WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapy cancer-killing viruses

  1. Novel innate cancer killing activity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovato James

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we pilot tested an in vitro assay of cancer killing activity (CKA in circulating leukocytes of 22 cancer cases and 25 healthy controls. Methods Using a human cervical cancer cell line, HeLa, as target cells, we compared the CKA in circulating leukocytes, as effector cells, of cancer cases and controls. The CKA was normalized as percentages of total target cells during selected periods of incubation time and at selected effector/target cell ratios in comparison to no-effector-cell controls. Results Our results showed that CKA similar to that of our previous study of SR/CR mice was present in human circulating leukocytes but at profoundly different levels in individuals. Overall, males have a significantly higher CKA than females. The CKA levels in cancer cases were lower than that in healthy controls (mean ± SD: 36.97 ± 21.39 vs. 46.28 ± 27.22. Below-median CKA was significantly associated with case status (odds ratio = 4.36; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.06, 17.88 after adjustment of gender and race. Conclusions In freshly isolated human leukocytes, we were able to detect an apparent CKA in a similar manner to that of cancer-resistant SR/CR mice. The finding of CKA at lower levels in cancer patients suggests the possibility that it may be of a consequence of genetic, physiological, or pathological conditions, pending future studies with larger sample size.

  2. Modelling Ebola virus dynamics: Implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyushev, Alexey; Nakaoka, Shinji; Sato, Kei; Noda, Takeshi; Iwami, Shingo

    2016-11-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a severe, often fatal Ebola virus disease (EVD), for which no approved antivirals exist. Recently, some promising anti-EBOV drugs, which are experimentally potent in animal models, have been developed. However, because the quantitative dynamics of EBOV replication in humans is uncertain, it remains unclear how much antiviral suppression of viral replication affects EVD outcome in patients. Here, we developed a novel mathematical model to quantitatively analyse human viral load data obtained during the 2000/01 Uganda EBOV outbreak and evaluated the effects of different antivirals. We found that nucleoside analogue- and siRNA-based therapies are effective if a therapy with a >50% inhibition rate is initiated within a few days post-symptom-onset. In contrast, antibody-based therapy requires not only a higher inhibition rate but also an earlier administration, especially for otherwise fatal cases. Our results demonstrate that an appropriate choice of EBOV-specific drugs is required for effective EVD treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Herpes simplex encephalitis : from virus to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, Flore; Deback, Claire; Agut, Henri

    2011-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the cause of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), a devastating human disease which occurs in 2-4 cases per million/year. HSE results either from a primary infection or virus reactivation, in accordance with the common pattern of HSV infection which is a chronic lifelong process. However its pathophysiology remains largely unknown and its poor prognosis is in contrast with the usually good tolerance of most clinical herpetic manifestations. HSE is due to HSV type 1 (HSV-1) in most cases but HSV type 2 (HSV-2) may be also implicated, especially in infants in the context of neonatal herpes. Polymerase chain reaction detection of HSV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid is the diagnosis of choice for HSE. Acyclovir, a nucleoside analogue which inhibits viral DNA polymerase activity, is the reference treatment of HSE while foscarnet constitutes an alternative therapy and the efficacy of cidofovir is currently uncertain in that context. The emergence of HSV resistance to acyclovir, a phenomenon which is mainly observed among immunocompromised patients, is a current concern although no case of HSE due to an acyclovir-resistant HSV strain has been reported to date. Nevertheless the identification and development of novel therapeutic strategies against HSV appears to be a non dispensable objective for future research in virology.

  4. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-03-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection.

  5. Hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy: Appropriate risk stratification

    OpenAIRE

    Seto, Wai-Kay

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppresive therapy has increased remarkably during recent years. HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals has been well-described in certain immunosuppressive regimens, including therapies containing corticosteroids, anthracyclines, rituximab, antibody to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HBV reactivation could also occur in HBsAg-negati...

  6. Towards antiviral therapies for treating dengue virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Suzanne Jf; Neyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Dengue virus is an emerging human pathogen that poses a huge public health burden by infecting annually about 390 million individuals of which a quarter report with clinical manifestations. Although progress has been made in understanding dengue pathogenesis, a licensed vaccine or antiviral therapy against this virus is still lacking. Treatment of patients is confined to symptomatic alleviation and supportive care. The development of dengue therapeutics thus remains of utmost importance. This review focuses on the few molecules that were evaluated in dengue virus-infected patients: balapiravir, chloroquine, lovastatin, prednisolone and celgosivir. The lessons learned from these clinical trials can be very helpful for the design of future trials for the next generation of dengue virus inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Loskog

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics.

  8. Combined Therapy at Persistent Herpes Virus Infection in Sickly Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Kharlamova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined 40 sickly children with recurrent croup (RC — 28 and bronchial obstruction (ROB — 8, (RC + ROB — 4 aged from 18 months till 14 years. We found that high frequency of persistent herpes viruses usually occurs as associations with CMV, EBV and human herpes virus 6 type. We substantiated anti viral and immune corrective therapy in two schemes compared in efficacy: the 1st group was administered monotherapy with Viferon, and the 2nd group received combined therapy Viferon + Arbidol in doses according to the age during three months. We received a more expressed clinical immunologic effect from the therapy with decreased antigenic load and frequency of recurrence of RC and ROB with Viferon application in suppositories in combination with Arbidol per orally in the intermittent scheme during three months. 

  9. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Martini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR to the affected organ (lung. Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

  10. Genital herpes simplex virus infection: clinical course and attempted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L G; Keeney, R E

    1981-06-01

    The epidemiology, clinical course, diagnosis, and attempted treatments of herpes genitalis are reviewed. Herpes genitalis is an increasingly common sexually transmitted disease for which there is no effective treatment. It can occur in either sex and is mot commonly first found in patients 14 to 29 years old. Initial exposure to the virus may result in prolonged local symptoms (pain, itching, discharge) and signs (ulcerative lesions) as well as fever, malaise, myalgias, and fatigue. After the initial exposure, the virus may be found in a latent stage in the dorsal nerve root ganglia in the sacral area, and recurrences of disease may ensue. The frequency and clinical course of recurrent genital herpes can be of varying duration and severity. Although antiviral substances, immune potentiators, topical surfactants, and photodynamic inactivation have been used to treat genital herpes infections, there is no proven effective therapy.

  11. Engineering adeno-associated viruses for clinical gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterman, Melissa A; Schaffer, David V

    2014-07-01

    Clinical gene therapy has been increasingly successful owing both to an enhanced molecular understanding of human disease and to progressively improving gene delivery technologies. Among these technologies, delivery vectors based on adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) have emerged as safe and effective and, in one recent case, have led to regulatory approval. Although shortcomings in viral vector properties will render extension of such successes to many other human diseases challenging, new approaches to engineer and improve AAV vectors and their genetic cargo are increasingly helping to overcome these barriers.

  12. Hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy: Appropriate risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Wai-Kay

    2015-04-28

    Our understanding of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppresive therapy has increased remarkably during recent years. HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals has been well-described in certain immunosuppressive regimens, including therapies containing corticosteroids, anthracyclines, rituximab, antibody to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HBV reactivation could also occur in HBsAg-negative, antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) positive individuals during therapies containing rituximab, anti-TNF or HSCT.For HBsAg-positive patients, prophylactic antiviral therapy is proven to the effective in preventing HBV reactivation. Recent evidence also demonstrated entecavir to be more effective than lamivudine in this aspect. For HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals, the risk of reactivations differs with the type of immunosuppression. For rituximab, a prospective study demonstrated the 2-year cumulative risk of reactivation to be 41.5%, but prospective data is still lacking for other immunosupressive regimes. The optimal management in preventing HBV reactivation would involve appropriate risk stratification for different immunosuppressive regimes in both HBsAg-positive and HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals.

  13. Genetic Modification of Oncolytic Newcastle Disease Virus for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xing; Wang, Weijia; Xu, Qi; Harper, James; Carroll, Danielle; Galinski, Mark S; Suzich, JoAnn; Jin, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Clinical development of a mesogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as an oncolytic agent for cancer therapy has been hampered by its select agent status due to its pathogenicity in avian species. Using reverse genetics, we have generated a lead candidate oncolytic NDV based on the mesogenic NDV-73T strain that is no longer classified as a select agent for clinical development. This recombinant NDV has a modification at the fusion protein (F) cleavage site to reduce the efficiency of F protein cleavage and an insertion of a 198-nucleotide sequence into the HN-L intergenic region, resulting in reduced viral gene expression and replication in avian cells but not in mammalian cells. In mammalian cells, except for viral polymerase (L) gene expression, viral gene expression is not negatively impacted or increased by the HN-L intergenic insertion. Furthermore, the virus can be engineered to express a foreign gene while still retaining the ability to grow to high titers in cell culture. The recombinant NDV selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells and is able to drive potent tumor growth inhibition following intratumoral or intravenous administration in a mouse tumor model. The candidate is well positioned for clinical development as an oncolytic virus. Avian paramyxovirus type 1, NDV, has been an attractive oncolytic agent for cancer virotherapy. However, this virus can cause epidemic disease in poultry, and concerns about the potential environmental and economic impact of an NDV outbreak have precluded its clinical development. Here we describe generation and characterization of a highly potent oncolytic NDV variant that is unlikely to cause Newcastle disease in its avian host, representing an essential step toward moving NDV forward as an oncolytic agent. Several attenuation mechanisms have been genetically engineered into the recombinant NDV that reduce chicken pathogenicity to a level that is acceptable worldwide without impacting viral production in

  14. Microwave therapy for cutaneous human papilloma virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Ivan; Lim, Wen Chean; Lee, Alvin; Holbrook, Daniel; Savelyeva, Natalia; Thomson, Peter; Webb, Christopher; Polak, Marta; Ardern-Jones, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infects keratinocytes of the skin and mucous membranes, and is associated with the induction of cutaneous warts and malignancy. Warts can induce significant morbidity and disability but most therapies, including cryotherapy, laser, and radiofrequency devices show low efficacy and induce discomfort through tissue destruction. Microwaves are readily capable of passing through highly keratinised skin to deliver energy and induce heating of the tissue in a highly controllable, uniform manner. To determine the effects of microwave on cutaneous HPV infection. We undertook a pilot study of microwave therapy to the skin in 32 consecutive individuals with 52 recalcitrant long-lived viral cutaneous warts. Additionally, we undertook a molecular characterisation of the effects of microwaves on the skin. Tissue inflammation was minimal, but 75.9% of lesions cleared which compares favourably with previous studies showing a clearance rate of 23-33% for cryotherapy or salicylic acid. We show that microwaves specifically induce dendritic cell cross-presentation of HPV antigen to CD8+ T cells and suggest that IL-6 may be important for DC IRF1 and IRF4 modulation to enhance this process. Keratinocyte-skin dendritic cell cross-talk is integral to host defence against HPV infections, and this pilot study supports the concept of microwave induction of anti-HPV immunity which offers a promising approach for treatment of HPV-induced viral warts and potentially HPV-related cancers.

  15. Frequent hepatitis B virus rebound among HIV-hepatitis B virus-coinfected patients following antiretroviral therapy interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dore, Gregory J; Soriano, Vicente; Rockstroh, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    .0002), nondetectable HBV DNA at baseline (P = 0.007), and black race (P = 0.03). Time to ART reinitiation was shorter (7.5, 15.6, and 17.8 months; P hepatitis C virus-positive and non-HBV/hepatitis...... C virus participants in the drug conservation arm. No hepatic decompensation events occurred among HBV-positive participants in either arm. CONCLUSION: HBV DNA rebound following ART interruption is common and may be associated with accelerated immune deficiency in HIV-HBV-coinfected patients.......BACKGROUND: The impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption in HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients was examined in the Strategic Management of AntiRetroviral Therapy (SMART) study. METHODS: Plasma HBV DNA was measured in all hepatitis B surface antigen-positive (HBV...

  16. Nonadherence with pediatric human immunodeficiency virus therapy as medical neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gretchen M; Wheeler, J Gary; Tucker, Nancy C; Hackler, Chris; Young, Karen; Maples, Holly D; Darville, Toni

    2004-09-01

    To examine the results of an interventionist approach applied to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children for whom caregiver nonadherence was suspected as the cause of treatment failure. The medical records of a cohort of 16 perinatally HIV-infected children whose care was managed at the Arkansas Children's Hospital Pediatric HIV Clinic for an uninterrupted period of >or=3 years were reviewed through July 2003. Data collected included date of birth, dates of and explanations for clinic visits and hospitalizations, dates of laboratory evaluations, CD4(+) T cell percentages, plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, antiretroviral medications, viral resistance tests (eg, phenotype and genotype), and physician-initiated interventions to enhance adherence to the medication regimen. A stepwise interventionist approach was undertaken when patients continued to demonstrate high viral loads, despite documented viral sensitivity to the medication regimen and caregivers' insistence that medications were being administered regularly. Step 1 was prescribing a home health nurse referral, step 2 was administering directly observed therapy (DOT) while the patient was hospitalized for 4 days, and step 3 was submitting a physician-initiated medical neglect report to the Arkansas Department of Human Services. The results for 6 patients for whom this stepwise approach was initiated are reported. Home health nurse referrals failed to result in sustained improvements in adherence in all 6 cases. Viral load assays performed before and after DOT provided an objective measure of the effect of adherence, with 12 hospitalizations resulting in a mean +/- SD decrease in HIV RNA levels of 1.09 +/- 0.5 log(10) copies per mL, with a range of 0.6 to 2.1 log(10) copies per mL. Four families responded to DOT hospitalization, and sustained decreases in the respective patients' viral loads were noted. In 2 cases, medical neglect reports were submitted when DOT did not result in improved adherence. These

  17. Simian virus 40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oppenheim Ariella

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. One of the primary organs affected by sepsis is the lung, presenting as the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. Organ damage in sepsis involves an alteration in gene expression, making gene transfer a potential therapeutic modality. This work examines the feasibility of applying simian virus 40 (SV40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy. Methods Sepsis-induced ARDS was established by cecal ligation double puncture (2CLP. SV40 vectors carrying the luciferase reporter gene (SV/luc were administered intratracheally immediately after sepsis induction. Sham operated (SO as well as 2CLP rats given intratracheal PBS or adenovirus expressing luciferase served as controls. Luc transduction was evaluated by in vivo light detection, immunoassay and luciferase mRNA detection by RT-PCR in tissue harvested from septic rats. Vector abundance and distribution into alveolar cells was evaluated using immunostaining for the SV40 VP1 capsid protein as well as by double staining for VP1 and for the surfactant protein C (proSP-C. Immunostaining for T-lymphocytes was used to evaluate the cellular immune response induced by the vector. Results Luc expression measured by in vivo light detection correlated with immunoassay from lung tissue harvested from the same rats. Moreover, our results showed vector presence in type II alveolar cells. The vector did not induce significant cellular immune response. Conclusion In the present study we have demonstrated efficient uptake and expression of an SV40 vector in the lungs of animals with sepsis-induced ARDS. These vectors appear to be capable of in vivo transduction of alveolar type II cells and may thus become a future therapeutic tool.

  18. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  19. Genome-wide RNAi Screening to Identify Host Factors That Modulate Oncolytic Virus Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Kristina J; Mahoney, Douglas J; Baird, Stephen D; Lefebvre, Charles A; Stojdl, David F

    2018-04-03

    High-throughput genome-wide RNAi (RNA interference) screening technology has been widely used for discovering host factors that impact virus replication. Here we present the application of this technology to uncovering host targets that specifically modulate the replication of Maraba virus, an oncolytic rhabdovirus, and vaccinia virus with the goal of enhancing therapy. While the protocol has been tested for use with oncolytic Maraba virus and oncolytic vaccinia virus, this approach is applicable to other oncolytic viruses and can also be utilized for identifying host targets that modulate virus replication in mammalian cells in general. This protocol describes the development and validation of an assay for high-throughput RNAi screening in mammalian cells, the key considerations and preparation steps important for conducting a primary high-throughput RNAi screen, and a step-by-step guide for conducting a primary high-throughput RNAi screen; in addition, it broadly outlines the methods for conducting secondary screen validation and tertiary validation studies. The benefit of high-throughput RNAi screening is that it allows one to catalogue, in an extensive and unbiased fashion, host factors that modulate any aspect of virus replication for which one can develop an in vitro assay such as infectivity, burst size, and cytotoxicity. It has the power to uncover biotherapeutic targets unforeseen based on current knowledge.

