research: Relationship With Interviews and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Lynne M; Peltzer, Jill N

    2016-01-01

    In this methodological article, the authors address the problem of underdeveloped themes in qualitative studies they have reviewed. Various possible reasons for underdeveloped themes are examined, and suggestions offered. Each problem area is explored, and literature support is provided. The suggestions that are offered are supported by the literature as well. The problem with underdeveloped themes in certain articles is related to 3 interconnected issues: (a) lack of clear relationship to the underlying research method, (b) an apparent lack of depth in interviewing techniques, and (c) lack of depth in the analysis. Underdeveloped themes in a qualitative study can lead to a lack of substantive findings that have meaningful implications for practice, research, and the nursing profession, as well as the rejection of articles for publication. Fully developed themes require knowledge about the paradigm of qualitative research, the methodology that is proposed, the effective techniques of interviewing that can produce rich data with examples and experiences, and analysis that goes beyond superficial reporting of what the participants have said. Analytic problem areas include premature closure, anxiety about how to analyze, and confusion about categories and themes. Effective qualitative research takes time and effort and is not as easy as is sometimes presumed. The usefulness of findings depends on researchers improving their research skills and practices. Increasingly researchers are using qualitative research to explore clinically important issues. As consumers of research or members of a research team, clinical nurse specialists need to understand the nature of this research that can provide in-depth insight and meaning.

  18. Incremental cost-effectiveness pharmacoeconomic assessment of hepatitis C virus therapy: an approach for less wealthy members of the common market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mance, Diana; Mance, Davor; Vitezić, Dinko

    2016-12-31

    To develop a new method of health-economic analysis based on a marginal approach. We tested the research hypothesis that a detailed comparative a priori incremental cost-effectiveness analysis provides the necessary input for budget impact analysis about the proper order of introduction of new therapies, and thus maximizes the cost-effectiveness bounded by the total budget constraint. For the analysis we chose a combination therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 (GT1) infection, which was approved by the European Medicine Agency in 2015. We used the incremental cost-effective approach to assess the increase in the percentage of patients achieving sustained virological response (SVR) and the expenditure per additional SVR modulated by the new therapy's market entrance dynamics. Patient subpopulations were differentiated by their response to previous treatment, presence of cirrhosis, and HCV GT1 subtype. Final parameters were estimated by Monte Carlo simulations. The new combination therapy had high efficacy, shorter duration, and was better tolerated than alternative interventions. The research hypothesis was confirmed: gradual introduction of the new therapy on the market, based on a priori incremental cost-effectiveness analysis, would result in average increase in successfully treated patients by 20%-40%, while additional costs would approximately be between 8%-40%, ie, ?21000-52000 per additional patient achieving SVR. We showed the new combination therapy to be cost-effective for certain patient subpopulations, especially for experienced cirrhotic HCV GT1 patients. Results of the analysis are in agreement with the latest recommendations for HCV patients' treatment in Croatia. This economic evaluation could serve as a starting point for negotiations between pharmaceutical industry and insurance companies.

  19. Tourism and Water: Themes of the Alpine Convention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, R.

    2012-04-01

    environment. This needs to be accomplished by balancing the local population's interests with environmental needs. Water is considered as a crucial element for different uses such as hydroelectricity production, irrigation or drinking water as well as in biotopes, especially forests, environmental regeneration and diversity and in natural and cultural landscapes features. Aspects of water protection can be found in the protocols on Energy, Nature Conservation and Landscape Protection, Soil Protection, Tourism, Spatial Planning and Sustainable Development, Mountain Agriculture, Mountain Forests and Transport. However a specific protocol on water is not in place. The Reports on the state of the Alps are published regularly by the Alpine Conference. In November 2006 water was chosen as the topic for the second Report on the State of the Alps. The report compiles information from the Alpine Countries on monitoring programmes, chemical quality of water (point sources, diffuse sources and the chemical status of surface and groundwater in the Alps), water abstraction, residual water and hydro-peaking, droughts and water scarcity, reservoirs and regulated lakes as well on river morphology and continuity. Finally, it summarizes information on property rights and provisions for access to water in the different countries, charges regarding the use of water, different management systems for water supply (public or private), hydro power generation in the Alps and water use management conflicts. The Report was adopted by the Ministers during the Xth Alpine Conference in Evian (France) in 2009. This Conference additionally set up a platform on Water management in the Alpine area in order to deal continually with the theme of water in the Alps. Within this platform, objectives that were identified in the second Report on the State of the Alps should be pursued and examples of good practices exchanged. The platform developed inter alia common guidelines for the use of small hydropower in the

  20. Environmental Protection Theme at Discourses of Corporative Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Rodrigues Leite da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper views and discusses discourses on social responsibility in organizations and their use of the environmental theme. We suppose that strategies are used to disseminate some discourses concerning these matters. The ambiguities of themes within organizations point to a fragmented discourse (Fineman, 1996, revealing practices of openness and dissimulation. The theoretical discussion starts with the theme of social responsibility, confronting it with an environmental theme and discusses discourses with ambiguities of organizational practice stemming from two themes. At the end, a case study of Antena completes the discussion. Data was collected with documental research and semi-structured interviews. We made use of Discourse Analysis methodology (Fiorin, 1989. In conclusion, the concern with social responsibility and its environmental thematic lie within the organization. It is found in the discourse and actions at a high administration level including managers and a high number of technical workers. The silence about the limits of this responsibility is fulfilled by a technical workers group that reveals dissimulation when openness menaces some objectives.

  1. Composing the theme of city to be diverse and sustainable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiranegara, H. W.

    2018-01-01

    To give a path for developing a city needs a theme. City’s goal stated in a document of a spatial plan were too broad and insufficient detail in giving a direction. To make more detail and precise, every city has to compose a city theme. It is developed based on the potential, the uniqueness, the excellence, and the sustainability of its human resources, natural resources, and man-made resources. An integration among the three of resources which have the highest score become a theme of the city. The aim of this research was to formulate the conceptual framework to compose a city theme. The research design was the interview survey in Banda Aceh, Banjarmasin, and Kupang. Informants were the government officials, academics, figures, the private sector and public who considered related to the intended information being collected. Having set the conceptual framework, the interview directed to check the implementation in realities. The result was that the conceptual framework could accommodate the phenomenon of composing the theme of the city. Yet, it was a preliminary in nature and needed more research to get a complete result.

  2. ThemeDelta: Dynamic Segmentations over Temporal Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Samah; Javed, Waqas; Ghani, Sohaib; Elmqvist, Niklas; Ewing, Tom; Hampton, Keith N; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2015-05-01

    We present ThemeDelta, a visual analytics system for extracting and visualizing temporal trends, clustering, and reorganization in time-indexed textual datasets. ThemeDelta is supported by a dynamic temporal segmentation algorithm that integrates with topic modeling algorithms to identify change points where significant shifts in topics occur. This algorithm detects not only the clustering and associations of keywords in a time period, but also their convergence into topics (groups of keywords) that may later diverge into new groups. The visual representation of ThemeDelta uses sinuous, variable-width lines to show this evolution on a timeline, utilizing color for categories, and line width for keyword strength. We demonstrate how interaction with ThemeDelta helps capture the rise and fall of topics by analyzing archives of historical newspapers, of U.S. presidential campaign speeches, and of social messages collected through iNeighbors, a web-based social website. ThemeDelta is evaluated using a qualitative expert user study involving three researchers from rhetoric and history using the historical newspapers corpus.

  3. Negative appraisals of insulin therapy are common among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin : Results from Diabetes MILES - Australia cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes-Truscott, E.; Skinner, T.C.; Pouwer, F.; Speight, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To identify insulin therapy appraisals among adults with Type 2 diabetes using insulin and how negative appraisals relate to clinical, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. Methods Diabetes MILES – Australia 2011 was a national survey of adults with diabetes, focused on behavioural and

  4. Problem-solving therapy for depression and common mental disorders in Zimbabwe: piloting a task-shifting primary mental health care intervention in a population with a high prevalence of people living with HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan Frances; Kajawu Lazarus; Mesu Petra; Chibanda Dixon; Araya Ricardo; Abas Melanie A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There is limited evidence that interventions for depression and other common mental disorders (CMD) can be integrated sustainably into primary health care in Africa. We aimed to pilot a low-cost multi-component 'Friendship Bench Intervention' for CMD, locally adapted from problem-solving therapy and delivered by trained and supervised female lay workers to learn if was feasible and possibly effective as well as how best to implement it on a larger scale. Method We trained ...

  5. Courting Apocalypse: Creating a Zombie-Themed Evidence-Based Medicine Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Amy E; Kiscaden, Elizabeth; Bengtson, Jason

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, two librarians at the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences at the University of Iowa turned their dreams into a reality and secured funding to build a zombie-themed evidence-based medicine game. The game features a "choose your own adventure" style that takes students through a scenario where a disease outbreak is taking place and a resident is asked to use evidence-based medicine skills to select a screening and diagnostic tool to use on potentially infected patients. Feedback on the game has been positive, and future plans include building additional modules on therapy, harm, and prognosis.

  6. Meeting: François Houtart “the common good of the common property of Mankind”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Houtart

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article relates the transcript of the conference Hourtart Francois offered in the city of Medellin Colombia, in 2015 developed the theme was: “In the commons, at the common good of humanity

  7. Theme park EMS. It's no Mickey Mouse operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, J H

    1995-07-01

    In a single shift, they can rescue someone trapped in a time warp, perform CPR while menacing monsters look over their shoulders or calmly watch as a motorboat chase ends in a huge ball of fire. It's just another routine day for EMS providers in America's theme parks, where getting ready for unusual calls is the norm. JEMS went behind the scenes with theme park responders to explore the unique challenges of their service environment. What we found was a group of super-dedicated professionals who place genuine hospitality right alongside quality patient care.

  8. European Union News Themes in Romanian Radio Stations. Case Study: Europa FM and Radio Romania Actualitati

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia-Ioana Matei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With Romania’s integration in the European Union, the media content related to the member states has acquired growing importance. The themes of journalism were enriched with new approaches towards national image in the European context and vice versa. At a first level, the study aims to conduct a quantitative analysis on the news topics broadcasted by Radio Romania Actualitati and Europa FM, for the duration of 32 days. The qualitative component focuses on the topics addressed in radio news in order to see what is the media content which reflects the image of the European Union. The findings show, beyond the numbers, that the editorial policy of the Romanian media is not concerned with the interests of the citizens - from the perspective of common themes - but rather with how can the EU, as a unified body, help member countries solve their problems.

  9. Therapy in Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costonis, Maureen Needham, Ed.

    This book contains a collection of articles on the subject of movement therapy. It can be used as a set of supplementary readings for an academic course in dance therapy or a psychiatric residency program. It includes an exhaustive bibliography on this field for students and practioners in this field. Four principal themes have been selected as a…

  10. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  11. Common Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from spreading Common warts Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  12. Using Herman Melville's "Moby-Dick" to Explore Geographic Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesler, Wil

    2004-01-01

    The classic American novel, Herman Melville's "Moby-Dick", can be used in geography and English classes at the high school and college levels to explore five themes that have a geographic component or are of interest to geography students: (1) the journey, (2) human/environment interactions, (3) social relationships in space, (4) acquiring…

  13. themes, dreams and reauty: the science project approach to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THEMES, DREAMS AND REAUTY: THE SCIENCE PROJECT APPROACH TO CURRICULUM. DEVELOPMENT IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE. The evolution of thinking and the development of materials relating to the biological component of the Science Education. Project are outlined, The context of the project within.

  14. Heuristical Strategies on the Study Theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons -- Alkenes"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumescu, Adrienne Kozan; Pasca, Roxana-Diana

    2011-01-01

    The influence of heuristical strategies upon the level of two experimental classes is studied in this paper. The didactic experiment took place at secondary school in Cluj-Napoca, in 2008-2009 school year. The study theme "The Unsaturated Hydrocarbons--Alkenes" has been efficiently learned by using the most active methods: laboratory…

  15. "Community" as a Guiding Theme for the Public Speaking Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson-Lepper, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    First-year students at many universities find themselves in new communities, with little understanding of how their new university, city, academic, or career communities function. Developing a student's sense of community can have long-term benefits. Using the theme of "Community" in the basic public speaking course provides students with…

  16. Further themes in Christian drama in Nigeria | Agoro | EJOTMAS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have used the following plays to illustrate the themes we are going to discuss in this paper: Cold Wings of Darkness and The Living Dead by A.E Anigala, Trial of the Beautiful Ones by Catherine Acholonu,The Secrets of the Devil, The beginning of the End and The Last Generation by Mike Bamiloye,The Church is the ...

  17. Using Sustainability Themes and Multidisciplinary Approaches to Enhance STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michael; Pfaff, Thomas; Hamilton, Jason; Erkan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the Multidisciplinary Sustainability Education Project (MSEP) as a framework using sustainability-themed education modules to introduce students to the need for multidisciplinary approaches to solving twenty-first-century problems while retaining traditional course strengths and content.…

  18. Editorial. Themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R J

    2014-03-01

    This themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology stems from the 7th in the series of meetings on the Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (MPGPCR) held at the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Melbourne Australia from the 6th-8th December 2012. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Identifying and Addressing Themes of Job Dissatisfaction for Secondary Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, David; Grundmeyer, Trent; Yankey, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Secondary principals serve in important roles that are complex, high-stress, and include demanding job responsibilities. Key stakeholders such as superintendents, school board members, and legislators must understand the challenges facing secondary principals in order to address the current themes of job dissatisfaction. Using new survey data…

  20. Infusing Multiculturalism into the Curriculum Through Broad Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, William J.

    1978-01-01

    Appropriate curriculum development strategies can result in the organization of instructional objectives, content, and activities around broad themes and the students' real-life experiences. Four basic areas of living, with substantial culturally pluralistic elements, are family life, community life, human relations, and the American cultural…

  1. Reading LGBT-Themed Literature with Young People: What's Possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Caroline T.; Blackburn, Mollie V.

    2009-01-01

    The authors' belief that using LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender)-themed literature in schools is possible and necessary, coupled with students' sense that either it cannot or is not being done, prompted them to write this article. While the authors are sympathetic with students' perspectives, and agree that examples are limited, such…

  2. Graduate Employability: A Review of Conceptual and Empirical Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of some of the dominant empirical and conceptual themes in the area of graduate employment and employability over the past decade. The paper considers the wider context of higher education (HE) and labour market change, and the policy thinking towards graduate employability. It draws upon various…

  3. An investigation into the theme patterns in selected extracts from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with Theme patterns analysis in the Nigerian female novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Half of a Yellow Sun using the Hallidayan Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL). Such an approach postulates that the study of language (written or spoken) can involve three functional labels such as experiential, ...

  4. Language and Theme Symbiosis: A Stylistic Analysis of use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okoye employs a simple diction, choice registers, connotations, pidgin, repetition, preponderance of complex and compound - complex sentences, parallelism, balanced construction, figures of speech, idioms, and proverbs to reinforce the themes. The enormous use of titles and aliases and the undue emphasis on their use ...

  5. The Great Pyramid Builders: An Integrated Theme on Ancient Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a themed classroom project designed to teach about the culture and civilization of ancient Egypt. In preparing the project, it is noted that teachers should remember that different learning styles, including activities that provide meaningful experiences, are appropriate in accommodating the various ways children learn.…

  6. Picking up the Pieces: Themes in Macedonian Midcareer Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudnik, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Addressing midcareer transition in post-socialist Macedonia, this work sought to provide practical help to participants through a range of techniques. Four themes are identified as important options for transitioners. Enthusiasm for "entrepreneurship" is tempered by a lack of funds and "portfolio careers" are also viewed with…

  7. Themes of Charlotte Zolotow's Books and Her Adult Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Karen Lenz

    A study of Charlotte Zolotow's life and the themes of her children's books provides an illustration of the usefulness and problems in the application of theories of adult development, especially as they apply to women. This report of the study contains (1) discussions of Erik Erikson's and Daniel Levinson's theories of adult development; (2) a…

  8. Chaotic Careers: A Narrative Analysis of Career Transition Themes and Outcomes Using Chaos Theory as a Guiding Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Sharon; McDowall, Almuth

    2012-01-01

    In a rapidly changing world of work, little research exists on mid-career transitions. We investigated these using the open-systems approach of chaos theory as a guiding metaphor and conducted interviews with seven mid-career individuals chosen for their experience of a significant mid-career transition. Four common themes were identified through…

  9. Evaluation of the efficacy of a combined formulation (Grippostad-C) in the therapy of symptoms of common cold: a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koytchev, R; Vlahov, V; Bacratcheva, N; Giesel, B; Gawronska-Szklarz, B; Wojcicki, J; Mrozikiewiczs, A; van der Meer, M; Alken, R G

    2003-03-01

    The aim of the present trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a combined product in the treatment of common cold and to examine the contribution of the separate components. In the published literature there is conflicting data on the efficacy of agents used in the treatment of common cold, especially when given in drug combinations. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter, 4-arm, controlled trial was carried out in 1,167 patients with common cold treated with one of the following medications: Grippostad-C, a combination of acetaminophen, caffeine, chlorpheniramine and ascorbic acid (verum), ascorbic acid (control), chlorpheniramine and ascorbic acid (reference 1), as well as acetaminophen, caffeine, and ascorbic acid (reference 2). A score of common cold symptoms (headache, throat pain, extremities and joint pain, cough, blocked nose, and disturbances of sleep quality) was the primary outcome. The test drug was first compared with the control using a hierarchic test strategy, then with reference 1, followed by reference 2 with the aim of proving superiority. A clinically relevant and statistically significant difference was demonstrated at each level of the hierarchy. Grippostad-C was significantly superior to all other treatment groups, the combination of acetaminophen, caffeine, and ascorbic acid was significantly superior to the control, and the combination of chlorpheniramine and ascorbic acid was not statistically different from the control. The efficacy of Grippostad-C for the treatment of common cold was proven. The findings demonstrate that the combination is superior to each of its separate components and each of the components has its own distinctive contribution to the efficacy of the combination product.

  10. Science commons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    SCP: Creative Commons licensing for open access publishing, Open Access Law journal-author agreements for converting journals to open access, and the Scholar's Copyright Addendum Engine for retaining rights to self-archive in meaningful formats and locations for future re-use. More than 250 science and technology journals already publish under Creative Commons licensing while 35 law journals utilize the Open Access Law agreements. The Addendum Engine is a new tool created in partnership with SPARC and U.S. universities. View John Wilbanks's biography

  11. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  12. Challenging some common beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arndt Broder

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors review their own empirical work inspired by the adaptive toolbox metaphor. The review examines factors influencing strategy selection and execution in multi-attribute inference tasks (e.g., information costs, time pressure, memory retrieval, dynamic environments, stimulus formats, intelligence. An emergent theme is the re-evaluation of contingency model claims about the elevated cognitive costs of compensatory in comparison with non-compensatory strategies. Contrary to common assertions about the impact of cognitive complexity, the empirical data suggest that manipulated variables exert their influence at the meta-level of deciding how to decide (i.e., which strategy to select rather than at the level of strategy execution. An alternative conceptualisation of strategy selection, namely threshold adjustment in an evidence accumulation model, is also discussed and the difficulty in distinguishing empirically between these metaphors is acknowledged.

  13. Combination therapy with hydrogen peroxide (4%), salicylic acid (0.5%) and D-panthenol (4%): efficacy and skyn tolerability in common acne vulgaris during sun exposure period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, F; Masini, F; Fossati, B; Frascione, P; De Waure, C; Capizzi, R; Guerriero, C

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a disease of the sebaceous follicle which affects up to 90% of adolescent patients. Topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide and antibiotics are the main treatments for mild to moderate acne vulgaris. The use of such topical treatments is often associated with local irritation and dryness making the skin more sensitive to the sun. The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy and skin tolerability of a fixed-dose combination therapy with hydrogen peroxide (4%), Salicylic acid (0.5%) and D-panthenol (4%) (HSD) gel, in mild-moderate acne vulgaris, during the period of sun exposure. We retrospectively observed 30 patients of Central Italy with mild to moderate acne between April and September 2012. All the patients selected underwent only therapy with HSD gel once a day in the evening for 60 days, while in the morning they just applied SPF 50 sunscreen. We evaluate the efficacy at 30 and 60 days with the "Global Evaluation Scale" (GES) and the tolerability with a 0-3 qualitative scale. The mean GES value showed a statistically significant reduction: 2.03 (SD 0.81) at baseline, 1.63 (SD 0.81) and 0.90 (SD 0.71) respectively at 30 and 60 days (p < 0.01). 21 (70%) and 27 patients (90%) did show good or very good tolerability at 30 and 60 days respectively. Topical treatments with retinoids, antibiotics and antiseptics may increase skin irritation reducing patient adherence to the treatment. HSD gel has shown a good skin tolerability and efficacy in reducing acne lesions, even during the sun exposure period in which traditional treatments should be cautiously used.

  14. Chaotic careers: a narrative analysis of career transition themes and outcomes using chaos theory as a guiding metaphor

    OpenAIRE

    Peake, S.; McDowall, Almuth

    2012-01-01

    In a rapidly changing world of work, little research exists on mid-career transitions. We investigated these using the open-systems approach of chaos theory as a guiding metaphor and conducted interviews with seven mid-career individuals chosen for their experience of a significant mid-career transition. Four common themes were identified through narrative analysis, where 'false starts' to a career were a common experience prior to finding a career 'fit'. Career transitions, precipitated by a...

  15. From themes to hypotheses: following up with quantitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David L

    2015-06-01

    One important category of mixed-methods research designs consists of quantitative studies that follow up on qualitative research. In this case, the themes that serve as the results from the qualitative methods generate hypotheses for testing through the quantitative methods. That process requires operationalization to translate the concepts from the qualitative themes into quantitative variables. This article illustrates these procedures with examples that range from simple operationalization to the evaluation of complex models. It concludes with an argument for not only following up qualitative work with quantitative studies but also the reverse, and doing so by going beyond integrating methods within single projects to include broader mutual attention from qualitative and quantitative researchers who work in the same field. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Smashing WordPress Themes Making WordPress Beautiful

    CERN Document Server

    Hedengren, Thord Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The ultimate guide to WordPress Themes - one of the hottest topics on the web today WordPress is so much more than a blogging platform, and Smashing WordPress Themes teaches readers how to make it look any way they like - from a corporate site, to a photography gallery and moreWordPress is one of the hottest tools on the web today and is used by sites including The New York Times, Rolling Stone, flickr, CNN, NASA and of course Smashing MagazineBeautiful full colour throughout - web designers expect nothing lessSmashing Magazine will fully support this book by by promoting it through their webs

  17. A Literature Analysis of Themes in Paediatric Cochlear Implant Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendar, Nils Ola Ebbe; Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2015-01-01

    Research on children with cochlear implants (CI) has documented positive outcomes, but also that many still experience language delays. The aim of this article is to explore how research on children with cochlear implants cover topics of early language development compared to research on children...... with typical hearing and children with hearing impairment without CI. Published research in the period 1990-2013 on language development was analysed with respect to frequency of selected search terms reflecting different language acquisition themes among children with typical hearing, children with hearing...... impairment without CI, and children with CI, respectively. Results showed a relatively lower number of articles which included themes such as pre-verbal language (imitation, joint attention and gestures), extra lingual abilities (social interaction), and later language skills (semantic, syntactic, grammar...

  18. Themes and challenges in making supply chains socially sustainable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasi, Maisam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Purpose of this paper is to explore and classify pattern of the currently discussed themes and challenges in making supply chains socially sustainable. Design/methodology/approach The methodology was based on a systematic review of the existing literature in order to explore what major...... holistic view of the pattern of currently discussed themes and challenges may be beneficial in increasing the absorptive capacity of industrial and business practitioners when they design and operationalize innovative strategies in developing sustainable supply chains. Originality/value This paper may...... increase awareness about the social responsibilities of supply chains actors and stakeholders. It may also guide managers, decision makers, and practitioners to better understand the difficulties, obstacles, or dilemmas that can hinder sustainable development of supply chains. The discussion section...

  19. Common approach to common interests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    In referring to issues confronting the energy field in this region and options to be exercised in the future, I would like to mention the fundamental condition of the utmost importance. That can be summed up as follows: any subject in energy area can never be solved by one country alone, given the geographical and geopolitical characteristics intrinsically possessed by energy. So, a regional approach is needed and it is especially necessary for the main players in the region to jointly address problems common to them. Though it may be a matter to be pursued in the distant future, I am personally dreaming a 'Common Energy Market for Northeast Asia,' in which member countries' interests are adjusted so that the market can be integrated and the region can become a most economically efficient market, thus formulating an effective power to encounter the outside. It should be noted that Europe needed forty years to integrate its market as the unified common market. It is necessary for us to follow a number of steps over the period to eventually materialize our common market concept, too. Now is the time for us to take a first step to lay the foundation for our descendants to enjoy prosperity from such a common market.

  20. Problem theme of (sexual) abuse of children in youth literature

    OpenAIRE

    Perpar, Slavica

    2013-01-01

    In my diploma thesis I explored the theme of (sexual) abuse in youth literature. In the theoretical part of the thesis I first examined various definitions of (sexual) abuse in relation to the social context, historical period and cultural characteristics. I placed special emphasis on the subject of paedophilia, i.e., sexual abuse by viewing child pornography, inappropriate touching of pre-adolescent children or performing sexual acts with children (Repič, 2008, p. 269). I examined these them...

  1. Measuring the operational efficiency of individual theme park attractions

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Changhee; Kim, Soowook

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the operation efficiency of theme park attractions using the data envelopment analysis, utilizing actual data on 15 attractions at Samsung Everland located in Yongin-si, Republic of Korea. In particular, this study identifies crowding and waiting time as one of the main causes of visitor?s satisfaction, and analyzes the efficiency of individual attractions in terms of waiting time. The installation area, installation cost, and annual repair cost are set as input factors an...

  2. Interpreting hegemonic themes in the electronic forró

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Henrique Costa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Current investigation analyzes hegemonic themes in the music of electronic forró (Brazilian dance. The critical theory of Theodor W. Adorno and Cultural Studies revealed: a the main thematic patterns and clichés of the genre; b the meanings of these thematic patterns; c and some hypothetical implications for the consumer. The above implies certain relations of domination reinforced in and by the consumption of the electronic forró.

  3. 'Historicising common sense'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millstone, Noah

    2012-12-01

    This essay is an expanded set of comments on the social psychology papers written for the special issue on History and Social Psychology. It considers what social psychology, and particularly the theory of social representations, might offer historians working on similar problems, and what historical methods might offer social psychology. The social history of thinking has been a major theme in twentieth and twenty-first century historical writing, represented most recently by the genre of 'cultural history'. Cultural history and the theory of social representations have common ancestors in early twentieth-century social science. Nevertheless, the two lines of research have developed in different ways and are better seen as complementary than similar. The theory of social representations usefully foregrounds issues, like social division and change over time, that cultural history relegates to the background. But for historians, the theory of social representations seems oddly fixated on comparing the thought styles associated with positivist science and 'common sense'. Using historical analysis, this essay tries to dissect the core opposition 'science : common sense' and argues for a more flexible approach to comparing modes of thought.

  4. [Delusion with a theme of generation in chronic schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Koichiro; Kato, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    For schizophrenics and persons at risk of developing schizophrenia, issues regarding the origin of self and paternity sometimes become pressing questions which jeopardize the formation of their subjects. We termed the system which gives rise to such questions as a theme of generation. Through the analysis of a peculiar delusion in a chronic male case, which included the reverse and alteration of the family relations, we clarified the location of a theme of generation in the psychopathology of schizophrenia. The delusion emerged on the death of his parents and successive alienation from his brothers and sisters, which confronted him with a question of generation. The important appearance mechanisms of the delusion were second person hallucinations and primary delusions through delusional ideas. Themes of feminization and monogenic reproduction playing a central role in the delusion were sustained by the concept of the female as a container to regulate the infinite chaos, which is characteristic to the delusion of feminization in schizophrenia (Kato, 2002). With reference to the findings of J. Lacan's structural psychoanalysis, we considered the delusion as a schizophrenic answer to a perplexing question of generation posed to the patient. Additionally, we discussed the delusional other as the responder to this question who had the following three characteristics: 1. the other was the place of the infinite production of signifiers, 2. the other took the position of a mysterious God-like figure and made the patient's body the object of "jouissance", and 3. the other also responded to the question of sexual difference.

