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Sample records for therapy clinics evidence

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy clinical evidence and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Successful clinical use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) represents a significant advance in radiation oncology. Because IMRT can deliver high-dose radiation to a target with a reduced dose to the surrounding organs, it can improve the local control rate and reduce toxicities associated with radiation therapy. Since IMRT began being used in the mid-1990s, a large volume of clinical evidence of the advantages of IMRT has been collected. However, treatment planning and quality assurance (QA) of IMRT are complicated and difficult for the clinician and the medical physicist. This book, by authors renowned for their expertise in their fields, provides cumulative clinical evidence and appropriate techniques for IMRT for the clinician and the physicist. Part I deals with the foundations and techniques, history, principles, QA, treatment planning, radiobiology and related aspects of IMRT. Part II covers clinical applications with several case studies, describing contouring and dose distribution with cl...

  2. Developing evidence-based physical therapy clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Sandra L; Coulter, Colleen; Fetters, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Recommended strategies for developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are provided. The intent is that future CPGs developed with the support of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association would consistently follow similar developmental processes to yield consistent quality and presentation. Steps in the process of developing CPGs are outlined and resources are provided to assist CPG developers in carrying out their task. These recommended processes may also be useful to CPG developers representing organizations with similar structures, objectives, and resources.

  3. Evidence-based therapy relationships: research conclusions and clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Wampold, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    In this closing article of the special issue, we present the conclusions and recommendations of the interdivisional task force on evidence-based therapy relationships. The work was based on a series of meta-analyses conducted on the effectiveness of various relationship elements and methods of treatment adaptation. A panel of experts concluded that several relationship elements were demonstrably effective (alliance in individual psychotherapy, alliance in youth psychotherapy, alliance in family therapy, cohesion in group therapy, empathy, collecting client feedback) while others were probably effective (goal consensus, collaboration, positive regard). Three other relationship elements (congruence/genuineness, repairing alliance ruptures, and managing countertransference) were deemed promising but had insufficient evidence to conclude that they were effective. Multiple recommendations for practice, training, research, and policy are advanced. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Targeted therapy of brain metastases: latest evidence and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Rodica; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S

    2017-12-01

    Brain metastases (BM) occur in 20-40% of patients with cancer and 60-75% of patients with BM become symptomatic. Due to an aging population and advances in the treatment of primary cancers, patients are living longer and are more likely to experience complications from BM. The diagnosis of BM drastically worsens long-term survival rates, with multiple metastases being a poor prognostic factor. Until recently, the mainstay of treatment consisted of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), surgical resection, whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), or a combination of these modalities. Systemic chemotherapy has been felt largely ineffective in the treatment of BM due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which includes efflux pumps on brain capillaries. Over the past decade however, researchers have identified therapeutic agents that are able to cross the BBB. These findings could make a multimodality treatment approach possible, consisting of surgery, radiation, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, which could lead to better disease control in this patient population and prolong survival. In this review, we discuss present evidence on available targeted therapies and their role in the treatment of BM from primary tumors with the highest prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement, specifically non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), breast cancer melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma.

  5. Clinical research evidence of cupping therapy in China: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Huijuan; Han, Mei; Li, Xun; Dong, Shangjuan; Shang, Yongmei; Wang, Qian; Xu, Shu; Liu, Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Though cupping therapy has been used in China for thousands of years, there has been no systematic summary of clinical research on it. This review is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of cupping therapy using evidence-based approach based on all available clinical studies. Methods We included all clinical studies on cupping therapy for all kinds of diseases. We searched six electronic databases, all searches ended in December 2008. We extracted data on the type of cupping...

  6. Pharmacological basis and clinical evidence of dabigatran therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redondo Santiago

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dabigatran is an emerging oral anticoagulant which is a direct inhibitor of thrombin activity. It has been approved in the European Union and the United States of America for the prevention of thrombosis after major orthopedic surgery. It has also been approved by the American Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the prevention of stroke in chronic atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran provides a stable anticoagulation effect without any need to perform periodical laboratory controls. Of note, there is a growing amount of clinical evidence which shows its safety and efficacy. For these reasons, dabigatran may suppose a revolution in oral anticoagulation. However, two important limitations remain. First, it is contraindicated in patients with end-stage renal disease. Second, there is no evidence of the prevention of thrombosis in mechanical heart valves.

  7. Polyphenol nanoformulations for cancer therapy: experimental evidence and clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davatgaran-Taghipour Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yasamin Davatgaran-Taghipour,1,2 Salar Masoomzadeh,3 Mohammad Hosein Farzaei,4,5 Roodabeh Bahramsoltani,6 Zahra Karimi-Soureh,7 Roja Rahimi,6,8 Mohammad Abdollahi9,10 1Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2PhytoPharmacology Interest Group (PPIG, Universal Scientific Education and Research Network (USERN, Tehran, Iran; 3Zanjan Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology Research Center, School of Pharmacy, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran; 4Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran; 5Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran; 6Department of Traditional Pharmacy, School of Traditional Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 7School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 8Evidence-Based Medicine Group, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 9Toxicology and Diseases Group, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 10Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Abstract: Cancer is defined as the abnormal cell growth that can cause life-threatening malignancies with high financial costs for patients as well as the health care system. Natural polyphenols have long been used for the prevention and treatment of several disorders due to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, antineoplastic, and immunomodulatory effects discussed in the literature; thus, these phytochemicals are potentially able to act as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in different types of cancer. One of the problems regarding the use of polyphenolic compounds is their low

  8. Polyphenol nanoformulations for cancer therapy: experimental evidence and clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatgaran-Taghipour, Yasamin; Masoomzadeh, Salar; Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Bahramsoltani, Roodabeh; Karimi-Soureh, Zahra; Rahimi, Roja; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is defined as the abnormal cell growth that can cause life-threatening malignancies with high financial costs for patients as well as the health care system. Natural polyphenols have long been used for the prevention and treatment of several disorders due to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, antineoplastic, and immunomodulatory effects discussed in the literature; thus, these phytochemicals are potentially able to act as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in different types of cancer. One of the problems regarding the use of polyphenolic compounds is their low bioavailability. Different types of formulations have been designed for the improvement of bioavailability of these compounds, nanonization being one of the most notable approaches among them. This study aimed to review current data on the nanoformulations of natural polyphenols as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents and to discuss their molecular anticancer mechanisms of action. Nanoformulations of natural polyphenols as bioactive agents, including resveratrol, curcumin, quercetin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, chrysin, baicalein, luteolin, honokiol, silibinin, and coumarin derivatives, in a dose-dependent manner, result in better efficacy for the prevention and treatment of cancer. The impact of nanoformulation methods for these natural agents on tumor cells has gained wider attention due to improvement in targeted therapy and bioavailability, as well as enhancement of stability. Today, several nanoformulations are designed for delivery of polyphenolic compounds, including nanosuspensions, solid lipid nanoparticles, liposomes, gold nanoparticles, and polymeric nanoparticles, which have resulted in better antineoplastic activity, higher intracellular concentration of polyphenols, slow and sustained release of the drugs, and improvement of proapoptotic activity against tumor cells. To conclude, natural polyphenols demonstrate remarkable anticancer potential in

  9. Clinical translation of photobiomodulation therapy using evidences from precision molecular pathway analyses (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arany, Praveen

    2017-02-01

    Can `light' be a Drug? To satisfy this definition as a pharmaceutical agent, light must be absorbed and change bodily function. Much evidence from our understanding of our visual cycle and Vitamin D metabolism have all noted this phenomenon. Advances in optophotonic technologies along with a better understanding of light-tissue interactions, especially in in vivo optical imaging and optogenetics, are spearheading the popularity of biophotonics in biology and medicine. The use of lasers and light devices at high doses in dermatology, ophthalmology, oncology and dentistry are now considered mainstream for certain clinical applications such as surgery, skin rejuvenation, ocular and soft tissue recontouring, anti-tumor and anti-microbial photodynamic therapy. In contrast, therapeutic use of low dose biophotonics devices is called Low Level Light / Laser Therapy (LLLT), now termed Photobiomodulation (PBM) Therapy. This therapy is defined as a non-thermal use of non-ionizing forms of electromagnetic radiation to alleviate pain, inflammation, modulating the immune responses and promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration. Surprisingly, despite vast volumes of scientific literature from both clinical and laboratory studies noting the phenomenological evidences for this innovative therapy, limited mechanistic insights have prevented the development of rigorous, reproducible clinical protocols. This presentation will outline our current efforts at ongoing efforts in our group to assess molecular pathways and precisely define clinical treatment variables to enable clinical translation with PBM therapies.

  10. Single case design studies in music therapy: resurrecting experimental evidence in small group and individual music therapy clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Hitchcock, John H

    2014-01-01

    The profession would benefit from greater and routine generation of causal evidence pertaining to the impact of music therapy interventions on client outcomes. One way to meet this goal is to revisit the use of Single Case Designs (SCDs) in clinical practice and research endeavors in music therapy. Given the appropriate setting and goals, this design can be accomplished with small sample sizes and it is often appropriate for studying music therapy interventions. In this article, we promote and discuss implementation of SCD studies in music therapy settings, review the meaning of internal study validity and by extension the notion of causality, and describe two of the most commonly used SCDs to demonstrate how they can help generate causal evidence to inform the field. In closing, we describe the need for replication and future meta-analysis of SCD studies completed in music therapy settings. SCD studies are both feasible and appropriate for use in music therapy clinical practice settings, particularly for testing effectiveness of interventions for individuals or small groups. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Clinical research evidence of cupping therapy in China: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Han, Mei; Li, Xun; Dong, Shangjuan; Shang, Yongmei; Wang, Qian; Xu, Shu; Liu, Jianping

    2010-11-16

    Though cupping therapy has been used in China for thousands of years, there has been no systematic summary of clinical research on it.This review is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of cupping therapy using evidence-based approach based on all available clinical studies. We included all clinical studies on cupping therapy for all kinds of diseases. We searched six electronic databases, all searches ended in December 2008. We extracted data on the type of cupping and type of diseases treated. 550 clinical studies were identified published between 1959 and 2008, including 73 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 22 clinical controlled trials, 373 case series, and 82 case reports. Number of RCTs obviously increased during past decades, but the quality of the RCTs was generally poor according to the risk of bias of the Cochrane standard for important outcome within each trials. The diseases in which cupping was commonly employed included pain conditions, herpes zoster, cough or asthma, etc. Wet cupping was used in majority studies, followed by retained cupping, moving cupping, medicinal cupping, etc. 38 studies used combination of two types of cupping therapies. No serious adverse effects were reported in the studies. According to the above results, quality and quantity of RCTs on cupping therapy appears to be improved during the past 50 years in China, and majority of studies show potential benefit on pain conditions, herpes zoster and other diseases. However, further rigorous designed trials in relevant conditions are warranted to support their use in practice.

  12. An evidence-based clinical guideline for the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Christopher M; Watters, William C; Heggeness, Michael H; Resnick, Daniel K; Shaffer, William O; Baisden, Jamie; Ben-Galim, Peleg; Easa, John E; Fernand, Robert; Lamer, Tim; Matz, Paul G; Mendel, Richard C; Patel, Rajeev K; Reitman, Charles A; Toton, John F

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the North American Spine Society (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline on antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery was to provide evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions surrounding the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery. The guideline is intended to address these questions based on the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of February 2008. The goal of the guideline recommendations was to assist in delivering optimum, efficacious treatment with the goal of preventing thromboembolic events. To provide an evidence-based, educational tool to assist spine surgeons in minimizing the risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This report is from the Antithrombotic Therapies Work Group of the NASS Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group was composed of multidisciplinary spine care specialists, all of whom were trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. Each member of the group was involved in formatting a series of clinical questions to be addressed by the group. The final questions agreed on by the group are the subject of this report. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English language references found in MEDLINE, EMBASE (Drugs and Pharmacology), and four additional, evidence-based databases. The relevant literature was then independently rated by at least three reviewers using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final grades of recommendation for the answers to each clinical question were arrived at via Web casts among members of the work group using standardized grades of recommendation. When Level I to IV evidence was insufficient to support a recommendation to answer a specific clinical question, expert consensus was arrived at by

  13. Evidence-based use of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in clinical plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Berish; Herman, Charles; Dabb, Richard; Ignarro, Louis J; Pilla, Arthur A

    2009-01-01

    The initial development of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy and its evolution over the last century for use in clinical surgery has been slow, primarily because of lack of scientifically-derived, evidence-based knowledge of the mechanism of action. Our objective was to review the major scientific breakthroughs and current understanding of the mechanism of action of PEMF therapy, providing clinicians with a sound basis for optimal use. A literature review was conducted, including mechanism of action and biologic and clinical studies of PEMF. Using case illustrations, a holistic exposition on the clinical use of PEMF in plastic surgery was performed. PEMF therapy has been used successfully in the management of postsurgical pain and edema, the treatment of chronic wounds, and in facilitating vasodilatation and angiogenesis. Using scientific support, the authors present the currently accepted mechanism of action of PEMF therapy. This review shows that plastic surgeons have at hand a powerful tool with no known side effects for the adjunctive, noninvasive, nonpharmacologic management of postoperative pain and edema. Given the recent rapid advances in development of portable and economical PEMF devices, what has been of most significance to the plastic surgeon is the laboratory and clinical confirmation of decreased pain and swelling following injury or surgery.

  14. Clinical research evidence of cupping therapy in China: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though cupping therapy has been used in China for thousands of years, there has been no systematic summary of clinical research on it. This review is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of cupping therapy using evidence-based approach based on all available clinical studies. Methods We included all clinical studies on cupping therapy for all kinds of diseases. We searched six electronic databases, all searches ended in December 2008. We extracted data on the type of cupping and type of diseases treated. Results 550 clinical studies were identified published between 1959 and 2008, including 73 randomized controlled trials (RCTs, 22 clinical controlled trials, 373 case series, and 82 case reports. Number of RCTs obviously increased during past decades, but the quality of the RCTs was generally poor according to the risk of bias of the Cochrane standard for important outcome within each trials. The diseases in which cupping was commonly employed included pain conditions, herpes zoster, cough or asthma, etc. Wet cupping was used in majority studies, followed by retained cupping, moving cupping, medicinal cupping, etc. 38 studies used combination of two types of cupping therapies. No serious adverse effects were reported in the studies. Conclusions According to the above results, quality and quantity of RCTs on cupping therapy appears to be improved during the past 50 years in China, and majority of studies show potential benefit on pain conditions, herpes zoster and other diseases. However, further rigorous designed trials in relevant conditions are warranted to support their use in practice.

  15. Towards clinical evidence in particle therapy: ENLIGHT, PARTNER, ULICE and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Combs, Stephanie E; Pötter, Richad; Orrechia, Roberto; Haberer, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Fossati, Piero; Parodi, Katia; Balosso, Jacques; Amaldi, Ugo; Baumann, Michael; Debus, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Since the middle of the 20th century, particle therapy has been in focus for patient treatments. In 1946, Robert Wilson proposed the use of charged particles for tumor therapy, and since then, the clinical use of protons and heavier ions, mainly carbon ions, has become more widespread. The first clinical evidence was obtained in Berkeley, treating radiation-resistant targets with various ion species. The main advantage of particle beams derive from their physical properties: through an inverted dose profile, regions within the entry channel of the beam can be spared of dose, while a steep dose deposition can be directed in an energydependent manner into the defined treatment volume (Bragg Peak). The following dose fall-off spares tissue behind the target volume, thus reducing integral dose significantly compared to when using photons. Heavier charged particles, such as carbon ions or oxygen, are additionally associated with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), while the RBE of protons is comm...

  16. Clinical evidence on high flow oxygen therapy and active humidification in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotera, C; Díaz Lobato, S; Pinto, T; Winck, J C

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been growing interest in an alternative to conventional oxygen therapy: the heated, humidified high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC). A number of physiological effects have been described with HFNC: pharyngeal dead space washout, reduction of nasopharyngeal resistance, a positive expiratory pressure effect, an alveolar recruitment, greater humidification, more comfort and better tolerance by the patient, better control of FiO2 and mucociliary clearance. There is limited experience of HFNC in adults. There are no established guidelines or decision-making pathways to guide use of the HFNC therapy for adults. In this article we review the existing evidence of HFNC oxygen therapy in adult patients, its advantages, limitations and the current literature on clinical applications. Further research is required to determine the long-term effect of this therapy and identify the adult patient population to whom it is most beneficial. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. The evidence-based topical therapies for management of minor burns in outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siphora Dien

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Burns are often seen in clinics or hospitals. Majority of burns are minor burns, which can be managed in outpatient setting with satisfactory result. The healing outcome depends on physician’s knowledge and competencies in burn pathogenesis and basic principles of burn care. Initial treatment of burns consists of emergency evaluation, assessment of depth and severity of burns and considerations for referral. The principles of minor wound therapy include cooling, cleansing, pain management, and topical therapy. Recently, many topical agents are available and indicated for first to second degree burn. Silver sulfadiazine (SSD is the standard treatment; however, it has some limitations. Scientific evidences showed that topical antibiotics do not reduce the incidence of local infection, invasive infection, and mortality of infection. Burns heal faster with hydrogel dressings and some other dressings compared to SSD. There are insufficient evidences to support the use of aloe vera, honey, and negative pressure wound therapy in burns. Moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO® has been demonstrated to have equal efficacy to SSD.

  18. Pharmacogenomics of anti-platelet therapy: how much evidence is enough for clinical implementation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Christina G; Shuldiner, Alan R

    2013-06-01

    Pharmacogenomics, the study of the genomics of drug response and adverse effects, holds great promise for more effective individualized (personalized) medicine. Recent evidence supports a role of loss-of-function (LOF) variants in the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2C19 as a determinant of clopidogrel response. Patients given clopidogrel after percutaneous coronary intervention who carry LOF variants do not metabolize clopidogrel, a prodrug, into its active form resulting in decreased inhibition of platelet function and a higher likelihood of recurrent cardiovascular events. Despite a large body of evidence supporting clinical utility, adoption of anti-platelet pharmacogenetics into clinical practice has been slow. In this review, we summarize the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and clinical evidence, identify gaps in knowledge and other barriers that appear to be slowing adoption, and describe CYP2C19 pharmacogenetics implementation projects currently underway. Only when we surmount these barriers will clinicians be able to use pharmacogenetic information in conjunction with the history, physical examination and other medical tests and information to choose the most efficacious anti-platelet therapy for each individual patient.

  19. Clinical evidence on high flow oxygen therapy and active humidification in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gotera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been growing interest in an alternative to conventional oxygen therapy: the heated, humidified high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC. A number of physiological effects have been described with HFNC: pharyngeal dead space washout, reduction of nasopharyngeal resistance, a positive expiratory pressure effect, an alveolar recruitment, greater humidification, more comfort and better tolerance by the patient, better control of FiO2 and mucociliary clearance. There is limited experience of HFNC in adults. There are no established guidelines or decision-making pathways to guide use of the HFNC therapy for adults. In this article we review the existing evidence of HFNC oxygen therapy in adult patients, its advantages, limitations and the current literature on clinical applications. Further research is required to determine the long-term effect of this therapy and identify the adult patient population to whom it is most beneficial. Resumo: Recentemente, uma alternativa à oxigenoterapia convencional tem recebido atenção crescente: trata-se da oxigenoterapia humidificada de alto débito com cânulas nasais (HFNC. Um número de efeitos fisiológicos têm sido descritos: «lavagem» do espaço morto faríngeo, redução da resistência da nasofarige, efeito tipo «CPAP», recrutamento alveolar, maior humidificação, maior conforto e melhor tolerância do doente, melhor controle do FiO2 e do «clearance» mucociliar. A experiência com HFNC em adultos ainda é limitada e de momento não há «guidelines» para o seu uso. Neste artigo revemos a evidência existente do uso da HFNC em adultos, as suas vantagens, limitações e a literatura mais recente sobre as suas aplicações clínicas. Mais investigação será necessária para determinar os efeitos a longo prazo desta terapêutica e identificar quais as populações em que é mais benéfica. Keywords: High flow nasal cannula, Non-invasive ventilation, Gas exchange, Respiratory

  20. An overview of systematic reviews of clinical evidence for cupping therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Huijuan; Han, Mei; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Liu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Background: As a traditional treatment method, cupping therapy is widely used in Asian countries. This overview of systematic reviews (SRs) investigated the effectiveness and safety of cupping therapy through an evidence-based approach. Methods: SRs that assessed the effectiveness of cupping therapy for any type of disease were searched through 6 electronic databases. Target diseases, cupping methods, numbers and types of included studies, quality of included trials, main results (includin...

  1. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha R.; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A.; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna; Boyce, Lindsay; Tripathy, Debu

    2018-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. PMID:28436999

  2. Transcatheter embolization therapy in liver cancer: an update of clinical evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; De Baere, Thierry; Idée, Jean-Marc; Ballet, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a form of intra-arterial catheter-based chemotherapy that selectively delivers high doses of cytotoxic drug to the tumor bed combining with the effect of ischemic necrosis induced by arterial embolization. Chemoembolization and radioembolization are at the core of the treatment of liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who cannot receive potentially curative therapies such as transplantation, resection or percutaneous ablation. TACE for liver cancer has been proven to be useful in local tumor control, to prevent tumor progression, prolong patients' life and control patient symptoms. Recent evidence showed in patients with single-nodule HCC of 3 cm or smaller without vascular invasion, the 5-year overall survival (OS) with TACE was similar to that with hepatic resection and radiofrequency ablation. Although being used for decades, Lipiodol(®) (Lipiodol(®) Ultra Fluid(®), Guerbet, France) remains important as a tumor-seeking and radio-opaque drug delivery vector in interventional oncology. There have been efforts to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors. Drug-eluting bead (DEB) is a relatively novel drug delivery embolization system which allows for fixed dosing and the ability to release the anticancer agents in a sustained manner. Three DEBs are available, i.e., Tandem(®) (CeloNova Biosciences Inc., USA), DC-Beads(®) (BTG, UK) and HepaSphere(®) (BioSphere Medical, Inc., USA). Transarterial radioembolization (TARE) technique has been developed, and proven to be efficient and safe in advanced liver cancers and those with vascular complications. Two types of radioembolization microspheres are available i.e., SIR-Spheres(®) (Sirtex Medical Limited, Australia) and TheraSphere(®) (BTG, UK). This review describes the basic procedure of TACE, properties and efficacy of some chemoembolization systems and radioembolization agents which are commercially available and/or currently under clinical

  3. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J; Balneaves, Lynda G; Carlson, Linda E; Cohen, Misha R; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna M; Boyce, Lindsay M; Tripathy, Debu

    2017-05-06

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:194-232. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. Establishing Evidence-Based Indications for Proton Therapy: An Overview of Current Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Mark V.; Aggarwal, Sameer; Bentzen, Soren M.; Knight, Nancy; Mehta, Minesh P.; Regine, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To review and assess ongoing proton beam therapy (PBT) clinical trials and to identify major gaps. Methods and Materials: Active PBT clinical trials were identified from (clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Platform Registry. Data on clinical trial disease site, age group, projected patient enrollment, expected start and end dates, study type, and funding source were extracted. Results: A total of 122 active PBT clinical trials were identified, with target enrollment of >42,000 patients worldwide. Ninety-six trials (79%), with a median planned sample size of 68, were classified as interventional studies. Observational studies accounted for 21% of trials but 71% (n=29,852) of planned patient enrollment. The most common PBT clinical trials focus on gastrointestinal tract tumors (21%, n=26), tumors of the central nervous system (15%, n=18), and prostate cancer (12%, n=15). Five active studies (lung, esophagus, head and neck, prostate, breast) will randomize patients between protons and photons, and 3 will randomize patients between protons and carbon ion therapy. Conclusions: The PBT clinical trial portfolio is expanding rapidly. Although the majority of ongoing studies are interventional, the majority of patients will be accrued to observational studies. Future efforts should focus on strategies to encourage optimal patient enrollment and retention, with an emphasis on randomized, controlled trials, which will require support from third-party payers. Results of ongoing PBT studies should be evaluated in terms of comparative effectiveness, as well as incremental effectiveness and value offered by PBT in comparison with conventional radiation modalities.

  5. Establishing Evidence-Based Indications for Proton Therapy: An Overview of Current Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mark V., E-mail: mmishra@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aggarwal, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Knight, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute at Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To review and assess ongoing proton beam therapy (PBT) clinical trials and to identify major gaps. Methods and Materials: Active PBT clinical trials were identified from (clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Platform Registry. Data on clinical trial disease site, age group, projected patient enrollment, expected start and end dates, study type, and funding source were extracted. Results: A total of 122 active PBT clinical trials were identified, with target enrollment of >42,000 patients worldwide. Ninety-six trials (79%), with a median planned sample size of 68, were classified as interventional studies. Observational studies accounted for 21% of trials but 71% (n=29,852) of planned patient enrollment. The most common PBT clinical trials focus on gastrointestinal tract tumors (21%, n=26), tumors of the central nervous system (15%, n=18), and prostate cancer (12%, n=15). Five active studies (lung, esophagus, head and neck, prostate, breast) will randomize patients between protons and photons, and 3 will randomize patients between protons and carbon ion therapy. Conclusions: The PBT clinical trial portfolio is expanding rapidly. Although the majority of ongoing studies are interventional, the majority of patients will be accrued to observational studies. Future efforts should focus on strategies to encourage optimal patient enrollment and retention, with an emphasis on randomized, controlled trials, which will require support from third-party payers. Results of ongoing PBT studies should be evaluated in terms of comparative effectiveness, as well as incremental effectiveness and value offered by PBT in comparison with conventional radiation modalities.

  6. Evidence and evidence gaps in tinnitus therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    A nearly endless number of procedures has been tried and in particular sold for the treatment of tinnitus, unfortunately they have not been evaluated appropriately in an evidence-based way. A causal therapy, omitting the tinnitus still does not exist, actually it cannot exist because of the various mechanisms of its origin. However or perhaps because of that, medical interventions appear and reappear like fashion trends that can never be proven by stable and reliable treatment success. This contribution will discuss and acknowledge all current therapeutic procedures and the existing or non-existing evidence will be assessed. Beside external evidence, the term of evidence also encompasses the internal evidence, i.e. the experience of the treating physician and the patient’s needs shall be included. While there is no evidence for nearly all direct procedures that intend modulating or stimulating either the cochlea or specific cervical regions such as the auditory cortex, there are therapeutic procedures that are acknowledged in clinical practice and have achieved at least a certain degree of evidence and generate measurable effect sizes. Those are in particular habituation therapy and psychotherapeutic measures, especially if they are combined with concrete measures for improved audio perception (hearing aids, CI, hearing therapies). PMID:28025604

  7. Cell-based therapy for acute organ injury: preclinical evidence and ongoing clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-Gang; Gennai, Stephane; Hao, Qi; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jae W

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients often suffer from multiple organ failures involving lung, kidney, liver, or brain. Genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches highlight common injury mechanisms leading to acute organ failure. This underlines the need to focus on therapeutic strategies affecting multiple injury pathways. The use of adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) may represent a promising new therapeutic approach as increasing evidence shows that MSC can exert protective effects following injury through the release of promitotic, antiapoptotic, antiinflammatory, and immunomodulatory soluble factors. Furthermore, they can mitigate metabolomic and oxidative stress imbalance. In this work, the authors review the biological capabilities of MSC and the results of clinical trials using MSC as therapy in acute organ injuries. Although preliminary results are encouraging, more studies concerning safety and efficacy of MSC therapy are needed to determine their optimal clinical use. (ANESTHESIOLOGY 2014; 121:1099-121).

  8. The efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of lower extremity trauma: review of clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakaris, N K; Thanasas, C; Keramaris, N; Kontakis, G; Granick, Mark S; Giannoudis, P V

    2007-12-01

    A large number of aids have been conceived and introduced into clinical practice (nutritional supplements, local dressings, technical innovations) aimed at facilitating and optimising wound healing in both acute and chronic wound settings. Among these advances, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been introduced during the last 30 years, and has been analysed in over 400 manuscripts of the English, Russian and German literature. Until very recently, vacuum assisted closure (VAC) (KCI, TX, USA) has been the only readily available commercial device that provides localised negative pressure to the wound and is the predominant agent used to deliver NPWT featured in this review. We conducted a comprehensive review of the existing clinical evidence of the English literature on the applications of NPWT in the acute setting of trauma and burns of the lower extremity. Overall, 16 clinical studies have been evaluated and scrutinised as to the safety and the efficacy of this adjunct therapy in the specific environment of trauma. Effectiveness was comparable to the standard dressing and wound coverage methods. The existing clinical evidence justifies its application in lower limb injuries associated with soft tissue trauma.

  9. An overview of systematic reviews of clinical evidence for cupping therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Cao

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Cupping therapy may be beneficial for pain-related conditions, acne, and facial paralysis. However, a firm conclusion could not be drawn due to the insufficient number of included reviews and the low quality of the original studies.

  10. Radical Prostatectomy Versus Radiation and Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: How Good Is the Evidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Mack, E-mail: mroach@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Ceron Lizarraga, Tania L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Lazar, Ann A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Division of Oral Epidemiology and Dental Public Health, Division of Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: The optimal treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer is controversial. Most studies focus on biochemical (PSA) failure when comparing radical prostatectomy (RP) with radiation therapy (RT), but this endpoint has not been validated as predictive of overall survival (OS) or cause-specific survival (CSS). We analyzed the available literature to determine whether reliable conclusions could be made concerning the effectiveness of RP compared with RT with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), assuming current treatment standards. Methods: Articles published between February 29, 2004, and March 1, 2015, that compared OS and CSS after RP or RT with or without ADT were included. Because the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) system emphasis is on randomized controlled clinical trials, a reliability score (RS) was explored to further understand the issues associated with the study quality of observational studies, including appropriateness of treatment, source of data, clinical characteristics, and comorbidity. Lower RS values indicated lower reliability. Results: Fourteen studies were identified, and 13 were completely evaluable. Thirteen of the 14 studies (93%) were observational studies with low-quality evidence. The median RS was 12 (range, 5-18); the median difference in 10-year OS and CSS favored RP over RT: 10% and 4%, respectively. In studies with a RS ≤12 (average RS 9) the 10-year OS and CSS median differences were 17% and 6%, respectively. For studies with a RS >12 (average RS 15.5), the 10-year OS and CSS median differences were 5.5% and 1%, respectively. Thus, we observed an association between low RS and a higher percentage difference in OS and CSS. Conclusions: Reliable evidence that RP provides a superior CSS to RT with ADT is lacking. The most reliable studies suggest that the differences in 10-year CSS between RP and RT are small, possibly <1%.

  11. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Abigail T., E-mail: abigail.berman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); James, Sara St.; Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-02

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  12. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail T. Berman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT, through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  13. Clinical Evidence of Chinese Massage Therapy (Tui Na) for Cervical Radiculopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangquan; Li, Linghui

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The review is to assess the current evidence of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na) for cervical radiculopathy. Methods. Seven databases were searched. Randomised controlled trials incorporating Tui Na alone or Tui Na combined with conventional treatment were enrolled. The authors in pairs independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Results. Five studies involving 448 patients were included. The pooled analysis from the 3 trials indicated that Tui Na alone showed a significant lowering immediate effects on pain score (SMD = −0.58; 95% CI: −0.96 to −0.21; Z = 3.08, P = 0.002) with moderate heterogeneity compared to cervical traction. The meta-analysis from 2 trials revealed significant immediate effects of Tui Na plus cervical traction in improving pain score (MD = −1.73; 95% CI: −2.01 to −1.44; Z = 11.98, P cervical traction alone. No adverse effect was reported. There was very low quality or low quality evidence to support the results. Conclusions. Tui Na alone or Tui Na plus cervical traction may be helpful to cervical radiculopathy patients, but supportive evidence seems generally weak. Future clinical studies with low risk of bias and adequate follow-up design are recommended. PMID:28303163

  14. Clinical Evidence of Chinese Massage Therapy (Tui Na for Cervical Radiculopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The review is to assess the current evidence of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na for cervical radiculopathy. Methods. Seven databases were searched. Randomised controlled trials incorporating Tui Na alone or Tui Na combined with conventional treatment were enrolled. The authors in pairs independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Results. Five studies involving 448 patients were included. The pooled analysis from the 3 trials indicated that Tui Na alone showed a significant lowering immediate effects on pain score (SMD = −0.58; 95% CI: −0.96 to −0.21; Z=3.08, P=0.002 with moderate heterogeneity compared to cervical traction. The meta-analysis from 2 trials revealed significant immediate effects of Tui Na plus cervical traction in improving pain score (MD = −1.73; 95% CI: −2.01 to −1.44; Z=11.98, P<0.00001 with no heterogeneity compared to cervical traction alone. No adverse effect was reported. There was very low quality or low quality evidence to support the results. Conclusions. Tui Na alone or Tui Na plus cervical traction may be helpful to cervical radiculopathy patients, but supportive evidence seems generally weak. Future clinical studies with low risk of bias and adequate follow-up design are recommended.

  15. Evidence on acne therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Sousa Costa

    Full Text Available Among the current treatments available for acne vulgaris, many widely practiced options lack support from studies at the best level of scientific evidence. The aim of this narrative review was to present the very latest information on topical and systemic treatments for acne vulgaris. Information from systematic reviews and well-designed clinical trials, obtained through a systematic search of the major medical databases, is emphasized. There are important issues regarding the clinical management of acne that still lack consistent grounding in scientific evidence. Among these are the optimum dose and duration of treatment with oral antibiotics that can be given without inducing bacterial resistance, and the safety of oral isotretinoin.

  16. Pharmacogenomics of Anti-platelet Therapy: How much evidence is enough for clinical implementation?

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Christina G.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics, the study of the genomics of drug response and adverse effects, holds great promise for more effective individualized (personalized) medicine. Recent evidence supports a role of loss-of-function variants in the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2C19 as a determinant of clopidogrel response. Those who carry loss-of-function variants do not metabolize clopidogrel, a prodrug, into its active form resulting in decreased inhibition of platelet function and a higher likelihood of recurren...

  17. Clinical evidence on PET-CT for radiation therapy planning in cervix and endometrial cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Mazeron, Renaud; Magne, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    PET-CT plays an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of gynaecological cancers. In cervix cancer, whilst MRI remains the best imaging technique for initial primary tumor staging, PET-CT has been showed to be a highly sensitive method to determine lymph node status, except in patients with early-stage cervical cancer where PET-CT cannot replace surgical exploration of pelvic lymph nodes. In patients with advanced cervical cancer, PET-CT has the potential of showing lymph node metastasis not only within the pelvis, but also outside the pelvis, more particularly in the para-aortic area. PET-CT has also been described as a useful tool in 3-D-based adaptative brachytherapy. In endometrial cancer, the issues are different, as the recent decade has seen a therapeutic decrease in early-stage disease, especially in postoperative radiation therapy, whilst more advanced disease have been approached with more aggressive treatments, integrating chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Lymph node status is also an important issue and PET-Scan may replace lymph node surgical procedure particularly in obese patients.

  18. Mechanisms of Acupuncture Therapy for Cerebral Ischemia: an Evidence-Based Review of Clinical and Animal Studies on Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Ye, Yang; Liu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Rui; Shi, Guang-Xia; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2017-12-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of mortality and disability worldwide. As a part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), acupuncture has been shown to be effective in promoting recovery after stroke. In this article, we review the clinical and experimental studies that demonstrated the mechanisms of acupuncture treatment for cerebral ischemia. Clinical studies indicated that acupuncture activated relevant brain regions, modulated cerebral blood flow and related molecules in stroke patients. Evidence from laboratory indicated that acupuncture regulates cerebral blood flow and metabolism after the interrupt of blood supply. Acupuncture regulates multiple molecules and signaling pathways that lead to excitoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, neurons death and survival. Acupuncture also promotes neurogenesis, angiogenesis as well as neuroplasticity after ischemic damage. The evidence provided from clinical and laboratory suggests that acupuncture induces multi-level regulation via complex mechanisms and a single factor may not be enough to explain the beneficial effects against cerebral ischemia.

  19. Maintenance treatment after induction therapy in non-small cell lung cancer: latest evidence and clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentzler, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death in the industrialized world. Despite significant progress in early stage disease, survival rates for advanced disease remain low. Maintenance therapy is a treatment strategy that has been investigated extensively in NSCLC. Therapies that have been studied in this setting in randomized trials to date include chemotherapy and molecularly targeted agents. Following the development of multiple new agents that show activity in NSCLC and have a tolerable side-effect profile, there has been increasing interest in utilizing them to maintain response to initial therapy after treatment with platinum-based doublets. Two effective strategies have evolved: continuation and switch maintenance. Despite improvements in progression-free survival and often overall survival on multiple clinical trials, there remains considerable controversy around this treatment paradigm. Here, we briefly outline the evolution of this treatment strategy and examine the available data, including recently updated data from the PARAMOUNT, AVAPERL, and PointBreak maintenance trials. Ultimately, the decision to use maintenance chemotherapy requires a nuanced discussion between the patient and physician that adequately assesses benefits of prolonged therapy and impact in terms of toxicity, quality of life, and financial cost. PMID:24381656

  20. Methodology for the development of antithrombotic therapy and prevention of thrombosis guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyatt, Gordon H; Norris, Susan L; Schulman, Sam; Hirsh, Jack; Eckman, Mark H; Akl, Elie A; Crowther, Mark; Vandvik, Per Olav; Eikelboom, John W; McDonagh, Marian S; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Gutterman, David D; Cook, Deborah J; Schünemann, Holger J

    2012-02-01

    To develop the Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: ACCP Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (AT9), the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) assembled a panel of clinical experts, information scientists, decision scientists, and systematic review and guideline methodologists. Clinical areas were designated as articles, and a methodologist without important intellectual or financial conflicts of interest led a panel for each article. Only panel members without significant conflicts of interest participated in making recommendations. Panelists specified the population, intervention and alternative, and outcomes for each clinical question and defined criteria for eligible studies. Panelists and an independent evidence-based practice center executed systematic searches for relevant studies and evaluated the evidence, and where resources and evidence permitted, they created standardized tables that present the quality of the evidence and key results in a transparent fashion. One or more recommendations relate to each specific clinical question, and each recommendation is clearly linked to the underlying body of evidence. Judgments regarding the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations were based on approaches developed by the Grades of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Working Group. Panel members constructed scenarios describing relevant health states and rated the disutility associated with these states based on an additional systematic review of evidence regarding patient values and preferences for antithrombotic therapy. These ratings guided value and preference decisions underlying the recommendations. Each topic panel identified questions in which resource allocation issues were particularly important and, for these issues, experts in economic analysis provided additional searches and guidance. AT9 methodology reflects the current science of evidence-based clinical practice guideline

  1. Adjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Executive summary of an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, George; Choy, Hak; Bradley, Jeffrey; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Bogart, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter J; Gore, Elizabeth; Langer, Corey; Louie, Alexander V; Lutz, Stephen; Machtay, Mitchell; Puri, Varun; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Videtic, Gregory M M

    2015-01-01

    To provide guidance to physicians and patients with regard to the use of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (RT) in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) based on available medical evidence complemented by consensus-based expert opinion. A panel authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Board of Directors and Guidelines Subcommittee conducted 2 systematic reviews on the following topics: (1) indications for postoperative adjuvant RT and (2) indications for preoperative neoadjuvant RT. Practice guideline recommendations were approved using an a priori-defined consensus-building methodology supported by ASTRO and approved tools for the grading of evidence quality and the strength of guideline recommendations. For patients who have undergone surgical resection, high-level evidence suggests that use of postoperative RT does not influence survival, but optimizes local control for patients with N2 involvement, and its use in the setting of positive margins or gross primary/nodal residual disease is recommended. No high-level evidence exists for the routine use of preoperative induction chemoradiation therapy; however, modern surgical series and a post-hoc Intergroup 0139 clinical trial analysis suggest that a survival benefit may exist if patients are properly selected and surgical techniques/postoperative care is optimized. A consensus and evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the adjuvant radiotherapeutic management of LA NSCLC has been created addressing 2 important questions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Definitive radiation therapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Executive summary of an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, George; Choy, Hak; Bradley, Jeffrey; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Bogart, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter J; Gore, Elizabeth; Langer, Corey; Louie, Alexander V; Lutz, Stephen; Machtay, Mitchell; Puri, Varun; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Videtic, Gregory M M

    2015-01-01

    To provide guidance to physicians and patients with regard to the use of definitive external beam radiation therapy (RT) in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) based on available medical evidence complemented by consensus-based expert opinion. A panel authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Board of Directors and Guidelines Subcommittee conducted 3 systematic reviews on the following topics: (1) ideal radical RT dose fractionation for RT alone; (2) ideal radical RT dose fractionation for chemoradiation; and (3) ideal timing of radical radiation therapy with systemic chemotherapy. Practice guideline recommendations were approved using an a priori-defined consensus-building methodology supported by ASTRO and approved tools for the grading of evidence quality and the strength of guideline recommendations. For patients managed by RT alone, a minimum dose of 60 Gy of RT is recommended. Dose escalation beyond 60 Gy in the context of combined modality concurrent chemoradiation has not been found to be associated with any clinical benefits. In the context of combined modality therapy, chemotherapy and radiation should ideally be given concurrently to maximize survival, local control, and disease response rate. A consensus and evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the definitive radiotherapeutic management of LA NSCLC has been created that addresses 3 important questions. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proposing the lymphatic target volume for elective radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis of clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jiade J

    2010-04-01

    lymph nodes (Group 16, 16.44%, and inferior body lymph nodes (Group 18, 24.66%. The probability of metastasis in other lymph nodal regions were Conclusions Pancreatic cancer has a high propensity of regional lymphatic metastases; however, clear patterns including the site and probability of metastasis can be identified and used as a guide of treatment in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. Further clinical investigation is needed to study the efficacy of elective treatment to CTV defined based on these patterns using high-dose conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

  4. Physical therapy management of congenital muscular torticollis: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline: from the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Sandra L; Coulter, Colleen; Fetters, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is an idiopathic postural deformity evident shortly after birth, typically characterized by lateral flexion of the head to one side and cervical rotation to the opposite side due to unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. CMT may be accompanied by other neurological or musculoskeletal conditions. Infants with CMT are frequently referred to physical therapists (PTs) to treat their asymmetries. This evidence-based clinical practice guideline (CPG) provides guidance on which infants should be monitored, treated, and/or referred, and when and what PTs should treat. Based upon critical appraisal of literature and expert opinion, 16 action statements for screening, examination, intervention, and follow-up are linked with explicit levels of evidence. The CPG addresses referral, screening, examination and evaluation, prognosis, first-choice and supplemental interventions, consultation, discharge, follow-up, suggestions for implementation and compliance audits, flow sheets for referral paths and classification of CMT severity, and research recommendations.

  5. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice.......Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may......, and single clinics. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to improve this situation. Guidelines for Good Clinical (Research) Practice, conduct of more trials as multicentre trials, The Consort Statement, and The Cochrane Collaboration may all help in the application of the best research evidence in clinical...

  6. Bone Marrow–Derived Stromal Cell Therapy in Cirrhosis: Clinical Evidence, Cellular Mechanisms, and Implications for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta [Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Genetics, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan, E-mail: cguhamd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Department of Pathology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Current treatment options for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are often limited by the presence of underlying liver disease. In patients with liver cirrhosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy all carry a high risk of hepatic complications, ranging from ascites to fulminant liver failure. For patients receiving radiation therapy, cirrhosis dramatically reduces the already limited radiation tolerance of the liver and represents the most important clinical risk factor for the development of radiation-induced liver disease. Although improvements in conformal radiation delivery techniques have improved our ability to safely irradiate confined areas of the liver to increasingly higher doses with excellent local disease control, patients with moderate-to-severe liver cirrhosis continue to face a shortage of treatment options for HCC. In recent years, evidence has emerged supporting the use of bone marrow–derived stromal cells (BMSCs) as a promising treatment for liver cirrhosis, with several clinical studies demonstrating sustained improvement in clinical parameters of liver function after autologous BMSC infusion. Three predominant populations of BMSCs, namely hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and endothelial progenitor cells, seem to have therapeutic potential in liver injury and cirrhosis. Preclinical studies of BMSC transplantation have identified a range of mechanisms through which these cells mediate their therapeutic effects, including hepatocyte transdifferentiation and fusion, paracrine stimulation of hepatocyte proliferation, inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells, enhancement of fibrolytic matrix metalloproteinase activity, and neovascularization of regenerating liver. By bolstering liver function in patients with underlying Child's B or C cirrhosis, autologous BMSC infusion holds great promise as a therapy to improve the safety, efficacy, and utility of surgery, chemotherapy, and hepatic radiation therapy in the

  7. Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Cardiac Repair in Patients After Acute Myocardial Infarction Leading to Ischemic Heart Failure: An Overview of Evidence from the Recent Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katarzyna, Rygiel

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) still represent the leading cause of mortality worldwide, despite the remarkable advances in interventional cardiology, cardiac surgery, and modern pharmacotherapy, particularly in the setting of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), chronic ischemic heart failure (HF), cardiomyopathy (CM), and the associated left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. A significant loss of cardiomyocytes that underlies all of these conditions was previously considered irreversible. However, current evidence indicates that the human heart has some potential for repair, and over the past decade, many research studies have been exploring the use of stem cells (SCs) to facilitate restoration of myocardium. Consequently, the safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of SC therapy have been reported in many randomized clinical trials (RCTs), using different lineages of adult SCs. Nevertheless, the clinical benefits of SC therapy are not yet well established. In the near future, understanding of the complex interrelations between SCs, paracrine factors, genetic or epigenetic predispositions, and myocardial microenvironment, in the context of an individual patient, will be crucial for translation of this knowledge into practical development of successful, long-term regenerative SC therapeutic applications, in a growing population of patients suffering from previous myocardial infarction (MI) leading to chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. This overview highlights the therapeutic potential of adult SCs in terms of their possible regenerative capacity, safety, and clinical outcomes, in patients with AMI, and/or subsequent HF (due to chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy). This review was based upon PubMed database search for trials on SC therapy, in patients with AMI and HF, and the main timeframe was set from 2006 to 2016. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...

  9. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garattini, Silvio; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    was considered through literature searches combined with personal files. Treatments should generally not be chosen based only on evidence from observational studies or single randomised clinical trials. Systematic reviews with meta-analysis of all identifiable randomised clinical trials with Grading...... of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) assessment represent the highest level of evidence. Even though systematic reviews are trust worthier than other types of evidence, all levels of the evidence hierarchy are under threats from systematic errors (bias); design errors (abuse of surrogate...

  10. Family therapy and clinical psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    1995-01-01

    The results of a survey of 111 clinical psychologists in the Republic of Ireland along with some comparable data from US and UK surveys were used to address a series of questions about the link between family therapy and clinical psychology. Family therapy was not a clearly identifiable sub-specialty within clinical psychology in Ireland. Family therapy theoretical models were used by more than a quarter of the Irish sample to conceptualize their work but by less than a tenth of US and UK res...

  11. Preclinical evidence supporting the clinical development of central pattern generator-modulating therapies for chronic spinal cord-injured patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre eGuertin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ambulation or walking is one of the main gaits of locomotion. In terrestrial animals, it may be defined as a series of rhythmic and bilaterally coordinated movement of the limbs which creates a forward movement of the body. This applies regardless of the number of limbs - from arthropods with six or more limbs to bipedal primates. These fundamental similarities among species may explain why comparable neural systems and cellular properties have been found, thus far, to control in similar ways locomotor rhythm generation in most animal models. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the known structural and functional features associated with central nervous system (CNS networks that are involved in the control of ambulation and other stereotyped motor patterns - specifically Central Pattern Generators (CPGs that produce basic rhythmic patterned outputs for locomotion, micturition, ejaculation, and defecation. Although there is compelling evidence of their existence in humans, CPGs have been most studied in reduced models including in vitro isolated preparations, genetically-engineered mice and spinal cord-transected animals. Compared with other structures of the CNS, the spinal cord is generally considered as being well-preserved phylogenetically. As such, most animal models of SCI should be considered as valuable tools for the development of novel pharmacological strategies aimed at modulating spinal activity and restoring corresponding functions in chronic spinal cord-injured patients.

  12. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  13. Testosterone Therapy: Review of Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Ryan C; Brooks, Nathan A

    2017-10-01

    Testosterone therapy is increasingly common in the United States, and many of these prescriptions are written by primary care physicians. There is conflicting evidence on the benefit of male testosterone therapy for age-related declines in testosterone. Physicians should not measure testosterone levels unless a patient has signs and symptoms of hypogonadism, such as loss of body hair, sexual dysfunction, hot flashes, or gynecomastia. Depressed mood, fatigue, decreased strength, and a decreased sense of vitality are less specific to male hypogonadism. Testosterone therapy should be initiated only after two morning total serum testosterone measurements show decreased levels, and all patients should be counseled on the potential risks and benefits before starting therapy. Potential benefits of therapy include increased libido, improved sexual function, improved mood and well-being, and increased muscle mass and bone density; however, there is little or mixed evidence confirming clinically significant benefits. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns that testosterone therapy may increase the risk of cardiovascular complications. Other possible risks include rising prostate-specific antigen levels, worsening lower urinary tract symptoms, polycythemia, and increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Patients receiving testosterone therapy should be monitored to ensure testosterone levels rise appropriately, clinical improvement occurs, and no complications develop. Testosterone therapy may also be used to treat hypoactive sexual desire disorder in postmenopausal women and to produce physical male sex characteristics in female-to-male transgender patients.

  14. Switching from neurostimulant therapy to atomoxetine in children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder : clinical approaches and review of current available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Suyash; Steer, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This review provides practical information on and clinical reasons for switching children and young people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) from neurostimulants to atomoxetine, detailing currently available evidence, and switching options. The issue is of particular relevance following recent guidance from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and European ADHD guidelines endorsing the use of atomoxetine, along with the stimulants methylphenidate and dexamphetamine, in the management of ADHD in children and adolescents in the UK. The selective norepinephrine (noradrenaline) reuptake inhibitor, atomoxetine, is a non-stimulant drug licensed for the treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents, and in adults who have shown a response in childhood. Following the once-daily morning dose, its therapeutic effects extend through the waking hours, into late evening, and in some patients, through to early the next morning. Atomoxetine may be considered for patients who are unresponsive or incompletely responsive to stimulant treatment, have co-morbid conditions (e.g. tics, anxiety, depression), and have sleep disturbances or eating problems, for patients in whom stimulants are poorly tolerated, and for situations where there is potential for drug abuse or diversion. Atomoxetine has been shown to be effective in relapse prevention and there is suggestion that atomoxetine may have a positive effect on global functioning; specifically health-related quality of life, self-esteem, and social and family functioning. According to one study, approximately 50% of non-responders to methylphenidate will respond to atomoxetine therapy and approximately 75% of responders to methylphenidate will also respond to atomoxetine. Atomoxetine may be initiated by a schedule of dose increases and cross-tapering with methylphenidate. A slow titration schedule with divided doses minimizes the impact of adverse events within the first several weeks of

  15. MIRROR THERAPY: A REVIEW OF EVIDENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Aishath Najiha; Jagatheesan Alagesan; Vandana J. Rathod; Poongundran Paranthaman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify and summarize the existing evidences on mirror box therapy for the management of various musculoskeletal conditions. A systemic literature search was performed to identify studies concerning mirror therapy. The included journal articles were reviewed and assessed for its significance. Fifty one studies were identified and reviewed. Five different patient categories were studied: 24 studies focussed on mirror therapy after stroke, thirteen studies focusse...

  16. The clinical applicability of music therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    practitioners in all three areas (and beyond) can demonstrate, through previous and current research, that the music therapy service and interventions they provide are relevant and effective (Ansdell, Pavicevic & Proctor, 2004; Gold, Voracek and Wigram, 2004; Vink, 2003; Wigram 2002). Documentation of research......Research serves the functions of informing the clinical field, guiding future research, establishing new knowledge and theory, and meeting criteria for evidence based practice. Given the demands of health, education and social services today and there is an increasing expectation that clinical...... in lengthy and complex theses is seldom accessible to the practitioner working ‘at the coal-face’; and sometimes lacks clear direction on how the results are applicable in everyday therapy. For results to be implemented in clinical practice and disseminated to colleagues in related fields as well as senior...

  17. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  18. [Ancient clinical application of massage therapy on navel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xing-Yue; Ma, Yu-Xiao; Tian, Si-Sheng; Gao, Shu-Zhong

    2014-07-01

    To further explore the clinical effect of massage therapy on navel,the related ancient literatures were arranged and analyzed,and several methods in ancient clinical were introduced, including stroking navel, rubbing navel, pushing navel, tapping navel and puffing navel. In addition, the theoretical basis of massage therapy on navel were discussed. The results revealed ancient literatures offered abundant theoretical basis to modern clinical practice, and there were evidences of treating gastroenteric and gynecological diseases with this therapy. Comprehensively, through the study of ancient literatures and modern research, therapy of massage on navel is believed to be promising and will gain popularity in the future.

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy: clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoz H

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Heidi Sandoz Accelerate CIC, Mile End Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT, also known as topical negative pressure therapy, has been increasingly used in health care for the management of a wide variety of wounds over the last 2–3 decades. It is an advanced therapy that can be helpful to accelerate wound healing in both acute and chronic wounds by delivering negative pressure (suction to the wound bed. More recent advancements in the application of NPWT have provided clinicians with wider choices of utilization. There are now devices available that can deliver irrigation to the wound bed, be used for closed surgical incisions, or are disposable and highly portable. Systematic reviews considering NPWT have been published previously. These usually focus on one wound group or device and fail to offer practical clinical guidance due to the scrutiny offered to the evidence via a systematic review process. Here, an overview of the history of NPWT, the varieties of device available, their wide clinical application, and the evidence to support its use are explored in a pragmatic way. Keywords: negative pressure, wound, incision, healing, pain 

  20. Efficacy of Curcumin as Adjuvant Therapy to Induce or Maintain Remission in Ulcerative Colitis Patients: an Evidence-based Clinical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcellus Simadibrata

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: treatment guidelines for ulcerative colitis (UC not yet established. Currently, mesalazine, corticosteroids, and immunomodulators are treatment options for UC. However, they are known to have unpleaseant side effects such as nausea, vomiting, headaches, hepatitis, and male infertility. Curcumin is found in Turmeric plants (Curcuma longa L., which possesses both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This study aimed to determine whether curcumin as adjuvant therapy can induce or maintain remission in UC patients. Methods: structured search in three database (Cochrane, PubMed, Proquest using “Curcumin”, “remission” and “Ulcerative Colitis” as keywords. Inclusion criteria is randomized controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analysis, or systematic review using curcumin as adjuvant therapy in adult UC patients. Results: we found 49 articles. After exclusion, three RCTs were reviewed; two examined curcumin efficacy to induce remission and one for remision maintenance in UC. Curcumin was significantly more effective than placebo in all RCTs. The efficacy of curcumin could be explained by its anti-inflammatory properties, which inhibit NF-kB pathway. Regulation of oxidant/anti-oxidant balance can modify the release of cytokines. However, methods varied between RCTs. Therefore, they cannot be compared objectively. Futhermore, the sample size were small (n= 50, 45, 89 therefore the statistical power was not enough to generate representative results in all UC patients. Conclusion: Available evidence showed that curcumin has the potential to induce and maintain remission in UC patients with no serious side effects. However, further studies with larger sample size are needed to recommend it as adjuvant therapy of ulcerative colitis.