  20. Long-term Therapy With Tenofovir Is Effective for Patients Co-Infected With Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries-Sluijs, Theodora E. M. S.; Reijnders, Jurriën G. P.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Prins, Jan M.; Pas, Suzan D.; Schutten, Martin; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Richter, Clemens; Mulder, Jan W.; de Man, Rob A.; Janssen, Harry L. A.; van der Ende, Marchina E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We investigated the long-term efficacy and renal safety of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), administered to patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus (HBV) as part of an antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: We performed a multicenter, prospective

  1. Timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)--associated tuberculous meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Török, M. Estee; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Mai, Pham Phuong; Dung, Nguyen Thi; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Tien, Nguyen Anh; Minh, N. H.; Hien, Nguyen Quang; Thai, Phan Vuong Khac; Dong, Doan The; Anh, Do Thi Tuong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Cam; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Quy, Hoang Thi; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Hien, Tran Tinh; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Simmons, Cameron Paul; de Jong, Menno; Wolbers, Marcel; Farrar, Jeremy James

    2011-01-01

    The optimal time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated tuberculous meningitis is unknown. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of immediate versus deferred ART in patients with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis to

  2. Oncotargeting by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV: Advances in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Bishnoi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern oncotherapy approaches are based on inducing controlled apoptosis in tumor cells. Although a number of apoptosis-induction approaches are available, site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents still remain the biggest hurdle in achieving the desired cancer treatment benefit. Additionally, systemic treatment-induced toxicity remains a major limiting factor in chemotherapy. To specifically address drug-accessibility and chemotherapy side effects, oncolytic virotherapy (OV has emerged as a novel cancer treatment alternative. In OV, recombinant viruses with higher replication capacity and stronger lytic properties are being considered for tumor cell-targeting and subsequent cell lysing. Successful application of OVs lies in achieving strict tumor-specific tropism called oncotropism, which is contingent upon the biophysical interactions of tumor cell surface receptors with viral receptors and subsequent replication of oncolytic viruses in cancer cells. In this direction, few viral vector platforms have been developed and some of these have entered pre-clinical/clinical trials. Among these, the Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based platform shows high promise, as it is not pathogenic to humans. Further, modern molecular biology techniques such as reverse genetics tools have favorably advanced this field by creating efficient recombinant VSVs for OV; some have entered into clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the current status of VSV based oncotherapy, challenges, and future perspectives regarding its therapeutic applications in the cancer treatment.

  3. Oncotargeting by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV): Advances in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Suman; Tiwari, Ritudhwaj; Gupta, Sharad; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Nayak, Debasis

    2018-02-23

    Modern oncotherapy approaches are based on inducing controlled apoptosis in tumor cells. Although a number of apoptosis-induction approaches are available, site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents still remain the biggest hurdle in achieving the desired cancer treatment benefit. Additionally, systemic treatment-induced toxicity remains a major limiting factor in chemotherapy. To specifically address drug-accessibility and chemotherapy side effects, oncolytic virotherapy (OV) has emerged as a novel cancer treatment alternative. In OV, recombinant viruses with higher replication capacity and stronger lytic properties are being considered for tumor cell-targeting and subsequent cell lysing. Successful application of OVs lies in achieving strict tumor-specific tropism called oncotropism, which is contingent upon the biophysical interactions of tumor cell surface receptors with viral receptors and subsequent replication of oncolytic viruses in cancer cells. In this direction, few viral vector platforms have been developed and some of these have entered pre-clinical/clinical trials. Among these, the Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based platform shows high promise, as it is not pathogenic to humans. Further, modern molecular biology techniques such as reverse genetics tools have favorably advanced this field by creating efficient recombinant VSVs for OV; some have entered into clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the current status of VSV based oncotherapy, challenges, and future perspectives regarding its therapeutic applications in the cancer treatment.

  4. Genital condyloma virus infection following pelvic radiation therapy: report of seven cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowell, D.M.; Livolsi, V.A.; Ludwig, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Six women who underwent radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies demonstrated cytologic evidence of condyloma virus infection 2 or more years following radiation. Histologic confirmation was obtained in two of the cases. A seventh patient developed in situ and invasive squamous cell carcinoma in a vulvar condyloma acuminatum following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease. This venereal infection is found most frequently in sexually active younger women (average age, 27 years). It is felt that depressed cell-mediated immunity consequent to the radiation therapy allowed the development of this infection in the older patients described in this report. The evolution of invasive squamous cell carcinoma in the condyloma acuminatum may indicate a possible oncogenic or cocarcinogenic effect of the virus. The immunologic responses to infection caused by the human papillomavirus group are discussed, as well as its potential for malignant transformation

  5. A Danish nationwide questionnaire study of hepatitis B virus screening before immunosuppressive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunyoz, Kristine Ifigenia; Krarup, Henrik; Weis, Nina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Difficulty in identifying patients who are at risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation makes it import-ant to screen for HBV before initiating immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate screening procedures for HBV infection before initiation of immunos......INTRODUCTION: Difficulty in identifying patients who are at risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation makes it import-ant to screen for HBV before initiating immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate screening procedures for HBV infection before initiation...... of immunosuppressive therapy and to explore HBV treatment strategies. METHODS: All Danish units of haematology, oncology, dermatology, rheumatology and gastroenterology using immunosuppressive agents were invited to fill out a questionnaire for The Danish Database for Hepatitis B and C. RESULTS: A total of 28 (53...

  6. Preclinical evaluation of oncolytic vaccinia virus for therapy of canine soft tissue sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS.

  7. The potential application of a transcriptionally regulated oncolytic herpes simplex virus for human cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, L; Fraefel, C; Sia, K C; Newman, J P; Mohamed-Bashir, S A; Ng, W H; Lam, P Y P

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emerging studies have shown the potential benefit of arming oncolytic viruses with therapeutic genes. However, most of these therapeutic genes are placed under the regulation of ubiquitous viral promoters. Our goal is to generate a safer yet potent oncolytic herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) for cancer therapy. Methods: Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) recombineering, a cell cycle-regulatable luciferase transgene cassette was replaced with the infected cell protein 6 (ICP6) coding region (encoded for UL39 or large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase) of the HSV-1 genome. These recombinant viruses, YE-PC8, were further tested for its proliferation-dependent luciferase gene expression. Results: The ability of YE-PC8 to confer proliferation-dependent transgene expression was demonstrated by injecting similar amount of viruses into the tumour-bearing region of the brain and the contralateral normal brain parenchyma of the same mouse. The results showed enhanced levels of luciferase activities in the tumour region but not in the normal brain parenchyma. Similar findings were observed in YE-PC8-infected short-term human brain patient-derived glioma cells compared with normal human astrocytes. intratumoural injection of YE-PC8 viruses resulted in 77% and 80% of tumour regression in human glioma and human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts, respectively. Conclusion: YE-PC8 viruses confer tumour selectivity in proliferating cells and may be developed further as a feasible approach to treat human cancers. PMID:24196790

  8. Parainfluenza Virus Infection Sensitizes Cancer Cells to DNA-Damaging Agents: Implications for Oncolytic Virus Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Candace R; Parks, Griffith D

    2018-04-01

    A parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) with mutations in the P/V gene (P/V-CPI - ) is restricted for spread in normal cells but not in cancer cells in vitro and is effective at reducing tumor burdens in mouse model systems. Here we show that P/V-CPI - infection of HEp-2 human laryngeal cancer cells results in the majority of the cells dying, but unexpectedly, over time, there is an emergence of a population of cells that survive as P/V-CPI - persistently infected (PI) cells. P/V-CPI - PI cells had elevated levels of basal caspase activation, and viability was highly dependent on the activity of cellular inhibitor-of-apoptosis proteins (IAPs) such as Survivin and XIAP. In challenge experiments with external inducers of apoptosis, PI cells were more sensitive to cisplatin-induced DNA damage and cell death. This increased cisplatin sensitivity correlated with defects in DNA damage signaling pathways such as phosphorylation of Chk1 and translocation of damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) to the nucleus. Cisplatin-induced killing of PI cells was sensitive to the inhibition of wild-type (WT) p53-inducible protein 1 (WIP1), a phosphatase which acts to terminate DNA damage signaling pathways. A similar sensitivity to cisplatin was seen with cells during acute infection with P/V-CPI - as well as during acute infections with WT PIV5 and the related virus human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2). Our results have general implications for the design of safer paramyxovirus-based vectors that cannot establish PI as well as the potential for combining chemotherapy with oncolytic RNA virus vectors. IMPORTANCE There is intense interest in developing oncolytic viral vectors with increased potency against cancer cells, particularly those cancer cells that have gained resistance to chemotherapies. We have found that infection with cytoplasmically replicating parainfluenza virus can result in increases in the killing of cancer cells by agents that induce DNA damage, and this is linked

  9. [Impact of antiviral therapy on the natural history of hepatitis C virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Rodriguez, Conrado M; Gutierrez Garcia, Maria Luisa

    2014-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection affects around 150 million persons, and 350,000 persons worldwide die of this disease each year. Although the data on its natural history are incomplete, after the acute infection, most patients develop chronic forms of hepatitis C with variable stages of fibrosis. In these patients, continual inflammatory activity can cause significant fibrosis, cirrhosis, decompensation of the liver disease, or hepatocarcinoma. In the next few years, it is expected that hepatitis C virus infection and its complications will significantly increase, as will the incidence of hepatocarcinoma in Spain. This review presents the data on the natural history of hepatitis C virus infection and discusses the potential impact of antiviral therapy on the distinct stages of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  10. Glycosylation of dengue virus glycoproteins and their interactions with carbohydrate receptors: possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Fakhriedzwan; Muharram, Siti Hanna; Diah, Suwarni

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus, an RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, affects 50 million individuals annually, and approximately 500,000-1,000,000 of these infections lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. With no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatments available to prevent dengue infection, dengue is considered a major public health problem in subtropical and tropical regions. The virus, like other enveloped viruses, uses the host's cellular enzymes to synthesize its structural (C, E, and prM/M) and nonstructural proteins (NS1-5) and, subsequently, to glycosylate these proteins to produce complete and functional glycoproteins. The structural glycoproteins, specifically the E protein, are known to interact with the host's carbohydrate receptors through the viral proteins' N-glycosylation sites and thus mediate the viral invasion of cells. This review focuses on the involvement of dengue glycoproteins in the course of infection and the virus' exploitation of the host's glycans, especially the interactions between host receptors and carbohydrate moieties. We also discuss the recent developments in antiviral therapies that target these processes and interactions, focusing specifically on the use of carbohydrate-binding agents derived from plants, commonly known as lectins, to inhibit the progression of infection.

  11. NIR-assisted orchid virus therapy using urchin bimetallic nanomaterials in phalaenopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shin-Yu; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling; Cheng, Liang-Chien; Chen, Chieh-Wei; Lee, Po-Han; Liu, Ru-Shi; Yu, Fengjiao; Zhou, Wuzong

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles has drawn special attention, particularly in the treatment of plant diseases. Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) and Odontoglossum ring spot virus (ORSV) are the most prevalent and serious diseases that affect the development of the orchid industry. In this study we treated nanoparticles as a strategy for enhancing the resistance of orchids against CymMV and ORSV. After chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were injected into Phalaenopsis leaves, the injected leaves were exposed to 980 nm laser for light–heat conversion. To evaluate virus elimination in the treated Phalaenopsis leaves, the transcripts of coat protein genes and the production of viral proteins were assessed by reverse transcription-Polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The expression of coat protein genes for both CymMV and ORSV was significantly lower in the chitosan-modified Au NP-treated Phalaenopsis leaves than in the control. Similarly, the amount of coat proteins for both viruses in the Phalaenopsis leaves was lower than that in the control (without nanoparticle injection). We propose that the temperature increase in the chitosan-modified Au NP-treated Phalaenopsis tissues after laser exposure reduces the viral population, consequently conferring resistance against CymMV and ORSV. Our findings suggest that the application of chitosan-modified Au NPs is a promising new strategy for orchid virus therapy. (paper)

  12. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  13. Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus before and after combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, José Manuel; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María Alma; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Wrobel, Boris; Carnicer, Fernando; del Olmo, Juan; Ortega, Enrique; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2008-08-26

    We present an analysis of the selective forces acting on two hepatitis C virus genome regions previously postulated to be involved in the viral response to combined antiviral therapy. One includes the three hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein, and the other encompasses the PKR binding domain and the V3 domain in the NS5A region. We used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin) for which samples were obtained before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were sequenced. These were used to detect general patterns of adaptation, to identify particular adaptation mechanisms and to analyze the patterns of evolutionary change in both genome regions. These analyses failed to detect a common adaptive mechanism for the lack of response to antiviral treatment in these patients. On the contrary, a wide range of situations were observed, from patients showing no positively selected sites to others with many, and with completely different topologies in the reconstructed phylogenetic trees. Altogether, these results suggest that viral strategies to evade selection pressure from the immune system and antiviral therapies do not result from a single mechanism and they are likely based on a range of different alternatives, in which several different changes, or their combination, along the HCV genome confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures.

  14. Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus before and after combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Cuevas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of the selective forces acting on two hepatitis C virus genome regions previously postulated to be involved in the viral response to combined antiviral therapy. One includes the three hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein, and the other encompasses the PKR binding domain and the V3 domain in the NS5A region. We used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin for which samples were obtained before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were sequenced. These were used to detect general patterns of adaptation, to identify particular adaptation mechanisms and to analyze the patterns of evolutionary change in both genome regions. These analyses failed to detect a common adaptive mechanism for the lack of response to antiviral treatment in these patients. On the contrary, a wide range of situations were observed, from patients showing no positively selected sites to others with many, and with completely different topologies in the reconstructed phylogenetic trees. Altogether, these results suggest that viral strategies to evade selection pressure from the immune system and antiviral therapies do not result from a single mechanism and they are likely based on a range of different alternatives, in which several different changes, or their combination, along the HCV genome confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures.

  15. A Danish nationwide questionnaire study of hepatitis B virus screening before immunosuppressive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunyoz, Kristine Ifigenia; Krarup, Henrik; Weis, Nina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Difficulty in identifying patients who are at risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation makes it import-ant to screen for HBV before initiating immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate screening procedures for HBV infection before initiation...... of immunosuppressive therapy and to explore HBV treatment strategies. METHODS: All Danish units of haematology, oncology, dermatology, rheumatology and gastroenterology using immunosuppressive agents were invited to fill out a questionnaire for The Danish Database for Hepatitis B and C. RESULTS: A total of 28 (53......%) of the 53 included units answered the questionnaire, of which 25 (89.3%) had a guideline regarding screening for HBV serological markers prior to immunosuppressive therapy, but only ten (37%) had a guideline that is in line with the joint guidelines from the national Danish Societies of Infectious Diseases...

  16. Modeling hepatitis C virus kinetics under therapy using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shudo, Emi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models have proven helpful in analyzing the virological response to antiviral therapy in hepatitis C virus (HCY) infected subjects. Objective: To summarize the uses and limitations of different models for analyzing HCY kinetic data under pegylated interferon therapy. Methods: We formulate mathematical models and fit them by nonlinear least square regression to patient data in order estimate model parameters. We compare the goodness of fit and parameter values estimated by different models statistically. Results/Conclusion: The best model for parameter estimation depends on the availability and the quality of data as well as the therapy used. We also discuss the mathematical models that will be needed to analyze HCV kinetic data from clinical trials with new antiviral drugs.

  17. Otitis media in Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus infected children undergoing antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miziara, I D; Weber, R; Araújo Filho, B Cunha; Pinheiro Neto, C Diógenes

    2007-11-01

    To assess changes in the prevalence of otitis media, associated with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, in Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected children. Division of otorhinolaryngology, Hospital das Clínicas, Sao Paulo University Medical School, Brazil. A cohort of 459 HIV-infected children aged below 13 years. The prevalence of otitis media and the serum cluster of differentiation four glycoprotein T lymphocyte count were compared for children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (with protease inhibitors) and those receiving standard antiretroviral therapy (without protease inhibitors). Otitis media was present in 33.1 per cent of the children. Children aged from zero years to five years 11 months receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy had a higher prevalence of acute otitis media (p=0.02) and a lower prevalence of chronic otitis media (p=0.02). Children who were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy had a mean serum cluster of differentiation four glycoprotein T lymphocyte count greater than that of those who were receiving standard antiretroviral therapy (pBrazilian HIV-infected children was associated with a lower prevalence of chronic otitis media.