  5. Rigorous optimization and validation of potent RNA CAR T cell therapy for the treatment of common epithelial cancers expressing folate receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutsky, Keith; Song, De-Gang; Lynn, Rachel; Smith, Jenessa B.; Poussin, Mathilde; Figini, Mariangela; Zhao, Yangbing; Powell, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Using lentiviral technology, we recently demonstrated that incorporation of CD27 costimulation into CARs greatly improves antitumor activity and T cell persistence. Still, virus-mediated gene transfer is expensive, laborious and enables long-term persistence, creating therapies which cannot be easily discontinued if toxic. To address these concerns, we utilized a non-integrating RNA platform to engineer human T cells to express FRα-specific, CD27 CARs and tested their capacity to eliminate human FRα+ cancer. Novel CARs comprised of human components were constructed, C4-27z and C4opt-27z, a codon-optimized variant created for efficient expression. Following RNA electroporation, C4-27z and C4opt-27z CAR expression is initially ubiquitous but progressively declines across T cell populations. In addition, C4-27z and C4opt-27z RNA CAR T cells secrete high levels of Th-1 cytokines and display strong cytolytic function against human FRα+ cancers in a time- and antigen-dependent manner. Further, C4-27z and C4opt-27z CAR T cells exhibit significant proliferation in vivo, facilitate the complete regression of fully disseminated human ovarian cancer xenografts in mice and reduce the progression of solid ovarian cancer. These results advocate for rapid progression of C4opt-27z RNA CAR to the clinic and establish a new paradigm for preclinical optimization and validation of RNA CAR candidates destined for clinical translation. PMID:26359629

  6. The effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in common lower limb conditions: a systematic review including quantification of patient-rated pain reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korakakis, Vasileios; Whiteley, Rodney; Tzavara, Alexander; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-09-27

    To evaluate extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in treating Achilles tendinopathy (AT), greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS), medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), patellar tendinopathy (PT) and proximal hamstring tendinopathy (PHT). Systematic review. Randomised and non-randomised studies assessing ESWT in patients with AT, GTPS, MTSS, PT and PHT were included. Risk of bias and quality of studies were evaluated. Moderate-level evidence suggests (1) no difference between focused ESWT and placebo ESWT at short and mid-term in PT and (2) radial ESWT is superior to conservative treatment at short, mid and long term in PHT. Low-level evidence suggests that ESWT (1) is comparable to eccentric training, but superior to wait-and-see policy at 4 months in mid-portion AT; (2) is superior to eccentric training at 4 months in insertional AT; (3) less effective than corticosteroid injection at short term, but ESWT produced superior results at mid and long term in GTPS; (4) produced comparable results to control treatment at long term in GTPS; and (5) is superior to control conservative treatment at long term in PT. Regarding the rest of the results, there was only very low or no level of evidence. 13 studies showed high risk of bias largely due to methodology, blinding and reporting. Low level of evidence suggests that ESWT may be effective for some lower limb conditions in all phases of the rehabilitation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. The Crystal Structure of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase from Human Rhinovirus: A Dual Function Target for Common Cold Antiviral Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, Robert A.; Maegley, Karen A.; Yu, Xiu; Ferre, RoseAnn; Lingardo, Laura K.; Diehl, Wade; Parge, Hans E.; Dragovich, Peter S.; Fuhrman, Shella A. (Pfizer)

    2010-11-16

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV), the predominant members of the Picornaviridae family of positive-strand RNA viruses, are the major causative agents of the common cold. Given the lack of effective treatments for rhinoviral infections, virally encoded proteins have become attractive therapeutic targets. The HRV genome encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) denoted 3D{sup pol}, which is responsible for replicating the viral genome and for synthesizing a protein primer used in the replication. Here the crystal structures for three viral serotypes (1B, 14, and 16) of HRV 3D{sup pol} have been determined. The three structures are very similar to one another, and to the closely related poliovirus (PV) 3D{sup pol} enzyme. Because the reported PV crystal structure shows significant disorder, HRV 3D{sup pol} provides the first complete view of a picornaviral RdRp. The folding topology of HRV 3D{sup pol} also resembles that of RdRps from hepatitis C virus (HCV) and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) despite very low sequence homology.

  8. Introduction to the themed issue - Poststructural approaches to fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mather

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This themed issue of papers for Maritime Studies emerges out of a special session of the MARE 2015 conference held in Amsterdam. The aim of this Introduction is to provide a brief background to poststructural scholarship drawing on examples and cases from research on fisheries. We argue that a poststructural sensibility has made an important impact on scholars interested in fisheries issues even though it is not normally framed as such. An additional goal of this short introduction is to introduce the papers in this special issue of Maritime Studies and to situate them within the broad and heterogeneous field of post-structural approaches to fisheries issues.

  9. Emergent themes in the sustainability of primary health care innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorpe, Beverly M; Glasgow, Nicholas J; Wells, Robert W

    2005-11-21

    A synthesis of the findings of the five studies of sustainability of primary health care innovation across six domains (political, institutional, financial, economic, client and workforce) yielded three main themes. These were: the importance of social relationships, networks and champions; the effect of political, financial and societal forces; and the motivation and capacity of agents within the system. The need for routine assessment of the sustainability of primary health care innovations is discussed. Given the dearth of literature on the sustainability of primary health care innovation, there is potential to develop a program of research directed towards a future synthesis of evidence.

  10. Co-occurrence of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms and Solid Tumors Is Attributed to a Synergism Between Cytoreductive Therapy and the Common TERT Polymorphism rs2736100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahling, Tunde; Balassa, Katalin; Kiss, Katalin Piroska; Bors, Andras; Batai, Arpad; Halm, Gabriella; Egyed, Miklos; Fekete, Sandor; Remenyi, Peter; Masszi, Tamas; Tordai, Attila; Andrikovics, Hajnalka

    2016-01-01

    The germline telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) rs2736100_C variant was identified as a susceptibility factor for a variety of solid tumors and recently for myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). LightCycler melting curve analysis was applied to detect risk alleles of TERT rs2736100_C and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) rs12343867_C tagging 46/1 haplotype in 584 BCR-ABL1-negative MPN, 308 acute, and 86 chronic myeloid leukemia (AML and CML) patients and 400 healthy individuals. TERT rs2736100_C showed an increased allele frequency in BCR-ABL1-negative MPN patients compared with controls (62.7%±2.8% vs. 48.8%±3.5%, P < 0.0001) regardless of molecular background or disease type, but not in CML or AML. Combined TERT and JAK2 hetero- or homozygosity conferred even higher risk for classic MPN. Common complications (thrombosis, myelofibrosis, or leukemia) were not associated with the TERT variant; however, adverse survival was noted in TERT variant carrier polycythemia vera patients. MPN patients with the TERT CC genotype had a higher probability (44.4%) to die from solid tumors compared with TERT AC/AA individuals (5.3%; P = 0.004). TERT rs2736100_C carriers had increased risk of solid tumors independently from cytoreductive treatment [3.08 (1.03-9.26), P = 0.045]. TERT rs2736100_C polymorphism predisposes to the development of BCR-ABL1-negative MPN with the co-occurrence of solid tumors, especially with the usage of cytoreductive treatment. The high frequency of TERT variant in the classic MPN population highlights the importance of the avoidance of long-term cytoreductive treatment in MPN patients. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. THERAPY OF GRAVES’ DISEASE WITH SODIUM IODIDE-131

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Hartadi Noor

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Graves’ disease is the most common form of thyrotoxicosis, with a peak incidence in the 20-40 year of age group. Females are involved about five times more commonly than male. The easiest sign to recognize patients with Graves’ disease is the present of Graves’ ophthalmopathy. The diagnosis of Graves’ disease may sometimes base only on a physical examination and a medical history. Diffuse thyroid enlargement and sign of thyrotoxicosis, mainly ophthalmopathy and to lesser extent dermopathy, usually adequate for diagnosis. TSH test combined with FT4 test is usually the first laboratory test performs in these patients. The patients suffered Graves’ disease can be treated with antithyroid drug therapy or undergo subtotal Thyroidectomy. Another therapy is by using sodium iodide-131, where this therapy has advantages including easy administration, effectiveness, low expense, and absence of pain. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  12. Evolution and current development of Transversal Themes: possibilities and limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rosales López

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of the evolution and current development of transversal themes in education, considering them basically as important social cuestions with great influence in the overall education of the student. Specifically it seeks to clarify the level of preparation and dedication of teachers and schools to teach them. To do this, legislation used in our country (organics laws and decrees curriculum were analyzed and also the contribution of outstanding educators, institutions and researchers. We analyzed the characteristics of transversal themes in the educational project and the teaching program, its development in the clasroom and its projection out of it through the help of family and community. Conclusions about their current status (possibilities and limitations are derived and future proposals are made on the improvement of initial and ongoing training of teachers, to increase their collegiate or cooperative work of planning, intervention and evaluation, increased media and counseling in use, the need for increased communication and collaboration with families and other community institutions.How to reference this articleRosales López, C. (2015. Evolución y desarrollo actual de los Temas Transversales: posibilidades y límites. Foro de Educación, 13(18, pp. 143-160. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/fde.2015.013.018.008

  13. Enhancing Students’ Local Knowledge Through Themed Garden Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esa Norizan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional or local knowledge is a major issue to be focused on, particularly since the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 and the Aichi Targets “Living in Harmony with Nature”. According to the strategic goals, by 2020, conservation of biodiversity and its sustainable use incorporate what local and indigenous communities have within their traditional knowledge, innovation and practice and their customary use of biological resources are respected at all relevant levels. The older generation among the local people usually use medicinal herbs for various ailments, health care and other cultural purposes. However, encroaching industrialization and the changes in today’s life styles are responsible for the decreasing practice in the local use of herbs especially for healing purposes. It is, therefore, felt worthwhile to encourage young generations such as school children to gain knowledge about these local herbs and record the native uses of these herbs before the information is lost. One biodiversity education program was conducted to facilitate secondary school students to set up a themed garden and find out the local knowledge of the plants they grew in their garden from their family members or communities. The findings revealed that students’ local knowledge on healing improved after they joined the program. Therefore, it is proposed that the themed garden project can enhance students’ local knowledge.

  14. Difficult decisions: An interpretative phenomenological analysis study of healthcare professionals' perceptions of oxygen therapy in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Carol Ann; O'Brien, Mary R

    2015-12-01

    The role of oxygen therapy to palliate dyspnoea is controversial. Without a clear evidence base oxygen is commonly prescribed, sometimes to the detriment of patients. This use of oxygen appears to be an entrenched culture, the roots of which remain obscure. To explore healthcare professionals' perceptions of oxygen therapy in palliative care. Interpretative phenomenological analysis study utilising semi-structured interviews to explore beliefs and behaviours of healthcare professionals regarding palliative oxygen therapy. Data were recorded, transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. A total of 34 healthcare professionals, including doctors, nurses, pharmacists and paramedics in the United Kingdom, who were involved in prescribing, or administering, oxygen therapy to palliate dyspnoea. Most healthcare professionals in this study were well informed about oxygen therapy; all recognised the role of oxygen in palliative care setting as important. The overarching theme of compassion identified sub-themes of 'comfort', 'do anything and everything' and 'family benefit'. However, the use of oxygen in the palliative care setting was not without its dilemmas, as additional sub-themes of 'controversy', 'doubt' and 'dependency' illustrated. Findings suggest that oxygen therapy in palliative care poses an on-going dilemma for healthcare professionals striving to provide optimum care. It seems patients and families often expect and welcome oxygen, but the perception of oxygen as a solution to dyspnoea can conflict with healthcare professionals' own doubt and experiences. There appears to be an emotional cost associated with this dilemma and the choices that need to be made. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Biblical and liturgical themes in Krzysztof Penderecki’s activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Drewniak

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Krzysztof Penderecki (born 1933 is considered to be one of the most outstanding contemporary composers. The religious theme is often taken to be an inspiration for his vocal-instrumental output. Penderecki presents in his compositions the religious and moral problems related to the human nature and existence. The principal issues in his activity are a trial to find a reason of evil and misfortune and also the vision of ordeal. The composer makes use of not only biblical and liturgical texts but also religious poetry mainly in latin language. His religious output has a concert character thanks to the musician language and composing techniques. His own commentaries concerning his compositions prove that his religious activity is an artistic confession of his faith.

  16. Variations on a theme: Topic modeling of naturalistic driving data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaurin, Elease; McDonald, Anthony D; Lee, John D; Aksan, Nazan; Dawson, Jeffrey; Tippin, Jon; Rizzo, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces Probabilistic Topic Modeling (PTM) as a promising approach to naturalistic driving data analyses. Naturalistic driving data present an unprecedented opportunity to understand driver behavior. Novel strategies are needed to achieve a more complete picture of these datasets than is provided by the local event-based analytic strategy that currently dominates the field. PTM is a text analysis method for uncovering word-based themes across documents. In this application, documents were represented by drives and words were created from speed and acceleration data using Symbolic Aggregate approximation (SAX). A twenty-topic Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) topic model was developed using words from 10,705 documents (real-world drives) by 26 drivers. The resulting LDA model clustered the drives into meaningful topics. Topic membership probabilities were successfully used as features in subsequent analyses to differentiate between healthy drivers and those suffering from Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

  17. METHODOLOGY FOR CROSS-CURRICULAR THEME OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL AXIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Aparicio López

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a methodology to identify the presence of the environmental axis in educational programs in Bachelors in the Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Mexico. It is sustained on competency-based education and constructionism, due to they appeal to humanism to deal current problems. It is composed of four phases: committee conformation, theoretical and conceptual concerning analysis, construction and application of instruments on a PE, and identification of the cross-curricular theme level. Even though the proposed methodology is applied to the environment, it is feasible to adapt to other axes, such as human rights, multiculturalism, and poverty, relevant to the educational context of the state of Guerrero.

  18. Social model: a new approach of the disability theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampi, Luciana Neves da Silva; Guilhem, Dirce; Alves, Elioenai Dornelles

    2010-01-01

    The experience of disability is part of the daily lives of people who have a disease, lesion or corporal limitation. Disability is still understood as personal bad luck; moreover, from the social and political points of view, the disabled are seen as a minority. The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge about the experience of disability. The research presents a new approach on the theme: the social model. This approach appeared as an alternative to the medical model of disability, which sees the lesion as the primary cause of social inequality and of the disadvantages experienced by the disabled, ignoring the role of social structures in their oppression and marginalization. The study permits reflecting on how the difficulties and barriers society imposed on people considered different make disability a reality and portray social injustice and the vulnerability situation lived by excluded groups.

  19. System safety based on a coordinated principle-based theme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate a logical progression for the identification of assets, threats, vulnerabilities, and protective measures, based on a structured approach that incorporates the results of the previous paper. The authors utilize a logical structure for identifying the constituents of the problem, derive appropriate applicable principles, and demonstrate a technique for incorporating the principles into a coordinated safety theme. They also show how to qualitatively assess such generally non-quantifiable items such as safety-component and safety-system response to severe abnormal environments. An illustrative example is followed step-by-step through to a safety system design approach and a safety assessment approach. The general approach is illustrated here through an example, generally representing a test rocket launch scenario, where the concern is the potential for loss of life.

  20. Transitioning through college with diabetes: themes found in online forums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravert, Russell D; Boren, Suzanne A; Wiebke, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Content analysis of Internet-based diabetes forum text was used to examine the experiences encountered by students with diabetes transitioning into and through college. Forum posts (N = 238) regarding attending college with diabetes were collected and analyzed. Thematic coding was used to identify prominent topics, followed by analysis of theme distribution across college transitional stages. Three students with diabetes were recruited to review results and corroborate findings. Twenty thematic categories were identified. Preparation for college involved efforts to move toward autonomous diabetes management. Transitioning in was marked by adjusting to a college lifestyle, then working to manage issues such as busy schedules and alcohol use as continuing students, and turning attention toward future career options and finances while transitioning out. As they move into and through college, students with diabetes negotiate developmental and diabetes-specific tasks within an environment that presents unique logistical, lifestyle, and psychological challenges.

  1. THE THEME OF THE CRUCIFIXION OF CHRIST IN VISUAL ARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian STOLERIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Crucifixion of Christ is one of the major Biblical events in the context of the four Gospels, also marking one of the most frequently met themes in the iconography of Christian art. The focus of the paper is to underline the main aspects of the visual representation of this tense moment in the history of Christianity, referring to representative works of the artistic heritage inspired by the event of Christ’s death on the cross. Thus, a number of famous works of art history are analyzed in relation to the described composition, the represented characters and their importance. They belong both to traditional artistic fields, such as painting, to modern ones, thus taking into account some of the most popular film representations on this topic.

  2. How Nigeria built child survival themes into national television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, G

    1990-01-01

    As part of the Government of Nigeria's goal of providing universal child immunization, a strategy was developed to strengthen the production capacity of the Nigerian Television Authority (NTA) and to award higher priority to health issues in NTA programming. At the national level, a child survival-oriented training, coordination, and production unit was established to produce "spot messages" on primary health care. In 1985-86, radio and television staff from all Nigerian states attended workshops at which Ministry of Health officials outlined Nigeria's maternal-child health problems and emphasized the potential of the broadcast media in health education. Each station was linked with an officer in the local Ministry of Health to ensure ongoing collaboration on technical problems and health programs in need of promotion. Another set of state-level workshops brought together media producers and radio and television writers to encourage them to integrate primary health care themes into their programs. In addition, a Nigerian nongovernmental organization has organized workshops for electronic media writers and producers aimed at incorporating family planning themes into several popular television programs. In 1986, both NTA and the Federal Radio Corporation of Nigeria signed agreements further committing their networks to the child survival campaign. The Nigerian experience exemplifies the potential for creating and institutionalizing long-term efforts to use the mass media to bring new information to the general population on health-related issues. Needed at this point is more knowledge about specific communication strategies that are most effective in promoting sustainable behavioral change on the family and community levels in a country with much social and cultural diversity.

  3. Integrating Environmental and Human Health Databases in the Great Lakes Basin: Themes, Challenges and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L. Bassil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many government, academic and research institutions collect environmental data that are relevant to understanding the relationship between environmental exposures and human health. Integrating these data with health outcome data presents new challenges that are important to consider to improve our effective use of environmental health information. Our objective was to identify the common themes related to the integration of environmental and health data, and suggest ways to address the challenges and make progress toward more effective use of data already collected, to further our understanding of environmental health associations in the Great Lakes region. Environmental and human health databases were identified and reviewed using literature searches and a series of one-on-one and group expert consultations. Databases identified were predominantly environmental stressors databases, with fewer found for health outcomes and human exposure. Nine themes or factors that impact integration were identified: data availability, accessibility, harmonization, stakeholder collaboration, policy and strategic alignment, resource adequacy, environmental health indicators, and data exchange networks. The use and cost effectiveness of data currently collected could be improved by strategic changes to data collection and access systems to provide better opportunities to identify and study environmental exposures that may impact human health.

  4. Three Variations on a Theme: The Power of Pure Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Jeffrey A.; Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Marbley, Aretha Faye

    1998-01-01

    With the counseling profession's increased emphasis on developing brief therapies, applying innovative techniques, and measuring outcomes, helping someone feel understood is sometimes neglected. Three narratives by humanistic practitioners illustrate the value of pure empathy in our work with clients, students, and others in our diverse…

  5. Development and testing of INSPIRE themes Addresses (AD) and Administrative Units (AU) managed by COSMC

    OpenAIRE

    Michal Med; Petr Souček

    2013-01-01

    Main content of this article is to describe implementing INSPIRE themes Addresses and Administrative Units in Czech Republic. Themes were implemented by Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre. Implementation contains developing GML files with data and designing its structure, developing and testing of INSPIRE services and preparing metadata for data and services. Besides harmonised INSPIRE themes COSMC manages also non-harmonised themes Cadastral map (KM) and Units eXtended (UX).

  6. Computational themes of peripheral processing in the auditory pathway of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, K Jannis; Benda, Jan; Hennig, R Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Hearing in insects serves to gain information in the context of mate finding, predator avoidance or host localization. For these goals, the auditory pathways of insects represent the computational substrate for object recognition and localization. Before these higher level computations can be executed in more central parts of the nervous system, the signals need to be preprocessed in the auditory periphery. Here, we review peripheral preprocessing along four computational themes rather than discussing specific physiological mechanisms: (1) control of sensitivity by adaptation, (2) recoding of amplitude modulations of an acoustic signal into a labeled-line code (3) frequency processing and (4) conditioning for binaural processing. Along these lines, we review evidence for canonical computations carried out in the peripheral auditory pathway and show that despite the vast diversity of insect hearing, signal processing is governed by common computational motifs and principles.

  7. Apical constriction: themes and variations on a cellular mechanism driving morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam C; Goldstein, Bob

    2014-05-01

    Apical constriction is a cell shape change that promotes tissue remodeling in a variety of homeostatic and developmental contexts, including gastrulation in many organisms and neural tube formation in vertebrates. In recent years, progress has been made towards understanding how the distinct cell biological processes that together drive apical constriction are coordinated. These processes include the contraction of actin-myosin networks, which generates force, and the attachment of actin networks to cell-cell junctions, which allows forces to be transmitted between cells. Different cell types regulate contractility and adhesion in unique ways, resulting in apical constriction with varying dynamics and subcellular organizations, as well as a variety of resulting tissue shape changes. Understanding both the common themes and the variations in apical constriction mechanisms promises to provide insight into the mechanics that underlie tissue morphogenesis.

  8. Teachers Working Cooperatively with Parents and Caregivers when Implementing LGBT Themes in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Many teachers are interested in having a more inclusive multicultural education that includes lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) themes and gay-themed children's literature; unfortunately, research has found that many teachers do not implement gay themes in their multicultural education curriculum because of fear of criticism from…

  9. Living in imaginary places: on the creation and consumption of themed residential architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier, S.O.

    2013-01-01

    This study deals with theming of residential space and architecture. In theoretical terms, theming is defined as the application of a narrative to places and the built environment to make them more appealing than they otherwise would be. In a broader sense it is argued that theming is related to an

  10. Chameleon Changes: An Exploration of Racial Identity Themes of Multiracial People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miville, Marie L.; Constantine, Madonna G.; Baysden, Matthew F.; So-Lloyd, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    The current study explored essential themes of racial identity development among 10 self-identified multiracial adults from a variety of racial backgrounds. Participants were interviewed using a semistructured protocol, and the interviews were recorded, transcribed, and then coded for themes by research team members. Four primary themes were…

  11. The Tourism Experience Offered by Religious Theme Parks: Taman Tamadun Islam (TTI) in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Moal - Ulvoas, Gaëlle M

    2016-01-01

    Theme parks are major drivers of tourism development and experience is a central concept in tourism research. This study investigates the experience potential associated with religious theme parks which offer a combination of religious and secular activities. The experiences of visitors to Taman Tamadun Islam (TTI), a Muslim theme park based in Malaysia, are identified through the analysis of visitors’ feedback on Tripadvisor.

  12. Integrated pathway clusters with coherent biological themes for target prioritisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-An Chen

    Full Text Available Prioritising candidate genes for further experimental characterisation is an essential, yet challenging task in biomedical research. One way of achieving this goal is to identify specific biological themes that are enriched within the gene set of interest to obtain insights into the biological phenomena under study. Biological pathway data have been particularly useful in identifying functional associations of genes and/or gene sets. However, biological pathway information as compiled in varied repositories often differs in scope and content, preventing a more effective and comprehensive characterisation of gene sets. Here we describe a new approach to constructing biologically coherent gene sets from pathway data in major public repositories and employing them for functional analysis of large gene sets. We first revealed significant overlaps in gene content between different pathways and then defined a clustering method based on the shared gene content and the similarity of gene overlap patterns. We established the biological relevance of the constructed pathway clusters using independent quantitative measures and we finally demonstrated the effectiveness of the constructed pathway clusters in comparative functional enrichment analysis of gene sets associated with diverse human diseases gathered from the literature. The pathway clusters and gene mappings have been integrated into the TargetMine data warehouse and are likely to provide a concise, manageable and biologically relevant means of functional analysis of gene sets and to facilitate candidate gene prioritisation.

  13. Medical-themed film and literature course for premedical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Mee; Ahn, Duck-Sun

    2004-09-01

    The authors introduced a "Medicine and Literature" course into the premedical curriculum to help students develop clearer expectations regarding their lives as future physicians, and also to gain insight into the humanistic and social aspects of medicine. The course was developed for the entire class of second-grade premedical students (n = 126) and consisted of one three-hour session per week over six weeks. The course was composed of two main themes: (1) medicine and film; and (2) medicine and literature. Students' responses showed that this course helped them to gain perspectives on both a physician's life and medical practice, and also enhanced their understanding of the humanistic and social aspects of medicine itself. Students reported that they also valued the advantages of collaborative learning, which holds the potential for improving their skills in presentation, discussion, communication and teamwork. In Korea, introducing arts- and humanities-related courses into the medical curriculum is a recent trend, and is still in a very early stage. Although our study has several limitations, we conclude that by studying literature and films during the premedical period, students can grasp a sense of the many different issues that physicians are faced with.

  14. Theme in Translation: A Systemic Functional Linguistic Perspective

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    Bo Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s, discourse analysis has been applied to translation studies, and studies with this approach have become quite prominent. As one resource of discourse analysis, the SFL (Systemic Functional Linguistics model can be applied to analyze both the original text and the translated text. Following this approach, both texts are compared at the sociological, semiotic, generic, registerial, discoursal, and lexicogrammatical levels by adopting a top-down process. The applicability of Halliday’s linguistic framework has then been widely recognized within the field of translation studies. Meanwhile, different strata of Systemic Functional Grammar have shed light on a number of studies. In this paper, I have restricted the topic to one aspect only, i.e. the textual metafunction. I have first traced the development of SFL and its integration with translation studies. Some basic terms in SFL and Theme/Rheme analysis are also explained. Then, some of the existing studies involving thematic analysis and translation are reviewed. As advocated by several scholars, what we need is a more objective apparatus for descriptive translation studies. It would be beneficial to link SFL and descriptive translation studies together, as SFL serves as a tool that relates linguistic choices to the sociocultural context systematically.

  15. Recreating Jane: “Austenland” and the Regency Theme Park

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    Maddalena Pennacchia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the maze of Austen’s ever-expanding textuality – with its prequels, sequels, rewritings and adaptations – it may be worth paying attention to an unpretentious little book by Shannon Hale titled Austenland (2007. The story is about the adventures of a New Yorker thirty-something with a name that says it all: Jane. Being obsessed with Mr Darcy as played by Colin Firth, she decides to be healed by her excessive Austenian fantasies (or rather to indulge in them for the last time by spending all her savings on a English Regency Theme park that promises to offer Janeites a real full immersive Austen experience. What interests me in this post-Austenian story is the embedded discourse of leisure and tourism in the age of participatory culture, when an everywoman like Jane brings to the fore the need to be more involved in re-creative activities that are triggered by reading Austen’s novels.

  16. Measuring the operational efficiency of individual theme park attractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhee; Kim, Soowook

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the operation efficiency of theme park attractions using the data envelopment analysis, utilizing actual data on 15 attractions at Samsung Everland located in Yongin-si, Republic of Korea. In particular, this study identifies crowding and waiting time as one of the main causes of visitor's satisfaction, and analyzes the efficiency of individual attractions in terms of waiting time. The installation area, installation cost, and annual repair cost are set as input factors and the number of annual users and customer satisfaction as output factors. The results show that the roller coaster-type attractions were less efficient than other types of attractions while rotating-type attractions were relatively more efficient. However, an importance performance analysis on individual attraction's efficiency and satisfaction showed that operational efficiency should not be the sole consideration in attraction installation. In addition, the projection points for input factors for efficient use of attractions and the appropriate reference set for benchmarking are provided as guideline for attraction efficiency management.