  1. Current clinical evidence on pioglitazone pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eKawaguchi-Suzuki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pioglitazone is the most widely used thiazolidinedione and acts as an insulin-sensitizer through activation of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ. Pioglitazone is approved for use in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but its use in other therapeutic areas is increasing due to pleiotropic effects. In this hypothesis article, the current clinical evidence on pioglitazone pharmacogenomics is summarized and related to variability in pioglitazone response. How genetic variation in the human genome affects the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pioglitazone was examined. For pharmacodynamic effects, hypoglycemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, risks of fracture or edema, and the increase in body mass index in response to pioglitazone based on genotype were examined. The genes CYP2C8 and PPARG are the most extensively studied to date and selected polymorphisms contribute to respective variability in pioglitazone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We hypothesized that genetic variation in pioglitazone pathway genes contributes meaningfully to the clinically observed variability in drug response. To test the hypothesis that genetic variation in PPARG associates with variability in pioglitazone response, we conducted a meta-analysis to synthesize the currently available data on the PPARG p.Pro12Ala polymorphism. The results showed that PPARG 12Ala carriers had a more favorable change in fasting blood glucose from baseline as compared to patients with the wild-type Pro12Pro genotype (p=0.018. Unfortunately, findings for many other genes lack replication in independent cohorts to confirm association; further studies are needed. Also, the biological functionality of these polymorphisms is unknown. Based on current evidence, we propose that pharmacogenomics may provide an important tool to individualize pioglitazone therapy and better optimize therapy in patients with T2DM or other conditions for which pioglitazone

  2. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Ling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment. Methods Search PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance", "neurodegenerative diseases", "Parkinson's disease or PD", "Alzheimer's disease or AD", "multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words. The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale. Results A total of 35 articles, including 2 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 13 clinical controlled trials, 13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation, 13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles. Clinical evidences showed that: 1 advice on sleep hygiene, careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD. Bright light therapy (BLT may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. However, to date, very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2 treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g. melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants and non-drug therapy (e.g. BLT, behavior therapy, but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3 the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4 there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative

  3. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays

  4. A systematic review of the evidence base for Schema Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masley, Samantha A; Gillanders, David T; Simpson, Susan G; Taylor, Morag A

    2012-01-01

    Schema Therapy is becoming an increasingly popular psychological model for working with individuals who have a variety of mental health and personality difficulties. The aim of this review is to look at the current evidence base for Schema Therapy and highlight directions for further research. A systematic search of the literature was conducted up until January 2011. All studies that had clinically tested the efficacy of Schema Therapy as described by Jeffrey Young (1994 and 2003) were considered. These studies underwent detailed quality assessments based on Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN-50) culminating in 12 studies being included in the review. The culminative message (both from the popularity of this model and the medium-to-large effect sizes) is of a theory that has already demonstrated clinically effective outcomes in a small number of studies and that would benefit from ongoing research and development with complex client groups. It is imperative that psychological practice be guided by high-quality research that demonstrates efficacious, evidence-based interventions. It is therefore recommended that researchers and clinicians working with Schema Therapy seek to build on these positive outcomes and further demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of this model through ongoing research.

  5. Treatment of face and scalp solar (actinic) keratosis with daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy is possible throughout the year in Australia: Evidence from a clinical and meteorological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelman, Lynda; Rubel, Diana; Murrell, Dedee F; See, Jo-Ann; Hewitt, Daniel; Foley, Peter; Salmon, Robert; Kerob, Delphine; Pascual, Thierry; Shumack, Stephen; Fernandez-Penas, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Solar (actinic) keratosis (AK) is an emergent concern worldwide and is associated with an increased risk of development of non-melanoma skin cancer, especially squamous cell carcinoma. Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) using methyl aminolaevulinate cream has proved to be an effective, nearly painless, and more convenient alternative to conventional PDT for the treatment of AK. In a phase III, randomised, controlled trial performed in Australia, the mean irradiance (light intensity) received by patients during DL-PDT treatment, assessed via a spectroradiometer, was 305 W/m(2) (min. 40 to max. 585 W/m(2) ) with similar efficacy irrespective of intensity or dose. The objective of the present meteorological study was to assess the suitability of natural daylight to perform DL-PDT for the treatment of face and scalp AK during different periods of the year and different geographical locations and latitudes across Australia. To determine daylight irradiance during a complete year in eight different geographical locations throughout Australia, we used meteorological software (Meteonorm, Meteotest, Bern, Switzerland), and available solar radiation and weather data from 1986-2005. The average daily irradiance remained within the levels (40-585 W/m(2) ) measured during the clinical DL-PDT study in Australia, throughout the year and in all geographical locations investigated (yearly average from Darwin 548 W/m(2) to Hobart 366 W/m(2) ). DL-PDT for the treatment of face and scalp AK in Australia can be performed effectively throughout the entire year as long as weather conditions permit daylight exposure and allow participants to remain under direct light for 2 h. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  6. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Robert L; Haddock, Michael G; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia N; Arndt, Carola A S

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy

  7. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foote Robert L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Summary sentence Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy.

  8. Advances in evidence-based cancer adoptive cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chunlei; Li, Ruilei; Song, Xin; Qin, Shukui

    2017-04-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has been developed in cancer treatment by transferring/infusing immune cells into cancer patients, which are able to recognize, target, and destroy tumor cells. Recently, sipuleucel-T and genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) show a great potential to control metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and hematologic malignancies in clinic. This review summarized some of the major evidence-based ACT and the challenges to improve cell quality and reduce the side effects in the field. This review also provided future research directions to make sure ACT widely available in clinic.

  9. Facilitating Case Studies in Massage Therapy Clinical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Baskwill, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The integration of evidence into reflective health care practice has been on the rise in recent years and is a phenomenon that has affected all health care professions, including massage therapy. Clinical case studies are a research design that follows one patient or subject, making the studies ideal for use in clinical practice. They are valuable for communicating information from clinical practice to the broader community. Case studies have face validity that may be more valuable to individ...

  10. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Walter SOBRADO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease.

  11. Art Therapy, Research and Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gilroy, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Art Therapy around the world is under increasing pressure to become more "evidence-based". As a result, practitioners now need to get to grips with what constitutes "evidence", how to apply research in appropriate ways and also how to contribute to the body of evidence through their own research and other related activities.\\ud \\ud Written specifically for art therapy practitioners and students, Art Therapy, Research & Evidence Based Practice traces the background to EBP, critically reviews t...

  12. Clinical Studies of Biofield Therapies: Summary, Methodological Challenges, and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shamini; Hammerschlag, Richard; Mills, Paul; Cohen, Lorenzo; Krieger, Richard; Vieten, Cassandra; Lutgendorf, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Biofield therapies are noninvasive therapies in which the practitioner explicitly works with a client's biofield (interacting fields of energy and information that surround living systems) to stimulate healing responses in patients. While the practice of biofield therapies has existed in Eastern and Western cultures for thousands of years, empirical research on the effectiveness of biofield therapies is still relatively nascent. In this article, we provide a summary of the state of the evidence for biofield therapies for a number of different clinical conditions. We note specific methodological issues for research in biofield therapies that need to be addressed (including practitioner-based, outcomes-based, and research design considerations), as well as provide a list of suggested next steps for biofield researchers to consider.

  13. Clinical Studies of Biofield Therapies: Summary, Methodological Challenges, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Mills, Paul; Cohen, Lorenzo; Krieger, Richard; Vieten, Cassandra; Lutgendorf, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Biofield therapies are noninvasive therapies in which the practitioner explicitly works with a client's biofield (interacting fields of energy and information that surround living systems) to stimulate healing responses in patients. While the practice of biofield therapies has existed in Eastern and Western cultures for thousands of years, empirical research on the effectiveness of biofield therapies is still relatively nascent. In this article, we provide a summary of the state of the evidence for biofield therapies for a number of different clinical conditions. We note specific methodological issues for research in biofield therapies that need to be addressed (including practitioner-based, outcomes-based, and research design considerations), as well as provide a list of suggested next steps for biofield researchers to consider. PMID:26665043

  14. Evidence-based radiology: a new approach to evaluate the clinical practice of radiology; Evidenzbasierte Radiologie: Ein neuer Ansatz zur Bewertung von klinisch angewandter radiologischer Diagnostik und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, S. [Univ.Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria); Forschungsprogramm fuer Evidenzbasierte Medizinische Diagnostik, Inst. fuer Public Health, Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversitaet, Salzburg (Austria); Felder-Puig, R. [Ludwig-Boltzmann-Inst. fuer Health Technology Assessment, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-15

    Over the last several years, the concept and methodology of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have received significant attention in the scientific community. However, compared to therapeutic medical disciplines, EBM-based radiological publications are still underrepresented. This article summarizes the principles of EBM and discusses the possibilities of their application in radiology. The presented topics include the critical appraisal of studies on the basis on EBM principles, the explanation of EBM-relevant statistical outcome parameters (e.g., ''likelihood ratio'' for diagnostic and ''number needed to treat'' for interventional procedures), as well as the problems facing evidence-based radiology. Evidence-based evaluation of radiological procedures does not only address aspects of cost-effectiveness, but is also particularly helpful in identifying patient-specific usefulness. Therefore it should become an integral part of radiologist training. (orig.)

  15. Pediatric Oxygen Therapy: A Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Anwarul; Rizvi, Munaza; Arif, Fehmina

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is a life-saving, medical intervention in the management of hospitalized children. The goal of oxygen therapy is to prevent or treat tissue hypoxia. Oxygen should be prescribed according to the principles of drug prescription, however, use of oxygen in clinical practice is often inappropriate without knowledge of its potential risks and benefits. This article summarizes practical aspects of clinical use of oxygen in terms of indication, administration, and monitoring, weaning, discontinuation and oxygen toxicity to rationalize therapy and achieve maximum benefits.

  16. [Acute bronchiolitis: evaluation of evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, F; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Martinón Sánchez, J M

    2001-10-01

    Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants and produces significant morbidity. Limited progress has been made in the treatment of this disease and, in many cases, the therapy employed is controversial and mainly based on general recommendations and not on evidence-based strategies. This report uses evidence-based methodology to provide a critical review of the data available on the treatment of acute bronchiolitis (understood as the first episode of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in a previously healthy infant). After this analysis, we conclude that the only justifiable therapeutic interventions in these patients are supportive treatment, nebulized epinephrine and mechanical ventilation. Other therapies such us physiotherapy, nebulization, heliox, anticholinergics or exogenous surfactant, among others, require further randomized controlled trials to determine their utility. No evidence supports the routine use of corticosteroids, beta-adrenergic drugs, antibiotics, immunoglobulins, interferon, vitamin A or ribavirin in these patients. Finally, we consider that a national consensus review for the implementation of evidence-based clinical practical guidelines on the management of acute bronchiolitis would be of great interest.

  17. Hormone Therapy in Clinical Equine Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Patrick M

    2016-12-01

    A wide variety of hormone therapies are used in clinical practice in the reproductive management of horses. The goal of this article is to review therapeutic options for a variety of clinical indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical processes in behavioral couples therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Daniel J; Fink, Brandi C

    2014-03-01

    Behavioral couples therapy is a broad term for couples therapies that use behavioral techniques based on principles of operant conditioning, such as reinforcement. Behavioral shaping and rehearsal and acceptance are clinical processes found across contemporary behavioral couples therapies. These clinical processes are useful for assessment and case formulation, as well as teaching couples new methods of conflict resolution. Although these clinical processes assist therapists in achieving efficient and effective therapeutic change with distressed couples by rapidly stemming couples' corrosive affective exchanges, they also address the thoughts, emotions, and issues of trust and intimacy that are important aspects of the human experience in the context of a couple. Vignettes are provided to illustrate the clinical processes described. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Designing for Anxiety Therapy, Bridging Clinical and Non-Clinical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Kramp, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    In this position paper we discuss, in terms of the concept of boundary objects, how a mobile application, the MIKAT.app, bridge between clinical intervention in anxiety therapy, and life and coping strategies outside the clinic and across phases of being a person suffering from, or having suffered...... from anxiety. Thereby, we hope to provide a counterpoint in the discussion on illness trajectories....

  20. Clinical applications of retinal gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Thake, Miriam; MacLaren, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Many currently incurable forms of blindness affecting the retina have a genetic etiology and several others, such as those resulting from retinal vascular disturbances, respond to repeated, potentially indefinite administration of molecular based treatments. The recent clinical advances in retinal gene therapy have shown that viral vectors can deliver genes safely to the retina and the promising initial results from a number of clinical trials suggest that certain diseases may potentially be treatable. Gene therapy provides a means of expressing proteins within directly transduced cells with far greater efficacy than might be achieved by traditional systemic pharmacological approaches. Recent developments have demonstrated how vector gene expression may be regulated and further improvements to vector design have limited side effects and improved safety profiles. These recent steps have been most significant in bringing gene therapy into the mainstream of ophthalmology. Nevertheless translating retinal gene therapy from animal research into clinical trials is still a lengthy process, including complexities in human retinal diseases that have been difficult to model in the laboratory. The focus of this review is to summarize the genetic background of the most common retinal diseases, highlight current concepts of gene delivery technology, and relate those technologies to pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for Resistance Training as a Treatment Therapy in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, investigators have paid increasing attention to the effects of resistance training (RT on several metabolic syndrome variables. Evidence suggests that skeletal muscle is responsible for up to 40% of individuals' total body weight and may be influential in modifying metabolic risk factors via muscle mass development. Due to the metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, it is understood that normal aging and/or decreased physical activity may lead to a higher prevalence of metabolic disorders. The purpose of this review is to (1 evaluate the potential clinical effectiveness and biological mechanisms of RT in the treatment of obesity and (2 provide up-to-date evidence relating to the impact of RT in reducing major cardiovascular disease risk factors (including dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes. A further aim of this paper is to provide clinicians with recommendations for facilitating the use of RT as therapy in obesity and obesity-related metabolic disorders.

  2. Clinical trials in psychiatry: Obtaining the evidence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    safety of any treatment. There is simply no place in clinical medical practice for compounds which have not been proved effective and ... hazard and fortuitous. Sometimes a slight structural change in a ... However, controlled studies provide the best evidence of safety and efficacy. Controlled studies are randomised and ...

  3. Evidence-based music therapy practice: an integral understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The American Music Therapy Association has recently put into action a plan called its Research Strategic Priority, with one of its central purposes to advance the music therapy field through research promoting Evidence-Based Practice of music therapy. The extant literature on music therapy practice, theory, and research conveys a range of very different perspectives on what may count as the "evidence" upon which practice is based. There is therefore a need to conceptualize evidence-based music therapy practice in a multifaceted, yet coherent and balanced way. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate a framework based upon four distinct epistemological perspectives on evidence-based music therapy practice that together represent an integral understanding.

  4. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Effectiveness of manual therapies: the UK evidence report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfort, Gert; Haas, Mitch; Evans, Roni; Leininger, Brent; Triano, Jay

    2010-02-25

    The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct but comprehensive summary of the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual treatment for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions. The conclusions are based on the results of systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), widely accepted and primarily UK and United States evidence-based clinical guidelines, plus the results of all RCTs not yet included in the first three categories. The strength/quality of the evidence regarding effectiveness was based on an adapted version of the grading system developed by the US Preventive Services Task Force and a study risk of bias assessment tool for the recent RCTs. By September 2009, 26 categories of conditions were located containing RCT evidence for the use of manual therapy: 13 musculoskeletal conditions, four types of chronic headache and nine non-musculoskeletal conditions. We identified 49 recent relevant systematic reviews and 16 evidence-based clinical guidelines plus an additional 46 RCTs not yet included in systematic reviews and guidelines.Additionally, brief references are made to other effective non-pharmacological, non-invasive physical treatments. Spinal manipulation/mobilization is effective in adults for: acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain; migraine and cervicogenic headache; cervicogenic dizziness; manipulation/mobilization is effective for several extremity joint conditions; and thoracic manipulation/mobilization is effective for acute/subacute neck pain. The evidence is inconclusive for cervical manipulation/mobilization alone for neck pain of any duration, and for manipulation/mobilization for mid back pain, sciatica, tension-type headache, coccydynia, temporomandibular joint disorders, fibromyalgia, premenstrual syndrome, and pneumonia in older adults. Spinal manipulation is not effective for asthma and dysmenorrhea when compared to sham manipulation, or for Stage 1

  6. Effectiveness of manual therapies: the UK evidence report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leininger Brent

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct but comprehensive summary of the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual treatment for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions. Methods The conclusions are based on the results of systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs, widely accepted and primarily UK and United States evidence-based clinical guidelines, plus the results of all RCTs not yet included in the first three categories. The strength/quality of the evidence regarding effectiveness was based on an adapted version of the grading system developed by the US Preventive Services Task Force and a study risk of bias assessment tool for the recent RCTs. Results By September 2009, 26 categories of conditions were located containing RCT evidence for the use of manual therapy: 13 musculoskeletal conditions, four types of chronic headache and nine non-musculoskeletal conditions. We identified 49 recent relevant systematic reviews and 16 evidence-based clinical guidelines plus an additional 46 RCTs not yet included in systematic reviews and guidelines. Additionally, brief references are made to other effective non-pharmacological, non-invasive physical treatments. Conclusions Spinal manipulation/mobilization is effective in adults for: acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain; migraine and cervicogenic headache; cervicogenic dizziness; manipulation/mobilization is effective for several extremity joint conditions; and thoracic manipulation/mobilization is effective for acute/subacute neck pain. The evidence is inconclusive for cervical manipulation/mobilization alone for neck pain of any duration, and for manipulation/mobilization for mid back pain, sciatica, tension-type headache, coccydynia, temporomandibular joint disorders, fibromyalgia, premenstrual syndrome, and pneumonia in older adults. Spinal manipulation is not effective for asthma and

  7. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the ''Holy Gray''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brans, B.; Bodei, L.; Giammarile, F.; Linden, O.; Tennvall, J.; Luster, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each case, emphasis is placed on the level of evidence and practical applicability. Although dosimetry has been of enormous value in the preclinical phase of radiopharmaceutical development, its clinical use to optimise administered activity on an individual patient basis has been less evident. In phase I and II trials, dosimetry may be considered an inherent part of therapy to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose-response relationship. To prove that dosimetry-based radionuclide therapy is of additional benefit over fixed dosing or dosing per kilogram body weight, prospective randomised phase III trials with appropriate end points have to be undertaken. Data in the literature which underscore the potential of dosimetry to avoid under- and overdosing and to standardise radionuclide therapy methods internationally are very scarce. In each section, particular developments and insights into these therapies are related to opportunities for dosimetry. The recent developments in PET and PET/CT imaging, including micro-devices for animal research, and molecular medicine provide major challenges for innovative therapy and dosimetry techniques. Furthermore, the increasing scientific interest in the radiobiological features specific to radionuclide therapy will advance our ability to administer this treatment modality optimally. (orig.)

  8. Emollient treatment of atopic dermatitis: latest evidence and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Lun Hon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To review current classes of emollients in the market, their clinical efficacy in atopic dermatitis (AD and considerations for choice of an emollient. Methods: PubMed Clinical Queries under Clinical Study Categories (with Category limited to Therapy and Scope limited to Narrow and Systematic Reviews were used as the search engine. Keywords of ‘emollient or moisturizer’ and ‘atopic dermatitis’ were used. Overview of findings: Using the keywords of ‘emollient’ and ‘atopic dermatitis’, there were 105 and 36 hits under Clinical Study Categories (with Category limited to Therapy and Scope limited to Narrow and Systematic Reviews, respectively. Plant-derived products, animal products and special ingredients were discussed. Selected proprietary products were tabulated. Conclusions: A number of proprietary emollients have undergone trials with clinical data available on PubMed-indexed journals. Most moisturizers showed some beneficial effects, but there was generally no evidence that one moisturizer is superior to another. Choosing an appropriate emollient for AD patients would improve acceptability and adherence for emollient treatment. Physician’s recommendation is the primary consideration for patients when selecting a moisturizer/ emollient; therefore, doctors should provide evidence-based information about these emollients.

  9. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  10. Clinical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; Gahbauer, R.; Clendenon, N.

    1986-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is potentially useful in treating malignant tumors of the central nervous system and is technically possible. Additional in vitro and in vivo testing is required to determine toxicities, normal tissue tolerances and tissue responses to treatment parameters. Adequate tumor uptake of the capture agent can be evaluated clinically prior to implementation of a finalized treatment protocol. Phase I and Phase II protocol development, clinical pharmacokinetic studies and neutron beam development

  11. Ion beam therapy fundamentals, technology, clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The book provides a detailed, up-to-date account of the basics, the technology, and the clinical use of ion beams for radiation therapy. Theoretical background, technical components, and patient treatment schemes are delineated by the leading experts that helped to develop this field from a research niche to its current highly sophisticated and powerful clinical treatment level used to the benefit of cancer patients worldwide. Rather than being a side-by-side collection of articles, this book consists of related chapters. It is a common achievement by 76 experts from around the world. Their expertise reflects the diversity of the field with radiation therapy, medical and accelerator physics, radiobiology, computer science, engineering, and health economics. The book addresses a similarly broad audience ranging from professionals that need to know more about this novel treatment modality or consider to enter the field of ion beam therapy as a researcher. However, it is also written for the interested public an...

  12. Documenting Art Therapy Clinical Knowledge Using Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Dafna

    2017-01-01

    Practicing art therapists have vast stores of knowledge and experience, but in most cases, their work is not documented, and their clinical knowledge does not enter the academic discourse. This article proposes a systematic approach to the collection of practice knowledge about art therapy based on conducting interviews with art therapists who…

  13. Evidence-based analysis of physical therapy in Parkinson's disease with recommendations for practice and research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, S.H.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Hendriks, E.J.M.; Bredero-Cohen, A.B.; Munneke, M.

    2007-01-01

    Physical therapy is often prescribed in Parkinson's disease. To facilitate the uniformity and efficacy of this intervention, we analyzed current evidence and developed practice recommendations. We carried out an evidence-based literature review. The results were supplemented with clinical expertise

  14. Evidence Considerations for Mobile Devices in the Occupational Therapy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Erickson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile app-based device utilization, including smartphones and handheld tablets, suggests a need to evaluate evidence to guide selection and implementation of these devices in the occupational therapy process. The purpose of the research was to explore the current body of evidence in relation to mobile app-based devices and to identify factors in the use of these devices throughout the occupational therapy process. Following review of available occupational therapy profession guidelines, assistive technology literature, and available mobile device research, practitioners using mobile app-based devices in occupational therapy should consider three areas: client needs, practitioner competence, and device factors. The purpose of this guideline is to identify factors in the selection and use of mobile app-based devices throughout the occupational therapy process based on available evidence. Considerations for mobile device implementation during the occupational therapy process is addressed, including evaluating outcomes needs, matching device with the client, and identifying support needs of the client.

  15. Fluid therapy in the perioperative setting-a clinical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldby, Anders Winther; Brandstrup, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    aims to analyze the literature concerning perioperative fluid therapy in abdominal surgery and to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice. RESULTS: Preoperative oral or intravenous administration of carbohydrate containing fluids has been shown to improve postoperative well...... for most patients. It is less expensive and simpler than the zero-balance GDT approach and therefore recommended in this review. In outpatient surgery, 1-2 L of balanced crystalloids reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting and improves well-being....

  16. Effectiveness of CAM therapy: understanding the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland

    2011-02-01

    By definition, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) attempts to diagnose and treat illnesses in unconventional ways. CAM has been classified as: (1) alternative medical systems (eg, traditional Chinese medicine [including acupuncture], naturopathic medicine, ayurvedic medicine, and homeopathy); (2) biologic-based therapies (eg, herbal, special dietary, and individual biologic treatments); (3) energy therapies (eg, Reiki, therapeutic touch, magnet therapy, Qi Gong, and intercessory prayer); (4) manipulative and body-based systems (eg, chiropractic, osteopathy, and massage); and (5) mind-body interventions (eg, meditation, biofeedback, hypnotherapy, and the relaxation response). This review focuses on how to assess the effectiveness of CAM therapies for chronic musculoskeletal pains, emphasizing the role of specific and nonspecific analgesic mechanisms, including placebo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Topical therapies in the management of chronic rhinosinusitis: an evidence-based review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke; Hoy, Monica; Schlosser, Rodney J; Harvey, Richard J; Welch, Kevin C; Lund, Valerie; Smith, Timothy L

    2013-04-01

    Topical therapies have become an integral component in the management plan for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Several topical therapy strategies have been evaluated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the utilization of topical therapies in the management of CRS. A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria were: adult population >18 years old; chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) based on published diagnostic criteria; and clearly defined primary clinical end-point. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2b or higher), but reported on lower-level studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. We excluded drug-eluting spacer and stent therapy from this review. This review identified and evaluated the literature on 5 topical therapy strategies for CRS: saline irrigation, topical steroid, topical antibiotic, topical antifungal, and topical alternatives (surfactant, manuka honey, and xylitol irrigations). Based on the available evidence, sinonasal saline irrigation and standard topical nasal steroid therapy are recommended in the topical treatment of CRS. Nonstandard (off-label) topical sinonasal steroid therapies can be an option for managing CRS. The evidence recommends against the use of topical antifungal therapy and topical antibiotic therapy delivered using nebulized and spray techniques in routine cases of CRS. There is insufficient clinical research to provide recommendations for alternative therapies or topical antibiotic therapy delivered using other delivery methods (eg, irrigations). © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  18. Preferences for antiretroviral therapy services: Qualitative evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is one of the interventions meant to prolong the progression from HIV to AIDS for People Living with HIV (PLHIVs). Although ART was introduced in Ghana in 2003, there is little or no information about the preferences of those on ART services. The main objective of the study therefore was to ...

  19. Review. Evidence-based complementary oncology. Innovative approaches to optimize standard therapy strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuth, Josef; Schierholz, Joerg Michael

    2007-01-01

    Cancer diseases demand diagnostic and therapeutic measures with proven quality, safety and efficacy. The basis for evaluation is clinical studies representing levels I or II (randomized controlled trials (RCT) or epidemiological cohort studies) in accordance with recommendations of the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine, University of Oxford, UK Regarding these claims, surgery, chemo-, radio- and hormone therapy have emerged as the gold standard in the treatment of carcinomas. These therapies have proven their cancer destructive potencies and their curative feasibilities, dependent on the particular cancer entity and stage. Complementary therapies are recommended to support and optimize the scientifically-based cancer standard treatment. Complementary medicine is currently widely debated by the oncological community, because the required scientific proof of safety and effectiveness for most of the therapeutic approaches has not yet been definitively provided. In the past years, basic research and clinical evaluation of defined complementary therapeutic concepts in oncology have been intensified in an attempt to integrate these procedures into evidence-based medicine. Scientifically-based therapies of complementary medicine cannot replace the well studied conventional cancer-destructive therapies such as surgery, chemo-, radio- or hormone therapy. Accordingly, they are by no means "alternative therapies". Complementary approaches in oncology that are recommended as additional to standard cancer destructive therapies claim to optimize this therapy. A great body of data emerging from scientifically sound clinical trials prove that defined complementary procedures are beneficial for the patients.

  20. Evidence to Practice Commentary: Is More Therapy Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Iona

    2012-01-01

    Parents seek sustained intense "hands-on" therapy for their children based on a belief that "more is better." Since the core objective of evidence-based practice (EBP) is to do the right things, for the right child, at the right time, and to optimize intervention outcomes, it is vital to know what the literature says about how much therapy to…

  1. Biofield Therapies: Helpful or Full of Hype? A Best Evidence Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Biofield therapies (such as Reiki, therapeutic touch, and healing touch) are complementary medicine modalities that remain controversial and are utilized by a significant number of patients, with little information regarding their efficacy. Purpose This systematic review examines 66 clinical studies with a variety of biofield therapies in different patient populations. Method We conducted a quality assessment as well as a best evidence synthesis approach to examine evidence for biofield therapies in relevant outcomes for different clinical populations. Results Studies overall are of medium quality, and generally meet minimum standards for validity of inferences. Biofield therapies show strong evidence for reducing pain intensity in pain populations, and moderate evidence for reducing pain intensity hospitalized and cancer populations. There is moderate evidence for decreasing negative behavioral symptoms in dementia and moderate evidence for decreasing anxiety for hospitalized populations. There is equivocal evidence for biofield therapies' effects on fatigue and quality of life for cancer patients, as well as for comprehensive pain outcomes and affect in pain patients, and for decreasing anxiety in cardiovascular patients. Conclusion There is a need for further high-quality studies in this area. Implications and future research directions are discussed. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12529-009-9062-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19856109

  2. Breast Cancer Biology: Clinical Implications for Breast Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Janet K; Jagsi, Reshma; Woodward, Wendy A; Ho, Alice

    2018-01-01

    Historically, prognosis and treatment decision making for breast cancer patients have been dictated by the anatomic extent of tumor spread. However, in recent years, "breast cancer" has proven to be a collection of unique phenotypes with distinct prognoses, patterns of failure, and treatment responses. Recent advances in biologically based assays and targeted therapies designed to exploit these unique phenotypes have profoundly altered systemic therapy practice patterns and treatment outcomes. Data associating locoregional outcomes with tumor biology are emerging. However, the likelihood of obtaining level I evidence for fundamental radiation therapy questions within each of the specific subtypes in the immediate future is low. As such, this review aims to summarize the existing data and provide practical context for the incorporation of breast tumor biology into clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence Supporting Intralesional Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Equine Flexor Tendon Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmitha Durgam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical bottom lineCurrent experimental evidence suggests that intralesional stem cell administration improves the histological characteristics and matrix organisation of healing equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT; however, the clinical relevance of these findings are not clear. Current case-based evidence suggests that cell-based therapies improve the quality of tendon healing and reduce the recurrence rates of SDFT injuries but the lack of any randomised, controlled prospective studies with function-based outcomes is still concerning, given the widespread advocacy for and use of ‘stem cell’ therapies for the treatment of equine tendon injuries. 

  4. Real-world Data for Clinical Evidence Generation in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozin, Sean; Blumenthal, Gideon M; Pazdur, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Conventional cancer clinical trials can be slow and costly, often produce results with limited external validity, and are difficult for patients to participate in. Recent technological advances and a dynamic policy landscape in the United States have created a fertile ground for the use of real-world data (RWD) to improve current methods of clinical evidence generation. Sources of RWD include electronic health records, insurance claims, patient registries, and digital health solutions outside of conventional clinical trials. A definition focused on the original intent of data collected at the point of care can distinguish RWD from conventional clinical trial data. When the intent of data collection at the point of care is research, RWD can be generated using experimental designs similar to those employed in conventional clinical trials, but with several advantages that include gains in efficient execution of studies with an appropriate balance between internal and external validity. RWD can support active pharmacovigilance, insights into the natural history of disease, and the development of external control arms. Prospective collection of RWD can enable evidence generation based on pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) that support randomized study designs and expand clinical research to the point of care. PCTs may help address the growing demands for access to experimental therapies while increasing patient participation in cancer clinical trials. Conducting valid real-world studies requires data quality assurance through auditable data abstraction methods and new incentives to drive electronic capture of clinically relevant data at the point of care. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. Valerian: No Evidence for Clinically Relevant Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieber, Karen; Kraft, Karin

    2014-01-01

    In recent popular publications as well as in widely used information websites directed to cancer patients, valerian is claimed to have a potential of adverse interactions with anticancer drugs. This questions its use as a safe replacement for, for example, benzodiazepines. A review on the interaction potential of preparations from valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L. root) was therefore conducted. A data base search and search in a clinical drug interaction data base were conducted. Thereafter, a systematic assessment of publications was performed. Seven in vitro studies on six CYP 450 isoenzymes, on p-glycoprotein, and on two UGT isoenzymes were identified. However, the methodological assessment of these studies did not support their suitability for the prediction of clinically relevant interactions. In addition, clinical studies on various valerian preparations did not reveal any relevant interaction potential concerning CYP 1A2, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4. Available animal and human pharmacodynamic studies did not verify any interaction potential. The interaction potential of valerian preparations therefore seems to be low and thereby without clinical relevance. We conclude that there is no specific evidence questioning their safety, also in cancer patients. PMID:25093031

  6. Valerian: No Evidence for Clinically Relevant Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Kelber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent popular publications as well as in widely used information websites directed to cancer patients, valerian is claimed to have a potential of adverse interactions with anticancer drugs. This questions its use as a safe replacement for, for example, benzodiazepines. A review on the interaction potential of preparations from valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L. root was therefore conducted. A data base search and search in a clinical drug interaction data base were conducted. Thereafter, a systematic assessment of publications was performed. Seven in vitro studies on six CYP 450 isoenzymes, on p-glycoprotein, and on two UGT isoenzymes were identified. However, the methodological assessment of these studies did not support their suitability for the prediction of clinically relevant interactions. In addition, clinical studies on various valerian preparations did not reveal any relevant interaction potential concerning CYP 1A2, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4. Available animal and human pharmacodynamic studies did not verify any interaction potential. The interaction potential of valerian preparations therefore seems to be low and thereby without clinical relevance. We conclude that there is no specific evidence questioning their safety, also in cancer patients.

  7. Recent Clinical Drug Trials Evidence in Marfan Syndrome and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Michael N; Lacro, Ronald V

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder of connective tissue with principal manifestations in the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. Cardiovascular disease, mainly progressive aortic root dilation and aortic dissection, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The primary aims of this report were to examine the evidence related to medical therapy for Marfan syndrome, including recently completed randomized clinical trials on the efficacy of β-blockers and angiotensin II receptor blockers for the prophylactic treatment of aortic enlargement in Marfan syndrome, and to provide recommendations for medical therapy on the basis of available evidence. Medical therapy for Marfan syndrome should be individualized according to patient tolerance and risk factors such as age, aortic size, and family history of aortic dissection. The Pediatric Heart Network trial showed that atenolol and losartan each reduced the rate of aortic dilation. All patients with known or suspected Marfan syndrome and aortic root dilation should receive medical therapy with adequate doses of either β-blocker or angiotensin receptor blocker. The Pediatric Heart Network trial also showed that atenolol and losartan are more effective at reduction of aortic root z score in younger subjects, which suggests that medical therapy should be prescribed even in the youngest children with aortic dilation. For patients with Marfan syndrome without aortic dilation, the available evidence is less clear. If aortic dilation is severe and/or progressive, therapy with a combination of β-blocker and angiotensin receptor blocker should be considered, although trial results are mixed with respect to the efficacy of combination therapy vs monotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bibliometric Analysis: Mirror Therapy as an Occupational Therapy Intervention Strategy in the Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Siprián Castro Alzate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the national and international scientific evidence regarding the use of mirror therapy, as an occupational therapy intervention tool in the clinical setting, in order to acquire knowledge and implement this strategy in professional practice. Materials and methods: A descriptive study was conducted in which the research strategy was held through medical subject headings (MeSH, such as “mirror neuron”, ”occupational therapy”, “physical rehabilitation” and “motor imagery”. Through the use of the bolean and combinations in five different databases were performed: Embase, Ebsco, OTseeker, Science Direct and Medline. The analysis was elaborated by establishing frequencies of different variables such as journal, country, study type and publish­ing year. Conclusions: In the evidence analysis it was found that mirror therapy is an interven­tion modality recently used by different rehabilitation professionals. Since 2004, an increase in the generation of high impact scientific evidence about this subject has been recognized, due in part to the reported effectiveness in clinical practices, mainly the treatment of health conditions secondary to stroke, limb amputations, chronic pain syndromes, and post-surgical rehabilitation. During the reviewed period, an increase in high level academic evidence was observed: 35.7 % of the analyzed publications correspond to randomized controlled trials and 42.9 % are system­atic reviews. The use of mirror therapy in occupational therapy is an intervention modality that facilitates functional rehabilitation processes, promotes independence in performing activities of daily living (adl and allows social participation and environment adaptation processes to happen.

  9. Evaluation of evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Persson, Dennis; Nygren, Carita

    2010-01-01

    therapy intervention related to the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within stroke rehabilitation. Design: Systematic searches of research studies published in English during 2000-2007 in peer-reviewed journals were undertaken. Thirty-nine articles and one Cochrane review were...... after rehabilitation. There is also considerable evidence for the use of everyday life occupations in occupational therapy. Occupational therapy was evaluated as an important aspect of stroke rehabilitation improving outcomes in everyday life occupations including activities of daily living (ADL......) and participation. Discussion: As research of relevance for the profession to a large extent includes qualitative research it gives rise to reflection on including more tools than the evidence hierarchy while evaluating evidence within occupational therapy....

  10. Facilitating case studies in massage therapy clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskwill, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The integration of evidence into reflective health care practice has been on the rise in recent years and is a phenomenon that has affected all health care professions, including massage therapy. Clinical case studies are a research design that follows one patient or subject, making the studies ideal for use in clinical practice. They are valuable for communicating information from clinical practice to the broader community. Case studies have face validity that may be more valuable to individual practitioners than homogeneous randomized controlled trials, as the practitioner may recognize a complex patient in the case report. At Humber College, Student Massage Therapists (SMTs) create, conduct, and communicate results of a clinical case study prior to graduation. This article describes the process and experience.

  11. Clinical pharmacist interventions to support adherence to thrombopreventive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla

    The three papers in the thesis were based on two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on in-hospital clinical pharmacist interventions for improvement of adherence to thrombopreventive therapy in two different populations: outpatients with hypertension and patients with acute stroke/transient isch......The three papers in the thesis were based on two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on in-hospital clinical pharmacist interventions for improvement of adherence to thrombopreventive therapy in two different populations: outpatients with hypertension and patients with acute stroke...... individualised interventions and team-based care, e.g. integrating a clinical pharmacist with particular focus on patients’ drug-related problems. One approach with growing evidence of improving medication adherence is motivational interviewing (MI). So far, no clinical pharmacist intervention using MI has...... targeted patients with hypertension or stroke in a hospital care setting. Thus, the aim of this thesis was to develop and evaluate in-hospital pharmacist interventions including MI to improve adherence to primary and secondary thrombopreventive therapy. The first study was a RCT, which investigated...

  12. The clinical effectiveness of cognitive therapy for depression in an outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Carly J; Fournier, Jay C; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; DeRubeis, Robert J; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Beck, Aaron T

    2010-09-01

    Cognitive therapy (CT) has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of depression in numerous randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, little evidence is available that speaks to the effectiveness of this treatment under routine clinical conditions. This paper examines outcomes of depressed individuals seeking cognitive therapy at an outpatient clinic (N=217, Center for Cognitive Therapy; CCT). Outcomes were then compared to those of participants in a large NIMH-funded RCT of cognitive therapy and medications as treatments for depression. The CCT is shown to be a clinically representative setting, and 61% of participants experienced reliable change in symptoms over the course of treatment; of those, 45% (36% of the total sample) met criteria for recovery by the end of treatment. Participants at CCT had similar outcomes to participants treated in the RCT, but there was some evidence that those with more severe symptoms at intake demonstrated greater improvement in the RCT than their counterparts at CCT. The CCT may not be representative of all outpatient settings, and the structure of treatment there was considerably different from that in the RCT. Treatment fidelity was not assessed at CCT. Depressed individuals treated with cognitive therapy in a routine clinical care setting showed a significant improvement in symptoms. When compared with outcomes evidenced in RCTs, there was little evidence of superior outcomes in either setting. However, for more severe participants, outcomes were found to be superior when treatment was delivered within an RCT than in an outpatient setting. Clinicians treating such patients in non-research settings may thus benefit from making modifications to treatment protocols to more closely resemble research settings. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. [Changing surgical therapy because of clinical studies?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, W; Haase, O; Müller, J M

    2002-04-01

    The randomised controlled clinical trial (RCT) is a powerful instrument to evaluate different therapeutic regimens. In a survey among 115 physicians visiting the 25th annual meeting of the Surgical Society of Berlin and Brandenburg, the RCT was judged to be very important when changes of therapeutic strategies are discussed. 90 % of all participants claimed to use data from RCTs in the clinical routine and 89 % would participate in such a trial. In official (e. g. discussions during coffee breaks at scientific meetings) or non-medical (e. g. non-scientific press or media) sources of information were assessed as irrelevant for decisions regarding therapeutic strategies. However, in contrast to this view laparoscopic cholecystectomy was introduced into clinical practice rapidly because patients informed by external (non-medical) sources preferred to be operated on with the "modern" technique. Clinical trials with a high level of evidence had no relevant influence on the rapid distribution of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Controversial discussions concerning the extent of lymphadenectomy with gastric resection for carcinoma demonstrate that the value of excellent clinical RCTs is low if their results challenge a stable paradigma of the surgical scientific society. To allow a rational judgement, new surgical technologies should undergo a scientific gradual evaluation in agreement with the principles of evidence based medicine.

  14. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Implementing evidence-based models in community settings

    OpenAIRE

    Szapocznik, José; Muir, Joan A.; Duff, Johnathan H.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2013-01-01

    Reflecting a nearly 40-year collaborative partnership between clinical researchers and clinicians, the present article reviews the authors’ experience in developing, investigating, and implementing the Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) model. The first section of the article focuses on the theory, practice, and studies related to this evidence-based family therapy intervention targeting adolescent drug abuse and delinquency. The second section focuses on the implementation model created f...

  15. Testicular tumors - clinical aspects and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschmann, K.E.

    1981-01-01

    In this study the author reports about classification, clinical experience, therapy and therapeutic results of testicular tumors on the basis of results given in literature and of own investigations performed at the Clinic and Policlinic for Radiotherapy at Wuerzburg. In total, 97 patients with testicular tumors were examined and their cases analysed. These patients had received radiotherapy between January 1, 1962 and December 31, 1979. The difficulties with the intended classification of testicular tumors and the advantages and disadvantages of the individual nomenclatures are described. Consideration of the affected age-groups showed that this disease concerns mainly younger males with a high life expectancy. The study depicts the relatively discrete symptoms and signs and the difficulties connected with clinical diagnosis. A more generous indication for the exposition of the testicles is demanded. Also the lymphatic drainage of the testicular region, the resulting paths of metastatic spread and the difficulties connected with the lymphographic detection of metastases are described. There are three therapeutic measures: surgical intervention, radiotherapy and cytostatic treatment. With seminomas mandatory semitestectomy and radiotherapy will suffice; with other affections than seminomas, semitestectomy shall be followed by a combined therapy comprising removal of lymphatic nodes and cytostatic treatment and not so much radiotherapy. The results of treatment given in literature are compared with the own results. This comparison revealed good success with treatment of seminomas. With non-seminomal affections exclusive radiotherapy appears to be insufficient. Therefore a combined therapy is postulated, which must be rendered possible by a good interdisciplinary cooperation of pathologists, urologists and radiologists. (orig.) [de

  16. State of the Art on the Evidence Base in Cardiac Regenerative Therapy: Overview of 41 Systematic Reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peruzzi, Mariangela; de Falco, Elena; Abbate, Antonio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Chimenti, Isotta; Lotrionte, Marzia; Benedetto, Umberto; Delewi, Ronak; Marullo, Antonino G. M.; Frati, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive appraisal of the evidence from secondary research on cardiac regenerative therapy. Overview of systematic reviews of controlled clinical trials concerning stem cell administration or mobilization in patients with cardiovascular disease. After a systematic database search,

  17. Current Evidence and Recommendations for Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dewhurst, Matthew J; Linker, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    The number of people in Europe living with symptomatic heart failure is increasing. Since its advent in the 1990s, cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) has proven beneficial in terms of morbidity and mortality in selected heart failure (HF) patient populations, when combined with optimal pharmacological therapy. We review the evidence for CRT and the populations of HF patients it is currently shown to benefit, and those in which more research needs to be performed.

  18. Core journals that publish clinical trials of physical therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Moseley, Anne M; Sherrington, Catherine; Maher, Christopher G; Herbert, Robert D; Elkins, Mark R

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify core journals in physical therapy by identifying those that publish the most randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions, provide the highest-quality reports of randomized controlled trials, and have the highest journal impact factors. This study was an audit of a bibliographic database. All trials indexed in the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) were analyzed. Journals that had published at least 80 trials were selected. The journals were ranked in 4 ways: number of trials published; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal, regardless of publication year; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal from 2000 to 2009; and 2008 journal impact factor. The top 5 core journals in physical therapy, ranked by the total number of trials published, were Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Rehabilitation, Spine, British Medical Journal (BMJ), and Chest. When the mean total PEDro score was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Stroke, Spine, and Clinical Rehabilitation. When the mean total PEDro score of the trials published from 2000 to 2009 was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, and Pain. The most highly ranked physical therapy-specific journals were Physical Therapy (ranked eighth on the basis of the number of trials published) and Journal of Physiotherapy (ranked first on the basis of the quality of trials). Finally, when the 2008 impact factor was used for ranking, the top 5 journals were JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, and Thorax. There were no significant relationships among the rankings on the basis of trial quality, number of trials, or journal impact factor. Physical therapists who are trying to keep up-to-date by reading the best

  19. Insufficient scientific evidence for efficacy of widely used electrotherapy, laser therapy, and ultrasound treatment in physiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouter, L M

    2000-01-01

    The Dutch Health Council recently published a report on the efficacy of electrotherapy, laser therapy and ultrasound treatment for musculoskeletal disorders. The assessment was based on three systematic reviews, including 169 randomized clinical trials, and focused on a best-evidence synthesis.

  20. Evidence-based therapies for upper extremity dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepert, Joachim

    2010-12-01

    The diversity of interventions aimed at improving upper extremity dysfunction is increasing. This article reviews the effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches that have been published in 2009 and 2010. Evidence is based on randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Application of constraint-induced movement therapy in acute stroke patients was not more effective than a control intervention, and a more intense therapy may even be harmful. Botulinum toxin injections do not only reduce spasticity but, in children, also improve motor functions if combined with occupational therapy. Strength training improves arm function but not necessarily activities of daily living. Bilateral arm training is as effective as other interventions. Extrinsic feedback and sensory training may further improve motor functions. Mirror therapy was particularly effective for patients with initial hand plegia. For some interventions (e.g. constraint-induced movement therapy, botulinum toxin), efficacy is evident, for others (e.g. mental practice, virtual reality), well designed studies with sufficient numbers of patients are needed. The ultimate goal still is to develop evidence-based therapies for all different degrees of motor impairment.

  1. Identifying an evidence-based model of therapy for the pre-hospital emergency management of supraventricular tachycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    This thesis provides a comprehensive reporting of the work undertaken to identify evidence supporting pre-hospital management of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), delivering an evidence base for paramedic treatment of these patients. The literature search identified absences in evidence supporting therapies used within existing clinical guidelines. The vagal manoeuvres, the simplest and least invasive therapy to employ in the stable patient, were insufficiently evidenced regarding technique...

  2. Systemic relational therapy and the case from the clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Rožič

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present article are represented the principal guidelines of the systemic relational model of psychotherapy and an example of clinical practice where the pacient was incluced in this kind of therapy. In the essence of systemic relational model there is a person which is captured in the repetition of old patterns in spite of its painfulness and hardness. Captured and helpless in old patterns, the person not only repeats but also recreates them, because they promise safety, belonging and connectedness. From the review of the therapy it is evident that behind the pacient's concrete problems stands her family system to which she is loyal in the way that only deepens her distress. By the increasing the responsability for herself, for her feelings and her acts, it increases the pacient's funcionality, too.

  3. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating disorders: international comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Hilbert, Anja; Hoek, Hans W.; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review The current systematic review sought to compare available evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for all specific eating disorders. Recent findings Nine evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for eating disorders were located through a systematic search. The international comparison demonstrated notable commonalities and differences among these current clinical guidelines. Summary Evidence-based clinical guidelines represent an important step toward the dissemina...

  4. Effectiveness of manual therapies: the UK evidence report

    OpenAIRE

    Bronfort, Gert; Haas, Mitch; Evans, Roni; Leininger, Brent; Triano, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this report is to provide a succinct but comprehensive summary of the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual treatment for the management of a variety of musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal conditions. Methods The conclusions are based on the results of systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), widely accepted and primarily UK and United States evidence-based clinical guidelines, plus the results of all RCTs not yet incl...

  5. Clinical concepts for regenerative therapy in intrabony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortellini, Pierpaolo; Tonetti, Maurizio S

    2015-06-01

    Evidence indicates that periodontal regeneration is an efficacious and predictable procedure for the treatment of isolated and multiple intrabony defects. Meta-analyses from systematic reviews indicate an added benefit, in terms of clinical attachment level gain, when demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft, barrier membranes and active biologic products/compounds are applied in addition to open flap debridement. On the other hand, a consistent amount of variability of the outcomes is evident among different studies and within the experimental population of each study. This variability is explained, at least in part, by different patient and defect characteristics. Patient-related factors include smoking habit, compliance with home oral hygiene and residual inflammation after cause-related therapy. Defect-associated factors include defect depth and radiographic angle, the number of residual bony walls, pocket depth and the degree of hypermobility. In addition, surgical-related variables, such as surgical skill, clinical experience and knowledge, and application of the different regenerative materials, have a significant impact on clinical outcomes. This paper presents a strategy to optimize the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. The surgical design of the flap, the use of different regenerative materials and the application of appropriate passive sutures are discussed in this review along with the scientific foundations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Complementary spiritist therapy: systematic review of scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Lucchetti, Alessandra L Granero; Bassi, Rodrigo M; Nobre, Marlene Rossi Severino

    2011-01-01

    Spiritism is the third most common religion in Brazil, and its therapies have been used by millions worldwide. These therapies are based on therapeutic resources including prayer, laying on of hands, fluidotherapy (magnetized water), charity/volunteering, spirit education/moral values, and disobsession (spirit release therapy). This paper presents a systematic review of the current literature on the relationship among health outcomes and 6 predictors: prayer, laying on of hands, magnetized/fluidic water, charity/volunteering, spirit education (virtuous life and positive affect), and spirit release therapy. All articles were analyzed according to inclusion/exclusion criteria, Newcastle-Ottawa and Jadad score. At present, there is moderate to strong evidence that volunteering and positive affect are linked to better health outcomes. Furthermore, laying on of hands, virtuous life, and praying for oneself also seem to be associated to positive findings. Nevertheless, there is a lack of studies on magnetized water and spirit release therapy. In summary, science is indirectly demonstrating that some of these therapies can be associated to better health outcomes and that other therapies have been overlooked or poorly investigated. Further studies in this field could contribute to the disciplines of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by investigating the relationship between body, mind, and soul/spirit.

  7. Complementary Spiritist Therapy: Systematic Review of Scientific Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Lucchetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spiritism is the third most common religion in Brazil, and its therapies have been used by millions worldwide. These therapies are based on therapeutic resources including prayer, laying on of hands, fluidotherapy (magnetized water, charity/volunteering, spirit education/moral values, and disobsession (spirit release therapy. This paper presents a systematic review of the current literature on the relationship among health outcomes and 6 predictors: prayer, laying on of hands, magnetized/fluidic water, charity/volunteering, spirit education (virtuous life and positive affect, and spirit release therapy. All articles were analyzed according to inclusion/exclusion criteria, Newcastle-Ottawa and Jadad score. At present, there is moderate to strong evidence that volunteering and positive affect are linked to better health outcomes. Furthermore, laying on of hands, virtuous life, and praying for oneself also seem to be associated to positive findings. Nevertheless, there is a lack of studies on magnetized water and spirit release therapy. In summary, science is indirectly demonstrating that some of these therapies can be associated to better health outcomes and that other therapies have been overlooked or poorly investigated. Further studies in this field could contribute to the disciplines of Complementary and Alternative Medicine by investigating the relationship between body, mind, and soul/spirit.

  8. Multisystemic Therapy(®) : Clinical Overview, Outcomes, and Implementation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henggeler, Scott W; Schaeffer, Cindy M

    2016-09-01

    Multisystemic therapy (MST) is an evidence-based treatment originally developed for youth with serious antisocial behavior who are at high risk for out-of-home placement and their families; and subsequently adapted to address other challenging clinical problems experience by youths and their families. The social-ecological theoretical framework of MST is presented as well as its home-based model of treatment delivery, defining clinical intervention strategies, and ongoing quality assurance/quality improvement system. With more than 100 peer-reviewed outcome and implementation journal articles published as of January 2016, the majority by independent investigators, MST is one of the most extensively evaluated family based treatments. Outcome research has yielded almost uniformly favorable results for youths and families, and implementation research has demonstrated the importance of treatment and program fidelity in achieving such outcomes. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  9. Clinical field note — Ultrasound Therapy: Getting it Right! | Amusat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasound therapy is a popular physical therapy modality among clinicians. The era of evidence-based practice has, however, led to intense research evaluation of its effectiveness. In many systematic reviews and meta-analyses on ultrasound therapy, multiple factors have resulted in inconclusive results on its possible ...

  10. Semantic Representation of Evidence-based Clinical Guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Zhisheng; Harmelen, Frank Van

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based Clinical Guidelines (EbCGs) are that the document or recommendation has been created using the best clinical research findings of the highest value to aid in the delivery of optimum clinical care to patients. In this paper, we propose a lightweight formal-ism of evidence-based

  11. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Heering, A.; Lubbe, N. van der; Vel, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy program compared with an exercise therapy program in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial of 109 hip OA patients was carried out in the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of

  12. Clinical targeting recombinant immunotoxins for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Meng Li,1,* Zeng-Shan Liu,1,* Xi-Lin Liu,1,* Qi Hui,2,* Shi-Ying Lu,1 Lin-Lin Qu,1 Yan-Song Li,1 Yu Zhou,1 Hong-Lin Ren,1 Pan Hu1 1Key Laboratory of Zoonosis Research, Ministry of Education, Institute of Zoonosis, College of Veterinary Medicine, China-Japan Union Hospital, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, 2School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Recombinant immunotoxins (RITs are proteins that contain a toxin fused to an antibody or small molecules and are constructed by the genetic engineering technique. RITs can bind to and be internalized by cells and kill cancerous or non-cancerous cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. A wide variety of RITs have been tested against different cancers in cell culture, xenograft models, and human patients during the past several decades. RITs have shown activity in therapy of several kinds of cancers, but different levels of side effects, mainly related to vascular leak syndrome, were also observed in the treated patients. High immunogenicity of RITs limited their long-term or repeat applications in clinical cases. Recent advances in the design of immunotoxins, such as humanization of antibody fragment, PEGylation, and modification of human B- and T-cell epitopes, are overcoming the above mentioned problems, which predict the use of these immunotoxins as a potential therapeutic method to treat cancer patients. Keywords: targeted therapy, hematologic malignancies, solid tumors, vascular leak syndrome, immunogenicity 

  13. Diagnosing dehydration? Blend evidence with clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kavouras, Stavros A; Walsh, Neil P; Roberts, William O

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the review is to provide recommendations to improve clinical decision-making based on the strengths and weaknesses of commonly used hydration biomarkers and clinical assessment methods. There is widespread consensus regarding treatment, but not the diagnosis of dehydration. Even though it is generally accepted that a proper clinical diagnosis of dehydration can only be made biochemically rather than relying upon clinical signs and symptoms, no gold standard biochemical hydration index exists. Other than clinical biomarkers in blood (i.e., osmolality and blood urea nitrogen/creatinine) and in urine (i.e., osmolality and specific gravity), blood pressure assessment and clinical symptoms in the eye (i.e., tear production and palpitating pressure) and the mouth (i.e., thirst and mucous wetness) can provide important information for diagnosing dehydration. We conclude that clinical observations based on a combination of history, physical examination, laboratory values, and clinician experience remain the best approach to the diagnosis of dehydration.