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus Suppressive Therapy in Herpes Simplex Virus-2/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Coinfected Women Is Associated With Reduced Systemic CXCL10 But Not Genital Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen-Nissen, Erica; Chang, Joanne T; Thomas, Katherine K; Adams, Devin; Celum, Connie; Sanchez, Jorge; Coombs, Robert W; McElrath, M Juliana; Baeten, Jared M

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) may heighten immune activation and increase human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) replication, resulting in greater infectivity and faster HIV-1 disease progression. An 18-week randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial of 500 mg valacyclovir twice daily in 20 antiretroviral-naive women coinfected with HSV-2 and HIV-1 was conducted and HSV-2 suppression was found to significantly reduce both HSV-2 and HIV-1 viral loads both systemically and the endocervical compartment. To determine the effect of HSV-2 suppression on systemic and genital mucosal inflammation, plasma specimens, and endocervical swabs were collected weekly from volunteers in the trial and cryopreserved. Plasma was assessed for concentrations of 31 cytokines and chemokines; endocervical fluid was eluted from swabs and assayed for 14 cytokines and chemokines. Valacyclovir significantly reduced plasma CXCL10 but did not significantly alter other cytokine concentrations in either compartment. These data suggest genital tract inflammation in women persists despite HSV-2 suppression, supporting the lack of effect on transmission seen in large scale efficacy trials. Alternative therapies are needed to reduce persistent mucosal inflammation that may enhance transmission of HSV-2 and HIV-1.

  19. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  20. Perspective on Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Modification for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Michael E; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a X-linked, progressive childhood myopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, one of the largest genes in the genome. It is characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration and dysfunction leading to cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a highly promising gene therapy vector. AAV gene therapy has resulted in unprecedented clinical success for treating several inherited diseases. However, AAV gene therapy for DMD remains a significant challenge. Hurdles for AAV-mediated DMD gene therapy include the difficulty to package the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in an AAV vector, the necessity for whole-body gene delivery, the immune response to dystrophin and AAV capsid, and the species-specific barriers to translate from animal models to human patients. Capsid engineering aims at improving viral vector properties by rational design and/or forced evolution. In this review, we discuss how to use the state-of-the-art AAV capsid engineering technologies to overcome hurdles in AAV-based DMD gene therapy.

  1. Side effects of antiviral therapy in hepatitis C virus infection-sarcoidosis - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodor, D; Teodor, Andra; Grigore, Lucia; Jugănariu, Gabriela; Dorobăţ, Carmen Mihaela; Miftode, Egidia; Azoicăi, Doina

    2012-01-01

    Standard therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus infection is still a combination of peginterferon alfa2a/2b and ribavirin for 48 weeks. As of side effects, there are organic side effects, such as hematologic disorders, and functional side effects, reflected in the quality of life of hepatitis C patients. Up to 30% of the patients develop specific side effects such as headache, fever, fatigue. Sarcoidosis, known as a granulomatous disease of uncertain cause, is an uncommon finding in this category of patients. This cause-effect relation is accounted for by the convergent action of peginterferon and ribavirin of stimulating type 1 T helper cells and reducing type 2 helper T cells activation. We present the case of male patient known with chronic hepatitis C who developed pulmonary sarcoidosis following antiviral therapy. The first manifestation of the disease was unexplained fever accompanied by pulmonary tract disease. The diagnosis was established by immunophenotyping in bronchial aspirate

  2. Clearance of Hepatitis C Virus Improves Insulin Resistance During and After Peginterferon and Ribavirin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Cheng-Hung; Lin, Chih-Lang; Hu, Ching-Chih; Chang, Jia-Jang; Chien, Rong-Nan

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at a greater risk of developing insulin resistance (IR). However, little is known about when insulin sensitivity may improve during or after treatment for hepatitis C. In this study, we examined the effect of combination therapy with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin on IR in patients with chronic HCV infection. We also analyzed factors associated with changes in insulin sensitivity. IR was estimated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). HOMA-IR was measured before therapy, during therapy (12 and 24 weeks), and at the end of therapy (EOT; 24 or 48 weeks). We analyzed 78 HCV patients receiving combination therapy. Twenty-two patients (28.2%) exhibited pretreatment IR (HOMA-IR >2.5). In all patients, HOMA-IR was not significantly different from baseline values at 12 weeks (P = 0.823), 24 weeks (P = 0.417), or at EOT (P = 0.158). In patients with pretreatment IR, a significant decrease in HOMA-IR was observed at 12 weeks (P = 0.023), 24 weeks (P = 0.008), and at EOT (P = 0.002). Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that baseline HOMA-IR is the only factor associated with the decline in HOMA-IR during and after therapy. The eradication of HCV infection was associated with improved insulin sensitivity among patients with pretreatment IR. This significant improvement in insulin sensitivity may occur as early as 12 weeks after the initiation of antiviral therapy.

  3. Herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and in neonate: status of art of epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barucca Valentina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection is one of the most common viral sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. The first time infection of the mother may lead to severe illness in pregnancy and may be associated with virus transmission from mother to foetus/newborn. Since the incidence of this sexually transmitted infection continues to rise and because the greatest incidence of herpes simplex virus infections occur in women of reproductive age, the risk of maternal transmission of the virus to the foetus or neonate has become a major health concern. On these purposes the Authors of this review looked for the medical literature and pertinent publications to define the status of art regarding the epidemiology, the diagnosis, the therapy and the prevention of HSV in pregnant women and neonate. Special emphasis is placed upon the importance of genital herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and on the its prevention to avoid neonatal HSV infections.

  4. The Role of Type III Interferons in Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Bruening

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The human interferon (IFN response is a key innate immune mechanism to fight virus infection. IFNs are host-encoded secreted proteins, which induce IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs with antiviral properties. Among the three classes of IFNs, type III IFNs, also called IFN lambdas (IFNLs, are an essential component of the innate immune response to hepatitis C virus (HCV. In particular, human polymorphisms in IFNL gene loci correlate with hepatitis C disease progression and with treatment response. To date, the underlying mechanisms remain mostly elusive; however it seems clear that viral infection of the liver induces IFNL responses. As IFNL receptors show a more restricted tissue expression than receptors for other classes of IFNs, IFNL treatment has reduced side effects compared to the classical type I IFN treatment. In HCV therapy, however, IFNL will likely not play an important role as highly effective direct acting antivirals (DAA exist. Here, we will review our current knowledge on IFNL gene expression, protein properties, signaling, ISG induction, and its implications on HCV infection and treatment. Finally, we will discuss the lessons learnt from the HCV and IFNL field for virus infections beyond hepatitis C.

  5. Study of the effect of antiviral therapy on homocysteinemia in hepatitis C virus- infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Mubin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the leading causes of chronic liver disease (CLD. About 80% of those exposed to the virus develop a chronic infection. Hyperhomocysteinemia, which is an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease and thromboembolism, may develop in HCV-infected patients although altered alanine amino transferase (ALT enzyme levels are generally associated with damage to liver cells. The gold standard therapy for chronic hepatitis C patients is pegylated interferon combined with an anti-viral drug (ribavirin. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of antiviral therapy on plasma homocysteine (Hcy levels in HCV patients in addition to other parameters. Methods 532 HCV-infected patients and 70 healthy controls were recruited for the study. All patients were subjected to laboratory investigations including HCV-RNA levels, complete blood cell counts, serum levels of homocysteine, ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, lipid profile and liver ultrasonographic examination. The outcome of treatment with pegylated interferon α plus ribavirin treatment and sustained virologic response (SVR was determined 6–9 months post-therapy. Results Hyperhomocysteinemia was found in 91.35% of HCV-infected patients. The difference in plasma Hcy concentrations reached statistical significance between the patient and control groups. ALT, cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs levels were found higher than normal in the patients group. After receiving a combined therapy for 24 weeks, 43.66% patients showed an SVR (responders; 30.98% patients were non-responders while 25.35% patients initially responded to therapy but again retrieved positive status of HCV infection six months post-therapy (relapse-cirrhotic patients. The mean levels of plasma Hcy, ALT and ALP were significantly reduced in responders within 10 weeks of therapy when compared with non-responders and relapse-cirrhotic patients. Conclusion

  6. Human Papilloma Virus Infection Does Not Predict Response to Interferon Therapy in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Anat; Garg, Nisha; Nanji, Afshan; Joag, Madhura; Nuovo, Gerard; Palioura, Sotiria; Wang, Gaofeng; Karp, Carol L

    2015-11-01

    To identify the frequency of human papilloma virus (HPV) in ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) and to evaluate differences in clinical features and treatment response of tumors with positive versus negative HPV results. Retrospective case series. Twenty-seven patients with OSSN. Ocular surface squamous neoplasia specimens were analyzed for the presence of HPV. Clinical features and response to interferon were determined retrospectively and linked to the presence (versus absence) of HPV. Clinical characteristics of OSSN by HPV status. Twenty-one of 27 tumors (78%) demonstrated positive HPV results. The HPV genotypes identified included HPV-16 in 10 tumors (48%), HPV-31 in 5 tumors, HPV-33 in 1 tumor, HPV-35 in 2 tumors, HPV-51 in 2 tumors, and a novel HPV in 3 tumors (total of 23 tumors because 1 tumor had 3 identified genotypes). Tumors found in the superior limbus were more likely to show positive HPV results (48% vs. 0%; P=0.06, Fisher exact test). Tumors with positive HPV-16 results were larger (68 vs. 34 mm2; P=0.08, Mann-Whitney U test) and were more likely to have papillomatous morphologic features (50% vs. 12%; P=0.07, Fisher exact test) compared with tumors showing negative results for HPV-16. Human papilloma virus status was not found to be associated with response to interferon therapy (P=1.0, Fisher exact test). Metrics found to be associated with a nonfavorable response to interferon were male gender and tumors located in the superior conjunctivae. The presence of HPV in OSSN seems to be more common in lesions located in the nonexposed, superior limbus. Human papilloma virus presence does not seem to be required for a favorable response to interferon therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. All rights reserved.

  7. Ribavirin-induced anemia in hepatitis C virus patients undergoing combination therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeja M Krishnan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection - combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin - elicits sustained responses in only ∼50% of the patients treated. No alternatives exist for patients who do not respond to combination therapy. Addition of ribavirin substantially improves response rates to interferon and lowers relapse rates following the cessation of therapy, suggesting that increasing ribavirin exposure may further improve treatment response. A key limitation, however, is the toxic side-effect of ribavirin, hemolytic anemia, which often necessitates a reduction of ribavirin dosage and compromises treatment response. Maximizing treatment response thus requires striking a balance between the antiviral and hemolytic activities of ribavirin. Current models of viral kinetics describe the enhancement of treatment response due to ribavirin. Ribavirin-induced anemia, however, remains poorly understood and precludes rational optimization of combination therapy. Here, we develop a new mathematical model of the population dynamics of erythrocytes that quantitatively describes ribavirin-induced anemia in HCV patients. Based on the assumption that ribavirin accumulation decreases erythrocyte lifespan in a dose-dependent manner, model predictions capture several independent experimental observations of the accumulation of ribavirin in erythrocytes and the resulting decline of hemoglobin in HCV patients undergoing combination therapy, estimate the reduced erythrocyte lifespan during therapy, and describe inter-patient variations in the severity of ribavirin-induced anemia. Further, model predictions estimate the threshold ribavirin exposure beyond which anemia becomes intolerable and suggest guidelines for the usage of growth hormones, such as erythropoietin, that stimulate erythrocyte production and avert the reduction of ribavirin dosage, thereby improving treatment response. Our model thus facilitates, in

  8. Long-term use of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohui Zhu

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy currently used in China is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with good highly active antiretroviral therapy compliance. Human immunodeficiency virus may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis.

  9. Impact of Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection on Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Outcome in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Nina Margrethe; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø.; Kronborg, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients may decrease the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We determined the impact of HCV infection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome among...

  10. Impact of hepatitis C virus coinfection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome in HIV-infected individuals: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Nina Margrethe; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø.; Kronborg, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients may decrease the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We determined the impact of HCV infection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome among...

  11. Physician Decisions to Defer Antiretroviral Therapy in Key Populations: Implications for Reducing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Incidence and Mortality in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ferro, Enrico G.; Culbert, Gabriel J.; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Marcus, Ruthanne; Steffen, Alana D.; Pauls, Heather A.; Westergaard, Ryan P.; Lee, Christopher K.; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet physician attitudes and prescribing behaviors toward members of key risk populations may limit ART access and undermine treatment as prevention strategies. Methods. Physicians in Malaysia (N = 214) who prescribe antiretroviral therapy (ART) responded in an Internet-based survey to hypothetical clinical scenarios of HIV patients, varying by key risk population and...

  12. Targeted decorin gene therapy delivered with adeno-associated virus effectively retards corneal neovascularization in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv R Mohan

    Full Text Available Decorin, small leucine-rich proteoglycan, has been shown to modulate angiogenesis in nonocular tissues. This study tested a hypothesis that tissue-selective targeted decorin gene therapy delivered to the rabbit stroma with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5 impedes corneal neovascularization (CNV in vivo without significant side effects. An established rabbit CNV model was used. Targeted decorin gene therapy in the rabbit stroma was delivered with a single topical AAV5 titer (100 µl; 5×10(12 vg/ml application onto the stroma for two minutes after removing corneal epithelium. The levels of CNV were examined with stereomicroscopy, H&E staining, lectin, collagen type IV, CD31 immunocytochemistry and CD31 immunoblotting. Real-time PCR quantified mRNA expression of pro- and anti-angiogenic genes. Corneal health in live animals was monitored with clinical, slit-lamp and optical coherence tomography biomicroscopic examinations. Selective decorin delivery into stroma showed significant 52% (p<0.05, 66% (p<0.001, and 63% (p<0.01 reduction at early (day 5, mid (day 10, and late (day 14 stages of CNV in decorin-delivered rabbit corneas compared to control (no decorin delivered corneas in morphometric analysis. The H&E staining, lectin, collagen type IV, CD31 immunostaining (57-65, p<0.5, and CD31 immunoblotting (62-67%, p<0.05 supported morphometric findings. Quantitative PCR studies demonstrated decorin gene therapy down-regulated expression of VEGF, MCP1 and angiopoietin (pro-angiogenic and up-regulated PEDF (anti-angiogenic genes. The clinical, biomicroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy is safe for the cornea. Tissue-targeted AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy decreases CNV with no major side effects, and could potentially be used for treating patients.

  13. Antifibrotic Therapy in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Preserves CD4+ T-Cell Populations and Improves Immune Reconstitution With Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Jacob D.; Reilly, Cavan; Trubey, Charles M.; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Cory, Theodore J.; Piatak, Michael; Russ, Samuel; Anderson, Jodi; Reimann, Thomas G.; Star, Robert; Smith, Anthony; Tracy, Russell P.; Berglund, Anna; Schmidt, Thomas; Coalter, Vicky; Chertova, Elena; Smedley, Jeremy; Haase, Ashley T.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Schacker, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Even with prolonged antiretroviral therapy (ART), many human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals have <500 CD4+ T cells/µL, and CD4+ T cells in lymphoid tissues remain severely depleted, due in part to fibrosis of the paracortical T-cell zone (TZ) that impairs homeostatic mechanisms required for T-cell survival. We therefore used antifibrotic therapy in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques to determine whether decreased TZ fibrosis would improve reconstitution of peripheral and lymphoid CD4+ T cells. Treatment with the antifibrotic drug pirfenidone preserved TZ architecture and was associated with significantly larger populations of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues. Combining pirfenidone with an ART regimen was associated with greater preservation of CD4+ T cells than ART alone and was also associated with higher pirfenidone concentrations. These data support a potential role for antifibrotic drug treatment as adjunctive therapy with ART to improve immune reconstitution. PMID:25246534

  14. Virus Capsids as Targeted Nanoscale Delivery Vessels of Photoactive Compounds for Site-Specific Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Brian A.