  17. Evolution of three Nobel Prize themes and a Nobel snub theme in chemistry: a bibliometric study with focus on international collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Sichao; Ahlgren, Per

    2017-01-01

    In this study, three chemistry research themes closely associated with the Nobel Prize are bibliometrically analyzed-Ribozyme, Ozone and Fullerene-as well as a research theme in chemistry not associated with the Nobel Prize (a Nobel snub theme): Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation. We analyze, based on an algorithmically constructed publication-level classification system, the evolution of the four themes with respect to publication volume and international collaboration, using two datasets, one of them a subset of highly cited publications, for each considered time period. The focus of the study is on international collaboration, where co-occurrence of country names in publications is used as a proxy for international collaboration. For all four themes, especially for Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation, the publication volumes increase considerably from the earliest period to the later periods. The international collaboration rate shows an increasing trend for each theme. For Ozone, Fullerene and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation, the international collaboration rate tend to be higher for the highly cited publications compared to full datasets. With regard to the evolution of number of countries per international publication and per highly cited international publication, a vast majority of the distributions are positively skewed, with a large share of publications with two countries. With respect to the last four periods of the study, the concentration to two countries per publication is more pronounced for the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation theme compared to the three Nobel Prize themes.

  18. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Genomic Imprinting: Common Themes in the Regulation of Imprinted Regions in Mammals, Plants, and Insects

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    William A. MacDonald

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is a form of epigenetic inheritance whereby the regulation of a gene or chromosomal region is dependent on the sex of the transmitting parent. During gametogenesis, imprinted regions of DNA are differentially marked in accordance to the sex of the parent, resulting in parent-specific expression. While mice are the primary research model used to study genomic imprinting, imprinted regions have been described in a broad variety of organisms, including other mammals, plants, and insects. Each of these organisms employs multiple, interrelated, epigenetic mechanisms to maintain parent-specific expression. While imprinted genes and imprint control regions are often species and locus-specific, the same suites of epigenetic mechanisms are often used to achieve imprinted expression. This review examines some examples of the epigenetic mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting in mammals, plants, and insects.

  19. The impact of technology on the wilderness experience: A review of common themes and approaches in three bodies of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Shultis

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, increasing concern has been expressed about the impact of new technologies - especially communication technologies - on the wilderness experience. Many authors have suggested a tipping point has been reached, with new technologies changing the very nature of the 'traditional' wilderness experience in various ways. The loss of direct...

  20. Variations on a Theme: The Shift from Distinction to Commonality in Philadelphia's Diverse Provider Model 2002-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulkley, Katrina E.; Travers, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing push toward Portfolio Management Models that incorporate a variety of "providers" operating public schools. One rationale for this is that such organizations can offer distinct and innovative educational practices. This article describes the Diverse Provider Model implemented in Philadelphia from…

  1. Foucault and the Turn to Narrative Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, A. C. (Tina)

    2002-01-01

    The pioneering authors of narrative therapy, White and Epston, state clearly that they have been influenced by the work of the French theorist Michel Foucault. This paper briefly outlines some features of narrative therapy, examines the Foucauldian themes in White and Epston's theory, and explores narrative therapy's poststructuralist challenge to…

  2. Problem-solving therapy for depression and common mental disorders in Zimbabwe: piloting a task-shifting primary mental health care intervention in a population with a high prevalence of people living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibanda, Dixon; Mesu, Petra; Kajawu, Lazarus; Cowan, Frances; Araya, Ricardo; Abas, Melanie A

    2011-10-26

    There is limited evidence that interventions for depression and other common mental disorders (CMD) can be integrated sustainably into primary health care in Africa. We aimed to pilot a low-cost multi-component 'Friendship Bench Intervention' for CMD, locally adapted from problem-solving therapy and delivered by trained and supervised female lay workers to learn if was feasible and possibly effective as well as how best to implement it on a larger scale. We trained lay workers for 8 days in screening and monitoring CMD and in delivering the intervention. Ten lay workers screened consecutive adult attenders who either were referred or self-referred to the Friendship Bench between July and December 2007. Those scoring above the validated cut-point of the Shona Symptom Questionnaire (SSQ) for CMD were potentially eligible. Exclusions were suicide risk or very severe depression. All others were offered 6 sessions of problem-solving therapy (PST) enhanced with a component of activity scheduling. Weekly nurse-led group supervision and monthly supervision from a mental health specialist were provided. Data on SSQ scores at 6 weeks after entering the study were collected by an independent research nurse. Lay workers completed a brief evaluation on their experiences of delivering the intervention. Of 395 potentially eligible, 33 (8%) were excluded due to high risk. Of the 362 left, 2% (7) declined and 10% (35) were lost to follow-up leaving an 88% response rate (n = 320). Over half (n = 166, 52%) had presented with an HIV-related problem. Mean SSQ score fell from 11.3 (sd 1.4) before treatment to 6.5 (sd 2.4) after 3-6 sessions. The drop in SSQ scores was proportional to the number of sessions attended. Nine of the ten lay workers rated themselves as very able to deliver the PST intervention. We have found preliminary evidence of a clinically meaningful improvement in CMD associated with locally adapted problem-solving therapy delivered by lay health workers through routine

  3. 'Opening up the mind': problem-solving therapy delivered by female lay health workers to improve access to evidence-based care for depression and other common mental disorders through the Friendship Bench Project in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Melanie; Bowers, Tarryn; Manda, Ethel; Cooper, Sara; Machando, Debra; Verhey, Ruth; Lamech, Neha; Araya, Ricardo; Chibanda, Dixon

    2016-01-01

    There are few accounts of evidence-based interventions for depression and other common mental disorders (CMDs) in primary care in low-income countries. The Friendship Bench Project is a collaborative care mental health intervention in primary care in Harare for CMDs which began as a pilot in 2006. We employed a mixture of quantitative and qualitative approaches to investigate the project's acceptability and implementation, 4-8 years after the initial pilot study. We carried out basic descriptive analyses of routine data on attendance collected between 2010 and 2014. We also conducted five focus group discussions (FGDs) with LHWs in 2013 and 12 in-depth interviews, six with staff and six with patients, to explore experiences of the intervention, which we analysed using grounded theory. Results show that the intervention appears highly acceptable as evidenced by a consistent number of visits between 2010 and 2014 (mean 505 per year, SD 132); by the finding that the same team of female community LHWs employed as government health promoters continue to deliver assessment and problem-solving therapy, and the perceived positive benefits expressed by those interviewed. Clients described feeling 'relieved and relaxed' after therapy, and having their 'mind opened', and LHWs describing satisfaction from being agents of change. Characteristics of the LHWs (status in the community, maturity, trustworthiness), and of the intervention (use of locally validated symptom screen, perceived relevance of problem-solving therapy) and continuity of the LHW team appeared crucial. Challenges to implementation included the LHWs ongoing need for weekly supervision despite years of experience; the supervisors need for supervision for herself; training needs in managing suicidal and hostile clients; poor documentation; lack of follow-up of depressed clients; and poor access to antidepressants. This case study shows that a collaborative care intervention for CMDs is positively received by

  4. Problem-solving therapy for depression and common mental disorders in Zimbabwe: piloting a task-shifting primary mental health care intervention in a population with a high prevalence of people living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Frances

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited evidence that interventions for depression and other common mental disorders (CMD can be integrated sustainably into primary health care in Africa. We aimed to pilot a low-cost multi-component 'Friendship Bench Intervention' for CMD, locally adapted from problem-solving therapy and delivered by trained and supervised female lay workers to learn if was feasible and possibly effective as well as how best to implement it on a larger scale. Method We trained lay workers for 8 days in screening and monitoring CMD and in delivering the intervention. Ten lay workers screened consecutive adult attenders who either were referred or self-referred to the Friendship Bench between July and December 2007. Those scoring above the validated cut-point of the Shona Symptom Questionnaire (SSQ for CMD were potentially eligible. Exclusions were suicide risk or very severe depression. All others were offered 6 sessions of problem-solving therapy (PST enhanced with a component of activity scheduling. Weekly nurse-led group supervision and monthly supervision from a mental health specialist were provided. Data on SSQ scores at 6 weeks after entering the study were collected by an independent research nurse. Lay workers completed a brief evaluation on their experiences of delivering the intervention. Results Of 395 potentially eligible, 33 (8% were excluded due to high risk. Of the 362 left, 2% (7 declined and 10% (35 were lost to follow-up leaving an 88% response rate (n = 320. Over half (n = 166, 52% had presented with an HIV-related problem. Mean SSQ score fell from 11.3 (sd 1.4 before treatment to 6.5 (sd 2.4 after 3-6 sessions. The drop in SSQ scores was proportional to the number of sessions attended. Nine of the ten lay workers rated themselves as very able to deliver the PST intervention. Conclusion We have found preliminary evidence of a clinically meaningful improvement in CMD associated with locally adapted problem

  5. Success stories and emerging themes in conservation physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madliger, Christine L.; Cooke, Steven J.; Crespi, Erica J.; Funk, Jennifer L.; Hultine, Kevin R.; Hunt, Kathleen E.; Rohr, Jason R.; Sinclair, Brent J.; Suski, Cory D.; Willis, Craig K. R.; Love, Oliver P.

    2016-01-01

    The potential benefits of physiology for conservation are well established and include greater specificity of management techniques, determination of cause–effect relationships, increased sensitivity of health and disturbance monitoring and greater capacity for predicting future change. While descriptions of the specific avenues in which conservation and physiology can be integrated are readily available and important to the continuing expansion of the discipline of ‘conservation physiology’, to date there has been no assessment of how the field has specifically contributed to conservation success. However, the goal of conservation physiology is to foster conservation solutions and it is therefore important to assess whether physiological approaches contribute to downstream conservation outcomes and management decisions. Here, we present eight areas of conservation concern, ranging from chemical contamination to invasive species to ecotourism, where physiological approaches have led to beneficial changes in human behaviour, management or policy. We also discuss the shared characteristics of these successes, identifying emerging themes in the discipline. Specifically, we conclude that conservation physiology: (i) goes beyond documenting change to provide solutions; (ii) offers a diversity of physiological metrics beyond glucocorticoids (stress hormones); (iii) includes approaches that are transferable among species, locations and times; (iv) simultaneously allows for human use and benefits to wildlife; and (v) is characterized by successes that can be difficult to find in the primary literature. Overall, we submit that the field of conservation physiology has a strong foundation of achievements characterized by a diversity of conservation issues, taxa, physiological traits, ecosystem types and spatial scales. We hope that these concrete successes will encourage the continued evolution and use of physiological tools within conservation-based research and

  6. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  7. Thematic analysis of the experience of group music therapy for people with chronic quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamplin, Jeanette; Baker, Felicity A; Grocke, Denise; Berlowitz, David J

    2014-01-01

    People living with quadriplegia are at risk for social isolation and depression. Research with other marginalized groups has indicated that music therapy can have a positive effect on mood and social interaction. To gather descriptions of participants' experience of 2 types of group music therapy - therapeutic singing or music appreciation and relaxation - and to determine commonalities and differences between participants' experience of these 2 methods. We interviewed 20 people with quadriplegia about their experience of participating in 12 weeks of therapeutic singing (n = 10) or music appreciation and relaxation (n = 10). These methods of group music therapy were the interventions tested in a previously reported randomized controlled trial. The interview data were subjected to an inductive thematic analysis. Six main themes were generated from the interview data. Four of these were shared themes and indicated that both types of group music therapy had a positive effect on mood/mental state and physical state, encouraged social engagement, and reconnected participants with their music identity or relationship with music. In addition, the participants who participated in the singing groups found singing to be challenging and confronting, but experienced a general increase in motivation. Group music therapy was experienced as an enjoyable and accessible activity that reconnected participants with their own music. Participants frequently described positive shifts in mood and energy levels, and social interaction was stimulated both within and beyond the music therapy groups.

  8. Thematic Analysis of the Experience of Group Music Therapy for People with Chronic Quadriplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Felicity A.; Grocke, Denise; Berlowitz, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: People living with quadriplegia are at risk for social isolation and depression. Research with other marginalized groups has indicated that music therapy can have a positive effect on mood and social interaction. Objective: To gather descriptions of participants’ experience of 2 types of group music therapy – therapeutic singing or music appreciation and relaxation – and to determine commonalities and differences between participants’ experience of these 2 methods. Methods: We interviewed 20 people with quadriplegia about their experience of participating in 12 weeks of therapeutic singing (n = 10) or music appreciation and relaxation (n = 10). These methods of group music therapy were the interventions tested in a previously reported randomized controlled trial. The interview data were subjected to an inductive thematic analysis. Results: Six main themes were generated from the interview data. Four of these were shared themes and indicated that both types of group music therapy had a positive effect on mood/mental state and physical state, encouraged social engagement, and reconnected participants with their music identity or relationship with music. In addition, the participants who participated in the singing groups found singing to be challenging and confronting, but experienced a general increase in motivation. Conclusions: Group music therapy was experienced as an enjoyable and accessible activity that reconnected participants with their own music. Participants frequently described positive shifts in mood and energy levels, and social interaction was stimulated both within and beyond the music therapy groups. PMID:25484569

  9. Detection and Selection of Behavioral Patterns Using Theme: A Concrete Example in Grassroots Soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Amatria

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Observational methodology provides a rigorous yet flexible framework for capturing behaviors over time to allow for the performance of subsequent diachronic analyses of the data captured. Theme is a specialized software program that detects hidden temporal behavioral patterns (T-patterns within data sets. It is increasingly being used to analyze performance in soccer and other sports. The aim of this study was to show how to select and interpret T-patterns generated by the application of three “quantitative” sort options in Theme and three “qualitative” filters established by the researchers. These will be used to investigate whether 7-a-side (F7 or 8-a-side (F8 soccer is best suited to the learning and skills development needs of 7- and 8-year-old male soccer players. The information contained in the T-patterns generated allowed us to characterize patterns of play in children in this age group. For both formats, we detected technical-tactical behaviors showing that children of this age have difficulty with first-touch actions and controlling the ball after a throw-in. We also found that ball control followed by a pass or a shot at the goal are common in the central corridor of the pitch. Further, depth of play is achieved by ball control, followed by dribbling and a pass or shot. In F8, we saw that depth of play was achieved through ball control, followed by dribbling and passing of one or more opponents leading to a pass or shot. However, in F7, we saw that players succeeded in advancing from their goal area to the rival goal area through a sequence of actions.

  10. Themes of Lust and Love in Popular Music Lyrics From 1971 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Madanikia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We explored themes related to sexual desire (lust and romantic desire (love in the lyrics of popular music over the past 40 years. We examined whether there have been changes in the prevalence of lust and love themes and changes in how these themes inter-relate in music lyrics over time. The study sample consisted of the top 40 songs of Billboard Year End Hot 100 single songs for every 5 years from 1971 to 2011 (N = 360. There was a linear decrease over time in the proportion of songs with a love theme and in the proportion of songs with a combination of lust and love themes. In contrast, there was a significant increase in the proportion of songs with a theme focusing on lust in the absence of love. Themes of lust in the absence of love were especially prevalent in hip-hop/rap music, although music genre did not account for the changing themes over time. These shifts in themes found in popular music may both influence cultural norms and reflect a cultural shift toward acceptance of sexuality outside of love relationships.

  11. Rethinking Social Justice and Adult Education for Welcoming, Inclusive Communities: Synthesis of Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Elizabeth; Baillie Abidi, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the key themes across the articles on transnational migration, social inclusion, and adult education, using Nancy Fraser's framework of redistributive, recognitive, and representational justice.

  12. Data-Driven Contextual Valence Shifter Quantification for Multi-Theme Sentiment Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongkun; Shang, Jingbo; Hsu, Meichun; Castellanos, Malú; Han, Jiawei

    2016-10-01

    Users often write reviews on different themes involving linguistic structures with complex sentiments. The sentiment polarity of a word can be different across themes. Moreover, contextual valence shifters may change sentiment polarity depending on the contexts that they appear in. Both challenges cannot be modeled effectively and explicitly in traditional sentiment analysis. Studying both phenomena requires multi-theme sentiment analysis at the word level, which is very interesting but significantly more challenging than overall polarity classification. To simultaneously resolve the multi-theme and sentiment shifting problems, we propose a data-driven framework to enable both capabilities: (1) polarity predictions of the same word in reviews of different themes, and (2) discovery and quantification of contextual valence shifters. The framework formulates multi-theme sentiment by factorizing the review sentiments with theme/word embeddings and then derives the shifter effect learning problem as a logistic regression. The improvement of sentiment polarity classification accuracy demonstrates not only the importance of multi-theme and sentiment shifting, but also effectiveness of our framework. Human evaluations and case studies further show the success of multi-theme word sentiment predictions and automatic effect quantification of contextual valence shifters.

  13. A General Chemistry Laboratory Theme: Spectroscopic Analysis of Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Houston; O'Donnell, Stephen E.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the introduction of spectroscopy into the general chemistry laboratory using a series of experiments based on a common substance, aspirin. In the first lab the students synthesize and recrystallize aspirin and take melting points of their product, an aspirin standard, and salicylic acid. The students perform the remaining experiments on a rotating basis where the following four labs run simultaneously: structural characterization of the synthesized aspirin by IR and NMR; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by UV vis spectroscopy; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by HPLC; and analysis of calcium in commercial buffered aspirin tablets by AAS. In each of the analysis experiments, students collect, graph, and analyze their data using a spreadsheet. We have found that this series of labs has been very beneficial to our students. From the course evaluations, students indicate that they are beginning to understand how chemistry is applied outside of the classroom.

  14. Green Logistic Practices: A Theoretical Approach of the Theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Engelage

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the main practices of green logistic considered in national and international academic literature. Using standard techniques for selection of previous studies, this study firts presents the definition of green logistic term in order to differentiate it from other concepts commonly treated similarly, as circular economy, the green chain management (GSCM, the reverse logistics and the environmental certifications (ISO 14001, to obtain clarity about their delimitations, scopes and depth. The study also organizes a taxonomy that involves different functional areas of the company, giving direction to the sustainable conduct, resulting in nine components of green logistic that serve as subsidy for the classification of the identified practices. Based on this conceptual definition and taxonomy, lists 112 practices of green logistic, among which 85 are enterprise ambit, 24 governmental and 3 towards consumers. Regarding the quantity of identified practices and the number of citations, both in business sphere as well as in governmental, the most representative part is related to green  Among the most cited practices are the search by more efficient deliveries, using intermodal and multimodal transport that are less polluting and the programming and optimization of flows deliveries. The survey also revealed that although the concept of green logistics is consolidated in the literature, the majority of studies, especially the empirical, concentrates on some of its components, in particular transport and reverse logistic.

  15. Comparative phenomena about phraseology in the animal theme field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindita Çifçi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Every language has its own history and structure of development and it is in a gradual and continuous process of change moving in an unconscious way from one kind to another, so in different languages we distinguish analogical development. Saphir (1912 was one of the first linguistics and anthropologists who developed the linguistic discipline and in an interlingual comparison he identified that languages differ from one another, but some differ more than others. Phraseological units deriving from a certain language do not remain isolated within the same language. They travel from one language to another due to relationships between people and languages. This happens because during these centennial relationships, people have exchanged not only goods, but even cultural values. As a result in our first steps of research there is a need to know and decide on phraseological types in each language, as well as comparison with other languages, to find out what is common and what is special among them. One of the main reasons of analogies in phraseology stays on similar or approximate concepts of objects and features of everyday life. Having into consideration the fact that the main source of phraseological units is the material world with a great variety and a wide range of clothes, tools, domestic animals, parts of human body, food and cooking, weapons and hunting objects, tribal relationships, job processes etc. we are going to analyse in this manuscript this phraseological phenomena.

  16. Themes Caribbean Overseas Students Perceive Influence Their Levels of Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Joseph, Arline; Baker, Stanley B.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether or not Caribbean overseas students, attending universities in the United States, perceived that they experienced culture shock and what themes emerged explaining their experiences. Thirty-eight participants indicated having experienced culture shock, and 20 did not. Five major themes (loneliness and feelings of not…

  17. Reality Construction at the Family/Society Interface: The Internalization of Family Themes and Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Dale H.

    1985-01-01

    Addresses issue of socialization of the young for participation in society by viewing the family as a micro-society. Congruence between family themes and societally shared meanings is considered, utilizing ideas from the social construction of reality theories of Berger and Luckmann (1966). Three ideal-types of family themes are developed relative…

  18. Hispanic Graduate Students' Mentoring Themes: Gender Roles in a Bicultural Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Bonnie A.; Castillo, Carlos P.; Garcia, Vanessa G.; Martinez, Alina; Navarro, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Male and female focus groups at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) discussed mentoring of Hispanic graduate students. Using Thematic Analysis, investigators identified three main themes: Relationship Initiation and Development, Valued Relationship Qualities, and Context and Barriers. Relationship themes included mentor openness, trust,…

  19. Sex Differences and/in the Self: Classic Themes, Feminist Variations, Postmodern Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohan, Janis S.

    2002-01-01

    This article examines perspectives on and intersections between two recurrent themes in the history of American psychology: sex differences and theories of self. These themes and certain connections between them are considered in three eras: early American psychology, feminist psychology coincident with the second wave of feminism, and the recent…

  20. Modern japanese play noh with a Christian theme: a wink to medieval iberian theater?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Cid Lucas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The author analyzes the noh play fukkatsu no kirisuto (resurrection of Christ, which derives directly from the theme of Christian tradition. It also compares it with other noh plays with the same theme and attempts to clarify some similarities between this form of classical japanese theater and the iberian religious theater in the middle ages (mysteries.

  1. Analysis and Comparison of Naturalistic Themes in Iranian and Britain Modern Children's Poems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shayesteh; Saljeghe, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Today, children's literature given the concept of childhood, has gained a special status in the studies of humanities. Children's poetry is one of the branches of this type of literature. Naturalistic themes have the highest frequency among the themes of children poems in two countries. The population of this research consists of collections that…

  2. What Goes around Comes around: Re-Emerging Themes in Sport and Exercise Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Maureen R.; Gill, Diane L.

    2005-01-01

    Sport and exercise psychology research appearing in Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) over the past 75 years can be characterized by re-emerging themes--hot topics in the 1930s remain hot topics now. Re-emerging themes include sportsmanship/moral development, social development/significant others, self-perceptions,…

  3. Teaching Spiritual Themes to African American Children: A Picture Book Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Demetrius B.

    2017-01-01

    "Teaching Spiritual Themes to African American Children: A Picture Book Approach" is a research project that used picture books to teach the four spiritual themes, 1.) love, 2.) forgiveness, 3.) kindness, and 4.) perseverance. This project was conducted in an after school program at Fifth Baptist Church, on Cary St. in Richmond, VA. The…

  4. The Impact of Fantasy Theme Methodology on the Study of Political Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Charles U.

    In 1972 Ernest Bormann and his students were in the process of developing and applying what was later called "fantasy theme analysis" to various kinds of communication including the political campaign communication of 1972. Fantasy theme methodology ultimately developed into "Symbolic Convergence Theory," which has generated a…

  5. THEME AND THEMATIC PROGRESSION OF UNDERGRADUATE THESIS: INVESTIGATING MEANING MAKING IN ACADEMIC WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wawan Gunawan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to investigate the choice of theme and thematic progression deployed in one of the considerably best undergraduate theses in a university in Indonesia. The choice of theme and thematic progression is constrained by the audience of a particular culture; therefore, the process of meaning making is culturally situated. The university, in effects, has its standard for grading academic writing, representing a culture that shapes meaning making processes. This study particularly focuses on how theme and thematic progression contributes to making meanings to meet the demands of the institution. This study employs a descriptive-qualitative research design embracing the characteristics of a case study approach. The data obtained from the best undergraduate student’s thesis were analyzed from the perspective of Halliday’s theme system and its progression. The analysis shows that the three types of theme: topical, interpersonal and textual themes, were realized in the thesis following the conventional features of good academic writings. The topical theme dominantly occupies the theme system chosen for the thesis. This study confirms that a good academic text shares its characteristics across cultures, suggesting that the teaching of academic writing in one culture could refer to the characteristics of good academic texts in other cultures.

  6. Methodology & Themes of Human-Robot Interaction: A Growing Research Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Dautenhahn

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses challenges of Human-Robot Interaction, which is a highly inter- and multidisciplinary area. Themes that are important in current research in this lively and growing field are identified and selected work relevant to these themes is discussed.

  7. Methodology & Themes of Human-Robot Interaction: A Growing Research Field

    OpenAIRE

    Dautenhahn, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses challenges of Human-Robot Interaction, which is a highly inter- and multidisciplinary area. Themes that are important in current research in this lively and growing field are identified and selected work relevant to these themes is discussed.

  8. Methodology & Themes of Human-Robot Interaction: A Growing Research Field

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstin Dautenhahn

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses challenges of Human-Robot Interaction, which is a highly inter- and multidisciplinary area. Themes that are important in current research in this lively and growing field are identified and selected work relevant to these themes is discussed.

  9. Methodology & Themes of Human-Robot Interaction: A Growing Research Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Dautenhahn

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses challenges of Human-Robot Interaction, which is a highly inter- and multidisciplinary area. Themes that are important in current research in this lively and growing field are identified and selected work relevant to these themes is discussed.

  10. Simulacra and simulation: double simulation at a North Song Dynasty theme park

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, C.E.; Jin, Ge

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines an unusual type of ‘cultural theme park’, one that is not based on simulating existing cultural diversity or historical places, but based in some senses on a ‘double simulation’. The theme park is based on an historical painting assumed to represent the North Song Dynasty period

  11. Creative Choices and Fan Practices in the Transformation of Theme Park Space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, Carissa Ann

    2016-01-01

    .... Together, management, designers, and fans have cocreated and reconstructed the theme park experience as one of exploration and participation. Despite multiple levels of control, fans will likewise persist in engagement with activities (in park and online) that help shape and interrogate the theme park space.

  12. In a Cultural Vortex: Theme Parks, Experience, and Opportunities for Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Carol S.

    2004-01-01

    Theme parks can have educational value for students and teachers when these cultural sites within the range of visual culture are understood as sites of experiential learning and as processes of mediation between visitors and park designers. Worthy of serious study, the theme park can be explored as a cultural vortex whose swirling forces…

  13. 77 FR 43117 - Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... National Park Service Meeting of the Cold War Advisory Committee for the Cold War Theme Study AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given in accordance... make recommendations to the National Park Service (NPS) concerning the Cold War Theme Study. DATES: The...

  14. Speaking for the Trees: The Use of Literature to Convey Outdoor Education Themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Steve

    1988-01-01

    States that the responsibility for bringing outdoor education themes into the reading of literature lies with the outdoor educator and not the classroom teacher. Presents a model for introducing such themes into school curricula and uses the works of Thoreau, Brautigan, and Dr. Seuss as examples. (Author/CW)

  15. Drug Themes in Fiction. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Issues 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Digby

    This essay is a survey of selected literary works of fiction with drug-related thematic content. The themes represented in the survey reflect popular American attitudes toward drugs from pre-World War II through the 1970's. The roots of these themes, beginning with 17th century French cultural attitudes are explained. The subject has been treated…

  16. A Comparison of Eight Themes in Chinese and U.S. History Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Ronald H.

    1996-01-01

    Uses brief excerpts from Chinese and US history textbooks to compare the different representations of historical themes. The themes represented are British colonialism in North America, Native Americans, Chinese immigration, post-Civil War reconstruction, Spanish American War, Versailles (post-World War I), the Great Depression, and Hiroshima.…

  17. Age-Graded Themes in White American Middle-Class Slang: A Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Thomas S.