  14. [Evidence-based therapy for tendinopathy of the knee joint : Which forms of therapy are scientifically proven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, H; Clausen, J D; Krettek, C; Weber-Spickschen, T S

    2017-03-01

    Tendinopathy in the region of the knee joint is a common pathological disorder. People active in sports, in particular, have a high probability of suffering from tendinopathy. Despite its high clinical relevance, the level of evidence of therapy options for tendinopathy in the knee region differs greatly. This review gives an overview of current evidence levels for therapy options in tendinopathy of the quadriceps, patellar and pes anserinus insertion tendons as well as of the distal iliotibial tract tendon. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma showed a significantly better outcome when used correctly and treatment with shock waves, operative treatment and sclerotherapy have also shown positive effects. Treatment with corticosteroid injections and with oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) showed positive short-term effects (follow-up ±4 weeks). No reasonable data are available for the treatment of tendinopathy in the knee region by acupuncture, fascial therapy or cryotherapy. The use of kinesio taping showed no significant relief from complaints compared with standard conservative treatment. The use of multimodal therapy without evidence is, therefore, particularly common in elite athletes.

  15. Viral gene therapy strategies: from basic science to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lawrence S; Searle, Peter F; Onion, David; Mautner, Vivien

    2006-01-01

    A major impediment to the successful application of gene therapy for the treatment of a range of diseases is not a paucity of therapeutic genes, but the lack of an efficient non-toxic gene delivery system. Having evolved to deliver their genes to target cells, viruses are currently the most effective means of gene delivery and can be manipulated to express therapeutic genes or to replicate specifically in certain cells. Gene therapy is being developed for a range of diseases including inherited monogenic disorders and cardiovascular disease, but it is in the treatment of cancer that this approach has been most evident, resulting in the recent licensing of a gene therapy for the routine treatment of head and neck cancer in China. A variety of virus vectors have been employed to deliver genes to cells to provide either transient (eg adenovirus, vaccinia virus) or permanent (eg retrovirus, adeno-associated virus) transgene expression and each approach has its own advantages and disadvantages. Paramount is the safety of these virus vectors and a greater understanding of the virus-host interaction is key to optimizing the use of these vectors for routine clinical use. Recent developments in the modification of the virus coat allow more targeted approaches and herald the advent of systemic delivery of therapeutic viruses. In the context of cancer, the ability of attenuated viruses to replicate specifically in tumour cells has already yielded some impressive results in clinical trials and bodes well for the future of this approach, particularly when combined with more traditional anti-cancer therapies. Copyright 2006 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Annotating Evidence Based Clinical Guidelines : A Lightweight Ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; de Waard, A.; Vdovjak, R.; Paschke, A.; Burger, A.; Romano, P.; Marshall, M.S.; Splendiani, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a lightweight ontology for representing annotations of declarative evidence based clinical guidelines. We present the motivation and requirements for this representation, based on an analysis of several guidelines. The ontology provides the means to connect clinical questions

  17. Updated Evidence on the Oncoplastic Approach to Breast Conservation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losken, Albert; Hart, Alexandra M; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2017-11-01

    The oncoplastic approach to breast conservation therapy has become a useful and popular option for women with breast cancer who wish to preserve their breast. The initial driving forces were aimed at minimizing the potential for a breast conservation therapy deformity; however, various other benefits have been identified that include broadening the indications for breast conservation therapy in some patients and improved margin control. The various techniques can be categorized into glandular rearrangement techniques such as breast reductions usually in patients with larger breasts or flap reconstruction such as the latissimus dorsi muscle usually in patients with smaller breasts. As the acceptance continues to increase, we are starting to see more outcomes evidence in terms of patient satisfaction, quality of life, complications, and recurrence, to further support the safety and efficacy of the oncoplastic approach.

  18. Awareness and use of Meseron therapy among clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite strong underlying philosophies and benefits of non western therapies such as Meseron therapy, it is apparent they meet with several challenges which limit their ready adoption and applicability in clinical practice. This paper examined the views of Nigerian clinical psychologists about non-western psychotherapies ...

  19. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Epidemiology, clinical pictures, diagnosis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, Shuji

    2007-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the reactivation of a ubiquitous polyomavirus JC (JCV). PML was for many years a rare disease occurring only in patients with underlying severe impaired immunity. Over the past three decades, the incidence of PML has significantly increased related to the AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) pandemic and, more recently, to the growing use of immunosuppressive drugs. The clinical presentation of PML is variable with neurological symptoms corresponding to affected cerebral areas. Usually, the clinical outcome of patients with PML is poor with an inexorable progression to death within 6 months of symptom onset. Although PML usually requires a brain biopsy or autopsy for confirmation, radiological imaging and a demonstration of JCV-DNA in the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) provide supportive evidence for the diagnosis. Although there is no proven effective therapy for PML, patients with HIV (human immunodeficeincy virus)-related PML may benefit significantly from HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy). In this article the author reviews the epidemiology, especially in Japan, current challenges in the diagnosis and the treatment guidelines of patients with PML based on recent advances in the understanding of the JC virus biology. (author)

  20. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kiichi; Yoshino, Junji; Akamatsu, Taiji; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamada, Tomoari; Takagi, Atsushi; Chiba, Toshimi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Mizokami, Yuji; Murakami, Kazunari; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Uemura, Naomi; Goto, Hidemi; Joh, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse.

  1. Clinical application of interventional therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wei; Liu Qiyu; Wang Zhong; Lin Hua; Xie Budong; Zhou Xi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the safety and efficiency of interventional therapy of hyperthyroidism. Methods: 70 cases of hyperthyroidism were selected and treated with embolization of the thyroid gland artery. The efficacy and complications of the therapy were observed. Results: The therapy was effect in 60 of all the 70 patients, while failed in 1 patient and relapsed in 9 cases. Specifically speaking, 2 of them hyperthyroidism crisis occurred in 2 cases, hypoparathyroidism occurred in 1 case and hypothyroidism occurred in 2 cases. Conclusion: Intervention therapy of hyperthyroidism is of advantage such as good effect, safety, microtrauma, little complication. (authors)

  2. The entry-level occupational therapy clinical doctorate: advantages, challenges, and international issues to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Mu, Keli; Wells, Joe

    2015-04-01

    Internationally, occupational therapy education has gone through several paradigm shifts during the last few decades, moving from certificate to diploma to bachelors to masters and now in some instances to clinical doctorate as the entry-level professional credential to practice. In the United States there is a recommendation under consideration by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) that by 2025, all occupational therapy university programs will move to the clinical doctorate level. It should be noted, however, that the AOTA Board can only make recommendations and it is the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) who has regulatory authority to approve such a change. What are the potential implications for the profession, our clients, and funders of occupational therapy services? What are the primary drivers for the move towards the clinical doctorate being the educational entry point? Is the next step in the evolution of occupational therapy education globally a shift to the entry-level clinical doctorate? This article reviews current literature and discusses issues about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate. The published evidence available about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate is summarized and the perceived or frequently cited pros and cons of moving to the clinical doctorate as the singular entry point to occupational therapy practice are considered. The potential impacts of the introduction of the clinical doctorate as the entry-to-practice qualification across the United States on the occupational therapy community internationally will be briefly discussed. If the United States moves toward the entry-level clinical doctorate as the only educational starting point for the profession, will other jurisdictions follow suit? Further discourse and investigation of this issue both inside and outside of the United States is needed so that informed decisions can be made.

  3. Melatonin therapy for REM sleep behavior disorder: a critical review of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, Ian R; Leung, Jonathan G; St Louis, Erik K; Boeve, Bradley F

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia associated with dream enactment often involving violent or potentially injurious behaviors during REM sleep that is strongly associated with synucleinopathy neurodegeneration. Clonazepam has long been suggested as the first-line treatment option for RBD. However, evidence supporting melatonin therapy is expanding. Melatonin appears to be beneficial for the management of RBD with reductions in clinical behavioral outcomes and decrease in muscle tonicity during REM sleep. Melatonin also has a favorable safety and tolerability profile over clonazepam with limited potential for drug-drug interactions, an important consideration especially in elderly individuals with RBD receiving polypharmacy. Prospective clinical trials are necessary to establish the evidence basis for melatonin and clonazepam as RBD therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Strategies to promote evidence-based practice in pediatric physical therapy: a formative evaluation pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Joe; Stern, Perri; Marchetti, Gregory; Provident, Ingrid

    2009-09-01

    The physical therapy profession has been perceived as one that bases its practice largely on anecdotal evidence and that uses treatment techniques for which there is little scientific support. Physical therapists have been urged to increase evidence-based practice behaviors as a means to address this perception and to enhance the translation of knowledge from research evidence into clinical practice. However, little attention has been paid to the best ways in which to support clinicians' efforts toward improving evidence-based practice. The purpose of this study was to identify, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of strategies aimed at enhancing the ability of 5 pediatric physical therapists to integrate scientific research evidence into clinical decision making. This study was a formative evaluation pilot project. The participants in this study collaborated with the first author to identify and implement strategies and outcomes aimed at enhancing their ability to use research evidence during clinical decision making. Outcome data were analyzed with qualitative methods. The participants were able to implement several, but not all, of the strategies and made modest self-reported improvements in evidence-based practice behaviors, such as reading journal articles and completing database searches. They identified several barriers, including a lack of time, other influences on clinical decision making, and a lack of incentives for evidence-based practice activities. The pediatric physical therapists who took part in this project had positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice and made modest improvements in this area. It is critical for the profession to continue to investigate optimal strategies to aid practicing clinicians in applying research evidence to clinical decision making.

  5. The Use of Music Therapy During the Treatment of Cancer Patients: A Collection of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Constance; Linden, Ulrike; Boehm, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Background: Music therapy is one of the oldest forms of creative art therapy and has been shown to have effects in different clinical and therapeutic settings, such as schizophrenia, pain, cardiovascular parameters, and dementia. This article provides an overview of some of the recent findings in this field and also reports two single case vignettes that offer insight into day-to-day applications of clinical music therapy. Material and Methods: For the collection of clinical studies of music therapy in oncology, the databases AMED, CAIRSS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and PSYNDEX were searched with the terms “Study OR Trial” AND “Music Therapy” AND “Cancer OR Oncolog$.” Studies were analyzed with respect to their design, setting and interventions, indications, patients, and outcomes. In addition, two case vignettes present the application of music therapy for a child with leukemia and an adult patient with breast cancer. Results: We found a total of 12 clinical studies conducted between 2001 and 2011 comprised of a total of 922 patients. Eight studies had a randomized controlled design, and four studies were conducted in the field of pediatric oncology. Studies reported heterogeneous results on short-term improvements in patients' mood and relaxation and reduced exhaustion and anxiety as well as in coping with the disease and cancer-related pain. Case descriptions showed similar effects in expressing emotions, opening up new goals, and turning the mind toward a healthy process and away form a disease-centered focus. Conclusion: The use of music therapy in the integrative treatment of cancer patients is a therapeutic option whose salutogenetic potential is shown in many case studies such as those presented here. Study results, however, did not draw a conclusive picture of the overall effect of music therapy. In addition to further clinical trials, the evidence mosaic should be complemented with qualitative studies, single case descriptions, and basic

  6. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating disorders : International comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbert, Anja; Hoek, Hans W.; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: The current systematic review sought to compare available evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for all specific eating disorders. Recent findings: Nine evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for eating disorders were located through a systematic search. The

  7. Evidence-based Dental Practice: Part I. Formulating Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) is an approach to oral health care that requires the judicious integration of systematic assessments of clinically relevant scientific evidence, relating to the patient's oral and medical condition and history, with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences.

  8. What should we mean by empirical validation in hypnotherapy: evidence-based practice in clinical hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen; Sabatini, Linda; Amundson, Jon K

    2007-04-01

    This paper briefly surveys the trend of and controversy surrounding empirical validation in psychotherapy. Empirical validation of hypnotherapy has paralleled the practice of validation in psychotherapy and the professionalization of clinical psychology, in general. This evolution in determining what counts as evidence for bona fide clinical practice has gone from theory-driven clinical approaches in the 1960s and 1970s through critical attempts at categorization of empirically supported therapies in the 1990s on to the concept of evidence-based practice in 2006. Implications of this progression in professional psychology are discussed in the light of hypnosis's current quest for validation and empirical accreditation.

  9. A pilot evaluation of therapist training in cognitive therapy for psychosis: therapy quality and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Suzanne; Onwumere, Juliana; Bissoli, Sarah; Bhayani, Pooja; Singh, Gurpreet; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Craig, Tom; Garety, Philippa

    2015-07-01

    Historically, it has been difficult to demonstrate an impact of training in psychological interventions for people with psychosis on routine practice and on patient outcomes. A recent pilot evaluation suggested that postgraduate training in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Psychosis (CBTp) increased the delivery of competent therapy in routine services. In this study, we evaluated clinical outcomes for patients receiving therapy from therapists who successfully completed training, and their association with ratings of therapist competence and therapy content. To characterize the therapy delivered during training and to inform both a calculation of effect size for its clinical impact, and the development of competence benchmarks to ensure that training standards are sufficient to deliver clinical improvement. Paired patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) were extracted from anonymized therapy case reports, and were matched with therapy ratings for each therapist. Twenty clients received a course of competent therapy, including a high frequency of active therapy techniques, from nine therapists. Pre-post effect size for change in psychotic symptoms was large (d = 1.0) and for affect, medium (d = 0.6), but improved outcomes were not associated with therapist competence or therapy content. Therapists trained to research trial standards of competence achieved excellent clinical outcomes. Therapy effect sizes suggest that training costs may be offset by clinical benefit. Larger, methodologically stringent evaluations of training are now required. Future research should assess the necessary and sufficient training required to achieve real-world clinical effectiveness, and the cost-effectiveness of training.

  10. CLINICAL FIELD NOTE - ULTRASOUND THERAPY: GETTING IT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    INTRODUCTION. Ultrasound (US) therapy is a widely-used treatment in physical therapy (PT) (Lindsay, Dearness and McGinley,. 1995; ter Haar, Dyson and Oakley, 1985; Wong, Schumann,. Townsend and Phelps, 2007). The popularity of this modality extends even to specialist orthopaedic physical therapists (Wong et al., ...

  11. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy for inflammatory neuropathy: current evidence base and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is of proven effect in chronic inflammatory neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). In more recent years, there have been a number of anecdotal case reports and small series, followed by a few trials of variable design, of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in these neuropathies. To date, limited evidence suggests that the subcutaneous route may be a more clinically effective, better-tolerated, at least cost-equivalent and a more patient-friendly option than the still more used intravenous alternative. Long-term efficacy is not as yet established in neuropathic indications by randomised controlled clinical trial evidence, and it is likely that the subcutaneous route may not be suitable in all cases with some hints to this effect appearing from the limited data available to date. Further studies are ongoing, including those of dose comparison, and more are likely to be planned in future. The literature on the use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in chronic inflammatory neuropathy is reviewed here. The current use in clinical practice, day-to-day benefits, including quality of life measures and health economics as published thus far, are evaluated. The limitations of this form of treatment in CIDP and MMN are also analysed in the light of current literature and taking into account the remaining unknowns. Future prospects and research with this mode of immunoglobulin therapy administration are discussed.

  12. Clinical and microbiological effects of the initial periodontal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predin Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Periodontitis is a destructive inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, primarily caused by Gram-negative microorganisms. Thus, the primary objective of cause-related initial periodontal therapy is disruption and removal of the subgingival biofilm. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effects of the initial therapy in patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Methods. Forty patients with chronic periodontitis were included in the study. As a part of the clinical assessment undertaken prior to the initial therapy, as well as one month and three months post-therapy, plaque index, gingival index, papilla bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were recorded. Microbiological testing was performed prior to the initial therapy and three months after therapy. Polymerase chain reaction assays were used to determine the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Results. All clinical parameters were significantly reduced after therapy. The prevalence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was reduced by 22.5%, which was a statistically significant decrease compared to the baseline. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis and Prevotella intermedia tended to decrease after therapy; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion. The results of the present study demonstrated the beneficial effects of the initial periodontal therapy on both the clinical and microbiological parameters. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175075

  13. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating disorders: international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja; Hoek, Hans W; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-11-01

    The current systematic review sought to compare available evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for all specific eating disorders. Nine evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for eating disorders were located through a systematic search. The international comparison demonstrated notable commonalities and differences among these current clinical guidelines. Evidence-based clinical guidelines represent an important step toward the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments into clinical practice. Despite advances in clinical research on eating disorders, a growing body of literature demonstrates that individuals with eating disorders often do not receive an evidence-based treatment for their disorder. Regarding the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments, current guidelines do endorse the main empirically validated treatment approaches with considerable agreement, but additional recommendations are largely inconsistent. An increased evidence base is critical in offering clinically useful and reliable guidance for the treatment of eating disorders. Because developing and updating clinical guidelines is time-consuming and complex, an international coordination of guideline development, for example, across the European Union, would be desirable.

  14. Immediate implant therapy in clinical practice: single-tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugazzotto, Paul A; Baker, Richard; Lightfoot, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Once viewed as an esoteric treatment option, implant therapy has demonstrated long-term predictability at least equal to that of more "conventional" treatment modalities. The continued evolution of implant surface technology and restorative options has made implant therapy the treatment modality of choice in many if not most, clinical situations. It is, therefore, only natural that the role of immediate implant therapy continues to expand. Proponents of immediate implant therapy advocate its use at the time of tooth removal or, in a partially or fully edentulous arch, to meet a variety of clinical challenges.

  15. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy. This re......The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy....... This review is based on the English-language literature on the effect of estrogen therapy and estrogen plus progestin therapy on postmenopausal women. The advantages of hormone replacement therapy are regulation of dysfunctional uterine bleeding, relief of hot flushes, and prevention of atrophic changes...... in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin...

  16. Factors influencing radiation therapy student clinical placement satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Pete; Carmichael, Mary-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation therapy students at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) attend clinical placements at five different clinical departments with varying resources and support strategies. This study aimed to determine the relative availability and perceived importance of different factors affecting student support while on clinical placement. The purpose of the research was to inform development of future support mechanisms to enhance radiation therapy students’ experience on clinical placement. Methods: This study used anonymous Likert-style surveys to gather data from years 1 and 2 radiation therapy students from QUT and clinical educators from Queensland relating to availability and importance of support mechanisms during clinical placements in a semester. Results: The study findings demonstrated student satisfaction with clinical support and suggested that level of support on placement influenced student employment choices. Staff support was perceived as more important than physical resources; particularly access to a named mentor, a clinical educator and weekly formative feedback. Both students and educators highlighted the impact of time pressures. Conclusions: The support offered to radiation therapy students by clinical staff is more highly valued than physical resources or models of placement support. Protected time and acknowledgement of the importance of clinical education roles are both invaluable. Joint investment in mentor support by both universities and clinical departments is crucial for facilitation of effective clinical learning

  17. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    relevance to targeted therapies. Our overarching goal is to more effectively bring novel agents and new biomarker driven trials directly to patients...direct relevance to targeted therapies. Our overarching goal is to more effectively bring novel agents and new biomarker driven trials directly to...al: Functional characterization of circulating tumor cells with a prostate-cancer-specific microfluidic device . PLoS One 7:e35976, 2012 21

  18. Combinations of Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiation therapy. The cytokines interferon-α and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiation therapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiation therapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested that radiation therapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study

  19. Combinations of Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Christopher A., E-mail: barkerc@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Postow, Michael A. [Department of Medicine, Melanoma and Sarcoma Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiation therapy. The cytokines interferon-α and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiation therapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiation therapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested that radiation therapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiation therapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study.

  20. EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE – II. CLINICAL USE AND CRITICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Čuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence-based medicine employs systematic searching, evaluation and use of current research findings as the basis for clinical decision-making. However, there are some problems and uncertainties hindering introduction and spreading of the use of the method in clinical practice. Physicians often have no time for literature searching and for use of the method in practice. For certain questions in clinical practice there are no answers in medical literature. Most of the evidences in medical literature are only available in English. Introduction of the method is hampered also by the fact that clinical decision-making is complex and does not allow procedures prescribed in advance. Rigidity and universality of decisions resulting from the evidence may appear impersonal and may affect the relationship between the physician and the patient. Trends towards evidence based medicine are followed also by big multinational pharmaceutical corporations. They carry out large and expensive clinical trials using the results for promotional purposes. In this way, they get the competitive advantage and influence the objectivity of physicians’ clinical decision-making.Conclusions. With introduction of evidence based medicine into clinical practice physicians acquire new information and use a new form of continuing education by following new developments in their field. This way, new findings from medical literature get into clinical practice faster and more efficiently. In addition, physicians get more professional satisfaction and quality in clinical practice is higher.

  1. Classification of clinically useful sentences in clinical evidence resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morid, Mohammad Amin; Fiszman, Marcelo; Raja, Kalpana; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2016-04-01

    Most patient care questions raised by clinicians can be answered by online clinical knowledge resources. However, important barriers still challenge the use of these resources at the point of care. To design and assess a method for extracting clinically useful sentences from synthesized online clinical resources that represent the most clinically useful information for directly answering clinicians' information needs. We developed a Kernel-based Bayesian Network classification model based on different domain-specific feature types extracted from sentences in a gold standard composed of 18 UpToDate documents. These features included UMLS concepts and their semantic groups, semantic predications extracted by SemRep, patient population identified by a pattern-based natural language processing (NLP) algorithm, and cue words extracted by a feature selection technique. Algorithm performance was measured in terms of precision, recall, and F-measure. The feature-rich approach yielded an F-measure of 74% versus 37% for a feature co-occurrence method (pUpToDate sentences (p=0.62). The feature-rich approach significantly outperformed general baseline methods. This approach significantly outperformed classifiers based on a single type of feature. Different types of semantic features provided a unique contribution to overall classification performance. The classifier's model and features used for UpToDate generalized well to Medline abstracts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Alzheimer's disease: Cerebrovascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and advanced clinical therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marlatt, M.W.; Lucassen, P.J.; Perry, G.; Smith, M.A.; Zhu, X.

    2008-01-01

    Many lines of independent research have provided convergent evidence regarding oxidative stress, cerebrovascular disease, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies spurred by these findings engage basic and clinical communities with tangible results regarding molecular targets and

  3. The Quest for Evidence for Proton Therapy: Model-Based Approach and Precision Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schaaf, Arjen van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marijnen, Corrie A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rasch, Coen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Reducing dose to normal tissues is the advantage of protons versus photons. We aimed to describe a method for translating this reduction into a clinically relevant benefit. Methods and Materials: Dutch scientific and health care governance bodies have recently issued landmark reports regarding generation of relevant evidence for new technologies in health care including proton therapy. An approach based on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models has been adopted to select patients who are most likely to experience fewer (serious) adverse events achievable by state-of-the-art proton treatment. Results: By analogy with biologically targeted therapies, the technology needs to be tested in enriched cohorts of patients exhibiting the decisive predictive marker: difference in normal tissue dosimetric signatures between proton and photon treatment plans. Expected clinical benefit is then estimated by virtue of multifactorial NTCP models. In this sense, high-tech radiation therapy falls under precision medicine. As a consequence, randomizing nonenriched populations between photons and protons is predictably inefficient and likely to produce confusing results. Conclusions: Validating NTCP models in appropriately composed cohorts treated with protons should be the primary research agenda leading to urgently needed evidence for proton therapy.

  4. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin......The menopause is defined as cessation of menstruation, ending the fertile period. The hormonal changes are a decrease in progesterone level, followed by a marked decrease in estrogen production. Symptoms associated with these hormonal changes may advocate for hormonal replacement therapy......, but the contribution of progestins for about 10 days every month excludes this risk. Breast cancer in relation to estrogen-progestogen therapy has been given much concern, and the problem is still not fully solved. If there is a risk, it is small, and only after prolonged use of estrogen (15-20 years). The decision...

  5. Clinical experience with electron pseudoarc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, M.R.; Freeman, C.R.; Pla, M.; Guerra, J.; Souhami, L.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1993-01-01

    Between November 1986 and June 1990, 24 patients were treated with electron pseudoarc therapy at McGill University. There were 21 females and three males aged 27 to 81 years (median 62 years). Electron pseudoarc therapy is a treatment option for selected breast carcinoma patients for palliation of extensive chest wall disease, although morbidity may be considerable. The technique may, however, play a more useful role in other situations where the superficial portion of large curved surfaces is to be treated with curative intent, such as chest wall lymphoma and sarcoma, scalp angiosarcoma, scalp lymphoma and posterior cervical soft tissue sarcoma. (Author)

  6. Prediction of higher cost of antiretroviral therapy (ART) according to clinical complexity. A validated clinical index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Cesar; Pérez, Inaki; Podzamczer, Daniel; Llibre, Josep Maria; Domingo, Pere; González-García, Juan; Puig, Inma; Ayala, Pilar; Martín, Mayte; Trilla, Antoni; Lázaro, Pablo; Gatell, Josep Maria

    2016-03-01

    The financing of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is generally determined by the cost incurred in the previous year, the number of patients on treatment, and the evidence-based recommendations, but not the clinical characteristics of the population. To establish a score relating the cost of ART and patient clinical complexity in order to understand the costing differences between hospitals in the region that could be explained by the clinical complexity of their population. Retrospective analysis of patients receiving ART in a tertiary hospital between 2009 and 2011. Factors potentially associated with a higher cost of ART were assessed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. Two predictive models of "high-cost" were developed. The normalized estimated (adjusted for the complexity scores) costs were calculated and compared with the normalized real costs. In the Hospital Index, 631 (16.8%) of the 3758 patients receiving ART were responsible for a "high-cost" subgroup, defined as the highest 25% of spending on ART. Baseline variables that were significant predictors of high cost in the Clinic-B model in the multivariate analysis were: route of transmission of HIV, AIDS criteria, Spanish nationality, year of initiation of ART, CD4+ lymphocyte count nadir, and number of hospital admissions. The Clinic-B score ranged from 0 to 13, and the mean value (5.97) was lower than the overall mean value of the four hospitals (6.16). The clinical complexity of the HIV patient influences the cost of ART. The Clinic-B and Clinic-BF scores predicted patients with high cost of ART and could be used to compare and allocate costs corrected for the patient clinical complexity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Target Therapies for Uterine Carcinosarcomas: Current Evidence and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Giovanni Vitale

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carcinosarcomas (CS in gynecology are very infrequent and represent only 2–5% of uterine cancers. Despite surgical cytoreduction and subsequent chemotherapy being the primary treatment for uterine CS, the overall five-year survival rate is 30 ± 9% and recurrence is extremely common (50–80%. Due to the poor prognosis of CS, new strategies have been developed in the last few decades, targeting known dysfunctional molecular pathways for immunotherapy. In this paper, we aimed to gather the available evidence on the latest therapies for the treatment of CS. We performed a systematic review using the terms “uterine carcinosarcoma”, “uterine Malignant Mixed Müllerian Tumors”, “target therapies”, “angiogenesis therapy”, “cancer stem cell therapy”, “prognostic biomarker”, and “novel antibody-drug”. Based on our results, the differential expression and accessibility of epithelial cell adhesion molecule-1 on metastatic/chemotherapy-resistant CS cells in comparison to normal tissues and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2 open up new possibilities in the field of target therapy. Nevertheless, future investigations are needed to clarify the impact of these new therapies on survival rate and medium-/long-term outcomes.

  8. Clinical Perspective Cognitive behavioral therapy for adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many interventions are available for treating adolescent depression. This paper attempts to present a summary of cognitive behavioral therapies/techniques that might be useful for treating depression in Asian immigrant adolescents. Articles were selected by conducting a literature search on Psyc-Info. Prevalence ...

  9. Development of a Best Evidence Statement for the Use of Pressure Therapy for Management of Hypertrophic Scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Patricia A; Pan, Brian; Yakuboff, Kevin P; Rothchild, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Pressure therapy has been considered standard, first-line intervention for the treatment of hypertrophic scars since its introduction in the 1960s. Although widely used, this scar management technique has historically been based on a wide array of anecdotal evidence as opposed to strong scientific support. Evidence has become more prevalent in recent years, necessitating a synthesis to develop an evidence-based clinical guideline. The clinical question was asked, "Among individuals with or at risk to develop active hypertrophic scars, does treatment with pressure therapy improve aesthetic and functional outcomes?" An evidence-based practice project was completed with aims to synthesize relevant literature to determine recommendations for the use of pressure therapy in individuals at risk for hypertrophic scars. A systematic search of the literature was conducted for the dates January 1950 to February 2014 of the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews, Burntherapist.com, Cochrane Libraries, Ebsco, Google Scholar, OT Seeker, Ovid, MedLine, PEDro.org, Pubmed.gov, Pubmed Clinical Queries, and hand search of relevant articles through use of reference lists. Search terms included scar, hypertroph*, pressure therapy, compression therapy, pressure garment, burn, scald, trauma as well as MeSH terms cicatrix and hypertrophic. Articles were reviewed in terms of ability to answer the clinical question as well as strength of conclusions. A total of 45 articles were found and critiqued, 28 of which were relevant to the clinical question. Evidence strength ranged from level 1 to level 5. Results from the studies were synthesized to create clinical recommendations to guide treatment. Based on best available evidence, it is recommended that pressure therapy is utilized to decrease scar height and erythema that it is used for grafts and wounds requiring 14 to 21 days to heal, for 23 hours/day for 12 months, fit to achieve 20 to 30 mm Hg of

  10. Endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with breast cancer: a critical appraisal of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemurro, Filippo; Del Mastro, Lucia; De Laurentiis, Michele; Puglisi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 60% of all breast cancer premenopausal women are diagnosed with a hormone receptor positive tumor and, therefore, are candidates for adjuvant hormonal therapy. Treatment with tamoxifen for at least 5 years has been for a long time the standard of care, as it is associated with overall positive clinical outcomes. However, in the last decade, a number of studies on adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer have been published, adding a bulk of evidence to existing knowledge in this field. A critical appraisal of their results appears necessary in order to put the recently collected data into the current framework of treatment, and to discuss the several issues that remain open. Here, we review the most recent evidence on the following: the optimal duration of tamoxifen treatment, results of the studies comparing tamoxifen alone to tamoxifen plus ovarian function suppression (OFS), results of the studies comparing tamoxifen plus OFS to aromatase inhibitors plus OFS.

  11. Animal-assisted therapy at an outpatient pain management clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Constantin, Janet M; Kunkel, Frank A; Breuer, Paula; Hanlon, Raymond B

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of brief therapy dog visits to an outpatient pain management facility compared with time spent in a waiting room. The design of this study is open-label. Setting.  This study was conducted in a university tertiary care adult chronic pain outpatient clinic. The subjects of this study include outpatients, adults accompanying outpatients to their appointments, and clinic staff. Intervention.  Participants were able to spend clinic waiting time with a certified therapy dog instead of waiting in the outpatient waiting area. When the therapy dog was not available, individuals remained in the waiting area. Self-reported pain, fatigue, and emotional distress were recorded using 11-point numeric rating scales before and after the therapy dog visit or waiting room time. Two hundred ninety-five therapy dog visits (235 with patients, 34 family/friends, and 26 staff) and 96 waiting room surveys (83 from patients, 6 family/friends, and 7 staff) were completed over a 2-month study period. Significant improvements were reported for pain, mood, and other measures of distress among patients after the therapy dog visit but not the waiting room control, with clinically meaningful pain relief (decrease ≥2 points) in 23% after the therapy dog visit and 4% in the waiting room control. Significant improvements were likewise seen after therapy dog visits for family/friends and staff. Therapy dog visits in an outpatient setting can provide significant reduction in pain and emotional distress for chronic pain patients. Therapy dog visits can also significantly improve emotional distress and feelings of well-being in family and friends accompanying patients to appointments and clinic staff. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evidence-Based Clinical Voice Assessment: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nelson; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie; Eadie, Tanya; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Mehta, Daryush; Paul, Diane; Hillman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what research evidence exists to support the use of voice measures in the clinical assessment of patients with voice disorders. Method: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Center for Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders staff searched 29 databases for peer-reviewed English-language…

  13. Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Assessing the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez de Arellano, Michael A.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; George, Preethy; Dougherty, Richard H.; Daniels, Allen S.; Ghose, Sushmita Shoma; Huang, Larke; Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) is a conjoint parent-child treatment developed by Cohen, Mannarino, and Deblinger that uses cognitive-behavioral principles and exposure techniques to prevent and treat posttraumatic stress, depression, and behavioral problems. This review defined TF-CBT, differentiated it from other models, and assessed the evidence base. Methods Authors reviewed meta-analyses, reviews, and individual studies (1995 to 2013). Databases surveyed were PubMed, PsycINFO, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, PILOTS, the ERIC, and the CINAHL. They chose from three levels of research evidence (high, moderate, and low) on the basis of benchmarks for number of studies and quality of their methodology. They also described the evidence of effectiveness. Results The level of evidence for TF-CBT was rated as high on the basis of ten RCTs, three of which were conducted independently (not by TF-CBT developers). TF-CBT has demonstrated positive outcomes in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, although it is less clear whether TF-CBT is effective in reducing behavior problems or symptoms of depression. Limitations of the studies include concerns about investigator bias and exclusion of vulnerable populations. Conclusions TF-CBT is a viable treatment for reducing trauma-related symptoms among some children who have experienced trauma and their nonoffending caregivers. Based on this evidence, TF-CBT should be available as a covered service in health plans. Ongoing research is needed to further identify best practices for TF-CBT in various settings and with individuals from various racial and ethnic backgrounds and with varied trauma histories, symptoms, and stages of intellectual, social, and emotional development. PMID:24638076

  14. [Effect of data management quality on clinical research evidence evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong-yang; Li, Qing-na; Zhao, Yang; Li, Bo; Rui, Gao

    2015-02-01

    Current clinical evaluation of literature quality has various ways. Most of them lay special emphasis on the evaluation of the design quality, but the evaluation of the implementation process quality is not perfect. Especially data management is not fully emphasized during the enforcement of clinical trials. Data from clinical research were bases for evaluating clinical findings. Although strict specifications and requirements for data management might be strictly written clearly in research protocols, they were not embodied in current clinical research evidence evaluation system. Data management is an important part of implementing the whole clinical trial process, which is a comprehensive reflection of data collecting, logging, sorting, and managing. Its objective is to obtain high quality research data for statistical analysis, thereby coming to a true and reliable conclusion. In order to overall evaluating clinical design and implement, we suggest that present quality evaluation indicators of clinical trails should be completed, and add data management quality evaluation during the whole implement process. Data management plans, standards and requirements for data checking, and management regulations for disobeying data and exception data should be added in quality evaluation indicators for clinical research evidence. The effect of data management quality on clinical research evidence evaluation should be emphasized.

  15. TU-G-BRB-02: Clinical Trials in Particle Therapy - Open Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, H. [UT Southwestern Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  16. TU-G-BRB-00: Clinical Trials in Proton and Particle Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  17. Adapting and implementing an evidence-based treatment with justice-involved adolescents: the example of multidimensional family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Howard A

    2014-09-01

    For over four decades family therapy research and family centered evidence-based therapies for justice-involved youths have played influential roles in changing policies and services for these young people and their families. But research always reveals challenges as well as advances. To be sure, demonstration that an evidence-based therapy yields better outcomes than comparison treatments or services as usual is an accomplishment. But the extraordinary complexity embedded in that assertion feels tiny relative to what we are now learning about the so-called transfer of evidence-based treatments to real world practice settings. Today's family therapy studies continue to assess outcome with diverse samples and presenting problems, but research and funding priorities also include studying particular treatments in nonresearch settings. Does an evidence-based intervention work as well in a community clinic, with clinic personnel? How much of a treatment has to change to be accepted and implemented in a community clinic? Perhaps it is the setting and existing procedures that have to change? And, in those cases, do accommodations to the context compromise outcomes? Thankfully, technology transfer notions gave way to more systemic, dynamic, and frankly, more family therapy-like conceptions of the needed process. Implementation science became the more sensible, as well as the theoretically and empirically stronger overarching framework within which the evidence-based family based therapies now operate. Using the example of Multidimensional Family Therapy, this article discusses treatment development, refinement, and implementation of that adapted approach in a particular clinical context-a sector of the juvenile justice system-juvenile detention. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  18. Clinical Perspective Cognitive behavioral therapy for adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... CWD-A, Beck's CBT are provided. A rationale for the use of these with Asian immigrants is hypothesized. There is no empirical evidence for the efficacy of CBT with this population. A need to validate the use of CBT with this population is asserted. Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health 2006, 18(1): 27–32 ...

  19. Intranasal insulin therapy: the clinical realities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, Sten; Hvidberg, A

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate metabolic control and safety parameters (hypoglycaemia frequency and nasal mucosa physiology), 31 insulin-dependent diabetic patients were treated with intranasal insulin at mealtimes for 1 month and with subcutaneous fast-acting insulin at meals for another month in an open, crossover...... was low, since intranasal insulin doses were approximately 20 times higher than subcutaneous doses. The frequency of hypoglycaemia was similar during intranasal and subcutaneous insulin therapy, and nasal mucosa physiology was unaffected after intranasal insulin. We conclude that due to low...

  20. Evidence from the Cochrane Collaboration for Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Susan; Kimbrough, Elizabeth; Cheng, Ker; Berman, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The Cochrane Collaboration, an international not-for-profit organization that prepares and maintains systematic reviews of randomized trials of health care therapies, has produced reviews summarizing much of the evidence on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Our objective was to review the evidence base according to Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods In order to detect reviews focusing on TCM, we searched the titles and abstracts of all reviews in Issue 4, 2008 of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. For each review, we extracted data on the number of trials included and the total number of participants. We provided an indication of the strength of the review findings by assessing the reviewers' abstract conclusions statement. We supplemented our assessment of the abstract conclusions statements with a listing of the comparisons and outcomes showing statistically significant meta-analyses results. Results We identified 70 Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM, primarily acupuncture (n = 26) and Chinese herbal medicine (n = 42), and 1 each of moxibustion and t'ai chi. Nineteen (19) of 26 acupuncture reviews and 22/42 herbal medicine reviews concluded that there was not enough good quality trial evidence to make any conclusion about the efficacy of the evaluated treatment, while the remaining 7 acupuncture and 20 herbal medicine reviews and each of the moxibustion and t'ai chi reviews indicated a suggestion of benefit, which was qualified by a caveat about the poor quality and quantity of studies. Most reviews included many distinct interventions, controls, outcomes, and populations, and a large number of different comparisons were made, each with a distinct forest plot. Conclusions Most Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM are inconclusive, due specifically to the poor methodology and heterogeneity of the studies reviewed. Some systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence of Chinese medicine's benefits to certain patient populations

  1. Current evidence and applications of photodynamic therapy in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Marilyn T; Lin, Jennifer Y

    2014-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT) a photosensitizer – a molecule that is activated by light – is administered and exposed to a light source. This leads both to destruction of cells targeted by the particular type of photosensitizer, and immunomodulation. Given the ease with which photosensitizers and light can be delivered to the skin, it should come as no surprise that PDT is an increasingly utilized therapeutic in dermatology. PDT is used commonly to treat precancerous cells, sun-damaged skin, and acne. It has reportedly also been used to treat other conditions including inflammatory disorders and cutaneous infections. This review discusses the principles behind how PDT is used in dermatology, as well as evidence for current applications of PDT. PMID:24899818

  2. Clinical application of photon activation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahbauer, R.; Goodman, J.H.; Clendenon, N.; Kanellitsas, C.; Fairchild, R.; Laster, B.

    1985-01-01

    Despite small improvements in median survival, high-grade astrocytoma remains a lethal disease with only anecdotal long-term survivors. The Brain Tumor Study Group Protocols have confirmed the value of radiation therapy and have further demonstrated that a dose-response relationship exists with doses of 5000, 5500, and 6000 cGy. However, 6000 cGy remains the upper limit of dose tolerated if external radiation therapy is used. Therefore the authors propose to combine the advantages of brachytherapy and sensitizers with halogenated pyrimidines (IUDR). By using stereotactically placed radiation sources with energies slightly above the K absorption edge of iodine they expect to obtain a significant further increase in therapeutic effect. This is due to enhancement of the physical dose, which is, furthermore, of higher biological effectiveness. Responsible for this effect are Auger electrons created in the process, which deposit their energy within the diameter of the nucleus. The dose delivered by Auger electrons is in many respects comparable with high-LET radiation. Since selective uptake of IUDR in brain tumor cells is assumed, the dose enhancement would localize itself into the tumor. Normal brain tolerance should be little, if at all, affected since normal brain would receive only low-LET radiation from the implanted samarium sources

  3. Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy vs No Therapy in Mild to Moderate Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Carl E; Patel, Smitaa; Ives, Natalie; Rick, Caroline E; Dowling, Francis; Woolley, Rebecca; Wheatley, Keith; Walker, Marion F; Sackley, Catherine M

    2016-03-01

    adverse events. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy were not associated with immediate or medium-term clinically meaningful improvements in ADL or quality of life in mild to moderate PD. This evidence does not support the use of low-dose, patient-centered, goal-directed physiotherapy and occupational therapy in patients in the early stages of PD. Future research should explore the development and testing of more structured and intensive physical and occupational therapy programs in patients with all stages of PD. isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN17452402.

  4. Nonpharmacological therapy for the management of neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer's disease: linking evidence to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staedtler, Amber V; Nunez, Diane

    2015-04-01

    Behavioral and psychiatric symptoms of dementia affect up to 90% of all patients at some point during their dementing illness. Today, many of these symptoms are treated with pharmacological therapy alone, incongruent with clinical recommendations. Barriers to the use of nonpharmacological interventions with dementia include a lack of education among caregivers on available options, shortage of time for implementation, lack of education on effects of nonpharmacological therapy, poor staff to resident ratios, and unmodifiable physical environments. The purpose of this paper is to explore current literature regarding the implementation of nonpharmacological therapy as an adjunct treatment to manage agitation in dementia, to identify practice discrepancies seen commonly among formal and informal caregivers, and to make recommendations for implementing evidence into practice. A systematic review of the literature published between 2009 and 2014 was conducted. Four databases were searched including CINAHL, Pubmed, the Cochrane Library, and PsycInfo. The most prevalent and substantial conclusion among the 10 studies evaluated is that nonpharmacological therapy is safe and effective. Although not every study was able to show statistically significant outcomes when compared to controls, all studies demonstrated a positive trend toward decreasing agitation without any adverse side effects. A multicomponent caregiver education program focused on evidence-based nonpharmacological strategies for addressing agitation in persons with Alzheimer's disease has the potential to decrease agitation, improve patient outcomes, and increase caregiver satisfaction. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Retrieving clinical evidence: a comparison of PubMed and Google Scholar for quick clinical searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Salimah Z; Bejaimal, Shayna Ad; Sontrop, Jessica M; Iansavichus, Arthur V; Haynes, R Brian; Weir, Matthew A; Garg, Amit X

    2013-08-15

    Physicians frequently search PubMed for information to guide patient care. More recently, Google Scholar has gained popularity as another freely accessible bibliographic database. To compare the performance of searches in PubMed and Google Scholar. We surveyed nephrologists (kidney specialists) and provided each with a unique clinical question derived from 100 renal therapy systematic reviews. Each physician provided the search terms they would type into a bibliographic database to locate evidence to answer the clinical question. We executed each of these searches in PubMed and Google Scholar and compared results for the first 40 records retrieved (equivalent to 2 default search pages in PubMed). We evaluated the recall (proportion of relevant articles found) and precision (ratio of relevant to nonrelevant articles) of the searches performed in PubMed and Google Scholar. Primary studies included in the systematic reviews served as the reference standard for relevant articles. We further documented whether relevant articles were available as free full-texts. Compared with PubMed, the average search in Google Scholar retrieved twice as many relevant articles (PubMed: 11%; Google Scholar: 22%; PGoogle Scholar: 8%; P=.07). Google Scholar provided significantly greater access to free full-text publications (PubMed: 5%; Google Scholar: 14%; PGoogle Scholar returns twice as many relevant articles as PubMed and provides greater access to free full-text articles.

  6. Clinical relevance of "withdrawal therapy" as a form of hormonal manipulation for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson John FR

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown in in-vitro experiments that "withdrawal" of tamoxifen inhibits growth of tumor cells. However, evidence is scarce when this is extrapolated into clinical context. We report our experience to verify the clinical relevance of "withdrawal therapy". Methods Breast cancer patients since 1998 who fulfilled the following criteria were selected from the departmental database and the case-notes were retrospectively reviewed: (1 estrogen receptor positive, operable primary breast cancer in elderly (age > 70 years, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer; (2 disease deemed suitable for treatment by hormonal manipulation; (3 disease assessable by UICC criteria; (4 received "withdrawal" from a prior endocrine agent as a form of therapy; (5 on "withdrawal therapy" for ≥ 6 months unless they progressed prior. Results Seventeen patients with median age of 84.3 (53.7-92.5 had "withdrawal therapy" as second to tenth line of treatment following prior endocrine therapy using tamoxifen (n = 10, an aromatase inhibitor (n = 5, megestrol acetate (n = 1 or fulvestrant (n = 1. Ten patients (58.8% had clinical benefit (CB (complete response/partial response/stable disease ≥ 6 months with a median duration of Clinical Benefit (DoCB of 10+ (7-27 months. Two patients remain on "withdrawal therapy" at the time of analysis. Conclusion "Withdrawal therapy" appears to produce sustained CB in a significant proportion of patients. This applies not only to "withdrawal" from tamoxifen, but also from other categories of endocrine agents. "Withdrawal" from endocrine therapy is, therefore, a viable intercalating option between endocrine agents to minimise resistance and provide additional line of therapy. It should be considered as part of the sequencing of endocrine therapy.

  7. Combination of radiation injuries: pathogenesis, clinic, therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyba, A.F.; Farshatova, M.N.

    1993-01-01

    Modern notions on combined radiation injuries (CRI) are presented. Characteristic of injurious factors of nuclear explosion and common regularities of the CRI origination is given. The data on the CRI clinical peculiarities, diagnostics and treatment, principles of medical assistance for the injured on the stages of medical evacuation and recommendations on rehabilitation are presented

  8. Clinical applications of bovine colostrum therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Müller, Klaus; Sangild, Per Torp

    2014-01-01

    not be confirmed by other investigators. Bovine colostrum may provide gastrointestinal and immunological benefits, but further studies are required before recommendations can be made for clinical application. Animal models may help researchers to better understand the mechanisms of bovine colostrum supplementation...

  9. [Clinical application of moving cupping therapy based on skin reaction observation and syndrome differentiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiao-Lan; Chen, Bo; Chen, Ze-Lin

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic evidence on clinical diseases and theoretic basis of moving cupping therapy were ex- plored in the paper. By the observation of the local reaction, such as skin appearance and color, the affected location, duration of sickness and nature of disease were judged. Different moving cupping methods were selected for different disorders. It was discovered that the property of syndromes should be recognized by the palpation on skin and muscle in the moving cupping therapy so that the pathogenesis and treating principle could be carefully determined. The moving cupping therapy is the important component of body surface therapy. Skin reaction observation and syndrome differentiation is the essential guidance of the moving cupping therapy.

  10. Clinical results of radiation therapy for thymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Sasai, Keisuke; Kitakabu, Yoshizumi; Abe, Mitsuyuki (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, Masaji; Tsutsui, Kazushige; Fushiki, Masato

    1992-05-01

    From August 1968 to December 1989, 58 patients with thymoma were treated by radiotherapy using cobalt-60 gamma ray. Eleven cases were treated by radiothrapy alone, 1 by preoperative radiotheapy, 43 by postoperative radiotherapy, and 3 in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy. The following points were clarified: (a) Postoperative and intraoperative radiotherapy were effective; (b) For postoperative radiotherapy, operability was the major factor influencing survival and local control, and Stage I and II tumors resected totally or subtotally as well as Stage III tumors resected totally were good indications for such therapy; (c) The patients with complicating myasthenia gravis had a longer survival time and better local control rate than those without it. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 17 patients, and none of them died of this complication. In all cases in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy, dry desquamation was observed within the irradiated field. (author).

  11. Professionally applied topical fluoride: evidence-based clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    With the dramatic increase in the amount of scientific information available about oral health, an evidence-based approach to oral health care and the practice of dentistry is necessary. There is a need to summarize, critique, and disseminate scientific evidence and to translate the evidence into a practical format that is used easily by dentists. The evidence-based clinical recommendations in this report were developed by an expert panel established by the American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs that evaluated the collective body of scientific evidence on the effectiveness of professionally applied topical fluoride for caries prevention. The recommendations are intended to assist dentists in clinical decision making. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched for systematic reviews and clinical studies of professionally applied topical fluoride-including gel, foam, and varnish-through October 2005. Panelists were selected on the basis of their expertise in the relevant subject matter. The recommendations are stratified by age groups and caries risk and indicate that periodic fluoride treatments should be considered for both children and adults who are at moderate or high risk of developing caries. Included in the clinical recommendations is a summary table that can be used as a chairside resource. The dentist, knowing the patient's health history and vulnerability to oral disease, is in the best position to make treatment decisions in the interest of each patient. These clinical recommendations must be balanced with the practitioner's professional expertise and the individual patient's preferences.

  12. Uniformity of Evidence-Based Treatments in Practice? Therapist Effects in the Delivery of Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Kevin M.; Smith, Tracey L.; Wislocki, Andrew P.; Minami, Takuya; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Various factors contribute to the effective implementation of evidence-based treatments (EBTs). In this study, cognitive processing therapy (CPT) was administered in a Veterans Affairs (VA) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specialty clinic in which training and supervision were provided following VA implementation guidelines. The…

  13. Dutch evidence statement for pelvic physical therapy in patients with anal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghmans, L C M; Groot, J A M; van Heeswijk-Faase, I C; Bols, E M J

    2015-04-01

    To promote agreement among and support the quality of pelvic physiotherapists' skills and clinical reasoning in The Netherlands, an Evidence Statement Anal Incontinence (AI) was developed based on the practice-driven problem definitions outlined. We present a summary of the current state of knowledge and formulate recommendations for a methodical assessment and treatment for patients with AI, and place the evidence in a broader perspective of current developments. Electronic literature searches were conducted in relevant databases with regard to prevalence, incidence, costs, etiological and prognostic factors, predictors of response to therapy, prevention, assessment, and treatment. The recommendations have been formulated on the basis of scientific evidence and where no evidence was available, recommendations were consensus-based. The evidence statement incorporates a practice statement with corresponding notes that clarify the recommendations, and accompanying flowcharts, describing the steps and recommendations with regard to the diagnostic and therapeutic process. The diagnostic process consists of history-taking and physical examination supported by measurement instruments. For each problem category for patients with AI, a certain treatment plan can be distinguished dependent on the presence of pelvic floor dysfunction, awareness of loss of stools, comorbidity, neurological problems, adequate anorectal sensation, and (in)voluntary control. Available evidence and expert opinion support the use of education, pelvic floor muscle training, biofeedback, and electrostimulation in selected patients. The evidence statement reflects the current state of knowledge for a methodical and systematic physical therapeutic assessment and treatment for patients with AI.

  14. Use of TNF blockers and other targeted therapies in rare refractory immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: evidence-based or rational?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, D.; van Hagen, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine implies that clinical decision making should be based on external research evidence when available. This external evidence includes, but is certainly not restricted to, randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The development of powerful but often expensive targeted therapies for

  15. Energy Therapies in Advanced Practice Oncology: An Evidence-Informed Practice Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions in cancer care; a description of the author’s professional experience with TT, HT, and Reiki in practice and research; an overview of the three energy healing modalities; a review of nine clinical studies related to oncology; and recommendations for EIP. These studies demonstrate a response to previous research design critiques. Findings indicate a positive benefit for oncology patients in the realms of pain, quality of life, fatigue, health function, and mood. Directionality of healing in immune response and cell line studies affirms the usual explanation that these therapies bring harmony and balance to the system in the direction of health. Foremost, the research literature demonstrates the safety of these therapies. In order to consider the varieties of evidence for TT, HT, and Reiki, EIP requires a qualitative examination of patient experiences with these modalities, exploration of where these modalities have been integrated into cancer care and how the practice works in the oncology setting, and discovery of the impact of implementation on provider practice and self-care. Next steps toward EIP require fleshing out the experience of these modalities by patients and health-care providers in the oncology care setting. PMID:25031994

  16. [Chemonucleolysis and intradiscal electrothermal therapy: what is the current evidence?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder-Puig, R; Gyimesi, M; Mittermayr, T; Geiger-Gritsch, S

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of chemonucleolysis and intradiscal electrothermal therapy (IDET) on the basis of the data presented in recently published papers with respect to pain relief, function, and complication rates. Detailed searches for English and German articles published between 2003 and 2008 were performed in a number of electronic databases. Further publications were identified by manual search. For summarizing the evidence, we considered only systematic reviews and controlled studies. The internal validity of reviews and studies was judged by two authors independently. Data extraction was performed by one author, and the extracted data was checked for completeness and correctness by a second author. The evidence of the efficacy of chemonucleolysis using chymopapain or collagenase is summarized in two recent, high-quality systematic reviews. We found 5 controlled studies evaluating nucleolysis using an oxygen-ozone mixture (O (2)O (3)-nucleolysis). Some of those studies were of limited methodological quality, but all showed the efficacy of O (2)O (3)-nucleolysis in comparison to microdiscectomy or the use of alternative substances. There is hardly any data regarding O (2)O (3)-nucleolysis complications. Regarding IDET, the authors of the 6 identified systematic reviews come to different conclusions about the efficacy of the procedure. The results of the 3 included controlled IDET studies, of which 2 are of high methodological quality, are also conflicting. The complication rates range from 0 to 15 %. In summary, the evidence of efficacy is presently more compelling for chemonucleolysis than for IDET. This may also be because indications for chemonucleolysis are more firmly established. However, safety aspects should be better evaluated and presented in the literature. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  17. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer

  18. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    a multi-institutional infrastructure incorporating 5 leading prostate cancer clinical sites, 2 sequencing and computational analysis sites, linked...unacceptable toxicity. Radiological assesment were defined according PCWG2 criteria and RECIST 1.1. Results: 64 pts were identified, 47 met all criteria

  19. Using levels of evidence to compare clinical impact from research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tashfeen; Chinoy, Muhammad Amin; Tayyab, Muhammad

    2014-02-01

    Impact of medical institutions on clinical decision-making globally might be estimated by the level of evidence of their research articles. The aim of this study was to compare levels of evidence of articles for Pakistan. We compared levels of evidence of articles from Pakistan, Nigeria, Japan, and the United States (U.S.). Majority (73%) of articles in U.S. general medical journals were high levels (1-2), while majority (66% to 95%) in Japanese, Nigerian, Pakistani, and sub-specialty U.S. journals were lower levels (3-4) (P evidence of articles across institutions might reflect relative potential of clinical impact, and might be useful for institutions, policy makers, and health research planners for priority setting. © 2014 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Antimicrobial therapy of acute diarrhoea: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübbert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhoea is one of the most commonly occurring diseases. This article presents a review of the current state of the treatment of acute infectious diarrhoea, as well as of the most important pathogens. The general principles of the therapy of diarrhoea are exemplified, followed by a description of the targeted antimicrobial therapy of the most important bacterial gastrointestinal infections, including salmonellosis, shigellosis and Campylobacter infections, as well as infections with pathogenic Escherichia coli strains, yersiniosis and cholera. Diarrhoea caused by toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains has increased in incidence and in severity. These infections will therefore be described in detail, including important new aspects of treatment. Symptomatic therapy is still the most important component of the treatment of infectious diarrhoea. However, empirical antibiotic therapy should be considered for severely ill patients with a high frequency of stools, fever, bloody diarrhoea, underlying immune deficiency, advanced age or significant comorbidities. Increasing resistance, in particular against fluoroquinolones, must be taken into consideration. Therapy with motility inhibitors is not recommended for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections, Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and severe colitis. The macrocyclic antibiotic fidaxomicin can reduce the rate of recurrent disease in CDI. Furthermore, evidence for the benefits of faecal microbiota transplantation as a treatment option for multiple recurrences of CDI is increasing. In conclusion, the treatment of acute diarrhoea is still primarily supportive. General empirical antibiotic therapy for acute diarrhoea is not evidence-based.