    The research presented in this work details the use of a viral capsid as an addressable delivery vessel of photoactive compounds for use in photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that involves the interaction of light with a photosensitizing molecule to create singlet oxygen, a reactive oxygen species. Overproduction of singlet oxygen in cells can cause oxidative damage leading to cytotoxicity and eventually cell death. Challenges with the current generation of FDA-approved photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy primarily stem from their lack of tissue specificity. This work describes the packaging of photoactive cationic porphyrins inside the MS2 bacteriophage capsid, followed by external modification of the capsid with cancer cell-targeting G-quadruplex DNA aptamers to generate a tumor-specific photosensitizing agent. First, a cationic porphyrin is loaded into the capsids via nucleotide-driven packaging, a process that involves charge interaction between the porphyrin and the RNA inside the capsid. Results show that over 250 porphyrin molecules associate with the RNA within each MS2 capsid. Removal of RNA from the capsid severely inhibits the packaging of the cationic porphyrins. Porphyrin-virus constructs were then shown to photogenerate singlet oxygen, and cytotoxicity in non-targeted photodynamic treatment experiments. Next, each porphyrin-loaded capsid is externally modified with approximately 60 targeting DNA aptamers by employing a heterobifunctional crosslinking agent. The targeting aptamer is known to bind the protein nucleolin, a ubiquitous protein that is overexpressed on the cell surface by many cancer cell types. MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells and MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cells were selected as an in vitro model for breast cancer and normal tissue, respectively. Fluorescently tagged virus-aptamer constructs are shown to selectively target MCF-7 cells versus MCF-10A cells. Finally, results are shown in which porphyrin-virus

  15. Follow-up on long-term antiretroviral therapy for cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Sheila de Oliveira; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Anísia Praxedes; Vasconcelos, Zilton; Brindeiro, Rodrigo de Moraes; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-04-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that induces AIDS-like disease in cats. Some of the antiretroviral drugs available to treat patients with HIV type 1 are used to treat FIV-infected cats; however, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not used in cats as a long-term treatment. In this study, the effects of long-term ART were evaluated in domestic cats treated initially with the nucleoside transcriptase reverse inhibitor (NTRI) zidovudine (AZT) over a period ranging from 5-6 years, followed by a regimen of the NTRI lamivudine (3TC) plus AZT over 3 years. Viral load, sequencing of pol (reverse transcriptase [RT]) region and CD4:CD8 lymphocyte ratio were evaluated during and after treatment. Untreated cats were evaluated as a control group. CD4:CD8 ratios were lower, and uncharacterized resistance mutations were found in the RT region in the group of treated cats. A slight increase in viral load was observed in some cats after discontinuing treatment. The data strongly suggest that treated cats were resistant to therapy, and uncharacterized resistance mutations in the RT gene of FIV were selected for by AZT. Few studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of long-term antiretroviral therapy in cats. To date, resistance mutations have not been described in vivo. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  16. The Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Therapy on the DNA Base Excision Repair System of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarny, Piotr; Merecz-Sadowska, Anna; Majchrzak, Kinga; Jabłkowski, Maciej; Szemraj, Janusz; Śliwiński, Tomasz; Karwowski, Bolesław

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can infect extrahepatic tissues, including lymphocytes, creating reservoir of the virus. Moreover, HCV proteins can interact with DNA damage response proteins of infected cells. In this article we investigated the influence of the virus infection and a new ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir ± dasabuvir ± ribavirin (OBV/PTV/r ± DSV ± RBV) anti-HCV therapy on the PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, mainly lymphocytes) DNA base excision repair (BER) system. BER protein activity was analyzed in the nuclear and mitochondrial extracts (NE and ME) of PBMC isolated from patients before and after therapy, and from subjects without HCV, using modeled double-strand DNA, with 2'-deoxyuridine substitution as the DNA damage. The NE and ME obtained from patients before therapy demonstrated lower efficacy of 2'-deoxyuridine removal and DNA repair polymerization than those of the control group or patients after therapy. Moreover, the extracts from the patients after therapy had similar activity to those from the control group. However, the efficacy of apurinic/apyrimidinic site excision in NE did not differ between the studied groups. We postulate that infection of lymphocytes by the HCV can lead to a decrease in the activity of BER enzymes. However, the use of novel therapy results in the improvement of glycosylase activity as well as the regeneration of endonuclease and other crucial repair enzymes.

  17. Structure and Function of the Non-Structural Protein of Dengue Virus and its Applications in Antiviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qian; Zhang, Bao; Yu, JianHai; Wu, Qinghua; Yang, Fangji; Cao, Hong; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever, a type of global and tropical infectious disease, and its prevention has become a challenging issue worldwide. Antibody-dependent enhancement effects and the virus pathogenic mechanism have not yet been fully elucidated, hindering the development of dengue fever prevention and suitable drug treatment. There is currently no specific prevention and therapy in clinical trials, however, in recent years, studies have focused on the pathogenesis and treatment of dengue. Research focusing on dengue virus nonstructural protein in special drugs for the prevention and control of dengue fever is a new progress leading to improved understanding regarding the prevention and control of dengue fever and suitable drugs for the treatment. The main challenges regarding the structure of dengue virus nonstructural protein and the drugs for antiviral therapy are summarized in this paper.

  18. Gene therapy with adeno-associated virus vector 5-human factor IX in adults with hemophilia B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miesbach, Wolfgang; Meijer, Karina; Coppens, Michiel

    2018-01-01

    Hemophilia B gene therapy aims to ameliorate bleeding risk and provide endogenous factor IX (FIX) activity/synthesis through a single treatment, eliminating the requirement for FIX concentrate. AMT-060 combines an adeno-associated virus-5 (AAV5) vector with a liver-specific promoter driving expre...

  19. Research advances in microRNAs in regulating hepatitis C virus replication and antiviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUI Xianghua

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the most common causes of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small, non-coding RNA, are involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes in human bodies. The mechanism by which miRNAs regulate HCV replication is described, and the effects of liver-specific microRNA-122 antagonists on hepatitis C antiviral therapy are discussed. Our study indicates that miRNAs play an important regulatory role in HCV expression. Targeting miRNAs may be a potential therapeutic approach for treating HCV infection, but further studies are still in need.

  20. Ocular herpes simplex virus: how are latency, reactivation, recurrent disease and therapy interrelated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dujaili, Lena J; Clerkin, Patrick P; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2011-08-01

    Most humans are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in early childhood and remain latently infected throughout life. While most individuals have mild or no symptoms, some will develop destructive HSV keratitis. Ocular infection with HSV-1 and its associated sequelae account for the majority of corneal blindness in industrialized nations. Neuronal latency in the peripheral ganglia is established when transcription of the viral genome is repressed (silenced) except for the latency-associated transcripts and microRNAs. The functions of latency-associated transcripts have been investigated since 1987. Roles have been suggested relating to reactivation, establishment of latency, neuronal protection, antiapoptosis, apoptosis, virulence and asymptomatic shedding. Here, we review HSV-1 latent infections, reactivation, recurrent disease and antiviral therapies for the ocular HSV diseases.

  1. Ocular herpes simplex virus: how are latency, reactivation, recurrent disease and therapy interrelated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dujaili, Lena J; Clerkin, Patrick P; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2012-01-01

    Most humans are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in early childhood and remain latently infected throughout life. While most individuals have mild or no symptoms, some will develop destructive HSV keratitis. Ocular infection with HSV-1 and its associated sequelae account for the majority of corneal blindness in industrialized nations. Neuronal latency in the peripheral ganglia is established when transcription of the viral genome is repressed (silenced) except for the latency-associated transcripts and microRNAs. The functions of latency-associated transcripts have been investigated since 1987. Roles have been suggested relating to reactivation, establishment of latency, neuronal protection, antiapoptosis, apoptosis, virulence and asymptomatic shedding. Here, we review HSV-1 latent infections, reactivation, recurrent disease and antiviral therapies for the ocular HSV diseases. PMID:21861620

  2. Advances in Developing Therapies to Combat Zika Virus: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Munjal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV remained largely quiescent for nearly six decades after its first appearance in 1947. ZIKV reappeared after 2007, resulting in a declaration of an international “public health emergency” in 2016 by the World Health Organization (WHO. Until this time, ZIKV was considered to induce only mild illness, but it has now been established as the cause of severe clinical manifestations, including fetal anomalies, neurological problems, and autoimmune disorders. Infection during pregnancy can cause congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly and neurological degeneration, and in other cases, Guillain-Barré syndrome, making infections with ZIKV a substantial public health concern. Genomic and molecular investigations are underway to investigate ZIKV pathology and its recent enhanced pathogenicity, as well as to design safe and potent vaccines, drugs, and therapeutics. This review describes progress in the design and development of various anti-ZIKV therapeutics, including drugs targeting virus entry into cells and the helicase protein, nucleosides, inhibitors of NS3 protein, small molecules, methyltransferase inhibitors, interferons, repurposed drugs, drugs designed with the aid of computers, neutralizing antibodies, convalescent serum, antibodies that limit antibody-dependent enhancement, and herbal medicines. Additionally, covalent inhibitors of viral protein expression and anti-Toll-like receptor molecules are discussed. To counter ZIKV-associated disease, we need to make rapid progress in developing novel therapies that work effectually to inhibit ZIKV.

  3. Combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin promotes multiple adaptive solutions in hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, José M; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María A; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Carnicer, Fernando; Olmo, Juan Del; Ortega, Enrique; González-Candelas, Fernando; Moya, Andrés

    2009-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) presents several regions involved potentially in evading antiviral treatment and host immune system. Two regions, known as PKR-BD and V3 domains, have been proposed to be involved in resistance to interferon. Additionally, hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein are also good candidates to participate in evasion from the immune system. In this study, we have used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin) for which samples obtained just before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment were available. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were obtained. The predominant amino acid sequences for each time sample and patient were determined. Next, the sequences of the PKR-BD and V3 domains and the hypervariable regions from different time samples were compared for each patient. The highest levels of variability were detected at the three hypervariable regions of the E2 protein and, to a lower extent, at the V3 domain of the NS5A protein. However, no clear patterns of adaptation to the host immune system or to antiviral treatment were detected. In summary, although high levels of variability are correlated to viral adaptive response, antiviral treatment does not seem to promote convergent adaptive changes. Consequently, other regions must be involved in evasion strategies likely based on a combination of multiple mechanisms, in which pools of changes along the HCV genome could confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus During Pegylated-interferon Alfa and Ribavirin Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Raghini; Janarthanan, Krishnaveni; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar

    2012-01-01

    A 16-year-old female was treated with pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN) alfa (a)-2b and ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. She attained rapid virological response. She presented with diabetic ketoacidosis after 41 weeks of therapy. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and islet cell antibodies were negative. Her fasting serum C-peptide level was <0.1 ng/mL, and the treatment course was completed. This case underlines the importance of periodic plasma glucose monitoring in patients during and after PEG-IFN and ribavirin therapy. PMID:25755410

  5. Dynamics of melanoma tumor therapy with vesicular stomatitis virus: explaining the variability in outcomes using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, D M; Offord, C P; Dev, J; Bajzer, Z; Vile, R G; Dingli, D

    2012-05-01

    Tumor selective, replication competent viruses are being tested for cancer gene therapy. This approach introduces a new therapeutic paradigm due to potential replication of the therapeutic agent and induction of a tumor-specific immune response. However, the experimental outcomes are quite variable, even when studies utilize highly inbred strains of mice and the same cell line and virus. Recognizing that virotherapy is an exercise in population dynamics, we utilize mathematical modeling to understand the variable outcomes observed when B16ova malignant melanoma tumors are treated with vesicular stomatitis virus in syngeneic, fully immunocompetent mice. We show how variability in the initial tumor size and the actual amount of virus delivered to the tumor have critical roles on the outcome of therapy. Virotherapy works best when tumors are small, and a robust innate immune response can lead to superior tumor control. Strategies that reduce tumor burden without suppressing the immune response and methods that maximize the amount of virus delivered to the tumor should optimize tumor control in this model system.

  6. Adeno-Associated Virus Gene Therapy in a Sheep Model of Tay-Sachs Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Randle, Ashley N; Maitland, Stacy A; Benatti, Hector R; Hubbard, Spencer M; Canning, Peter F; Vogel, Matthew B; Brunson, Brandon L; Hwang, Misako; Ellis, Lauren E; Bradbury, Allison M; Gentry, Atoska S; Taylor, Amanda R; Wooldridge, Anne A; Wilhite, Dewey R; Winter, Randolph L; Whitlock, Brian K; Johnson, Jacob A; Holland, Merilee; Salibi, Nouha; Beyers, Ronald J; Sartin, James L; Denney, Thomas S; Cox, Nancy R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2018-03-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme hexosaminidase A (HexA). TSD also occurs in sheep, the only experimental model of TSD that has clinical signs of disease. The natural history of sheep TSD was characterized using serial neurological evaluations, 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiograms, electrodiagnostics, and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Intracranial gene therapy was also tested using AAVrh8 monocistronic vectors encoding the α-subunit of Hex (TSD α) or a mixture of two vectors encoding both the α and β subunits separately (TSD α + β) injected at high (1.3 × 10 13 vector genomes) or low (4.2 × 10 12 vector genomes) dose. Delay of symptom onset and/or reduction of acquired symptoms were noted in all adeno-associated virus-treated sheep. Postmortem evaluation showed superior HexA and vector genome distribution in the brain of TSD α + β sheep compared to TSD α sheep, but spinal cord distribution was low in all groups. Isozyme analysis showed superior HexA formation after treatment with both vectors (TSD α + β), and ganglioside clearance was most widespread in the TSD α + β high-dose sheep. Microglial activation and proliferation in TSD sheep-most prominent in the cerebrum-were attenuated after gene therapy. This report demonstrates therapeutic efficacy for TSD in the sheep brain, which is on the same order of magnitude as a child's brain.

  7. A review of palivizumab and emerging therapies for respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadman, Kristin A; Wald, Ellen R

    2011-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important pathogen in children and adults; however, current treatment options are primarily supportive. Palivizumab, the only approved specific monoclonal antibody for RSV is used prophylactically to reduce morbidity in a select population of high-risk children. The development and current use of palivizumab; the potential role of palivizumab as preventive therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis, asthma and compromised immune systems; and explores the limited research in which palivizumab has been used for treatment of RSV. The modified recommendations for the use of palivizumab espoused by the American Academy of Pediatrics and research on the cost-effectiveness of this product are presented. In addition, the authors discuss the development of enhanced monoclonal antibodies including motavizumab, which was recently denied FDA approval for preventative therapy. The authors explore the historical and current efforts to develop a vaccine targeting RSV. The current status of antiviral drug development is also reviewed. The literature search included RSV-Ig, palivizumab, and emerging drugs and vaccines for the treatment of RSV as keywords and titles from 1997 to 2011. Although there are potential drugs and vaccines in development to prevent or reduce the effects of RSV infection, palivizumab remains the only licensed product to reduce the severity of disease in high-risk pediatric patients.

  8. Attitudes and Willingness to Assume Risk of Experimental Therapy to Eradicate Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseso, Linda; Magaret, Amalia S; Jerome, Keith R; Fox, Julie; Wald, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment of genital herpes is focused on ameliorating signs and symptoms but is not curative. However, as potential herpes simplex virus (HSV) cure approaches are tested in the laboratory, we aimed to assess the interest in such studies by persons with genital herpes and the willingness to assume risks associated with experimental therapy. We constructed an anonymous online questionnaire that was posted on websites that provide information regarding genital herpes. The questions collected demographic and clinical information on adults who self-reported as having genital herpes, and assessed attitudes toward and willingness to participate in HSV cure clinical research. Seven hundred eleven participants provided sufficient responses to be included in the analysis. Sixty-six percent were women; the median age was 37 years, and the median time since genital HSV diagnosis was 4.7 years. The willingness to participate in trials increased from 59.0% in phase 1 to 68.5% in phase 2, and 81.2% in phase 3 trials, and 40% reported willingness to participate even in the absence of immediate, personal benefits. The most desirable outcome was the elimination of risk for transmission to sex partner or neonate. The mean perceived severity of receiving a diagnosis of genital HSV-2 was 4.2 on a scale of 1 to 5. Despite suppressive therapy available, persons with genital herpes are interested in participating in clinical research aimed at curing HSV, especially in more advanced stages of development.