    It is proposed that middle- and upper-middle-class slang used among white young people in modern America shows age-related themes. For youngsters between the ages of eight and early adolescence, the major theme in slang use is to establish in-group and out-group membership, with standards of judgment based on clothes, manners, and physical appeal.…

  18. Common Emergencies in Pet Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Jane D

    2016-05-01

    Treating avian emergencies can be a challenging task. Pet birds often mask signs of illness until they are critically ill and require quick initiation of supportive care with minimal handling to stabilize them. This article introduces the clinician to common avian emergency presentations and details initial therapeutics and diagnostics that can be readily performed in the small-animal emergency room. Common disease presentations covered include respiratory and extrarespiratory causes of dyspnea, gastrointestinal signs, reproductive disease, neurologic disorders, trauma, and toxin exposure. The duration and severity of the avian patient's disease and the clinician's initiation of appropriate therapy often determines clinical outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pan-Cellulosomics of Mesophilic Clostridia: Variations on a Theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bareket Dassa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial cellulosome is an extracellular, multi-enzyme machinery, which efficiently depolymerizes plant biomass by degrading plant cell wall polysaccharides. Several cellulolytic bacteria have evolved various elaborate modular architectures of active cellulosomes. We present here a genome-wide analysis of a dozen mesophilic clostridia species, including both well-studied and yet-undescribed cellulosome-producing bacteria. We first report here, the presence of cellulosomal elements, thus expanding our knowledge regarding the prevalence of the cellulosomal paradigm in nature. We explored the genomic organization of key cellulosome components by comparing the cellulosomal gene clusters in each bacterial species, and the conserved sequence features of the specific cellulosomal modules (cohesins and dockerins, on the background of their phylogenetic relationship. Additionally, we performed comparative analyses of the species-specific repertoire of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes for each of the clostridial species, and classified each cellulosomal enzyme into a specific CAZy family, thus indicating their putative enzymatic activity (e.g., cellulases, hemicellulases, and pectinases. Our work provides, for this large group of bacteria, a broad overview of the blueprints of their multi-component cellulosomal complexes. The high similarity of their scaffoldin clusters and dockerin-based recognition residues suggests a common ancestor, and/or extensive horizontal gene transfer, and potential cross-species recognition. In addition, the sporadic spatial organization of the numerous dockerin-containing genes in several of the genomes, suggests the importance of the cellulosome paradigm in the given bacterial species. The information gained in this work may be utilized directly or developed further by genetically engineering and optimizing designer cellulosome systems for enhanced biotechnological biomass deconstruction and biofuel production.

  20. Big data - smart health strategies. Findings from the yearbook 2014 special theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutkias, V; Thiessard, F

    2014-08-15

    To select best papers published in 2013 in the field of big data and smart health strategies, and summarize outstanding research efforts. A systematic search was performed using two major bibliographic databases for relevant journal papers. The references obtained were reviewed in a two-stage process, starting with a blinded review performed by the two section editors, and followed by a peer review process operated by external reviewers recognized as experts in the field. The complete review process selected four best papers, illustrating various aspects of the special theme, among them: (a) using large volumes of unstructured data and, specifically, clinical notes from Electronic Health Records (EHRs) for pharmacovigilance; (b) knowledge discovery via querying large volumes of complex (both structured and unstructured) biological data using big data technologies and relevant tools; (c) methodologies for applying cloud computing and big data technologies in the field of genomics, and (d) system architectures enabling high-performance access to and processing of large datasets extracted from EHRs. The potential of big data in biomedicine has been pinpointed in various viewpoint papers and editorials. The review of current scientific literature illustrated a variety of interesting methods and applications in the field, but still the promises exceed the current outcomes. As we are getting closer towards a solid foundation with respect to common understanding of relevant concepts and technical aspects, and the use of standardized technologies and tools, we can anticipate to reach the potential that big data offer for personalized medicine and smart health strategies in the near future.

  1. Creative choices and fan practices in the transformation of theme park space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carissa Ann Baker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes and interprets fan activities within the theme park space related to a particular fan object. It examines an evolving paradigm wherein the role of theme park visitors is changed. Rather than being perceived as observers of spectacles, they can participate and interact with the environment in new ways. An example of this is Sorcerers of the Magic Kingdom (2012, an interactive role-playing quest and collector card game at Disney's Magic Kingdom Park in Florida. Fans participate in a variety of practices that have dynamically redefined theme park activities. Together, management, designers, and fans have cocreated and reconstructed the theme park experience as one of exploration and participation. Despite multiple levels of control, fans will likewise persist in engagement with activities (in park and online that help shape and interrogate the theme park space.

  2. The porcine antibody repertoire: Variations on the textbook theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eButler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The genes encoding the heavy and light chains of swine antibodies are organized in the same manner as in other eutherian mammals. There are ~ 30 VH genes, two functional DH genes and one functional JH gene. There are 14-60 V genes and 5 J segments, >22V genes and at least four JC cassettes. The heavy chain constant regions encode the same repertoire of isotypes common to other eutherian mammals. The piglet models offers advantage over rodent models since the fetal repertoire develops without maternal influences and the precocial nature of their multiple offspring allows the experimenter to control the influences of environmental and maternal factors on repertoire development postnatally. B cell lymphogenesis in swine begins in the fetal yolk sac at 20 days of gestation (DG, moves to the fetal liver at 30 DG and eventually to the bone marrow which dominates until birth (114 DG and to at least 5 weeks postpartum. There is no evidence that the ileal Peyers patches are a site of B cell lymphogenesis or are required for B cell maintenance. Unlike rodents and humans, light chain rearrangement begins first in the lambda locus; kappa rearrangements are not seen until late gestation.Dissimilar to lab rodents and more in the direction of the rabbit, swine utilize a small number of VH genes to form >90% of their pre-immune repertoire. Diversification in response to environmental antigen does not alter this pattern and is achieved by somatic hypermutation (SHM of the same small number of VH genes. The situation for light chains is less-well studied, but certain V and J and V and J are dominant in transcripts. The transcribed and secreted pre-immune antibodies of the fetus include mainly IgM, IgA and IgG3; this last isotype may provide a type of first responder mucosal immunity. Development of functional adaptive immunity is dependent on bacterial PAMPs or PAMPs provided by viral infections, indicating the importance of innate

  3. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neu...

  4. Approaches to chemical dependency: chemical dependency and interactive group therapy--a synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, R A; Yalom, I D

    1991-07-01

    Though the focus on interpersonal interaction is a powerful therapeutic factor in group therapy, traditional chemical dependency therapy groups generally fail to employ the interactional group orientation. An interactional approach can be effectively applied to alcoholics if the following guidelines are observed: (1) recovery is always accorded priority, (2) the patient accepts identification as an alcoholic, (3) anxiety is carefully modulated, (4) the proper distinction is made between what the alcoholic is and is not responsible for, (5) the therapist is thoroughly familiar with Alcoholics Anonymous language, steps, and traditions. It is important that therapists not permit misperceptions of A.A. to be used as therapy resistance and that they be able to harness the wisdom of A.A. for psychotherapeutic ends. Group therapists must also be prepared to deal with common themes arising in the treatment of the alcoholic patient: idealization, devaluation, externalization, defiance, grandiosity, conning, and avoidance.

  5. Posttraumatic stress disorder and art group therapy: Self-expression of traumatic inner world of war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić-Gajić, Gordana; Špirić, Željko

    2016-08-01

    Art therapy and drawings may serve as alternative means of expression and release from trauma among veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The retrospective clinical study of drawings of war veterans was performed. A total of 89 war veterans met the Diagnostics and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) PTSD criteria and were consecutively admitted to the Day Hospital during 5 years. Art group therapy as part of integrative treatment was performed once a week. The group was open and heterogeneous. Qualitative analysis of drawings content and group protocols were obtained. The drawings were made by free associations. War related themes were explored and descriptive statistics were applied. The most frequent type of common themes of combat stress presented battle and witnessing wounded and killed combatants. Less frequent were themes of graves, destroyed cities and broken trees. The veterans preferred black and red colors with association to death, blood, wounds and destroyed objects. Drawing could provide a unique, complex, visual illustration of war traumatic experiences and memories of posttraumatic stress disorder veterans. Art group discussion might enhance war veterans’ verbal expression due to group support in safe setting. As adjuvant psychotherapy, art group therapy could enrich awareness and the ability of clinicians to treat hard posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms related to uncovered war trauma.

  6. Posttraumatic stress disorder and art group therapy: Self-expression of traumatic inner world of war veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Art therapy and drawings may serve as alternative means of expression and release from trauma among veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Methods. The retrospective clinical study of drawings of war veterans was performed. A total of 89 war veterans met the Diagnostics and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV PTSD criteria and were consecutively admitted to the Day Hospital during 5 years. Art group therapy as part of integrative treatment was performed once a week. The group was open and heterogeneous. Qualitative analysis of drawings content and group protocols were obtained. The drawings were made by free associations. War related themes were explored and descriptive statistics were applied. Results. The most frequent type of common themes of combat stress presented battle and witnessing wounded and killed combatants. Less frequent were themes of graves, destroyed cities and broken trees. The veterans preferred black and red colors with association to death, blood, wounds and destroyed objects. Conclusion. Drawing could provide a unique, complex, visual illustration of war traumatic experiences and memories of posttraumatic stress disorder veterans. Art group discussion might enhance war veterans’ verbal expression due to group support in safe setting. As adjuvant psychotherapy, art group therapy could enrich awareness and the ability of clinicians to treat hard posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms related to uncovered war trauma.

  7. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  8. Animal-Assisted Therapy and Application to Older Adults in Long Term Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Ann Mercer

    2015-01-01

    In the past thirty years animal-assisted therapy (AAT) has moved beyond anecdotal status to a scientific evidence-based intervention. AAT comes in many shapes and sizes. There are a variety of animals which can be used such as dogs, cats, rabbits, horses, guinea pigs, goats, dolphins, and even fish aquariums. Loneliness is a common theme among older adults in long term care (LTC). Many older adults living in LTC facilities feel isolated. Some have little contact with family members or friends...

  9. Feature rich, but user-friendly: Speech pathologists' preferences for computer-based aphasia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swales, Megan A; Hill, Anne J; Finch, Emma

    2016-08-01

    High-intensity language therapy has been shown to provide greater outcomes for people with aphasia (PWA). Unfortunately, a number of issues including the ageing population and a lack of rurally-based clinicians prevent high-intensity interventions. Computer-based therapies are a potential solution to the issues of intensity and accessibility; however, this service delivery model is not commonly used. A possible reason behind the poor uptake is that current computer-based aphasia therapy (CBAT) programs may not meet the needs of speech-language pathologists (SLPs). This study investigated the preferences of SLPs with regard to the features desired in their ideal CBAT program. Phenomenological research methodology was used to explore the preferences of 10 SLPs. Data were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis. Desired features were grouped into five themes: therapy activities, stimuli, cues, access and progress data. A range of sub-themes were also identified. The wide range of desirable features found in this study may reflect the extent to which current CBAT programs are considered to be useful, but perhaps do not meet the needs of users. The study's findings provide useful information for future CBAT developers to create programs with high clinician usability.

  10. EFL Chinese Students and High Stakes Expository Writing: A Theme Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The expository essay in English is a key gatekeeping milestone as students seek to move from one level of schooling to the next (Schleppegrell, 2004. Using Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL, this study analyzes a Chinese college student's expository essay written on a nationwide English examination in China. Two aspects of theme in the textual metafunction will be examined: theme markedness and theme progression (Eggins, 1994; Halliday, 1994. These components are further explored through a parallel analysis of an expository essay written by a North American freshman. This comparative theme analysis highlights areas in pedagogy that should be attended to if EFL students are to get more sophisticated control over important features of expository writing.

  11. Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber / Jonathan Swain

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Swain, Jonathan

    1990-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber, Mathis der Maler - Symphony, Nobilissima visione - suite. Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Yoel Levi" Telarc/ Conifer CD 80 195

  12. A Contrastive Study of Theme in English and Azerbaijani Turkish Fictional Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmail Faghih

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Thematisationis one of the troublesome areas both for translation purposes from or into English and also for learning EFL. The main reason for the problem lies in the fact that usually different languages structure thematisation in different ways. Therefore, the present research is an attempt to investigate contrastively: experiential (topical, interpersonal and textual themes in a sample of Azeri Turkish and English short stories. Specifically, it aims to find out whether these three kinds of themes have similar occurrences in these two languages or not. To characterize thematising in fictional texts on an empirical basis the model of analyzing theme as suggested by Halliday (2002 is applied to a small corpus of two short stories. The study revealed that in both English and Azeri Turkish, experiential, textual and interpersonal themes are used more frequently in this order respectively. It is hoped that the results of this study can contribute to both theoretical and applied linguistics.

  13. Themes and time use by participants in general team meetings at a psychiatric day hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scherer, Edson Arthur; Campos, Maria Auxiliadora; Scherer, Zeyne Alves Pires

    2007-01-01

    This naturalistic study was realized through observation and aimed to characterize general staff meetings held at a day hospital regarding theme and the professionals' participation in the use of time...

  14. Common Career Technical Core: Common Standards, Common Vision for CTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium's (NASDCTEc) Common Career Technical Core (CCTC), a state-led initiative that was created to ensure that career and technical education (CTE) programs are consistent and high quality across the United States. Forty-two states,…

  15. A Political Campaign Strategy and Campaign Theme : How to Win a Political Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    河村, 直幸; Kawamura, Naoyuki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this research paper is to introduce a political campaign strategy. A political campaign should do on a scientific system and needs effective strategy. Before political campaign begin, a candidate and its campaigner needs to analyze election district and sample voter opinion. An election campaign needs campaign theme. The creation of campaign theme needs careful and elaborate planning. A style of campaign varies according to incumbent or challenger. The developing of an effective po...

  16. Motifs, themes and thematic maps of an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Brenda

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale studies have revealed networks of various biological interaction types, such as protein-protein interaction, genetic interaction, transcriptional regulation, sequence homology, and expression correlation. Recurring patterns of interconnection, or 'network motifs', have revealed biological insights for networks containing either one or two types of interaction. Results To study more complex relationships involving multiple biological interaction types, we assembled an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae network in which nodes represent genes (or their protein products and differently colored links represent the aforementioned five biological interaction types. We examined three- and four-node interconnection patterns containing multiple interaction types and found many enriched multi-color network motifs. Furthermore, we showed that most of the motifs form 'network themes' – classes of higher-order recurring interconnection patterns that encompass multiple occurrences of network motifs. Network themes can be tied to specific biological phenomena and may represent more fundamental network design principles. Examples of network themes include a pair of protein complexes with many inter-complex genetic interactions – the 'compensatory complexes' theme. Thematic maps – networks rendered in terms of such themes – can simplify an otherwise confusing tangle of biological relationships. We show this by mapping the S. cerevisiae network in terms of two specific network themes. Conclusion Significantly enriched motifs in an integrated S. cerevisiae interaction network are often signatures of network themes, higher-order network structures that correspond to biological phenomena. Representing networks in terms of network themes provides a useful simplification of complex biological relationships.

  17. Embodiment, Multimodality, and Composition: Convergent Themes across HCI and Education for Mixed-Reality Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    David Birchfield; Harvey Thornburg; M. Colleen Megowan-Romanowicz; Sarah Hatton; Brandon Mechtley; Igor Dolgov; Winslow Burleson

    2008-01-01

    We present concurrent theoretical work from HCI and Education that reveals a convergence of trends focused on the importance of three themes: embodiment, multimodality, and composition. We argue that there is great potential for truly transformative work that aligns HCI and Education research, and posit that there is an important opportunity to advance this effort through the full integration of the three themes into a theoretical and technological framework for learning. We present our own w...

  18. Creative choices and fan practices in the transformation of theme park space

    OpenAIRE

    Carissa Ann Baker

    2016-01-01

    This article describes and interprets fan activities within the theme park space related to a particular fan object. It examines an evolving paradigm wherein the role of theme park visitors is changed. Rather than being perceived as observers of spectacles, they can participate and interact with the environment in new ways. An example of this is Sorcerers of the Magic Kingdom (2012), an interactive role-playing quest and collector card game at Disney's Magic Kingdom Park in Florida. Fans part...

  19. Content Themes of Alcohol Advertising in US Television — Latent Class Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Matthis; Schoeppe, Franziska; Campbell, Julie; Braam, Marloes W.G.; Stoolmiller, Michael; Sargent, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is little alcohol research that reports on the thematic contents of contemporary alcohol advertisements in US television. Studies of alcohol ads from two decades ago did not identify “partying” as a social theme. Aim of the present study was to describe and classify alcohol advertisements aired in national television in terms of contents, airing times, and channel placements and to identify different marketing strategies of alcohol brands. Methods Content analysis of all ads from the top 20 US beer and spirit brands aired between July 2009 and June 2011. These were 581 unique alcohol ads accounting for 272,828 (78%) national television airings. Ads were coded according to predefined definitions of 13 content areas. A latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted to define content cluster themes and determine alcoholic brands that were more likely to exploit these themes. Results About half of the advertisements (46%) were aired between 3am and 8pm, and the majority were placed either in Entertainment (40%) and Sports (38%) channels. Beer ads comprised 64% of the sample, with significant variation in airing times and channels between types of products and brands. LCA revealed five content classes that exploited the “Partying”, “Quality”, “Sports”, “Manly”, and “Relax” themes. The partying class, indicative of ad messages surrounding partying, love and sex, was the dominant theme, comprising 42% of all advertisements. Ads for alcopops, flavored spirits, and liqueur were more likely to belong to the party class, but there were also some beer brands (Corona, Heineken) where more than 67% of ads exploited this theme. Conclusions This is the first analysis to identify a partying theme to contemporary alcohol advertising. Future analyses can now determine whether exposure to that or other themes predicts alcohol misuse among youth audiences. PMID:26207317

  20. Content Themes of Alcohol Advertising in U.S. Television-Latent Class Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Matthis; Schoeppe, Franziska; Campbell, Julie; Braam, Marloes W G; Stoolmiller, Michael; Sargent, James D

    2015-09-01

    There is little alcohol research that reports on the thematic contents of contemporary alcohol advertisements in U.S. television. Studies of alcohol ads from 2 decades ago did not identify "Partying" as a social theme. Aim of this study was to describe and classify alcohol advertisements aired in national television in terms of contents, airing times, and channel placements and to identify different marketing strategies of alcohol brands. Content analysis of all ads from the top 20 U.S. beer and spirit brands aired between July 2009 and June 2011. These were 581 unique alcohol ads accounting for 272,828 (78%) national television airings. Ads were coded according to predefined definitions of 13 content areas. A latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted to define content cluster themes and determine alcoholic brands that were more likely to exploit these themes. About half of the advertisements (46%) were aired between 3 am and 8 pm, and the majority were placed either in Entertainment (40%) and Sports (38%) channels. Beer ads comprised 64% of the sample, with significant variation in airing times and channels between types of products and brands. LCA revealed 5 content classes that exploited the "Partying," "Quality," "Sports," "Manly," and "Relax" themes. The partying class, indicative of ad messages surrounding partying, love, and sex, was the dominant theme comprising 42% of all advertisements. Ads for alcopops, flavored spirits, and liqueur were more likely to belong to the party class, but there were also some beer brands (Corona, Heineken) where more than 67% of ads exploited this theme. This is the first analysis to identify a partying theme to contemporary alcohol advertising. Future analyses can now determine whether exposure to that or other themes predicts alcohol misuse among youth audiences. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  1. "Theme" Bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Andrea M.; Cash, Julie Shornstein

    2006-01-01

    Thematic topics offer tremendous potential for science learning in the early grades and beyond. One second-grade class explored honeybees, a subject their teacher found both fascinating and easy to connect to a number of learning standards and science concepts. Her unit, "Honeybees and Apple Trees: A Close Look at Nature's Balancing Act," explored…

  2. Common Leadership Responsibilities of Principals of Successful Turnaround Model Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullwood, Jezelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover which leadership responsibilities, within the domains of trust, communication, learning, and shared leadership, did elementary and middle school principals of successful turnaround schools commonly perceive as most necessary to lead a turnaround intervention model school. Themes were…

  3. Common Errors in School Crisis Response: Learning from Our Mistakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Dewey G.; Sheras, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes five school crises. In each case example, errors in crisis management by school staff exacerbated the crisis and resulted in deleterious consequences for the school, its students, and the surrounding community. Identifies common themes of leadership, teamwork, and responsibility that are critical to successful crisis management.…

  4. Understanding and Accommodating Online Social Communities: A Common Sense Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Sean M.

    2013-01-01

    Online social networks such as Facebook have changed the context and definitions of socialization. Focusing on teacher use, this article considers the size and impact of these forums and the importance many young professionals feel toward them. Themed as a common sense approach, the author uses anecdotal points and discussions with…

  5. A cross-media content analysis of motivational themes in direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpradit, Nithima; Ascione, Frank J; Bagozzi, Richard P

    2004-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of prescription drugs is a widely discussed issue in health care. However, little is known about the characteristics of the motivational themes used in this type of advertising. The aim of this study was to investigate the concurrent presentation of motivational themes in DTC print and television advertisements. The content analyses focused on advertisements of 2 targeted drug classes (cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme inhibitors and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) in magazines and on television. Targeted print advertisements (for celecoxib, rofecoxib, atorvastatin, pravastatin, and simvastatin) from September to December 2001 and targeted television advertisements (for celecoxib, rofecoxib, and simvastatin) from November 2001 were investigated. The motivational themes were assessed using a theoretical framework based on self-regulatory focus theory and cultural orientation. Self-regulatory focus was examined in terms of goal orientation (promotion vs prevention) and emotional aspects, (e.g., cheerfulness, dejection, quiescence, agitation). The cultural orientation was examined in terms of individualism versus collectivism. The visual-verbal match was categorized as direct if the audio and visual information was semantically redundant, as partial if it was partially related, and as no match at all if it was different or conflicting. Twelve print advertisements in 10 magazines and 4 television advertisements on 4 television networks were examined; the interrater reliability scores from 3 independent, trained judges ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. The score was low (0.57) in the visual-verbal match measurement for television advertisements. Products in the same category appeared to be promoted using different self-regulatory foci. For example, celecoxib and atorvastatin advertisements tended to be promotion oriented, whereas pravastatin advertisements tended to be prevention oriented. Motivational themes were found

  6. OCCUPATION COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH CONTACT DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elice Wijaya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Occupational skin diseases are a widespread problem. Despite numerous protective mechanisms, the skin remains vulnerable to new irritants found in the workplace. As a result, many workers in different occupations suffer from occupational skin diseases. From the data at Sanglah Hospital in Dermatology Department, it should be noted that there is increasing number of new cases of contact dermatitis in period of January 2000 until December 2005, from 10,16% until 13,36% in the next year and relatively stable in the next four years. Occupations commonly associated with contact dermatitis are agriculture workers, construction workers, dental workers, electronic workers, florists, food workers, hairdressers, haousekeeping personnel, machinist, mechanics, medical workers, office workers, photographers, printers, textile workers. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  7. Fear of oxygen therapy for children in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Anna Clare; Edwards, Christopher; Langton, Josephine; Zamawe, Collins; Kennedy, Neil

    2015-03-01

    Although pneumonia is a common cause of death in children in Malawi, healthcare staff frequently encounter patients or carers who refuse oxygen therapy. This qualitative study documents factors that influence acceptance or refusal of oxygen therapy for children in Malawi. Nine group interviews involving 86 participants were held in community and hospital settings in rural and urban Malawi. Eleven in-depth interviews of healthcare staff providing oxygen were held in a central hospital. Thematic analysis of transcripts of the audio recordings was carried out to identify recurring themes. Similar ideas were identified in the group interviews and in-depth staff interviews. Past experiences of oxygen use (direct and indirect, positive and negative) had a strong influence on views of oxygen. A recurrent theme was fear of oxygen, often due to a perceived association between death and recent oxygen use. Fears were intensified by a lack of familiarity with equipment used to deliver oxygen, distrust of medical staff and concerns about cost of oxygen. This study identifies reasons for refusal of oxygen therapy for children in a low-income country. Findings from the study suggest that training of healthcare staff to address fears of parents, and information, education and communication (IEC) approaches that improve public understanding of oxygen and provide positive examples of its use are likely to be helpful in improving uptake of oxygen therapy in Malawi. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. [Endoprosthesis Infections - Guidelines for Antibiotic Therapy Common Guidelines of the Czech Society for Orthopaedics and Traumatology and the Society for Infectious Diseases of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, D; Balejová, M; Horníková, M; Chrdle, A; Mallátová, N; Nyč, O; Chmelík, V; Gallo, J; Jahoda, D; Stehlík, J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY This study aims to articulate regional guidelines for curative and suppressive antibiotic therapy of total joint replacement infections. MATERIAL AND METHODS When developing the standard, used as source materials were the published foreign guidelines for antibiotic therapy of prosthetic joint infections, the analysis of resistance of bacterial strains conducted in the Hospital in České Budějovice, a.s. and the assessment of strain resistance for the Czech Republic published by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net). Considered was also the availability of individual antibiotics in the Czech Republic and restricted prescription according to the Summary of Product Characteristics as specified in the State Institute for Drug Control marketing authorisation. The expert group composed of orthopaedists, microbiologists and infectious disease specialists elaborated the basic antibiotic guideline for choosing an appropriate antibiotic/antifungal drug based on the usual susceptibility, its dose and dosage interval for initial and continuation therapy. The comments of individual specialists were gradually incorporated therein and in case of doubts majority rule was applied. The drafted document was sent for peer reviews to clinical orthopaedic, infectious disease and microbiological centres, whose comments were also incorporated and the finalised document was submitted for evaluation to specialised medical societies. RESULTS The outcome is the submitted guideline for antibiotic curative and suppressive therapy suitable for managing the prosthetic joint infections, which was approved by the committee of the Czech Society for Orthopaedics and Traumatology andthe Society for Infectious Diseases of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně. DISCUSION Curative therapy of total joint replacement infections consists primarily in surgical treatment and has to be accompanied by adequate antibiotic therapy administered

  9. The Impacts of Theme-Based Language Instruction: A Case Study of an Advanced Chinese Intensive Program

    OpenAIRE

    Song Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Theme-based language teaching under Content-Based Instruction (CBI) is a pedagogical approach that emphasizes learning professional content along with language skills. This paper reports a case study on the impacts of a theme-based advanced Chinese intensive program in a university setting. It begins with a review of CBI and its theme-based approach and then discusses the program design, curriculum development, and instructional practice of the program. The impacts of the theme-based approach...

  10. The Development of a National Curriculum Guide for Persian: Themes, Genres, Standards-based Goals, and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Mills

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wang (2009 has challenged foreign language scholars to “engage in rigorous discussions to develop language-specific examples and performance indicators to guide program development and decision-making for less commonly taught language (LCTL instructors” (p. 284. The 2011-2012 STARTALK programs in Persian aimed to encourage such rigorous discussion through the development of a National Curriculum Guide in Persian. Persian professionals explored current theories in second language acquisition, examined curricular resources and models, and shared successful teaching materials. This article describes the rationale, procedures, and outcomes of a series of faculty development events that aimed to create a model for curriculum development for the LCTLs and, perhaps, also for other language programs in the context of higher education. The final curriculum guide produced by the program participants includes overarching themes and genres, Standards-based goals, strategies for authentic assessment, and model unit plans.

  11. Temi firthiani di linguistica applicata: "Restricted Languages" e "Collocation" (Firthian Themes in Applied Linguistics: "Restricted Languages" and "Collocation")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Magda

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the importance of two Firthian themes for language teaching. The first theme, "Restricted Languages," concerns the "microlanguages" of every language (e.g., literary language, scientific, etc.). The second theme, "Collocation," shows that equivalent words in two languages rarely have the same position in…

  12. The Future of Organization Design: An Interpretative Synthesis in Three Themes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Burton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the inaugural issue of the Journal of Organization Design (Vol. 1, #1, 2012, noted scholars and experienced practitioners presented their views on the future of organization design. The seven wise and provocative statements were subsequently discussed by members of the Organizational Design Community at a conference held at Harvard University on August 3, 2012. I was asked by JOD to monitor the discussion and identify the broad organization design themes that emerged. Although the discussion was wide ranging, three themes were noticeable. The first theme is that there are fundamentals of organization design, and all agreed that design involves creating a cohesive socio-technical system from a number of constituent elements. The second theme is that the boundaries of many newer organizational forms extend beyond that of the single firm, so the scope of organization design needs to expand to include ecosystems, collaborative communities, industries, and other supra-firm architectures. The third theme involves time and change, requiring a shift in focus from how organizations become stable and predictable to how they can become more agile.