  1. Complement in clinical medicine: Clinical trials, case reports and therapy monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2017-09-01

    Research during past decades made it evident that complement is involved in more tasks than fighting infections, but has important roles in other immune surveillance and housekeeping functions. If the balance between complement activation and regulation is out of tune, however, complement can quickly turn against the host and contribute to adverse processes that result in various clinical conditions. Whereas clinical awareness was initially focused on complement deficiencies, excessive activation and insufficient regulation are frequently the dominant factors in complement-related disorders. The individual complement profile of a patient often determines the course and severity of the disease, and the pathophysiological involvement of complement may be highly diverse. As a consequence, complement assays have evolved as essential tools not only in initial diagnosis but also for following disease progression and for monitoring complement-targeted therapies, which become increasingly available in routine clinical use. We herein review the current state of complement-directed drug candidates in clinical evaluation and provide an overview of extended indications considered for the FDA-approved inhibitor eculizumab. Furthermore we review the literature describing cases reports and case series where eculizumab has been used "off-label". Finally, we give a summary of the currently available tests to measure complement profiles and discuss their suitability in diagnostics and treatment monitoring. With complement finally entering the clinical arena, there are intriguing opportunities for treating complement-mediated diseases. However, this progress also requires a new awareness about complement pathophysiology, adequate diagnostic tools and suitable treatment options among clinicians treating patients with such disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical trials for stem cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounson, Alan; Thakar, Rahul G; Lomax, Geoff; Gibbons, Don

    2011-05-10

    In recent years, clinical trials with stem cells have taken the emerging field in many new directions. While numerous teams continue to refine and expand the role of bone marrow and cord blood stem cells for their vanguard uses in blood and immune disorders, many others are looking to expand the uses of the various types of stem cells found in bone marrow and cord blood, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, to uses beyond those that could be corrected by replacing cells in their own lineage. Early results from these trials have produced mixed results often showing minor or transitory improvements that may be attributed to extracellular factors. More research teams are accelerating the use of other types of adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells for diseases where beneficial outcome could result from either in-lineage cell replacement or extracellular factors. At the same time, the first three trials using cells derived from pluripotent cells have begun.

  3. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Implementing evidence-based models in community settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szapocznik, José; Muir, Joan A.; Duff, Johnathan H.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2014-01-01

    Reflecting a nearly 40-year collaborative partnership between clinical researchers and clinicians, the present article reviews the authors’ experience in developing, investigating, and implementing the Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) model. The first section of the article focuses on the theory, practice, and studies related to this evidence-based family therapy intervention targeting adolescent drug abuse and delinquency. The second section focuses on the implementation model created for the BSFT intervention– a model that parallels many of the recommendations furthered within the implementation science literature. Specific challenges encountered during the BSFT implementation process are reviewed, along with ways of conceptualizing and addressing these challenges from a systemic perspective. The implementation approach that we employ uses the same systemic principles and intervention techniques as those that underlie the BSFT model itself. Recommendations for advancing the field of implementation science, based on our on-the-ground experiences, are proposed. PMID:24274187

  4. Assessing Fidelity to Evidence-Based Practices in Usual Care: The Example of Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a multimethod evaluation of treatment fidelity to the family therapy (FT) approach demonstrated by front-line therapists in a community behavioral health clinic that utilized FT as its routine standard of care. Study cases (N = 50) were adolescents with conduct and/or substance use problems randomly assigned to routine family therapy (RFT) or to a treatment-as-usual clinic not aligned with the FT approach (TAU). Observational analyses showed that RFT therapists consistently achieved a level of adherence to core FT techniques comparable to the adherence benchmark established during an efficacy trial of a research-based FT. Analyses of therapist-report measures found that compared to TAU, RFT demonstrated strong adherence to FT and differentiation from three other evidence-based practices: cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and drug counseling. Implications for rigorous fidelity assessments of evidence-based practices in usual care settings are discussed. PMID:23314000

  5. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the ''Holy Gray''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brans, B. [University Hospital Maastricht, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bodei, L. [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Giammarile, F. [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Linden, O.; Tennvall, J. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Lund (Sweden); Luster, M. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Oyen, W.J.G. [University Medical Center Nijmegen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each case, emphasis is placed on the level of evidence and practical applicability. Although dosimetry has been of enormous value in the preclinical phase of radiopharmaceutical development, its clinical use to optimise administered activity on an individual patient basis has been less evident. In phase I and II trials, dosimetry may be considered an inherent part of therapy to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose-response relationship. To prove that dosimetry-based radionuclide therapy is of additional benefit over fixed dosing or dosing per kilogram body weight, prospective randomised phase III trials with appropriate end points have to be undertaken. Data in the literature which underscore the potential of dosimetry to avoid under- and overdosing and to standardise radionuclide therapy methods internationally are very scarce. In each section, particular developments and insights into these therapies are related to opportunities for dosimetry. The recent developments in PET and PET/CT imaging, including micro-devices for animal research, and molecular medicine provide major challenges for innovative therapy and dosimetry techniques. Furthermore, the increasing scientific interest in the radiobiological features specific to radionuclide therapy will advance our ability to administer this treatment modality optimally. (orig.)

  6. Evidence-based diabetes nutrition therapy recommendations are effective: the key is individualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz MJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marion J Franz,1 Jackie L Boucher,2 Alison B Evert3 1Nutrition Concepts by Franz, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, 2Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, 3Diabetes Care Center, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Current nutrition therapy recommendations for the prevention and treatment of diabetes are based on a systematic review of evidence and answer important nutrition care questions. First, is diabetes nutrition therapy effective? Clinical trials as well as systematic and Cochrane reviews report a ~1%–2% lowering of hemoglobin A1c values as well as other beneficial outcomes from nutrition therapy interventions, depending on the type and duration of diabetes and level of glycemic control. Clinical trials also provide evidence for the effectiveness of nutrition therapy in the prevention of diabetes. Second, are weight loss interventions important and when are they beneficial? Modest weight loss is important for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and early in the disease process. However, as diabetes progresses, weight loss may or may not result in beneficial glycemic and cardiovascular outcomes. Third, are there ideal percentages of macronutrients and eating patterns that apply to all persons with diabetes? There is no ideal percentage of macronutrients and a variety of eating patterns has been shown to be effective for persons with diabetes. Treatment goals, personal preferences (eg, tradition, culture, religion, health beliefs, economics, and the individual's ability and willingness to make lifestyle changes must all be considered by clinicians and/or educators when counseling and educating individuals with diabetes. A healthy eating pattern emphasizing nutrient-dense foods in appropriate portion sizes, regular physical activity, and support are priorities for all individuals with diabetes. Reduced energy intake for persons with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes as well as matching insulin to planned

  7. Oral Antibacterial Therapy for Acne Vulgaris: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienenfeld, Amanda; Nagler, Arielle R; Orlow, Seth J

    2017-08-01

    To some degree, acne vulgaris affects nearly every individual worldwide. Oral antibiotic therapy is routinely prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe inflammatory acne; however, long-term use of oral antibiotics for acne may have unintended consequences. The aim of this study was to provide a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence on the efficacy and appropriate use of oral antibiotics in the treatment of acne. A systematic search of MEDLINE was conducted to identify randomized controlled clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses evaluating the efficacy of oral antibiotics for acne. Overall, 41 articles that examined oral antibiotics compared with placebo, another oral therapy, topical therapy, alternate dose, or duration were included in this study. Tetracyclines, macrolides, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole are effective and safe in the treatment of moderate to severe inflammatory acne. Superior efficacy of one type or class of antibiotic could not be determined, therefore the choice of antibiotic is generally based on the side-effect profile. Although different dosing regimens have been studied, there is a lack of standardized comparator trials to determine optimal dosing and duration of each oral antibiotic used in acne. The combination of oral antibiotics with a topical therapy is superior to oral antibiotics alone. This article provides a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence of the efficacy of oral antibiotics for acne. Due to heterogeneity in the design of the trials, there is insufficient evidence to support one type, dose, or duration of oral antibiotic over another in terms of efficacy; however, due to increasing resistance to antibiotics, dermatologists should heed consensus guidelines for their appropriate use.

  8. Evidence-Based Clinical Decision: Key to Improved Patients Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... materials remain limited to mostly developed countries. There is need to adopt measures to further facilitate dissemination of current information of effective health to care providers and policymakers in resource-poor countries. This review is aimed at re-enforcing the need for applying best-evidence into clinical practice

  9. Adherence of Healthcare Professionals to Evidence-based Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The checklist included the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the HD vascular access, HD adequacy, anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD), nutrition, cardiovascular risk assessment, and hepatitis B and C virus infection control. Implementation of these guidelines was evaluated, and further graded using a ...

  10. Urinary urgency - translating the evidence base into daily clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardozo, L.; Chapple, C. R.; Dmochowski, R.; Fitzgerald, M. P.; Hanno, P.; Michel, M. C.; Staskin, D.; van Kerrebroeck, P.; Wyndaele, J.-J.; Yamaguchi, O.; Yoshida, M.

    2009-01-01

    P>Aim: To consider the currently available knowledge and understanding of the symptom of urgency. Materials & Methods: Each faculty member reviewed the literature base of a different aspect of urgency and along with their personal clinical experience provided a base of evidence for discussion.

  11. The role of hypnotherapy in evidence-based clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, M J

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to discuss the place of hypnotherapy in a modern medical world dominated by so-called evidence-based clinical practice. Hypnosis is an easily learned technique that is a valuable adjuvant to many medical, dental and psychological interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Adoption of Evidence-Based Clinical Innovations: The Case of Buprenorphine Use by Opioid Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christina M.; D’Aunno, Thomas A.; Pollack, Harold A.; Friedmann, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations’ technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs’ decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use. PMID:24051897

  13. Adoption of evidence-based clinical innovations: the case of buprenorphine use by opioid treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christina M; D'Aunno, Thomas A; Pollack, Harold A; Friedmann, Peter D

    2014-02-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations' technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs' decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use.

  14. An online community of practice to support evidence-based physiotherapy practice in manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cathy; Yeung, Euson; Markoulakis, Roula; Guilcher, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how a community of practice promoted the creation and sharing of new knowledge in evidence-based manual therapy using Wenger's constructs of mutual engagement, joint enterprise, and shared repertoire as a theoretical framework. We used a qualitative approach to analyze the discussion board contributions of the 19 physiotherapists who participated in the 10-week online continuing education course in evidence-based practice (EBP) in manual therapy. The course was founded on community of practice, constructivism, social, and situated learning principles. The 1436 postings on 9 active discussion boards revealed that the community of practice was a social learning environment that supported strong participation and mutual engagement. Design features such as consistent facilitation, weekly guiding questions, and collaborative assignments promoted the creation and sharing of knowledge. Participants applied research evidence to the contexts in which they worked through reflective comparison of what they were reading to its applicability in their everyday practice. Participants' shared goals contributed to the common ground established in developing collective knowledge about different study designs, how to answer research questions, and the difficulties of conducting sound research. An online longitudinal community of practice utilized as a continuing education approach to deliver an online course based on constructivist and social learning principles allowed geographically dispersed physiotherapists to be mutually engaged in a joint enterprise in evidence-based manual therapy. Advantages included opportunity for reflection, modeling, and collaboration. Future studies should examine the impact of participation on clinical practice. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital

  15. [Pathogenesis, clinical picture, and current therapy of rosacea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonser, L I; Gonser, C E; Schaller, M

    2016-01-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory disease, especially in patients with fair skin and positive family history. Typical locations are forehead, nose, cheeks and chin; the periorbital region is usually not involved. Clinical features can be very heterogeneous. Besides different subtypes (erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, papulopustular rosacea, phymatous rosacea), which often overlap, various special forms of rosacea exist. Up to 60% of patients with cutaneous rosacea suffer from ocular rosacea. In Germany, brimonidine, metronidazol, azelaic acid, and ivermectin are approved for topical therapy of rosacea; for systemic therapy, doxycycline at a subantimicrobial dose (40 mg/day) is the only approved substance. In case of resistance to this therapy, contraindications or side effects, various alternative therapies are available, however off-label.

  16. Imaging: Guiding the Clinical Translation of Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Patricia K.; Lan, Feng; Wang, Yongming; Wu, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have been touted as the holy grail of medical therapy with promises to regenerate cardiac tissue, but it appears the jury is still out on this novel therapy. Using advanced imaging technology, scientists have discovered that these cells do not survive nor engraft long-term. In addition, only marginal benefit has been observed in large animal studies and human trials. However, all is not lost. Further application of advanced imaging technology will help scientists unravel the mysteries of stem cell therapy and address the clinical hurdles facing its routine implementation. In this review, we will discuss how advanced imaging technology will help investigators better define the optimal delivery method, improve survival and engraftment, and evaluate efficacy and safety. Insights gained from this review may direct the development of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:21960727

  17. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxious children: from evidence to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Monique C; Nunez, Diane E

    2014-02-01

    Anxiety is the most common mental health problem in children, yet less than one third of children with anxiety disorders seek treatment. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is recommended as a first-line treatment for childhood anxiety. However, current practice generally does not include CBT due to issues of feasibility, affordability, and transportability. The primary purpose of this review was to appraise current literature regarding the effectiveness of individual CBT for childhood anxiety. Secondary purposes were to identify reasons for the discrepancy between current evidence and practice as well as to offer suggestions to overcome this dilemma. A systematic review of the literature published between 2007 and 2012 was conducted, searching four databases--Cochrane, PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. In all 10 studies reviewed, individual CBT significantly reduced rates of anxiety diagnoses when compared with controls, and was equally effective or superior to comparison therapies. The only exception was when CBT was compared to a combination of CBT and pharmacological management, in which case the latter was more effective. Each study included in this review employed hour-long sessions over a minimum of 12 visits. In order to meet clinical demands and patient preferences, affordability, and feasibility of CBT interventions must be addressed. A brief, manualized CBT program that can be supported to be clinically effective is proposed as an evidence-based solution for anxious children in outpatient mental health and primary care settings. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Multidimensional Family Therapy: Evidence Base for Transdiagnostic Treatment Outcomes, Change Mechanisms, and Implementation in Community Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Howard A

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes the 30+-year evidence base of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT), a comprehensive treatment for youth substance abuse and antisocial behaviors. Findings from four types of MDFT studies are discussed: hybrid efficacy/effectiveness randomized controlled trials, therapy process studies, cost analyses, and implementation trials. This research has evaluated various versions of MDFT. These studies have systematically tested adaptations of MDFT for diverse treatment settings in different care sectors (mental health, substance abuse, juvenile justice, and child welfare), as well as adaptations according to treatment delivery features and client impairment level, including adolescents presenting with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Many published scientific reviews, including meta-analyses, national and international government publications, and evidence-based treatment registries, offer consistent conclusions about the clinical effectiveness of MDFT compared with standard services as well as active treatments. The diverse and continuing MDFT research, the favorable, multi-source independent evaluations, combined with the documented receptivity of youth, parents, community-based clinicians and administrators, and national and international MDFT training programs (U.S.-based organization is MDFT International, www.mdft.org; and Europe-based organization is www.mdft.nl) all support the potential for continued transfer of MDFT to real-world clinical settings. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  19. The History, Mechanism, and Clinical Application of Auricular Therapy in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu-Wei Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular therapy includes acupuncture, electroacupuncture, acupressure, lasering, cauterization, moxibustion, and bloodletting in the auricle. For 2500 years, people have employed auricular therapy for treating diseases, but the methods have been limited to bloodletting and cauterization. Only after 1957, the international scientific community became aware that the map of the ear resembles an inverted fetus, its introduction has led to auricular acupuncture (AA becoming a more systemic approach, and, following the identification and standardization of more precise points, AA has been employed in clinical applications. The mechanisms of AA are considered to have a close relationship with the autonomic nervous system, the neuroendocrine system, neuroimmunological factors, neuroinflammation, and neural reflex, as well as antioxidation. Auricular therapy has been applied, for example, for pain relief, for the treatment of epilepsy, anxiety, and obesity, and for improving sleep quality. However, the mechanisms and evidence for auricular therapy warrant further study.

  20. The History, Mechanism, and Clinical Application of Auricular Therapy in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Pu-Wei; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tang, Nou-Ying; Cheng, Chin-Yi; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Auricular therapy includes acupuncture, electroacupuncture, acupressure, lasering, cauterization, moxibustion, and bloodletting in the auricle. For 2500 years, people have employed auricular therapy for treating diseases, but the methods have been limited to bloodletting and cauterization. Only after 1957, the international scientific community became aware that the map of the ear resembles an inverted fetus, its introduction has led to auricular acupuncture (AA) becoming a more systemic approach, and, following the identification and standardization of more precise points, AA has been employed in clinical applications. The mechanisms of AA are considered to have a close relationship with the autonomic nervous system, the neuroendocrine system, neuroimmunological factors, neuroinflammation, and neural reflex, as well as antioxidation. Auricular therapy has been applied, for example, for pain relief, for the treatment of epilepsy, anxiety, and obesity, and for improving sleep quality. However, the mechanisms and evidence for auricular therapy warrant further study.

  1. In Vivo Monitoring of Photodynamic Therapy: from lab to clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Kruijt (Bastiaan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPhotodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging clinical treatment modality, which utilizes light, oxygen and a light sensitive drug (the photosensitizer), for curative and palliative treatment of a variety of malignant and non-malignant conditions tumors. PDT is frequently used in the

  2. Family therapy training on a clinical psychology programme

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The report describes the intake interviewing exercise in a family therapy training unit developed for postgraduates in clinical psychology. The teaching method includes pre-class reading, video modelling, and simulated practice with live feedback. The academic material and other similar practice exercises are contained in the core textbook for this unit.

  3. Sevoflurane induction for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)- a clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The search for an ideal induction agent for use in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been a long one. To date numerous agents have been used and there is little uniformity in clinical practice regarding agent of choice. Recent reports in the literature suggesting the efficacy of the volatile anaesthetic agent ...

  4. Clinical effect of Fuzheng quyu therapy in patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the clinical effect of Fuzheng Quyu therapy in patients undergoing radiotherapy after cervical carcinoma surgery. Methods: One hundred and twenty patients who underwent radiotherapy after cervical carcinoma surgery were selected randomly and divided evenly into control and study groups. Patients ...

  5. Clinical Outcomes after Regenerative Periodontal Therapy with Emdogain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beresescu Gabriela Felicia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Regeneration is defined as a reconstruction of a lost part of the body in such a way that the structure and function of the lost tissue are completely restored. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical outcomes of intrabony defects treatment using regenerative periodontal therapy with enamel matrix proteins (Emdogain, EMD with a control group.

  6. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  7. Antiretroviral therapy in a community clinic - early lessons from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To report on operational and clinical problems encountered during the first 6 months of a community-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme. Methods. ART was implemented in a primary care setting utilising an easily replicable service-delivery model based on a medical officer and nurse. Therapeutic ...

  8. A clinical treatment intervention for dysphoria: externalizing metaphors therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinty, Everett; Armstrong, David; Carrière, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore a novel, short-term treatment intervention for internalizing behaviours. This intervention is primarily based upon an externalizing process, transforming of metaphoric imagery, and shifting of underlying maladaptive emotional schemas. This article addresses the clinical population of children and youth, specifically through outlining the protocol, externalizing metaphors therapy. A selective review of significant works regarding the efficacy of short-term therapy was conducted, including the process of change within narrative therapy. It is proposed that two specific processes account for the mental health change experienced by clients who receive this new treatment intervention: (1) externalization of problems and (2) purposeful client-generated metaphor manipulation, impacting upon underlying schemas. From these theoretical constructs, the present article outlines a three-session treatment protocol that manualizes these key clinical processes. A case study is presented to illustrate this intervention for anxiety and depression. Further clinical research is underway to address the testable hypotheses resulting from the current theoretical model. Clinical trials in brief psychotherapy are suggested to empirically evaluate the efficacy of this new treatment intervention for dysphoria. This article outlines a short-term treatment intervention for anxiety and depression (dysphoira) through a novel 3-session model, where the clinician-practitioner can obtain competency through a one-day workshop.Its relevance for the clinical researcher and the mental health community is in its versatility in addressing internalizing behavior for four clinical populations: (1) children and adolescents; (2) children and adolescents on the autism spectrum; (3) adults in general; and, (4) adults with a dual-diagnosis. The treatment protocol described within is based upon the externalizing and deconstructive properties of Narrative Therapy, and the

  9. Weighing the evidence: Risks and benefits of participatory documentary in corporatized clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Helena

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of one U.S.-based public psychiatry clinic’s shift to a centralized, corporate style of management, in response to pressures to cut expenditures by focusing on “evidence based” treatments. Participant observation research conducted between 2008 and 2012 for a larger study involving 127 interviews with policy makers, clinic managers, clinical practitioners and patients revealed that the shift heralded the decline of arts based therapies in the clinic, and of the social networks that had developed around them. It also inspired a participatory video self-documentary project among art group members, to portray the importance of arts-based therapies and garner public support for such therapies. Group members found a way to take action in the face of unilateral decision making, but experienced subsequent restrictions on clinic activities and discharge of core members from the clinic. The paper ends with a discussion of biopolitics, central legibility through corporate standardization, and the potential and risks of participatory documentaries to resist these trends. PMID:23932854

  10. The evidence for present-centered therapy as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Nickolas D; Laska, Kevin M; Wampold, Bruce E

    2014-02-01

    To examine the evidence for present-centered therapy (PCT) as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 5 randomized clinical trials that compared PCT to an existing evidence-based treatment for PTSD were reviewed. A meta-analysis was used to estimate between-treatment differences on targeted measures, secondary measures, and dropout. PCT was found to be as efficacious as the comparison evidence-based treatment in 3 of the 5 trials, and in the 2 cases where a no-treatment condition was included, PCT was superior, with large effect sizes for targeted variables (d = 0.88, 0.74, and 1.27). When results were aggregated using meta-analysis, effects for PCT versus an evidence-based treatment for both targeted and secondary measures were small and nonsignificant (d = 0.13 and d = 0.09, respectively). As well, the dropout rate for PCT was significantly less than for the comparison evidence-based treatments (14.3% and 31.3%, respectively). It appears that PCT is an efficacious and acceptable treatment for PTSD. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  11. "Clinical approach to fibromyalgia: Synthesis of Evidence-based recommendations, a systematic review".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángel García, Daniel; Martínez Nicolás, Ismael; Saturno Hernández, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    Efforts have been made to standardise evidence-based practice, but clinical practice guidelines do not always follow strict development methods. The objective of this review is to identify the current guidelines, analyse the variability of its recommendations and make a synthesis for clinical practice. A systematic review of clinical practice guidelines was made in electronic databases and guidelines databases; using "fibromyalgia" AND ["guideline" OR "Clinical Practice guideline"] as terms, from January for 2003 to July of 2013. Guidelines were selected according to the following criteria: a) aimed to fibromyalgia treatment in adults; b) based on scientific evidence, systematically searched; c) evidence levels and strength of recommendation included; d) written in English or Spanish. From 249 initial results, six guides fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Clinical practice guidelines analysed in this review show great variability both in the presence and level of evidence and in the strength of recommendation of many treatments. Physical exercise and cognitive-behavioural therapy are first-line treatments, showing high level of evidence. Amitriptyline, used for short periods of time for pain control, is the pharmacologic treatment with the most solid evidence. The multimodal approach reported better results than the isolated application of any treatment. Final recommendations in this review identify optimal treatments, facilitating the translation of evidence into practice and enabling more efficient and effective quality care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  12. Applying new strategies for the national adaptation, updating, and dissemination of trustworthy guidelines: results from the Norwegian adaptation of the Antithrombotic Therapy and the Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th Ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Annette; Brandt, Linn; Agoritsas, Thomas; Akl, Elie A; Berge, Eivind; Flem Jacobsen, Anne; Granan, Lars-Petter; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Guyatt, Gordon; Vandvik, Per Olav

    2014-09-01

    The Antithrombotic Therapy and the Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th Edition: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (AT9) represent trustworthy international guidelines for antithrombotic treatment and thromboprophylaxis. We describe major changes to the format and content resulting from applying new strategies for guideline adaptation and dissemination. A Norwegian guideline panel of 46 experts completed a structured and systematic adaptation process, updated the recommendations based on new evidence, and rewrote the recommendations in an electronic multilayered presentation format. We published the adapted guideline using the web-based Making GRADE the Irresistible Choice Guideline Authoring and Publication Platform. We applied a novel presentation format to 333 recommendations from 11 of the 15 management chapters in AT9 and condensed and restructured them into 249 recommendations in a multilayered format. We added additional relevant information, such as 29 best-practice statements about new oral anticoagulants and practical information sections for 121 recommendations. Common reasons for modifications included feasibility of the recommendations in a national context, disagreement with applied baseline risk estimates, and reevaluation of the balance between the benefits and harms of interventions in relation to assumed typical patient preferences and values. The adapted guideline was published and disseminated online in November 2013. New strategies for adapting, updating, and disseminating trustworthy guidelines proved feasible and will provide Norwegian health-care professionals and patients with up-to-date guidance tailored to national circumstances.

  13. Occupational therapy for elderly : evidence mapping of randomised controlled trials from 2004-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voigt-Radloff, S; Ruf, G.; Vogel, A.; van Nes, F.; Hüll, M.

    OBJECTIVE: Previous systematic reviews on occupational therapy for elderly included studies until 2003. The present evidence mapping summarizes recent evidence for the efficacy of occupational therapy with older persons based on randomised controlled trials from 2004-2012. METHOD: An electronic

  14. Evidence-based clinical practice update: practice guidelines for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation based on a systematic review and multidisciplinary consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melick, N. van; Cingel, R.E. van; Brooijmans, F.; Neeter, C.; Tienen, T. van; Hullegie, W.; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) instructed a multidisciplinary group of Dutch anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) experts to develop an evidence statement for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. DESIGN: Clinical practice guideline underpinned by systematic review and

  15. Biomarkers in the clinical development of asthma therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Tracy L; Choy, David F; Arron, Joseph R

    2016-01-01

    Here we review how biomarkers have been used in the design, execution and interpretation of recent clinical studies of therapeutic candidates targeting cytokine-mediated inflammatory pathways in asthma. This review focuses on type 2 inflammation, as there are multiple therapeutics and/or clinical studies that can be compared within that specific pathway. Comparative analyses of data from these clinical studies illustrate the utility of biomarkers to quantify pharmacodynamic effects, clarify mechanism of action and stratify patients, which may facilitate the interpretation of outcomes in the development of molecularly targeted therapies. These case examples provide a basis for biomarker considerations in the design of future studies in the asthma setting.

  16. Clinical reasoning for manual therapy management of tension type and cervicogenic headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing knowledge in the pathogenesis and better management of chronic headaches. Current scientific evidence supports the role of manual therapies in the management of tension type and cervicogenic headache, but the results are still conflicting. These inconsistent results can be related to the fact that maybe not all manual therapies are appropriate for all types of headaches; or maybe not all patients with headache will benefit from manual therapies. There are preliminary data suggesting that patients with a lower degree of sensitization will benefit to a greater extent from manual therapies, although more studies are needed. In fact, there is evidence demonstrating the presence of peripheral and central sensitization in chronic headaches, particularly in tension type. Clinical management of patients with headache needs to extend beyond local tissue-based pathology, to incorporate strategies directed at normalizing central nervous system sensitivity. In such a scenario, this paper exposes some examples of manual therapies for tension type and cervicogenic headache, based on a nociceptive pain rationale, for modulating central nervous system hypersensitivity: trigger point therapy, joint mobilization, joint manipulation, exercise, and cognitive pain approaches. PMID:24976747

  17. State of the art in clinical informatics: evidence and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, A B; Wright, A; Eysenbach, G; Malin, B A; Patterson, E S; Xu, H; Sittig, D F

    2013-01-01

    The field of clinical informatics has expanded substantially in the six decades since its inception. Early research focused on simple demonstrations that health information technology (HIT) such as electronic health records (EHRs), computerized provider order entry (CPOE), and clinical decision support (CDS) systems were feasible and potentially beneficial in clinical practice. In this review, we present recent evidence on clinical informatics in the United States covering three themes: 1) clinical informatics systems and interventions for providers, including EHRs, CPOE, CDS, and health information exchange; 2) consumer health informatics systems, including personal health records and web-based and mobile HIT; and 3) methods and governance for clinical informatics, including EHR usability; data mining, text mining, natural language processing, privacy, and security. Substantial progress has been made in demonstrating that various clinical informatics methodologies and applications improve the structure, process, and outcomes of various facets of the healthcare system. Over the coming years, much more will be expected from the field. As we move past the "early adopters" in Rogers' diffusion of innovations' curve through the "early majority" and into the "late majority," there will be a crucial need for new research methodologies and clinical applications that have been rigorously demonstrated to work (i.e., to improve health outcomes) in multiple settings with different types of patients and clinicians.

  18. Complementary Spiritist Therapy: Systematic Review of Scientific Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Lucchetti, Alessandra L. Granero; Bassi, Rodrigo M.; Nobre, Marlene Rossi Severino

    2011-01-01

    Spiritism is the third most common religion in Brazil, and its therapies have been used by millions worldwide. These therapies are based on therapeutic resources including prayer, laying on of hands, fluidotherapy (magnetized water), charity/volunteering, spirit education/moral values, and disobsession (spirit release therapy). This paper presents a systematic review of the current literature on the relationship among health outcomes and 6 predictors: prayer, laying on of hands, magnetized/fl...

  19. Behavioral insomnia therapy for fibromyalgia patients: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Jack D; Wohlgemuth, William K; Krystal, Andrew D; Rice, John R

    2005-11-28

    Insomnia is common and debilitating to fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective for many types of patients with insomnia, but has yet to be tested with FM patients. This study compared CBT with an alternate behavioral therapy and usual care for improving sleep and other FM symptoms. This randomized clinical trial enrolled 47 FM patients with chronic insomnia complaints. The study compared CBT, sleep hygiene (SH) instructions, and usual FM care alone. Outcome measures were subjective (sleep logs) and objective (actigraphy) total sleep time, sleep efficiency, total wake time, sleep latency, wake time after sleep onset, and questionnaire measures of global insomnia symptoms, pain, mood, and quality of life. Forty-two patients completed baseline and continued into treatment. Sleep logs showed CBT-treated patients achieved nearly a 50% reduction in their nocturnal wake time by study completion, whereas SH therapy- and usual care-treated patients achieved only 20% and 3.5% reductions on this measure, respectively. In addition, 8 (57%) of 14 CBT recipients met strict subjective sleep improvement criteria by the end of treatment compared with 2 (17%) of 12 SH therapy recipients and 0% of the usual care group. Comparable findings were noted for similar actigraphic improvement criteria. The SH therapy patients showed favorable outcomes on measures of pain and mental well-being. This finding was most notable in an SH therapy subgroup that self-elected to implement selected CBT strategies. Cognitive-behavioral therapy represents a promising intervention for sleep disturbance in FM patients. Larger clinical trials of this intervention with FM patients seem warranted.

  20. Beta-lactam combination therapy for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species bacteremia: A summary and appraisal of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bartash

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal bacteremia and enterococcal bacteremia are prevalent in hospitalized or recently instrumented patients, and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. They are often difficult to treat due to the pathogenicity of the organisms, poor response to antibiotics, and increasing development of multidrug resistance. Therefore, there has been increasing interest in combination therapy for the treatment of these infections. The aim of this review was to summarize and assess the evidence supporting combination beta-lactam therapy for both Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species blood stream infections. Currently, there is promising in vitro data but little clinical evidence supporting combination beta-lactam therapy for this indication. Further clinical investigations are needed to elucidate the potential benefits of beta-lactam combination therapy over monotherapy for Gram-positive bacteremia, although combination therapy may be useful in refractory cases of bacteremia that do not respond to standard antibiotic therapy.

  1. Clinical pharmacists as medication therapy experts in diabetic clinics in Saudi Arabia – Not just a perception but a need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz A. Makeen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacist’s role is expanding from medication dispensing to patient care. There are several newer horizons in which clinical pharmacists have a vital role to play such as diabetic care, handling asthma patients, pain management, anti-coagulation therapy and in hyperlipidemia. Among these, the disorder that is perceived to reach epidemic proportions globally is diabetes mellitus. In the Arab world, particularly in countries like Saudi Arabia, the number affected and the cost incurred in the management of diabetes are relatively high. Apart from adding to the economic burden, the complications arising due to a lag in identification and management are manifold. In developed countries, several practicing hospitals and clinics have inducted clinical pharmacists as vital members of the healthcare team. With profound knowledge about medications, clinical pharmacists are inclined to stay abreast with recent developments in research and latest guidelines, thus supporting physicians in evidence based practice. Clinical pharmacists through Medication Therapy Management can render services by guiding, identifying and monitoring drug related issues faced by the patients. This can contribute in reducing the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and improving the quality of life. To keep pace with the growing prevalence of diabetes in the kingdom, clinical pharmacists need to undergo specialized training in high risk areas. Health regulating bodies should be keen in adopting provisions of inducting them in discrete specialties which can also help in trimming heathcare expenditure.

  2. Anti-EGFR Therapy: Mechanism and Advances in Clinical Efficacy in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Flynn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will focus on recent advances in the application of antiepidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR for the treatment of breast cancer. The choice of EGFR, a member of the ErbB tyrosine kinase receptor family, stems from evidence pinpointing its role in various anti-EGFR therapies. Therefore, an increase in our understanding of EGFR mechanism and signaling might reveal novel targets amenable to intervention in the clinic. This knowledge base might also improve existing medical treatment options and identify research gaps in the design of new therapeutic agents. While the approved use of drugs like the dual kinase inhibitor Lapatinib represents significant advances in the clinical management of breast cancer, confirmatory studies must be considered to foster the use of anti-EGFR therapies including safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy.

  3. Reported characteristics of participants in physical therapy-related clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevan, Julia; Haskvitz, Esther M

    2015-06-01

    The inclusion of sociodemographic and anthropometric variables in published clinical trials enables physical therapists to determine the applicability of trial results to patients in their clinics. The aim of this study was to examine the reporting of participant sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics in published physical therapy-related clinical trials. This was a retrospective review of clinical trials from 2 samples drawn from literature applicable to physical therapy. Two reviewers independently extracted data from a random sample of 152 clinical trials from the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and a purposive sample of 85 clinical trials published in the journal Physical Therapy (PTJ). A database containing the occurrence of sociodemographic (age, sex, race/ethnicity, level of education, marital status) and anthropometric variables (height, weight, body mass index) in each article was created to generate descriptive statistics about both samples. Among the sociodemographic variables, at least 90% of articles reported the sex and age of trial participants. Additional sociodemographic characteristics that were reported in 20% to 26% of articles were participant level of education and participant race/ethnicity. The reporting of anthropometric data differed between the 2 samples, with body mass index being most commonly reported in the PEDro sample (48.0%) and weight being most commonly reported in the PTJ sample (38.8%). Articles reviewed were limited by year of publication (from 2008 to 2012 for PTJ articles and 2010 for clinical trials from PEDro) and to English-language-only literature. The physical therapy literature would benefit from enhanced reporting requirements for both sociodemographic and anthropometric data about participants. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  4. Cellular Therapies Clinical Research Roadmap: lessons learned on how to move a cellular therapy into a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, Stacy; Tappitake, Darah; Armant, Myriam; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Derecho, Ivy; Draxler, Rebecca; Wood, Deborah; Centanni, John M

    2015-04-01

    A clinical research roadmap has been developed as a resource for researchers to identify critical areas and potential pitfalls when transitioning a cellular therapy product from the research laboratory, by means of an Investigational New Drug (IND) application, into early-phase clinical trials. The roadmap describes four key areas: basic and preclinical research, resource development, translational research and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and IND assembly and submission. Basic and preclinical research identifies a new therapeutic concept and demonstrates its potential value with the use of a model of the relevant disease. During resource development, the appropriate specialists and the required expertise to bring this product into the clinic are identified (eg, researchers, regulatory specialists, GMP manufacturing staff, clinicians and clinical trials staff, etc). Additionally, the funds required to achieve this goal (or a plan to procure them) are identified. In the next phase, the plan to translate the research product into a clinical-grade therapeutic is developed. Finally regulatory approval to start the trial must be obtained. In the United States, this is done by filing an IND application with the Food and Drug Administration. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-funded Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies program has facilitated the transition of a variety of cellular therapy products from the laboratory into Phase1/2 trials. The five Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies facilities have assisted investigators by performing translational studies and GMP manufacturing to ensure that cellular products met release specifications and were manufactured safely, reproducibly and at the appropriate scale. The roadmap resulting from this experience is the focus of this article. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    OpenAIRE

    Abiko, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Chiba, Itsuo; Toyofuku, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i) What is the prevalence of AO in the community? (ii) What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii) A...

  6. Evidence for clinical progression of unipolar and bipolar disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L. V.; Andersen, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    ) the risk of recurrence of episodes, (ii) probability of recovery from episodes, (iii) severity of episodes, (iv) the threshold for developing episodes, and (v) progression of cognitive deficits in unipolar and bipolar disorders. Method: A systematic review comprising an extensive literature search...... severity of episodes, (iv) decreasing threshold for developing episodes, and (v) increasing risk of developing dementia. Conclusion: Although the course of illness is heterogeneous, there is evidence for clinical progression of unipolar and bipolar disorders....

  7. Evidence Based Therapeutic Outcome of Multimodal Therapy on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    info

    Abstract. Previous efforts at remediating sexual decision of adolescents in Nigeria have been based on unimodal therapies. Therefore, this study investigated the effectiveness of. Multimodal Therapy (MMT) on sexual decisions of adolescents studying in Remedial. Centres in Rivers state, Nigeria. Pre-test post control group ...

  8. Abnormalities of laboratory coagulation tests versus clinically evident coagulopathic bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Ronald; Fox, Erin E; Greene, Thomas J

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laboratory-based evidence of coagulopathy (LC) is observed in 25-35% of trauma patients, but clinically-evident coagulopathy (CC) is not well described. METHODS: Prospective observational study of adult trauma patients transported by helicopter from the scene to nine Level 1 trauma...... centers in 2015. Patients meeting predefined highest-risk criteria were divided into CC+ (predefined as surgeon-confirmed bleeding from uninjured sites or injured sites not controllable by sutures) or CC-. We used a mixed-effects, Poisson regression with robust error variance to test the hypothesis...... that abnormalities on rapid thrombelastography (r-TEG) and international normalized ratio (INR) were independently associated with CC+. RESULTS: Of 1,019 highest-risk patients, CC+ (n=41, 4%) were more severely injured (median ISS 32 vs 17), had evidence of LC on r-TEG and INR, received more transfused blood...

  9. Scientific evidence of dockworker illness to nursing clinical reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlise Capa Verde de Almeida

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify scientific evidence of occupational illness of dockworkers published in the literature. METHOD systematic review of the literature, developed according to the Cochrane method. The databases searched were: Cochrane, LILACS, MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL and SciELO. Studies from 1988 to 2014 were selected. The data were analyzed according to the level of evidence and Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology. RESULTS We included 14 studies, in which 11 (78.6% were from international journals. The year of 2012 showed greater number of studies. All studies were classified as: Level of Evidence 4, highlighting lung cancer, musculoskeletal and ischemic diseases, causal link in chemical risks. CONCLUSION The development of preventive measures should especially include chemical exposure of workers applying the clinical reasoning of nurses' environmental knowledge to care for illnesses.

  10. Laetrile for cancer: a systematic review of the clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Stefania; Lejeune, Stephane; Ernst, Edzard

    2007-06-01

    Many cancer patients treated with conventional therapies also try 'alternative' cancer treatments. Laetrile is one such 'alternative' that is claimed to be effective by many alternative therapists. Laetrile is also sometimes referred to as amygdalin, although the two are not the same. The aim of this review is to summarize all types of clinical data related to the effectiveness or safety of laetrile interventions as a treatment of any type of cancer. All types of clinical studies containing original clinical data of laetrile interventions were included. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (from 1951), EMBASE (from 1980), Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), Scirus, CancerLit, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL; all from 1982), CAMbase (from 1998), the MetaRegister, the National Research Register, and our own files. For reports on the safety of laetrile, we also searched the Uppsala database. No language restrictions were imposed. Thirty six reports met our inclusion criteria. No controlled clinical trials were found. Three articles were nonconsecutive case series, 2 were consecutive case series, 6 were best case series, and 25 were case reports. None of these publications proved the effectiveness of laetrile. Therefore, the claim that laetrile has beneficial effects for cancer patients is not supported by sound clinical data.

  11. Clinical study of interventional therapy for acute cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Guangze; Xiao Yiming; Wen Zhilin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of interventional therapy for acute cerebral infarction. Method: Using urokinase, 35 patients with acute cerebral infarction within 24 hours were treated by intra-artery thrombolytic therapy. Europe stroke scale (ESS), Barthel index (BI) were used to evaluate the recovery of neurological functions. Result: ESS score increase rapidly after thrombolytisis, and there were significant difference between the two teams. Thirteen of 13 cases treated within 6 hours from onset showed complete/partial recanalization in cerebral angiography and intraparenchymal hemorrhagic rate were 0%, twenty-six of 35 cases treated within 24 hours showed complete/partial recanalization and intraparenchymal hemorrhagic rate were 5.71%. Conclusion: Interventional therapy for acute cerebral infarction within 6h were safe and effective. (authors)

  12. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may prove helpful when assessing the

  13. Physical therapy clinical management recommendations for children with cerebral palsy - spastic diplegia: achieving functional mobility outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Margaret E; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A; Westcott, Sarah L; Martin, Karen; Chiarello, Lisa A; Valvano, Joanne; Rose, Rachel Unanue

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this special report is to present recommendations for the clinical management of children with cerebral palsy, spastic diplegia when increased functional mobility is the identified outcome. These recommendations provide a framework that allows physical therapists to increase their accountability and promote effective interventions for improved patient outcomes. The key components of this special report on clinical management are: a) the Major Recommendations that provide the background and evidence for clinical management; b) a flow chart to assist in clinical decision-making; and c) a Table of Tests and Measures for information on useful tools in the management of children with spastic diplegia. These recommendations are suggestions for clinical management, not an all-inclusive document on physical therapy for children with cerebral palsy. These recommendations may help therapists develop systematic approaches to service delivery and documentation.

  14. Bioresorbable scaffolds: current evidence and ongoing clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourantas, Christos V; Zhang, Yaojun; Farooq, Vasim; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W

    2012-10-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) represent a novel approach in coronary stent technology. In contrast to the metallic stents, they provide transient scaffolding, thereby safeguarding early vessel patency and acute gain. Subsequently a process of "decomposition" occurs, that results in the complete absorption of the scaffold. This reduces the risk of late complications, allowing the vessel to maintain its integrity and physiological function. This unique ability has attracted interest and nowadays several BRS are available. The aim of this review article is to describe the advances in the field, present the evidence from the preclinical and clinical evaluation of these devices, and provide an overview of the ongoing clinical trials that were designed to examine the effectiveness of BRS in the clinical setting.

  15. TZDs and Bone: A Review of the Recent Clinical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann V. Schwartz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two years, evidence has emerged that the currently available thiazolidinediones (TZDs, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone have negative skeletal consequences, at least in women, which are clinically important. Increased fracture risk in women, but not men, was reported for both TZDs, based on analyses of adverse event reports from clinical trials. In short-term clinical trials in women, both TZDs caused more rapid bone loss. In these trials, changes in bone turnover markers suggest a pattern of reduced bone formation without a change in resorption. Although limited, these results support the hypothesis based on rodent and in vitro models that reduced bone formation resulting from activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- (PPAR is a central mechanism for TZDs_ effect on bone. Research is needed to better understand the mechanisms of bone loss with TZDs, to identify factors that influence susceptibility to TZD-induced osteoporosis, and to test treatments for its prevention.

  16. The glycaemic outcomes of Cinnamon, a review of the experimental evidence and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medagama, Arjuna B

    2015-10-16

    Cinnamon is currently marketed as a remedy for obesity, glucose intolerance, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidaemia. Integrative medicine is a new concept that combines conventional treatment with evidence-based complementary therapies. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the experimental evidence available for cinnamon in improving glycaemic targets in animal models and humans. Insulin receptor auto-phosphorlylation and de-phosphorylation, glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4 ) receptor synthesis and translocation, modulation of hepatic glucose metabolism through changes in Pyruvate kinase (PK) and Phosphenol Pyruvate Carboxikinase (PEPCK), altering the expression of PPAR (γ) and inhibition of intestinal glucosidases are some of the mechanisms responsible for improving glycaemic control with cinnamon therapy. We reviewed 8 clinical trials that used Cinnamomum cassia in aqueous or powder form in doses ranging from 500 mg to 6 g per day for a duration lasting from 40 days to 4 months as well as 2 clinical trials that used cinnamon on treatment naïve patients with pre-diabetes. An improvement in glycaemic control was seen in patients who received Cinnamon as the sole therapy for diabetes, those with pre-diabetes (IFG or IGT) and in those with high pre-treatment HbA1c. In animal models, cinnamon reduced fasting and postprandial plasma glucose and HbA1c. Cinnamon has the potential to be a useful add-on therapy in the discipline of integrative medicine in managing type 2 diabetes. At present the evidence is inconclusive and long-term trials aiming to establish the efficacy and safety of cinnamon is needed. However, high coumarin content of Cinnamomum cassia is a concern, but Cinnamomum zeylanicum with its low coumarin content would be a safer alternate.

  17. Management and outcome of clinically evident neck recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Laura Y; Migliacci, Jocelyn C; Tuttle, R Michael; Shaha, Ashok R; Shah, Jatin P; Patel, Snehal G; Ganly, Ian

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to report our incidence of clinically evident neck recurrence, salvage neck management and subsequent outcomes in patients with papillary thyroid cancer. This is important to know so that patients with thyroid cancer can be properly counselled about the implications of recurrent disease and subsequent outcome. An institutional database of 3664 patients with thyroid cancer operated between 1986 and 2010 was reviewed. Patients with nonpapillary histology and gross residual disease and those with distant metastases at presentation or distant metastases prior to nodal recurrence were excluded from the study. Of these, 99 (3.0%) patients developed clinically evident nodal recurrence. Details of recurrence and subsequent therapy were recorded for each patient. Subsequent disease-specific survival (sDSS), distant recurrence-free survival (sDRFS) and nodal recurrence-free survival (sNRFS) were determined from the date of first nodal recurrence using the Kaplan-Meier method. Of the 99 patients, 59% were female and 41% male. The median age was 41 years (range 5-91). The majority of patients had pT3/4 primary tumours (63%) and were pN+ (78%) at initial presentation. The median time to clinically evident nodal recurrence was 28 months (range: 3-264). Nodal recurrence occurred in the central neck in 15 (15%) patients, lateral neck in 74 (75%) patients and both in 10 (10%) patients. After salvage treatment, the 5-year sDSS was 97.4% from time of nodal recurrence. The 5-year sDRFS and sNRFS were 89.2% and 93.7%, respectively. In our series, isolated clinically evident nodal recurrence occurred in 3.0% of patients. Such patients are successfully salvaged with surgery and adjuvant therapy with sDSS of 97.4% at 5 years. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evidence-Based Clinical Significance in Health Care: Toward an Inferential Analysis of Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Dousti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based dental practice requires the developmment and evaluation of protocols that en-sure translational effectiveness: that is, the efficient incorporation of the best available efficacy and effec-tiveness findings in specific clinical dentistry settings and environments. Evidence-based dentistry predi-cates the synthesis of research for obtaining the best available evidence in a validated, stringent, systematic and unbiased fashion. Research synthesis is now established as a science in its own right, precisely because it adheres to the scientific process that is driven by a research question and a hypothesis, follows through clearly defined methodology and design, yielding quantifiable data that are analyzed statistically, and from which stringent statistical inferences are drawn. The conclusions from the protocol of research synthesis define the best available evidence, which is used in the process of evidence-based revision of clinical practice guidelines. One important hurdle of the process of applying research synthesis in evidence-based dentistry lies in the fact that the statistical inferences produced by research must be translated into clinical relevance. Here, we present a model to circumvent this limitation by means of text analysis/mining protocols, which could lead the path toward a novel, valid and reliable ap-proach for the inferential analysis of clinical relevance.

  19. Evidence for a Detrimental Effect of Bicarbonate Therapy in Hypoxic Lactic Acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Helmut; Leach, William; Arieff, Allen I.

    1985-02-01

    Lactic acidosis, a clinical syndrome caused by the accumulation of lactic acid, is characterized by lactate concentration in blood greater than 5 mM. Therapy usually consists of intravenous sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), but resultant mortality is greater than 60 percent. The metabolic and systemic effects of NaHCO3 therapy of hypoxic lactic acidosis in dogs were studied and compared to the effects of sodium chloride or no therapy. Sodium bicarbonate elevated blood lactate concentrations to a greater extent than did either sodium chloride or no treatment. Despite the infusion of NaHCO3, both arterial pH and bicarbonate concentration decreased by a similar amount in all three groups of dogs. Additional detrimental effects of NaHCO3 were observed on the cardiovascular system, including decreases in cardiac output and blood pressure that were not observed with either sodium chloride or no treatment. Thus there is evidence for a harmful effect of NaHCO3 in the treatment of hypoxic lactic acidosis.

  20. Integrating evidence-based practice and information literacy skills in teaching physical and occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruff, Jill T; Thomas, Aliki

    2011-12-01

    To ensure that physical and occupational therapy graduates develop evidence-based practice (EBP) competencies, their academic training must promote EBP skills, such as posing a clinical question and retrieving relevant literature, and the information literacy skills needed to practice these EBP skills. This article describes the collaborative process and outcome of integrating EBP and information literacy early in a professional physical therapy and occupational therapy programme. The liaison librarian and a faculty member designed an instructional activity that included a lecture, workshop and assignment that integrated EBP skills and information literacy skills in the first year of the programme. The assignment was designed to assess students' ability to conduct a search independently. The lecture and workshop were successful in their objectives, as 101 of the 104 students received at least 8 out of 10 points on the search assignment. The teaching activities developed for the students in this course appear to have achieved the goal of teaching students the EBP research cycle so that they might begin to emulate it. The collaboration between the faculty member and the librarian was integral to the success of this endeavour. Future work will include the evaluation of students' long-term retention of information literacy objectives. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  1. On electroconvulsive therapy in depression : Clinical, cognitive and neurobiological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Nordanskog, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is used worldwide to treat severe mental disorders. The most common mental disorder, and the third leading cause of disease burden in the world is depression. The clinical efficacy of ECT for severe depression is well-established. However, both the pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of ECT remain elusive. The main aims of this thesis are to address the following issues: 1) the use and practice of ECT in Sweden has not been systematically ...

  2. Cell therapy for intervertebral disc repair: advancing cell therapy from bench to clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Benneker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encouraging results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium "Where Science meets Clinics", sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5-7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imaging methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neuro-genesis. Discogenic pain, originating from "black discs" or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects.

  3. Evaluation of medication treatment for Alzheimer's disease on clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-qiu LI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To formulate the best treatment plan for Alzheimer's disease patients by evaluating the therapeutic efficacy and side effect of various evidence-based programs. Methods Alzheimer's disease, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, memantine, rosiglitazone, etc. were defined as retrieval words. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases were used with applying of manual searching. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCT, controlled clinical trials and case-observation studies were collected and evaluated by Jadad Scale. Results After screening, 33 selected resources included 14 systematic reviews, 14 randomized controlled trials, 4 controlled clinical trials and 1 case-observation study. According to Jadad Scale, total 28 articles were evaluated to be high quality (12 with score 4, 10 score 5, 6 score 7, and 5 were low quality with score 3. It was summarized as follows: 1 Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease for which no cure exists. To date, only symptomatic treatments with cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine and an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor noncompetitive antagonist (memantine, are effective and well tolerated to counterbalance the neurotransmitter disturbance, but cannot limit or impact on disease progression. 2 Disease modifying drug is an potential agent, with persistent effect on slowing the progression of structural damage, and can be detected even after withdrawing the treatment. Many types of disease modifying drugs are undergoing clinical trials. Conclusions Using evidence-based medicine methods can provide best clinical evidence on Alzheimer's disease treatment. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.009

  4. A Conceptual Model and Clinical Framework for Integrating Mindfulness into Family Therapy with Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Janet L; Scherer, David G; Turner, Charles W; Annett, Robert D; Dalen, Jeanne

    2017-06-07

    Individual and group-based psychotherapeutic interventions increasingly incorporate mindfulness-based principles and practices. These practices include a versatile set of skills such as labeling and attending to present-moment experiences, acting with awareness, and avoiding automatic reactivity. A primary motivation for integrating mindfulness into these therapies is compelling evidence that it enhances emotion regulation. Research also demonstrates that family relationships have a profound influence on emotion regulation capacities, which are central to family functioning and prosocial behavior more broadly. Despite this evidence, no framework exists to describe how mindfulness might integrate into family therapy. This paper describes the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions, highlighting how and why informal mindfulness practices might enhance emotion regulation when integrated with family therapy. We provide a clinical framework for integrating mindfulness into family therapy, particularly as it applies to families with adolescents. A brief case example details sample methods showing how incorporating mindfulness practices into family therapy may enhance treatment outcomes. A range of assessment modalities from biological to behavioral demonstrates the breadth with which the benefits of a family-based mindfulness intervention might be evaluated. © 2017 The Authors. Family Process published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Family Process Institute.