  9. Immunotherapy of murine leukemia. Efficacy of passive serum therapy of Friend leukemia virus-induced disease in immunocompromised mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genovesi, E.V.; Livnat, D.; Collins, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the passive therapy of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced disease with chimpanzee anti-F-MuLV serum is accompanied by the development of host antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, the latter measurable in adoptive transfer protocols and by the ability of serum-protected mice to resist virus rechallenge. The present study was designed to further examine the contribution of various compartments of the host immune system to serum therapy itself, as well as to the acquired antiviral immunity that develops in serum-protected mice, through the use of naturally immunocompromised animals [e.g., nude athymic mice and natural killer (NK)-deficient beige mutant mice] or mice treated with immunoabrogating agents such as sublethal irradiation, cyclophosphamide [Cytoxan (Cy)], cortisone, and 89 Sr. The studies in nude mice indicate that while mature T-cells are not needed for effective serum therapy, they do appear to be necessary for the long-term resistance of serum-protected mice to virus rechallenge and for the generation of the cell population(s) responsible for adoptive transfer of antiviral immunity. Furthermore, this acquired resistance is not due to virus neutralization by serum antibodies since antibody-negative, Cy-treated, serum-protected mice still reject the secondary virus infection. Lastly, while the immunocompromise systems examined did effect various host antiviral immune responses, none of them, including the NK-deficient beige mutation, significantly diminished the efficacy of the passive serum therapy of F-MuLV-induced disease

  10. Impact of a Rapid Herpes Simplex Virus PCR Assay on Duration of Acyclovir Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Tam T; Mongkolrattanothai, Kanokporn; Arevalo, Melissa; Lustestica, Maryann; Dien Bard, Jennifer

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates in children. This study assessed the impact of a direct HSV (dHSV) PCR assay on the time to result reporting and the duration of acyclovir therapy for children with signs and symptoms of meningitis and encephalitis. A total of 363 patients with HSV PCR results from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were included in this retrospective analysis, divided into preimplementation and postimplementation groups. For the preimplementation group, CSF testing was performed using a laboratory-developed real-time PCR assay; for the postimplementation group, CSF samples were tested using a direct sample-to-answer assay. All CSF samples were negative for HSV. Over 60% of patients from both groups were prescribed acyclovir. The average HSV PCR test turnaround time for the postimplementation group was reduced by 14.5 h (23.6 h versus 9.1 h; P < 0.001). Furthermore, 79 patients (43.6%) in the postimplementation group had dHSV PCR results reported <4 h after specimen collection. The mean time from specimen collection to acyclovir discontinuation was 17.1 h shorter in the postimplementation group (31.1 h versus 14 h; P < 0.001). The median duration of acyclovir therapy was also significantly reduced in the postimplementation group (29.2 h versus 14.3 h; P = 0.01). Our investigation suggests that implementation of rapid HSV PCR testing can decrease turnaround times and the duration of unnecessary acyclovir therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Reduced Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-HBV-Coinfected Individuals Receiving HBV-Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J. Judy; Wightman, Fiona; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Ayres, Anna; Kent, Stephen J.; Sasadeusz, Joseph; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2005-01-01

    Functional hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T cells are significantly diminished in individuals chronically infected with HBV compared to individuals with self-limiting HBV infection or those on anti-HBV therapy. In individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), coinfection with HBV is associated with an increased risk of worsening liver function following antiviral therapy and of more rapid HBV disease progression. Total HBV-specific T-cell responses in subjects with ...

  12. Improvement of therapy for escherichiosis in children infected with Epstein-Barr virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.S. Olkhovskyy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Escherichiosis remains one of the most common intestinal infections, especially among young children. Indigestion of essential nutrients, transient fermentopathy, imbalance of the symbiotic flora, which develop in escherichiosis in combination with general intoxication and water-electrolyte disturbances, can lead to unfavorable outcomes. One of the factors influencing the course of escherichiosis can be Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection in the child. Purpose of the research — improvement of treatment of children with escherichiosis and EBV infection in different periods of the disease. Materials and methods. We examined 74 children aged 2–3 years, who were treated at the Regional Children’s Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital in Kharkiv with a diagnosis of moderate-to-severe escherichiosis. A group of 36 children was selected, who received conventional therapy with early gradual restoration of nutrition according to the existing protocol, and the restoration of the qualitative and quantitative composition of food was carried out as soon as possible (first group. The second group was represented by 38 children, who received two-day prolonged gradual restoration of the diet: more gradual increasing the volume of food at each feeding and reducing the number of feedings per day. Children of the second group received drugs containing Lactobacillus, milk thistle extract and B vitamins (once daily with meals from the first day. Ultrasound examination of the abdominal cavity was performed in all children. Results. Analysis of the main clinical, laboratory and instrumental parameters of patients in both groups during their stay in the hospital and one month after the discharge from the hospital revealed that in children of the second group, in whom rational diet therapy was applied, there was a reduction in the duration of bowel dysfunction, abdominal syndrome, flatulence; the parameters of the coprological test and the echosonoscopy

  13. Outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children after anti-retroviral therapy in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Fong Siew; Fahey, Paul; Nik Yusoff, Nik K; Razali, Kamarul A; Nallusamy, Revathy

    2015-02-01

    To describe outcome and examine factors associated with mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children in Malaysia after anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Retrospective and prospective data collected through March 2009 from children in four different states in Malaysia enrolled in TREAT Asia's Pediatric HIV Observational Database were analysed. Of 347 children in the cohort, only 278 (80.1%) were commenced on ART. The median CD4 count and median age at baseline prior to ART was 272 cells/μL and 4.2 years (interquartile range (IQR): 1.4, 7.4 years), respectively. The median duration of follow-up was 3.7 years (IQR: 1.8, 6.0) with 32 deaths giving a crude mortality rate of 2.86 per 100 child-years. The mortality rate highest in the first 6 months of ART was 10.62 per 100 child-years and declined to 1.83 per 100 child-years thereafter. On univariate analyses, only baseline median CD4 percentage, weight for age z score, height for age z score and anaemia were significantly associated with mortality. Upon including all four of these predictors into a single multivariate model, only weight for age z score remained statistically significantly predictive of mortality. Children commenced on ART had high mortality in the first 6 months especially in those with low CD4 percentage, wasting and anaemia. Poor nutritional status is an important independent predictor of mortality in this study. Besides initiating ART therapy, nutritional support and intervention must receive the utmost attention. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Targeted Therapy of Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarene Koh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy using a patient’s own T cells redirected to recognize and kill tumor cells has achieved promising results in metastatic melanoma and leukemia. This technique involves harnessing a patient’s T cells and then delivering a gene that encodes a new T cell receptor (TCR or a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR that allow the cells to recognize specific cancer antigens. The prospect of using engineered T cell therapy for persistent viral infections like hepatitis B virus (HBV and their associated malignancies is promising. We recently tested in a first-in-man clinical trial, the ability of HBV-specific TCR-redirected T cells to target HBsAg-productive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and demonstrated that these redirected T cells recognized HCC cells with HBV–DNA integration [1] We discuss here the possibility to use HBV-specific TCR-redirected T cells targeting hepatitis B viral antigens as a tumor specific antigen in patients with HBV-related HCC, and the potential challenges facing the development of this new immunotherapeutic strategy.

  15. Assessment of different virus-mediated approaches for retinal gene therapy of Usher 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Vanda S; Diemer, Tanja; Williams, David S

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome type 1B, which is characterized by congenital deafness and progressive retinal degeneration, is caused by the loss of the function of MYO7A. Prevention of the retinal degeneration should be possible by delivering functional MYO7A to retinal cells. Although this approach has been used successfully in clinical trials for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA2), it remains a challenge for Usher 1B because of the large size of the MYO7A cDNA. Different viral vectors have been tested for use in MYO7A gene therapy. Here, we review approaches with lentiviruses, which can accommodate larger genes, as well as attempts to use adeno-associated virus (AAV), which has a smaller packaging capacity. In conclusion, both types of viral vector appear to be effective. Despite concerns about the ability of lentiviruses to access the photoreceptor cells, a phenotype of the photoreceptors of Myo7a-mutant mice can be corrected. And although MYO7A cDNA is significantly larger than the nominal carrying capacity of AAV, AAV-MYO7A in single vectors also corrected Myo7a-mutant phenotypes in photoreceptor and RPE cells. Interestingly, however, a dual AAV vector approach was found to be much less effective.

  16. Oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy II. Cell-internal factors for conditional growth in neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stephanie A; Gromeier, Matthias

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of virus-host interactions have fueled new studies in the field of oncolytic viruses. The first part of this review explained how cell-external factors, such as cellular receptors, influence tumor tropism and specificity of oncolytic virus candidates. In the second part of this review, we focus on cellinternal factors that mediate tumor-specific virus growth. An oncolytic virus must be able to replicate within cancerous cells and kill them without collateral damage to healthy surrounding cells. This desirable property is inherent to some proposed oncolytic viral agents or has been achieved by genetic manipulation in others.

  17. Research for virus infectious protection on high-dose recipient host and its therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hideki; Takahashi, Hidemune

    2004-01-01

    Irradiation effects to infectious disease and infectious immunity were investigated using herpes virus and influenza virus of mouse. Protection mechanisms, in which virus infections to living body are protected under the irradiation, were analyzed. Mouse ligaments, dsRNA, Poly(I:C), Lipopolysaccharide(LPS) and Choleratoxin (CTB) were used as conductors to innate immunity. The Poly(I:C), LPS and CTB were injected to mice by intranasal inoculation. Influenza virus was given to the mice at 6 hrs, one day, 3 and 7 days after the inoculation. A virus titer of each group was measured. The infection of influenza virus was suppressed extremely at the groups of 6 hrs and one day after the LPS inoculation. The virus infectious protection was possible by innate immunity conduction, and the protection ability was kept at sublethal dose irradiation. (M. Suetake)

  18. Live attenuated measles virus vaccine therapy for locally established malignant glioblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shammari AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Al-Shammari,1 Farah E Ismaeel,2 Shahlaa M Salih,2 Nahi Y Yaseen11Experimental Therapy Department, Iraqi Center for Cancer and Medical Genetic Researches, Mustansiriya University, 2Departments of Biotechnology, College of Science, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, IraqAbstract: Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, with poor prognosis. A new glioblastoma cell line (ANGM5 was established from a cerebral glioblastoma multiforme in a 72-year-old Iraqi man who underwent surgery for an intracranial tumor. This study was carried out to evaluate the antitumor effect of live attenuated measles virus (MV Schwarz vaccine strain on glioblastoma multiforme tumor cell lines in vitro. Live attenuated MV Schwarz strain was propagated on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human glioblastoma-multiform (ANGM5 cell lines. The infected confluent monolayer appeared to be covered with syncytia with granulation and vacuolation, as well as cell rounding, shrinkage, and large empty space with cell debris as a result of cell lysis and death. Cell lines infected with virus have the ability for hemadsorption to human red blood cells after 72 hours of infection, whereas no hemadsorption of uninfected cells is seen. Detection of MV hemagglutinin protein by monoclonal antibodies in infected cells of all cell lines by immunocytochemistry assay gave positive results (brown color in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cell viability was measured after 72 hours of infection by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results showed a significant cytotoxic effect for MV (P≤0.05 on growth of ANGM5 and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines after 72 hours of infection. Induction of apoptosis by MV was assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potentials in tumor cells after 48, 72, and 120 hours of infection. Apoptotic cells were counted, and the mean percentage of dead cells was significantly higher after 48, 72

  19. Timing of Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)–Associated Tuberculous Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, M. Estee; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Mai, Pham Phuong; Dung, Nguyen Thi; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Tien, Nguyen Anh; Minh, N. H.; Hien, Nguyen Quang; Thai, Phan Vuong Khac; Dong, Doan The; Anh, Do Thi Tuong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Cam; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Quy, Hoang Thi; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Hien, Tran Tinh; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Simmons, Cameron Paul; de Jong, Menno; Wolbers, Marcel; Farrar, Jeremy James

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated tuberculous meningitis is unknown. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of immediate versus deferred ART in patients with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis to determine whether immediate ART reduced the risk of death. Antiretroviral drugs (zidovudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz) were started either at study entry or 2 months after randomization. All patients were treated with standard antituberculosis treatment, adjunctive dexamethasone, and prophylactic co-trimoxazole and were followed up for 12 months. We conducted intention-to-treat, per-protocol, and prespecified subgroup analyses. Results A total of 253 patients were randomized, 127 in the immediate ART group and 126 in the deferred ART group; 76 and 70 patients died within 9 months in the immediate and deferred ART groups, respectively. Immediate ART was not significantly associated with 9-month mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], .81–1.55; P = .50) or the time to new AIDS events or death (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, .87–1.55; P = .31). The percentage of patients with severe (grade 3 or 4) adverse events was high in both arms (90% in the immediate ART group and 89% in the deferred ART group; P = .84), but there were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm (102 in the immediate ART group vs 87 in the deferred ART group; P = .04). Conclusions Immediate ART initiation does not improve outcome in patients presenting with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. There were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm, supporting delayed initiation of ART in HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. Clinical Trials Registration ISRCTN63659091. PMID:21596680

  20. Immunomodulatory Therapy of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Adriaensen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL–human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection experience increased drug toxicity and treatment failure rates compared to VL patients, with more frequent VL relapse and death. In the era of VL elimination strategies, HIV coinfection is progressively becoming a key challenge, because HIV-coinfected patients respond poorly to conventional VL treatment and play an important role in parasite transmission. With limited chemotherapeutic options and a paucity of novel anti-parasitic drugs, new interventions that target host immunity may offer an effective alternative. In this review, we first summarize current views on how VL immunopathology is significantly affected by HIV coinfection. We then review current clinical and promising preclinical immunomodulatory interventions in the field of VL and discuss how these may operate in the context of a concurrent HIV infection. Caveats are formulated as these interventions may unpredictably impact the delicate balance between boosting of beneficial VL-specific responses and deleterious immune activation/hyperinflammation, activation of latent provirus or increased HIV-susceptibility of target cells. Evidence is lacking to prioritize a target molecule and a more detailed account of the immunological status induced by the coinfection as well as surrogate markers of cure and protection are still required. We do, however, argue that virologically suppressed VL patients with a recovered immune system, in whom effective antiretroviral therapy alone is not able to restore protective immunity, can be considered a relevant target group for an immunomodulatory intervention. Finally, we provide perspectives on the translation of novel theories on synergistic immune cell cross-talk into an effective treatment strategy for VL–HIV-coinfected patients.