  13. Thirty years of artificial intelligence in medicine (AIME) conferences: A review of research themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Niels; Combi, Carlo; Marin, Roque; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, the international conference on Artificial Intelligence in MEdicine (AIME) has been organized at different venues across Europe every 2 years, establishing a forum for scientific exchange and creating an active research community. The Artificial Intelligence in Medicine journal has published theme issues with extended versions of selected AIME papers since 1998. To review the history of AIME conferences, investigate its impact on the wider research field, and identify challenges for its future. We analyzed a total of 122 session titles to create a taxonomy of research themes and topics. We classified all 734 AIME conference papers published between 1985 and 2013 with this taxonomy. We also analyzed the citations to these conference papers and to 55 special issue papers. We identified 30 research topics across 12 themes. AIME was dominated by knowledge engineering research in its first decade, while machine learning and data mining prevailed thereafter. Together these two themes have contributed about 51% of all papers. There have been eight AIME papers that were cited at least 10 times per year since their publication. There has been a major shift from knowledge-based to data-driven methods while the interest for other research themes such as uncertainty management, image and signal processing, and natural language processing has been stable since the early 1990s. AIME papers relating to guidelines and protocols are among the most highly cited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S. M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  15. [The most cited themes in the research in the field of Mental Health: analyses of six international nursing and medical journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunico, Laura; Fredo, Susanna; Bernini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The review aimed to identify and analyse the future development on the topic by analysing the main themes discussed in number of scientific journal focused on Mental Health both by nurses and physicians.. 4 international journals focused on Mental health and psychiatry International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, American Journal of Psychiatry, Australian and New Zeland Journal of Psychiatry as well as two journal focused generically on health, Journal of Advanced Nursing and Lancet were scrutinized. We have analysed the papers of 2012-2015 for the specialised journals and last and first 6 months of 2012 and 2013 and 2014-2015 for the generic. Editorials, comments and contributions regarding theoretical models were exluded. From the analysis we identified 9 themes and for each theme the pertinent category. For the diagnostic grouping we used the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision. A trend in research about mood disorders, schizophrenia and addictions and comorbidity emerged according to the 2099 abstracts analysed. Within medical research antidepressants were the most studied psychotropic medication and cognitive behaviour therapy was the most studied psychotherapy. Within nursing research: the nurse-patient relationship, adherence and monitoring of pharmacological therapy, the treatment planning and the working environment, the nursing training and its efficacy. The clinical research trials were twice as frequent in the medical versus nursing research where qualitative research prevails. The research challenge will be to find a new paradigm fit for the future psychiatry having at its disposition the patient's genoma, and needing to routinely use biomarkers for a personalised therapy. A further challenge might be the promotion of interprofessional research between doctors and nurses and the acquisition of new competences of health professionals needed to tackle the

  16. Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions KidsHealth / For Parents / Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions What's in this article? Flatfeet Toe Walking ...

  17. To Realize the Commons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolphijn, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution to the Common Conflict [www.onlineopen.org/commonconflict] virtual roundtable, Rick Dolphijn emphasizes that the commons is not a humanist concept but much more a materialist concept. He argues that  the commons depends upon the creation of new assemblages: it is the accidental

  18. An Innovative Course Featuring Action Research Integrated with Unifying Science Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Charlotte A.; Luera, Gail R.; Everett, Susan A.

    2009-12-01

    In this article, we describe an innovative capstone course for preservice K-8 teachers integrating action research and a unifying theme in science (AAAS in Science for all Americans. Oxford University Press, New York, 1989; NRC in National science education standards. National Academy Press, Washington, DC, 1996). The goals of the capstone course are to increase student knowledge of the unifying theme, improve written communication skills, and introduce students to educational research. We provide evidence that each of these goals is met. Student growth in theme knowledge is demonstrated through concept maps, questionnaires, and previously reported assessments. Improved writing ability is demonstrated using the spelling and grammar checking feature of Microsoft Word. The analysis of action research reports demonstrates that students are able to connect their action research project results to previous research.

  19. Common sleep disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kevin A; Hathaway, Nathanael E; Lettieri, Christine F

    2014-03-01

    Up to 50% of children will experience a sleep problem. Early identification of sleep problems may prevent negative consequences, such as daytime sleepiness, irritability, behavioral problems, learning difficulties, motor vehicle crashes in teenagers, and poor academic performance. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs in 1% to 5% of children. Polysomnography is needed to diagnose the condition because it may not be detected through history and physical examination alone. Adenotonsillectomy is the primary treatment for most children with obstructive sleep apnea. Parasomnias are common in childhood; sleepwalking, sleep talking, confusional arousals, and sleep terrors tend to occur in the first half of the night, whereas nightmares are more common in the second half of the night. Only 4% of parasomnias will persist past adolescence; thus, the best management is parental reassurance and proper safety measures. Behavioral insomnia of childhood is common and is characterized by a learned inability to fall and/or stay asleep. Management begins with consistent implementation of good sleep hygiene practices, and, in some cases, use of extinction techniques may be appropriate. Delayed sleep phase disorder is most common in adolescence, presenting as difficulty falling asleep and awakening at socially acceptable times. Treatment involves good sleep hygiene and a consistent sleep-wake schedule, with nighttime melatonin and/or morning bright light therapy as needed. Diagnosing restless legs syndrome in children can be difficult; management focuses on trigger avoidance and treatment of iron deficiency, if present.

  20. [Functional therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lima, G R

    1977-03-01

    This article attempts to present and explain the therapy for the most common gynecological and nongynecological problems caused by oral contraception (OC). Carcinogenic side effects include vulvar and cervical cancer, which can be treated with cryosurgery, breast cancer, usually treated either by termination of OC, or by additional hormonal therapy, endometritis, and endometrial hyperplasia and adenocarcinoma, a result of the action of progesterone on tissues continuously stimulated by estrogen. Endocrinal aspects of OC include all menopausal syndromes, most dermatological side effects, such as acne and hirsutism, nonpuerperal galactorrhea, usually due to hyperprolactinemia, and which responds very well to treatment with bromocriptine, and infections such as herpes genitalis, candida albicans, and others. OC can also cause vulvar distrophy, to be treated with testosterone propionate, and anovulation, which responds very well to treatment with clomiphene.

  1. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...... music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive...

  2. Evidence-based medicine teaching requirements in the USA: taxonomy and themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Allen F; Torro, John R; Frame, Kara A; Bakshi, Munish

    2016-05-01

    In the USA, recent changes to oversight of residency training codify the requirements for teaching evidence-based medicine and information mastery (lifelong learning) knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The goal of this project is to determine current requirements for teaching of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and information mastery (IM) in specialty residency education in the USA. The project was a qualitative thematic analysis using content analysis. The source of the requirements for EBM and IM were the "milestone" statements for all 28 major specialties and transition year programs. Milestone descriptors related to EBM/IM were extracted and codes were developed and applied to each descriptor by four researchers. The resulting codes were coalesced into themes and tested against the milestone descriptors. The coding process identified 15 content areas comprising five themes. Two themes related to the knowledge and skills of EBM and three themes related to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of IM. EBM themes encompassed basic critical appraisal skills and knowledge of clinical epidemiology principles and statistics. IM themes centered on identifying one's information needs for patient-specific information, using information sources, and using current awareness services to remain abreast of changes in medicine. In general, they align well with the Sicily Statement on Evidence-Based Practice. No specialty required competence in all areas. New training requirements for specialties in the USA require the development of both classic EBM skills as well as skills for managing information. However, there is marked variation in the requirements among specific specialties. © 2016 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. A Volunteer Basketball Clinic for Children with Disabilities: Professional Development Impact on Student-Athletes and Physical Therapy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburger, Peter; Wilson, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the change in perceptions of student-athletes, physical therapy students, and parents of children who helped to facilitate an athletic skills camp for children with disabilities. Participants experienced 3 hours of basketball activity yearly. Data were collected for 3 consecutive years from a total of 51 parents, 15 student-athletes, and 22 physical therapy students. Pre- and post-survey data were evaluated by two independent researchers. Common themes were developed for all participant groups and cross-group comparisons were evaluated. Findings indicated a synergistic benefit for student-athletes and physical therapy students derived from their impact and children with disabilities. Perceptual changes in students included a decrease in fear in working with disabled children, an appreciation for the value of having fun, and increased growth in civic identity and desire to volunteer.

  4. Mapping the Landscape of Future Research Themes in Supply Chain Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Andreas; Handfield, Robert; Durach, Christian F.

    2016-01-01

    , as well as those that researchers believe should be focused on. While areas of research deemed to become most important include big data and analytics, the most under-researched areas include efforts that target the “people dimension” of SCM, ethical issues and internal integration. The themes....... These results were then reviewed by 10 SCM scholars. Potential interactions and areas of overlap were identified, classified, and integrated into a compelling set of ideas for future research in the field of SCM. We believe these ideas provide a forward-looking view on those themes that will become important...

  5. Making Sense of the Brutality of the Holocaust: Critical Themes and New Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric D

    2017-01-02

    This article offers an analytic, integrative review of select themes associated with one of history's greatest atrocities: the Holocaust. Much of this review considers general and Holocaust-specific themes as they pertain to the nature of senseless violence and evil. The importance of having a greater understanding of the sheer brutality of violence perpetuated in the Holocaust is emphasized. As part of this discussion, considerable attention is given to how Internet-based photographs and videos from the Holocaust era can provide greater insight into understanding the evil associated with this genocide. Some consideration of the larger meaning of the Holocaust, particularly for Jews, is also examined.

  6. An exploration of physiotherapists' experiences of robotic therapy in upper limb rehabilitation within a stroke rehabilitation centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Andrew; Stephens, John

    2017-04-01

    Strokes are the world's leading cause of adult disability, with movement impairment being more common in the upper limb (UL). Robotic therapy (RT) is identified as an effective adjunct to promote movement but with limited effect on functional capabilities. There is currently limited research in user experience of RT, specifically that of physiotherapists. This study sought to explore physiotherapists' experience of using RT in rehabilitation of the UL, within a stroke rehabilitation centre in the north of England. Physiotherapists (n = 6) shared their experiences of working with the InMotion2 robot through semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was employed to interpret data, identify emergent themes and interdependent relationships between them. Five interdependent themes were identified focused around individualized care, influenced by evidence for practice, human relationships, skill mix, and resources and resource management. All physiotherapists valued the use of RT as an adjunct to conventional therapy, although barriers to successful implementation seemed to dominate the views of some. RT was perceived positively by physiotherapists, regarded as an adjunct to conventional therapy. A framework to summarize the relationships of participants' views and experiences is proposed in an attempt to understand the influences on the clinical use of RT. Implications for Rehabilitation Robotic therapy (RT) is valued as an adjunct to (conventional) person-centred rehabilitation. Resource management and skill mix are viewed as two key challenges to the successful implementation of RT. The production of evidence-based guidelines would be a useful development in the advancement.

  7. Tragedy of the Commons

    OpenAIRE

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    The tittle refers to an article from 1968 by Garrett Hardin, using the metaphore of the common grazing land in villages in old time. These 'Commons' were for free use for people in the commounity to have some sheep grazing. This system was based on a certain social solidarity and ethic. With an individualistic and selfish attitude this would collaps, since each single citizen could benefit from putting more sheep on the common, which would eventually collapse by overgrazing. The metaphore is ...

  8. Mission 2 Solution: Requirements Engineering Education as a Central Theme in the BIT Programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijs, C.; Sikkel, Nicolaas; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    Design of integrated business-IT solutions is the main theme in the Business Information Technology programme (BIT) at the University of Twente. Our mission is to teach students to design solutions that are needed instead of solutions that are asked for. This makes requirements engineering an

  9. A Disability Studies Response to JTE's Themed Issue on Diversity and Disability in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent themed issue of "Journal of Teacher Education" ("JTE" 63.4) about issues of disability, diversity, and teacher education, guest editors Marleen Pugach, Linda Blanton, and Lani Florian (2012) invite readers to participate in "honest, difficult, and much needed dialogue across the many diversity constituencies in teacher education" (p.…

  10. Toward a More Inclusive Multicultural Education: Methods for Including LGBT Themes in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Although multicultural education scholars and the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME) have encouraged the implementation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender themes in the classroom (NAME, 2005), many classroom educators look the other way because of fear, retaliation, or personal discomfort. The following article will…

  11. Conservation of Life as a Unifying Theme for Process Safety in Chemical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, James A.; Davis, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of "conservation of life" as a concept and unifying theme for increasing awareness, application, and integration of process safety in chemical engineering education. Students need to think of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, and conservation of life as equally important in engineering design and analysis.…

  12. Climate adaptation - 5 key research themes; Denmark; Klimatilpasning - 5 centrale forskningstemaer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Bent; Binnerup, S.; Bijl, L. van der; Villholth, K.G.; Drews, M.; Strand, I.F.; Henrichs, T.; Larsen, Niels; Timmermann, T.; Moseholm, L.

    2009-06-15

    The report proposes five key research themes under the heading 'Future climate and climate adaptation' which can support the Danish climate adaptation efforts. These themes underpin climate adaptation in the light of research needs identified by the research environments and sectors under the government's strategy on adaptation to climate change in Denmark from March 2008. The paper has been prepared within the framework of RESEARCH2015-proposal by the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation in order to bring about the knowledge and tools that are demanded by sectors and authorities to implement the government's climate adaptation strategy. This concept paper for research themes is a thorough, holistic and inter-sectoral suggestion for future research priorities in climate adaptation with anchoring in both the research community as well as in the political-administrative system. The five key themes are; 1. Models and climate adaptation; 2. Communities and climate adaptation; 3. Construction and climate adaptation; 4. Landscape and climate adaptation; 5. Climate adaptation in the coastal zone. The overall research needs over a 5 year period is estimated at 700 million DKK, of which 85 million DKK yearly can be estimated to be financed primarily through national basic funds and research council funds. Research is assumed to be coupled to external financing, for which the EU's 7th Framework Program and the Nordic excellence and innovation program in the energy, climate and environment will be significant sources.

  13. Visual to Print Transfer: A Literacy Strategy for Theme Analysis of Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This article shares a literacy strategy to support students' analysis of the theme of text and provide evidence to support their assertion. The strategy is called Visual to Print Transfer (VPT). The VPT strategy leverages students' out-of-school literacy practices involving media images of Hollywood icons as a way to support their understanding of…

  14. What Are Chinese Children Reading? Major Themes Found in Their Mandatory Reading Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Rhea A.

    2002-01-01

    Explores the literary themes present in the stories in the "Texts for Nine-Year Compulsory Education: Chinese," grade 1-3. Notes that these textbooks are currently used in Shanghai public elementary schools in the People's Republic of China (PRC) for instruction in the Mandarin dialect of the Chinese language. Concludes that the themes…

  15. Theme, Rheme, Topic, and Comment in the Syntax of American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    The syntax of lexical units, or signs, of American Sign Language (ASL) is analyzed. Previous areas of study concerning pauses, functional sentence perspective, theme and rheme, and topic and comment are discussed. A model is offered to depict topic-comment relationships in ASL using space, vectors, and relationship rules. (SW)

  16. Implementation of First-Year Seminars, the Summer Academy Bridge Program, and Themed Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chism, Lauren P.; Baker, Sarah S.; Hansen, Michele J.; Williams, Gayle

    2008-01-01

    Many colleges offer a summer bridge program and even more offer learning communities for first-year students. Few, however, link these initiatives. This article will offer brief descriptions of IUPUI's successful bridge, learning community, and themed learning community (TLC) initiatives; examine the links between them; and share assessment data,…

  17. A Theme-Based Course: Hydrogen as the Fuel of the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Kelly, Matthew; Paritsky, Leonid; Wagner, Julia

    2009-01-01

    A theme-based course focusing on the potential role of hydrogen as a future fuel is described. Numerous topics included in typical introductory courses can be directly related to the issue of hydrogen energy. Beginning topics include Avogadro's number, the mole, atomic mass, gas laws, and the role of electrons in chemical transformations. Reaction…

  18. Spring Research Festival Theme Explores Host­–Microbe Interactions | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer The 18th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF) will take place May 5–8 at the NCI Campus at Frederick and Fort Detrick.  This is the second year that the event is sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), an interagency committee made up of various research entities located within Fort Detrick. Theme

  19. Windows to the World: Themes for Cross-Cultural Understanding. Grade 4-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Phyllis; Royse, Brooke Sarno; Kepler, John

    The purpose of this book is to help equip students with some of the concepts, attitudes and skills for successful cross-cultural understanding. The emphasis is on the exploration of cultural perspectives, both of themselves and others. The book is divided into chapters devoted to particular themes and uses the kaleidoscope of various world…

  20. Simulations, Imaging, and Modeling: A Unique Theme for an Undergraduate Research Program in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephanie M; Domire, Zachary J

    2017-07-01

    As the reliance on computational models to inform experiments and evaluate medical devices grows, the demand for students with modeling experience will grow. In this paper, we report on the 3-yr experience of a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) based on the theme simulations, imaging, and modeling in biomechanics. While directly applicable to REU sites, our findings also apply to those creating other types of summer undergraduate research programs. The objective of the paper is to examine if a theme of simulations, imaging, and modeling will improve students' understanding of the important topic of modeling, provide an overall positive research experience, and provide an interdisciplinary experience. The structure of the program and the evaluation plan are described. We report on the results from 25 students over three summers from 2014 to 2016. Overall, students reported significant gains in the knowledge of modeling, research process, and graduate school based on self-reported mastery levels and open-ended qualitative responses. This theme provides students with a skill set that is adaptable to other applications illustrating the interdisciplinary nature of modeling in biomechanics. Another advantage is that students may also be able to continue working on their project following the summer experience through network connections. In conclusion, we have described the successful implementation of the theme simulation, imaging, and modeling for an REU site and the overall positive response of the student participants.

  1. the theme of democracy in the drama of ola rotimi and wole soyinka

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The preoccupation of this study is to critically examine the theme of democracy in Ola Rotimi's Our Husband has Gone Mad Again: a comedy and Wole Soyinka's Kongi's Harvest. Our choice of Rotimi and Soyinka is based on the fact that both of them rank toweringly among the most accomplished playwrights and theatre ...

  2. Multicultural Inclusion of Lesbian and Gay Literature Themes in Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Stephanie R.; Watson, Dwight C.; Hood, Yolanda; Lasswell, Terri A.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a rationale for and methods to assist elementary educators in creating spaces where the enhancement of awareness of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ)-themed literature could be explored in elementary schools and classrooms. The authors assert that an approach to providing gender and sexuality…

  3. (Text) Mining the LANDscape: Themes and Trends over 40 years of Landscape and Urban Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gobster

    2014-01-01

    In commemoration of the journal's 40th anniversary, the co-editor explores themes and trends covered by Landscape and Urban Planning and its parent journals through a qualitative comparison of co-occurrence term maps generated from the text corpora of its abstracts across the four decadal periods of publication.Cluster maps generated from the...

  4. Opening Doors: Teaching LGBTQ-Themed Young Adult Literature for an Inclusive Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Katherine E.; Ramos, Maria; Neiswander, Samantha

    2018-01-01

    LGBTQ themes are often neglected in many schools' curriculum. Currently, an LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum framework is not required in most school districts across the county. Therefore, it is important to understand how teachers regard LGBTQ issues; how they address the needs of students in the middle school and high school English classroom who…

  5. Examining Kindergarteners' Drawings for Their Perspectives on Picture Books' Themes and Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ching-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Mei

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize children's perspectives on a picture book's themes and characters by examining their drawings. The study was conducted over a five-month period in a public kindergarten in southern Taiwan, with six children aged 5-6 years. Picture book appreciation activities focused on eight picture books.…

  6. Adolescents' Interest in and Views of Destructive Themes in Rock Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, Hannelore; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Surveyed 694 adolescents concerning rock music preferences and views on homicide, satanism, and suicide (HSS) themes. Nine percent of middle school students, 17 percent of rural and 24percent of urban high school students were HSS rock fans. Three-fourths of fans were male, majority were White. Many students expressed concerns about destructive…

  7. Adolescents and Destructive Themes in Rock Music: A Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, Hannelore; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Administered questionnaire to 120 adolescent offenders in detention centers to study rock music preferences and views of themes advocating homicide, suicide, and satanic practices (HSSR). Found that HSSR fans were more likely to be white, school dropouts, and spend more time listening to music. Findings suggest relationship between preference for…

  8. Design of a Food Chemistry-Themed Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The physical science curriculum design at Georgia Gwinnett College requires a theme-based course (lecture and group work, and laboratory) for nonscience majors. Increased student engagement is anticipated when science topics are taught in the context of a topic of which students can select during course registration. This paper presents the course…

  9. Key Themes and Future Directions in Teaching English to Young Learners: Introduction to the Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copland, Fiona; Garton, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Despite being something of a "Cinderella" area of study, research into and informed discussion of teaching young learners is on the increase, perhaps mirroring the increasing numbers of children learning English globally in primary schools. This introductory article reviews key themes and issues in the teaching of English to young…

  10. Project Cheddarfield: Supporting Co-Curricular Themes through Creative Use of Video Course-Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Natalie C.; Hancock, Philip G.

    2011-01-01

    This article chronicles the coordination and better integration of existing institutional resources to support "cocurricular" themes embedded in the provision of a large enrollment, video-mediated undergraduate operations management (OM) course. The name Project Cheddarfield refers to a 2008 initiative in which two professors team-taught…

  11. "Eyes in the back of Your Head": Moral Themes in African American Narratives of Racial Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Janie Victoria

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes African-Americans narratives of interracial conflict. Concludes that issues of power and authority are imbedded in interracial interpersonal relationships. Explores themes of justice and care in the psychological development of African Americans and in the transmission of race-related morals and values in African-American culture. (DK)

  12. Ambiguity in an Alaskan history theme park : Presenting "history as commodity" and "history as heritage"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Tity

    2007-01-01

    America's most northern history theme park has been located in Fairbanks, Alaska since 1967. This article focuses on the evolution of the Alaskaland/Pioneer Park: from a tourist attraction where Alaskan traditions of progress and boosterism ruled into a community park with a sincere concern for

  13. Food as a Theme in Social Studies Classes: Connecting Daily Life to Technology, Economy, and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resor, Cynthia Williams

    2010-01-01

    Connecting wider economic, technological, or cultural trends to the everyday life of students can be a challenge. Food can serve as a course-long theme that helps students comprehend the essential connection between personal actions and national or international trends and develop skills of critical analysis. The author describes four activities…

  14. The Hot and Energetic Universe: A White Paper presenting the science theme motivating the Athena+ mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandra, Kirpal; Barret, Didier; Barcons, Xavier; Fabian, Andy; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Piro, Luigi; Watson, Mike; Adami, Christophe; Aird, James; Afonso, Jose Manuel; Alexander, Dave; Argiroffi, Costanza; Amati, Lorenzo; Arnaud, Monique; Atteia, Jean-Luc; Audard, Marc; Badenes, Carles; Ballet, Jean; Ballo, Lucia; Bamba, Aya; Bhardwaj, Anil; Stefano Battistelli, Elia; Becker, Werner; De Becker, Michaël; Behar, Ehud; Bianchi, Stefano; Biffi, Veronica; Bîrzan, Laura; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bogdanov, Slavko; Boirin, Laurence; Boller, Thomas; Borgani, Stefano; Borm, Katharina; Bouché, Nicolas; Bourdin, Hervé; Bower, Richard; Braito, Valentina; Branchini, Enzo; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Bregman, Joel; Brenneman, Laura; Brightman, Murray; Brüggen, Marcus; Buchner, Johannes; Bulbul, Esra; Brusa, Marcella; Bursa, Michal; Caccianiga, Alessandro; Cackett, Ed; Campana, Sergio; Cappelluti, Nico; Cappi, Massimo; Carrera, Francisco; Ceballos, Maite; Christensen, Finn; Chu, You-Hua; Churazov, Eugene; Clerc, Nicolas; Corbel, Stephane; Corral, Amalia; Comastri, Andrea; Costantini, Elisa; Croston, Judith; Dadina, Mauro; D'Ai, Antonino; Decourchelle, Anne; Della Ceca, Roberto; Dennerl, Konrad; Dolag, Klaus; Done, Chris; Dovciak, Michal; Drake, Jeremy; Eckert, Dominique; Edge, Alastair; Ettori, Stefano; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Feigelson, Eric; Fender, Rob; Feruglio, Chiara; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fiore, Fabrizio; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallagher, Sarah; Gandhi, Poshak; Gaspari, Massimo; Gastaldello, Fabio; Georgakakis, Antonis; Georgantopoulos, Ioannis; Gilfanov, Marat; Gitti, Myriam; Gladstone, Randy; Goosmann, Rene; Gosset, Eric; Grosso, Nicolas; Guedel, Manuel; Guerrero, Martin; Haberl, Frank; Hardcastle, Martin; Heinz, Sebastian; Alonso Herrero, Almudena; Hervé, Anthony; Holmstrom, Mats; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Jonker, Peter; Kaastra, Jelle; Kara, Erin; Karas, Vladimir; Kastner, Joel; King, Andrew; Kosenko, Daria; Koutroumpa, Dimita; Kraft, Ralph; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Lallement, Rosine; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Lee, J.; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne; Lobban, Andrew; Lodato, Giuseppe; Lovisari, Lorenzo; Lotti, Simone; McCharthy, Ian; McNamara, Brian; Maggio, Antonio; Maiolino, Roberto; De Marco, Barbara; de Martino, Domitilla; Mateos, Silvia; Matt, Giorgio; Maughan, Ben; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Mendez, Mariano; Merloni, Andrea; Micela, Giuseppina; Miceli, Marco; Mignani, Robert; Miller, Jon; Miniutti, Giovanni; Molendi, Silvano; Montez, Rodolfo; Moretti, Alberto; Motch, Christian; Nazé, Yaël; Nevalainen, Jukka; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Nulsen, Paul; Ohashi, Takaya; O'Brien, Paul; Osborne, Julian; Oskinova, Lida; Pacaud, Florian; Paerels, Frederik; Page, Mat; Papadakis, Iossif; Pareschi, Giovanni; Petre, Robert; Petrucci, Pierre-Olivier; Piconcelli, Enrico; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Pinto, C.; de Plaa, Jelle; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Ponman, Trevor; Ponti, Gabriele; Porquet, Delphine; Pounds, Ken; Pratt, Gabriel; Predehl, Peter; Proga, Daniel; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Rafferty, David; Ramos-Ceja, Miriam; Ranalli, Piero; Rasia, Elena; Rau, Arne; Rauw, Gregor; Rea, Nanda; Read, Andy; Reeves, James; Reiprich, Thomas; Renaud, Matthieu; Reynolds, Chris; Risaliti, Guido; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rodriguez Hidalgo, Paola; Roncarelli, Mauro; Rosario, David; Rossetti, Mariachiara; Rozanska, Agata; Rovilos, Emmanouil; Salvaterra, Ruben; Salvato, Mara; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Sanders, Jeremy; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Schawinski, Kevin; Schaye, Joop; Schwope, Axel; Sciortino, Salvatore; Severgnini, Paola; Shankar, Francesco; Sijacki, Debora; Sim, Stuart; Schmid, Christian; Smith, Randall; Steiner, Andrew; Stelzer, Beate; Stewart, Gordon; Strohmayer, Tod; Strüder, Lothar; Sun, Ming; Takei, Yoh; Tatischeff, V.; Tiengo, Andreas; Tombesi, Francesco; Trinchieri, Ginevra; Tsuru, T. G.; Ud-Doula, Asif; Ursino, Eugenio; Valencic, Lynne; Vanzella, Eros; Vaughan, Simon; Vignali, Cristian; Vink, Jacco; Vito, Fabio; Volonteri, Marta; Wang, Daniel; Webb, Natalie; Willingale, Richard; Wilms, Joern; Wise, Michael; Worrall, Diana; Young, Andrew; Zampieri, Luca; In't Zand, Jean; Zane, Silvia; Zezas, Andreas; Zhang, Yuying; Zhuravleva, Irina

    2013-01-01

    This White Paper, submitted to the recent ESA call for science themes to define its future large missions, advocates the need for a transformational leap in our understanding of two key questions in astrophysics: 1) How does ordinary matter assemble into the large scale structures that we see today?