  5. Evidence and ideology as a rationale for light-therapy in Russia: from the Soviet Union to the present day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühlbrandt, Charlotte; McKee, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Light therapy is still used to treat a number of common diseases in Russia. The practice is firmly anchored in history: Soviet clinical practice was divorced from the emerging field of evidence-based medicine. Medical researchers were cut off from international medical research and scientific literature, with much Soviet scientific activity based on a particular socialist ideology. In this study, the use of light therapy serves as a case study to explore tensions between international evidence-based medicine and practices developed in isolation under the Soviet Union, the legacy of which is to the detriment of many patients today. We used four different search methods to uncover scientific and grey literature, both historical and contemporary. We assessed the changing frequency of publications over time and contrasted the volume of literature on light therapy with more orthodox treatments such as statins and painkillers. Our search found an increasing number and comparatively large body of scientific publications on light therapy in the Russian language, and many publications emanating from prestigious Russian institutions. Combined with our analysis of the historical literature and our appraisal of 22 full text articles, this leads us to suggest that light therapy entered mainstream Soviet medical practice before the Stalinist period and still occupies an important position in contemporary Russian clinical practice. We propose that this outdated treatment survives in Russia in part due to the political, economic and social forces that helped to popularize it during Soviet times, and by the seeming justification offered by poorly executed studies.

  6. Reports from the 2010 Clinical and Translational Cancer Research Think Tank meeting: design strategies for personalized therapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donald A; Herbst, Roy S; Rubin, Eric H

    2012-02-01

    It has long been evident that cancer is a heterogeneous disease, but only relatively recently have we come to realize the extent of this heterogeneity. No single therapy is effective for every patient with tumors having the same histology. A clinical strategy based on a single-therapy approach results in overtreatment for the majority of patients. Biomarkers can be considered as knives that dissect the disease ever more finely. The future of clinical research will be based on learning whether certain therapies are more appropriate than others for biomarker-defined subsets of patients. Therapies will eventually be tailored to narrow biomarker subsets. The ability to determine which therapies are appropriate for which patients requires information from biological science as well as empirical evidence from clinical trials. Neither is easy to achieve. Here we describe some nascent approaches for designing clinical trials that are biomarker-based and adaptive. Our focus is on adaptive trials that address many questions at once. In a way, these clinical experiments are themselves part of a much larger experiment: learning how (or whether it is possible) to design experiments that match patients in small subsets of disease with therapies that are especially effective and possibly even curative for them.

  7. Contribution of Dry Needling to Individualized Physical Therapy Treatment of Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palomares, Sara; Oliván-Blázquez, Bárbara; Pérez-Palomares, Ana; Gaspar-Calvo, Elena; Pérez-Benito, Marina; López-Lapeña, Elena; de la Torre-Beldarraín, Maria Luisa; Magallón-Botaya, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Multicenter, parallel randomized clinical trial. Background Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are implicated in shoulder pain and functional limitations. An intervention intended to treat MTrPs is dry needling. Objectives To investigate the effectiveness of dry needling in addition to evidence-based personalized physical therapy treatment in the treatment of shoulder pain. Methods One hundred twenty patients with nonspecific shoulder pain were randomly allocated into 2 parallel groups: (1) personalized, evidencebased physical therapy treatment; and (2) trigger point dry needling in addition to personalized, evidence-based physical therapy treatment. Patients were assessed at baseline, posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was pain assessed by a visual analog scale at 3 months, and secondary variables were joint range-of-motion limitations, Constant-Murley score for pain and function, and number of active MTrPs. Clinical efficacy was assessed using intention-to-treat analysis. Results Of the 120 enrolled patients, 63 were randomly assigned to the control group and 57 to the intervention group. There were no significant differences in outcome between the 2 treatment groups. Both groups showed improvement over time. Conclusion Dry needling did not offer benefits in addition to personalized, evidencebased physical therapy treatment for patients with nonspecific shoulder pain. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Registered February 11, 2009 at www.isrctn.com (ISRCTN30907460). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(1):11-20. Epub 9 Dec 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6698.

  8. Adoption of motivational interviewing and motivational enhancement therapy following clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guydish, Joseph; Jessup, Martha; Tajima, Barbara; Manser, Sarah Turcotte

    2010-09-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) is designed to test drug abuse treatment interventions in multisite clinical trials and to support the translation of effective interventions into practice. In this study, qualitative methods were applied to examine adoption of motivational interviewing and motivational enhancement therapy (MI/MET) in five clinics where these interventions were tested. Participants were clinic staff (n=17) who were interviewed about the MI/MET study, and about whether MI/MET was adopted after the study ended. Although clinics' participation in a clinical trial includes many elements thought to be necessary for later adoption of the intervention, we found that there was "adoption" in one clinic, "partial adoption" in one clinic, "counselor adoption" in one clinic, and "no adoption" in two clinics. These findings highlight a distinction between adoption at the organizational and counselor levels, and suggest that a range of adoption outcomes may be observed in the field. Findings are relevant to clinical staff, program directors, administrators and policy makers concerned with improvement of drug abuse treatment systems through adoption of evidence-based practices.

  9. When to Wait for More Evidence? Real Options Analysis in Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Keith R.; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Peters, Hans J.M.; Beutner, Eric; Lambin, Philippe; Joore, Manuela A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Trends suggest that cancer spending growth will accelerate. One method for controlling costs is to examine whether the benefits of new technologies are worth the extra costs. However, especially new and emerging technologies are often more costly, while limited clinical evidence of superiority is available. In that situation it is often unclear whether to adopt the new technology now, with the risk of investing in a suboptimal therapy, or to wait for more evidence, with the risk of withholding patients their optimal treatment. This trade-off is especially difficult when it is costly to reverse the decision to adopt a technology, as is the case for proton therapy. Real options analysis, a technique originating from financial economics, assists in making this trade-off. Methods. We examined whether to adopt proton therapy, as compared to stereotactic body radiotherapy, in the treatment of inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Three options are available: adopt without further research; adopt and undertake a trial; or delay adoption and undertake a trial. The decision depends on the expected net gain of each option, calculated by subtracting its total costs from its expected benefits. Results. In The Netherlands, adopt and trial was found to be the preferred option, with an optimal sample size of 200 patients. Increase of treatment costs abroad and costs of reversal altered the preferred option. Conclusion. We have shown that real options analysis provides a transparent method of weighing the costs and benefits of adopting and/or further researching new and expensive technologies. PMID:22147003

  10. Allergic Rhinitis in Children: Principles of Early Diagnosis and Effective Therapy. Overview of Clinical Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Baranov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article briefly summarizes the key provisions of the clinical recommendations on medical care delivery for children with allergic rhinitis: modern approaches to diagnosis and therapy. The current document was developed by the professional association of pediatric specialists —the Union of Pediatricians of Russia — together with the leading experts of the Russian Association of Allergists and Clinical Immunologists. The recommendations are regularly updated due to the latest evidence-based results of effectiveness and safety of various medical interventions. The article presents information on the epidemiology of allergic rhinitis in children, specific diagnostic features which provide the opportunity for the timely and correct diagnosis and an effective therapy with personal approach.

  11. Spirulina in clinical practice: evidence-based human applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkos, P D; Leong, S C; Karkos, C D; Sivaji, N; Assimakopoulos, D A

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews suggest that this alga may improve several symptoms and may even have an anticancer, antiviral and antiallergic effects. Current and potential clinical applications, issues of safety, indications, side-effects and levels of evidence are addressed in this review. Areas of ongoing and future research are also discussed.

  12. Spirulina in Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Human Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Karkos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews suggest that this alga may improve several symptoms and may even have an anticancer, antiviral and antiallergic effects. Current and potential clinical applications, issues of safety, indications, side-effects and levels of evidence are addressed in this review. Areas of ongoing and future research are also discussed.

  13. Clinical use of lasers in caries diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ambrose

    2008-06-01

    Laser technology is now ubiquitous in science, business, the arts, the military, industry, telecommunications, entertainment and medicine. It is increasingly finding a useful place in dentistry to offer the potential for practical solutions to managing difficult clinical problems. Research into the clinical use of lasers in diagnostic and therapeutic dental procedures has escalated rapidly in recent years. Laser technology has revolutionized the treatment of dental caries. This article reviews the role of laser technology in the clinical management of caries, early caries diagnosis and treatment planning decision making, caries prevention, soft tissue management, fluorescence aided caries elimination and fluorescence feedback-controlled selective caries removal. Laser technology plays a vital role in enhancing caries diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Nanomedicine in cancer therapy: challenges, opportunities, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicki, Andreas; Witzigmann, Dominik; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Huwyler, Jörg

    2015-02-28

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently available therapies are inadequate and spur demand for improved technologies. Rapid growth in nanotechnology towards the development of nanomedicine products holds great promise to improve therapeutic strategies against cancer. Nanomedicine products represent an opportunity to achieve sophisticated targeting strategies and multi-functionality. They can improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of conventional therapeutics and may thus optimize the efficacy of existing anti-cancer compounds. In this review, we discuss state-of-the-art nanoparticles and targeted systems that have been investigated in clinical studies. We emphasize the challenges faced in using nanomedicine products and translating them from a preclinical level to the clinical setting. Additionally, we cover aspects of nanocarrier engineering that may open up new opportunities for nanomedicine products in the clinic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence informed management of chronic low back pain with cognitive behavioral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatchel, Robert J.; Rollings, Kathryn H.

    2011-01-01

    Editors’ preface The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing amongst available non-surgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited healthcare resources to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used non-surgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this supplement to The Spine Journal, titled Evidence informed management of chronic low back pain without surgery. Articles in this supplement were contributed by leading spine practitioners and researchers, who were invited to summarize the best available evidence for a particular intervention and encouraged to make this information accessible to non-experts. Each of the articles contains five sections (description, theory, evidence of efficacy, harms, and summary) with common subheadings to facilitate comparison across the 24 different interventions profiled in this supplement, blending narrative and systematic review methodology as deemed appropriate by the authors. It is hoped that articles in this supplement will be informative and aid in decision making for the many stakeholders evaluating non-surgical interventions for CLBP. PMID:18164452

  16. Clinical applications of laser therapy on the dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2004-09-01

    Dental practice consists of a series of laboring procedures which demands the use of several types of equipment and materials. Usually patient"s fears brings additional burden to the Dentists. The use of Lasers for treating and diagnosis in Dentistry is quite new comparing to other medical areas. Initially Laser technology was used as an alternative method for treating dental caries in order to substitute the use of the drill. Lately surgical Lasers have shown themselves very useful for treating several pathologies and began to be used as a powerful tool on the treatment of several conditions affecting the maxillofacial complex and later on, the era of the use of Laser therapy began. The advent of the diode Lasers made possible the introduction of small units at the dental office and Laser therapy was used to improve healing and later included also caries diagnosis. This paper discuss the use of Laser therapy on Restorative Dentistry, Periodondology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral implantology and other. Clinical and laboratorial experience has demonstrated that Laser therapy does improve the healing of both mineralized and soft tissues, reduces pain and inflammation, and also reduces both cost and length of the dental treatment.

  17. Use of magnetic therapy in clinical neurology: literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shogam, I.I.; Lenchin, V.N.; Baranovskaya, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    A literature survey is presented on the current status of magnetic therapy in clinical neurology. It is generally accepted that the high susceptibility of the nervous system to the magnetic field is due to a large extent to the automatic component. Furthermore, it has also become clear that glial cells are far more susceptible to magnetic fields than are neurons. Controversy prevails on the question of whether the therapeutic effectiveness of magnetic fields involves a direct mechanism of action or an indirect one via reflex mechanisms. Nevertheless, effectiveness of magnetic therapy has been demonstrated and generally accepted in cases dealing with lagophthalmia, ptosis, various neuralgia, radiculitis, neuritis, vascular and infectious pathology of the brain, and so forth. Basically, the effectiveness of such therapy is strongly dependent on the location and the nature of the pathologic process, as well as on the functional status of the autonomic nervous system. In view of this, effective magnetic therapy is highly dependent on individualization of a given approach. 111 References.

  18. [Cardiovascular effects of insulin therapy: from pharmacology to clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, Edoardo

    2016-03-01

    Insulin has direct effects on vascular walls which, depending on experimental models, can be either predominantly antiatherogenic or proatherogenic. In observational studies, insulin therapy is usually associated with an increase in the incidence of major cardiovascular events. However, this result is probably determined by the effect of confounders. In clinical trials performed in the acute phase of coronary syndromes, the benefits observed with insulin therapy are probably due to the improvement of glycemic control, rather than to direct effects of insulin on the cardiovascular system. In long-term trials for primary or secondary prevention such as UKPDS and ORIGIN insulin has no relevant effects on major cardiovascular events beyond those determined by the improvement of metabolic control. On the other hand, severe hypoglycemia, which is a possible side effect of insulin therapy, is associated with a worse prognosis of cardiovascular disease. The availability of new long-acting insulin analogs, which reduce the incidence of hypoglycemia for similar levels of glycemic control, makes insulin therapy easier and potentially safer for the cardiovascular system.

  19. Clinical evaluation in hyperbaric oxygen therapy by using computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Eiki; Mihara, Tadahiro; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Fujimoto, Toshiro; Fujimoto, Seijiro.

    1982-01-01

    Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (H.O.T. for abbreviation), accompanied by usual conservative therapy, was performed on 30 patients with cerebrovascular disturbances (cerebral infarction: 20 cases; hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage: 10 cases). The clinical signs and symptoms, clinical courses, EEG findings, and CT findings and agter the H.O.T. were then compared before. Moreover, by analyzing the changes in the CT findings (the size and Hounsfield Number of the low-density area and the effect of contrast enhancement), the authors have attempted a clinical evaluation of H.O.T. The results are as follows: 1) Infarction group: There is a tendency to have more changes in the CT findings (reduction of the low-density area, decrease in the Hounsfield Number in the low-density portion, and changes in the effect of contrast enhancement) in the earlier H.O.T. - starting group. However, there was no definite relation between the changes in the CT findings and the clinical signs and symptoms. 2) Hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage group: there was a tendency to have a reduction in the low-density area and an improvement in the clinical signs and symptoms in cases who had an early start of H.O.T. So far as investigating hemodynamic changes is concerned, there is a limit to the ability of investigation by means of CT scan. In future, we hope to establish methods by which if will be possible to detect the hemodynamic changes more exactly with respect to the clinical evaluation of H.O.T. (author)

  20. Evidence based practice and techniques in aquatic therapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquatic therapy (AT) is a holistic method of treatment that involves activity or passive activity to produce healthcare outcomes. The push for holistic treatment in rehabilitation is emphasized by the World Health Organization (WHO) (2009). The WHO suggested that healthcare organizations should turn their attention from ...

  1. Adoption of Motivational Interviewing and Motivational Enhancement Therapy Following Clinical Trials†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guydish, Joseph; Jessup, Martha; Tajima, Barbara; Manser, Sarah Turcotte

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) is designed to test drug abuse treatment interventions in multisite clinical trials and to support the translation of effective interventions into practice. In this study, qualitative methods were applied to examine adoption of motivational interviewing and motivational enhancement therapy (MI/MET) in five clinics where these interventions were tested. Participants were clinic staff (n = 17) who were interviewed about the MI/MET study, and about whether MI/MET was adopted after the study ended. Although clinics’ participation in a clinical trial includes many elements thought to be necessary for later adoption of the intervention, we found that there was “adoption” in one clinic, “partial adoption” in one clinic, “counselor adoption” in one clinic, and “no adoption” in two clinics. These findings highlight a distinction between adoption at the organizational and counselor levels, and suggest that a range of adoption outcomes may be observed in the field. Findings are relevant to clinical staff, program directors, administrators and policy makers concerned with improvement of drug abuse treatment systems through adoption of evidence-based practices. PMID:21138198

  2. Trichuris suis ova therapy for allergic rhinitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Arnved, John; Rønborg, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic helminth infections can protect against allergic airway inflammation in experimental models and have been associated with a reduced risk of atopy and a reduced course of asthma in some observational studies. Although no clinical evidence exists to support the use of helminth therapy...... for allergic disease, the helminth Trichuris suis has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of inflammatory bowel disease....

  3. Trichuris suis ova therapy for allergic rhinitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Arnved, John; Rønborg, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic helminth infections can protect against allergic airway inflammation in experimental models and have been associated with a reduced risk of atopy and a reduced course of asthma in some observational studies. Although no clinical evidence exists to support the use of helminth therapy for...

  4. Compliance with doxycycline therapy in sexually transmitted diseases clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augenbraun, M; Bachmann, L; Wallace, T; Dubouchet, L; McCormack, W; Hook, E W

    1998-01-01

    To determine rates of compliance with doxycycline therapy for patients attending two inner city sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinics using the MEMS (Medication Event Monitoring System) technology (Aprex Corporation, Fremont, CA). An observational study. Two STD clinics in Brooklyn, New York and Birmingham, Alabama. Patients warranting doxycycline as antichlamydial therapy by usual clinical criteria (e.g., documented chlamydial infections, gonococcal urethritis, mucopurulent cervicitis) were enrolled consecutively from both clinics into four separate categories according to gender and the presence or absence of symptoms: symptomatic men (77), asymptomatic men (30), symptomatic women (83), asymptomatic women (33). In the clinic area, patients were given their doxycycline in standard 30-dram medication bottles fitted with the MEMS cap, which is capable of recording the date and time of each bottle opening and closing. This information was then retrieved using a software program developed by the manufacturer. Patients were instructed to return the bottle and cap at the completion of therapy. Efforts were made to contact those who did not return their bottles by both telephone and mail. Bottle openings as recorded by the MEMS were considered to represent use of medication. Patients were considered strictly compliant with prescription instructions if bottle openings and closings occurred at least twice daily for 6 consecutive days. Noncompliance was defined as initially opening the medication more than 48 hours after leaving the clinic or opening the bottle less than once daily for 5 consecutive days. Usage between these extremes was classified as intermediate. Eighty percent of 223 patients enrolled completed the study by returning their bottles. The rate of strict compliance with prescription instruction was 25%. The rate of noncompliance was 24%. Fifty-one percent used some intermediate amount of medication. There was no statistical difference in compliance by

  5. Group art therapy in a methadone clinic lobby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virshup, E

    1985-01-01

    A weekly group art therapy workshop, held in the waiting room of the Venice (California) Methadone Clinic of the Los Angeles Institute for Studies of Destructive Behavior, is described. In this workshop, the clients project their imagination onto random lines and shapes made by string and ink on paper, drawing out the images they see and writing titles and sometimes stories about them. The artwork is shared, discussed, and displayed in the lobby. Through this art-centered process, the clients learn to communicate feelings and conflicts with each other. They also develop social skills, gain insight, and improve their self-esteem. Group art therapy, when combined with counseling, is an effective therapeutic modality when working with a nonverbal and resistant population such as drug abusers.

  6. Vitamin D and Colorectal Cancer: Molecular, Epidemiological, and Clinical Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Ruoxu; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Qian, Zhi Rong; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    In many cells throughout the body, vitamin D is converted into its active form calcitriol, and binds to vitamin D receptor (VDR), which functions as a transcription factor to regulate various biological processes including cellular differentiation and immune response. Vitamin D metabolizing enzymes (including CYP24A1 and CYP27B1) and VDR play major roles in exerting and regulating effects of vitamin D. Preclinical and epidemiological studies provide evidence for anticancer effects of vitamin D (in particular, against colorectal cancer), though clinical trials have yet to prove its benefit. Additionally, molecular pathological epidemiology research can provide insights into the interaction of vitamin D with tumour molecular and immunity status. Other future research directions include genome-wide research on VDR transcriptional targets, gene-environment interaction analyses, and clinical trials on vitamin D efficacy in colorectal cancer patients. Here we review the literature on vitamin D and colorectal cancer from both mechanistic and population studies, and discuss the links and controversies within and between the two parts of evidence. PMID:27245104

  7. When Veterinarians Support Canine Therapy: Bidirectional Benefits for Clinics and Therapy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binfet, John-Tyler; Silas, Haley J; Longfellow, Sean W; Widmaier-Waurechen, Katrina

    2018-01-04

    This paper proposes a mutually beneficial model of collaboration between veterinarians and canine therapy programs. Veterinarians and the clinics for whom they work routinely establish collaborations with multiple and varied stakeholders. This might include a laboratory for processing samples and the corresponding courier company needed to deliver samples to the lab or a partnership with a local dog rescue organization for whom discounted rates are offered. One community partnership that stands to benefit both the clinic and the community agency, is for veterinarians to work in tandem with a local canine-assisted therapy program. The benefits to such an alliance are multifold and address aspects of veterinary medicine including client recruitment, community education, and access to a network of devoted dog enthusiasts.

  8. When Veterinarians Support Canine Therapy: Bidirectional Benefits for Clinics and Therapy Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John-Tyler Binfet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a mutually beneficial model of collaboration between veterinarians and canine therapy programs. Veterinarians and the clinics for whom they work routinely establish collaborations with multiple and varied stakeholders. This might include a laboratory for processing samples and the corresponding courier company needed to deliver samples to the lab or a partnership with a local dog rescue organization for whom discounted rates are offered. One community partnership that stands to benefit both the clinic and the community agency, is for veterinarians to work in tandem with a local canine-assisted therapy program. The benefits to such an alliance are multifold and address aspects of veterinary medicine including client recruitment, community education, and access to a network of devoted dog enthusiasts.

  9. The Client-Centred Evidence-Based Practice of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; von Zweck, Claudia; Vallerand, Josee

    1998-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is therapy guided by the results of scientifically sound, relevant research. The Occupational Performance Process Model outlines the occupational therapy problem-solving process to assist occupational therapists in integrating information about individual clients into research findings to implement EBP. (SK)

  10. Current evidence on atypical odontalgia: diagnosis and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Chiba, Itsuo; Toyofuku, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i) What is the prevalence of AO in the community? (ii) What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii) Are there any comorbidities of AO? (iv) Is local anesthesia effective for the relief of pain in AO? (v) Are there any characteristic symptoms of AO other than spontaneous pain? (vi) Are antidepressants effective for treatment of AO? (vii) Are anticonvulsants effective for treatment of AO? Our literature search provided answers for these questions; however, there is insufficient evidence-based data to establish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AO. Overall, some diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain and persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder may be applied to AO patients. The patient's psychogenic background should always be considered in the treatment and/or management of AO. The clinicians may need to treat AO patients using Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters approach.

  11. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Abiko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i What is the prevalence of AO in the community?\t(ii What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii Are there any comorbidities of AO? (iv Is local anesthesia effective for the relief of pain in AO? (v Are there any characteristic symptoms of AO other than spontaneous pain? (vi Are antidepressants effective for treatment of AO? (vii Are anticonvulsants effective for treatment of AO? Our literature search provided answers for these questions; however, there is insufficient evidence-based data to establish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AO. Overall, some diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain and persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder may be applied to AO patients. The patient's psychogenic background should always be considered in the treatment and/or management of AO. The clinicians may need to treat AO patients using Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters approach.

  12. Telomerase in cancer diagnosis and therapy: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, A M

    1999-12-01

    Curing cancers is one of the most challenging tasks of modern medicine. The major problem is the heterogeneity of human tumours and thus finding a 'universal' target for cancer treatment. The discovery that the expression of the enzyme telomerase is a hallmark of immortality and cancer, and that it is found in the majority (>85%) of human tumours but is repressed in most normal cells, has therefore caused considerable excitement. These observations led to the design of potential telomerase inhibitors and ideas about targeting telomerase in the clinic. To date, several classes of telomerase inhibitory agents have been identified and are in preclinical development. However, the approach has not yet been tested clinically. Because of the proposed function of telomerase, and the understanding that replicative cell senescence or cell death result from progressive telomere shortening during successive cell divisions, even complete enzyme inhibition will not produce immediate cell death. Designing clinical trials for promising telomerase inhibitors requires consideration of the novel mechanism of action of these drugs. A lag period between initiation of treatment and occurrence of effects is likely, and thus anti-telomerase therapy might best be given in adjuvant treatment protocols after initial tumour debulking therapy and in combination with other cytostatic agents. The available knowledge of telomerase biology and its association with human tumours suggests that telomerase inhibition might prove a valuable addition to current cancer treatment regimens.

  13. Key updates in the clinical application of electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Richard D; Reti, Irving M

    2017-04-01

    ECT is the oldest and most effective therapy available for the treatment of severe major depression. It is highly effective in individuals with treatment resistance and when a rapid response is required. However, ECT is associated with memory impairment that is the most concerning side-effect of the treatment, substantially contributing to the controversy and stigmatization surrounding this highly effective treatment. There is overwhelming evidence for the efficacy and safety of an acute course of ECT for the treatment of a severe major depressive episode, as reflected by the recent FDA advisory panel recommendation to reclassify ECT devices from Class III to the lower risk category Class II. However, its application for other indications remains controversial, despite strong evidence to the contrary. This article reviews the indication of ECT for major depression, as well as for other conditions, including catatonia, mania, and acute episodes of schizophrenia. This study also reviews the growing evidence supporting the use of maintenance ECT to prevent relapse after an acute successful course of treatment. Although ECT is administered uncommonly to patients under the age of 18, the evidence supporting its use is also reviewed in this patient population. Finally, memory loss associated with ECT and efforts at more effectively monitoring and reducing it are reviewed.

  14. The evidence-base for couple therapy, family therapy and systemic interventions for adult-focused problems

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This review updates similar articles published in JFT in 2000 and 2009. It presents evidence from meta-analyses, systematic literature reviews and controlled trials for the effectiveness of couple and family therapy for adults with various relationship and mental health problems. The evidence supports the effectiveness of systemic interventions, either alone or as part of multi-modal programmes, for relationship distress, psychosexual problems, intimate partner violence, anxiety disorders, mo...

  15. Systematic review of evidence underpinning non-pharmacological therapies in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olley, Richard; Morales, Andrea

    2017-05-15

    Objective Dementia is one of the most common illnesses worldwide, and is one of the most important causes of disability in older people. Currently, dementia affects over 35million people around the globe. It is expected that this number will increase to 65.7million by 2030. Early detection, diagnosis and treatment to control the principal behaviour symptoms may help reduce these numbers and delay the progression to more advanced and dangerous stages of this disorder with resultant increase quality of life for those affected. The main goal of the present systematic literature review was to examine contemporary evidence relating to non-pharmacological therapy in the treatment of dementia. Methods To achieve the study goal, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement was used. Results This study identified the five most common behaviours in patients with dementia as aggression, wandering, agitation, apathy and sleep disturbances. Two non-pharmacological therapies were the most studied treatment: music therapy and aromatherapy. Ten other non-pharmacological therapies were also identified, but these lack a sufficient evidence-base. Conclusion Although all the therapies identified could be used as part of the treatment of behavioural symptoms, there is insufficient evidence relating to the indications, appropriate use and effectiveness of these therapies to apply in each behavioural treatment. Thus, the present study has demonstrated a significant research gap. What is known about the topic? Despite the widespread use of many different types of therapies, there is limited evidence regarding the efficacy of non-pharmaceutical therapies deployed in the management of behaviours of concern manifested by some people who suffer with dementia in all its forms. What does this paper add? This systematic review examines contemporary evidence from the literature to determine whether there is an evidence base available that would

  16. Linking restless legs syndrome with Parkinson's disease: clinical, imaging and genetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeraully Tasneem

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Restless legs syndrome (RLS and Parkinson's disease (PD are both common neurological disorders. There has been much debate over whether an etiological link between these two diseases exists and whether they share a common pathophysiology. Evidence pointing towards a link includes response to dopaminergic agents in PD and RLS, suggestive of underlying dopamine dysfunction in both conditions. The extrastriatal dopaminergic system, in particular altered spinal dopaminergic modulation, may be variably involved in PD patients with RLS symptoms. In addition, there is now evidence that the nigrostriatal system, primarily involved in PD, is also affected in RLS. Furthermore, an association of RLS with the parkin mutation has been suggested. The prevalence of RLS has also been reported to be increased in other disorders of dopamine regulation. However, clinical association studies and functional imaging have produced mixed findings. Conflicting accounts of emergence of RLS and improvement in RLS symptoms after deep brain stimulation (DBS also contribute to the uncertainty surrounding the issue. Among the strongest arguments against a common pathophysiology is the role of iron in RLS and PD. While elevated iron levels in the substantia nigra contribute to oxidative stress in PD, RLS is a disorder of relative iron deficiency, with symptoms responding to replacement therapy. Recent ultrasonography studies have suggested that, despite overlapping clinical features, the mechanisms underlying idiopathic RLS and RLS associated with PD may differ. In this review, we provide a concise summary of the clinical, imaging and genetic evidence exploring the link between RLS and PD.

  17. Clinical Prediction Rules for Physical Therapy Interventions: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneciuk, Jason M; Bishop, Mark D; George, Steven Z

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) involving physical therapy interventions have been published recently. The quality of the studies used to develop the CPRs was not previously considered, a fact that has potential implications for clinical applications and future research. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the quality of published CPRs developed for physical therapy interventions. Methods: Relevant databases were searched up to June 2008. Studies were included in this review if the explicit purpose was to develop a CPR for conditions commonly treated by physical therapists. Validated CPRs were excluded from this review. Study quality was independently determined by 3 reviewers using standard 18-item criteria for assessing the methodological quality of prognostic studies. Percentage of agreement was calculated for each criterion, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined for overall quality scores. Results: Ten studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Percentage of agreement for individual criteria ranged from 90% to 100%, and the ICC for the overall quality score was .73 (95% confidence interval=.27–.92). Criteria commonly not met were adequate description of inclusion or exclusion criteria, inclusion of an inception cohort, adequate follow-up, masked assessments, sufficient sample sizes, and assessments of potential psychosocial factors. Quality scores for individual studies ranged from 48.2% to 74.0%. Discussion and Conclusion: Validation studies are rarely reported in the literature; therefore, CPRs derived from high-quality studies may have the best potential for use in clinical settings. Investigators planning future studies of physical therapy CPRs should consider including inception cohorts, using longer follow-up times, performing masked assessments, recruiting larger sample sizes, and incorporating psychological and psychosocial assessments. PMID:19095806

  18. Clinical perceptions of radiation therapy undergraduate competency standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Mary-Ann; Bridge, Pete

    2014-12-01

    The multifactorial nature of clinical skills development makes assessment of undergraduate radiation therapist competence level by clinical mentors challenging. A recent overhaul of the clinical assessment strategy at Queensland University of Technology has moved away from the high-stakes Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to encompass a more continuous measure of competence. This quantitative study aimed to gather stakeholder evidence to inform development of standards by which to measure student competence for a range of levels of progression. A simple anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all Queensland radiation therapists. The tool asked respondents to assign different levels of competency with a range of clinical tasks to different levels of student. All data were anonymous and was combined for analysis using Microsoft Excel. Feedback indicated good agreement with tasks that specified the amount of direction required and this has been incorporated into the new clinical achievements record that the students need to have signed off. Additional puzzling findings suggested higher expectations with planning tasks than with treatment-based tasks. The findings suggest that the amount of direction required by students is a valid indicator of their level and has been adopted into the clinical assessment scheme. Further work will build on this to further define standards of competency for undergraduates.

  19. Preparing Occupational Therapy Students for the Complexities of Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Knecht-Sabres DHS, OTR/L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the effect of a unique amalgam of adult learning methodologies near the end of the occupational therapy (OT students’ didactic education as a means to enhance readiness for clinical practice. Results of quantitative and qualitative data analysis indicated that the use of standardized patients, in combination with a sequential, semistructured, and progressively challenging series of client cases, in an OT adult practice (intervention course, improved the students’ self-perception of their level of comfort and skill on various foundational, yet essential, OT-related competencies.

  20. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Targeted Testing and Augmentation Therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Marciniuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality.

  1. Scientific evidence of dockworker illness to nursing clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Marlise Capa Verde de; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina

    2016-04-01

    To identify scientific evidence of occupational illness of dockworkers published in the literature. systematic review of the literature, developed according to the Cochrane method. The databases searched were: Cochrane, LILACS, MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL and SciELO. Studies from 1988 to 2014 were selected. The data were analyzed according to the level of evidence and Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology. We included 14 studies, in which 11 (78.6%) were from international journals. The year of 2012 showed greater number of studies. All studies were classified as: Level of Evidence 4, highlighting lung cancer, musculoskeletal and ischemic diseases, causal link in chemical risks. The development of preventive measures should especially include chemical exposure of workers applying the clinical reasoning of nurses' environmental knowledge to care for illnesses. Identificar evidências científicas de adoecimento ocupacional do trabalhador portuário publicadas na literatura. Revisão sistemática da literatura, construída conforme o método Cochrane. As bases de dados pesquisadas foram Cochrane, LILACS, MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL e SciELO. Foram selecionados artigos publicados de 1988 a 2014. Os dados foram analisados conforme o Nível de Evidência e Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology. Foram selecionadas 14 publicações, das quais 11 (78,6%) de revistas internacionais. O ano de 2012 reuniu maior número de publicações no período de estudo. Todas as publicações pertenciam ao Nível de Evidência 4, destacando o câncer pulmonar, doenças osteomusculares e isquêmicas, com nexo causal nos riscos químicos. A elaboração de medidas preventivas deve prever especialmente a exposição química do trabalhador, aplicando ao raciocínio clínico do enfermeiro um conhecimento ambiental para a assistência aos adoecimentos.

  2. An evidence-based review of natalizumab therapy in the management of Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja GR Edula

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Raja GR Edula, Michael F PiccoMayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida, USAAbstract: Treatment options for Crohn’s disease have evolved beyond the early goals of induction and remission and are now more focused on preventing complications by altering the natural history of the disease. The advent of biologic therapies has revolutionized the management of Crohn’s disease. Specifically, antibodies to tumor necrosis factor alpha induce rapid mucosal healing. This translates into improved patient outcomes. However, many patients will fail these and other therapies. Natalizumab is a new biologic agent that has been approved for the treatment of moderately to severely active Crohn’s disease in patients who have failed or are intolerant to immunosuppressants and/or tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. It is a selective adhesion molecule inhibitor to alpha-4 integrin resulting in inhibition of the migration of inflammatory cells across the endothelium. This unique mechanism of action has been shown to be effective in the treatment of Crohn’s disease, making it an important option for otherwise refractory patients. Its use has been limited to these refractory patients because of concerns about the development of complications, especially progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In this review, evidence-based data on the indications, efficacy and safety of natalizumab will be presented and its role in the management of patients with Crohn’s disease will be defined.Keywords: Crohn’s disease, natalizumab, alpha-4 integrin

  3. Exploiting science? A systematic analysis of complementary and alternative medicine clinic websites' marketing of stem cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Blake; Zarzeczny, Amy; Caulfield, Timothy

    2018-02-28

    To identify the frequency and qualitative characteristics of stem cell-related marketing claims made on websites of clinics featuring common types of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners. The involvement of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners in the marketing of stem cell therapies and stem cell-related interventions is understudied. This research explores the extent to which they are involved and collaborate with medical professionals. This knowledge will help with identifying and evaluating potential policy responses to this growing market. Systematic website analysis. Global. US and English-language bias due to methodology. Representations made on clinic websites in relation to practitioner types, stem cell therapies and their targets, stem cell-related interventions. Statements about stem cell therapies relating to evidence of inefficacy, limited evidence of efficacy, general procedural risks, risks specific to the mode of therapy, regulatory status, experimental or unproven nature of therapy. Use of hype language (eg, language that exaggerates potential benefits). 243 websites offered stem cell therapies. Many websites advertised stem cell transplantation from multiple sources, such as adipose-derived (112), bone marrow-derived (100), blood-derived (28), umbilical cord-derived (26) and others. Plant stem cell-based treatments and products (20) were also advertised. Purposes for and targets of treatment included pain, physical injury, a wide range of diseases and illnesses, cosmetic concerns, non-cosmetic ageing, sexual enhancement and others. Medical doctors (130), chiropractors (53) and naturopaths (44) commonly work in the clinics we found to be offering stem cell therapies. Few clinic websites advertising stem cell therapies included important additional information, including statements about evidence of inefficacy (present on only 12.76% of websites), statements about limited evidence of efficacy (18.93%), statements of

  4. Schema Therapy for Emotional Dysregulation: Theoretical Implication and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadomo, Harold; Grecucci, Alessandro; Giardini, Irene; Ugolini, Erika; Carmelita, Alessandro; Panzeri, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The term emotional dysregulation refers to an impaired ability to regulate unwanted emotional states. Scientific evidence supports the idea that emotional dysregulation underlies several psychological disorders as, for example: personality disorders, bipolar disorder type II, interpersonal trauma, anxiety disorders, mood disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder. Emotional dysregulation may derive from early interpersonal traumas in childhood. These early traumatic events create a persistent sensitization of the central nervous system in relation to early life stressing events. For this reason, some authors suggest a common endophenotypical origin across psychopathologies. In the last 20 years, cognitive behavioral therapy has increasingly adopted an interactive-ontogenetic view to explain the development of disorders associated to emotional dysregulation. Unfortunately, standard Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) methods are not useful in treating emotional dysregulation. A CBT-derived new approach called Schema Therapy (ST), that integrates theory and techniques from psychodynamic and emotion focused therapy, holds the promise to fill this gap in cognitive literature. In this model, psychopathology is viewed as the interaction between the innate temperament of the child and the early experiences of deprivation or frustration of the subject’s basic needs. This deprivation may lead to develop early maladaptive schemas (EMS), and maladaptive Modes. In the present paper we point out that EMSs and Modes are associated with either dysregulated emotions or with dysregulatory strategies that produce and maintain problematic emotional responses. Thanks to a special focus on the therapeutic relationship and emotion focused-experiential techniques, this approach successfully treats severe emotional dysregulation. In this paper, we make several comparisons between the main ideas of ST and the science of emotion regulation, and we present how to conceptualize pathological

  5. Exploring the experiences of novice clinical instructors in physical therapy clinical education: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, B H; Bridges, P H; Phillips, T A; Drill, A N; Gaydosik, C D; Krishnan, A; Yandziak, H J

    2014-12-01

    To explore the perceptions of novice physical therapy clinical instructors (CIs) about their interactions and teaching behaviours with physical therapy students. A phenomenological approach using semi-structured interviews and a focus group. Six novice physical therapy CIs (less than two years as a CI and supervised fewer than three students) were recruited purposefully from a large metropolitan area in the USA. All participants were credentialed by the American Physical Therapy Association as CIs. Transcripts of interview data and focus group data were analysed using interpretative analysis for themes and subthemes. Participants viewed the transition of students from the classroom to the clinic as their primary role, using strategies of 'providing a way in', 'fostering critical thinking', 'finding a balance', 'overcoming barriers' and 'letting go'. While novice CIs showed skill in fostering student reflection and providing orientation, they struggled with student autonomy and balancing the competing obligations of patient care and clinical instruction. They expressed issues related to anxiety and lack of confidence. In the future, novice CIs could benefit from training and support in these areas. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical implementation and quality assurance for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Price, R.; McNeeley, S.; Chen, L.; Li, J.S.; Wang, L.; Ding, M.; Fourkal, E.; Qin, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical implementation and quality assurance (QA) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on the experience at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, USA. We will review our procedures for the clinical implementation of the IMRT technique and the requirements for patient immobilization, target delineation, treatment optimization, beam delivery and system administration. We will discuss the dosimetric requirements and measurement procedures for beam commissioning and dosimetry verification for IMRT. We will examine the details of model-based dose calculation for IMRT treatment planning and the potential problems with such dose calculation algorithms. We will discuss the effect of beam delivery systems on the actual dose distributions received by the patients and the methods to incorporate such effects in the treatment optimization process. We will investigate the use of the Monte Carlo method for dose calculation and treatment verification for IMRT

  7. Clinical and investigational considerations for the use of IGIV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballow, Mark

    2005-08-15

    Clinical uses of immunoglobulin intravenous (IGIV) therapy for a number of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are discussed, as well as the probable mechanisms by which IGIV exerts its immunoregulatory and antiinflammatory actions. Case studies are also presented to examine practical considerations in the selection of IGIV products for patients at risk for adverse events. At present, the Food and Drug Administration has approved IGIV for use in six conditions, including replacement therapy for patients with antibody-deficiency disease, adjunct therapy in patients with poor antibody-producing capabilities, prophylaxis against certain types of infections, and several autoimmune disorders, including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and Kawasaki disease. Numerous mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial effects of IGIV, including the interaction of infused IgG with fragment crystallizable (Fc) receptors and complement proteins, the modulation of synthesis and release of cytokines and cytokine antagonists, and neutralization of circulating autoantibodies.IGIV products differ significantly in methods of production, virus elimination, formulation, and composition. These differences can potentially have an impact on safety, tolerability, and efficacy. The major features affecting tolerability include volume load, sugar and salt content, and osmolality. Case studies highlight how these product characteristics could affect patient outcomes. While numerous mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial effects of IGIV, the specific mechanisms remain elusive. Patient outcomes can be affected by IGIV product characteristics. The choice of an IGIV product should be matched to the patient's risk-factor profile.

  8. Hijama therapy (wet cupping) - its potential use to complement British healthcare in practice, understanding, evidence and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Mohammed Imran

    2016-05-01

    Wet cupping was used in the nineteenth century for treatment of patients in the United Kingdom (UK) by a few experienced practitioners. Revival Hijama use by practitioners in the UK in recent years has been observed as well as interest from the public, with developments of specific certified training programmes, established businesses providing tailored Hijama therapy Clinical Waste disposal services, provisions of insurance cover, involvement of medical professionals and membership with the General Regulatory Council for Complementary Therapies (GRCCT). However, there has also been noted that there is not much in the way of guidance or regulation. Therefore, we would like to initiate some communication and understanding of Hijama (wet cupping) to benefit medical professionals, discussing recent research undertaken as a basis for potentially more in the future (evidence-based practice), in the likely event that a patient might request to be referred for this therapy during a consultation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Curcumin and insulin resistance-Molecular targets and clinical evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Osorio, Angélica Saraí; Monroy, Adriana; Alavez, Silvestre

    2016-11-12

    Curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), the main component of the Indian spice turmeric, has been used in traditional medicine to improve diabetes and its comorbidities. Since the last two decades, scientific research has shown that in addition to its antioxidant properties, curcumin could also work as protein homeostasis regulator and it is able to modulate other intracellular pathways. Curcumin supplementation has been proposed to improve insulin resistance (IR) through the activation of the insulin receptor and its downstream pathways in several experimental models, pointing out that its clinical use may be a good and innocuous strategy to improve IR-related diseases. IR is associated with many diseases and syndromes like carbohydrate intolerance, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, it is imperative to identify safe therapeutic interventions aimed to reduce side effects that could lead the patient to leave the treatment. To date, many clinical trials have been carried out using turmeric and curcumin to improve metabolic syndrome, carbohydrate intolerance, diabetes, and obesity in individuals with IR. Results so far are inconclusive because dose, time of treatment, and type of curcumin can change the study outcome significantly. However, there is some clinical evidence suggesting a beneficial effect of curcumin on IR. In this review, we discuss the factors that could influence curcumin effects in clinical trials aimed to improve IR and related diseases, and the conclusions that can be drawn from results obtained so far. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):561-580, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Evaluating the Quality of Website Information of Private-Practice Clinics Offering Cell Therapies in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kashihara, Hidenori; Nakayama, Takeo; Hatta, Taichi; Takahashi, Naomi; Fujita, Misao

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the safety and effectiveness of stem cell therapies are yet to be proven, recent studies show that such therapies are being advertised with some questionable marketing techniques to effect positive portrayal of the therapies on the webpages of private-practice clinics to sell their therapies worldwide. In such context, those clinics communicate directly with consumers (patients and their family members) via the clinics? websites. Meanwhile, the Health Science Council at th...

  11. TU-G-BRB-05: Panel Discussion: Clinical Trials in Proton and Ion Therapy - Are We Ready?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, R. [Loma Linda Univ. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  12. Current evidence of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Mittermayr, Rainer; Fuerst, Martin; Al Muderis, Munjed; Thiele, Richard; Saxena, Amol; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy has been described as the most common overuse injury in sports medicine. Several treatment modalities such as activity modification, heel lifts, arch supports, stretching exercises, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and eccentric loading are known as standard treatment mostly without proven evidence. After failed conservative therapy, invasive treatment may be considered. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been successfully used in soft-tissue pathologies like lateral epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis, tendinopathy of the shoulder and also in bone and skin disorders. Conclusive evidence recommending ESWT as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy is still lacking. In plantar fasciitis as well as in calcific shoulder tendinopathy shock wave therapy is recently the best evaluated treatment option. This article analysis the evidence based literature of ESWT in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Recently published data have shown the efficacy of focused and radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. All rights reserved.

  13. Contemporary Cognitive Behavior Therapy: A Review of Theory, History, and Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Nathan; Pilecki, Brian; McKay, Dean

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has come to be a widely practiced psychotherapy throughout the world. The present article reviews theory, history, and evidence for CBT. It is meant as an effort to summarize the forms and scope of CBT to date for the uninitiated. Elements of CBT such as cognitive therapy, behavior therapy, and so-called "third wave" CBT, such as dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) are covered. The evidence for the efficacy of CBT for various disorders is reviewed, including depression, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, substance abuse, schizophrenia, chronic pain, insomnia, and child/adolescent disorders. The relative efficacy of medication and CBT, or their combination, is also briefly considered. Future directions for research and treatment development are proposed.

  14. Kombucha: a systematic review of the clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E

    2003-04-01

    Kombucha has become a popular complementary remedy. The aim of this systematic review was to critically evaluate the evidence related to its efficacy and safety. Computerised literature searches were carried out to locate all human medical investigations of kombucha regardless of study design. Data were extracted and validated by the present author and are reported in narrative form. No clinical studies were found relating to the efficacy of this remedy. Several case reports and case series raise doubts about the safety of kombucha. They include suspected liver damage, metabolic acidosis and cutaneous anthrax infections. One fatality is on record. On the basis of these data it was concluded that the largely undetermined benefits do not outweigh the documented risks of kombucha. It can therefore not be recommended for therapeutic use. Copyright 2003 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  15. Hand decontamination in clinical practice: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Ruth; Pegram, Anne; Woodward, Sue

    2017-04-27

    Hand decontamination is known to significantly reduce the spread of hospital-acquired infections but, despite a wealth of guidelines and education campaigns, evidence suggests that many healthcare workers are non-compliant with hand decontamination. The behaviours that prevent hand decontamination are complex. Studies look at attitudes towards dirt, disgust, self-protective hand washing and familiarity with patients. Self-protection behaviours manifest themselves in washing hands more often after certain tasks. Professional issues are also reported to have an impact on hand decontamination, mainly lack of time, heavy workloads, understaffing and frequency of admissions to the clinical area. Further research needs to be undertaken to include comparison between self-reported studies and observational studies, as it has been shown that healthcare workers may rationalise their behaviour and that self-reporting can be unreliable.

  16. [New directions in the hypotensive therapy of open-angle glaucoma (experimental and clinical research)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunin, A Ia; Ermakov, V N; Filina, A A

    1993-01-01

    Clinical use of eye drops of a hybrid beta-alpha-adrenoblocker OF-4680 to reduce intraocular pressure has shown a high efficacy of the drug, not inferior to thymolol, for local hypotensive therapy of open-angle glaucoma. A combination of thymolol with taurin helped reduce the inhibiting effect of the beta-blocker on chamber humor secretion and simultaneously enhanced its discharge. The results evidence the desirability of correcting glutathion deficiency, detected in the patients with narrow-angle glaucoma, by lipoic acid.

  17. Highlights from the UEG Week Congress 2014: New Evidence and Novel Therapies for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Charles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common gastrointestinal disorder that affects up to 15% of the European and North American population, and is characterised by abdominal pain, bloating sensations, cramping, constipation, and diarrhoea. Main subtypes of IBS include constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C, diarrhoea-predominant IBS (IBS-D, and mixed diarrhoea and constipation-associated IBS (IBS-M. The pathophysiology of IBS is still unclear, but important factors such as alterations in the brain-gut axis, bacterial overgrowth in the intestines, increased paracellular permeability, disruptions in the immune system, and accrued visceral sensitivity have been suggested. While many therapies are available to treat the symptoms associated with IBS, on a symptom-by-symptom basis, there are few effective treatments for IBS itself, including linaclotide, which was approved 2 years ago in Europe but only for IBS-C. Additional disease-modifying therapies to slow disease progression or achieve remission are needed as this represents a substantial unmet need. New emerging data on the pathophysiology of IBS are certainly promising; better knowledge of the underlying mechanisms will help refine the management of IBS, both in terms of diagnosis with the development of biomarkers, and in terms of therapeutic management with new pharmacological targets. Additional treatment options will be welcome given the variety of disease subtypes and presentations. The United European Gastroenterology (UEG Week Congress, which was held in Vienna, Austria, 18th-22nd October 2014, was an excellent opportunity to share new findings on the pathophysiology and new clinical evidence and emerging therapies in the management of IBS. Selected abstracts received additional exposure through the “Posters in the Spotlight” session and the “Posters of Excellence” award; such abstracts will be developed in this review.

  18. Clinical Efficacy of Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic modality for advanced diabetes mellitus (DM). This study presents a meta-analysis of relevant clinical trials to determine the efficacy of stem cell therapy in DM. We aim to critically evaluate and synthesize clinical evidence on the safety and efficiency of different types of stem cell therapy for both T1DM and T2DM. We pooled participant-level data from twenty-two eligible clinical trials that satisfied our inclusion criteria, with a total of 524 patients. There were significant differences in the outcome based on the type and source of the infused cells. Out of all T1DM patients who received CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) infusion, 58.9% became insulin independent for a mean period of 16 months, whereas the results were uniformly negative in patients who received umbilical cord blood (UCB). Infusion of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) provided significantly beneficial outcome in T1DM, when compared to bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) (Pstem cell therapy early after DM diagnosis was more effective than intervention at later stages (relative risk = 2.0, P = 0.0008). Adverse effects were observed in only 21.72% of both T1DM and T2DM stem cell recipients with no reported mortality. Out of all poor responders, 79.5% were diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. Stem cell transplantation can represent a safe and effective treatment for selected patients with DM. In this cohort of trials, the best therapeutic outcome was achieved with CD34+ HSC therapy for T1DM, while the poorest outcome was observed with HUCB for T1DM. Diabetic ketoacidosis impedes therapeutic efficacy.

  19. The theories underpinning rational emotive behaviour therapy: where's the supportive evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnes, Douglas

    2004-08-01

    This paper examines the underlying theoretical philosophy of one of the most widely used cognitive behaviour therapies, rational emotive behaviour therapy. It examines whether two central theoretical principles are supported by research evidence: firstly, that irrational beliefs lead to dysfunctional emotions and inferences and that rational beliefs lead to functional emotions and inferences and, secondly, that demand beliefs are the primary core irrational belief. The established criteria for evaluating the efficacy of the theories are detailed and used to evaluate the strength of evidence supporting these two assumptions. The findings indicate there is limited evidence to support these theories. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Clinical management of paradoxical psoriasiform reactions during TNF- α therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R; Daudén, E

    2014-10-01

    There have been reports of paradoxical induction or worsening of psoriasis during treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α agents (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, and certolizumab). It has been hypothesized that an imbalance between TNF-α and interferon α might have a role in the etiology and pathogenesis of these reactions. Paradoxical psoriasiform reactions can be divided clinically into de novo psoriasis and exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis. The first, which is more common and more extensively described in the literature, occurs in patients without a history of psoriasis who are receiving TNF-α therapy for another inflammatory disorder. The second can occur with or without changes in the morphology of the lesions. In this article, we review the literature on the clinical and histologic features of paradoxical psoriasiform reactions, analyze their clinical course and treatment, and propose a clinical management model for use in routine practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical results of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, T.; Mizobuchi, Y.; Nagahiro, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Kumada, H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of BSH-based intra-operative BNCT (IO-BNCT) and BSH and BPA-based non-operative BNCT (NO-BNCT). We have treated 23 glioblastoma patients with BNCT without any additional chemotherapy since 1998. The median survival time (MST) of BNCT was 19.5 months, and 2-year, 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 26.1%, 17.4% and 5.8%, respectively. This clinical result of BNCT in patients with GBM is superior to that of single treatment of conventional radiotherapy compared with historical data of conventional treatment. - Highlights: ► In this study, we evaluate the clinical outcome of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant brain tumors. ► We have treated 23 glioblastoma (GBM) patients with BNCT without any additional chemotherapy. ► Clinical results of BNCT in patients with GBM are superior to that of single treatment of conventional radiotherapy compared with historical data of conventional treatment.