  1. Immunomodulatory Therapy of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Coinfected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaensen, Wim; Dorlo, Thomas P. C.; Vanham, Guido; Kestens, Luc; Kaye, Paul M.; van Griensven, Johan

    2018-01-01

    Patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL)–human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection experience increased drug toxicity and treatment failure rates compared to VL patients, with more frequent VL relapse and death. In the era of VL elimination strategies, HIV coinfection is progressively becoming a key challenge, because HIV-coinfected patients respond poorly to conventional VL treatment and play an important role in parasite transmission. With limited chemotherapeutic options and a paucity of novel anti-parasitic drugs, new interventions that target host immunity may offer an effective alternative. In this review, we first summarize current views on how VL immunopathology is significantly affected by HIV coinfection. We then review current clinical and promising preclinical immunomodulatory interventions in the field of VL and discuss how these may operate in the context of a concurrent HIV infection. Caveats are formulated as these interventions may unpredictably impact the delicate balance between boosting of beneficial VL-specific responses and deleterious immune activation/hyperinflammation, activation of latent provirus or increased HIV-susceptibility of target cells. Evidence is lacking to prioritize a target molecule and a more detailed account of the immunological status induced by the coinfection as well as surrogate markers of cure and protection are still required. We do, however, argue that virologically suppressed VL patients with a recovered immune system, in whom effective antiretroviral therapy alone is not able to restore protective immunity, can be considered a relevant target group for an immunomodulatory intervention. Finally, we provide perspectives on the translation of novel theories on synergistic immune cell cross-talk into an effective treatment strategy for VL–HIV-coinfected patients. PMID:29375567

  2. [Pulmonary hypertension in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: the role of antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalla, Julián; Urdiales, Daniel; Pombo, Marta; del Arco, Alfonso; de la Torre, Javier; Prada, José Luis

    2014-03-20

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious disorder, more prevalent in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is not entirely clear what role is played by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in PAH development or course. Our aim was to describe PAH prevalence in a series of HIV-infected patients and identify possible links with cumulative and current use of different antiretrovirals. Cross-sectional study of a cohort of HIV-infected patients attending a hospital in southern Spain. Demographic data, data on HIV infection status and on cumulative and recent antiretroviral treatment were recorded. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all study participants. PAH was defined as pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 36mmHg or more. A total of 400 patients participated in the study; 178 presented with tricuspid regurgitation and 22 of these presented with PAH (5.5%). No differences were encountered in age, sex, CD4 lymphocytes, proportion of naive patients or patients with AIDS. No differences were encountered in cumulative use of antiretrovirals. However, recent use of lamivudine was associated with a greater presence of PAH, whereas recent use of tenofovir and emtricitabine was associated with a lower presence of PAH. Logistic regression analysis was performed including the use of lamivudine, emtricitabine and tenofovir. Only recent use of tenofovir was associated with a lower presence of PAH (odds ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.17-0.84). PAH prevalence in our study was similar to others series. Current use of tenofovir may be associated with lower PAH prevalence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. A case report of Epstein–Barr virus-associated retinal vasculitis: successful treatment using only acyclovir therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keorochana N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Narumon Keorochana Department of Ophthalmology, Phramongkutklao Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand Abstract: The purpose of this study was to describe a presumed case of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV-associated retinal vasculitis in a 42-year-old female with sudden unilateral vision loss and successful treatment with acyclovir therapy. Diagnostic vitreous biopsy of the right eye was performed to test for EBV and other known infectious causes of retinitis and evaluate vitreous cells and serological testing. Vitreous polymerase chain reaction viral DNA testing result was positive for EBV but negative for herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus. Serologic testing was negative for toxoplasma gondii, syphilis, tuberculosis, and HIV. Histopathologic analysis of vitreous cells revealed atypical lymphocytes. Fluorescein angiography showed disk leakage, occluded retinal artery, peripheral vascular leakage, and ischemic area of the right eye. Intravenous acyclovir, 10 mg/kg/d, was prescribed for 14 days followed by oral acyclovir for 3 months. All lesions have become quiet. EBV may be a cause of retinal disease, and intravenous acyclovir is a successful treatment choice. Keywords: Epstein-Barr virus, retinal vasculitis, acyclovir, treatment

  4. Virus-directed enzyme prodrug therapy and the assessment of the cytotoxic impact of some benzimidazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczuk, Michał; Boguszewska, Karolina; Żebrowska, Marta; Balcerczak, Ewa; Stasiak, Marta; Świątkowska, Maria; Błaszczak-Świątkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-07-01

    Virus-directed enzyme prodrug therapy is one of the major strategy of increasing cytotoxicity of bioreductive agents. This research intended to examine new selected benzimidazole derivatives as a substrate for nitroreductase, the enzyme involved in nitroreduction which is responsible to the production of cytotoxic metabolites. In this way, the selectivity and strength of cytotoxicity can be raised. The effect of benzimidazoles on virus transfected cells and non-virus transfected cells A549 cell line was established by Annexin V + propidium iodide test, western blot, and polymerase chain reaction analysis of specific pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the corresponding gene expression and additionally nitroreductase gene expression. Our results proved the pro-apoptotic properties of all tested compounds in normoxia and hypoxia, especially according to virused A549 cells where the time of exposition was reduced from 48 to 4 h. In this shorten period of time, the strongest activity was shown by N-oxide compounds with nitro-groups. The apoptosis was confirmed by generation of BAX gene and protein and reduction of BCL2 gene and protein.

  5. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  6. Combined Analysis of the Prevalence of drug Resistant Hepatitis B Virus in antiviral therapy Experienced patients in Europe (CAPRE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermans, L E; Svicher, V; Pas, S D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: European guidelines recommend treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB) with the nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) entecavir or tenofovir. However, many European CHB patients have been exposed to other NAs, which are associated with therapy failure and resistance. The CAPRE study...... was performed to gain insight in prevalence and characteristics of NA resistance in Europe. METHODS: A survey was performed on genotypic resistance testing results acquired during routine monitoring of CHB patients with detectable serum hepatitis B virus DNA in European tertiary referral centers. RESULTS: Data...... from 1568 patients were included. The majority (73.8%) were exposed to lamivudine monotherapy. Drug-resistant strains were detected in 52.7%. The most frequently encountered primary mutation was M204V/I (48.7%), followed by A181T/V (3.8%) and N236T (2.6%). In patients exposed to entecavir (n = 102...

  7. Evaluation of radiation effects against C6 glioma in combination with vaccinia virus-p53 gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D. S.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Timiryasova, T.; Chen, B.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of recombinant vaccinia virus-p53 (rVV-p53) in combination with radiation therapy against the C6 rat glioma, a p53 deficient tumor that is relatively radioresistant. VV-LIVP, the parental virus (Lister strain), was used as a control. Localized treatment of subcutaneous C6 tumors in athymic mice with either rVV-p53 or VV-LIVP together with tumor irradiation resulted in low tumor incidence and significantly slower tumor progression compared to the agents given as single modalities. Assays of blood and spleen indicated that immune system activation may account, at least partly, for the enhance tumor inhibition seen with combined treatment. No overt signs of treatment-related toxicity were noted.

  8. Hepatitis C virus NS3 protease genotyping and drug concentration determination during triple therapy with telaprevir or boceprevir for chronic infection with genotype 1 viruses, southeastern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherfi, Sarah; Solas, Caroline; Motte, Anne; Moreau, Jacques; Borentain, Patrick; Mokhtari, Saadia; Botta-Fridlund, Danielle; Dhiver, Catherine; Portal, Isabelle; Ruiz, Jean-Marie; Ravaux, Isabelle; Bregigeon, Sylvie; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Stein, Andreas; Gérolami, René; Brouqui, Philippe; Tamalet, Catherine; Colson, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Telaprevir and boceprevir, the two first hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs), considerably increase rates of sustained virologic response in association with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in chronic HCV genotype 1 infections. The 30 first patients treated by telaprevir or boceprevir including anti-HCV therapies since 2011 in Marseille University hospitals, France, were monitored. HCV loads and plasmatic concentrations of telaprevir and boceprevir were determined on sequential blood samples. HCV NS3 protease gene population sequencing was performed at baseline of treatment and in case of treatment failure. Fifteen patients (including 7 co-infected with HIV) received telaprevir and the other 15 patients (including 4 co-infected with HIV) received boceprevir. At baseline, HCV NS3 protease from six patients harbored amino acid substitutions associated with PI-resistance. Treatment failure occurred at week 12 for 7 patients. Amino acid substitutions associated with PI-resistance were observed in six of these cases. HCV NS3 R155K and T54A/S mutants, all of genotype 1a, were found from four patients. Median (interquartile range) plasma concentrations were 3,092 ng/ml (2,320-3,525) for telaprevir and 486 ng/ml (265-619) for boceprevir. For HIV-HCV co-infected patients, median concentrations were 3,162 ng/ml (2,270-4,232) for telaprevir and 374 ng/ml (229-519) for boceprevir. Plasma drug concentration monitoring revealed undetectable concentrations for two patients at week 4, and probable non-adherence to therapy for another patient. These findings indicate that routine HCV NS3 protease sequencing and plasma PI concentration monitoring might be helpful to characterize cases of therapy failure, at a cost dramatically low compared to that of anti-HCV therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2004-01-01

    The tasks that were originally planned for the first year of this 3 year project are to demonstrate that the fusogenic oncolytic herpes simplex viruses are potent anti-tumor agents for advanced ovarian cancer...

  10. Poor neurological sequelae of herpes simplex virus encephalitis in an infant despite adequate antiviral and adjunct corticosteroid therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna B Basak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old infant presented to our emergency department with fever, altered consciousness, and focal seizures of acute onset. He had vesicular skin lesions over the right preauricular region. CT brain showed a large hypodense lesion involving the left temporo-parietal region, left basal ganglia and left thalamus. MRI brain revealed bilateral multifocal corticomedullary lesions suggestive of encephalitis. CSF-PCR was positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV type I. He was treated with standard dose intravenous acyclovir for 15 days along with a trial of pulse methylprednisolone, but was readmitted within a week with features of an early relapse. The infant survived but developed significant neurological sequelae. Although treatment of HSV is available, the neurological outcome is guarded even with adequate antiviral therapy. Adjunct corticosteroid therapy did not appear to attenuate the neurological sequelae.

  11. Efficacy of Prompt Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in the Treatment of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Triggered by Uncontrolled Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan P. Fitzgerald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening, rapidly progressive hematologic disorder involving uncontrolled immune system activation. HLH has been associated with viral infections, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections. We report a case of a critically ill 30-year-old female who was hospitalized with HIV-associated HLH, with a CD4 count of 4 cells/mL and HIV viral load of 1,842,730 copies/mL. After ruling out other potential infectious causes of HLH, antiretroviral therapy (ART was initiated with darunavir, ritonavir, tenofovir, and emtricitabine. Within one week of initiation of ART, the patient began to improve clinically and hematologically and was stable enough for discharge from the hospital three weeks after starting therapy. This case suggests that treatment with ART in patients with HIV-associated HLH should be considered even in critically ill patients with low CD4 counts.

  12. Disabled infectious single cycle-herpes simplex virus (DISC-HSV) as a vector for immunogene therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Robert C; McArdle, Stephanie; Mian, Shahid; Li, Geng; Ahmad, Murrium; Parkinson, Richard; Ali, Selman A

    2002-02-01

    Disabled infectious single cycle-herpes simplex viruses (DISC-HSV) have been shown to be safe for use in humans and may be considered efficacious as vectors for immunogene therapy in cancer. Preclinical studies show that DISC-HSV is an efficient delivery system for cytokine genes and antigens. DISC-HSV infects a high proportion of cells, resulting in rapid gene expression for at least 72 h. The DISC-HSV-mGM-CSF vector, when inoculated into tumors, induces tumor regression in a high percentage of animals, concomitant with establishing a cytotoxic T-cell response, which is MHC class I restricted and directed against peptides of known tumor antigens. The inherent properties of DISC-HSV makes it a suitable vector for consideration in human immunogene therapy trials.

  13. Resistance-Associated NS5A Variants of Hepatitis C Virus Are Susceptible to Interferon-Based Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Itakura

    Full Text Available The presence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs of hepatitis C virus (HCV attenuates the efficacy of direct acting antivirals (DAAs. The objective of this study was to characterize the susceptibility of RAVs to interferon-based therapy.Direct and deep sequencing were performed to detect Y93H RAV in the NS5A region. Twenty nine genotype 1b patients with detectable RAV at baseline were treated by a combination of simeprevir, pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The longitudinal changes in the proportion of Y93H RAV during therapy and at breakthrough or relapse were determined.By direct sequencing, Y93H RAV became undetectable or decreased in proportion at an early time point during therapy (within 7 days in 57% of patients with both the Y93H variant and wild type virus at baseline when HCV RNA was still detectable. By deep sequencing, the proportion of Y93H RAV against Y93 wild type was 52.7% (5.8%- 97.4% at baseline which significantly decreased to 29.7% (0.16%- 98.3% within 7 days of initiation of treatment (p = 0.023. The proportion of Y93H RAV was reduced in 21 of 29 cases (72.4% and a marked reduction of more than 10% was observed in 14 cases (48.7%. HCV RNA reduction was significantly greater for Y93H RAV (-3.65±1.3 logIU/mL/day than the Y93 wild type (-3.35±1.0 logIU/mL/day (p<0.001.Y93H RAV is more susceptible to interferon-based therapy than the Y93 wild type.

  14. Resistance-Associated NS5A Variants of Hepatitis C Virus Are Susceptible to Interferon-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Jun; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Mayu; Takada, Hitomi; Nakakuki, Natsuko; Itakura, Yoshie; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Yasui, Yutaka; Suzuki, Shoko; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuka; Maekawa, Shinya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Izumi, Namiki

    2015-01-01

    The presence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) attenuates the efficacy of direct acting antivirals (DAAs). The objective of this study was to characterize the susceptibility of RAVs to interferon-based therapy. Direct and deep sequencing were performed to detect Y93H RAV in the NS5A region. Twenty nine genotype 1b patients with detectable RAV at baseline were treated by a combination of simeprevir, pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The longitudinal changes in the proportion of Y93H RAV during therapy and at breakthrough or relapse were determined. By direct sequencing, Y93H RAV became undetectable or decreased in proportion at an early time point during therapy (within 7 days) in 57% of patients with both the Y93H variant and wild type virus at baseline when HCV RNA was still detectable. By deep sequencing, the proportion of Y93H RAV against Y93 wild type was 52.7% (5.8%- 97.4%) at baseline which significantly decreased to 29.7% (0.16%- 98.3%) within 7 days of initiation of treatment (p = 0.023). The proportion of Y93H RAV was reduced in 21 of 29 cases (72.4%) and a marked reduction of more than 10% was observed in 14 cases (48.7%). HCV RNA reduction was significantly greater for Y93H RAV (-3.65±1.3 logIU/mL/day) than the Y93 wild type (-3.35±1.0 logIU/mL/day) (p<0.001). Y93H RAV is more susceptible to interferon-based therapy than the Y93 wild type.

  15. An efficient deletion mutant packaging system for defective herpes simplex virus vectors: Potential applications to human gene therapy and neuronal physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, A.I.; Keyomarsi, K.; Bryan, J.; Pardee, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have previously described a defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vector system that permits that introduction of virtually any gene into nonmitotic cells. pHSVlac, the prototype vector, stably expresses Escherichia coli β-galactosidase from a constitutive promoter in many human cell lines, in cultured rat neurons from throughout the nervous system, and in cells in the adult rat brain. HSV-1 vectors expressing other genes may prove useful for studying neuronal physiology or performing human gene therapy for neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease or brain tumors. A HSV-1 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, ts K, has been used as helper virus; ts mutants revert to wild type. In contrast, HSV-1 deletion mutants essentially cannot revert to wild type; therefore, use of a deletion mutant as helper virus might permit human gene therapy with HSV-1 vectors. They now report an efficient packaging system for HSV-1 VECTORS USING A DELETION MUTANT, d30EBA, as helper virus; virus is grown on the complementing cell line M64A. pHSVlac virus prepared using the deletion mutant packaging system stably expresses β-galactosidase in cultured rat sympathetic neurons and glia. Both D30EBA and ts K contain a mutation in the IE3 gene of HSV-1 strain 17 and have the same phenotype; therefore, changing the helper virus from ts K to D30EBA does not alter the host range or other properties of the HSV-1 vector system

  16. Yellow fever virus: genetic and phenotypic diversity and implications for detection, prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, David W C; McAuley, Alexander J; Bente, Dennis A

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is the prototypical hemorrhagic fever virus, yet our understanding of its phenotypic diversity and any molecular basis for observed differences in disease severity and epidemiology is lacking, when compared to other arthropod-borne and haemorrhagic fever viruses. This is, in part, due to the availability of safe and effective vaccines resulting in basic YFV research taking a back seat to those viruses for which no effective vaccine occurs. However, regular outbreaks occur in endemic areas, and the spread of the virus to new, previously unaffected, areas is possible. Analysis of isolates from endemic areas reveals a strong geographic association for major genotypes, and recent epidemics have demonstrated the emergence of novel sequence variants. This review aims to outline the current understanding of YFV genetic and phenotypic diversity and its sources, as well as the available animal models for characterizing these differences in vivo. The consequences of genetic diversity for detection and diagnosis of yellow fever and development of new vaccines and therapeutics are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on HIV response to antiretroviral therapy in a Chinese antiretroviral therapy center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Yang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: HBV co-infection can affect late immunological and virological responses to ART and increase the risk of hepatotoxicity. Mortality due to liver disease was high among HIV/HBV co-infected individuals in this study, despite HBV-active ART. As long as HIV/HBV co-infected persons need anti-HBV therapy, they should be recommended ART that includes agents with activity against both HIV and HBV, regardless of the CD4 cell count level.