  15. Theme-Based Project Learning: Design and Application of Convergent Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Man-Seog; Kang, Kwang Il; Kim, Young H.; Kim, Young Mee

    2015-01-01

    This case study aims to verify the benefits of theme-based project learning for convergent science experiments. The study explores the possibilities of enhancing creative, integrated and collaborative teaching and learning abilities in science-gifted education. A convergent project-based science experiment program of physics, chemistry and biology…

  16. Elementary School Teachers' Perceptions Regarding the Inclusion of LGBTQ Themed Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    This critical explanatory mixed methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions regarding the inclusion of LGBTQ-themed literature in the curriculum. An electronic survey questionnaire and focus group sessions were used to collect both quantitative and qualitative data that described the perceived benefits and barriers of LGBTQ-themed…

  17. Interviewing to assess credibility in the Swedish asylum procedure: analyzing question style, type and theme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuizen, T.S.; Horselenberg, R.; Landström, S.; Granhag, P.A.; van Koppen, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current vignette study is to map the style, type, and themes of questions that are asked when assessing the credibility of asylum seekers' claims. Sixty-five officials from the Swedish Migration Agency (Migrationsverket), were asked to respond to one out of four different vignettes

  18. War as a Theme in Literature-Language Arts, English, World Literature: 5114.46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This course guide examines the theme of war in literary works. Works studied include the short stories of Stephen Crane, Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner; novels such as "The Red Badge of Courage" and "All Quiet on the Western Front"; and a variety of poems by writers from several countries. Students' performance…

  19. Being in Community: A Food Security Themed Approach to Public Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Barbara; Nelson, Connie; Stroink, Mirella

    2013-01-01

    For six years the Food Security Research Network at Lakehead University, Canada, has been engaged in an interdisciplinary theme-based service-learning initiative focusing on food security. Informed by complexity theory, the contextual fluidity partnership model brings community partners, students, and faculty into a nexus through which new…

  20. Themes, scenes, and taste in the history of Japanese garden art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuitert, W.

    1988-01-01

    The present study deals - in its three parts - with three fragments of the garden history of Japan. It reveals how the meaning a garden had to the people of its time was significantly different in all of these periods.

    Part one, titled "Themes", deals with the later Heian period,

  1. The "Animal House" Effect: How University-Themed Comedy Films Affect Students' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylkiw, Louise; Currie, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from learning and attitude theories, the current investigation explores the effect of media on students' attitudes. Study 1 was a content analysis of 34 films classified as university-themed comedies and showed that such films highlighted risk-taking (e.g., alcohol consumption) and minimized the importance of academics (e.g., studying).…

  2. An Empirical Study on the Application of Theme Theory in the Field of Writing Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingxia, Liu; Li, Liu

    2013-01-01

    English writing instruction is an important part in college English pedagogy. Traditional way of teaching English writing lays much emphasis on word, grammar and sentence rather than the level of discourse. Under the traditional way, the students have difficulties to yield well-organized and coherent compositions. Theme Theory provides a…

  3. "Teachosaurus" and "Learnoceratops": Dinosaurs as a Motivating Cross-Curricular Theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Denis

    2011-01-01

    The author takes a look into the benefits that dinosaurs may bring to the classroom. He discusses how he used dinosaurs as a cross-curricular theme to improve children's understanding and knowledge of science concepts. To investigate what a child might learn from dinosaurs, he started by comparing the many non-fiction dinosaur books using the…

  4. Kindergarten Magic: Theme-Based Lessons for Building Literacy and Library Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Kathy; Kirker, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This time-saving program planner for librarians and classroom teachers alike includes everything you need to get started--reading lists, flannelboard patterns, poems, songs, easy crafts, even take-home activities to extend the learning process. The many creative ideas packed inside include: (1) Activities keyed to popular classroom themes, with…

  5. M-Learning Challenges in Teaching Crosscutting Themes in the Education of Young People and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Marcos Andrei; de Araujo, Carlos Fernando, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges faced in using new technologies in the classroom are numerous, but contributions generated with their resolution can proportionately provide original and efficient teaching practices more in tune to students' eager learning needs. This article presents some strategies developed to help teachers in transversal themes classes using…

  6. Beyond a Pets Theme: Teaching Young Children to Interact Safely with Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2008-01-01

    Although it is commonplace for early childhood educators to include a theme or unit on pets, opportunities to incorporate safety goals frequently are overlooked. Approximately 400,000 incidents of dog bites to children are documented in the United States annually and this estimate may be low, due to the fact that not all injuries are reported.…

  7. Tragedy of the Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    The tittle refers to an article from 1968 by Garrett Hardin, using the metaphore of the common grazing land in villages in old time. These 'Commons' were for free use for people in the commounity to have some sheep grazing. This system was based on a certain social solidarity and ethic....... With an individualistic and selfish attitude this would collaps, since each single citizen could benefit from putting more sheep on the common, which would eventually collapse by overgrazing. The metaphore is applied to our common planet, and our ability to built up institutions, economics and ethics, geared for sharing...

  8. Experiences of ex-ex-gay individuals in sexual reorientation therapy: reasons for seeking treatment, perceived helpfulness and harmfulness of treatment, and post-treatment identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentje, Annesa; Heck, Nicholas C; Cochran, Bryan N

    2014-01-01

    Therapy meant to change someone's sexual orientation, or reorientation therapy, is still in practice despite statements from the major mental health organizations of its potential for harm. This qualitative study used an inductive content analysis strategy (Patton, 2002) to examine the experiences of thirty-eight individuals (31 males and seven females) who have been through a total of 113 episodes of reorientation therapy and currently identify as gay or lesbian. Religious beliefs were frequently cited as the reason for seeking reorientation therapy. Frequently endorsed themes of helpful components of reorientation therapy included connecting with others and feeling accepted. Harmful aspects of reorientation therapy included experiences of shame and negative impacts on mental health. Common reasons for identifying as LGB after the therapy included self-acceptance and coming to believe that sexual orientation change was not possible. The findings of this study were consistent with recommendations by the American Psychological Association Task Force on Appropriate Therapeutic Responses to Sexual Orientation (2009), which concluded that helpful aspects of reorientation therapy could be achieved through affirmative treatment methods while avoiding potential harms that may be associated with reorientation therapy. Limitations of the findings, including a small, self-selected sample, are discussed.

  9. What is narrative therapy and what is it not?: the usefulness of Q methodology to explore accounts of White and Epston's (1990) approach to narrative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Jennifer; Burns, Jan; Capdevila, Rose

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. 'What is narrative therapy and how do you do it?' is a question that is repeatedly asked of narrative therapy, with little consistent response. This study aimed to explore and distil out the 'common themes' of practitioner definitions of White and Epston's approach to narrative therapy. DESIGN. This was an Internet-based study involving current UK practitioners of this type of narrative therapy using a unique combination of a Delphi Panel and Q methodology. METHOD. A group of experienced practitioners were recruited into the Delphi Poll and were asked two questions about what narrative therapy is and is not, and what techniques are and are not employed. These data combined with other information formed the statements of a Q-sort that was then administered to a wider range of narrative practitioners. FINDINGS. The Delphi Panel agreed on a number of key points relating to the theory, politics and practice of narrative therapy. The Q-sort produced eight distinct accounts of narrative therapy and a number of dimensions along which these different positions could be distinguished. These included narrative therapy as a political stance and integration with other approaches. CONCLUSIONS. For any therapeutic model to demonstrate its efficacy and attract proponents, an accepted definition of its components and practice should preferably be established. This study has provided some data for the UK application of White and Epston's narrative therapy, which may then assist in forming a firmer base for further research and practice. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Oral appliance therapy versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, M; Byraki, A; Ahlberg, J; Heymans, M W; Hamburger, H L; De Lange, J; Lobbezoo, F; Aarab, G

    2017-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with several sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) with those of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. In this randomised placebo-controlled trial, sixty-four OSAS patients (52·0 ± 9·6 years) were randomly assigned to an MAD, nCPAP or an intra-oral placebo appliance in a parallel design. All participants filled out the validated Dutch Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ) twice: one before treatment and one after six months of treatment. With 88 questions, thirteen scales were constructed, representing common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to study differences between the groups for the different SDQ scales over time. The MAD group showed significant improvements over time in symptoms corresponding with 'insomnia', 'excessive daytime sleepiness', 'psychiatric sleep disorder', 'periodic limb movements', 'sleep apnoea', 'sleep paralysis', 'daytime dysfunction', 'hypnagogic hallucinations/dreaming', 'restless sleep', 'negative conditioning' and 'automatic behaviour' (range of P values: 0·000-0·014). These improvements in symptoms were, however, not significantly different from the improvements in symptoms observed in the nCPAP and placebo groups (range of P values: 0·090-0·897). It can be concluded that there is no significant difference between MAD and nCPAP in their positive effects on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. These beneficial effects may be a result of placebo effects. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE FOR INTERACTIVE TRAINING OF STUDENTS ON THE THEME “MUTUAL INTERSECTING OF PYRAMIDS AND PRISMS IN AXONOMETRY”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyan Georgiev Zlatanov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This work acquaints with the program Sam for interactive computer training of students on the theme "Mutual intersecting of pyramids and prisms in axonometry”. The program containing three modules – teacher, student and autopilot – allows for briefest time to teach and study the whole variety of the tasks on this theme. A classification of the pierce points of the surrounding edges of the one polyhedron with the other one, based on the mutual position of their auxiliary planes, is made. The solutions of the tasks can be traced in each of the popular axonometric projection (cabinet projection, cavalier perspective, military perspective, increased orthogonal dimetry, increased orthogonal isometry in their significant stages as well as in each step. Each stage of the solution is accompanied by commentary. The student can manipulate any object of the drawing or can apply on the whole drawing rotation, translation, expansion, shrink, zoom, etc. The student can watch on all sides the rotating 3D image of the composition of the two intersecting polyhedrons and separate the rotating 3D image of their common part. The combination of traditional methods of training in descriptive geometry using the program Sam and the classification of the pierce points enable for a thorough, creative and self study of the students. They are instruments through which the students can not only learn in depth material for a short time, but they can prepare creative course projects such as: improvisations on a task or a selection of tasks from known sources and creating original tasks on a given topic. The program also allows to create dynamic geometric drawings.

  12. Genes2WordCloud: a quick way to identify biological themes from gene lists and free text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroukh, Caroline; Jenkins, Sherry L; Dannenfelser, Ruth; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2011-10-13

    Word-clouds recently emerged on the web as a solution for quickly summarizing text by maximizing the display of most relevant terms about a specific topic in the minimum amount of space. As biologists are faced with the daunting amount of new research data commonly presented in textual formats, word-clouds can be used to summarize and represent biological and/or biomedical content for various applications. Genes2WordCloud is a web application that enables users to quickly identify biological themes from gene lists and research relevant text by constructing and displaying word-clouds. It provides users with several different options and ideas for the sources that can be used to generate a word-cloud. Different options for rendering and coloring the word-clouds give users the flexibility to quickly generate customized word-clouds of their choice. Genes2WordCloud is a word-cloud generator and a word-cloud viewer that is based on WordCram implemented using Java, Processing, AJAX, mySQL, and PHP. Text is fetched from several sources and then processed to extract the most relevant terms with their computed weights based on word frequencies. Genes2WordCloud is freely available for use online; it is open source software and is available for installation on any web-site along with supporting documentation at http://www.maayanlab.net/G2W. Genes2WordCloud provides a useful way to summarize and visualize large amounts of textual biological data or to find biological themes from several different sources. The open source availability of the software enables users to implement customized word-clouds on their own web-sites and desktop applications.

  13. Genes2WordCloud: a quick way to identify biological themes from gene lists and free text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma'ayan Avi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Word-clouds recently emerged on the web as a solution for quickly summarizing text by maximizing the display of most relevant terms about a specific topic in the minimum amount of space. As biologists are faced with the daunting amount of new research data commonly presented in textual formats, word-clouds can be used to summarize and represent biological and/or biomedical content for various applications. Results Genes2WordCloud is a web application that enables users to quickly identify biological themes from gene lists and research relevant text by constructing and displaying word-clouds. It provides users with several different options and ideas for the sources that can be used to generate a word-cloud. Different options for rendering and coloring the word-clouds give users the flexibility to quickly generate customized word-clouds of their choice. Methods Genes2WordCloud is a word-cloud generator and a word-cloud viewer that is based on WordCram implemented using Java, Processing, AJAX, mySQL, and PHP. Text is fetched from several sources and then processed to extract the most relevant terms with their computed weights based on word frequencies. Genes2WordCloud is freely available for use online; it is open source software and is available for installation on any web-site along with supporting documentation at http://www.maayanlab.net/G2W. Conclusions Genes2WordCloud provides a useful way to summarize and visualize large amounts of textual biological data or to find biological themes from several different sources. The open source availability of the software enables users to implement customized word-clouds on their own web-sites and desktop applications.

  14. Metformin - a Future Therapy for Neurodegenerative Diseases : Theme: Drug Discovery, Development and Delivery in Alzheimer's Disease Guest Editor: Davide Brambilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz-Piasecka, Magdalena; Sikora, Joanna; Szydłowska, Aleksandra; Skupień, Agata; Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elżbieta; Huttunen, Kristiina M

    2017-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex, chronic and progressive metabolic disease, which is characterized by relative insulin deficiency, insulin resistance, and high glucose levels in blood. Esteemed published articles and epidemiological data exhibit an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in diabetic pateints. Metformin is the most frequently used oral anti-diabetic drug, which apart from hypoglycaemic activity, improves serum lipid profiles, positively influences the process of haemostasis, and possesses anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, scientists have put their efforts in establishing metformin's role in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Parkinson's disease. Results of several clinical studies confirm that long term use of metformin in diabetic patients contributes to better cognitive function, compared to participants using other anti-diabetic drugs. The exact mechanism of metformin's advantageous activity in AD is not fully understood, but scientists claim that activation of AMPK-dependent pathways in human neural stem cells might be responsible for the neuroprotective activity of metformin. Metformin was also found to markedly decease Beta-secretase 1 (BACE1) protein expression and activity in cell culture models and in vivo, thereby reducing BACE1 cleavage products and the production of Aβ (β-amyloid). Furthermore, there is also some evidence that metformin decreases the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which is responsible for the degradation of acetylcholine (Ach), a neurotransmitter involved in the process of learning and memory. In regard to the beneficial effects of metformin, its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties cannot be omitted. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that metformin ameliorates oxidative damage.

  15. Efektivitas Instagram Common Grounds

    OpenAIRE

    Wifalin, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Efektivitas Instagram Common Grounds merupakan rumusan masalah yang diambil dalam penelitian ini. Efektivitas Instagram diukur menggunakan Customer Response Index (CRI), dimana responden diukur dalam berbagai tingkatan, mulai dari awareness, comprehend, interest, intentions dan action. Tingkatan respons inilah yang digunakan untuk mengukur efektivitas Instagram Common Grounds. Teori-teori yang digunakan untuk mendukung penelitian ini yaitu teori marketing Public Relations, teori iklan, efekti...

  16. common bacterial pathogens seen.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bacterial infections are important causes of morbidity in the neonatal period. Therefore identification of infecting organisms and the risk factors for possible bacterial infection in the newborn is of great importance. Institution early appropriate therapy is an important step in combating morbidity and mortality in this ...

  17. Pain in photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Tampa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy is a modern treatment with applications in several medical specialties, which has been intensely studied in the last years. The main indications in dermatology are actinic keratosis, superficial basal cell carcinoma and Bowen's disease- common skin disorders in which photodynamic therapy proved its efficacy. At present, the use of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of other skin disorders is profoundly researched. Pain is the most common and redoubtable adverse effect of photodynamic therapy and it is the most important factor affecting the patient's adherence to treatment. The aim of this article is to look over the most recent medical studies regarding pain in PDT, with emphasis on the factors affecting the occurrence of pain and the most recent strategies for controlling photodynamic therapy- related pain.

  18. Applying relationship anecdotes paradigm interviews to study client-therapist relationship narratives: Core conflictual relationship theme analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Hadas; Tishby, Orya

    2017-05-01

    We describe client-therapist relational narratives collected in relationship anecdotes paradigm (RAP) interviews during psychotherapy and the application of the core conflictual relationship theme (CCRT) method. Changes in clients' and therapists' CCRT in relation to each other are examined and associations between their CCRTs and self-reported ruptures and repairs are explored. Sixty-seven clients and 27 therapists underwent RAP interviews and completed self-report rupture and repair items at early, middle, and late psychodynamic psychotherapy. Client-therapist relationship narratives were rated on the CCRT and the relational interplay within dyads was explored qualitatively. CCRT changes from early to late therapy showed that with time clients perceived the therapist (RO) and the self (RS) more positively, and the therapist perceived the self (RS) less negatively. Some associations were found between tension in the session and clients' and therapists' negative RO and RS. Therapists' reports of alliance repairs were associated with positive RO and RS. Relational narratives that clients and therapists tell in RAP interviews about meaningful interactions between them, enhance our understanding of clients' and therapists' inner experiences during interpersonal dances in the therapeutic relationship. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed, and implications for training are suggested.

  19. Communication and common interest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Godfrey-Smith

    Full Text Available Explaining the maintenance of communicative behavior in the face of incentives to deceive, conceal information, or exaggerate is an important problem in behavioral biology. When the interests of agents diverge, some form of signal cost is often seen as essential to maintaining honesty. Here, novel computational methods are used to investigate the role of common interest between the sender and receiver of messages in maintaining cost-free informative signaling in a signaling game. Two measures of common interest are defined. These quantify the divergence between sender and receiver in their preference orderings over acts the receiver might perform in each state of the world. Sampling from a large space of signaling games finds that informative signaling is possible at equilibrium with zero common interest in both senses. Games of this kind are rare, however, and the proportion of games that include at least one equilibrium in which informative signals are used increases monotonically with common interest. Common interest as a predictor of informative signaling also interacts with the extent to which agents' preferences vary with the state of the world. Our findings provide a quantitative description of the relation between common interest and informative signaling, employing exact measures of common interest, information use, and contingency of payoff under environmental variation that may be applied to a wide range of models and empirical systems.

  20. Understanding veterinarians' prescribing decisions on antibiotic dry cow therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, H M; Golding, S E; Mouncey, J; Nanjiani, I; Cook, A J C

    2017-04-01

    In the United Kingdom, blanket antibiotic dry cow therapy (BDCT) is commonly prescribed. An alternate strategy is selective dry cow therapy (SDCT) whereby a teat sealant is given instead of an antibiotic to cows with a low probability of infection. Switching from BDCT to SDCT can significantly reduce antibiotic use. The aims of this study were to explore how veterinarians (vets) rationalized their prescribing decisions for mammary treatments at drying off, and the barriers and motivators they perceived to implementing SDCT. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 20 purposively recruited vets from 6 practices in England, United Kingdom. The data were analyzed qualitatively using an inductive thematic analysis. The majority of participants stated a personal preference for SDCT because it constitutes more responsible antibiotic use. On the majority of farms, the prescribing decision was taken by a senior veterinarian and BDCT was prescribed. Less experienced vets expressed a desire to be more involved in the decision-making process. The first theme, prioritizing responsible antimicrobial prescribing, encapsulated the difficulties vets expressed engaging with farmers, conflicts of interest, and vets' determination to take action. The second theme, the effect of a vet's experience on their ability to influence farmers, focused on the specific challenges faced by less experienced vets and the importance of vets being both trusted by farmers and being knowledgeable. The third theme, vets' perceptions about the risk and complexity of implementing SDCT, revealed markedly different levels of concern and fears about adverse outcomes with teat sealants versus antibiotics. The results also showed differences in perceptions about how difficult SDCT is to implement in practice. The last theme, vets' suggestions for facilitating the introduction of SDCT, was wide ranging and provided useful insight from a veterinary perspective into ways to facilitate SDCT. Initiatives that

  1. Modelling p-value distributions to improve theme-driven survival analysis of cancer transcriptome datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brors Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theme-driven cancer survival studies address whether the expression signature of genes related to a biological process can predict patient survival time. Although this should ideally be achieved by testing two separate null hypotheses, current methods treat both hypotheses as one. The first test should assess whether a geneset, independent of its composition, is associated with prognosis (frequently done with a survival test. The second test then verifies whether the theme of the geneset is relevant (usually done with an empirical test that compares the geneset of interest with random genesets. Current methods do not test this second null hypothesis because it has been assumed that the distribution of p-values for random genesets (when tested against the first null hypothesis is uniform. Here we demonstrate that such an assumption is generally incorrect and consequently, such methods may erroneously associate the biology of a particular geneset with cancer prognosis. Results To assess the impact of non-uniform distributions for random genesets in such studies, an automated theme-driven method was developed. This method empirically approximates the p-value distribution of sets of unrelated genes based on a permutation approach, and tests whether predefined sets of biologically-related genes are associated with survival. The results from a comparison with a published theme-driven approach revealed non-uniform distributions, suggesting a significant problem exists with false positive rates in the original study. When applied to two public cancer datasets our technique revealed novel ontological categories with prognostic power, including significant correlations between "fatty acid metabolism" with overall survival in breast cancer, as well as "receptor mediated endocytosis", "brain development", "apical plasma membrane" and "MAPK signaling pathway" with overall survival in lung cancer. Conclusions Current methods of theme

  2. Influence of memory theme and posttraumatic stress disorder on memory specificity in British and Iranian trauma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Laura; Cheraghi, Sepideh

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the influence of culture, memory theme and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on autobiographical memory specificity in Iranian and British trauma survivors. Participants completed the Autobiographical Memory Test and PTSD Diagnostic Scale. The results indicated that the British group provided significantly more personal-themed memories than the Iranian group, while the Iranian group provided significantly more social-themed memories than the British group. The British group also provided a significantly greater proportion of specific personal-themed and social-themed memories than the Iranian group. Overall, in both cultural groups memory specificity was found to be significantly correlated with PTSD symptoms. These findings provide further evidence that regardless of memory theme, specificity of autobiographical memories function to differentiate the self from others and reaffirm the independent self. They also further highlight that pan-culturally an overgeneral retrieval style may be employed by those with PTSD symptoms.

  3. Inpatient Massage Therapy Versus Music Therapy Versus Usual Care: A Mixed-methods Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseen, Eric J; Cornelio-Flores, Oscar; Lemaster, Chelsey; Hernandez, Maria; Fong, Calvin; Resnick, Kirsten; Wardle, Jon; Hanser, Suzanne; Saper, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the feasibility of providing massage or music therapy to medical inpatients at urban safety-net hospitals or the impact these treatments may have on patient experience. To determine the feasibility of providing massage and music therapy to medical inpatients and to assess the impact of these interventions on patient experience. Single-center 3-arm feasibility randomized controlled trial. Urban academic safety-net hospital. Adult inpatients on the Family Medicine ward. Massage therapy consisted of a standardized protocol adapted from a previous perioperative study. Music therapy involved a preference assessment, personalized compact disc, music-facilitated coping, singing/playing music, and/or songwriting. Credentialed therapists provided the interventions. Patient experience was measured with the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) within 7 days of discharge. We compared the proportion of patients in each study arm reporting "top box" scores for the following a priori HCAHPS domains: pain management, recommendation of hospital, and overall hospital rating. Responses to additional open-ended postdischarge questions were transcribed, coded independently, and analyzed for common themes. From July to December 2014, 90 medical inpatients were enrolled; postdischarge data were collected on 68 (76%) medical inpatients. Participants were 70% females, 43% non-Hispanic black, and 23% Hispanic. No differences between groups were observed on HCAHPS. The qualitative analysis found that massage and music therapy were associated with improved overall hospital experience, pain management, and connectedness to the massage or music therapist. Providing music and massage therapy in an urban safety-net inpatient setting was feasible. There was no quantitative impact on HCAHPS. Qualitative findings suggest benefits related to an improved hospital experience, pain management, and connectedness to the massage or music therapist.

  4. Inpatient Massage Therapy Versus Music Therapy Versus Usual Care: A Mixed-methods Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelio-Flores, Oscar; Lemaster, Chelsey; Hernandez, Maria; Fong, Calvin; Resnick, Kirsten; Wardle, Jon; Hanser, Suzanne; Saper, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background Little is known about the feasibility of providing massage or music therapy to medical inpatients at urban safety-net hospitals or the impact these treatments may have on patient experience. Objective To determine the feasibility of providing massage and music therapy to medical inpatients and to assess the impact of these interventions on patient experience. Design Single-center 3-arm feasibility randomized controlled trial. Setting Urban academic safety-net hospital. Patients Adult inpatients on the Family Medicine ward. Interventions Massage therapy consisted of a standardized protocol adapted from a previous perioperative study. Music therapy involved a preference assessment, personalized compact disc, music-facilitated coping, singing/playing music, and/or songwriting. Credentialed therapists provided the interventions. Measurements Patient experience was measured with the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) within 7 days of discharge. We compared the proportion of patients in each study arm reporting “top box” scores for the following a priori HCAHPS domains: pain management, recommendation of hospital, and overall hospital rating. Responses to additional open-ended postdischarge questions were transcribed, coded independently, and analyzed for common themes. Results From July to December 2014, 90 medical inpatients were enrolled; postdischarge data were collected on 68 (76%) medical inpatients. Participants were 70% females, 43% non-Hispanic black, and 23% Hispanic. No differences between groups were observed on HCAHPS. The qualitative analysis found that massage and music therapy were associated with improved overall hospital experience, pain management, and connectedness to the massage or music therapist. Conclusions Providing music and massage therapy in an urban safety-net inpatient setting was feasible. There was no quantitative impact on HCAHPS. Qualitative findings suggest benefits related to an

  5. Investigating the experiences in a school-based occupational therapy program to inform community-based paediatric occupational therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rens, Lezahn; Joosten, Annette

    2014-06-01

    A collaborative approach with teachers is required when providing community-based occupational therapy to educationally at risk children. Collaborators share common goals and interact and support each other but challenges arise in providing collaborative occupational therapy in settings outside the school environment. The aim of this study was to capture experiences of teachers and occupational therapists working within a school-based occupational therapy program to determine if their experiences could inform collaborative practice. In this pilot study, participant responses to questionnaires (n = 32) about their experiences formed the basis for focus groups and individual interviews. Two focus group were conducted, one with teachers (n = 11) and one with occupational therapy participants (n = 6). Individual interviews were conducted with the supervising occupational therapist, school principal and two leading teachers. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data from closed questions, and thematic analysis using a constant comparison approach was used to analyse open ended questions, focus groups and interviews. Three main themes emerged: (i) the need for occupational therapists to spend time in the school, to explain their role, build relationships, understand classroom routines and the teacher role; (ii) occupational therapists need to not see themselves as the expert but develop equal partnerships to set collaborative goals and (iii) occupational therapists advocating for all parties to be informed throughout the occupational therapy process. The pilot study findings identified teacher and therapist experiences within the school setting that could inform improved collaborative practice with teachers and community-based occupational therapists and these findings warrant further investigation. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  6. Common questions in veterinary toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N; Rawson-Harris, P; Edwards, N

    2015-05-01

    Toxicology is a vast subject. Animals are exposed to numerous drugs, household products, plants, chemicals, pesticides and venomous animals. In addition to the individual toxicity of the various potential poisons, there is also the question of individual response and, more importantly, of species differences in toxicity. This review serves to address some of the common questions asked when dealing with animals with possible poisoning, providing evidence where available. The role of emetics, activated charcoal and lipid infusion in the management of poisoning in animals, the toxic dose of chocolate, grapes and dried fruit in dogs, the use of antidotes in paracetamol poisoning, timing of antidotal therapy in ethylene glycol toxicosis and whether lilies are toxic to dogs are discussed. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. An evaluation of a Scottish higher education ‘Student Transitions’ Enhancement Theme : stakeholders’ perceptions and recommendations for future activities

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Ashley; Gordon, Lisi; Howden, Stella; Jindal-Snape, Divya

    2017-01-01

    We would like to acknowledge that this work was funded by QAA Scotland. The Quality Assurance Agency Enhancement Themes identify specific development themes to enhance the student learning experience in Scottish higher education (HE). This evaluation explored the second year of the ‘Student Transitions’ theme through the questions: How do stakeholders perceive the impact of the ‘Student Transitions’ work and, what are the facilitators and barriers to the successful development of projects?...