  2. Potential clinical applications of adult human mesenchymal stem cell (Prochymal® therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel AN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Amit N Patel, Jorge GenoveseUniversity of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USAAbstract: In vitro, in vivo animal, and human clinical data show a broad field of application for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. There is overwhelming evidence of the usefulness of MSCs in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and immune therapy. At present, there are a significant number of clinical trials exploring the use of MSCs for the treatment of various diseases, including myocardial infarction and stroke, in which oxygen suppression causes widespread cell death, and others with clear involvement of the immune system, such as graft-versus-host disease, Crohn's disease, and diabetes. With no less impact, MSCs have been used as cell therapy to treat defects in bone and cartilage and to help in wound healing, or in combination with biomaterials in tissue engineering development. Among the MSCs, allogeneic MSCs have been associated with a regenerative capacity due to their unique immune modulatory properties. Their immunosuppressive capability without evidence of immunosuppressive toxicity at a global level define their application in the treatment of diseases with a pathogenesis involving uncontrolled activity of the immune system. Until now, the limitation in the number of totally characterized autologous MSCs available represents a major obstacle to their use for adult stem cell therapy. The use of premanufactured allogeneic MSCs from controlled donors under optimal conditions and their application in highly standardized clinical trials would lead to a better understanding of their real applications and reduce the time to clinical translation.Keywords: regeneration, immunomodulation, tissue engineering, allogeneic, mesenchymal stem cells

  3. Second-Line Hormonal Therapy for Men With Chemotherapy-Naïve, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgo, Katherine S; Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Rumble, R Bryan; Carducci, Michael A; Nordquist, Luke; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Winquist, Eric; Singer, Eric A

    2017-06-10

    Purpose ASCO provisional clinical opinions (PCOs) offer direction to the ASCO membership after publication or presentation of potential practice-changing data. This PCO addresses second-line hormonal therapy for chemotherapy-naïve men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) who range from being asymptomatic with only biochemical evidence of CRPC to having documented metastases but minimal symptoms. Clinical Context The treatment goal for CRPC is palliation. Despite resistance to initial androgen deprivation therapy, most men respond to second-line hormonal therapies. However, guidelines have neither addressed second-line hormonal therapy for nonmetastatic CRPC nor provided specific guidance with regard to the chemotherapy-naïve population. Recent Data Six phase III randomized controlled trials and expert consensus opinion inform this PCO. Provisional Clinical Opinion For men with CRPC, a castrate state should be maintained indefinitely. Second-line hormonal therapy (eg, antiandrogens, CYP17 inhibitors) may be considered in patients with nonmetastatic CRPC at high risk for metastatic disease (rapid prostate-specific antigen doubling time or velocity) but otherwise is not suggested. In patients with radiographic evidence of metastases and minimal symptoms, enzalutamide or abiraterone plus prednisone should be offered after discussion with patients about potential harms, benefits, costs, and patient preferences. Radium-223 and sipuleucel-T also are options. No evidence provides guidance about the optimal order of hormonal therapies for CRPC beyond second-line treatment. Prostate-specific antigen testing every 4 to 6 months is reasonable for men without metastases. Routine radiographic restaging generally is not suggested but can be considered for patients at risk for metastases or who exhibit symptoms or other evidence of progression. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/genitourinary-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  4. Fasting therapy for treating and preventing disease - current state of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Andreas; Li, Chenying

    2013-01-01

    Periods of deliberate fasting with restriction of solid food intake are practiced worldwide, mostly based on traditional, cultural or religious reasons. There is large empirical and observational evidence that medically supervised modified fasting (fasting cure, 200-500 kcal nutritional intake per day) with periods of 7-21 days is efficacious in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, chronic pain syndromes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. The beneficial effects of fasting followed by vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis are confirmed by randomized controlled trials. Further beneficial effects of fasting are supported by observational data and abundant evidence from experimental research which found caloric restriction and intermittent fasting being associated with deceleration or prevention of most chronic degenerative and chronic inflammatory diseases. Intermittent fasting may also be useful as an accompanying treatment during chemotherapy of cancer. A further beneficial effect of fasting relates to improvements in sustainable lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthy diet, possibly mediated by fasting-induced mood enhancement. Various identified mechanisms of fasting point to its potential health-promoting effects, e.g., fasting-induced neuroendocrine activation and hormetic stress response, increased production of neurotrophic factors, reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress, general decrease of signals associated with aging, and promotion of autophagy. Fasting therapy might contribute to the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases and should be further evaluated in controlled clinical trials and observational studies. © 2014 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  5. Impact of High-Dose Atorvastatin Therapy and Clinical Risk Factors on Incident Aortic Valve Stenosis in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease (from TNT, IDEAL, and SPARCL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsenault, Benoit J.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Mora, Samia; Demicco, David A.; Bao, Weihang; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Amarenco, Pierre; Pedersen, Terje; Barter, Philip; Waters, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials have not provided evidence for a role of statin therapy in reducing aortic valve stenosis (AVS) severity in patients with documented AVS. However, whether statin therapy could prevent the onset of AVS is unknown. Our objectives were (1) to compare the incidence rates of AVS among

  6. Modern clinical research: How rapid learning health care and cohort multiple randomised clinical trials complement traditional evidence based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambin, Philippe; Zindler, Jaap; Vanneste, Ben; van de Voorde, Lien; Jacobs, Maria; Eekers, Daniëlle; Peerlings, Jurgen; Reymen, Bart; Larue, Ruben T H M; Deist, Timo M; de Jong, Evelyn E C; Even, Aniek J G; Berlanga, Adriana J; Roelofs, Erik; Cheng, Qing; Carvalho, Sara; Leijenaar, Ralph T H; Zegers, Catharina M L; van Limbergen, Evert; Berbee, Maaike; van Elmpt, Wouter; Oberije, Cary; Houben, Ruud; Dekker, Andre; Boersma, Liesbeth; Verhaegen, Frank; Bosmans, Geert; Hoebers, Frank; Smits, Kim; Walsh, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Trials are vital in informing routine clinical care; however, current designs have major deficiencies. An overview of the various challenges that face modern clinical research and the methods that can be exploited to solve these challenges, in the context of personalised cancer treatment in the 21st century is provided. The purpose of this manuscript, without intending to be comprehensive, is to spark thought whilst presenting and discussing two important and complementary alternatives to traditional evidence-based medicine, specifically rapid learning health care and cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design. Rapid learning health care is an approach that proposes to extract and apply knowledge from routine clinical care data rather than exclusively depending on clinical trial evidence, (please watch the animation: http://youtu.be/ZDJFOxpwqEA). The cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design is a pragmatic method which has been proposed to help overcome the weaknesses of conventional randomised trials, taking advantage of the standardised follow-up approaches more and more used in routine patient care. This approach is particularly useful when the new intervention is a priori attractive for the patient (i.e. proton therapy, patient decision aids or expensive medications), when the outcomes are easily collected, and when there is no need of a placebo arm. Truly personalised cancer treatment is the goal in modern radiotherapy. However, personalised cancer treatment is also an immense challenge. The vast variety of both cancer patients and treatment options makes it extremely difficult to determine which decisions are optimal for the individual patient. Nevertheless, rapid learning health care and cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design are two approaches (among others) that can help meet this challenge.

  7. Clinical intuition versus statistics: different modes of tacit knowledge in clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braude, Hillel D

    2009-01-01

    Despite its phenomenal success since its inception in the early nineteen-nineties, the evidence-based medicine movement has not succeeded in shaking off an epistemological critique derived from the experiential or tacit dimensions of clinical reasoning about particular individuals. This critique claims that the evidence-based medicine model does not take account of tacit knowing as developed by the philosopher Michael Polanyi. However, the epistemology of evidence-based medicine is premised on the elimination of the tacit dimension from clinical judgment. This is demonstrated through analyzing the dichotomy between clinical and statistical intuition in evidence-based medicine's epistemology of clinical reasoning. I argue that clinical epidemiology presents a more nuanced epistemological model for the application of statistical epidemiology to the clinical context. Polanyi's theory of tacit knowing is compatible with the model of clinical reasoning associated with clinical epidemiology, but not evidence-based medicine.

  8. Cardiovascular Considerations in Antidepressant Therapy: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibeh Yekehtaz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a definite correlation between cardiovascular diseases and depressive disorders. Nevertheless, many aspects of this association have yet to be fully elucidated. Up to half of coronary artery disease patients are liable to suffer from some depressive symptoms, with approximately 20% receiving a diagnosis of major depressive disorders. Pharmacotherapy is a key factor in the management of major depression, not least in patients with chronic diseases who are likely to fail to show proper compliance and response to non-pharmacological interventions. Antidepressants are not deemed completely safe. Indeed, numerous side effects have been reported with the administration of antidepressants, among which cardiovascular adverse events are of paramount importance owing to their disabling and life-threatening nature. We aimed to re-examine some of the salient issues in antidepressant therapy vis-à-vis cardiovascular considerations, which should be taken into account when prescribing such medications.

  9. Availability of insulin pump therapy in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, B-M; Andersson, P Nord; Alnervik, J; Carstensen, J; Lind, M

    2012-08-01

    To examine the availability of insulin pump therapy in patients with Type 1 diabetes. Patients using insulin pumps among a cohort of 7224 patients with Type 1 diabetes were studied. In logistic regression, used to evaluate variables not changing over time among the total cohort, use of insulin pumps varied by outpatient clinic (Pinsulin pump showed higher HbA(1c) (Pinsulin doses (Pinsulin pump. Women were 1.5-fold more likely to start using an insulin pump (hazard ratio 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.29-1.79) and patients in the 20- to 30-years age range were more than twice as likely to begin use of an insulin pump than patients aged 40-50 years (hazard ratio 8.63, 95% confidence interval 5.91-12.59 and hazard ratio 3.98, 95% confidence interval 2.80-5.64, respectively). A 10-μmol/l higher level of creatinine was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.56 (95% confidence interval 0.39-0.81) of starting use of an insulin pump. At 10 hospital outpatient clinics in Sweden, use of insulin pumps therapy varied by clinic. A higher proportion of women began using insulin pumps. Younger patients and patients with fewer complications were also more likely to start using an insulin pump. Further research is needed to confirm these findings in other geographical regions and to understand whether the availability of insulin pumps today is optimized. © 2011 The Author. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  10. Evolution of Functional Family Therapy as an Evidence-Based Practice for Adolescents with Disruptive Behavior Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael S; Alexander, James F; Turner, Charles W; Hollimon, Amy

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes the evolution of functional family therapy (FFT) based upon four decades of clinical practice and scientific scrutiny through research evidence. FFT research has evolved from an initial focus upon clinical process research, which examined sequential exchanges between therapists and family members. A key element of this research has been an examination of the way in which clinicians acquire, consolidate, and maintain the skills needed to implement FFT effectively with youth and families. Many randomized efficacy and effectiveness studies have evaluated the impact of FFT across diverse clinical populations. Subsequent research investigated factors that influence the effectiveness of implementation across more than 300 clinical settings in which more than 2,500 trained clinicians have provided service to nearly 400,000 families. Another important set of investigations concerned the cost-effectiveness of the interventions. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  11. Systemic Therapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Gregory A.; Temin, Sarah; Azzoli, Christopher G.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie R.; Ellis, Peter M.; Gajra, Ajeet; Rackear, Nancy; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Johnson, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to update the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline on systemic therapy for stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods An Update Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology NSCLC Expert Panel based recommendations on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials from January 2007 to February 2014. Results This guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Recommendations There is no cure for patients with stage IV NSCLC. For patients with performance status (PS) 0 to 1 (and appropriate patient cases with PS 2) and without an EGFR-sensitizing mutation or ALK gene rearrangement, combination cytotoxic chemotherapy is recommended, guided by histology, with early concurrent palliative care. Recommendations for patients in the first-line setting include platinum-doublet therapy for those with PS 0 to 1 (bevacizumab may be added to carboplatin plus paclitaxel if no contraindications); combination or single-agent chemotherapy or palliative care alone for those with PS 2; afatinib, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with sensitizing EGFR mutations; crizotinib for those with ALK or ROS1 gene rearrangement; and following first-line recommendations or using platinum plus etoposide for those with large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Maintenance therapy includes pemetrexed continuation for patients with stable disease or response to first-line pemetrexed-containing regimens, alternative chemotherapy, or a chemotherapy break. In the second-line setting, recommendations include docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed for patients with nonsquamous cell carcinoma; docetaxel, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with squamous cell carcinoma; and chemotherapy or ceritinib for those with ALK rearrangement who experience progression after crizotinib. In the third-line setting, for patients who have not received erlotinib or gefitinib, treatment with erlotinib is

  12. Clinical review: Therapy for refractory intracranial hypertension in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüttler, Eric; Schellinger, Peter D; Aschoff, Alfred; Zweckberger, Klaus; Unterberg, Andreas; Hacke, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of patients with large hemispheric ischaemic stroke accompanied by massive space-occupying oedema represents one of the major unsolved problems in neurocritical care medicine. Despite maximum intensive care, the prognosis of these patients is poor, with case fatality rates as high as 80%. Therefore, the term 'malignant brain infarction' was coined. Because conservative treatment strategies to limit brain tissue shift almost consistently fail, these massive infarctions often are regarded as an untreatable disease. The introduction of decompressive surgery (hemicraniectomy) has completely changed this point of view, suggesting that mortality rates may be reduced to approximately 20%. However, critics have always argued that the reduction in mortality may be outweighed by an accompanying increase in severe disability. Due to the lack of conclusive evidence of efficacy from randomised trials, controversy over the benefit of these treatment strategies remained, leading to large regional differences in the application of this procedure. Meanwhile, data from randomised trials confirm the results of former observational studies, demonstrating that hemicraniectomy not only significantly reduces mortality but also significantly improves clinical outcome without increasing the number of completely dependent patients. Hypothermia is another promising treatment option but still needs evidence of efficacy from randomised controlled trials before it may be recommended for clinical routine use. This review gives the reader an integrated view of the current status of treatment options in massive hemispheric brain infarction, based on the available data of clinical trials, including the most recent data from randomised trials published in 2007.

  13. Music Therapy with Children: A Review of Clinical Utility and Application to Special Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaw, John David Andrew

    This paper reviews the effectiveness of music therapy in treating children with psychiatric and developmental problems. The clinical utility of music therapy is first evaluated by examining the foundational effects of music on affect and behavior. Next, the two broad approaches to music therapy, active and passive music therapy, are discussed.…

  14. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...] Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy... Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), gene and cellular therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders...

  15. Clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of a proximal positional fault of the radius. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo-Urriés, Miguel; Hidalgo-García, César; Bueno-Gracia, Elena; Estébanez-de-Miguel, Elena; Lucha-López, Orosia; Tricás-Moreno, José Miguel

    2014-06-01

    Positional faults are considered a possible underlying mechanism mimicking the symptoms of a joint sprain. Despite numerous clinical studies indicating the presence of positional faults, there is limited evidence of imaging studies confirming positional faults. This case report is a preliminary study that offers clinical and ultrasonographic evidence of a proximal positional fault of the radius, treated successfully with manual therapy techniques. Three weeks after a bike fall on the outstretched hand, the patient in this study presented with right wrist pain and a lack of progress with conventional conservative treatment (NSAIDs, rest and immobilization). Clinical findings indicating a proximal positional fault of the radius included pain during active pronation increased by associating a passive movement of the radius in a proximal direction and it was reduced by associating a passive movement of the radius in a distal direction. Ultrasonographic (US) images showed a reduction of radio-capitellar distance on the right side (11.4 mm) compared to the left side (13.3 mm). A positive response with a distal mobilization of the radius supported the proximal positional fault of the radius. After two manual therapy sessions, the patient had recovered normal asymptomatic function. The outcomes used to assess function and pain were active pronation range of motion, the Spanish version of the DASH questionnaire and a 0-10 numeric pain rating scale. Each measure was conducted prior and after each treatment session and one week post treatment. The patient was re-examined at 6 months follow-up, during which US images, demonstrated a normalization of the right radio-capitellar distance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation: Review of Evidence and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul J; Attinger, Christopher E; Olawoye, Olayinka; Crist, Brett D; Gabriel, Allen; Galiano, Robert D; Gupta, Subhas; Lantis Ii, John C; Lavery, Lawrence; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Teot, Luc

    2015-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) and dwell time is an adjunctive treatment modality for selected complex wounds. Because of the greater amount of research now available, a multidisciplinary expert panel comprising the fields of podiatry, plastic and general surgery, burn treatment, infectious diseases, and orthopedics was convened on July 11, 2015, to produce a summary of the data and recommendations on the use of NPWTi. The panel members each reviewed available published literature on NPWTi in the PubMed, Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases from 1 January 2012 up until 20 July 2015 using the string search term negative pressure wound therapy instillation provided by the panel moderator; there were no restrictions on the language or type of publication. Panel members discussed their experiences and worked to reach consensus on several predefined topics. NPWTi was found to be most appropriate for properly selected complex hosts or wounds such as patients with multiple comorbidities, patients with an American Society of Anesthesiology Classification ≥ 2, severe traumatic wounds, diabetic foot infections, and wounds complicated by invasive infection or extensive biofilm. NPWTi should not be used routinely to treat simple wounds or hosts without comorbidities.There is evidence that when NPWTi is added to standard of care in properly selected cases it provides better overall clinical outcomes than standard of care alone, even when including NPWT. Based on published evidence and panel member experience, the Panel recommends a dwell time - fluid briefly instilled into the wound and allowed to diffuse for a user-specified time - of 10-20 minutes followed by 2-4 hours of negative pressure at -125 mmHg, although larger wounds may need times of up to 6 hours. Normal saline (0.9%) is the preferred solution for NPWTi, except in special situations. NPWTi with dwell time is an adjunct to other standard principles of appropriate wound assessment and

  17. Radiation therapy plan checks in a paperless clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, R Alfredo; Pennington, Edward C; Waldron, Timothy J; Bayouth, John E

    2009-01-27

    Traditional quality assurance checks of a patient's radiation therapy plan involve printing out treatment parameters from the treatment planning system and the "record and verify" (R&V) system and visually checking the information for one-to-one correspondence. In a paperless environment, one can automate this process through independent software that can read the treatment planning data directly and compare it against the parameters in the R&V system's database. In addition to verifying the data integrity, it is necessary to check the logical consistency of the data and the accuracy of various calculations. The results are then imported into the patient's electronic medical record. Appropriate workflows must be developed to ensure that no steps of the QA process are missed. This paper describes our electronic QA system (EQS), consisting of in-house software and workflows. The EQS covers 3D conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy, electrons, stereotactic radiosurgery, total body irradiation, and clinical set ups with and without virtual simulation. The planning systems handled by our EQS are ADAC Pinnacle and Varian FASTPLAN, while the R&V systems are LANTIS and VARIS. The improvement in our plan check process over the paperless system is described in terms of the types of detected errors. The potential problems with the implementation and use of the EQS, as well as workarounds for data that are not easily accessible through electronic means, are described.

  18. Clinical value of ambulatory blood pressure: evidence and limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2015-03-13

    This article reviews the clinical value of ambulatory blood pressure (BP) vis-à-vis the traditional BP measurements taken in the physician's office or in the hospital. Mention is initially made that longitudinal studies conducted in the general population or in hypertensive cohorts have shown that ambulatory BP provides a more accurate prediction of outcome than office BP. Namely, that (1) the risk of cardiovascular events increases in a less steep fashion with office than with 24-hour mean BP, (2) the 24-hour BP-dependent prediction is maintained after adjustment for office BP values, and (3) among individuals with normal office BP, those with increased ambulatory BP (masked hypertension) have an increased prevalence of organ damage, a more frequent unfavorable metabolic profile and a higher risk of new onset sustained hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular events than those with normal ambulatory BP. It is further mentioned, however, that more recently similar observations have been made for individuals with high office but normal ambulatory BP (white coat hypertension) suggesting a complementary role of out-of-office and office BP values in the determination of patients' prognosis. The evidence in favor of an independent prognostic value also of some within 24-hour BP phenomena (night BP reduction or absolute values, short-term BP variations, and morning BP surge) is then critically appraised for its elements of strength and weakness. Finally, whether the clinical advantages of ambulatory BP make this approach necessary for all patients with hypertension is discussed. The conclusion is that this is at present still premature because crucial evidence pro or against routine use of this approach in untreated and treated hypertensives is not yet available. It will be crucial for future studies to determine whether, compared with a treatment guided by office BP, a treatment tailored on ambulatory BP allows to improve prevention or regression of organ

  19. [Dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease--major clinical features, aetiology, therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellrichmann, G; Russ, H; Müller, T

    2007-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a slowly, progressive degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, which affects about ten million people world-wide, is currently treated symptomatically. Current treatment aim i. e. to balance the decreased dopamine turnover in striatal neurons. Chronic exposure to dopaminergic agents, however, supports onset of motor complications and dyskinesia in the long term. Dyskinesia appear mainly as chorea, athetosis, dystonia, stereotypia, ballism or a combination. Sometimes excessive abnormal facial, body and limb movements depend on the overall dosage of dopaminergic substitution. This is why the main therapy is based on reducing the total dosage of dopaminergic substances. Either alternative or additional well-tried substances like apomorphine, amantadine or clozapine are used. New possibilities in treatment emerge from substances like sarizotan, istradefylline, fipampezol or talampanel. Even so disability and reduced quality of life in PD patients and their caregivers may exist. This survey describes the major clinical features, aetiology and demographics of treatment-associated dyskinesia in PD.

  20. Cognitive-behavioral versus psychodynamic therapy for major depression: Secondary outcomes of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Ellen; Van, Henricus L; Peen, Jaap; Don, Frank J; Twisk, Jos W R; Cuijpers, Pim; Dekker, Jack J M

    2017-07-01

    In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy for adult outpatient depression on measures of psychopathology, interpersonal functioning, pain, and quality of life. There were 341 Dutch adults (70.1% female, mean age = 38.9, SD = 10.3) meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition ( DSM-IV ) criteria for a major depressive episode and with a Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) score ≥14, who were randomized to 16 sessions of individual manualized CBT or short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy. Severely depressed patients (HAM-D >24) received additional antidepressant medication according to a protocol. Outcome measures included the Brief Symptom Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Outcome Questionnaire, a visual analogue scale for pain, and EuroQol. Data were analyzed with mixed model analyses using intention-to-treat samples. Noninferiority margins were prespecified as Cohen's d = -0.30. Across treatment conditions, 45-60% of the patients who completed posttreatment assessment showed clinically meaningful change for most outcome measures. We found no significant differences between the treatment conditions on any of the outcome measures at both posttreatment and follow-up. Noninferiority of psychodynamic therapy to CBT was shown for posttreatment and follow-up anxiety measures as well as for posttreatment pain and quality of life measures, but could not be consistently demonstrated for the other outcomes. This is the first study that shows that psychodynamic therapy can be at least as efficacious as CBT for depression on important aspects of patient functioning other than depressive symptom reduction. These findings extend the evidence-base of psychodynamic therapy for depression, but replication is needed by means of rigorously designed noninferiority trials. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Phytothermotherapy in osteoarthritis: new evidence for an old therapy

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    Cheleschi S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sara Cheleschi, Sara Tenti, Mauro Galeazzi, Antonella FioravantiRheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Surgery, and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyIntroduction: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common disabling joint disease worldwide. Moreover, its incidence and prevalence are increasing because of aging, higher life expectancy, and lifestyle changes, leading to a growing population of patients with OA. Current treatment of OA includes nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic modalities. Phytothermotherapy (PTT is a singular crenotherapic treatment consisting of immersing oneself in pools of fermenting alpine grass, to exploit its heat and rich, aromatic components. The efficacy of PTT in OA is bolstered by ancient tradition. However, there is a marked lack of clinical validation of its efficacy and tolerability in current literature. The aim of this review was to evaluate the currently available knowledge of possible clinical effects and mechanisms of action of PTT in OA.Methodology: We searched PubMed and Scopus (the period examined was 1980–2012 for clinical trials examining the effect of PTT in OA. MedLine was searched using the term “phytothermotherapy” and “hay baths” in combination with “osteoarthritis.” We included only papers published in English or Italian and in peer-reviewed journals.Results: We identified three trials describing the results of PTT in OA. The available data demonstrate that PTT is efficacious in decreasing pain and disability and improving function in patients with OA. Moreover, the tolerability of PTT is excellent. The mechanisms of action of PTT are not yet completely known, although it is probably due to different combined mechanical, physical, and chemical effects.Discussion: PTT could represent a useful aid in the treatment of OA or a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacologic treatments. However, further studies on a larger number of patients are needed to

  2. Suanzaoren Formulae for Insomnia: Updated Clinical Evidence and Possible Mechanisms

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    Qi-Hui Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia disorder is a widespread and refractory disease. Semen Ziziphi Spinosae, Suanzaoren, a well-known Chinese herbal medicine, has been used for treating insomnia for thousands of years. Here, we aimed to assess the available evidence of Chinese herbal formulae that contains Suanzaoren (FSZR for insomnia according to high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs and reviewed their possible mechanisms based on animal-based studies. Electronic searches were performed in eight databases from inception to November 2016. The primary outcome measures were polysomnography index and Pittsburgh sleep quality index. The secondary outcome measures were clinical effective rate and adverse events. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed by Cochrane's collaboration tool, and only RCTs with positive for 4 out of 7 for the Cochrane risk of bias domains were included in analyses. Thirteen eligible studies with 1,454 patients were identified. Meta-analysis of high-quality RCTs showed that FSZR monotherapy was superior to placebo (P < 0.01; FSZR plus Diazepam was superior to Diazepam alone (P < 0.05; there were mixed results comparing FSZR with Diazepam (P > 0.05 or P < 0.05. Furthermore, FSZR caused fewer side effects than that of Diazepam. Suanzaoren contains complex mixtures of phytochemicals including sanjoinine A, Jujuboside A, spinosin and other flavonoids, which has sedative and hypnotic functions primarily mediated by the GABAergic and serotonergic system. In conclusion, the findings of present study supported that FSZR could be an alternative treatment for insomnia in clinic. FSZR exerted sedative and hypnotic actions mainly through the GABAergic and serotonergic system.

  3. Strengthening organizations to implement evidence-based clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDeusen Lukas, Carol; Engle, Ryann L; Holmes, Sally K; Parker, Victoria A; Petzel, Robert A; Nealon Seibert, Marjorie; Shwartz, Michael; Sullivan, Jennifer L

    2010-01-01

    Despite recognition that implementation of evidence-based clinical practices (EBPs) usually depends on the structure and processes of the larger health care organizational context, the dynamics of implementation are not well understood. This project's aim was to deepen that understanding by implementing and evaluating an organizational model hypothesized to strengthen the ability of health care organizations to facilitate EBPs. CONCEPTUAL MODEL: The model posits that implementation of EBPs will be enhanced through the presence of three interacting components: active leadership commitment to quality, robust clinical process redesign incorporating EBPs into routine operations, and use of management structures and processes to support and align redesign. In a mixed-methods longitudinal comparative case study design, seven medical centers in one network in the Department of Veterans Affairs participated in an intervention to implement the organizational model over 3 years. The network was selected randomly from three interested in using the model. The target EBP was hand-hygiene compliance. Measures included ratings of implementation fidelity, observed hand-hygiene compliance, and factors affecting model implementation drawn from interviews. Analyses support the hypothesis that greater fidelity to the organizational model was associated with higher compliance with hand-hygiene guidelines. High-fidelity sites showed larger effect sizes for improvement in hand-hygiene compliance than lower-fidelity sites. Adherence to the organizational model was in turn affected by factors in three categories: urgency to improve, organizational environment, and improvement climate. Implementation of EBPs, particularly those that cut across multiple processes of care, is a complex process with many possibilities for failure. The results provide the basis for a refined understanding of relationships among components of the organizational model and factors in the organizational context

  4. Ilaj bil hijamah (cupping therapy) in the Unani system of medicine: anecdotal practice to evidence based therapy.

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    Abbas Zaidi, S M; Jameel, S S; Jafri, Kehkashan; Khan, Shariq A; Ahmad, Ehsan

    2016-08-01

    Cupping (Hijamah) therapy is very well documented as a result of several thousand years of clinical experiences in Unani medicine. In this procedure, suction is created by various means either with or without bloodletting. Though this therapy is being widely practiced across the globe for treating many chronic and intractable ailments but many reports reveal its unscientific and improper practices which results in many complications. Therefore to develop standard operative procedures and to propose protocols of cupping therapy in various diseases is the need of hour. A thorough literature review of relevant journals and textbooks was performed to gather the maximum available data on cupping therapy. This paper seeks to introduce the general concepts of cupping therapy in Unani medicine and other traditional systems of medicine, shortcomings and limitations of the currently published studies and suggest ways to improve these technical/methodological flaws. In addition, the authors have also attempted to provide the cupping related materials, hypotheses, observations which will provide the researchers the base for evaluating their usefulness in future clinical trials.

  5. Lost in translation? Moving contingency management and cognitive behavioral therapy into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Kathleen M

    2014-10-01

    In the treatment of addictions, the gap between the availability of evidence-based therapies and their limited implementation in practice has not yet been bridged. Two empirically validated behavioral therapies, contingency management (CM) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), exemplify this challenge. Both have a relatively strong level of empirical support but each has weak and uneven adoption in clinical practice. This review highlights examples of how barriers to their implementation in practice have been addressed systematically, using the Stage Model of Behavioral Therapies Development as an organizing framework. For CM, barriers such as cost and ideology have been addressed through the development of lower-cost and other adaptations to make it more community friendly. For CBT, barriers such as relative complexity, lack of trained providers, and need for supervision have been addressed via conversion to standardized computer-assisted versions that can serve as clinician extenders. Although these and other modifications have rendered both interventions more disseminable, diffusion of innovation remains a complex, often unpredictable process. The existing specialty addiction-treatment system may require significant reforms to fully implement CBT and CM, particularly greater focus on definable treatment goals and performance-based outcomes. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Clinical review: Optimal dose of continuous renal replacement therapy in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowle, John R; Schneider, Antoine; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is the preferred treatment for acute kidney injury in intensive care units (ICUs) throughout much of the world. Despite the widespread use of CRRT, controversy and center-specific practice variation in the clinical application of CRRT continue. In particular, whereas two single-center studies have suggested survival benefit from delivery of higher-intensity CRRT to patients with acute kidney injury in the ICU, other studies have been inconsistent in their results. Now, however, two large multi-center randomized controlled trials - the Veterans Affairs/National Institutes of Health Acute Renal Failure Trial Network (ATN) study and the Randomized Evaluation of Normal versus Augmented Level (RENAL) Replacement Therapy Study - have provided level 1 evidence that effluent flow rates above 25 mL/kg per hour do not improve outcomes in patients in the ICU. In this review, we discuss the concept of dose of CRRT, its relationship with clinical outcomes, and what target optimal dose of CRRT should be pursued in light of the high-quality evidence now available.

  7. A structured process to develop scenarios for use in evaluation of an evidence-based approach in clinical decision making

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    Manns PJ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Patricia J Manns, Johanna DarrahDepartment of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, CanadaBackground and purpose: Scenarios are used as the basis from which to evaluate the use of the components of evidence-based practice in decision making, yet there are few examples of a standardized process of scenario writing. The aim of this paper is to describe a step-by-step scenario writing method used in the context of the authors’ curriculum research study.Methods: Scenario writing teams included one physical therapy clinician and one academic staff member. There were four steps in the scenario development process: (1 identify prevalent condition and brainstorm interventions; (2 literature search; (3 develop scenario framework; and (4 write scenario.Results: Scenarios focused only on interventions, not diagnostic or prognostic problems. The process led to two types of scenarios – ones that provided an intervention with strong research evidence and others where the intervention had weak evidence to support its use. The end product of the process was a scenario that incorporates aspects of evidence-based decision making and can be used as the basis for evaluation.Conclusion: The use of scenarios has been very helpful to capture therapists’ reasoning processes. The scenario development process was applied in an education context as part of a final evaluation of graduating clinical physical therapy students.Keywords: physical therapists, clinical decision making, evaluation, curriculum

  8. Clinical audit training improves undergraduates' performance in root canal therapy.

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    Fong, J Y M; Tan, V J H; Lee, J R; Tong, Z G M; Foong, Y K; Tan, J M E; Parolia, A; Pau, A

    2017-12-20

    To evaluate the effectiveness of clinical audit-feedback cycle as an educational tool in improving the technical quality of root canal therapy (RCT) and compliance with record keeping performed by dental undergraduates. Clinical audit learning was introduced in Year 3 of a 5-year curriculum for dental undergraduates. During classroom activities, students were briefed on clinical audit, selected their audit topics in groups of 5 or 6 students, and prepared and presented their audit protocols. One chosen topic was RCT, in which 3 different cohorts of Year 3 students conducted retrospective audits of patients' records in 2012, 2014 and 2015 for their compliance with recommended record keeping criteria and their performance in RCT. Students were trained by and calibrated against an endodontist (κ ≥ 0.8). After each audit, the findings were reported in class, and recommendations were made for improvement in performance of RCT and record keeping. Students' compliance with published guidelines was presented and their RCT performances in each year were compared using the chi-square test. Overall compliance with of record keeping guidelines was 44.1% in 2012, 79.6% in 2014 and 94.6% in 2015 (P = .001). In the 2012 audit, acceptable extension, condensation and the absence of mishap were observed in 72.4, 75.7% and 91.5%; in the 2014 audit, 95.1%, 64.8% and 51.4%; and in 2015 audit, 96.4%, 82.1% and 92.8% of cases, respectively. In 2015, 76.8% of root canal fillings met all 3 technical quality criteria when compared to 48.6% in 2014 and 44.7% in 2012 (P = .001). Clinical audit-feedback cycle is an effective educational tool for improving dental undergraduates' compliance with record keeping and performance in the technical quality of RCT. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Competent in Evidence-Based Practice (EBP): Validation of a Measurement Tool that Measures EBP Self-Efficacy and Task Value in Speech-Language Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to know the impact their teaching has on these…

  10. Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP): validation of a measurement tool that measures EBP self-efficacy and task value in speech-language therapy students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to know the

  11. Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP) : validation of a measurement tool that measures EBP self-efficacy and task value in speech-language therapy students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Lucas; M. Wieringa-de Waard; N. van Dijk; B. Spek

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to

  12. Rééducation Posturale Globale in musculoskeletal diseases: scientific evidence and clinical practice

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    D. Tosarelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies on the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases with physiotherapy and clinical experiences on the basis of a method called Rééducation Posturale Globale (RPG, have highlighted the usefulness of this treatment. Although such treatment technique is commonly used in physical therapy practice, only few studies support its therapeutic effectiveness. Objective: To search the literature for evidence of RPG effectiveness, in order to identify the most appropriate therapeutic contexts for its use. Methods: A review of the literature through the following databases: PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, Pedro, and Medscape. The keywords used for the search in the databases are: Rééducation Posturale Globale, Souchard, Posture, and Manual Therapy. The following clinical studies were selected: randomized controlled studies, non-randomized controlled studies, observation studies, and case reports, in English, Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian. Results: Out of 18 studies found, 9 were analyzed: 2 randomized controlled studies, 2 non-randomized controlled studies, 3 non-controlled studies, and 2 case reports. Conclusions: The RPG method has been shown to be an effective treatment technique for musculoskeletal diseases, in particular for ankylosing spondylitis, acute and chronic low back pain, and lumbar discherniation. Although the scarcity of rigorous experimental trials on a large scale does not allow the drawing of undisputable conclusions, the results gathered up to now are an encouragement to carry on research in the field of conservative treatment.

  13. Management of celiac disease: from evidence to clinical practice

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    Tiziana M. Attardo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a complex polygenic disorder, which involves genetic factors human leukocyte complex (HLA and non-HLA genes, environmental factors, innate and adoptive immunity, and a robust chronic T-mediated autoimmune component. The main goal of the present monograph is to define a methodological approach for the disease, characterized by frequent late diagnosis, in order for the physician to become aware of the disease management, the diversity of the clinical presentation itself and in different patients. A unique attention is payed to the specific diagnostic tests to define a correct and accurate application of them, and in addition, to disease follow-up and possible complications. Moreover, a dedicated space is assigned to refractory CD, to potential CD and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Legislative aspects of the celiac disease in Italy are addressed, too. The celiac disease guidelines and their evaluation by means of Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II instrument allow us to classify the different recommendations and to apply them according to the stakeholders’ involvement, pertinence, methodological accuracy, clarity and publishing independence. Finally, the most current scientific evidence is taken into account to create a complete updated monograph.

  14. Overview of the evidence for clinical interventions in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butani, Yogita; Levy, Steven M; Nowak, Arthur J; Kanellis, Michael J; Heller, Keith; Hartz, Arthur J; Dawson, Deborah V; Watkins, Catherine A

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe the quantity of published literature and types of studies supporting the use of 4 pediatric dentistry procedures: (1) ferric sulfate pulpotomy; (2) stainless steel crowns; (3) space maintainers; and (4) atraumatic restorative technique (ART). When available, titles and abstracts of reports written in English and published over a 36-year period (1966-2002) concerning these procedures were retrieved from MEDLINE. They were classified using a modified classification scheme that, in addition to the study designs, also considered the 4 dimensions of measuring dental outcomes. The quantity of available literature concerning each dental procedure varied considerably. Even though many reports were published on treatments, only a small proportion of the published literature for each procedure was found to evaluate outcomes, regardless of outcome dimension. Besides outcomes evaluations, studies on techniques, material properties, and review articles comprised a large proportion of the literature. Clinical dimension of outcomes was most commonly studied. Case series and case reports were the most frequently used study designs to report outcomes. The outcomes-related literature to support some of the commonly performed treatments is limited both in quantity and study types. More reports are needed to develop the evidence base to support the commonly performed procedures in pediatric dental practice. Additional analyses reporting of the literature are also needed to assess internal and external validity of the studies.

  15. Evidence-based Practices Addressed in Community-based Children’s Mental Health Clinical Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurso, Erin C.; Taylor, Robin M.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    Context Clinical supervision is the principal method of training for psychotherapeutic practice, however there is virtually no research on supervision practice in community settings. Of particular interest is the role supervision might play in facilitating implementation of evidence-based (EB) care in routine care settings. Objective This study examines the format and functions of clinical supervision sessions in routine care, as well as the extent to which supervision addresses psychotherapeutic practice elements common to EB care for children with disruptive behavior problems, who represent the majority of patients served in publicly-funded routine care settings. Methods Supervisors (n=7) and supervisees (n=12) from four publicly-funded community-based child mental health clinics reported on 130 supervision sessions. Results Supervision sessions were primarily individual in-person meetings lasting one hour. The most common functions included case conceptualization and therapy interventions. Coverage of practice elements common to EB treatments was brief. Discussion Despite the fact that most children presenting to public mental health services are referred for disruptive behavior problems, supervision sessions are infrequently focused on practice elements consistent with EB treatments for this population. Supervision is a promising avenue through which training in EB practices could be supported to improve the quality of care for children in community-based “usual care” clinics. PMID:24761163

  16. The clinical study of interventional therapy in thrombo angitis obliterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qi; Jiang Zhongpu; Ren Lijun; Wang Haiting; Mao Dongrang; Huang Liguang; Wang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical feasibility and validity of interventional therapy in thrombo angitis obliterans. Methods: 13 patients with thrombo angitis obliterans were treated with percutaneous left subclavian artery port-catheter system implantation. The catheter external iliac artery with perfusion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) 100 μg, urokinase (UK) 200, 000U and mailuoning 20 ml every day. Each treatment lasted for 7-10 days. Results: 13 patients with angiographic demonstration showed occlusions of 1 case in the middle segment of superficial femoral artery, 9 cases of complete occlusion in popliteal artery and same for 3 cases in anterior tibial artery, the end of the peroneal artery and posterior tibial artery. After treatment, 3 patients had to undergo amputation due to gangrene in foot and 10 patients with no gangrene showed skin temperature rising up in the lower limb. Intermittent claudication and rest pain were relieved obviously accompanied by increasing step distance over 500 m with the Fontain grade improvement of twice at least. Follow up angiography one year later showed large quantity of vasculogenesis in the lower limb. Conclusion: The treatment of trans-port-catheter system is excellent and practical for improving the clinical status of patients with thrombo angitis obliterans. (authors)

  17. Evidence for the Use of Cell-Based Therapy for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

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    Piuzzi, Nicolas S; Chahla, Jorge; Schrock, John B; LaPrade, Robert F; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Mont, Michael A; Muschler, George F

    2017-05-01

    Cell-therapy has been promoted among the therapeutic arsenal that can aid in bone formation and remodeling, in early stages of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the evidence supporting the (1) clinical efficacy; (2) structural modifying effect, as evaluated radiographically; (3) revision rates; and (4) safety of cell-therapy for the treatment of ONFH. A systematic review was performed including studies with a level-of-evidence of III or higher. A total of 1483 articles were screened. Eleven studies met the criteria for inclusion in this review (level-of-evidence: 6 level-I, 1 level-II, and 4 level-III), including 683 cases of ONFH. All 10 studies that reported patient-reported outcomes showed improved outcomes in the cell-therapy groups compared with the control group. Overall, 24.5% (93/380 hips) that received cell-therapy showed radiographic progression compared with 40% (98/245 hips) in the control group. Nine of 10 studies that reported failure rates showed a lower total hip arthroplasty conversion rate in the cell-therapy group 16% (62/380 hips) compared with the control group 21% (52/252 hips). There was a low complication rate (<3%) with no major adverse effects. Cell-therapies for the treatment of ONFH have been reported to be safe and suggest improved clinical outcomes with lower disease progression rate. However, there was substantial heterogeneity in the included studies, and in the cell-based therapies used. Specific clinical indications and cell-therapy standardization are required because studies varied widely with respect to cell sourcing, cell characterization, adjuvant therapies, and assessment of outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT CLINICAL FORMS OF BASAL CELL CARCINOMA OF THE SKIN

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    O. V. Matveeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Photodynamic therapy is frequently applied for non-invasive destruction of basal cell carcinomas (BCC of the skin; though, there is lack of evidence for efficacy of the method. Aim: To assess objective response of BCCs to photodynamic therapy with intralesional administration of photosensitizer Radachlorin in patients with different clinical forms, stages, flow patterns and localization of BCC. Materials and methods: 45  stage I–II BCCs patients with primary and recurrent solitary (ulcerative, superficial, scleroderma-like and nodular forms and multiple lesions (predominantly Т₁– Т₂N₀M₀, with difficult to treat localization and high risk of recurrence were included during the period from March 2004 to March 2007. All patients received one cycle of photodynamic therapy with intralesional Radachlorin (0.5–1  ml/1  cm² tumor surface and irradiation dose 300  J/cm² (wavelength 662 nm. A primary outcome measure was grade of clinical and cytological lesion regression after three months. Secondary outcome measure was stable clinical and cytological reaction at the lesion site. In the long-term, lesion recurrence was assessed yearly during 5 years. Results: Complete regression of BCCs was found in 43  (95.5% patients and 47  (95.9% lesions. In 2 (4.5% patients with partial regression of 2 (4.1% lesions repeated cycles of photodynamic therapy resulted in complete response. In BCCs Т₁N₀M₀, early outcome was independent from the clinical form of the diseases; by contrast, in BCCs Т₂N₀M₀, treatment of scleroderma-like BCCs was non-significantly less effective (66.7% compared to nodular, surface (100% for both and ulcerative (92.8% forms. In the long-term, 1  tumor recurrence was observed after 29 months at the site of completely regressed ulcerative lesion. Conclusion: Photodynamic therapy with intralesional administration of photosensitizer Radachlorin is an effective treatment method for different

  19. Triple therapy in COPD: new evidence with the extrafine fixed combination of beclomethasone dipropionate, formoterol fumarate, and glycopyrronium bromide

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    Singh D

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dave Singh,1 Massimo Corradi,2 Monica Spinola,3 Alberto Papi,4 Omar S Usmani,5 Mario Scuri,3 Stefano Petruzzelli,3 Jørgen Vestbo1 1Division of Infection, Immunity and Respiratory Medicine, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 2Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, Parma, Italy; 3Chiesi Farmaceutici SpA, Parma, Italy; 4Department of Medical Sciences, Research Centre on Asthma and COPD, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; 5National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: The goals of COPD therapy are to prevent and control symptoms, reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations, and improve exercise tolerance. The triple combination therapy of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs, long-acting beta2 agonists (LABAs, and long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs has become an option for maintenance treatment of COPD and as a “step-up” therapy from single or double combination treatments. There is evidence that triple combination ICS/LABA/LAMA with different inhalers improves lung function, symptoms, and health status and reduces exacerbations. A new triple fixed-dose combination of extrafine beclomethasone dipropionate (100 µg/puff/formoterol fumarate (6 µg/puff/glycopyrronium bromide (12.5 µg/puff has been developed as a hydrofluoroalkane pressurized metered dose inhaler. Two large pivotal studies showed that this extrafine fixed ICS/LABA/LAMA triple combination is superior to fixed ICS/LABA combined therapy and also superior to the LAMA tiotropium in terms of lung function and exacerbation prevention in COPD patients at risk of exacerbation. This review considers the new information provided by these clinical trials of extrafine triple therapy and the implications for the clinical management of COPD patients. Keywords: COPD, inhaled triple therapy, beclomethasone dipropionate, formoterol fumarate and glycopyrronium bromide

  20. Is laser acupuncture an effective complementary therapy for obesity management? A systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Nazli; Khodamoradi, Kajal; Larijani, Bagher; Ayati, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-12-01

    Complementary therapies may increase the success rate of weight loss via a calorie-restricted diet. Acupuncture is a popular complementary therapy for obesity management. To our knowledge, no studies have summarised the effects of laser acupuncture (LA) on obesity. To evaluate the efficacy of LA, in particular with respect to its impact on anthropometric features and appetite in obese adults, by conducting a systematic review of previous clinical trials. We searched PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar electronic databases for papers published through October 2016. All clinical trials in English containing either anthropometric indices or appetite parameters were included. Two reviewers independently examined studies based on a predefined form for data extraction and the Jadad scale for quality assessment in order to minimise bias throughout the evaluation. After screening the papers, seven clinical trials met the criteria and were included in the systematic review. Positive effects of LA therapy were seen in body weight (n=3), body mass index (n=5), waist circumference (n=4), hip circumference (n=3), waist to hip ratio (n=4) and % fat mass (n=3). Appetite parameters were reported in one study, which showed that LA can reduce appetite and increase the sensation of feeling full. Although some studies have indicated beneficial effects for LA on obesity, the lack of evidence with high methodological quality made it impossible to reach a definitive conclusion about the efficacy of LA for obesity management. Further high-quality, randomised, sham-controlled clinical trials with a larger sample size are needed to shed light on the efficacy of LA for obesity management and weight maintenance. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. OnabotulinumtoxinA in the treatment of patients with chronic migraine: clinical evidence and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia-Chun; Starling, Amaal J

    2017-12-01

    Chronic migraine is a debilitating neurobiological disorder that affects approximately 1.4-2.2% of the population worldwide. Patients with chronic migraine have 15 or more headache days per month, with at least 8 days per month that meet the criteria for migraine. Injection of onabotulinumtoxinA, using a standardized injection protocol, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2010 for the treatment of chronic migraine. The approval was made based on results from two large, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trials: the Phase III Research Evaluating Migraine Prophylaxis Therapy (PREEMPT) trials. Since then, numerous studies have been performed investigating the short-term and long-term benefits, risks and complications of the use of onabotulinumtoxinA injections for the treatment of chronic migraine. The purpose of this narrative review is to describe the currently available clinical evidence for the use of onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating patients with chronic migraine.

  2. Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia do Carmo Silva Parreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Questions: Is Kinesio Taping more effective than a sham taping/placebo, no treatment or other interventions in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Is the addition of Kinesio Taping to other interventions more effective than other interventions alone in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Design: Systematic review of randomised trials. Participants: People with musculoskeletal conditions. Intervention: Kinesio Taping was compared with sham taping/placebo, no treatment, exercises, manual therapy and conventional physiotherapy. Outcome measures: Pain intensity, disability, quality of life, return to work, and global impression of recovery. Results: Twelve randomised trials involving 495 participants were included in the review. The effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping was tested in participants with: shoulder pain in two trials; knee pain in three trials; chronic low back pain in two trials; neck pain in three trials; plantar fasciitis in one trial; and multiple musculoskeletal conditions in one trial. The methodological quality of eligible trials was moderate, with a mean of 6.1 points on the 10-point PEDro Scale score. Overall, Kinesio Taping was no better than sham taping/placebo and active comparison groups. In all comparisons where Kinesio Taping was better than an active or a sham control group, the effect sizes were small and probably not clinically significant or the trials were of low quality. Conclusion: This review provides the most updated evidence on the effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping for musculoskeletal conditions. The current evidence does not support the use of this intervention in these clinical populations. PROSPERO registration: CRD42012003436. [Parreira PdCS, Costa LdCM, Hespanhol Junior LC, Lopes AD, Costa LOP (2014 Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 31–39

  3. Proton Therapy in Children: A Systematic Review of Clinical Effectiveness in 15 Pediatric Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Roos, E-mail: Roos.leroy@kce.fgov.be [Belgian Healthcare Knowledge Centre (KCE), Brussels (Belgium); Benahmed, Nadia; Hulstaert, Frank [Belgian Healthcare Knowledge Centre (KCE), Brussels (Belgium); Van Damme, Nancy [Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels (Belgium); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-05-01

    Because it spares many normal tissues and reduces the integral dose, proton therapy (PT) is the preferred tumor irradiation technique for treating childhood cancer. However, to the best of our knowledge, no systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of PT in children has been reported in the scientific literature. A systematic search for clinical outcome studies on PT published between 2007 and 2015 was performed in Medline (through OVID), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Twenty-three primary studies were identified, including approximately 650 patients overall. The median/mean follow-up times were limited (range, 19-91 months). None of the studies were randomized, 2 were comparative, and 20 were retrospective. Most suffered from serious methodologic limitations, yielding a very low level of clinical evidence for the outcomes in all indications. For example, for retinoblastoma, very low-level evidence was found that PT might decrease the incidence of second malignancies. For chondrosarcoma, chordoma, craniopharyngioma, ependymoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma, central nervous system germinoma, glioma, medulloblastoma, osteosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma, there was insufficient evidence to either support or refute PT in children. For pelvic sarcoma (ie, nonrhabdomyosarcoma and non-Ewing sarcoma), pineal parenchymal tumor, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and “adult-type” soft tissue sarcoma, no studies were identified that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Although there is no doubt that PT reduces the radiation dose to normal tissues and organs, to date the critical clinical data on the long-term effectiveness and harm associated with the use of PT in the 15 pediatric cancers under investigation are lacking. High-quality clinical research in this area is needed.

  4. The clinical and cost effectiveness of group art therapy for people with non-psychotic mental health disorders: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttley, Lesley; Stevenson, Matt; Scope, Alison; Rawdin, Andrew; Sutton, Anthea

    2015-07-07

    The majority of mental health problems are non-psychotic (e.g., depression, anxiety, and phobias). For some people, art therapy may be a more acceptable alternative form of psychological therapy than standard forms of treatment, such as talking therapies. This study was part of a health technology assessment commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research, UK and aimed to systematically appraise the clinical and cost-effective evidence for art therapy for people with non-psychotic mental health disorders. Comprehensive literature searches for studies examining art therapy in populations with non-psychotic mental health disorders were performed in May 2013. A quantitative systematic review of clinical effectiveness and a systematic review of studies evaluating the cost-effectiveness of group art therapy were conducted. Eleven randomised controlled trials were included (533 patients). Meta-analysis was not possible due to clinical heterogeneity and insufficient comparable data on outcome measures across studies. The control groups varied between studies but included: no treatment/wait-list, attention placebo controls and psychological therapy comparators. Art therapy was associated with significant positive changes relative to the control group in mental health symptoms in 7 of the 11 studies. A de novo model was constructed and populated with data identified from the clinical review. Scenario analyses were conducted allowing comparisons of group art therapy with wait-list control and group art therapy with group verbal therapy. Group art-therapy appeared cost-effective compared with wait-list control with high certainty although generalisability to the target population was unclear; group verbal therapy appeared more cost-effective than art therapy but there was considerable uncertainty and a sizeable probability that art therapy was more cost effective. From the limited available evidence art therapy was associated with positive effects compared with

  5. Evidence-based clinical guidelines: a new system to better determine true strength of recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Edward; Zhang, Weiya; Doherty, Michael; Arden, Nigel K; Barlow, Julie; Birrell, Fraser; Carr, Alison; Chakravarty, Kuntal; Dickson, John; Hay, Elaine; Hosie, Gillian; Hurley, Michael; Jordan, Kelsey M; McCarthy, Christopher; McMurdo, Marion; Mockett, Simon; O'Reilly, Sheila; Peat, George; Pendleton, Adrian; Richards, Selwyn

    2006-06-01

    Clinical practice guidelines often grade the 'strength' of their recommendations according to the robustness of the supporting research evidence. The existing methodology does not allow the strength of recommendation (SOR) to be upgraded for recommendations for which randomized controlled trials are impractical or unethical. The purpose of this study was to develop a new method of determining SOR, incorporating both research evidence and expert opinion. A Delphi technique was employed to produce 10 recommendations for the role of exercise therapy in the management of osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. The SOR for each recommendation was determined by the traditional method, closely linked to the category of research evidence found on a systematic literature search, and on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Recommendations were grouped A-D according to the traditional SOR allocated and the mean VAS calculated. Difference across the groups was assessed by one-way ANOVA variance analysis. Mean VAS scores for the traditional SOR groups A-D and one proposition which was 'not recommended' showed significant linearity on one-way ANOVA. However, certain recommendations which, for practical reasons, could not assessed in randomized controlled trials and therefore could not be recommended strongly by the traditional methodology, were allocated a strong recommendation by VAS. This new system of grading strength of SOR is less constrained than the traditional methodology and offers the advantage of allowing SOR for procedures which cannot be assessed in RCTs for practical or ethical reasons to be upgraded according to expert opinion.

  6. Smoking and periodontal disease: clinical evidence for an association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Zina, Lívia Guimarães; Saliba, Orlando; Garbin, Cleá Adas Saliba

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the periodontal condition and smoking status, according to dose and duration information, and to estimate the percentage of subjects with periodontitis attributable to cigarette smoking in a representative adult rural population in southern Brazil. Bivariate statistical analysis was used to evaluate the association of smoking status with periodontitis in a cross-sectional study comprising 165 dentate individuals, aged 35 to 66 years, subjected to oral clinical examination of six sites per tooth in all sextants. The prevalence of periodontitis (having > or = 1 pocket of > or = 4 mm around the index teeth) in the population was 35.2%. Overall, 13.9% had a cumulative loss of attachment > 4 mm; 35.7% of subjects were current smokers, classified as heavy (average 25.3 pack years), moderate (average 14.6 pack years) and light smokers (average 3.1 pack years). Statistical analysis showed that current smokers had an 11 times (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.69 to 26.62) and former smokers had a nine times (95% CI = 3.29 to 25.96) greater probability of having established periodontitis compared with non-smokers. The number of pack years (P = 0.0004) and years of smoking exposure (P = 0.0013) were associated with an increased prevalence of periodontitis. The number of current smokers with periodontitis might be reduced by 80%, had they not smoked cigarettes. Of the subjects with periodontitis, 64% could be prevented among current smokers by eliminating tobacco consumption. Cigarette smoking was strongly associated with periodontitis, and there was a relationship with dose and duration of smoking. These findings contributed to the evidence of smoking as a risk factor for periodontal disease and support the importance of dose-response analysis on determining the strength of this association.

  7. Modernizing Relationship Therapy through Social Thermoregulation Theory: Evidence, Hypotheses, and Explorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJzerman, Hans; Heine, Emma C. E.; Nagel, Saskia K.; Pronk, Tila M.