  18. Fetal demise and failed antibody therapy during Zika virus infection of pregnant macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Diogo M; Rogers, Thomas F; Maness, Nicholas J; Grubaugh, Nathan D; Beutler, Nathan; Bailey, Varian K; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Gutman, Martin J; Pedreño-Lopez, Núria; Kwal, Jaclyn M; Ricciardi, Michael J; Myers, Tereance A; Julander, Justin G; Bohm, Rudolf P; Gilbert, Margaret H; Schiro, Faith; Aye, Pyone P; Blair, Robert V; Martins, Mauricio A; Falkenstein, Kathrine P; Kaur, Amitinder; Curry, Christine L; Kallas, Esper G; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J; Whitehead, Stephen S; Andersen, Kristian G; Bonaldo, Myrna C; Lackner, Andrew A; Panganiban, Antonito T; Burton, Dennis R; Watkins, David I

    2018-04-24

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection of pregnant women is associated with pathologic complications of fetal development. Here, we infect pregnant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with a minimally passaged ZIKV isolate from Rio de Janeiro, where a high rate of fetal development complications was observed. The infection of pregnant macaques with this virus results in maternal viremia, virus crossing into the amniotic fluid (AF), and in utero fetal deaths. We also treated three additional ZIKV-infected pregnant macaques with a cocktail of ZIKV-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (nmAbs) at peak viremia. While the nmAbs can be effective in clearing the virus from the maternal sera of treated monkeys, it is not sufficient to clear ZIKV from AF. Our report suggests that ZIKV from Brazil causes fetal demise in non-human primates (NHPs) without additional mutations or confounding co-factors. Treatment with a neutralizing anti-ZIKV nmAb cocktail is insufficient to fully stop vertical transmission.

  19. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  20. Meta-analysis of mutations in the NS5A gene and hepatitis C virus resistance to interferon therapy: uniting discordant conclusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Janke; Spaan, Willy J. M.; Kroes, Aloys C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotype 1B responds poorly to treatment with interferon, in contrast to the more interferon-sensitive genotypes 2 and 3. Studies on combination therapy regimens with PEG-interferon and ribavirin report sustained response rates that generally do not exceed 50%, in contrast to

  1. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with inserted gene coding for GM-CSF as a new vector for cancer immunogene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janke, M.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Leeuw, de O.S.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Arnold, A.; Fournier, P.; Schirrmacher, V.

    2007-01-01

    This is the first report describing recombinant (rec) Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as vector for gene therapy of cancer. The gene encoding granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was inserted as an additional transcription unit at two different positions into the NDV genome. The

  2. Have we found an optimal insertion site in a Newcastle disease virus vector to express a foreign gene for vaccine and gene therapy purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using reverse genetics technology, many strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) have been developed as vectors to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign gene is usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit. Eval...

  3. Hepatitis B virus prevalence and vaccine response in HIV-infected children and adolescents on combination antiretroviral therapy in Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutwa, Philippe R.; Boer, Kimberly R.; Rusine, John B.; Muganga, Narcisse; Tuyishimire, Diane; Reiss, Peter; Lange, Joep M. A.; Geelen, Sibyl P. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a cohort of HIV-infected Rwandan children and adolescents on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and the success rate of HBV vaccination in those children found to be HBV negative. HIV-infected

  4. Endobiont viruses sensed by the human host - beyond conventional antiparasitic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina N Fichorova

    Full Text Available Wide-spread protozoan parasites carry endosymbiotic dsRNA viruses with uncharted implications to the human host. Among them, Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasite adapted to the human genitourinary tract, infects globally ∼250 million each year rendering them more susceptible to devastating pregnancy complications (especially preterm birth, HIV infection and HPV-related cancer. While first-line antibiotic treatment (metronidazole commonly kills the protozoan pathogen, it fails to improve reproductive outcome. We show that endosymbiotic Trichomonasvirus, highly prevalent in T. vaginalis clinical isolates, is sensed by the human epithelial cells via Toll-like receptor 3, triggering Interferon Regulating Factor -3, interferon type I and proinflammatory cascades previously implicated in preterm birth and HIV-1 susceptibility. Metronidazole treatment amplified these proinflammatory responses. Thus, a new paradigm targeting the protozoan viruses along with the protozoan host may prevent trichomoniasis-attributable inflammatory sequelae.

  5. Association of opioid agonist therapy with lower incidence of hepatitis C virus infection in young adult injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I; Evans, Jennifer L; Lum, Paula J; Hahn, Judith A; Page, Kimberly

    2014-12-01

    Injection drug use is the primary mode of transmission for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Prior studies suggest opioid agonist therapy may reduce the incidence of HCV infection among injection drug users; however, little is known about the effects of this therapy in younger users. To evaluate whether opioid agonist therapy was associated with a lower incidence of HCV infection in a cohort of young adult injection drug users. Observational cohort study conducted from January 3, 2000, through August 21, 2013, with quarterly interviews and blood sampling. We recruited young adult (younger than 30 years) injection drug users who were negative for anti-HCV antibody and/or HCV RNA. Substance use treatment within the past 3 months, including non-opioid agonist forms of treatment, opioid agonist (methadone hydrochloride or buprenorphine hydrochloride) detoxification or maintenance therapy, or no treatment. Incident HCV infection documented with a new positive result for HCV RNA and/or HCV antibodies. Cumulative incidence rates (95% CI) of HCV infection were calculated assuming a Poisson distribution. Cox proportional hazards regression models were fit adjusting for age, sex, race, years of injection drug use, homelessness, and incarceration. Baseline characteristics of the sample (n = 552) included median age of 23 (interquartile range, 20-26) years; 31.9% female; 73.1% white; 39.7% who did not graduate from high school; and 69.2% who were homeless. During the observation period of 680 person-years, 171 incident cases of HCV infection occurred (incidence rate, 25.1 [95% CI, 21.6-29.2] per 100 person-years). The rate ratio was significantly lower for participants who reported recent maintenance opioid agonist therapy (0.31 [95% CI, 0.14-0.65]; P = .001) but not for those who reported recent non-opioid agonist forms of treatment (0.63 [95% CI, 0.37-1.08]; P = .09) or opioid agonist detoxification (1.45 [95% CI, 0.80-2.69]; P = .23). After adjustment for

  6. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tenofovir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients Taking Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jullien, Vincent; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Rey, Elisabeth; Jaffray, Patrick; Krivine, Anne; Moachon, Laurence; Lillo-Le Louet, Agnès; Lescoat, Anne; Dupin, Nicolas; Salmon, Dominique; Pons, Gérard; Urien, Saïk

    2005-01-01

    The influence of renal function on tenofovir pharmacokinetics was investigated in 193 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients by the use of a population approach performed with the nonlinear mixed effects modeling program NONMEM. Tenofovir pharmacokinetics was well described by a two-compartment open model in which the absorption and the distribution rate constants are equal. Typical population estimates of apparent central distribution volume (Vc/F), peripheral distribution volu...

  7. Understanding the hepatitis C virus life cycle paves the way for highly effective therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Rice, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    More than two decades of intense research has provided a detailed understanding of hepatitis C virus (HCV), which chronically infects 2% of the world's population. This effort has paved the way for the development of antiviral compounds to spare patients from life-threatening liver disease......, such as HCV diversity, viral resistance, the influence of host genetics, advanced liver disease and other co-morbidities....

  8. Current Concepts in Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Liver Disease: Clinical Outcomes, Hepatitis C Virus Association, and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Compeán, Diego; González-González, José Alberto; Lavalle-González, Fernando Javier; González-Moreno, Emmanuel Irineo; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor J

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for chronic liver disease, and ~30 % of patients with liver cirrhosis develop diabetes. Diabetes mellitus has been associated with cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic hepatitis C virus liver infection, can aggravate the course the liver infection, and can induce a lower sustained response to antiviral treatment. Evidences that HCV may induce metabolic and autoimmune disturbances leading to hypobetalipoproteinemia, steatosis, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, thyroid disease, and gonadal dysfunction have been found. Prospective studies have demonstrated that diabetes increases the risk of liver complications and death in patients with cirrhosis. However, treatment of diabetes in these patients is complex, as antidiabetic drugs can promote hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis. There have been few therapeutic studies evaluating antidiabetic treatments in patients with liver cirrhosis published to date; thus, the optimal treatment for diabetes and the impact of treatment on morbidity and mortality are not clearly known. As numbers of patients with chronic liver disease and diabetes mellitus are increasing, largely because of the global epidemics of obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, evaluation of treatment options is becoming more important. This review discusses new concepts on hepatogenous diabetes, the diabetes mellitus–hepatitis C virus association, and clinical implications of diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition, the effectiveness and safety of old and new antidiabetic drugs, including incretin-based therapies, will be described.

  9. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications.

  10. Prolonged control of replication-competent dual- tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 following cessation of highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgado Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART during primary HIV-1 infection occasionally results in transient control of viral replication after treatment interruption, the vast majority of patients eventually experience a rebound in plasma viremia. Results Here we report a case of a patient who was started on HAART during symptomatic primary infection and who has subsequently maintained viral loads of + T cells. In addition, he does not have any known protective HLA alleles. Thus it is unlikely that he was destined to become a natural elite controller or suppressor. The mechanism of control of viral replication is unclear; he is infected with a CCR5/CXCR4 dual-tropic virus that is fully replication-competent in vitro. In addition, his spouse, who transmitted the virus to him, developed AIDS. The patient's CD4+ T cells are fully susceptible to HIV-1 infection, and he has low titers of neutralizing antibodies to heterologous and autologous HIV-1 isolates. Furthermore, his CD8+ T cells do not have potent HIV suppressive activity. Conclusion This report suggests that some patients may be capable of controlling pathogenic HIV-1 isolates for extended periods of time after the cessation of HAART through a mechanism that is distinct from the potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL mediated suppression that has been reported in many elite suppressors.

  11. Simultaneous splenectomy during liver transplantation augments anti-viral therapy in patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Heng-Cheng; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Hsu, Kuo-Feng; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Chen, Teng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous splenectomy in liver transplantation (LT) is selectively indicated because of splenoportal venous thromboses and increased sepsis. Therefore, its impact should be further investigated. Of the 160 liver transplant patients, only 40 underwent simultaneous splenectomy. Clinicopathologic characteristics and outcomes were compared between the splenectomy and non-splenectomy group using retrospective analysis. Although the groups were similar and had no significant difference in the intra- and postoperative data, non-splenectomy group had more male patients. However, splenectomy group showed significantly higher platelet and leukocyte counts at 1 month and 6 months after the transplantation and higher hepatitis C virus anti-viral therapy completion. Furthermore, 3 patients developed portal or splenic vein thrombosis during the postoperative follow-up, but the overall survival rate did not significantly differ between these groups. Simultaneous splenectomy in LT can be safely performed, particularly in patients with hepatitis C virus cirrhosis, small-for-size grafts, hypersplenism, and ABO blood group incompatible (ABO - incompatible) LT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of the timing of hepatitis B virus identification and anti-hepatitis B virus therapy initiation on the risk of adverse liver outcomes for patients receiving cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jessica P; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Cantor, Scott B; Barbo, Andrea; Lin, Heather Y; Ahmed, Sairah; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Donato-Santana, Christian; Eng, Cathy; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Fisch, Michael J; McLaughlin, Peter; Simon, George R; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Lok, Anna S

    2017-09-01

    Data on the incidence of adverse liver outcomes are limited for cancer patients with chronic (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]-positive/hepatitis B core antibody [anti-HBc]-positive) or past (HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive) hepatitis B virus (HBV) after chemotherapy. This study was aimed at determining the impact of test timing and anti-HBV therapy on adverse liver outcomes in these patients. Patients with solid or hematologic malignancies who received chemotherapy between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively studied. HBV testing and anti-HBV therapy were defined as early at the initiation of cancer therapy and as late after initiation. Outcomes included hepatitis flares, hepatic impairment, liver failure, and death. Time-to-event analysis was used to determine incidence, and multivariate hazard models were used to determine predictors of outcomes. There were 18,688 study patients (80.4% with solid tumors). The prevalence of chronic HBV was 1.1% (52 of 4905), and the prevalence of past HBV was 7.1% (350 of 4905). Among patients with solid tumors, late identification of chronic HBV was associated with a higher risk of hepatitis flare (hazard ratio [HR], 4.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-12.86), hepatic impairment (HR, 8.48; 95% CI, 1.86-38.66), liver failure (HR, 9.38; 95% CI, 1.50-58.86), and death (HR, 3.90; 95% CI, 1.19-12.83) in comparison with early identification. Among patients with hematologic malignancies and chronic HBV, the risk of death was 7.8 (95% CI, 1.73-35.27) times higher for persons with late initiation of anti-HBV therapy versus early initiation. Patients with late identification of chronic HBV had late or no anti-HBV therapy. Chronic HBV predicted liver failure in patients with solid or hematologic malignancies, whereas male sex and late identification were predictors for patients with solid tumors. Early identification correlates with early anti-HBV therapy and reduces the risk of liver failure and death in chronic HBV patients

  13. Gene therapy for human glioblastoma using neurotropic JC virus-like particles as a gene delivery vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chun-Nun; Yang, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Mu-Sheng; Chou, Ming-Chieh; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Lin, Mien-Chun; Tai, Chien-Kuo; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Wang, Meilin

    2018-02-02

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor, has a short period of survival even with recent multimodality treatment. The neurotropic JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infects glial cells and oligodendrocytes and causes fatal progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in patients with AIDS. In this study, a possible gene therapy strategy for GBM using JCPyV virus-like particles (VLPs) as a gene delivery vector was investigated. We found that JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver the GFP reporter gene into tumor cells (U87-MG) for expression. In an orthotopic xenograft model, nude mice implanted with U87 cells expressing the near-infrared fluorescent protein and then treated by intratumoral injection of JCPyV VLPs carrying the thymidine kinase suicide gene, combined with ganciclovir administration, exhibited significantly prolonged survival and less tumor fluorescence during the experiment compared with controls. Furthermore, JCPyV VLPs were able to protect and deliver a suicide gene to distal subcutaneously implanted U87 cells in nude mice via blood circulation and inhibit tumor growth. These findings show that metastatic brain tumors can be targeted by JCPyV VLPs carrying a therapeutic gene, thus demonstrating the potential of JCPyV VLPs to serve as a gene therapy vector for the far highly treatment-refractory GBM.

  14. Topical hexaminolevulinate photodynamic therapy for the treatment of persistent human papilloma virus infections and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillemanns, Peter; Einstein, Mark H; Iversen, Ole Erik

    2015-02-01

    Current treatments for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) are mainly excisional procedures, which are associated with significant side effects and pose risks for future pregnancies. An effective and safe therapy is needed to reduce the requirement for surgical interventions in women of reproductive age. This review looks at the pharmacokinetic and clinical data for topical hexaminolevulinate (HAL) photodynamic therapy (PDT), which is currently entering late phase clinical trials for high-grade CIN. The authors include published studies in patients and volunteers but laboratory and animal studies have been excluded as have studies on other porphyrins such as Photofrin, 5-aminolevulinic acid, methyl aminolevulinate and studies reporting other clinical applications for HAL. Topical HAL PDT has potential as a non-surgical tissue-preserving treatment for CIN and persistent oncogenic human papilloma virus infections. HAL PDT selectively treats the entire epithelial sheet, without the tissue destruction seen in excisional procedures. The authors believe that this treatment could replace surgery in a large proportion of patients. It would be of particular value to the high percentage of women who are interested in future child-bearing. If the treatment is approved, it is very likely that physicians will want to use this treatment, as many patients will be keen to consider a non-surgical option.

  15. Development of new therapy for canine mammary cancer with recombinant measles virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising treatment strategy for cancer. We previously generated a recombinant measles virus (rMV-SLAMblind that selectively uses a poliovirus receptor-related 4 (PVRL4/Nectin4 receptor, but not signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM. We demonstrated that the virus exerts therapeutic effects against human breast cancer cells. Here, we examined the applicability of rMV-SLAMblind to treating canine mammary cancers (CMCs. We found that the susceptibilities of host cells to rMV-SLAMblind were dependent on canine Nectin-4 expression. Nectin-4 was detected in four of nine CMC cell lines. The rMV-SLAMblind efficiently infected those four Nectin-4-positive cell lines and was cytotoxic for three of them (CF33, CHMm, and CTBm. In vivo experiment showed that the administration of rMV-SLAMblind greatly suppressed the progression of tumors in mice xenografted with a CMC cell line (CF33. Immunohistochemistry revealed that canine Nectin-4 was expressed in 45% of canine mammary tumors, and the tumor cells derived from one clinical specimen were efficiently infected with rMV-SLAMblind. These results suggest that rMV-SLAMblind infects CMC cells and displays antitumor activity in vitro, in xenografts, and ex vivo. Therefore, oncolytic virotherapy with rMV-SLAMblind can be a novel method for treating CMCs.