  8. MA Common Tern Census

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The official State census period for common terns was June 1-10. The survey was conducted on June 4 by Biologist Healey, Biotech Springfield, and Maintenance...

  9. Common Knowledge on Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liddell, Torrin M

    2015-01-01

    Common knowledge of intentions is crucial to basic social tasks ranging from cooperative hunting to oligopoly collusion, riots, revolutions, and the evolution of social norms and human culture. Yet little is known about how common knowledge leaves a trace on the dynamics of a social network. Here we show how an individual's network properties---primarily local clustering and betweenness centrality---provide strong signals of the ability to successfully participate in common knowledge tasks. These signals are distinct from those expected when practices are contagious, or when people use less-sophisticated heuristics that do not yield true coordination. This makes it possible to infer decision rules from observation. We also find that tasks that require common knowledge can yield significant inequalities in success, in contrast to the relative equality that results when practices spread by contagion alone.

  10. Common Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Susan R.; Levine, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of common student mental health issues and approaches for student affairs practitioners who are working with students with mental illness, and ways to support the overall mental health of students on campus.

  11. Five Common Glaucoma Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Donate In This Section Five Common Glaucoma Tests en Español email Send this article to ... year or two after age 35. A Comprehensive Glaucoma Exam To be safe and accurate, five factors ...

  12. Organising pneumonia in common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujaoude, Ziad; Arya, Rohan; Rafferty, William; Dammert, Pedro

    2013-06-07

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common of the primary immunodeficiency disorders. Pulmonary manifestations are characterised by recurrent rhinosinusitis, respiratory tract infections and bronchiectasis. Less commonly the lung may be affected by lymphoid disorders and sarcoid-like granulomas. Organising pneumonia (OP) is a rare pulmonary manifestation. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with CVID who presented with fever, dyspnoea and persistent lung infiltrates despite antibiotic therapy. CT of the chest showed bilateral patchy alveolar infiltrates. Pulmonary function tests revealed moderate restriction and reduction in diffusion capacity. Initial bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsies did not yield a diagnosis but surgical lung biopsies identified OP. Significant clinical, radiographic and physiological improvement was achieved after institution of corticosteroid therapy.

  13. Common Culture Cabaret

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, David; Durden, Mark; Brown, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Common Culture’s solo exhibition ‘Cabaret’ includes the major newly commissioned moving image work Vent, made in response to the unruly traditions of popular entertainment. Commissioned for MAC, Birmingham as the main work in Common Culture’s solo exhibition Cabaret, the multi-channel video installation explores the seductive allure of the entertainment industry, a space where individual creative ambition is processed as formulaic spectacle. Vent examines popular culture’s obsessive fascinati...

  14. Common Vestibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Balatsouras, Dimitrios G

    2017-01-01

    The three most common vestibular diseases, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Meniere's disease (MD) and vestibular neuritis (VN), are presented in this paper. BPPV, which is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder, can be defined as transient vertigo induced by a rapid head position change, associated with a characteristic paroxysmal positional nystagmus. Canalolithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal is considered the most convincing theory of its pathogenesis and the ...

  15. Colonialism’s Past and Present: Performing History at a Gold Rush Theme Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Watson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The urge to seize, to claim the past in order to experience the truth of history is a powerful impulse - one full of desire for a time apart from the here and now. Conceiving and sustaining an experience of the past is today very big business. The ongoing development of the heritage, tourism and re-enactment industries inter-link with popular historical perception in ways that raise multiple questions about the relationship between popular and academic accounts of the past and the many other ways of performing history (Dening 1996. This paper takes as its starting point a gold rush theme park, Old Mogo Town in NSW Australia, and in particular, its erasure of all evidence of the Indigenous past. From here, it is my aim to develop a revised performance of that past- one that interrogates the catastrophe of colonialism and the fate of history currently expunged from the gold rush theme park of Old Mogo Town.

  16. The influence of theme identifiability on false memories: evidence for age-dependent opposite effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Paula; Fernandez, Angel; Dias, Ana Rita

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, we used the Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm to analyze the relationship between theme identifiability of word lists and false memories in adults and children. We conducted two normative studies to determine the identifiability levels for critical unpresented words in 40 associative lists in adults and in 16 associative lists in children. Then, in three experiments, false memories for critical words that were either easy or hard to identify were analyzed in adults and in children 4-5 years old and 11-12 years old. Opposite results were found for adults and children. Lists with highly identifiable critical words produced fewer false memories for adults but more false memories for children. These results suggest that, if they can identify critical words, adults use an identify-to-reject strategy to edit out false memories, whereas, in children, theme identification does not lead to the use of such a monitoring strategy.

  17. Four Themes to Enhanced Interprofessional Education Integration: Lessons Learned from Early Implementation and Curricular Redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret de Voest

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the release of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE Standards 2016, interprofessional education (IPE has become more formalized and needs to be embedded into the curricula of colleges and schools of pharmacy. While IPE is not new to the practice and training of pharmacists, the call for IPE has become more robust over the last several years creating challenges to widespread implementation. The purpose of this Case Study Report is to describe a twelve-year progression of IPE implementation at a college of pharmacy without an academic medical center. Focused strategies for the development, integration, and expansion of IPE are provided through the context of four themes: working through program differences; collaborators and effective collaboration; attention to implementation planning; and prebriefing and debriefing. Each theme is defined and reviewed using specific examples and lessons learned. Finally, in consideration of the ACPE Standards 2016, potential next steps are discussed.   Type: Case Study

  18. Exploring themes and challenges in developing sustainable supply chains – A complexity theory perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasi, Maisam

    in developing sustainable supply chain activities from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Six research studies (RS) were designed and carried out. Two explored the patterns of the themes and challenges in making supply chains environmentally and socially sustainable in general (RS1, RS2). One explored...... freight transport (RS3), one, urban freight distribution (RS4), and one, logistical services (RS5) in particular. RS6 explored a complexity theory perspective (CTP) on managing, governing, and developing sustainable supply chains activities. A CTP was chosen because of its applicability and ability...... information), and identifying their patterns of associations. After assessing the quality of the synthesized knowledge, the results were communicated to several target groups through several communication channels. In RS1, five major themes and challenges were identified in making supply chains...

  19. Themes of power and betrayal in sexual abuse survivors' characterizations of interpersonal relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, J H; O'Toole, J G; James, J B

    1996-10-01

    Consistent with the notion that childhood sexual abuse (CSA) shapes motivational dispositions and internalized schemata that are reflected in adult characterizations of self and others, we hypothesized that adult CSA survivors' characterizations of interpersonal relationships would reflect greater power motivation as defined by McClelland and Winter, and more preoccupation with themes of powerlessness and betrayal than nonabused adult's - a pattern associated with poor psychological functioning. Stories written by women with CSA histories (n = 43) reflected both a greater need for and fear of power, and contained more themes of powerlessness and betrayal than stories written by women without CSA histories (n = 43). Frequency of sexual abuse in combination with fear of power was predictive of depression and low self-esteem.

  20. Evaluation of a mental health liaison team. Part 2: the themes and their effect on practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClimens, Alex; Kelly, Shona; Ismail, Mubarak; Breckon, Jeff

    2017-12-08

    Hospitals and emergency departments (EDs) are caring for increasing numbers of patients who present with underlying mental health issues. Managing these patients can be challenging for clinical staff who often lack the specialist knowledge and skills required to provide appropriate care. This article, part two of two on the evaluation of a newly formed mental health liaison team (MHLT) working in a general hospital, focuses on the perceptions and experiences of the MHLT participants, and explores three sub-themes derived from the interview data. The article considers the effect of these themes on practice, and the relationship between MHLT members and staff in EDs and the wider hospital. ©2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  1. Realistic teenage fiction with a sexrelated theme: Readers’ responses to Slinger-slinger by Francois Bloemhof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Wiggill

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Francois Bloemhof submitted his novel for teenagers, “Slinger-slinger” for the Sanlam competition for youth fiction in 1996. Eventually this prizewinner in the beginners’ category was published in 1997. The main theme of “Slinger-slinger” is the sexual awakening and identity of teenagers. A study was undertaken to obtain the opinions of teenage readers about the success of “Slinger-slinger” as a whole, as well as to gauge the success of integrating sexual aspects in this novel. The study also served to obtain information about the reading needs of teenage readers with regard to realistic teenage fiction and teenage fiction with a sex-related theme. The findings of the study underlying this article indicated that the participating teenage readers regarded “Slinger-slinger” as successful and interesting, and that they would like to read more realistic Afrikaans teenage fiction such as “Slinger-slinger”.

  2. A novel scoring system based on common laboratory tests predicts the efficacy of TNF-inhibitor and IL-6 targeted therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, multicenter observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Jin; Koyama, Yoshinobu; Kawakami, Atsushi; Ueki, Yukitaka; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Takahiko; Nagano, Shuji; Uchino, Ayumi; Ota, Toshiyuki; Akahoshi, Mitsuteru; Akashi, Koichi

    2017-08-11

    Currently, although several categories of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) are available, there are few data informing selection of initial treatment for individual patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNF-i) and tocilizumab (TCZ) are treated as equivalent treatments in the recent disease management recommendations. We focused on two anticytokine therapies, TCZ and TNF-i, and aimed to develop a scoring system that predicts a better treatment for each RA patient before starting an IL-6 or a TNF-i. The expression of IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA in peripheral blood from 45 newly diagnosed RA patients was measured by DNA microarrays to evaluate cytokine activation. Next, laboratory indices immediately before commencing treatment and disease activity score improvement ratio after 6 months in 98 patients treated with TCZ or TNF-i were retrospectively analyzed. Some indices correlated with TCZ efficacy were selected and their cutoff values were defined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to develop a scoring system to discriminate between individuals more likely to respond to TCZ or TNF-i. The validity of the scoring system was verified in these 98 patients and an additional 228 patients. There was significant inverse correlation between the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA in newly diagnosed RA patients. The analysis of 98 patients revealed significant correlation between TCZ efficacy and platelet counts, hemoglobin, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase; in contrast, there was no similar correlation in the TNF-i group. The cutoff values were defined by ROC analysis to develop a scoring system (1 point/item, maximum of 4 points). A good TCZ response was predicted if the score was ≥2; in contrast, TNF-i seemed to be preferable if the score was ≤1. Similar results were obtained in a validation study of an additional 228 patients. If the case scored ≥3, the good

  3. Gendered Citizenship and the Individualization of Environmental Responsibility: Evaluating a Campus Common Reading Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Emily Huddart; Boyd, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    Campus common reading programs are intended to stimulate critical thinking and dialogue across disciplines yet scarce evidence exists to evaluate the success of such programs. We assess the extent to which engagement in an environmentally-themed common reading program is related to (1) concern for waste-related issues, (2) beliefs that addressing…

  4. The collective action on governing the commons in the surroundings of protected areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araújo Pereira, de Márcio; Schneider, Sérgio; Ploeg, van der Jandouwe; Souza, de Marcelino

    2016-01-01

    This work has as its theme the common natural resources and the management models that allow new governance systems in the rural areas in the surrounding of protected areas. In this sense, this paper aims to discuss the collective action of social actors in the management of common natural

  5. Analysis of pharmacy-centric blogs: Types, discourse themes, and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Dillon, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    To determine types of pharmacy blogs in existence, themes of discourse on pharmacy blogs, and impressions of the profession generated by pharmacy blogs. Descriptive, qualitative, cross-sectional study. Weblogs (blogs) on the World Wide Web in July 2009. Not applicable; pharmacy-centric blogs were analyzed. Qualitative research methods were used to form categories and assign pharmacy-centric blogs to appropriate categories. Thematic analysis was used to study the discourse of blogs in the personal views category. Finally, blogs in the personal views category were analyzed further to determine what type of impression (positive, negative, or neutral) they gave the reader. Categories, themes, and impressions of blogs, as determined by analysis. 136 blogs met study criteria. Seven main categories of pharmacy blogs emerged from the study. The majority of blogs were assigned to the news (n = 44) and personal views (n = 38) categories. Thematic analysis of blogs in the personal views category revealed 11 different themes. The top four blog post themes were issues with patients (n = 30), personal lives (n = 29), working conditions/issues (n = 20), and issues with other professionals (n = 19). A total of 24 (63%) blogs in the personal views category were judged as promoting a negative impression of pharmacists and/or the profession. The pharmacy blogosphere contains a variety of blog types. Most of these blogs studied were useful information resources for those in or considering the profession. However, a considerable number of pharmacy blogs contained derogatory posts regarding patients, other health care professionals, and/or the author's occupation as a pharmacist. Blogs such as these tend to generate a negative impression of pharmacy to the reader. The opportunity exists for pharmacists and pharmacy educators to use social media applications such as blogs to educate new pharmacists and advance the profession.

  6. Theme of the Workshop on Itinerant-Electron Magnetism, and Spin Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    The international workshop on itinerant-electron magnetism was held during September 25-27, 2015 in the seminar house of Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan. Here, I explain the theme of this workshop, and stress the development of itinerant-electron magnetism in several decades. The workshop was also organized in commemoration of Professor Yoshinori Takahashi’s retirement from University of Hyogo, Japan. Here, I also explain some of his works contributing to the development of itinerant magnetism.

  7. Theme C: Medical information systems and databases - results and future work

    OpenAIRE

    Souf, Nathalie; Verdier, Christine; Flory, André; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents the activities of the theme C “medical information systems and databases” in the GDR Stic Santé. Six one-day workshops have been organized during the period 2011–2012. They were devoted to 1) sharing anatomical and physiological object models for simulation of clinical medical images, 2) advantages and limitations of datawarehouse for biological data, 3) medical information engineering, 4) systems for sharing medical images for research, 5) knowledg...

  8. Inquiry-based learning in mathematics education: Important themes in the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyøe, Jonas; Larsen, Dorte Moeskær; Hjelmborg, Mette Dreier

    From a grading list of 28 of the highest ranked mathematics education journals, the six highest ranked journals were chosen, and a systematic search for inquiry-based mathematics education and related keywords was conducted. This led to five important theme/issues for inquiry-based learning...... developed to determine which implications were important for the didactical intervention of the design in the Quality in the subjects Danish and Mathematics (KiDM) project....

  9. Exploratory Analysis of Marketing and Non-marketing E-cigarette Themes on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sifei

    2017-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) have been gaining popularity and have emerged as a controversial tobacco product since their introduction in 2007 in the U.S. The smoke-free aspect of e-cigs renders them less harmful than conventional cigarettes and is one of the main reasons for their use by people who plan to quit smoking. The US food and drug administration (FDA) has introduced new regulations early May 2016 that went into effect on August 8, 2016. Given this important context, in this paper, we report results of a project to identify current themes in e-cig tweets in terms of semantic interpretations of topics generated with topic modeling. Given marketing/advertising tweets constitute almost half of all e-cig tweets, we first build a classifier that identifies marketing and non-marketing tweets based on a hand-built dataset of 1000 tweets. After applying the classifier to a dataset of over a million tweets (collected during 4/2015 – 6/2016), we conduct a preliminary content analysis and run topic models on the two sets of tweets separately after identifying the appropriate numbers of topics using topic coherence. We interpret the results of the topic modeling process by relating topics generated to specific e-cig themes. We also report on themes identified from e-cig tweets generated at particular places (such as schools and churches) for geo-tagged tweets found in our dataset using the GeoNames API. To our knowledge, this is the first effort that employs topic modeling to identify e-cig themes in general and in the context of geo-tagged tweets tied to specific places of interest. PMID:28782062

  10. Key themes and research opportunities in sustainable supply chain management - identification and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Reefke, Hendrik; Sundaram, David

    2016-01-01

    Supply chains play an integral role in today's globalised economy. Hence, in order to truly pursue sustainable business development, the underlying dynamics and influential themes for sustainability in supply chains have to be understood. However, this area remains characterized by limited theoretical knowledge and practical application. A literature review was conducted first in order to gain an overview of available theory and to develop initial categorisations. In the next step, the insigh...

  11. Energy efficient and solar construction. Themes 2008; Energieeffizientes und solares Bauen. Themen 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadermann, Gerd (ed.)

    2009-04-15

    Within the annual meeting of the Renewable Energy Research Association (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) at 29th to 30th September, 2008, the lectures were held to the following themes: (a) Energy efficient and solar construction - a change of paradigm; (b) Revolution in construction technology; (c) Energetic sanitation of old buildings; (d) Innovative technologies of energy supply; (e) Integrated facility management; (f) Demonstration and practice of new technologies; (g) Market, politics, and sustainability.

  12. Key health themes and reporting of numerical cigarette-waterpipe equivalence in online news articles reporting on waterpipe tobacco smoking: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Mohammed; Bakir, Ali M; Ali, Mohammed; Jawad, Sena; Akl, Elie A

    2015-01-01

    There is anecdotal evidence that health messages interpreted from waterpipe tobacco smoking (WTS) research are inconsistent, such as comparing the health effects of one WTS session with that of 100 cigarettes. This study aimed to identify key health themes about WTS discussed by online news media, and how numerical cigarette-waterpipe equivalence (CWE) was being interpreted. We identified 1065 online news articles published between March 2011 and September 2012 using the 'Google Alerts' service. We screened for health themes, assessed statements mentioning CWE and reported differences between countries. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with articles incorrectly reporting a CWE equal to or greater than 100 cigarettes, in the absence of any comparative parameter ('CWE ≥100 cigarettes'). Commonly mentioned health themes were the presence of tobacco (67%) and being as bad as cigarettes (49%), and we report on differences between countries. While 10.8% of all news articles contained at least one positive health theme, 22.9% contained a statement about a CWE. Most of these (18.6% total) were incorrectly a CWE ≥100 cigarettes, a quarter of which were made by healthcare professionals/organisations. Compared with the Middle East, articles from the USA and the UK were the most significant predictors to contain a CWE ≥100 cigarettes statement. Those wishing to write or publish information related to WTS may wish to avoid comparing WTS to cigarettes using numerical values as this is a major source of confusion. Future research is needed to address the impact of the media on the attitudes, initiation and cessation rates of waterpipe smokers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Manual therapy for childhood respiratory disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino, Vanessa Carina; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; de Noronha, Marcos; Mezzacappa, Maria Aparecida; Schivinski, Camila Isabel Santos

    2013-01-01

    This study reviewed the scientific evidence available on the effects of manipulative techniques on children with respiratory diseases. Three databases (SciELO, PEDro, and MEDLINE) were searched for clinical trials on the effects of manual therapy techniques on children and adolescents with respiratory diseases. The relevant studies were chosen by 2 independent researchers who assessed their abstracts and selected the studies that met the criteria for a complete and structured review. Of the 1147 relevant titles, 103 titles were selected for abstract assessment, and of these, 24 were selected for a full-text review. After critical analysis, 8 studies were included in the review and 16 were excluded for the following reasons: 1 covered only conventional therapy, 7 were not about the studied theme, and 8 included adults. Of the 8 studies included in the present review, 5 consisted of asthmatic children and the others of children with the following conditions: cystic fibrosis, bronchiolitis, recurrent respiratory infections, among others. Only 2 studies did not identify positive results with the use of manual therapy. The other 6 studies found some benefit, specifically in spirometric parameters, immunologic tests, anxiety questionnaire, or level of salivary cortisol. The use of manual techniques on children with respiratory diseases seems to be beneficial. Chiropractic, osteopathic medicine, and massage are the most common interventions. The lack of standardized procedures and limited variety of methods used evidenced the need for more studies on the subject. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antihistamines for the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sutter, An I M; Saraswat, Avadhesh; van Driel, Mieke L

    2015-11-29

    The common cold is an upper respiratory tract infection, most commonly caused by a rhinovirus. It affects people of all age groups and although in most cases it is self limiting, the common cold still causes significant morbidity. Antihistamines are commonly offered over the counter to relieve symptoms for patients affected by the common cold, however there is not much evidence of their efficacy. To assess the effects of antihistamines on the common cold. We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1948 to July week 4, 2015), EMBASE (2010 to August 2015), CINAHL (1981 to August 2015), LILACS (1982 to August 2015) and Biosis Previews (1985 to August 2015). We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) using antihistamines as monotherapy for the common cold. We excluded any studies with combination therapy or using antihistamines in patients with an allergic component in their illness. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We collected adverse effects information from the included trials. We included 18 RCTs, which were reported in 17 publications (one publication reports on two trials) with 4342 participants (of which 212 were children) suffering from the common cold, both naturally occurring and experimentally induced. The interventions consisted of an antihistamine as monotherapy compared with placebo. In adults there was a short-term beneficial effect of antihistamines on severity of overall symptoms: on day one or two of treatment 45% had a beneficial effect with antihistamines versus 38% with placebo (odds ratio (OR) 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.60 to 0.92). However, there was no difference between antihistamines and placebo in the mid term (three to four days) to long term (six to 10 days). When evaluating individual symptoms such as nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea and sneezing, there was some beneficial effect of the sedating antihistamines compared to placebo (e.g. rhinorrhoea on day three: mean difference (MD) -0

  15. Traditional pharmacology and medicine in Africa. Ethnopharmacological themes in sub-Saharan art objects and utensils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, P A

    1998-11-01

    Drawing from the general description that ethnopharmacology studies the human use of crude drugs and poisons in a traditional context, ethnopharmacological themes in native art can be defined as themes visualizing different features of traditional medicines and poisons, such as natural sources, methods of preparation, containers, usage and implements, target diseases and effects. This review documents that native African art objects and utensils are a goldmine of such ethnopharmacological themes by focusing on the following subjects: (a) objects related to the use of medicines (sources as well as tools for their collection, preparation and keeping); (b) objects related to the use of poisons (e.g. for ordeals, hunting and fishing); (c) objects related to the use of psychotropic agents (e.g. alcoholic beverages, kola nuts, smoking and snuffing materials); (d) pathological representations (e.g. treponematoses, leprosy, smallpox, swollen abdomen, scrotal enlargement, goiter and distorted faces); and (e) portrayals of certain types of treatment (e.g. topical instillations, perinatal care, and surgery). To avoid the impression that ethnopharmacology has little else to offer than armchair amusement, an epilogue outlines the medical relevance of this interdisciplinary science for Western and African societies.

  16. Suffering Daughters and Wives. Sentimental Themes in Finnish and Nordic Realism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saija Isomaa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines sentimental themes and scenarios in Nordic nineteenthcentury literature, focusing on Finnish realism. The main claim of the article is that the treatment of the Woman Question in Nordic literature is thematically connected to French sentimentalism that depicted upper-class women caught in the conflict between personal freedom and familial duties. Typical scenarios were family barrier to marriage and love triangle, in which an unhappily married woman fell in love with another man. French sentimental social novels took a stance on the position of women. Similar themes and scenarios can be found in Nordic nineteenth-century novels and plays. The ‘daughter novel’ tradition from Fredrika Bremer’s The President’s Daughters (1834 to Minna Canth’s Hanna (1886 depict the sufferings of upper-class girls in patriarchal family and society. A Doll’s House (1879 by Henrik Ibsen centers on the theme of conflicting duties, depicting the moral awakening of a doll-like wife, and Papin rouva (1893, ‘The Wife of a Clergyman’ by Juhani Aho concentrates on the sufferings and moral considerations of the unhappily married Elli. The article suggests that the sentimentalist legacy informs the Nordic nineteenth-century literature and should be taken into account in the scholarship.

  17. Theme Semester at the University of Michigan: The Universe - Yours to Discover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shannon

    2008-09-01

    The Theme Semester program in the College of Literature Science and the Arts (LSA) at the University of Michigan brings the resources of a major University to the students and wider community. The winter 2009 theme semester was chosen to match the IYA: The Universe, Yours to Discover. This poster will present the programs and activities planned and sponsored by LSA, the Department of Astronomy, the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, the Student Astronomical Society, the Department of Physics, the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, the Residential College, University Libraries, local libraries, and other university divisions and local organizations. Among the major events is a distinguished lecture series on Friday evenings followed by free public planetarium shows and public observing. The Special Collections Library will hold a special exhibition of their collection, which includes a copy of Principia and some of Galileo's first notes on the moons of Jupiter. Several new courses are planned, including the first offering of "Life in the Universe", an introductory astronomy class with a focus on astrobiology. Cultural programs include a production of Bertolt Brecht's "Galileo” and an astronomy theme to the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra's youth concerts. Most of the programming is offered free to students and free or low admission to the general public. A website is planned as a clearinghouse for information and resources.

  18. Analysis and Comparison of Naturalistic Themes in Iranian and Britain Modern Children's Poems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh Ebrahimi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, children's literature given the concept of childhood, has gained a special status in the studies of humanities. Children's poetry is one of the branches of this type of literature. Naturalistic themes have the highest frequency among the themes of children poems in two countries. The population of this research consists of collections that have been published from 1921 to 2011. Children's literature was born in England in the eighteenth century and before that the first didactic books for children had come into existence in England. In addition, due to industrial growth, the emergence of the new middle class and expansion of formal education the UK was pioneering among Europe and the world countries. Therefore, to find the roots of the formation of children's literature should be referred to the UK. Therefore, in this paper Britain children’s poem has been selected to be compared with Iranian children’s poem so that by revealing the similarities and differences one can deal with the pathology of poems for children in Iran and to detect shortcomings and strengths and present some guidelines that be helpful for children and young poets as well as critics and researchers in this field. Keywords: Naturalistic themes, children literature, Iranian children's poems, Britain children's poems, comparative literature

  19. Behavior as a common focus of toxicology and nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.

    1980-01-01

    Behavior as an index of toxicity parallels its role as an index of nutritional impairment, just as toxicology and nutrition share other common themes. Intersections among the three disciplines arise because foodstuffs serve as one of the major routes of toxic exposure and also because food elements modify toxicity. With this perspective, the safety of our food supply is examined in the contexts of essential nutrients, toxins, toxic metals, manufactured contaminants, self-administered toxicants, and food additives.