    2017-01-01

    In the present article the authors propose to modernize relationship therapy by integrating novel sensor and actuator technologies that can help optimize people’s thermoregulation, especially as they pertain to social contexts. Specifically, they propose to integrate Social Thermoregulation Theory (IJzerman et al., 2015a; IJzerman and Hogerzeil, 2017) into Emotionally Focused Therapy by first doing exploratory research during couples’ therapy, followed by Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs). The authors thus suggest crafting a Social Thermoregulation Therapy (STT) as enhancement to existing relationship therapies. The authors outline what is known and not known in terms of social thermoregulatory mechanisms, what kind of data collection and analyses are necessary to better understand social thermoregulatory mechanisms to craft interventions, and stress the need to conduct RCTs prior to implementation. They further warn against too hastily applying these theoretical perspectives. The article concludes by outlining why STT is the way forward in improving relationship functioning. PMID:28507525

  8. Exploring physical therapy clinical decision making for children with spastic diplegia: survey of pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Lisa Ann; O'Neil, Margaret; Dichter, Carol Gildenberg; Westcott, Sarah L; Orlin, Margo; Marchese, Victoria Gocha; Tieman, Beth; Rose, Rachel Unanue

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this special interest report is to describe the outcomes of a research round table discussion regarding the physical therapy management of mobility for children with spastic diplegia. Sixty-two pediatric physical therapists and physical therapists assistants participated in focus groups during the Research Round Table at the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) 1999 Combined Sections Meeting. A case description of a child with spastic diplegia and guiding questions were used to facilitate discussion. Common practices in patient management across the child's life-span emerged from the discussion. Practices in examination, evaluation and prognosis, and intervention differed depending on the age and function of the child and the family's needs. In general, therapists reported that younger children receive examinations that include standardized tests of development and ongoing intervention with a frequency of one to five times per week. In contrast, older children receive therapy services on an episodic basis that address their specific needs. The elements of patient management served as a useful framework for exploring decision making. The information compiled from this project needs to be validated through systematic inquiry. Therapists may, however, use the practices reported here to reflect on their clinical decision making and to identify questions for further exploration. This descriptive document is the first step in the development of a guideline for evidence-based practice. The development of such a clinical guideline could serve as an education tool for novice therapists, a program evaluation tool to ensure quality care, and a foundation for future research to promote evidence-based practice.

  9. Clinical and Histological Evaluation of the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy used in addition to Antibiotic Therapy in Pericoronitis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Tunc, Serap Keskin; Erten, Remzi; Usumez, Aslıhan

    2018-02-24

    Although antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic therapy has been studied several times, there is no study investigating its efficacy on pericoronitis. This study aimed to determine whether antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with antibiotic therapy is clinically and histologically superior to antibiotic therapy alone in pericoronitis treatment. Patients (n = 40) with pericoronitis were divided into two groups (20 patients for each) to receive either antibiotic + indocyanine green + 810 nm wavelength diode laser (antimicrobial photodynamic therapy group) or antibiotic alone. Initial biopsy samples were obtained from the affected tissue of the patients at their first presentation to the clinic before any intervention. The second biopsy samples were obtained on the 3rd day of treatment in both groups from the tissue part not biopsied before; tooth extraction was then performed. All tissue samples were histologically examined to assess inflammatory cell response. Patients' pain (using Visual Analogue Scale) and lymphadenopathy (presence or absence) were clinically evaluated in the first 3 days and on the 7th day of treatment. In the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy group, 100% improvement was achieved regarding pain and lymphadenopathy at the end of the 7th day. Comparison of the inflammatory cell scores of the 2nd biopsy samples between the antibiotic alone and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy groups revealed a significant difference in favor of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy group. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy combined with antibiotic therapy for pericoronitis treatment was found to be more successful as compared with the antibiotic therapy alone regarding clinical and histological outcomes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The influence of punctural millimeter wave therapy on clinical presentation of patients with essential hypertention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotenko К.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to estimate the influence of punctural millimeter wave therapy on clinical presentation. Material and methods. This study includes 102 patients with essential hypertension the I and II stage. Patients were divided into three equal groups depending on the method of treatment: some of them received procedures of punctural millimeter wave therapy, some of them received these procedures as the "placebo" and those who had not received specified procedures. Dynamics of clinical symptomatology and condition of eye bottom vessels was estimated. It was shown that addition of punctural millimeter wave therapy in complex therapy of patients with essential hypertension promotes the expressed regress of clinical symptomatology and state normalization the retinal vessels at these patients. Results. Addition of punctural millimeter wave therapy into the complex therapy was shown to lead to pronounced regress of clinical symptoms. Conclusion. The received results allow to recommend this method to be used in clinical practice for treating patients with essential hypertension.

  11. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Minako

    2002-01-01

    The goal of radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is to improve the survival rate of patients without increasing treatment-related toxicity and to improve patients' quality of life. Several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated a survival advantage in combined modality treatment over radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone when a cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimen is utilized in the treatment plan. Combined modality treatment of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiotherapy is standard treatment for selected patients such as those with better performance status with locally or regionally advanced lung cancer including T3-T4 or N2-N3. Determining the contribution of new agents in combined modality treatment will require carefully designed and conducted clinical trials. High-dose involved field radiation therapy using 3D-conformal radiation therapy potentially enables the use of higher doses than standard radiation therapy, because less normal tissue is irradiated, and may improve local control and survival. The combination of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and dose escalation using 3D-conformal radiation therapy is also a possibility in unresectable NSCLC. In surgery cases, the results of several Phase III trials of cisplatin-based preoperative chemotherapy have suggested survival improvement. But the concept needs to be tested in a larger Phase III trial. (author)

  12. Clinical significance of metallothioneins in cell therapy and nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sushil Sharma,1 Afsha Rais,1 Ranbir Sandhu,1 Wynand Nel,1 Manuchair Ebadi21Saint James School of Medicine, Bonaire, The Netherlands; 2Department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Therapeutics, Center of Excellence in Neuroscience, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USAAbstract: Mammalian metallothioneins (MTs are low molecular weight (6–7 kDa cysteine-rich proteins that are specifically induced by metal nanoparticles (NPs. MT induction in cell therapy may provide better protection by serving as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic agents, and by augmenting zinc-mediated transcriptional regulation of genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Liposome-encapsulated MT-1 promoter has been used extensively to induce growth hormone or other genes in culture and gene-manipulated animals. MTs are induced as a defensive mechanism in chronic inflammatory conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and infections, hence can serve as early and sensitive biomarkers of environmental safety and effectiveness of newly developed NPs for clinical applications. Microarray analysis has indicated that MTs are significantly induced in drug resistant cancers and during radiation treatment. Nutritional stress and environmental toxins (eg, kainic acid and domoic acid induce MTs and aggregation of multilamellar electron-dense membrane stacks (Charnoly body due to mitochondrial degeneration. MTs enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex-1, a rate-limiting enzyme complex involved in the oxidative phosphorylation. Monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors (eg, selegiline inhibit α-synuclein nitration, implicated in Lewy body formation, and inhibit 1-methyl 4-phenylpyridinium and 3-morpholinosydnonimine-induced apoptosis in cultured human dopaminergic neurons and mesencephalic fetal stem cells. MTs

  13. The efficacy of herbal therapy on quality of life in patients with breast cancer: self-control clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lai Yi Eliza; Wong, Chun Kwok; Leung, Ping Chung; Lam, Wei Kei Christopher

    2010-07-21

    Mounting evidence indicates that herbal therapy is effective in alleviating anxiety, lessening cancer treatment-related side-effects, and facilitating rehabilitation. This is the first trial to examine the herbal therapy of combined yunzhi and danshen on quality of life among breast cancer patients. A multicenter, longitudinal, and self-control study was used. Eighty-two breast cancer patients were given combined yunzhi and danshen capsules for six months on a daily basis. Data collection including quality of life, vitality status and adverse effects were taken. Results showed a significant improvement in physical function, role-physical, role-emotion and health transition (P cancer patients. Therefore, herbal therapy has a potentially important role to play in managing psychological distress in cancer patients. This study also suggests that herbal therapy is clinically acceptable and can be used safely with breast cancer patients.

  14. Randomized clinical trial comparing affect regulation and supportive group therapies for victimization-related PTSD with incarcerated women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julian D; Chang, Rocío; Levine, Joan; Zhang, Wanli

    2013-06-01

    Traumatic victimization and associated problems with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and affect dysregulation are prevalent among incarcerated women, but there is limited evidence to support psychotherapeutic interventions for these problems in this underserved population. A group psychotherapy designed to enhance affect regulation without trauma memory processing-Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy (TARGET)-was compared to a supportive group therapy (SGT) in a randomized clinical trial with 72 incarcerated women with full or partial PTSD. Both interventions achieved statistically significant reductions in PTSD and associated symptom severity and increased self-efficacy. Dropout rates for both interventions were low (women's ability to achieve affective resolution (forgiveness) while also reducing their victimization-related PTSD and associated symptoms. Experiential-focused supportive group therapy also may reduce victimization-related PTSD and associated symptoms. Both group therapy approaches warrant further study with this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Effectiveness of exercise therapy: a best-evidence summary of systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, N.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Bouter, L.M.; Dekker, J.; Arendzen, J.H.; Bie, R.A. de; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.; Helders, P.J.M.; Keus, S.H.J.; Kwakkel, G.; Lenssen, T.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Reijman, M.; Terwee, C.B.; Theunissen, C.; Thomas, S.; Baar, M.E. van; Hul, A. van 't; Peppen, R.P. van; Verhagen, A.; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to summarise the available evidence on the effectiveness of exercise therapy for patients with disorders of the musculoskeletal, nervous, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems. Systematic reviews were identified by means of a comprehensive search strategy in 11

  16. Teaching evidence-based speech and language therapy: Influences from formal and informal curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on influences from formal and informal curriculum on the effectiveness of teaching evidence-based speech and language therapy. A study showed that while EBP knowledge and skills increase during the years of study, motivational beliefs such as EBP task value and

  17. Evidence of the efficacy for occupational therapy in different conditions: an overview of systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the research evidence available from systematic reviews of the efficacy of occupational therapy (OT) for practitioners, researchers, purchasing organizations and policy-makers. DATA SOURCE: The search for systematic reviews was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library

  18. No evidence for the use of stem cell therapy for tendon disorders : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Haiko I M F L; Moen, Maarten H; Haisma, Hidde J; Winters, Marinus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stem cells have emerged as a new treatment option for tendon disorders. We systematically reviewed the current evidence for stem cell therapy in tendon disorders. METHODS: Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, cohort studies and case series with a minimum of 5 cases were

  19. No evidence for the use of stem cell therapy for tendon disorders: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Haiko I. M. F. L.; Moen, Maarten H.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Winters, Marinus

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells have emerged as a new treatment option for tendon disorders. We systematically reviewed the current evidence for stem cell therapy in tendon disorders. Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, cohort studies and case series with a minimum of 5 cases were searched in MEDLINE,

  20. Mandatory Personal Therapy: Does the Evidence Justify the Practice? In Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Surabhi

    2013-01-01

    The article addresses the question of whether the practice of mandatory personal therapy, followed by several training organisations, is justified by existing research and evidence. In doing so, it discusses some implications of this training requirement from an ethical and ideological standpoint, raising questions of import for training…

  1. Correction to: The hidden therapist: evidence for a central role of music in psychedelic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelen, Mendel; Giribaldi, Bruna; Raine, Jordan; Evans, Lisa; Timmermann, Christopher; Rodriguez, Natalie; Roseman, Leor; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David; Carhart-Harris, Robin

    2018-05-01

    The article The hidden therapist: evidence for a central role of music in psychedelic therapy, written by Mendel Kaelen, Bruna Giribaldi, Jordan Raine, Lisa Evans, Christopher Timmerman, Natalie Rodriguez, Leor Roseman, Amanda Feilding, David Nutt, Robin Carhart-Harris, was originally published electronically on the publisher's internet portal.

  2. Summit on cell therapy for cancer: The importance of the interaction of multiple disciplines to advance clinical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melief, Cornelis J M; O'Shea, John J; Stroncek, David F

    2011-07-08

    The field of cellular therapy of cancer is moving quickly and the issues involved with its advancement are complex and wide ranging. The growing clinical applications and success of adoptive cellular therapy of cancer has been due to the rapid evolution of immunology, cancer biology, gene therapy and stem cell biology and the translation of advances in these fields from the research laboratory to the clinic. The continued development of this field is dependent on the exchange of ideas across these diverse disciplines, the testing of new ideas in the research laboratory and in animal models, the development of new cellular therapies and GMP methods to produce these therapies, and the testing of new adoptive cell therapies in clinical trials. The Summit on Cell Therapy for Cancer to held on November 1 and 2, 2011 at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus will include a mix of perspectives, concepts and ideas related to adoptive cellular therapy that are not normally presented together at any single meeting. This novel assembly will generate new ideas and new collaborations and possibly increase the rate of advancement of this field.

  3. Respiratory clinical guidelines inform ward-based nurses’ clinical skills and knowledge required for evidence-based care

    OpenAIRE

    Alisha M. Johnson; Sheree M.S. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory clinical guidelines provide clinicians with evidence-based guidance for practice. ­Clinical guidelines also provide an opportunity to identify the knowledge and technical and non-technical skills required by respiratory ward-based registered nurses. The aim of this review was to use a systematic process to establish the core technical and non-technical skills and knowledge ­identified in evidence-based clinical guidelines that enable the care of hospitalised adult respiratory pati...

  4. MO-F-BRCD-01: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Updates on Clinical, Biological, and Physics/QA:SBRT (Part 1): Biological and Clinical Updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, P

    2012-06-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) is an important form of cancer therapy with increasingly broad application across a spectrum of tumor types in primary and metastatic settings. In this presentation the radiation biology, clinical experience from various trials, and cautionary updates on normal tissue tolerances will be presented. The effective radiobiology of SBRT and hypofractionated courses of therapy has become more evident with the increasing reports of retrospective clinical outcomes and prospective clinical trial results. Current open multi-institutional national cooperative trials will be reviewed. Accumulating clinical experiences are yielding new insights into practical aspects of tumor and normal tissue responses to high dose per fraction treatment. Indeed, SBRT has produced profound tumoricidal and ablative effects, however there is potential for grave toxicity and this demands that clinicians be knowledgeable regarding normal tissue tolerances for various hypofractionated courses. As a final note, the technology associated with SBRT has evolved remarkably in the last decade, and procedures that originally required hours to plan, with cumbersome quality assurance methods, arduous set-up times, and long protracted deliveries can now be performed in ever shorter time periods. Given these technology improvements and recognizing the great palliative potential of hypofractionated radiation therapy to relieve cancer symptoms quickly and efficiently, a new strategy to deliver SBRT in a single session called STAT RAD is presented for discussion. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. The evidence-based principles of negative pressure wound therapy in trauma & orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice.

  6. The Evidence-Based Principles of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Trauma & Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice. PMID:25067971

  7. Electroencephalographic neurofeedback: Level of evidence in mental and brain disorders and suggestions for good clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; McGonigal, A; Lopez, R; Daudet, C; Kotwas, I; Bartolomei, F

    2015-12-01

    The technique of electroencephalographic neurofeedback (EEG NF) emerged in the 1970s and is a technique that measures a subject's EEG signal, processes it in real time, extracts a parameter of interest and presents this information in visual or auditory form. The goal is to effectuate a behavioural modification by modulating brain activity. The EEG NF opens new therapeutic possibilities in the fields of psychiatry and neurology. However, the development of EEG NF in clinical practice requires (i) a good level of evidence of therapeutic efficacy of this technique, (ii) a good practice guide for this technique. Firstly, this article investigates selected trials with the following criteria: study design with controlled, randomized, and open or blind protocol, primary endpoint related to the mental and brain disorders treated and assessed with standardized measurement tools, identifiable EEG neurophysiological targets, underpinned by pathophysiological relevance. Trials were found for: epilepsies, migraine, stroke, chronic insomnia, attentional-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, addictive disorders, psychotic disorders. Secondly, this article investigates the principles of neurofeedback therapy in line with learning theory. Different underlying therapeutic models are presented didactically between two continua: a continuum between implicit and explicit learning and a continuum between the biomedical model (centred on "the disease") and integrative biopsychosocial model of health (centred on "the illness"). The main relevant learning model is to link neurofeedback therapy with the field of cognitive remediation techniques. The methodological specificity of neurofeedback is to be guided by biologically relevant neurophysiological parameters. Guidelines for good clinical practice of EEG NF concerning technical issues of electrophysiology and of learning are suggested. These require validation by

  8. Significance of Kampo, Japanese Traditional Medicine, in the Treatment of Obesity: Basic and Clinical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Yamakawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cause of obesity includes genetic and environmental factors, including cytokines derived from adipocytes (adipo-cytokines. Although drug therapy is available for obesity, it is highly risky. Our main focus in this review is on the traditional form of Japanese medicine, Kampo, in the treated of obesity. Two Kampo formulas, that is, bofutsushosan (防風通聖散 and boiogito (防己黄耆湯, are covered by the national health insurance in Japan for the treatment of obesity. Various issues related to their action mechanisms remain unsolved. Considering these, we described the results of basic experiments and presented clinical evidence and case reports on osteoarthritis as examples of clinical application of their two Kampo medicine. Traditional medicine is used not only for treatment but also for prevention. In clinical practice, it is of great importance to prove the efficacy of combinations of traditional medicine and Western medicine and the utility of traditional medicine in the attenuation of adverse effects of Western medicine.

  9. HYPERPHAGIA REACTIONS WITHIN EATING DISORDERS. CLINICAL FEATURES AND THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Gladyshev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate clinical features of hyperphagia reactions, their significance in attraction abnormities within eating disorders and treatment options for these conditions with escitalopram.Material and methods. Mental state of 39 women (age 19-50 years with psychogenic overeating and obesity (body mass index of 30 to 53 kg/m2 was studied. Patients were admitted to the Institute of Nutrition of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Diagnostic criteria for International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition, as well as Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and Ferreri Anxiety Rating Diagram (FARD were used for syndrome qualifications. Patient Global Impression of Change was also studied using a 4-point scale of results (excellent, good, fair, and negative.Results. Clinical features of hyperphagic reactions were found. Escitalopram treatment course was completed with excellent and good results in 80% of patients. 50%-reduction in HADS score for anxiety was found in 74% of patients, for depression – in 63%, and for Ferreri scale – in 68% of patients. Escitalopram promoted more intensive body weight loss: 11% vs 8% of baseline weight in active and control groups, respectively. Adverse events occurred only in 7 (36% patients; they were transient and did not require therapy discontinuation.Conclusion: Significant differences of premanifest disorders were often observed in patients history. Escitalopram in these patients showed efficacy in improvement of both mental and somatic symptoms of anxiety. It decreased dependence on food as a factor mitigating affect and stress, thus provided better results in body weight reduction.

  10. HYPERPHAGIA REACTIONS WITHIN EATING DISORDERS. CLINICAL FEATURES AND THERAPY

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    O. A. Gladyshev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate clinical features of hyperphagia reactions, their significance in attraction abnormities within eating disorders and treatment options for these conditions with escitalopram.Material and methods. Mental state of 39 women (age 19-50 years with psychogenic overeating and obesity (body mass index of 30 to 53 kg/m2 was studied. Patients were admitted to the Institute of Nutrition of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Diagnostic criteria for International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition, as well as Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and Ferreri Anxiety Rating Diagram (FARD were used for syndrome qualifications. Patient Global Impression of Change was also studied using a 4-point scale of results (excellent, good, fair, and negative.Results. Clinical features of hyperphagic reactions were found. Escitalopram treatment course was completed with excellent and good results in 80% of patients. 50%-reduction in HADS score for anxiety was found in 74% of patients, for depression – in 63%, and for Ferreri scale – in 68% of patients. Escitalopram promoted more intensive body weight loss: 11% vs 8% of baseline weight in active and control groups, respectively. Adverse events occurred only in 7 (36% patients; they were transient and did not require therapy discontinuation.Conclusion: Significant differences of premanifest disorders were often observed in patients history. Escitalopram in these patients showed efficacy in improvement of both mental and somatic symptoms of anxiety. It decreased dependence on food as a factor mitigating affect and stress, thus provided better results in body weight reduction.

  11. A review on reporting guidelines of clinical research in evidence based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xing; Wang, Gui-qian; Xie, Yan-ming

    2015-07-01

    Good clinical practice should be based on evidence. Evidence quality should be based on critical appraisal in evidence based medicine (EBM). Evaluation of evidence quality plays an important role in evidence level clarifying, which is the core of EBM. Different recommendations for clinical practice often derive from evidence levels. Thus evidence quality evaluation is the first and most important step in EBM. There are lots of standards to evaluate evidence quality in the world. However there are two aspects of the evaluation, one is methodological evaluation and the other is reporting evaluation. This article collected a series of standards for clinical trials quality evaluation according to different research designs. It is hoped that the resource and introduction about the quality evaluation of clinical trials be helpful for medical researchers in China. Only being familiar with all kinds of standards of methodology and reporting, researchers could publish high quality scientific papers.

  12. Exercise therapy for human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS patients: Guidelines for clinical exercise therapists

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    Jeanne M. Grace

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has infected > 60 million people since its discovery and 30 million people have died since the pandemic began. Antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV infection from an acute to a chronic disease, increasing life expectancy but also adding to the potential side effects associated with drug therapy and the comorbidity accompanying longevity. Exercise can play a valuable role in the management of HIV/AIDS patients by addressing various symptoms and improving their quality of life, but the optimum mode, intensity, frequency, and duration of exercise that take the different clinical stages of the disease into consideration are inadequately known. Searches of Medline, Embase, Science Citation Index, CINAHL database, HealthSTAR, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro, and SPORTDiscus were conducted between 2000 and January 2014. Searches of published and unpublished abstracts were conducted, as well as a hand search of reference lists and tables of contents of relevant journals and books. Identified studies were reviewed for methodological quality. A total of 33 studies met the inclusion criteria. Most studies failed to indicate the optimum type (mode, intensity, frequency, and duration of aerobic and progressive resistive exercise prescribed to HIV-infected individuals in relation to the different clinical stages of the disease. The purpose of this review is to provide evidence-based recommendations after revision of exercise guidelines for HIV patients, by highlighting practical guidelines that clinical exercise therapists should consider when prescribing exercise for patients in different stages of the disease.

  13. New perspectives on the theory of justice: implications for physical therapy ethics and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ian; Delany, Clare M; Townsend, Anne F; Swisher, Laura Lee

    2011-11-01

    Recent revisions of physical therapy codes of ethics have included a new emphasis concerning health inequities and social injustice. This emphasis reflects the growing evidence regarding the importance of social determinants of health, epidemiological trends for health service delivery, and the enhanced participation of physical therapists in shaping health care reform in a number of international contexts. This perspective article suggests that there is a "disconnect" between the societal obligations and aspirations expressed in the revised codes and the individualist ethical frameworks that predominantly underpin them. Primary health care is an approach to health care arising from an understanding of the nexus between health and social disadvantage that considers the health needs of patients as expressive of the health needs of the communities of which they are members. It is proposed that re-thinking ethical frameworks expressed in codes of ethics can both inform and underpin practical strategies for working in primary health care. This perspective article provides a new focus on the ethical principle of justice: the ethical principle that arguably remains the least consensually understood and developed in the ethics literature of physical therapy. A relatively recent theory of justice known as the "capability approach to justice" is discussed, along with its potential to assist physical therapy practitioners to further develop moral agency in order to address situations of health inequity and social injustice in clinical practice.

  14. Mechanism-based Classification of Pain for Physical Therapy Management in Palliative care: A Clinical Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Senthil P; Saha, Sourov

    2011-01-01

    Pain relief is a major goal for palliative care in India so much that most palliative care interventions necessarily begin first with pain relief. Physical therapists play an important role in palliative care and they are regarded as highly proficient members of a multidisciplinary healthcare team towards management of chronic pain. Pain necessarily involves three different levels of classification–based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Mechanism-based treatments are most likely to succeed compared to symptomatic treatments or diagnosis-based treatments. The objective of this clinical commentary is to update the physical therapists working in palliative care, on the mechanism-based classification of pain and its interpretation, with available therapeutic evidence for providing optimal patient care using physical therapy. The paper describes the evolution of mechanism-based classification of pain, the five mechanisms (central sensitization, peripheral neuropathic, nociceptive, sympathetically maintained pain and cognitive-affective) are explained with recent evidence for physical therapy treatments for each of the mechanisms. PMID:21633629

  15. Mechanism-based classification of pain for physical therapy management in palliative care: A clinical commentary

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    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain relief is a major goal for palliative care in India so much that most palliative care interventions necessarily begin first with pain relief. Physical therapists play an important role in palliative care and they are regarded as highly proficient members of a multidisciplinary healthcare team towards management of chronic pain. Pain necessarily involves three different levels of classification-based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Mechanism-based treatments are most likely to succeed compared to symptomatic treatments or diagnosis-based treatments. The objective of this clinical commentary is to update the physical therapists working in palliative care, on the mechanism-based classification of pain and its interpretation, with available therapeutic evidence for providing optimal patient care using physical therapy. The paper describes the evolution of mechanism-based classification of pain, the five mechanisms (central sensitization, peripheral neuropathic, nociceptive, sympathetically maintained pain and cognitive-affective are explained with recent evidence for physical therapy treatments for each of the mechanisms.

  16. Clinical pharmacology and clinical trials of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors: is it a viable cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannargudi, Mukundan Baskar; Deb, Subrata

    2017-08-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) enzymes (RR1 and RR2) play an important role in the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides which is involved in DNA replication and repair. Augmented RR activity has been ascribed to uncontrolled cell growth and tumorigenic transformation. This review mainly focuses on several biological and chemical RR inhibitors (e.g., siRNA, GTI-2040, GTI-2501, triapine, gemcitabine, and clofarabine) that have been evaluated in clinical trials with promising anticancer activity from 1960's till 2016. A summary on whether their monotherapy or combination is still effective for further use is discussed. Among the RR2 inhibitors evaluated, GTI-2040, siRNA, gallium nitrate and didox were more efficacious as a monotherapy, whereas triapine was found to be more efficacious as combination agent. Hydroxyurea is currently used more in combination therapy, even though it is efficacious as a monotherapy. Gallium nitrate showed mixed results in combination therapy, while the combination activity of didox is yet to be evaluated. RR1 inhibitors that have long been used in chemotherapy such as gemcitabine, cladribine, fludarabine and clofarabine are currently used mostly as a combination therapy, but are equally efficacious as a monotherapy, except tezacitabine which did not progress beyond phase I trials. Based on the results of clinical trials, we conclude that RR inhibitors are viable treatment options, either as a monotherapy or as a combination in cancer chemotherapy. With the recent advances made in cancer biology, further development of RR inhibitors with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity is possible for treatment of variety of cancers.

  17. Evidence-Based Evaluation of Practice and Innovation in Physical Therapy Using the IDEAL-Physio Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, David; Hamilton, David; Davies, Loretta; Cook, Jonathan; Hirst, Allison; McCulloch, Peter; Paez, Arsenio

    2018-02-01

    The IDEAL framework is an established method for initial and ongoing evaluations of innovation and practice for complex health care interventions. First derived for surgical sciences and embedded at a global level for evaluating surgery/surgical devices, the IDEAL framework is based on the principle that innovation and evaluation in clinical practice can, and should, evolve together in an ordered manner: from conception to development and then to validation by appropriate clinical studies and, finally, longer-term follow-up. This framework is highly suited to other complex, nonpharmacological interventions, such as physical therapist interventions. This perspective outlines the application of IDEAL to physical therapy in the new IDEAL-Physio framework. The IDEAL-Physio framework comprises 5 stages. In stage 1, the idea phase, formal data collection should begin. Stage 2a is the phase for iterative improvement and adjustment with thorough data recording. Stage 2b involves the onset of formal evaluation using systematically collected group or cohort data. Stage 3 is the phase for formal comparative assessment of treatment, usually involving randomized studies. Stage 4 involves long-term follow-up. The IDEAL-Physio framework is recommended as a method for guiding and evaluating both innovation and practice in physical therapy, with the overall goal of providing better evidence-based care. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association.

  18. [Electroconvulsive therapy and level of evidence: From causality to dose-effect relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Quilès, C; Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2016-12-01

    The first objective of this article is to summarize the history of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in psychiatry in order to highlight the transition from clinical level of evidence based on phenomenological descriptions to controlled trial establishing causal relationship. The second objective is to apply the criteria of causation for ECT, to focus on the dose-effect relationship criteria, and thus to analyze the conditions of application of these criteria for ECT. A literature review exploring the use of electricity, ECT and electroencephalography (EEG) in psychiatry was conducted. The publications were identified from the Pubmed and GoogleScholar electronic databases. The scientific literature search of international articles was performed in July 2016. In 1784, a Royal commission established in France by King Louis XVI tested Mesmer's claims concerning animal magnetism. By doing that, the commission, including such prominent scientists as the chemist Anton Lavoisier and the scientist and researcher on electricity and therapeutics Benjamin Franklin, played a central role in establishing the criteria needed to assess the level of evidence of electrical therapeutics in psychiatry. Surprisingly, it is possible to identify the classical Bradford Hill criteria of causation in the report of the commission, except the dose-effect relationship criteria. Since then, it has been conducted blinded randomized controlled trials that confirmed the effectiveness of ECT against ECT placebos for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. At present, the dose-effect relationship criteria can be analyzed through an EEG quality assessment of ECT-induced seizures. EEG quality assessment includes several indices: TSLOW (time to onset of seizure activity ≤5Hz, seconds), peak mid-ictal amplitude (mm), regularity (intensity or morphology of the seizure (0-6)), stereotypy (global seizure patterning, 0-3) and post-ictal suppression (0-3). A manual rating sheet is needed to score theses

  19. Reflections on Clinical Learning in Novice Speech-Language Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne E.; Davidson, Bronwyn J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reflective practice is reported to enhance clinical reasoning and therefore to maximize client outcomes. The inclusion of targeted reflective practice in academic programmes in speech-language therapy has not been consistent, although providing opportunities for speech-language therapy students to reflect during their clinical practice…

  20. Profile of everolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

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    Capal JK

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jamie K Capal, David Neal Franz Department of Neurology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a relatively rare genetic disorder, affecting one in 6,000 births. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, such as everolimus, which have been previously used to prevent solid organ transplant rejection, augment anticancer treatment regimens, and prevent neovascularization of artificial cardiac stents, are now approved for treating TSC-related manifestations, such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas. The use of everolimus in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytomas is supported by long-term Phase II and III clinical trials. Seizures are a common feature in TSC, occurring in up to 96% of patients. While mTOR inhibitors currently do not have regulatory approval in treating this manifestation, small clinical studies have demonstrated beneficial outcomes with everolimus. Further evidence from a forthcoming Phase III clinical study may provide additional support for the use of everolimus for this indication. Also, there are no approved treatments for TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders, which include intellectual disability, behavioral difficulties, and autism spectrum disorder, but preclinical data and small studies have suggested that some neuropsychiatric symptoms may be improved through mTOR inhibition therapy. More evidence is needed, particularly regarding safety in young infants. This review focuses on the current evidence supporting the use of everolimus in neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations of TSC, and the place of everolimus in therapy. Keywords: everolimus, tuberous sclerosis complex, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, seizures, TAND

  1. Clinical Significance of Diffuse Intrathoracic Uptake on Post-Therapy I-131 Scans in Thyroid Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyun Su; Kim, Sung Hoon; Park, Sonya Youngju; Park, Hye Lim; Seo, Ye Young; Choi, Woo Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and possible cause of diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy I-131 scans in thyroid cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed 781 post-therapy scans of 755 thyroid cancer patients who underwent total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine therapy between January and December 2010. Diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy scans was examined, and clinical patient characteristics including sex, age, regimen for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation (thyroid hormone withdrawal or recombinant human TSH injection), TSH, thyroglobulin (Tg) and anti-thyroglobulin antibody (anti-Tg Ab) levels, therapeutic dose of radioactive iodine therapy and prior history of radioactive iodine therapy were recorded.Scan findings were correlated with chest CT, chest radiographs, laboratory tests and/or clinical status. Diffuse intrathoracic uptake without evidence of pathologic condition was categorized as indeterminate. The association between clinical characteristics and intrathoracic uptake were analyzed for negative intrathoracic uptake and indeterminate uptake groups. Diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy scans was demonstrated in 39 out of 755 (5.2 %) patients, among which 3 were confirmed as lung metastasis. The 14 patients that showed high Tg or anti-Tg Ab levels were considered to be at risk of having undetected micrometastasis on other imaging modalities. The remaining 22 were indeterminate (2.9 %). Upon comparison of negative intrathoracic uptake and indeterminate uptake groups, TSH stimulation by thyroid hormone withdrawal was shown to be significantly correlated with diffuse intrathoracic uptake (p <0.05). The frequency of diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy scans was 5.2 % and could be seen in thyroid cancer patients with underlying lung metastasis as well as those without definite pathologic condition. In the latter, there was a higher frequency for diffusely increased intrathoracic

  2. Clinical Significance of Diffuse Intrathoracic Uptake on Post-Therapy I-131 Scans in Thyroid Cancer Patients

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    Choi, Hyun Su; Kim, Sung Hoon; Park, Sonya Youngju; Park, Hye Lim; Seo, Ye Young; Choi, Woo Hee [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency and possible cause of diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy I-131 scans in thyroid cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed 781 post-therapy scans of 755 thyroid cancer patients who underwent total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine therapy between January and December 2010. Diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy scans was examined, and clinical patient characteristics including sex, age, regimen for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation (thyroid hormone withdrawal or recombinant human TSH injection), TSH, thyroglobulin (Tg) and anti-thyroglobulin antibody (anti-Tg Ab) levels, therapeutic dose of radioactive iodine therapy and prior history of radioactive iodine therapy were recorded.Scan findings were correlated with chest CT, chest radiographs, laboratory tests and/or clinical status. Diffuse intrathoracic uptake without evidence of pathologic condition was categorized as indeterminate. The association between clinical characteristics and intrathoracic uptake were analyzed for negative intrathoracic uptake and indeterminate uptake groups. Diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy scans was demonstrated in 39 out of 755 (5.2 %) patients, among which 3 were confirmed as lung metastasis. The 14 patients that showed high Tg or anti-Tg Ab levels were considered to be at risk of having undetected micrometastasis on other imaging modalities. The remaining 22 were indeterminate (2.9 %). Upon comparison of negative intrathoracic uptake and indeterminate uptake groups, TSH stimulation by thyroid hormone withdrawal was shown to be significantly correlated with diffuse intrathoracic uptake (p <0.05). The frequency of diffuse intrathoracic uptake on post-therapy scans was 5.2 % and could be seen in thyroid cancer patients with underlying lung metastasis as well as those without definite pathologic condition. In the latter, there was a higher frequency for diffusely increased intrathoracic

  3. High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) versus TENS and NSAIDs in low back pain: clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zati, Allesandro; Fortuna, Damiano; Valent, A.; Filippi, M. V.; Bilotta, Teresa W.

    2004-09-01

    Low back pain, caused by lumbar disc herniation, is prevalently treated with a conservative approach. In this study we valued the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT), compared with accepted therapies such as TENS and NSAIDs. Laser therapy obtained similar results in the short term, but better clinical effect over time than TENS and NSAIDs. In conclusion high intensity laser therapy appears to be a interesting new treatment, worthy of further research.

  4. Teaching Trauma-Focused Exposure Therapy for PTSD: Critical Clinical Lessons for Novice Exposure Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.; Bittinger, Joyce N.; Bedard-Gilligan, Michele A.; Slagle, David M.; Post, Loren M.; Chen, Jessica A.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, our experiences delivering exposure therapy and teaching clinicians to deliver exposure therapy for PTSD have taught us some important lessons. We will focus on lessons learned as we have attended to clinicians’ experiences as they begin to implement and apply the therapy. Specifically, we highlight common therapist expectations including the beliefs that the exposure therapy requires a new set of clinical skills, therapists themselves will experience a high level of d...

  5. Sustained adoption of an evidence-based treatment: a survey of clinicians certified in problem-solving therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, Rebecca M; Areán, Patricia A; Hegel, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Training models that incorporate case supervision in addition to didactic instruction appear to be effective in maximizing clinicians' proficiency in evidence-based treatments (EBTs). However, it is unknown the extent to which these models promote sustained adoption of EBTs. We describe the results of an online survey on post-training utilization of an EBT, problem-solving therapy (PST), among 40 clinicians highly trained in PST. Seventy-five percent of the survey's 40 respondents reported that they continued to use PST in their clinical practices. Many PST-trained clinicians reported that they had modified the PST protocol in their clinical practices according to patient characteristics or preferences. Considering these results, we recommend emphasizing patient variability and treatment tailoring throughout the training process as a means for promoting clinicians' sustained adoption of EBTs.

  6. Diagnosis of Upper Quadrant Lymphedema Secondary to Cancer: Clinical Practice Guideline From the Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenhagen, Kimberly; Davies, Claire; Perdomo, Marisa; Ryans, Kathryn; Gilchrist, Laura

    2017-07-01

    The Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) developed a clinical practice guideline to aid the clinician in diagnosing secondary upper quadrant cancer-related lymphedema. Following a systematic review of published studies and a structured appraisal process, recommendations were written to guide the physical therapist and other health care clinicians in the diagnostic process. Overall clinical practice recommendations were formulated based on the evidence for each diagnostic method and were assigned a grade based on the strength of the evidence for different patient presentations and clinical utility. In an effort to maximize clinical applicability, recommendations were based on the characteristics as to the location and stage of a patient's upper quadrant lymphedema. © American Physical Therapy Association 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the American Physical Therapy Association].

  7. FDG PET in non-pharmacological therapy in Alzheimer's disease; cerebral metabolic increase correlates with clinical improvement after cognitive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Hae Ri; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Park, Seong Min; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jung Seok; Kim, Sang Yun; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    In management of AD, pharmacological treatment alone using acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) is general consensus, and provides beneficial effect to prolong their progression. Combined non-pharmacological therapy, especially cognitive therapy is recently having attention with expectation of improvement in cognitive ability. This study examined the effect of combined cognitive therapy in AD patients who were maintaining AChEI using FDG PET. Four patients (689 yrs) who diagnosed as probable Alzheimer's disease based on the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria participated in this study. 12-week cognitive therapy comprised seven fields to enhance orientation, memory, recall, visuo-motor organization, categorization and behavior modification/sequencing. They received 45-minute sessions twice per week with maintaining their previous medication. Clinical improvement was assessed by comprehensive neuropsychological tests. Two FDG PET studies were performed before cognitive therapy and in the middle of the therapy, and compared to evaluate the effect of cognitive therapy to cerebral metabolism. Two of 4 patients whose initial cognitive impairment was milder had clinical improvement after 12 weeks, the rest who were more severely impaired failed to have clinical improvement. Regional cerebral hypometabolism on initial PET was correlated with their functional status. Follow up PET of two responders demonstrated the increases in regional metabolism in the temporal and/or frontal cortex, which was associated their functional improvement. Cerebral metabolism in poor responders were minimally increased or no changed. This preliminary data suggests that cognitive therapy is potentially useful to stabilize or improve cognitive and functional performance in AD patients with relatively mild cognitive dysfunction. And FDG PET could demonstrate possible candidates for cognitive therapy and the effect of the therapy

  8. Nutritional therapy for the management of diabetic gastroparesis: clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiya A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Amena SadiyaLifestyle Clinic, Rashid Centre for Diabetes and Research, Ministry of Health, Ajman, United Arab EmiratesAbstract: Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP, or slow emptying of the stomach, is a well-established complication of diabetes mellitus and is typically considered to occur in individuals with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical consequences of DGP include induction of gastrointestinal (GI symptoms (early satiety, abdominal distension, reflux, stomach spasm, postprandial nausea, vomiting, alteration in drug absorption, and destabilization of glycemic control (due to mismatched postprandial glycemic and insulin peaks. Effective nutritional management not only helps in alleviating the symptoms, but also in facilitating better glycemic control. Although there have been no evidence-based guidelines pertaining to the nutrition care process of the DGP, the current dietary recommendations are based on expert opinions or observational studies. The dietary management of gastroparesis needs to be tailored according to the severity of malnutrition and kind of upper GI symptom by changing the volume, consistency, frequency, fiber, fat, and carbohydrates in the meal. Small frequent meals, using more liquid calories, reducing high fat or high fiber, consuming bezoar forming foods, and adjusting meal carbohydrates based on medications or insulin helps in improving the upper GI symptoms and glycemic control. Enteral nutrition can be an option for patients who fail to stabilize their weight loss, or for those who cannot gain weight with oral feedings, while total parenteral nutrition is rarely necessary for the patient with gastroparesis.Keywords: diabetic gastroparesis, delayed gastric emptying, diabetes mellitus, bezoar, GI symptoms, glycemic control

  9. Combination implementation for HIV prevention: moving from clinical trial evidence to population-level effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Larry W; Serwadda, David; Quinn, Thomas C; Wawer, Maria J; Gray, Ronald H; Reynolds, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    The promise of combination HIV prevention-the application of multiple HIV prevention interventions to maximise population-level effects-has never been greater. However, to succeed in achieving significant reductions in HIV incidence, an additional concept needs to be considered: combination implementation. Combination implementation for HIV prevention is the pragmatic, localised application of evidence-based strategies to enable high sustained uptake and quality of interventions for prevention of HIV. In this Review, we explore diverse implementation strategies including HIV testing and counselling models, task shifting, linkage to and retention in care, antiretroviral therapy support, behaviour change, demand creation, and structural interventions, and discusses how they could be used to complement HIV prevention efforts such as medical male circumcision and treatment as prevention. HIV prevention and treatment have arrived at a pivotal moment when combination efforts might result in substantial enough population-level effects to reverse the epidemic and drive towards elimination of HIV. Only through careful consideration of how to implement and operationalise HIV prevention interventions will the HIV community be able to move from clinical trial evidence to population-level effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dolutegravir: clinical efficacy and role in HIV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2014-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integrase enzyme has recently emerged as a primary alternative target to block viral replication, and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are now considered an alternative 'third agent' class of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. Dolutegravir is the first next-generation INSTI showing some novel and intriguing characteristics: it has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile with a prolonged intracellular halflife, rendering feasible a once daily dosing without the need for pharmacokinetic boosting. Secondly, it is largely metabolized via uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase-1A1 with a minor component of cytochrome P450 isoforms, thus allowing a low grade of drug-drug interactions, so that its metabolic profile consents co-administration with the majority of the other ARV drugs without dose adjustments. Lastly, but no less important, virological studies have clearly demonstrated that dolutegravir has a significant activity against HIV-1 isolates showing raltegravir and/or elvitegravir associated resistance mutations. The attributes of once daily administration and the potential to treat INSTI-resistant viruses make dolutegravir an interesting and promising new agent in the treatment of both naïve and experienced HIV-1 subjects. In this review, the main concerns on dolutegravir efficacy are focused through the analysis of the currently available data from clinical studies in naïve and experienced patients, evaluating its possible place within the anti-HIV-1 drug armamentarium. The development of newer once daily, single tablet coformulations improved drug adherence and maximized the success of ARV therapy. Pharmacokinetic studies and dose-ranging trials suggested that dolutegravir is a good candidate for a single tablet regimen in one or more new coformulated pills that will be available in the near future.

  11. Clinical therapeutic effect of two therapies on circumscribed choroidal hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le-Le Huang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the clinical therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy(PDTand transpupillary thermotherapy(TTTon circumscribed choroid hemangioma(CCH.METHODS: Totally 24 cases(24 eyesof CCH were selected in this study. Twelve of them had undergone TTT, and the other 12 were treated by PDT. The changes of tumors were examined by best corrected visual acuity, results of fundus photography, and direct ophthalmoscopy; the changes of tumors' sizes and heights were examined by B-ultrasound examination and coloured doppler imaging; the presence of serous subretinal fluid were examined by optical coherence tomography(OCT; the leakage of tumors and complications were analyzed by fluorescence fundus angiography(FFAand indocyanine green angiography(ICGA.RESULTS: In all cases, the tumors shrinked back, the blood flows tuned negative, the fluorescence leakages lessened and the serous retinal detachments resolved completely according to OCT, FFA, ICGA and coloured doppler imaging. In the 12 patients treated by TTT, visual acuity improved in 33.3%, unchanged in 33.3%, and droped in 33.3% too; the results of fundus examinations showed obvious pigmentation and atrophy tumor with organized scar. In the 12 patients treated by PDT, visual acuity improved in 66.7%, unchanged in 33.3%, and none droped; the results of fundus examinations showed slight pigment derangement, atrophy tumor tuned white, and normal blood vessel undamaged.CONCLUSION: Both TTT and PDT can make the tumor atrophy and the exudation absorbed. Unlike TTT, PDT damages little normal tissue, and has higher security.

  12. Employing external facilitation to implement cognitive behavioral therapy in VA clinics: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blevins Dean

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although for more than a decade healthcare systems have attempted to provide evidence-based mental health treatments, the availability and use of psychotherapies remains low. A significant need exists to identify simple but effective implementation strategies to adopt complex practices within complex systems of care. Emerging evidence suggests that facilitation may be an effective integrative implementation strategy for adoption of complex practices. The current pilot examined the use of external facilitation for adoption of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in 20 Department of Veteran Affairs (VA clinics. Methods The 20 clinics were paired on facility characteristics, and 23 clinicians from these were trained in CBT. A clinic in each pair was randomly selected to receive external facilitation. Quantitative methods were used to examine the extent of CBT implementation in 10 clinics that received external facilitation compared with 10 clinics that did not, and to better understand the relationship between individual providers' characteristics and attitudes and their CBT use. Costs of external facilitation were assessed by tracking the time spent by the facilitator and therapists in activities related to implementing CBT. Qualitative methods were used to explore contextual and other factors thought to influence implementation. Results Examination of change scores showed that facilitated therapists averaged an increase of 19% [95% CI: (2, 36] in self-reported CBT use from baseline, while control therapists averaged a 4% [95% CI: (-14, 21] increase. Therapists in the facilitated condition who were not providing CBT at baseline showed the greatest increase (35% compared to a control therapist who was not providing CBT at baseline (10% or to therapists in either condition who were providing CBT at baseline (average 3%. Increased CBT use was unrelated to prior CBT training. Barriers to CBT implementation were therapists' lack of

  13. Evaluation of Wet Cupping Therapy: Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bedah, Abdullah M N; Khalil, Mohamed K M; Posadzki, Paul; Sohaibani, Imen; Aboushanab, Tamer Shaaban; AlQaed, Meshari; Ali, Gazzaffi I M

    2016-10-01

    Wet cupping is a widely used traditional therapy in many countries, which justifies a continuous scientific evaluation of its efficacy and safety. To perform a systematic review to critically evaluate and update the available evidence of wet cupping in traditional and complementary medicine. Ten electronic databases were searched from their inceptions to February 2016. Included studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated wet cupping against any type of control interventions in patients with any clinical condition, as well as healthy individuals. Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to appraise the included RCTs. Fourteen RCTs met the eligibility criteria. The included studies evaluated the following clinical conditions: nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP), hypertension, brachialgia, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), chronic neck pain, metabolic syndrome, migraine headaches, oxygen saturation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease. Two RCTs evaluated physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals. Overall, 9 RCTs favored wet cupping over various control interventions in NSLBP (n = 2), hypertension (n = 1), brachialgia (n = 1), CTS (n = 1), chronic neck pain (n = 2), oxygen saturation in smokers with COPD (n = 1), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease (n = 1). Five RCTs showed no statistically significant between-group differences: NSLBP (n = 1), metabolic syndrome (n = 1), migraine headaches (n = 1), and physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals (n = 2). Included RCTs had a variable risk of bias across all domains and suffered methodologic limitations. There is a promising evidence in favor of the use of wet cupping for musculoskeletal pain, specifically NSLBP, neck pain, CTS, and brachialgia. Better-quality trials are needed to generate solid evidence and firmly inform policy makers.

  14. Cognitive-behavioural therapy for outpatients with eating disorders: effectiveness for a transdiagnostic group in a routine clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Hannah; Marshall, Emily; Stopa, Lusia; Waller, Glenn

    2015-05-01

    Whilst there is a growing evidence to support the impact of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in the treatment of adults with eating disorders, much of this evidence comes from tightly controlled efficacy trials. This study aimed to add to the evidence regarding the effectiveness of CBT when delivered in a routine clinical setting. The participants were 203 adults presenting with a range of eating disorder diagnoses, who were offered CBT in an out-patient community eating disorders service in the UK. Patients completed measures of eating disorder pathology at the start of treatment, following the sixth session, and at the end of treatment. Symptoms of anxiety, depression, and psychosocial functioning were measured pre- and post-treatment. Approximately 55% of patients completed treatment, and there were no factors that predicted attrition. There were significant improvements in eating disorder psychopathology, anxiety, depression and general functioning, with particular changes in eating attitudes in the early part of therapy. Effect sizes were medium to large for both completer and intention to treat analyses. These findings confirm that evidence-based forms of CBT can be delivered with strong outcomes in routine clinical settings. Clinicians should be encouraged to deliver evidence-based treatments when working in these settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hormones and tumour therapy: current clinical status and future developments in endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szepesi, T.; Schratter-Sehn, A.U.

    1982-01-01

    Postoperative adjuvant hormone therapy and hormone therapy in disseminated breast cancer will be discussed systematically. The classical ablative and additive endocrine therapeutic measures - with the exception of ovarectomy and gestagen therapy - are increasinlgy being replaced by antagonists. Individual chapters discuss recent experience with combined hormone-radiotherapy or hormone-chemotherapy. In addition, a successful therapy scheme for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer will be presented. (Author)

  16. Clinical diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome and response to metformin therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, N.; Ayub, R.; Alam, A.Y.; Raees, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of diagnosing polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) predominantly on clinical features and the response to metformin therapy. Women fulfilling the inclusion criteria (oligo/hypomenorrhea, infertility, weight gain, hyperandrogenism) were enrolled. Ultrasound pelvis was obtained in all women. Presence of eight or more multiple follicles in both or one ovary without presence of mature follicle was the cutoff number for positive ultrasound. Thyroid stimulating hormone levels were performed in all patients, and patients with abnormal levels were excluded from the study. Metformin was adjusted to 500 mg thrice daily. Six months later patients were again evaluated for response to metformin therapy and those who failed to conceive were given clomiphene citrate along with metformin. Fertility was re-evaluated at the end of one year. At the start of the study, 81% women had menstrual irregularity and 84% had infertility. Hirsutism was seen in 72% while history of weight gain was present in 62% of patients. Ultrasound evidence of polycystic ovaries was seen in 93% of women. After 6 months of metformin therapy, 80% patients had achieved correction in their menstrual irregularity. After 6 months on metformin alone, 51% patients conceived while an additional 20% conceived on both metformin and clomiphene citrate during next 6 months. Overall fertility rate was 71% at the end of one year. There was statistically significant change in pre-treatment and post-treatment BMI. Combination of three or more of the clinical features (irregular cycles, history of weight gain, infertility and hirsutism) provide an appropriate basis for the diagnosis of PCOS. Metformin alone was an effective treatment for PCOS in this series. (author)

  17. Economic evaluation of manual therapy for musculoskeletal diseases: a protocol for a systematic review and narrative synthesis of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Gon; Mun, Su-Jeong; Kim, Ka-Na; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Kim, Nam-Kwen; Lee, Dong-Hyo; Lee, Jung-Han

    2016-05-13

    Manual therapy is the non-surgical conservative management of musculoskeletal disorders using the practitioner's hands on the patient's body for diagnosing and treating disease. The aim of this study is to systematically review trial-based economic evaluations of manual therapy relative to other interventions used for the management of musculoskeletal diseases. Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) on the economic evaluation of manual therapy for musculoskeletal diseases will be included in the review. The following databases will be searched from their inception: Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Econlit, Mantis, Index to Chiropractic Literature, Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), National Health Service Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (NHS DARE), National Health Service Health Technology Assessment Database (NHS HTA), National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), CENTRAL, five Korean medical databases (Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System (OASIS), Research Information Service System (RISS), DBPIA, Korean Traditional Knowledge Portal (KTKP) and KoreaMed) and three Chinese databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP and Wanfang). The evidence for the cost-effectiveness, cost-utility and cost-benefit of manual therapy for musculoskeletal diseases will be assessed as the primary outcome. Health-related quality of life and adverse effects will be assessed as secondary outcomes. We will critically appraise the included studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Drummond checklist. Results will be summarised using Slavin's qualitative best-evidence synthesis approach. The results of the study will be disseminated via a peer-reviewed journal and/or conference presentations

  18. Measuring evidence-based practice in physical therapy: translation, adaptation, further development, validation, and reliability test of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsson, Susanne; Larsson, Maria E H

    2013-06-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) and evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are becoming increasingly important in physical therapy. For the purpose of meeting the goals of designing, implementing, and evaluating strategies to facilitate the development of more EBP in primary care physical therapy, a valid and reliable questionnaire for measuring attitudes, knowledge, behavior, prerequisites, and barriers related to EBP and guidelines is needed. The 3 objectives of this study were: (1) to translate and cross-culturally adapt a questionnaire to a Swedish primary care context for the purpose of measuring various aspects of EBP and guidelines in physical therapy, (2) to further develop the questionnaire to examine more aspects of guidelines, and (3) to test the validity and reliability of the adapted Swedish questionnaire. This was an instrument development study with validity and reliability testing. A previously used questionnaire about EBP was translated and cross-culturally adapted to a Swedish primary care physical therapy context. Additional items were constructed. A draft version was pilot tested for content validity (n=10), and a revised version was tested for test-retest reliability (n=42). The percentage of agreement between the 2 tests was analyzed. The development process resulted in a first questionnaire draft containing 48 items. The validation process resulted in a second draft with acceptable content validity and consisting of 38 items. The test-retest analysis showed that the median percentage of agreement was 67% (range=41%-81%). After removal or revision of items with poor agreement, the final questionnaire included 31 items. Only face validity and content validity were tested. The final translated and adapted questionnaire was determined to have good face and content validity and acceptable reliability for measuring self-reported attitudes, knowledge, behavior, prerequisites, and barriers related to EBP and guidelines among physical therapists in

  19. Pediatric anxiety disorders: from neuroscience to evidence-based clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Desousa, Diogo Araújo; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Pine, Daniel Samuel; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this narrative review of the literature is to describe the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders. We aim to guide clinicians in understanding the biology of anxiety disorders and to provide general guidelines for the proper diagnoses and treatment of these conditions early in life. Anxiety disorders are prevalent, associated with a number of negative life outcomes, and currently under-recognized and under-treated. The etiology involves both genes and environmental influences modifying the neural substrate in a complex interplay. Research on pathophysiology is still in its infancy, but some brain regions, such as the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, have been implicated in fear and anxiety. Current practice is to establish diagnosis based purely on clinical features, derived from clinical interviews with the child, parents, and teachers. Treatment is effective using medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, or a combination of both. An introduction to the neuroscience behind anxiety disorders combined with an evidence-based approach may help clinicians to understand these disorders and treat them properly in childhood.

  20. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-02

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  1. Medical documentation, bioanalytical evidence of an accidental human exposure to sulfur mustard and general therapy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinritz, Dirk; Striepling, Enno; Rudolf, Klaus-Dieter; Schröder-Kraft, Claudia; Püschel, Klaus; Hullard-Pulstinger, Andreas; Koller, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst; Gandor, Felix; Gawlik, Michael; John, Harald

    2016-02-26

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent (CWA) that was first used in World War I and in several military conflicts afterwards. The threat by SM is still present even today due to remaining stockpiles, old and abandoned remainders all over the world as well as to its ease of synthesis. CWA are banned by the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) interdicting their development, production, transport, stockpiling and use and are subjected to controlled destruction. The present case report describes an accidental exposure of three workers that occurred during the destruction of SM. All exposed workers presented a characteristic SM-related clinical picture that started about 4h after exposure with erythema and feeling of tension of the skin at the upper part of the body. Later on, superficial blister and a burning phenomenon of the affected skin areas developed. Similar symptoms occurred in all three patients differing severity. One patient presented sustained skin affections at the gluteal region while another patient came up with affections of the axilla and genital region. Fortunately, full recovery was observed on day 56 after exposure except some little pigmentation changes that were evident even on day 154 in two of the patients. SM-exposure was verified for all three patients using bioanalytical GC MS and LC MS/MS based methods applied to urine and plasma. Urinary biotransformation products of the β-lyase pathway were detected until 5 days after poisoning whereas albumin-SM adducts could be found until day 29 underlining the beneficial role of adduct detection for post-exposure verification. In addition, we provide general recommendations for management and therapy in case of SM poisoning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Placebo versus Best-Available-Therapy Control Group in Clinical Trials for Pharmacologic Therapies: Which Is Better?

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Mario

    2007-01-01

    There are valid scientific and ethical considerations for using a control group in a clinical trial. Placebo-controlled trials are justifiable when they are supported by sound methodologic consideration and when their use does not expose research participants to excessive risk of harm. Consideration should be given to “best available therapy” control groups in the evaluation of a new therapy or intervention over an existing therapy. Investigators should keep in mind that one should not sacrif...

  3. ?Third wave? cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian; Kongerslev, Mickey; Larsen, Kirsten Aaskov; S?rensen, Per; Winkel, Per; Lange, Theis; S?gaard, Ulf; Simonsen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. ‘Third wave‘ cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients with major depression. Methods/ design We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diag...

  4. Clinical and Research Perspectives on Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatments and Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttiah, Nimisha; Georges, Katie; Brackenbury, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the incorporation of research evidence, clinical expertise, and client values in clinical decision making. One case in which these factors conflict is the use of nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) for children with developmental speech sound disorders. Critical reviews of the research evidence…

  5. WE-D-BRB-04: Clinical Applications of CBCT for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, B.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  6. Systemic therapy for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer: a clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, J.; Coakley, N.; Elit, L.; Mackay, H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this guideline is to recommend systemic therapy options for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer, including fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancers. Methods This document updates the recommendations published in the 2011 Optimal Chemotherapy for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer guideline from Cancer Care Ontario. Draft recommendations were formulated based on evidence obtained through a systematic review of phase ii and iii randomized controlled trials (rcts). The draft recommendations underwent internal review by clinical and methodology experts, and external review by clinical practitioners through a survey assessing the clinical relevance and overall quality of the guideline. Feedback from the internal and external reviews was integrated into the clinical practice guideline. Results The primary literature search yielded thirty-six primary research papers representing thirty rcts that met the eligibility criteria. The guideline provides recommendations for patients with serous tumour histologies and with recurrent, platinum-resistant, and platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Conclusions The body of evidence from trials that included olaparib and bevacizumab consistently shows a benefit in progression-free survival (pfs) without a corresponding benefit in overall survival (os). The Working Group for this guideline designated pfs, which is associated with symptom control, as a critical outcome. A finding of net benefit can therefore be concluded based on significant differences in pfs. However, that benefit is not without identified harms. Given the identified harms, patient involvement in the decision-making process must take into consideration the side effect profiles of olaparib and bevacizumab within the context of improved pfs but minimal change in os. PMID:29270064

  7. [Clinical analysis of safety and effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Marek; Parnowski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess efficacy and safety of electroconvulsive therapy. 43 patients included into the study were hospitalised in The Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology and received all together over 400 bilateral electroconvulsive procedures. Most of the patients (N = 25) were qualified for electroconvulsive therapy due to treatment resistant depression (58.1%). Six patients: 2 with catatonia and 4 with depression had life saving indications for electroconvulsive therapy. Three patients (7%) were excluded from electroconvulsive therapy, following 1 or 2 electroconvulsive procedures. Forty patients continued electroconvulsive therapy. There were no complications and serious adverse events in patients who continued electroconvulsive therapy. Generally, electroconvulsive therapy was well tolerated and treatment had been cut down in only one case due to adverse events and high risk related to the procedure. Transient cardiac arrhythmias (10% of patients) were the most often occurring adverse events and patients (35%) mostly reported headaches. We observed remission in 22 patients (58%) and improvement in 14 patients (35%) following electroconvulsive treatment. Only 4 patients (10%) had no benefit after a series of electroconvulsive procedures. Electroconvulsive treatment was most effective in patients with catatonia (80% patients had full recovery) and in depressive patients with bipolar disorder (73% patients had full recovery). Electroconvulsive procedures were safe and effective. Electroconvulsive treatment was most effective in catatonic patients with schizophrenia and in depressive patients with bipolar disorder.

  8. Cancer rehabilitation with a focus on evidence-based outpatient physical and occupational therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Gilchrist, Laura S

    2011-05-01

    Cancer rehabilitation is an important part of survivorship as a distinct phase of treatment. Although cancer rehabilitation may involve many disciplines, this article specifically covers evidence-based treatment in physical and occupational therapy. Patients may need physical and occupational therapy services for a variety of cancer-related or cancer-treatment-related problems, including pain, fatigue, deconditioning, and difficulty with gait. They may also have problems resuming their previous level of function, which can impact on activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, return to previous home and community activity levels, and return to work. This review discusses the role of physical and occupational therapy in helping cancer patients improve pain and musculoskeletal issues, deconditioning and endurance effects, fatigue, balance and falls, and lymphedema and psychosocial problems.

  9. Striding Out With Parkinson Disease: Evidence-Based Physical Therapy for Gait Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Clarissa L.; Schenkman, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is common throughout the world, the evidence for physical therapy interventions that enable long-term improvement in walking is still emerging. This article critiques the major physical therapy approaches related to gait rehabilitation in people with PD: compensatory strategies, motor skill learning, management of secondary sequelae, and education to optimize physical activity and reduce falls. The emphasis of this review is on gait specifically, although balance and falls are of direct importance to gait and are addressed in that context. Although the researchers who have provided the evidence for these approaches grounded their studies on different theoretical paradigms, each approach is argued to have a valid place in the comprehensive management of PD generally and of gait in particular. The optimal mix of interventions for each individual varies according to the stage of disease progression and the patient's preferred form of exercise, capacity for learning, and age. PMID:20022998

  10. Striding out with Parkinson disease: evidence-based physical therapy for gait disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meg E; Martin, Clarissa L; Schenkman, Margaret L

    2010-02-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is common throughout the world, the evidence for physical therapy interventions that enable long-term improvement in walking is still emerging. This article critiques the major physical therapy approaches related to gait rehabilitation in people with PD: compensatory strategies, motor skill learning, management of secondary sequelae, and education to optimize physical activity and reduce falls. The emphasis of this review is on gait specifically, although balance and falls are of direct importance to gait and are addressed in that context. Although the researchers who have provided the evidence for these approaches grounded their studies on different theoretical paradigms, each approach is argued to have a valid place in the comprehensive management of PD generally and of gait in particular. The optimal mix of interventions for each individual varies according to the stage of disease progression and the patient's preferred form of exercise, capacity for learning, and age.

  11. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application.

  12. Computerised mirror therapy with Augmented Reflection Technology for early stroke rehabilitation: clinical feasibility and integration as an adjunct therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoermann, Simon; Ferreira Dos Santos, Luara; Morkisch, Nadine; Jettkowski, Katrin; Sillis, Moran; Devan, Hemakumar; Kanagasabai, Parimala S; Schmidt, Henning; Krüger, Jörg; Dohle, Christian; Regenbrecht, Holger; Hale, Leigh; Cutfield, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    New rehabilitation strategies for post-stroke upper limb rehabilitation employing visual stimulation show promising results, however, cost-efficient and clinically feasible ways to provide these interventions are still lacking. An integral step is to translate recent technological advances, such as in virtual and augmented reality, into therapeutic practice to improve outcomes for patients. This requires research on the adaptation of the technology for clinical use as well as on the appropriate guidelines and protocols for sustainable integration into therapeutic routines. Here, we present and evaluate a novel and affordable augmented reality system (Augmented Reflection Technology, ART) in combination with a validated mirror therapy protocol for upper limb rehabilitation after stroke. We evaluated components of the therapeutic intervention, from the patients' and the therapists' points of view in a clinical feasibility study at a rehabilitation centre. We also assessed the integration of ART as an adjunct therapy for the clinical rehabilitation of subacute patients at two different hospitals. The results showed that the combination and application of the Berlin Protocol for Mirror Therapy together with ART was feasible for clinical use. This combination was integrated into the therapeutic plan of subacute stroke patients at the two clinical locations where the second part of this research was conducted. Our findings pave the way for using technology to provide mirror therapy in clinical settings and show potential for the more effective use of inpatient time and enhanced recoveries for patients. Implications for Rehabilitation Computerised Mirror Therapy is feasible for clinical use Augmented Reflection Technology can be integrated as an adjunctive therapeutic intervention for subacute stroke patients in an inpatient setting Virtual Rehabilitation devices such as Augmented Reflection Technology have considerable potential to enhance stroke rehabilitation.

  13. Clinical application of cell, gene and tissue therapies in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez-Martín, P; Ruiz, A; Clares, B

    2017-10-12

    Scientific and technical advances in the areas of biomedicine and regenerative medicine have enabled the development of new treatments known as "advanced therapies", which encompass cell therapy, genetics and tissue engineering. The biologic products that can be manufactured from these elements are classified from the standpoint of the Spanish Agency of Medication and Health Products in advanced drug therapies, blood products and transplants. This review seeks to provide scientific and administrative information for clinicians on the use of these biologic resources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  14. Confronting diversity in the production of clinical evidence goes beyond merely including under-represented groups in clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronks, Karien; Wieringa, Nicolien F.; Hardon, Anita

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that outcomes of health care differ by patient characteristics, such as gender and ethnicity. If evidence-based medicine is to improve quality of care for all patients, it is essential to take this diversity into account when designing clinical studies. So far, this

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of whole-breast radiation therapy: Clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, Ernest; Darko, Johnson; Fleck, Andre; White, Jana; Kiciak, Alexander; Redekop, Rachel; Gopaul, Darin

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the intact breast is the standard therapy for preventing local recurrence of early-stage breast cancer following breast conservation surgery. To improve patient standard of care, there is a need to define a consistent and transparent treatment path for all patients that reduces significance variations in the acceptability of treatment plans. There is lack of consistency among institutions or individuals about what is considered an acceptable treatment plan: target coverage vis-à-vis dose to organs at risk (OAR). Clinical trials usually resolve these issues, as the criteria for an acceptable plan within the trial (target coverage and doses to OAR) are well defined. We developed an institutional criterion for accepting breast treatment plans in 2006 after analyzing treatment data of approximately 200 patients. The purpose of this article is to report on the dosimetric review of 623 patients treated in the last 18 months to evaluate the effectiveness of the previously developed plan acceptability criteria and any possible changes necessary to further improve patient care. The mean patient age is 61.6 years (range: 25.2 to 93.0 years). The mean breast separation for all the patients is 21.0 cm (range: 12.4 to 34.9 cm), and the mean planning target volume (PTV_eval) (breast volume for evaluation) is 884.0 cm 3 (range: 73.6 to 3684.6 cm 3 ). Overall, 314 (50.4%) patients had the disease in the left breast and 309 (49.6%) had it in the right breast. A total of 147 (23.6%) patients were treated using the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. The mean normalized PTV_eval receiving at least 92% (V 92% PD ) and 95% (V 95% PD ) of the prescribed dose (PD) are more than 99% and 97%, respectively, for all patients. The mean normalized PTV_eval receiving at least 105% (V 105% PD ) of the PD is less than 1% for all groups. The mean homogeneity index (HI), uniformity index (UI), and conformity index (CI) for the PTV_eval are 0.09 (range: 0.05 to 0

  16. Corticosteroids as a therapy for bacterial keratitis: an evidence-based review of 'who, when and why'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallab, Raghad T; Stone, Donald U

    2016-06-01

    Corticosteroids have been proposed as an adjunct to antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial keratitis, with significant controversy regarding the appropriate use of this therapy. Recent prospective randomised controlled trials have provided additional evidence to guide clinical decision-making. A review of the epidemiology and mechanisms of pathogenesis, preliminary animal studies, retrospective human studies and prospective randomised clinical trials that address the potential risks and benefits of corticosteroids in patients with bacterial keratitis was performed. Four prospective randomised controlled trials were identified. Three small studies found no benefit of topical corticosteroids, but were underpowered to evaluate adverse events. The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) study and subgroup analyses provide evidence for a relative gain of one line of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity in patients with non-Nocardia bacterial keratitis, especially when corticosteroids were initiated within 3 days of presentation; no increase in adverse events was noted. No evidence was found to support the concern for corneal thinning attributable to corticosteroids in the absence of an inadequately treated infectious process. In patients with culture-proven non-Nocardia bacterial keratitis, corticosteroids provide one line of vision improvement over antimicrobials alone, with no increase in adverse events. This benefit should not be extrapolated to patients with other aetiologies of keratitis, such as fungus, herpes viruses, acanthamoeba or atypical mycobacteria, and these entities should be excluded before considering adjunctive steroid therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric wounds: a retrospective examination of clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene

    2007-06-01

    The clinical effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy for the management of acute and chronic wounds is well documented in the adult population but information regarding its use in the pediatric population is limited. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted to examine the clinical outcomes of using negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of pediatric wounds. The medical records of 24 consecutive pediatric patients receiving negative pressure wound therapy were reviewed. Demographic data, wound etiology, time to closure, closure method, duration of negative pressure wound therapy, complications, dressing change frequency, dressing type used, and pressure settings were analyzed. All categorical variables in the dataset were summarized using frequency (count and percentages) and all continuous variables were summarized using median (minimum, maximum). The 24 pediatric patients (mean age 8.5 years [range 14 days to 18 years old]) had 24 wounds - 12 (50%) were infected at baseline. Sixteen patients had hypoalbuminemia and six had exposed hardware and bone in their wounds. Twenty-two wounds reached full closure in a median time of 10 days (range 2 to 45) following negative pressure wound therapy and flap closure (11), split-thickness skin graft (three), secondary (four), and primary (four) closure. Pressures used in this population ranged from 50 to 125 mm Hg and most wounds were covered with reticulated polyurethane foam. One patient developed a fistula during the course of negative pressure wound therapy. When coupled with appropriate systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and medical and nutritional optimization, in this population negative pressure wound therapy resulted in rapid granulation tissue and 92% successful wound closure. Future neonatal and pediatric negative pressure wound therapy usage registries and prospective studies are needed to provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions can be made in the management

  18. Assessing the Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Language Delayed Children: A Clinical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkus, Gila; Tilley, Ciara; Thomas, Catherine; Hockey, Hannah; Kennedy, Anna; Arnold, Tina; Thorburn, Blair; Jones, Katie; Patel, Bhavika; Pimenta, Claire; Shah, Rena; Tweedie, Fiona; O'Brien, Felicity; Leahy, Ruth; Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) is widely used by speech and language therapists to improve the interactions between children with delayed language development and their parents/carers. Despite favourable reports of the therapy from clinicians, little evidence of its effectiveness is available. We investigated the effects of PCIT as…

  19. Teaching evidence-based practice in a distance education occupational therapy doctoral program: strategies for professional growth and advancing the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Centennial Vision of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) projects that by 2017 all occupational therapy (OT) practice areas will be supported by evidence. Achieving this goal requires preparing clinicians with the skills to assimilate, analyze, and apply research to their areas of practice and communicate the value of OT services to consumers and payers. These skills are at the heart of evidence-based practice (EBP). Educators must be prepared to teach EBP skills in both entry-level and postprofessional programs. This article outlines how EBP can be taught to postprofessional occupational therapy clinical doctoral students using a distance education format. Key features of a successful EBP course include having access to full-text electronic articles, opportunities for students to explore the literature in their own areas of interest, consistent and timely feedback on written work and discussion topics, and opportunities to collaborate with peers.

  20. Towards automated calculation of evidence-based clinical scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher A; Dziadzko, Mikhail A; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2017-03-26

    To determine clinical scores important for automated calculation in the inpatient setting. A modified Delphi methodology was used to create consensus of important clinical scores for inpatient practice. A list of 176 externally validated clinical scores were identified from freely available internet-based services frequently used by clinicians. Scores were categorized based on pertinent specialty and a customized survey was created for each clinician specialty group. Clinicians were asked to rank each score based on importance of automated calculation to their clinical practice in three categories - "not important", "nice to have", or "very important". Surveys were solicited via specialty-group listserv over a 3-mo interval. Respondents must have been practicing physicians with more than 20% clinical time spent in the inpatient setting. Within each specialty, consensus was established for any clinical score with greater than 70% of responses in a single category and a minimum of 10 responses. Logistic regression was performed to determine predictors of automation importance. Seventy-nine divided by one hundred and forty-four (54.9%) surveys were completed and 72/144 (50%) surveys were completed by eligible respondents. Only the critical care and internal medicine specialties surpassed the 10-respondent threshold (14 respondents each). For internists, 2/110 (1.8%) of scores were "very important" and 73/110 (66.4%) were "nice to have". For intensivists, no scores were "very important" and 26/76 (34.2%) were "nice to have". Only the number of medical history (OR = 2.34; 95%CI: 1.26-4.67; P calculation. Future efforts towards score calculator automation should focus on technically feasible "nice to have" scores.

  1. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the "Holy Gray".

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brans, B.; Bodei, L.; Giammarile, F.; Linden, O.; Luster, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Tennvall, J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. REVIEW: This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each

  2. A clinical trial of fast neutron therapy for malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunemoto, Hiroshi; Morita, Shinroku; Ishikawa, Tatsuo

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-four patients with malignant melanoma of the skin or the head and neck underwent fast neutron therapy between November 1975 and March 1983. Of these patients, 21 patients with melanoma of the skin and 12 patients with melanoma of the head and neck were chosen as subjects for this study. Of the 21 patients with skin lesions, complete regression was seen in 2 patients undergoing fast neutron therapy alone and in 17 patients undergoing fast neutron therapy combined with salvage surgery. A cumulative five-year survival rate was 47 %. Preoperative fast neutron therapy is a promising method used in the treatment of malignant melanoma. Two of 12 patients with advanced melanoma of the head and neck were long-term survivors. Fast neutron-induced skin damage was seen in one of the 33 patients. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. A clinical perspective: melodic intonation therapy for developmental apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich-Miller, K R

    1994-09-01

    The therapeutic process is a mix of technique and insight, and effective clinicians are able to blend theory with practice. This is especially true in the area of DAS. Children with the symptom complex of apraxia are a challenge to any therapy program. Clinicians should choose combinations of therapy protocols that best serve the child. MIT is one technique that has been shown to be successful.

  4. Clinical trial experience using erythropoietin during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavey, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Oncologists have several reasons for trying to maintain or increase hemoglobin levels in their patients during therapy. Relief of the symptoms of anemia, including fatigue and dyspnea, are traditional, well-accepted indications. A newer rationale is to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy in controlling tumors. A laboratory animal study found that administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) increased intratumoral median oxygen levels and diminished the proportion of measurements in the very low ( [de

  5. Comparing the acceptability of a positive psychology intervention versus a cognitive behavioural therapy for clinical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Gomez, Irene; Chaves, Covadonga; Hervas, Gonzalo; Vazquez, Carmelo

    2017-09-01

    There is growing evidence on the efficacy of positive psychology interventions (PPI) to treat clinical disorders. However, very few studies have addressed their acceptability. The present study aimed to analyse 2 key components of acceptability (i.e., client satisfaction and adherence to treatment) of a new PPI programme, the Integrative Positive Psychological Intervention for Depression (IPPI-D), in comparison to a standard cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme in the treatment of clinical depression. One hundred twenty-eight women with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depression or dysthymia were allocated to a 10-session IPPI-D or CBT group intervention condition. Results showed that both interventions were highly acceptable for participants. Attendance rates were high, and there were no significant differences between conditions. However, the IPPI-D condition showed significantly higher client satisfaction than the CBT condition. Moreover, acceptability did not differ based on participants' severity of symptoms, regardless of condition. These findings encourage further investigations of the applicability of PPI in clinical settings in order to broaden the range of acceptable and suitable therapies for depressed patients. Key Practitioner Message This study sheds light on the client satisfaction and adherence to a positive intervention. For participants, positive psychology interventions (PPI) may be more satisfactory than CBT as PPI are framed within a positive mental health model and, consequently, may reduce the risk of stigmatization Because acceptability of treatments and preferences may affect the efficacy of treatments, this study provides an excellent opportunity to offer professionals more therapeutic options to tailor treatments to clients' needs and expectations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Cutaneous epidermoid carcinoma (spinocellular carcinoma): clinical practice recommendations for diagnosis and therapy. Full report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Ludovic; Bonerandi, Jean-Jacques; Brugneaux, Julie; Beauvillain, Claude; Chassagne, Jean-Francois; Clavere, Pierre; Grolleau, Jean-Louis; Grossin, Maggy; Sei, Jean-Francois; Caquant, Ludovic; Chaussade, Veronique; Desouches, Christophe; Garnier, Francois; Jourdain, Alain; Lemonnier, Jean-Yves; Maillard, Herve; Ortonne, Nicolas; Rio, Emmanuel; Simon, Etienne

    2009-01-01

    This guide aims at providing practitioners taking into care patients presenting a cutaneous cancer with recommendations based on scientific evidences or expert agreements. More precisely, the objectives are to clarify the terminology used to describe the different forms of cutaneous epidermoid carcinoma (CEC) and of their precursors (actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease), to propose a prognosis classification of CECs adapted to the previously identified prognosis factors, to optimise the diagnosis and therapy of actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease according to recent publications, and to recall the principles of a primary prevention of CECs and of their precursors, and of screening of high risk individuals. Thus, the different parts of this report address the following issues: anatomic-clinical forms and epidemiology of CECs and of their precursors, prognosis factors of CECs, means of treatment of CECs and of their precursors (medical, physical, surgical, radiation-based, and chemical treatments). Radiotherapy notably comprises external radiotherapy and interstitial brachytherapy. Indications for radiotherapy are discussed with respect to existing guides and to the clinical situation. The authors address the care of CECs and of their precursors (prevention, screening and clinical diagnosis, care of invasive CECs, keratoacanthoma treatment). They finally discuss quality criteria aimed at practice improvement, and perspectives regarding the evolution of this guide and studies to be performed

  7. A CLINICAL STUDY ON THE INCIDENCE AND MANAGEMENT OF BIOLOGICAL COMPLICATIONS IN IMPLANT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae VASILE

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The scope of the study was to evidence the methods recommended for avoiding, managing and implementing an efficient treatment capable of reducing the biological complications accompanying implant therapies. Materials and method. The study evaluates the patients with prosthesis charged implants - or during their osseointegration period - inserted in the Clinic of The Emergency Military Hospital of Sibiu, over a 5 year period (2009-2014. Retrospective investigation was based on the evaluation of the treatment files and on the imagistic and clinical analyses of the 125 patients to whom 385 implants had been inserted. Results and discussion. The study demonstrates that, when implants are the support of an overdenture, surrounded by either limited keratinized gingiva or mobile tissues, the presence of the bacterial plaque is considerable, the peri-implant pocket exceeds 5 mm, and sensitivity and bleeding are produced on contact with the probe. In susceptible patients, or in those with pathological periodontal antecedents, the re-infection potential has been always higher. The clinical study confirms that, invariably, peri-implantitis is associated with the existence of the bacterial plaque and also with the presence of a peri-implant pocket exceeding 4 mm (8.9%, with partial exposure of the covering screw (4.5% and fixed restaurations without self-cleaning spaces (2%. Conclusions. Out of the post-surgery biological complications, peri-implantitis is the most frequent one, causing a – sometimes total – loss of the alveolar bone around the osseointegrated implant.

  8. Basic mechanisms of urgency: preclinical and clinical evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; Chapple, Christopher R.

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Urgency is the core symptom of the overactive bladder symptom complex, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. OBJECTIVE: To review clinical and experimental studies related to how bladder filling and urgency are sensed and what causes urgency and to discuss how this process

  9. Clinical evidence in the management of swimmer's ear

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dermatitis, acne vulgaris and systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical pharmacology and practice guidelines. Various guidelines for the management of acute otitis externa are published and updated on a regular basis by different otolaryngology authorities worldwide.1 A shared commonality in these guidelines includes the ...

  10. Quantitative assessment of barriers to the clinical development and adoption of cellular therapies: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Davies

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There has been a large increase in basic science activity in cell therapy and a growing portfolio of cell therapy trials. However, the number of industry products available for widespread clinical use does not match this magnitude of activity. We hypothesize that the paucity of engagement with the clinical community is a key contributor to the lack of commercially successful cell therapy products. To investigate this, we launched a pilot study to survey clinicians from five specialities and to determine what they believe to be the most significant barriers to cellular therapy clinical development and adoption. Our study shows that the main concerns among this group are cost-effectiveness, efficacy, reimbursement, and regulation. Addressing these concerns can best be achieved by ensuring that future clinical trials are conducted to adequately answer the questions of both regulators and the broader clinical community.

  11. Cardioprotective effects of cocoa: clinical evidence from randomized clinical intervention trials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, Sara; Valderas-Martinez, Palmira; Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Casas, Rosa; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M; Estruch, Ramon

    2013-06-01

    Cocoa is an important source of polyphenols, which comprise 12-18% of its total dry weight. The major phenolic compounds in cocoa and cocoa products are mainly flavonoids such as epicatechin, catechin, and proanthocyanidins. These products contain higher amounts of flavonoids than other polyphenol-rich foods. However, the bioavailability of these compounds depends on other food constituents and their interactions with the food matrix. Many epidemiological and clinical intervention trials have concluded that the ingestion of flavonoids reduces the risk factors of developing cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the new findings regarding the effects of cocoa and chocolate consumption on cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms involved in the cardioprotective effects of cocoa flavonoids include reduction of oxidative stress, inhibition of low-density lipoproteins oxidation and platelet aggregation, vasodilatation of blood vessels, inhibition of the adherence of monocytes to vascular endothelium, promotion of fibrinolysis, and immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activity. Scientific evidence supports a cause and effect relationship between consumption of cocoa flavonoids and the maintenance of normal endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which contributes to normal blood flow. However, larger randomized trials are required to definitively establish the impact of cocoa and cocoa products consumption on hard cardiovascular outcomes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Use of Integrative Therapies as Supportive Care in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha; Deng, Gary; Hershman, Dawn; Mumber, Matthew; Perlmutter, Jane; Seely, Dugald; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M.; Tripathy, Debu

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. Methods Following the Institute of Medicine’s guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. Results The search (January 1, 1990–December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). Conclusions Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well

  13. Latent hypothyreosis as a clinical biomarker for therapy response under abiraterone acetate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Nagele, Udo; Pircher, Andreas; Pichler, Renate; Horninger, Wolfgang; Bektic, Jasmin

    2014-01-01

    Abiraterone acetate (AA) is a selective oral inhibitor of Steroid-17α-Hydroxylase, for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Not all patients respond to therapy, however, there are no biomarkers predicting response to AA therapy. The aim of the present study was the identification of a biomarker for patients who are likely to respond to AA therapy. We measured thyroid parameters in a collective of 30 patients before and during AA therapy. For statistical analyses, paired and unpaired t-tests were used. During AA therapy, responders developed a significant increase in thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) compared to non-responders (p=0.03). In the subgroup of responders, 16 out of 21 patients (76.1%) had a significant increase in TSH level (p=0.001), suggesting that TSH increase is predictive of therapy response. Non-responders showed no change in TSH level during AA therapy. Hypothyreosis may serve as a simple predictive biomarker for therapy response under AA therapy.

  14. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy for postural hyperkyphosis: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Fahimeh; Shirazi, Sara Abolahrari; Ebrahimi, Samaneh; Mirshamsi, Maryam; Ghanbari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of a manual therapy and an exercise therapy program in improving postural hyperkyphosis among young adults. Forty-six women between the ages of 18 to 30 years with thoracic kyphosis diagnosed by flexicurve ruler were randomly assigned to either an exercise therapy or a manual therapy group. The exercise therapy program focused on stretching and strengthening exercises in 15 sessions over 5 weeks. The manual therapy group received 15 sessions of manual techniques including massage, mobilization, muscle energy and myofascial release. Kyphosis angle and back extensor muscle strength were measured with a motion analysis system and a dynamometer at the baseline and after treatment. The data were analyzed with paired and independent t-tests. After treatment, the angle of thoracic kyphosis was smaller and back extensor muscle strength was significantly greater in both the exercise and manual therapy groups (p after treatment (p > 0.05). Manual therapy was as effective as exercise therapy in reducing kyphosis angle and increasing back extensor muscle strength in young women with postural hyperkyphosis.

  15. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa and atypical bulimic nervosa: effectiveness in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Glenn; Gray, Emma; Hinrichsen, Hendrik; Mountford, Victoria; Lawson, Rachel; Patient, Eloise

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimic disorders has been established in research trials. This study examined whether that efficacy can be translated into effectiveness in routine clinical practice. Seventy-eight adult women with bulimic disorders (bulimia nervosa and atypical bulimia nervosa) undertook individual CBT, with few exclusion criteria and a treatment protocol based on evidence-based approaches, utilizing individualized formulations. Patients completed measures of eating behaviors, eating attitudes, and depression pre- and post-treatment. Eight patients dropped out. The mean number of sessions attended was 19.2. No pretreatment features predicted drop-out. Treatment outcome was similar whether using treatment completer or intent to treat analyses. Approximately 50% of patients were in remission by the end of treatment. There were significant improvements in mood, eating attitudes, and eating behaviors. Reductions in bingeing and vomiting were comparable to efficacy trials. The improvements in this "real-world" trial of CBT for adults with bulimic disorders mirrored those from large, funded research trials, though the conclusions that can be reached are inevitably limited by the nature of the trial (e.g., lack of control group and therapy validation). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Evaluation of Respiratory Muscle Strength in Mouth Breathers: Clinical Evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha, Renata Andrade da

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The child who chronically breathes through the mouth may develop a weakness of the respiratory muscles. Researchers and clinical are seeking for methods of instrumental evaluation to gather complementary data to clinical evaluations. With this in mind, it is important to evaluate breathing muscles in the child with Mouth Breathing. Objective To develop a review to investigate studies that used evaluation methods of respiratory muscle strength in mouth breathers. Data Synthesis  The authors were unanimous in relation to manovacuometry method as a way to evaluate respiratory pressures in Mouth Breathing children. Two of them performed with an analog manovacuometer and the other one, digital. The studies were not evaluated with regard to the method efficacy neither the used instruments. Conclusion There are few studies evaluating respiratory muscle strength in Mouth Breathing people through manovacuometry and the low methodological rigor of the analyzed studies hindered a reliable result to support or refuse the use of this technique.

  17. Comparison of clinical results of pharmaceutical and surgical therapy in patients with severe chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotsoeva О.Т.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the presented paper is a meta-analysis of clinical studies on the comparative effectiveness of pharmaceutical therapy and surgical treatment such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, cardiac resynchronization therapy with cardioversion-defibrillation (CRT-D, circulatory support system and heart transplantation in patients with severe chronic heart failure (CHF. Material and Methods. Results of 41 clinical studies (29799 patients with severe CHF were included in a meta-analysis. Data search was conducted in the following databases: Medline, Medscape, Pubmed, and websites dedicated to clinical research (National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, ClinicalStudyResults.org, ClinicalTrials.gov. Results. As compared with pharmaceutical therapy, surgical treatment of severe CHF is better to reduce fatal risk, incidence of decompensation of CHF, frequency of cardiac arrhythmias, the need to perform or re-perform heart transplantation. It is also shown that CRT better reduced the mortality from progression of heart failure than heart transplantation. Both pharmaceutical therapy and surgical treatment improved functional class of CHF and quality of patients' life, but does not affect the left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion. It was found out that there was a number of significant advantages of surgical treatment of severe CHF, compared with pharmaceutical therapy. However, it is still a number of unresolved issues (particularly in relation to heart transplantation on the effectiveness comparing pharmaceutical and surgical therapies of severe CHF

  18. Spirulina in Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Human Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Karkos, P. D.; Leong, S. C.; Karkos, C. D.; Sivaji, N.; Assimakopoulos, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and sy...

  19. Clinical experience with outpatient radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csenkey-Sinko, I.; Roka, R.; Sera, T.; Csernay, L.; Pavics, L.; Valkusz, Z.; Julesz, J.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1993, outpatient radioiodine therapy has been available in Hungary. The reported study evaluated the efficacy of outpatient radioiodine treatment in subjects with hyperthyroidism. The data on 238 patients with Graves' disease and 123 patients with thyroid autonomy were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were treated within the period 1994 - 1999. The activities of radioiodine were calculated individually. The dose applied in Graves' disease was 150 Gy, and that in thyroid autonomy was 300 Gy. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated 3,6 and 12 months after radioiodine therapy. In patients with persistent hyperthyroidism, repeated therapy was performed. Overall,the radioiodine therapy was successful in 84% of the Graves' disease patients. In thyroid autonomy, treatment with 300 Gy was successful in 79% of the patients. The efficacy of radioiodine treatment was similar to the results of one-dose application. It was concluded that radioidine therapy with an absorbed dose of 150 Gy in Graves' disease and with an absorbed dose of 300 Gy in thyroid autonomy proved successful by the method applied. (author)

  20. Abnormal Bleeding during Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Freitas De Medeiros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman's characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT, it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies.

  1. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: implementing evidence-based models in community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szapocznik, José; Muir, Joan A; Duff, Johnathan H; Schwartz, Seth J; Brown, C Hendricks

    2015-01-01

    To review a 40-year collaborative partnership between clinical researchers and clinicians, in developing, investigating and implementing Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT). First, to review theory, practice and studies related to this evidenced-based therapy intervention targeting adolescent drug abuse and delinquency. Second, to present the BSFT Implementation Model created for the BSFT intervention-a model that parallels many of the recommendations from the implementation science literature. Specific challenges encountered during the BSFT implementation process are reviewed, along with ways of conceptualizing and addressing these challenges from a systemic perspective. The BSFT implementation uses the same systemic principles and intervention techniques as those that underlie the BSFT clinical model. Building on our on-the-ground experiences, recommendations are proposed for advancing the field of implementation science.

  2. The current status of clinics providing private practice cell therapy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Misao; Hatta, Taichi; Ozeki, Reina; Akabayashi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the current state of clinics in Japan that offer unproven cell therapies. Google searches were performed to collect and analyze what kind of clinics provide what kind of cell therapies. A total of 74 clinics and 247 cases of cell therapies were identified. Various cell therapies, including allograft, were provided not only to seriously ill patients but also to patients with other therapeutic options and healthy individuals. Although the practices revealed by our study seem to deviate from international standard, some of these can be construed as legal under the Japanese new act established in 2014. Considering many patients travel to foreign countries to seek therapy, more research from non-English-speaking countries is needed.

  3. [Coccygodynia: etiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2012-01-01

    The term 'coccygodynia' means the pain in the tailbone area (os coccygis; coccyx). Due to the sitting intolerance, coccygodynia can significantly disturb the quality of life. Coccygeal disorders that could be manifested in coccygodynia are injuries (fracture, subluxation, luxation), abnormal mobility (hypermobility, anterior and posterior subluxation or luxation of the coccyx), disc degeneration at sacrococcygeal (SC) and intercoccygeal (IC) segments, coccygeal spicule (bony excrescence), osteomyelitis and tumors. Abnormal mobility of coccyx, which can be seen on dynamic radiograph (lateral X-rays of the coccyx in the standing and sitting position), is the most common pathological finding in patients with coccygodynia (70% of patients). It can be a result of an injury and chronic static and dynamic overload of the coccyx (obesity, prolonged sitting, bicycling, rowing, riding etc). Coccygeal origin of the pain can be confirmed by injections of the local anesthetic in the structures that can be a source of the pain (SC disc, first IC disc, Walther's ganglion, muscle attachments around the top of the coccyx etc). Extracoccygeal disorders that can be manifested by coccygodynia are: pilonidal cyst, perianal abscess, hemorrhoids, and diseases of pelvic organs as well as disorders of lumbosacral spine, sacroiliac joints, piriformis muscle and sacrum. In 30% of patients with coccygodynia, the cause of pain cannot be found (idiopathic coccygodynia). Therapy for coccygodynia can be conservative and surgical (partial or total coccygectomy). Conservative therapy includes: rest, medicamentous therapy, acupuncture, coccyx cushion, physical therapy, manual therapy (massage and stretching of the levator ani muscle; mobilization of the coccyx) and therapeutic interventions (injections of local anesthetic and corticosteroid in the painful structures; radiofrequency ablation of coccygeal discs and Walther's ganglion). Using different modalities of conservative therapy, satisfactory

  4. Mesoglycan: Clinical Evidences for Use in Vascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Tufano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular glycosaminoglycans (GAG are essential components of the endothelium and vessel wall and have been shown to be involved in several biologic functions. Mesoglycan, a natural GAG preparation, is a polysaccharide complex rich in sulphur radicals with strong negative electric charge. It is extracted from porcine intestinal mucosa and is composed of heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, electrophoretically slow-moving heparin, and variable and minimal quantities of chondroitin sulfate. Data on antithrombotic and profibrinolytic activities of the drug show that mesoglycan, although not indicated in the treatment of acute arterial or venous thrombosis because of the low antithrombotic effect, may be useful in the management of vascular diseases, when combined with antithrombotics in the case of disease of cerebral vasculature, and with antithrombotics and vasodilator drugs in the case of chronic peripheral arterial disease. The protective effect of mesoglycan in patients with venous thrombosis and the absence of side effects, support the use of GAG in patients with chronic venous insufficiency and persistent venous ulcers, in association with compression therapy (zinc bandages, multiple layer bandages, etc., elastic compression stockings, and local care, and in the prevention of recurrences in patients with previous DVT following the standard course of oral anticoagulation treatment.

  5. Carbon dioxide therapy in the treatment of cellulite: an audit of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Georgia S K

    2010-04-01

    The clinical practice of using carbon dioxide therapy for localized adiposities was audited over a 4-year period. Patients receiving physical, dietary, or drug concurrent therapy were excluded from the audit. Original measurements in terms of mean +/- standard error of the mean (SEM) were compared with those obtained after five sessions. This series included 101 women who underwent abdominal therapy. Significant reduction (p carboxytherapy is safe and effective.

  6. Enhancing cognitive behavior therapy with logotherapy: techniques for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Matti; Dattilio, Frank M

    2013-09-01

    Logotherapy is a meaning-centered approach to psychotherapy, which is compatible with cognitive behavior therapy. Its basic tenets have the potential to increase both the efficacy and effectiveness of the therapeutic process. This article describes the main techniques of logotherapy and provides specific and practical examples of how they may be incorporated into a cognitive behavior framework. The article concludes with a proposal for future research to validate integrative treatment protocols, and to provide an empirical base for logotherapy-enhanced cognitive behavior therapy. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  7. 'Third wave' cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian Nyfeldt; Kongerslev, Mickey Toftkjær

    2012-01-01

    Background: Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. 'Third wave' cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients...... with major depression.Methods/ design: We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder. The participants will be randomised to either 'third wave' cognitive therapy...... versus mentalization-based therapy. The primary outcome will be the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at cessation of treatment at 18 weeks. Secondary outcomes will be the proportion of patients with remission, Symptom Checklist 90 Revised, Beck's Depression Inventory, and The World Health...

  8. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-02-08

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient's daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure allergic respiratory diseases, by modulating the immune system activity. This review clearly summarizes and analyzes the available randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials, which aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and the safety of grass pollen and house dust mite SLIT for the specific treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis. Our analysis demonstrates the good evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT for allergic rhinitis to grass pollens in children, whereas trials regarding pediatric allergic rhinitis to house dust mites present lower quality, although several studies supported its usefulness.

  9. Wound healing in cell studies and animal model experiments by low level laser therapy; Were clinical studies justified? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, C.; Criens-Poublon, L. J.; Cockrell, C. T.; de Haan, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Based on results of cell studies and animal experiments, clinical trials with Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) were performed, which finally did not demonstrate a beneficial effect on outcome of wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the evidence from cell studies and animal

  10. Are we really delivering evidence-based treatments for eating disorders? How eating-disordered patients describe their experience of cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdrey, Natasha D; Waller, Glenn

    2015-12-01

    Psychotherapists report routinely not practising evidence-based treatments. However, there is little research examining the content of therapy from the patient perspective. This study examined the self-reported treatment experiences of individuals who had been told that they had received cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for their eating disorder. One hundred and fifty-seven such sufferers (mean age = 25.69 years) were recruited from self-help organisations. Participants completed an online survey assessing demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapy components. The use of evidence-based CBT techniques varied widely, with core elements for the eating disorders (e.g., weighing and food monitoring) used at well below the optimum level, while a number of unevidenced techniques were reported as being used commonly. Cluster analysis showed that participants received different patterns of intervention under the therapist label of 'CBT', with evidence-based CBT being the least common. Therapist age and patient diagnosis were related to the pattern of intervention delivered. It appears that clinicians are not subscribing to a transdiagnostic approach to the treatment of eating disorders. Patient recollections in this study support the conclusion that evidence-based practice is not routinely undertaken with this client group, even when the therapy offered is described as such. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Clinical effect of clarithromycin therapy in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qing; Deng, Jie; Xu, Rui; Zuo, Kejun; Li, Huabin; Shi, Jianbo

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of clarithromycin (CAM) treatment in adult Chinese patients suffering from chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) or without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). A prospective, open and self-controlled clinical trial on patients with CRS was conducted. Fifty patients met inclusion criteria. Of 50 patients, there were 33 patients with CRSsNP and 17 patients with CRSwNP. CAM was administered at 250 mg/d and the duration of administration was 12 weeks. Outcome measures included assessments of visual analogue scale (VAS), the sino-nasal outcome test-20(SNOT-20), the medical outcomes study short-form 36 items(SF-36), Lund-Kennedy endoscopy score, and Lund-Mackay computed tomography score. Before starting the treatment, 2 months after treatment and at the end of treatment, each patient had to complete all the measures except Lund-Mackay computed tomography score, which was only conducted before and after treatment. In order to evaluate the safety of CAM, liver function and renal function in all patients were detected before and after treatment. SPSS 16.0 software was used to analyze the data. Forty-five patients completed 3 months follow-up and 5 patients withdrew due to different reasons. The results were as follows: (1) Thirty-three patients with CRSsNP's VAS scores of four time point were 5.81 ± 1.69, 3.76 ± 1.94, 2.98 ± 1.95, 2.06 ± 2.13, respectively, there were statistically significant improvements in turn (t values were 5.910, 8.090, 8.932, all P 0.05). Endoscopy score of four time point were 10.65 ± 1.77, 9.35 ± 1.93, 8.65 ± 2.76, 8.47 ± 2.76, respectively, there were statistically significant improvements in turn(t values were 4.068, 4.863, 5.156, all P CAM treatment, 1 patient reported a tolerable headache and weakness and 1 patient had abdominal pain after two months treatment, all the symptoms disappeared while they were asked to stop the drug. Liver function and renal function were detected in 40 patients, the differences

  12. Critical review of current clinical practice guidelines for antifungal therapy in paediatric haematology and oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica E; Hassan, Hadeel; Cockle, Julia V; Lethaby, Christopher; James, Beki; Phillips, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD) is rising, but its treatment in paediatric haematology and oncology patients is not yet standardised. This review aimed to critically appraise and analyse the clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) that are available for paediatric IFD. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, MEDLINE in-Process & Other non-Indexed Citations, the Guidelines International Network (GIN), guideline.gov and Google were performed and combined fungal disease (Fung* OR antifung*OR Candida* OR Aspergill*) with prophylaxis or treatment (prophyl* OR therap* OR treatment). All guidelines were assessed using the AGREE II tool and recommendations relating to prophylaxis, empirical treatment and specific therapy were extracted. Nineteen guidelines met the inclusion criteria. The AGREE II scores for the rigour of development domain ranged from 11 to 92 % with a median of 53 % (interquartile range 32-69 %). Fluconazole was recommended as antifungal prophylaxis in all nine of the included guidelines which recommended a specific drug. Liposomal amphotericin B was recommended in all five guidelines giving empirical therapy recommendations. Specific therapy recommendations were given for oral or genital candidiasis, invasive candida infection, invasive aspergillosis and other mould infections. In many areas, recommendations were clear about appropriate practice but further clarity was required, particularly relating to the decision to discontinue empirical antifungal treatment, the relative benefits of empiric and pre-emptive strategies and risk stratification. Future CPGs could consider working to published guideline production methodologies and sharing summaries of evidence appraisal to reduce duplication of effort, improving the quality and efficiency of CPGs in this area.

  13. Adjuvant Systemic Therapy and Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Stage I to IIIA Completely Resected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancers: American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris, Mark G; Gaspar, Laurie E; Chaft, Jamie E; Kennedy, Erin B; Azzoli, Christopher G; Ellis, Peter M; Lin, Steven H; Pass, Harvey I; Seth, Rahul; Shepherd, Frances A; Spigel, David R; Strawn, John R; Ung, Yee C; Weyant, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Purpose The panel updated the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) adjuvant therapy guideline for resected non-small-cell lung cancers. Methods ASCO convened an update panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature, investigating adjuvant therapy in resected non-small-cell lung cancers. Results The updated evidence base covered questions related to adjuvant systemic therapy and included a systematic review conducted by Cancer Care Ontario current to January 2016. A recent American Society for Radiation Oncology guideline and systematic review, previously endorsed by ASCO, was used as the basis for recommendations for adjuvant radiation therapy. An update of these systematic reviews and a search for studies related to radiation therapy found no additional randomized controlled trials. Recommendations Adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy is recommended for routine use in patients with stage IIA, IIB, or IIIA disease who have undergone complete surgical resections. For individuals with stage IB, adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy is not recommended for routine use. However, a postoperative multimodality evaluation, including a consultation with a medical oncologist, is recommended to assess benefits and risks of adjuvant chemotherapy for each patient. The guideline provides information on factors other than stage to consider when making a recommendation for adjuvant chemotherapy, including tumor size, histopathologic features, and genetic alterations. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not recommended for patients with stage IA disease. Adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for patients with resected stage I or II disease. In patients with stage IIIA N2 disease, adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for routine use. However, a postoperative multimodality evaluation, including a consultation with a radiation oncologist, is recommended to assess benefits and risks of adjuvant radiation therapy for each patient with N2 disease. Additional

  14. What is the evidence for rest, ice, compression, and elevation therapy in the treatment of ankle sprains in adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Struijs, Peter A A; Blankevoort, Leendert; Welling, Lieke; van Dijk, C Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2012-01-01

    Ankle sprains are common problems in acute medical care. The variation in treatment observed for the acutely injured lateral ankle ligament complex in the first week after the injury suggests a lack of evidence-based management strategies for this problem. To analyze the effectiveness of applying rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) therapy begun within 72 hours after trauma for patients in the initial period after ankle sprain. Eligible studies were published original randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials concerning at least 1 of the 4 subtreatments of RICE therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains in adults. MEDLINE, Cochrane Clinical Trial Register, CINAHL, and EMBASE. The lists of references of retrieved publications also were checked manually. We extracted relevant data on treatment outcome (pain, swelling, ankle mobility or range of motion, return to sports, return to work, complications, and patient satisfaction) and assessed the quality of included studies. If feasible, the results of comparable studies were pooled using fixed- or random-effects models. After deduction of the overlaps among the different databases, evaluation of the abstracts, and contact with some authors, 24 potentially eligible trials remained. The full texts of these articles were retrieved and thoroughly assessed as described. This resulted in the inclusion of 11 trials involving 868 patients. The main reason for exclusion was that the authors did not describe a well-defined control group without the intervention of interest. Insufficient evidence is available from randomized controlled trials to determine the relative effectiveness of RICE therapy for acute ankle sprains in adults. Treatment decisions must be made on an individual basis, carefully weighing the relative benefits and risks of each option, and must be based on expert opinions and national guidelines.

  15. Conservative approach to dental extractions in patients on anticoagulant therapy: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, Francesco; Grande, Nicola Maria; Plotino, GianLuca; Cameli, Giorgio; Pameijer, Cornelis H

    2010-01-01

    This clinical study reviewed dental surgical extractions that were performed on 532 patients diagnosed at risk of thromboembolism without interrupting their anticoagulant therapy. The results confirmed that anticoagulant therapy can be modified successfully and does not need to be interrupted, which can carry significant risks.

  16. Art Therapy for an Individual with Late Stage Dementia: A Clinical Case Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucknott-Cohen, Tisah; Ehresman, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the healing benefits of art therapy for an individual with dementia of the Alzheimer's type. In this clinical case description, a woman diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease received individual art therapy for 17 weeks. The treatment concerns that arose, altered view of reality, agitation, and retrogenesis provide insight on…

  17. Cognitive-behavioral versus psychodynamic therapy for major depression: secondary outcomes of a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, E.; Van, H.L.; Peen, J.; Don, F.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Cuijpers, Pim; Dekker, J.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy for adult outpatient depression on measures of psychopathology, interpersonal functioning, pain, and quality of life. Method: There were 341 Dutch adults (70.1% female,

  18. Clinical Evidence for the Cardiovascular Benefits of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Nickenig

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS, specifically the effector peptide angiotensin II (Ang II, represents a major opportunity for slowing the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD and, in turn, reducing the risk of morbidity and mortality. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and selective blockade of Ang II AT1 receptors are two approaches through which the pathophysiological effects of Ang II can be targeted. Numerous clinical studies have established the benefits of ACE inhibitors P, (ACE-Is in lessening the morbidity and mortality burden of CVD. There are, however, tolerability concerns associated with ACE-Is, such as angioedema and dry cough. By blocking Ang II at the AT1 receptor level, Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs provide a more specific and complete blockade of the deleterious effects of Ang II and tend to have more favourable tolerability. A number of clinical trials have shown that ARBs are not only associated with positive outcomes across the CVD continuum but may also have a role in the prevention or delay of diabetes (a major cardiovascular risk factor. Ongoing trials are aiming to define the place of such agents in lessening morbidity and mortality from CVD.

  19. Endovascular laser therapy for varicose veins: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the MAS evidence review was to conduct a systematic review of the available evidence on the safety, effectiveness, durability and cost-effectiveness of endovascular laser therapy (ELT) for the treatment of primary symptomatic varicose veins (VV). The Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC) met on November 27, 2009 to review the safety, effectiveness, durability and cost-effectiveness of ELT for the treatment of primary VV based on an evidence-based review by the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS). CLINICAL CONDITION: VV are tortuous, twisted, or elongated veins. This can be due to existing (inherited) valve dysfunction or decreased vein elasticity (primary venous reflux) or valve damage from prior thrombotic events (secondary venous reflux). The end result is pooling of blood in the veins, increased venous pressure and subsequent vein enlargement. As a result of high venous pressure, branch vessels balloon out leading to varicosities (varicose veins). SYMPTOMS TYPICALLY AFFECT THE LOWER EXTREMITIES AND INCLUDE (BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO): aching, swelling, throbbing, night cramps, restless legs, leg fatigue, itching and burning. Left untreated, venous reflux tends to be progressive, often leading to chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). A NUMBER OF COMPLICATIONS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH UNTREATED VENOUS REFLUX: including superficial thrombophlebitis as well as variceal rupture and haemorrhage. CVI often results in chronic skin changes referred to as stasis dermatitis. Stasis dermatitis is comprised of a spectrum of cutaneous abnormalities including edema, hyperpigmentation, eczema, lipodermatosclerosis and stasis ulceration. Ulceration represents the disease end point for severe CVI. CVI is associated with a reduced quality of life particularly in relation to pain, physical function and mobility. In severe cases, VV with ulcers, QOL has been rated to be as bad or worse as other chronic diseases such as back pain and arthritis. Lower limb VV is a

  20. Cupping therapy for treating knee osteoarthritis: The evidence from systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Quan; Guo, Wen; Sun, Ze-Gan; Huang, Qing-Song; Lee, En Yeong; Wang, Ying; Yao, Xiao-Dong

    2017-08-01

    Cupping therapy is widely used in East Asia, the Middle East, or Central and North Europe to manage the symptom of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of cupping therapy for treating patients with KOA. The following databases were searched from their inception until January 2017: PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and four Chinese databases [WanFang Med Database, Chinese BioMedical Database, Chinese WeiPu Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI)]. Only the RCTs related to the effects of cupping therapy on KOA were included in this systematic review. A quantitative synthesis of RCTs will be conducted using RevMan 5.3 software. Study selection, data extraction, and validation was performed independently by two reviewers. Cochrane criteria for risk-of-bias were used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. Seven RCTs met the inclusion criteria, and most were of low methodological quality. Study participants in the dry cupping therapy plus the Western medicine therapy group showed significantly greater improvements in the pain [MD = -1.01, 95%CI (-1.61, -0.41), p therapy group, with low heterogeneity (Chi 2  = 0.00 p = 1.00, I 2  = 0% in pain; Chi 2  = 0.45 p = 0.50, I 2  = 0% in stiffness; Chi 2  = 1.09 p = 0.30, I 2  = 9% in physical function). However, it failed to do so on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) [MD = -0.32, 95%CI (-0.70, 0.05), p = 0.09]. In addition, when compared with Western medicine therapy alone, meta-analysis of four RCTs suggested favorable statistically significant effects of wet cupping therapy plus western medicine on response rate [MD = 1.06, 95%CI (1.01, 1.12), p = 0.03; heterogeneity: Chi 2  = 1.13, p = 0.77, I 2  = 0%] and Lequesne Algofunctional Index (LAI) [MD = -2.74, 95%CI (-3.41, -2.07), p cupping therapy can effectively improve the

  1. Promoting Clinical Reasoning in Undergraduate Physical Therapy Education: A Review of Strategies and Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    2015-01-01

    in this area. This has resulted in diverse methods and strategies to transfer reasoning skills effectively to students. Awareness about recommended pedagogical techniques to enhance clinical reasoning skills can significantly influence the educator’s choice of methods within and beyond the classroom teaching......-deduction and the pattern recognition skills in physical therapy students, focused teaching methods and strategies need to be emphasized and adopted by academicians, clinical educators and of course students. It is also of utmost importance that evaluation systems of physical therapy programs are introspected for inclusion......Title: Promoting Clinical Reasoning in Undergraduate Physical Therapy Education: A Review of Strategies and Approaches Juneja H1, Brekke A F2 1,2 Physical Therapy Education, University College Zealand, Denmark Background: Clinical reasoning (CR) also referred to as “critical thinking” or “decision...

  2. The entry-level occupational therapy clinical doctorate: The next education wave of change in Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Wells, Joe; Mu, Keli

    2016-12-01

    Currently, Canada and the United States are the only two