  20. Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Past and Future of Molecular Target Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Jack, Kerri; Sun, Weijing

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer related mortality worldwide. The incidence of HCC has been increasing annually. Viral infection, alcohol usage, and other causes of cirrhosis have been identified as major risk factors for HCC development. The underlying pathogenesis has not been as well defined. There have been multiple hypotheses to the specific mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis and they share the common theme of chronic inflammation, increase oxidative stress, and genomic alteration. Therapeutic options of HCC have been primarily local and/or regional including transplantation, resection, and radial frequency ablation, chemoembolization or radio-embolization. For unresectable or metastatic disease, the options are limited. Conventional chemotherapeutic options have been noted to have limited benefit. Sorafenib has been the one and only systemic therapy which has demonstrated modest overall survival benefit. This has led to more extensive research with focus on targeted therapy. Numerous pre-clinical and early phase clinical studies have been noted but failed to show efficacy in later phase clinical trials. In an effort to identify new potential therapeutic options, new understanding of underlying pathways to hepatocarcinogenesis should be one of the main focuses. This leads to development of more molecularly targeted agents to specific pathways, and immunotherapy. This article provides a review of major studies of molecular targeted agents which attempts to target these specific pathways in HCC. PMID:28933381

  1. Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Past and Future of Molecular Target Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Nguyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common causes of cancer related mortality worldwide. The incidence of HCC has been increasing annually. Viral infection, alcohol usage, and other causes of cirrhosis have been identified as major risk factors for HCC development. The underlying pathogenesis has not been as well defined. There have been multiple hypotheses to the specific mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis and they share the common theme of chronic inflammation, increase oxidative stress, and genomic alteration. Therapeutic options of HCC have been primarily local and/or regional including transplantation, resection, and radial frequency ablation, chemoembolization or radio-embolization. For unresectable or metastatic disease, the options are limited. Conventional chemotherapeutic options have been noted to have limited benefit. Sorafenib has been the one and only systemic therapy which has demonstrated modest overall survival benefit. This has led to more extensive research with focus on targeted therapy. Numerous pre-clinical and early phase clinical studies have been noted but failed to show efficacy in later phase clinical trials. In an effort to identify new potential therapeutic options, new understanding of underlying pathways to hepatocarcinogenesis should be one of the main focuses. This leads to development of more molecularly targeted agents to specific pathways, and immunotherapy. This article provides a review of major studies of molecular targeted agents which attempts to target these specific pathways in HCC.

  2. The Common Good

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Liv Egholm

    being "polluted" by the state and market logic and maintain their distinctness rooted in civil society´s values and logics. Through a historical case analysis of the Egmont Foundation from Denmark (a corporate philanthropic foundation from 1920), the paper shows how concrete gift-giving practices...... and concepts continuously over time have blurred the different sectors and “polluted” contemporary definitions of the “common good”. The analysis shows that “the common good” is not an autonomous concept owned or developed by specific spheres of society. The analysis stresses that historically, “the common...... good” has always been a contested concept. It is established through messy and blurred heterogeneity of knowledge, purposes and goal achievements originating from a multitude of scientific, religious, political and civil society spheres contested not only in terms of words and definitions but also...

  3. COMMON FISCAL POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mursa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that a common fiscal policy, designed to support the euro currency, has some significant drawbacks. The greatest danger is the possibility of leveling the tax burden in all countries. This leveling of the tax is to the disadvantage of countries in Eastern Europe, in principle, countries poorly endowed with capital, that use a lax fiscal policy (Romania, Bulgaria, etc. to attract foreign investment from rich countries of the European Union. In addition, common fiscal policy can lead to a higher degree of centralization of budgetary expenditures in the European Union.

  4. Exploring the therapeutic power of narrative at the end of life: a qualitative analysis of narratives emerging in dignity therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Glendon R; Schryer, Catherine; McDougall, Allan; Lingard, Lorelei

    2011-12-01

    To understand the therapeutic effect of a narrative intervention, specifically dignity therapy, in patients at the end-of-life. To examine the thematic dimensions and shared narrative features of the stories that emerge in dignity therapy and theorise their relationship to the intervention's clinical impact. Resident physicians, as part of an educational intervention, co-administered the dignity therapy protocol with the principal investigator. Interviews were transcribed, edited, and then, within a week, read back to the patient and provided as a document for the patient to keep. A constant comparative approach was taken to identify narratives and thematic patterns. 12 Patients at the end-of-life were administered dignity interviews by 12 resident physicians, accompanied by the principal investigator. Palliative care settings in two University of Toronto academic hospitals. Three narrative types emerged, each containing several themes. Evaluation narratives create a life lived before illness, with an overarching theme of overcoming adversity. Transition narratives describe a changing health situation and its meanings, including impact on family and on one's world view. Legacy narratives discuss the future without the patient and contain the parables and messages to be left for loved ones. While the interview protocol guides patients' responses, the commonality of narrative structures across interviews suggests that patients draw on experiences with two familiar genres: the eulogy and the medical interview, to create a narrative order during the chaos of dying. The dignity interview's resonance with these genres appears to facilitate a powerful, and perhaps unexpected sense of agency.

  5. "Some Words Are Messengers/Hay Palabras Mensajeras": Interpreting Sociopolitical Themes in Latino/a Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carmen L.; Enciso, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Illustrates relationships between sociopolitical themes identified in selected exemplary pieces of children's literature written and/or illustrated by Latino/as and the aesthetic expression of these themes. Contributes to more expanded, informed interpretations and mediations of Latino/a art in children's literature research and education.…

  6. Global History. A Curriculum Guide. Second Semester. Theme V: The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact. Teacher Strategies. Experimental Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Designed to assist teachers and supervisors in the implementation of the global history course, this bulletin presents learning activities which include the rationale, performance objectives, and teaching strategies related to Theme V entitled, "The Industrial Revolution Had Global Impact." This theme has seven subthemes: (1)…

  7. Common Tests for Arrhythmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living for Heart.org ... help your doctor diagnose an arrhythmia. View an animation of arrhythmia . Common Tests for Arrhythmia Holter monitor ( ...

  8. 'Crossing a Bare Common'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    2006-01-01

    than not described as a ‘sublime rhetoric’. From the stock of rhetorical tropes the most favoured by Emerson and picked out as the trademark of his rhetorical sublimity critics mention in particular his use of hyperbole, chiasmus and metalepsis. Common to all three tropes is said to be their ability...

  9. Sequential Common Agency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prat, A.; Rustichini, A.

    1998-01-01

    In a common agency game a set of principals promises monetary transfers to an agent which depend on the action he will take. The agent then chooses the action, and is paid the corresponding transfers. Principals announce their transfers simultaneously. This game has many equilibria; Bernheim and

  10. Common mistakes of investors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Wai Pong Raymond

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral finance is an actively discussed topic in the academic and investment circle. The main reason is because behavioral finance challenges the validity of a cornerstone of the modern financial theory: rationality of investors. In this paper, the common irrational behaviors of investors are discussed

  11. Common eye emergencies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-10-11

    Oct 11, 2007 ... Common eye emergencies may present as an acute red eye, sudden visual loss or acute ocular trauma. Most eye emergencies will require referral to an ophthalmologist after initial basic examination and primary management. A relevant history of onset and symptoms of the current problem must be ...

  12. Common Dermatoses of Infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Gora, Irv

    1986-01-01

    Within the pediatric population of their practices, family physicians frequently encounter infants with skin rashes. This article discusses several of the more common rashes of infancy: atopic dermatitis, cradle cap, diaper dermatitis and miliaria. Etiology, clinical picture and possible approaches to treatment are presented.

  13. Common dermatoses of infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, I

    1986-09-01

    Within the pediatric population of their practices, family physicians frequently encounter infants with skin rashes. This article discusses several of the more common rashes of infancy: atopic dermatitis, cradle cap, diaper dermatitis and miliaria. Etiology, clinical picture and possible approaches to treatment are presented.

  14. A Culture in Common.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravitch, Diane

    1991-01-01

    If public schools abandon their historic common school mission to promote racial and ethnic separatism, they will forfeit their claim to public support. If they remain true to their historic role, the public schools will rightfully serve as a bulwark against ethnic chauvinism and counter the forces of social fragmentation by instilling democratic…

  15. Common Magnets, Unexpected Polarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss a "misconception" in magnetism so simple and pervasive as to be typically unnoticed. That magnets have poles might be considered one of the more straightforward notions in introductory physics. However, the magnets common to students' experiences are likely different from those presented in educational…

  16. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family therapy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided ...

  17. Occupational Therapy Students' Perceptions of Spirituality in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthembu, Thuli Godfrey; Ahmed, Firdous; Nkuna, Thembi; Yaca, Khalipha

    2015-12-01

    Spirituality is recognized as an essential and integral component of a holistic approach in occupational therapy practice. However, little is known about occupational therapy students' perceptions regarding spirituality in learning context. This study used qualitative exploratory, descriptive design to explore the occupational therapy students' perceptions about spirituality in training. Using purposive sampling, four semi-structured interviews were conducted with two students, a lecturer and an occupational therapist. In addition, two focus groups were conducted with students in order to collect data. Data collected were audio-taped; transcribed and thematic analysis was used to identify themes. The analysis resulted in emergence of four themes: "Unique to every individual," "Spirituality in occupational therapy," "To be or not to be taught," and "The Real world." Participants perceived spirituality as an individually experienced. The study contributes to the body of knowledge base of occupational therapy education regarding spirituality. However, there is a need for guidelines to integrate spirituality in occupational therapy training.

  18. Common Factors' Role in Accredited MFT Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aniello, Carissa; Fife, Stephen T

    2017-10-01

    Common factors proponents discuss the benefits and methods of including common factors in marriage and family therapy (MFT) training; yet there are no empirical investigations of how common factors are incorporated into MFT curricula. The purpose of this study was to obtain a baseline understanding of common factors' role in MFT training. Thirty-one directors of COAMFTE- and CACREP-accredited MFT training programs responded to a survey about the inclusion of common factors in their training program, as well as the benefits, challenges, and students' reactions to common factors training. Findings show that common factors are regularly included in MFT training programs and have garnered largely positive responses. Additional results are discussed regarding the implications of common factors in MFT training. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  19. Subjective Experiences of Speech and Language Therapy in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spurgeon, Laura; Clarke, Carl E; Sackley, Cath

    2015-01-01

    .... This was the aim of the present study. Methods. Semistructured interviews, using themes derived from the literature, were conducted with nine Parkinson's disease patients, all of whom had undergone speech-language therapy...

  20. Common themes and unique proteins for the uptake and trafficking of nickel, a metal essential for the virulence of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Reuse, Hilde; Vinella, Daniel; Cavazza, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Nickel is a virulence determinant for the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Indeed, H. pylori possesses two nickel-enzymes that are essential for in vivo colonization, [NiFe] hydrogenase and urease, an abundant virulence factor that contains 24 nickel ions per active complex. Because of these two enzymes, survival of H. pylori relies on an important supply of nickel, implying a tight control of its distribution and storage. In this review, we will present the pathways of activation of the nickel enzymes as well as original mechanisms found in H. pylori for the uptake, trafficking and distribution of nickel between the two enzymes. These include (i) an outer-membrane nickel uptake system, the FrpB4 TonB-dependent transporter, (ii) overlapping protein complexes and interaction networks involved in nickel trafficking and distribution between urease and hydrogenase and, (iii) Helicobacter specific nickel-binding proteins that are involved in nickel storage and can play the role of metallo-chaperones. Finally, we will discuss the implication of the nickel trafficking partners in virulence and propose them as novel therapeutic targets for treatments against H. pylori infection. PMID:24367767

  1. Expectations of patients and parents of children with asthma regarding access to complementary therapy information and services via the NHS: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alison; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Sharp, Deborah J

    2006-12-01

    To explore the expectations of patients and parents of children with asthma regarding access to complementary therapies via the NHS. Fifty semi-structured interviews with adults and parents of children with asthma, from a range of health-care settings, including users and non-users of complementary therapies. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and the data were analysed thematically. Thirty-one patients were using complementary therapies for asthma, six were using complementary therapies for other health problems and 13 were non-users. Various therapies were used for asthma, most commonly homeopathy and breathing techniques, predominantly outside the NHS. Two broad themes emerging from the data were expectations about access to information and knowledge about complementary therapies via NHS health professionals, and expectations regarding access to complementary therapy services via the NHS. As a minimum, the majority of participants wanted NHS health professionals to be more 'open' towards and know more about complementary therapies than their patients - perceived as not currently usual. Most were positive about greater NHS access to complementary therapy services, for enhancing patient choice, improving equality in access for less affluent patients and facilitating patients' self-help. Participants who were highly sceptical about complementary therapies argued that lack of scientific evidence of effectiveness prohibited the need for greater complementary therapy knowledge or service provision within the NHS. Alongside their expectations, patients and parents expressed realistic views about facilitators and barriers to greater access. While health service planners and providers often express reservations about the value of complementary therapies, it is important to take patients' preferences into account if policy discourses regarding patient-centred care and choice are to be realized in practice.

  2. Exploring the practical themes for medical education social accountability in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmady, Soleiman; Akbari Lakeh, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore themes for enhancing socially accountability in medical education. Medical education in Iran experience new challenges due to the enormous influence of changes in technology, development of new methods of teaching and learning, student requirements, patient management, financial credit constraints, and social and economic developments. For responding to these, use of strategic thinking in order to make appropriate decisions is the only solution. Strategic plans need to formulate practical guides which can help accountable to people's reasonable expectations. For this qualitative study, along with the 14(th)national conference on Medical Education in Iran, the opinions of experts were obtained during seven expert panels' group discussions, each lasting four hours and including 10 participants. Data were collected by audiotapes, which were then transcribed. Data analyzed using a thematic content analysis approach. Peer and member checking during analysis and data triangulation from other recent studies were used to increase the findings' trustworthiness. Among more than hundred meaning units groups identified the following eight main themes as affecting the social accountable medical education in Iran: organization of responsive education councils; development of community based courses; development in field training; organization of educational processes; homogeneity in educational rules and regulations; budget management, educational outcomes; educational programs in departments and groups. This study have found the main themes that might affecting social accountable medical education in Iran, where Iranian policymakers should consider those when plan to make changes in medical education and could potentially adopt the proven useful policies and strategies of other countries.

  3. Ask an anatomist: Identifying global trends, topics and themes of academic anatomists using twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Madeleine J; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2017-10-04

    Social media (SoMe) is increasingly used in higher education (HE) to access knowledge and enable global communication. The SoMe platform Twitter ® is particularly beneficial in these contexts because it is readily accessible, easily searchable (via hashtags) and global. Given these advantages, the twitter platform @AskAnatomist was created to foster a global weekly tweet chat, where students and academics can ask and address anatomy-related questions. The aim of this study was to identify themes arising in the early stages of the @AskAnatomy Twitter community to gain insights into current needs/key areas for academic anatomists, students, and other followers. A qualitative analysis of tweets including the hashtag #AnatQ, (the associated @AskAnatomist hashtag), was undertaken to achieve this aim. Thematic analysis revealed three core themes arising in the formative stages of the @AskAnatomist Twitter site: (1) anatomical education modalities, (2) specific anatomy content, and (3) research motivations. These themes reveal controversies within the field of anatomical sciences, areas for potential education resource improvement and research, as well as the humor of anatomists. Though the original intent of the @AskAnatomist site was to engage the general public in anatomy content and knowledge, tweet analysis suggests that academic anatomists were the primary active "tweeters". Interestingly, this analysis reveals that the @AskAnatomist site progressed into a web-based community of practice (CoP), suggesting an additional benefit of SoMe communities in the field of anatomy. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  4. Variations in dream recall frequency and dream theme diversity by age and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore eNielsen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We assessed dream recall frequency and dream theme diversity with an internet questionnaire among a cohort of 28,888 male and female participants aged 10 to 79 years in a cross-sectional design. Dream recall frequency increased from adolescence (ages 10-19 to early adulthood (20-29 and then decreased again for the next 20 years. The nature of this decrease differed for males and females. For males, it began earlier (30-39, proceeded more gradually, and reached a nadir earlier (40-49 than it did for females. For females, it began later (40-49, dropped more abruptly, and reached nadir later (50-59. Marked sex differences were observed for age strata 10-19 through 40-49 and year-by-year analyses estimated the window for these differences to be more precisely from 14-44 yrs. Dream theme diversity decreased linearly with age for both sexes up to 50-59 and then dropped even more sharply for 60-79. There was a sex difference favouring males on this measure but only for ages 10-19. Findings replicate, in a single sample, those from several previous studies showing an increase in dream recall frequency from adolescence to early adulthood, a subsequent decrease in dream recall frequency—primarily in early and middle adulthood, and different patterns of age-related decrease in the two sexes. Age-related changes in sleep structure, such as decreasing %REM sleep, parallel the observed dream recall changes but are much smaller and more gradual in nature. Changes in the phase and amplitude of circadian rhythms of REM propensity and generational differences in life experiences may also account for some part of the findings. However, that decreases in dream theme diversity parallel known age-related decreases in episodic and autobiographical memory may signify that the diversity measure indexes an aspect of autobiographical memory that is specific to dream recall.

  5. Operations research in global health: a scoping review with a focus on the themes of health equity and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Beverly D; Jung, Tiffany; Tandon-Verma, Ananya; Khoury, Bassem; Chan, Timothy C Y; Cheng, Yu-Ling

    2017-04-18

    Operations research (OR) is a discipline that uses advanced analytical methods (e.g. simulation, optimisation, decision analysis) to better understand complex systems and aid in decision-making. Herein, we present a scoping review of the use of OR to analyse issues in global health, with an emphasis on health equity and research impact. A systematic search of five databases was designed to identify relevant published literature. A global overview of 1099 studies highlights the geographic distribution of OR and common OR methods used. From this collection of literature, a narrative description of the use of OR across four main application areas of global health - health systems and operations, clinical medicine, public health and health innovation - is also presented. The theme of health equity is then explored in detail through a subset of 44 studies. Health equity is a critical element of global health that cuts across all four application areas, and is an issue particularly amenable to analysis through OR. Finally, we present seven select cases of OR analyses that have been implemented or have influenced decision-making in global health policy or practice. Based on these cases, we identify three key drivers for success in bridging the gap between OR and global health policy, namely international collaboration with stakeholders, use of contextually appropriate data, and varied communication outlets for research findings. Such cases, however, represent a very small proportion of the literature found. Poor availability of representative and quality data, and a lack of collaboration between those who develop OR models and stakeholders in the contexts where OR analyses are intended to serve, were found to be common challenges for effective OR modelling in global health.

  6. Common tester platform concept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, Michael James

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a case study on the doctrine of a common tester platform, a concept of a standardized platform that can be applicable across the broad spectrum of testing requirements throughout the various stages of a weapons program, as well as across the various weapons programs. The common tester concept strives to define an affordable, next-generation design that will meet testing requirements with the flexibility to grow and expand; supporting the initial development stages of a weapons program through to the final production and surveillance stages. This report discusses a concept investing key leveraging technologies and operational concepts combined with prototype tester-development experiences and practical lessons learned gleaned from past weapons programs.

  7. Management of common fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennie

    2013-02-01

    The incidence of fractures increases with advancing age partly due to the presence of multiple comorbidities and increased risk of falls. Common fracture sites in older people include femoral neck, distal radius and vertebral bodies. Nurses have an important role in caring for older patients who have sustained fractures, not only to maximise function and recovery, but as part of a team to minimise the morbidity and mortality associated with fractures in this group.

  8. Women and children exposed to domestic violence: themes in maternal interviews about their children's psychiatric diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Joan A

    2010-02-01

    Twelve mothers who had experienced domestic violence and whose children had received psychiatric diagnoses before school age were interviewed. An attachment based tool, the Reaction to Diagnosis Interview, was employed as it accesses maternal representational content. Using psychodynamic and attachment based models as a theoretical framework, content analysis was performed and four thematic categories emerged from the data: intense negative emotionality and suffering; diminished cognitive coping and dysregulation; preoccupation with trauma related material; and constricted causal attributions. Thematic categories as well as inter-relationships among themes are described and discussed in terms of current literature.

  9. Spatial data on energy, environmental, and socioeconomic themes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R. J.; Watts, J. A.; Shonka, D. B.; Leobe, A. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Ogle, M. C.; Malthouse, N. S.; Madewell, D. G.; Hull, J. F.

    1977-02-01

    Spatial data files covering energy, environmental, and socioeconomic themes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are described. The textual descriptions are maintained by the Regional and Urban Studies Information Center (RUSTIC) within the Data Management and Analysis Group, Energy Division, as part of the Oak Ridge Computerized Hierarchical Information System (ORCHIS) and are available for online retrieval using the ORLOOK program. Descriptions provide abstracts, geographic coverage, original data source, availability limitations, and contact person. Most of the files described in this document are available on a cost-recovery basis.

  10. Strangers in their Country: Major Themes in the Lyrics of the Palestinian Israeli Rap Group Dam

    OpenAIRE

    Beenfeldt, Eli Marie

    2011-01-01

    The Palestinian Israeli rap group Dam emerged on the scene in the early 2000s. Throughout their career, their music has gained popularity among Arab speaking listeners. When I first came across their music while studying at the Bir Zeit University in the West Bank, I got interested in looking further into the phenomena of Palestinian Israeli rap music. The main aim with this thesis has been to discover what the major themes of the lyrics of Dam are through a discourse analysis. My assumption ...

  11. Extracellular vesicles, tissue factor, cancer and thrombosis – discussion themes of the ISEV 2014 Educational Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Gardiner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the association between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE has long been known, the mechanisms are poorly understood. Circulating tissue factor–bearing extracellular vesicles have been proposed as a possible explanation for the increased risk of VTE observed in some types of cancer. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV and International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH held a joint Educational Day in April 2014 to discuss the latest developments in this field. This review discusses the themes of that event and the ISEV 2014 meeting that followed.

  12. Common sense codified

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    At CERN, people of more than a hundred different nationalities and hundreds of different professions work together towards a common goal. The new Code of Conduct is a tool that has been designed to help us keep our workplace pleasant and productive through common standards of behaviour. Its basic principle is mutual respect and common sense. This is only natural, but not trivial…  The Director-General announced it in his speech at the beginning of the year, and the Bulletin wrote about it immediately afterwards. "It" is the new Code of Conduct, the document that lists our Organization's values and describes the basic standards of behaviour that we should both adopt and expect from others. "The Code of Conduct is not going to establish new rights or new obligations," explains Anne-Sylvie Catherin, Head of the Human Resources Department (HR). But what it will do is provide a framework for our existing rights and obligations." The aim of a co...

  13. Common HEP UNIX Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Arnaud

    After it had been decided to design a common user environment for UNIX platforms among HEP laboratories, a joint project between DESY and CERN had been started. The project consists in 2 phases: 1. Provide a common user environment at shell level, 2. Provide a common user environment at graphical level (X11). Phase 1 is in production at DESY and at CERN as well as at PISA and RAL. It has been developed around the scripts originally designed at DESY Zeuthen improved and extended with a 2 months project at CERN with a contribution from DESY Hamburg. It consists of a set of files which are customizing the environment for the 6 main shells (sh, csh, ksh, bash, tcsh, zsh) on the main platforms (AIX, HP-UX, IRIX, SunOS, Solaris 2, OSF/1, ULTRIX, etc.) and it is divided at several "sociological" levels: HEP, site, machine, cluster, group of users and user with some levels which are optional. The second phase is under design and a first proposal has been published. A first version of the phase 2 exists already for AIX and Solaris, and it should be available for all other platforms, by the time of the conference. This is a major collective work between several HEP laboratories involved in the HEPiX-scripts and HEPiX-X11 working-groups.

  14. Therapist and patient perspectives on cognitive-behavioral therapy for older adults with hoarding disorder: a collective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Catherine R; Bratiotis, Christiana; Saxena, Sanjaya; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing a qualitative approach, the current study explored therapist and patient perspectives on a specialized cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for clinically significant hoarding in older adult patients. Data were derived from the following sources: (1) therapist observation; (2) CBT consultant observation; (3) clinical treatment notes; (4) participant feedback, including a focus group; and (5) participant in-session notes and completed homework assignments. Our findings showed that the value of homework, treatment session compliance, and deficits in executive functioning (prospective memory, planning, problem solving, and cognitive flexibility) were common themes among participants as viewed by the therapist. Patients reported that exposure exercises and the therapeutic relationship were the most helpful aspects of their treatment, while cognitive strategies had limited success. Our results suggest that treatment for hoarding in older adults may be improved by focusing on exposure therapy elements, remediating executive function deficits, providing simplified homework assignments, and decreasing the emphasis or modifying cognitive restructuring techniques.

  15. An Exploration of Teacher Perceptions toward Occupational Therapy and Occupational Therapy Practices: A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Vi; Hodgetts, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Many occupational therapists work in school-based practice, where collaborative consultation between teachers and therapists is critical for intervention effectiveness. This scoping review explores teacher perceptions toward occupational therapy (OT). Three themes emerged: (1) teachers' confusion over the OT role and scope of practice; (2)…

  16. Pharmacological therapy for amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anupam; Nagpal, Ritu; Mittal, Sanjeev Kumar; Bahuguna, Chirag; Kumar, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    Amblyopia is the most common cause of preventable blindness in children and young adults. Most of the amblyopic visual loss is reversible if detected and treated at appropriate time. It affects 1.0 to 5.0% of the general population. Various treatment modalities have been tried like refractive correction, patching (both full time and part time), penalization and pharmacological therapy. Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in one third of patients with anisometropic amblyopia. Various drugs have also been tried of which carbidopa & levodopa have been popular. Most of these agents are still in experimental stage, though levodopa-carbidopa combination therapy has been widely studied in human amblyopes with good outcomes. Levodopa therapy may be considered in cases with residual amblyopia, although occlusion therapy remains the initial treatment choice. Regression of effect after stoppage of therapy remains a concern. Further studies are therefore needed to evaluate the full efficacy and side effect profile of these agents. PMID:29018759

  17. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neuroblastoma. We present preclinical research and clinical trials on several promising candidates such as IL-12, dendritic cell vaccines, anti-GD2 antibodies, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. An optimal treatment plan for neuroblastoma will most likely involve multimodal approaches and combinations of immune therapies. PMID:19342881

  18. Accepted Common Interest Community (CIC) Proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    These are the 18 accepted proposals for the three Common Interest Community (CIC) sessions at IAYT's Symposium on Yoga Therapy and Research (SYTAR), June 5-8, 2014, in Austin, Texas and published in the Final Program Guide and CIC Works for SYTAR 2014. The sessions were CIC#1 Rehab Professionals: Bridging the Past with the Future and CIC#2a & CIC#2b Mental, Emotional and Spiritual Health.

  19. Discontinuous Residue and Theme in Higher-Order Semiotic: A Case for Interlocking Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Farahani

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The fallacy persists in discourse analysis research to explore lexicogrammatical phenomena detached from any adjacent plane of the meaning potential. In an attempt to dispel this and toss out some preconceived notions about what a modern SFG vantage point should involve, this study homes in on one aspect of SFG within prose fiction in particular, which is very revealing in terms of how separate system networks are actually in synergistic simultaneity, and how SFG allows one , phenomenally well, to bring such synergies out, getting to the heart of the fact that language pervasively operates on multiple planes of textuality simultaneously. Thus, building upon Halliday’s 2004 work, the quest is if it is interpersonally significant when the Residue is split into two parts; more importantly, if it is also laced with some lexicogrammatical quality on the textual plane, in light of the fairly well-entrenched assumption that there is always Theme at work when the Residue is split. Halliday is the only scholar to touch upon the topic of Discontinuous Residue and its relationship to Marked Theme in the culmination of his groundbreaking career, i.e. his 2004 work. Having driven home the proposal to make into a watchword the ubiquity of interlocking macro-semantic system networks, some pedagogical and research implications and suggestions flowing from this are brought up.

  20. Representations of Self and Parents, and Relationship Themes, in Adolescents with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafran, Naama; Shahar, Golan; Berant, Ety; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Negative perceptions of self and others have lately become one of the criteria for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among adults and adolescents. Drawing from theories of mental representations in psychopathology, this study examined self-reported negative cognitions, self and parental representations, and relationship themes among adolescents with and without PTSD. Thirty one adolescents with PTSD (11 boys, mean age = 14.06, SD = 2.24) were matched with 29 adolescents who had no psychiatric diagnosis (11 boys, mean age = 14.96, SD = 1.78). Adolescents completed self-report measures, wrote a description of self, mother and father, and were interviewed about positive and negative relationship episodes with mother, father, and peers. Adolescents with PTSD reported more self-criticism and performance evaluation than did controls. Their self-representation exhibited a lower sense of agency, which was related to structural variables (i.e., less integrative description). Although parental representations of adolescents with PTSD were not generally less benevolent or more punitive than those of controls, their relationship themes revealed a higher proportion of the wish to be distant from others. Adolescents with PTSD exhibited more passive responses and perceived more dominant or controlling responses from their parents. Findings point out to a serious impairment in representations of self and relationship patterns in adolescent PTSD.