  16. Production of a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine Containing Inactivated Autologous Virus for Therapy of Patients with Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Riddler, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus is...

  17. Richter transformation driven by Epstein-Barr virus reactivation during therapy-related immunosuppression in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barchino, Maria J; Sarasquete, Maria E; Panizo, Carlos; Morscio, Julie; Martinez, Antonio; Alcoceba, Miguel; Fresquet, Vicente; Gonzalez-Farre, Blanca; Paiva, Bruno; Young, Ken H; Robles, Eloy F; Roa, Sergio; Celay, Jon; Larrayoz, Marta; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Piris, Miguel A; Balanzategui, Ana; Jimenez, Cristina; Rodriguez, Idoia; Calasanz, Maria J; Larrayoz, Maria J; Segura, Victor; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Rabasa, Maria P; Yi, Shuhua; Li, Jianyong; Zhang, Mingzhi; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Puig-Moron, Noemi; Orfao, Alberto; Böttcher, Sebastian; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M; Miguel, Jesus San; Prosper, Felipe; Tousseyn, Thomas; Sagaert, Xavier; Gonzalez, Marcos; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2018-05-01

    The increased risk of Richter transformation (RT) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy with fludarabine other targeted agents remains controversial. Among 31 RT cases classified as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), seven (23%) showed EBV expression. In contrast to EBV - tumours, EBV + DLBCLs derived predominantly from IGVH-hypermutated CLL, and they also showed CLL-unrelated IGVH sequences more frequently. Intriguingly, despite having different cellular origins, clonally related and unrelated EBV + DLBCLs shared a previous history of immunosuppressive chemo-immunotherapy, a non-germinal centre DLBCL phenotype, EBV latency programme type II or III, and very short survival. These data suggested that EBV reactivation during therapy-related immunosuppression can transform either CLL cells or non-tumoural B lymphocytes into EBV + DLBCL. To investigate this hypothesis, xenogeneic transplantation of blood cells from 31 patients with CLL and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) was performed in Rag2 -/- IL2γc -/- mice. Remarkably, the recipients' impaired immunosurveillance favoured the spontaneous outgrowth of EBV + B-cell clones from 95% of CLL and 64% of MBL patients samples, but not from healthy donors. Eventually, these cells generated monoclonal tumours (mostly CLL-unrelated but also CLL-related), recapitulating the principal features of EBV + DLBCL in patients. Accordingly, clonally related and unrelated EBV + DLBCL xenografts showed indistinguishable cellular, virological and molecular features, and synergistically responded to combined inhibition of EBV replication with ganciclovir and B-cell receptor signalling with ibrutinib in vivo. Our study underscores the risk of RT driven by EBV in CLL patients receiving immunosuppressive therapies, and provides the scientific rationale for testing ganciclovir and ibrutinib in EBV + DLBCL. Copyright © 2018 Pathological

  18. Simple and efficient generation of virus-specific T cells for adoptive therapy using anti-4-1BB antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Nishida, Tetsuya; Goto, Tatsunori; Terakura, Seitaro; Watanabe, Keisuke; Hanajiri, Ryo; Sakemura, Reona; Imai, Misa; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki; Murata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Although recent studies of virus-specific T-cell (VST) therapy for viral infections after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have shown promising results, simple and less time-intensive and labor-intensive methods are required to generate VSTs for the wider application of VST therapy. We investigated the efficacy of anti-CD28 and anti-4-1BB antibodies, which can provide T cells with costimulatory signals similar in strength to those of antigen-presenting cells, in generating VSTs. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with viral peptides together with isotype control, anti-CD28, or anti-4-1BB antibodies, anti-4-1BB antibodies yielded the highest numbers of VSTs, which were on an average 7.9 times higher than those generated with isotype control antibody. The combination of anti-CD28 and anti-4-1BB antibodies did not result in increased numbers of VSTs compared with anti-4-1BB antibody alone. Importantly, the positive effect of anti-4-1BB antibody was observed regardless of the epitopes of the VSTs. In contrast, the capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) to generate VSTs differed considerably depending on the epitopes of the VSTs. Furthermore, the numbers of VSTs generated with DCs were at most similar to those generated with the anti-4-1BB antibody. Generation of VSTs with anti-4-1BB antibody did not result in excessive differentiation or deteriorated function of the generated VSTs compared with those generated with control antibody or DCs. In conclusion, VSTs can be generated rapidly and efficiently by simply stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with viral peptide and anti-4-1BB antibody without using antigen-presenting cells. We propose using anti-4-1BB antibody as a novel strategy to generate VSTs for adoptive therapy.

  19. Adeno-associated virus LPL(S447X) gene therapy in LDL receptor knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rip, Jaap; Sierts, Jeroen A.; Vaessen, Stefan F. C.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Twisk, Jaap; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Overexpression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) protects against atherosclerosis in genetically engineered mice. We tested whether a gene therapy vector that delivers human (h) LPL(S447X) cDNA to skeletal muscle could induce similar effects. METHODS: LDL receptor knockout (LDLr-/-) mice were

  20. Impact of occult hepatitis B virus infection on antiviral therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gamal El Din Ahmed Elsawaf

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... in the serum of patients who are negative for HBsAg. The presence ... positive. The frequency of HBV-DNA positive HCV patients has a statistically significant associa- ..... not affect the outcome of therapy at weeks 12 and 24.

  1. Detection of lipoatrophy in human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected children treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, K.; Verweel, G.; Groot, R. de; Hartwig, N.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Highly active antiretroviral therapy has been associated with lipodystrophy in adults. Much is unknown about its characteristics, especially in children. OBJECTIVE: To obtain an objective case definition of the lipodystrophy syndrome. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. One

  2. SCREENING OF PROTEASE INHIBITORS RESISTANCE MUTATIONS IN HEPATITIS C VIRUS ISOLATES INFECTING ROMANIAN PATIENTS UNEXPOSED TO TRIPLE THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, Sorin; Calistru, Petre-Iacob; Ceauşu, Emanoil; Târdeil, Graţiela; Oprişan, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Although the European recommendations include the use of new antiviral drugs for the treatment of hepatitis C, in Romania the current treatment remains interferon plus ribavirin. First generation viral protease inhibitors (i.e. boceprevir, telaprevir), which have raised the chances of obtaining viral clearance in up to 70% of infection cases produced by genotype 1 isolates, have not been introduced yet as standard treatment in our country. The success of these new antivirals is limited by the occurrence and selection of resistance mutations during therapy. We set-up a molecular study aiming to detect any resistance mutations to boceprevir and telaprevir harbored by hepatitis C isolates infecting Romanian patients naïve to viral protease inhibitors. Since these new antivirals are efficient and approved for genotype 1 infection, viral samples were genotyped following a protocol previously developed by our research group. We analyzed by both population sequencing and molecular cloning and sequencing the NS3 protease region of hepatitis C virus isolates infecting patients which were not previously exposed to boceprevir and telaprevir. All the analyzed samples were subtype 1b and resembled the samples collected in recent years from Romanian patients. Molecular cloning followed by sequencing showed great intra-host diversity, which is known to represent the source of isolates with different resistance phenotypes. Both population sequencing and molecular cloning followed by clone sequencing revealed two boceprevir resistance mutations (T54S and V55A), respectively, a telaprevir resistance mutation (T54S) in the sequences obtained from a patient with chronic hepatitis C. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating the existence of pre-treatment resistance mutations to boceprevir and telaprevir in hepatitis C virus isolates infecting Romanian patients.

  3. Predicting Early Viral Control under Direct-Acting Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Using Pretreatment Immunological Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Hutchinson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent introduction of all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA treatment has revolutionized care of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Regrettably, the high cost of DAA treatment is burdensome for healthcare systems and may be prohibitive for some patients who would otherwise benefit. Understanding how patient-related factors influence individual responses to DAA treatment may lead to more efficient prescribing. In this observational study, patients with chronic HCV infection were comprehensively monitored by flow cytometry to identify pretreatment immunological variables that predicted HCV RNA negativity within 4 weeks of commencing DAA treatment. Twenty-three patients [genotype 1a (n = 10, 1b (n = 9, and 3 (n = 4] were treated with daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir (SOF (n = 15, ledipasvir plus SOF (n = 4, or ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir (n = 4. DAA treatment most prominently altered the distribution of CD8+ memory T cell subsets. Knowing only pretreatment frequencies of CD3+ and naive CD8+ T cells allowed correct classification of 83% of patients as “fast” (HCV RNA-negative by 4 weeks or “slow” responders. In a prospective cohort, these parameters correctly classified 90% of patients. Slow responders exhibited higher frequencies of CD3+ T cells, CD8+ TEM cells, and CD5high CD27− CD57+ CD8+ chronically activated T cells, which is attributed to bystander hyperactivation of virus-non-specific CD8+ T cells. Taken together, non-specific, systemic CD8+ T cell activation predicted a longer time to viral clearance. This discovery allows pretreatment identification of individuals who may not require a full 12-week course of DAA therapy; in turn, this could lead to individualized prescribing and more efficient resource allocation.

  4. Toxicity of Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, James; Grew, David; DeLacure, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the acute morbidity of high dose head and neck RT and CRT in patients with infected with HIV. Methods and Materials: All HIV-positive patients who underwent radiation therapy for head and neck cancer in our department between 2004 and 2008 were reviewed. Treatment related data were examined. All treatments were delivered with megavoltage photon beams or electron beams. Patients were evaluated by an attending radiation oncologist for toxicity and response on a weekly basis during therapy and monthly after treatment in a multidisciplinary clinic. Acute toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group (RTOG) common toxicity criteria. Response to treatment was based on both physical exam as well as post-treatment imaging as indicated. Results: Thirteen patients who underwent RT with a diagnosis of HIV were identified. Median age was 53 years and median follow-up was 22 months. Twelve had squamous cell carcinoma and one had lymphoproliferative parotiditis. Median radiation dose was 66.4 Gy and median duration of treatment was 51 days. The median number of scheduled radiotherapy days missed was zero (range 0 to 7). One patient (8%) developed Grade 4 confluent moist desquamation. Eight patients (61%) developed Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Based on our results, HIV-positive individuals appear to tolerate treatment for head and neck cancer, with toxicity similar to that in HIV-negative individuals.

  5. Detection of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus in Semen, Urethra, and Male Reproductive Organs during Efficient Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusali, G.; Dereuddre-Bosquet, N.; Le Tortorec, A.; Moreau, M.; Satie, A.-P.; Mahé, D.; Roumaud, P.; Bourry, O.; Sylla, N.; Bernard-Stoecklin, S.; Pruvost, A.; Le Grand, R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of men receiving prolonged suppressive highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) still shed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in semen. To investigate whether this seminal shedding may be due to poor drug penetration and/or viral production by long-lived cells within male genital tissues, we analyzed semen and reproductive tissues from macaques chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus mac251 (SIVmac251) who were treated for 4 months with HAART, which was intensified over the last 7 weeks with an integrase inhibitor. We showed that a subset of treated animals continued shedding SIV in semen despite efficient HAART. This shedding was not associated with low antiretroviral drug concentrations in semen or in testis, epididymis, seminal vesicles, and prostate. HAART had no significant impact on SIV RNA in the urethra, whereas it drastically reduced SIV RNA levels in the prostate and vas deferens and to a lesser extent in the epididymis and seminal vesicle. The only detectable SIV RNA-positive cells within the male genital tract after HAART were urethral macrophages. SIV DNA levels in genital tissues were not decreased by HAART, suggesting the presence throughout the male genital tract of nonproductively infected cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that 4 months of HAART induced variable and limited control of viral infection in the male reproductive organs, particularly in the urethra, and suggest that infected long-lived cells in the male genital tract may be involved in persistent seminal shedding during HAART. These results pave the way for further investigations of male genital organ infection in long-term-treated infected individuals. IMPORTANCE A substantial subset of men receiving prolonged HAART suppressing viral loads in the blood still harbor HIV in semen, and cases of sexual transmission have been reported. To understand the origin of this persistence, we analyzed the semen and male reproductive tissues from SIV

  6. Epstein - Barr Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Štorkánová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus Bachelor thesis summarizes the findings of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), its general characteristics, transmission and spread of the virus, symptoms of disease and subsequent therapy and recovery. More specifically, it focuses on infectious mononucleosis, as well as more generally to other diseases, which the Epstein-Barr virus causes. It includes details of the vaccine against EB virus. There are the statistics on the incidence of infectious mononucleosis.

  7. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekwaletswe CT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinics in Tshwane, South Africa.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument. Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted.Results: About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an

  8. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co-infected pa......The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co......-10 viral response to HCV therapy in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  9. Preliminary guidelines for the evaluation and management of dyslipidemia in adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus and receiving antiretroviral therapy: Recommendations of the Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group Cardiovascular Disease Focus Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubé, M. P.; Sprecher, D.; Henry, W. K.; Aberg, J. A.; Torriani, F. J.; Hodis, H. N.; Schouten, J. [=Judith; Levin, J.; Myers, G.; Zackin, R.; Nevin, T.; Currier, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a prevalent condition that affects patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who are receiving antiretroviral therapy, These preliminary recommendations summarize the current understanding in this area and propose guidelines for management. Existing guidelines for the

  10. In vivo PET imaging with 18F-FHBG of hepatoma cancer gene therapy using herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and ganciclovir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, TaeSup; Kim, JunYoup; Moon, ByungSeok; Kang, JooHyun; Song, Inho; Kwon, HeeChung; Kim, KyungMin; Cheon, GiJeong; Choi, ChangWoon; Lim, SangMoo

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression in vivo to evaluate the gene therapy efficacy is a critical issue for scientists and physicians. Non-invasive nuclear imaging can offer information regarding the level of gene expression and its location when an appropriate reporter gene is constructed in the therapeutic gene therapy. Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (HSV1-tk) is the most common reporter gene and is used in cancer gene therapy by activating relatively nontoxic compounds, such as acyclovir or ganciclovir (GCV), to induce cell death. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of monitoring cancer gene therapy using retroviral vector transduced HSV1-tk and GCV, in vitro cellular uptake and in vivo animal studies, including biodistribution and small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, were performed in HSV1-tk and luciferase (Luc)-transduced MCA-TK/Luc and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-transduced MCA-eGFP hepatoma cell lines

  11. Liver ultrastructural morphology and mitochondrial DNA levels in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfection: no evidence of mitochondrial damage with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Motoi; Chu, Fanny F S; Au, May; Lu, Helen; Chen, Jennifer; Rietkerk, Sonja; Barrios, Rolando; Farley, John D; Montaner, Julio S; Montessori, Valentina C; Walker, David C; Côté, Hélène C F

    2008-06-19

    Liver mitochondrial toxicity is a concern, particularly in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. Liver biopsies from HIV/HCV co-infected patients, 14 ON-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and nine OFF-HAART, were assessed by electron microscopy quantitative morphometric analyses. Hepatocytes tended to be larger ON-HAART than OFF-HAART (P = 0.05), but mitochondrial volume, cristae density, lipid volume, mitochondrial DNA and RNA levels were similar. We found no evidence of increased mitochondrial toxicity in individuals currently on HAART, suggesting that concomitant HAART should not delay HCV therapy.

  12. Gluteal Augmentation With Intramuscular Implants in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus With Lipoatrophy Related to the Use of Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Guilherme Augusto; Coltro, Pedro Soler; Barros, Mário Eduardo; Müller Neto, Bruno Francisco; Lima, Renan Victor; Farina, Jayme Adriano

    2017-11-01

    Lipodystrophy syndrome associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may lead to low self-esteem and poor compliance with the drug treatment on patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is a matter of concern for the health system. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with HIV submitted to gluteal augmentation with intramuscular silicone implants to correct gluteal lipoatrophy related to the use of HAART. This is a retrospective evaluation of 10 patients submitted to gluteal augmentation with intramuscular silicone implant for correction of gluteal lipoatrophy related to the use of HAART, operated between 2012 and 2015. Postoperative complications and the degree of patient's satisfaction were analyzed. There were 3 postoperative complications including 1 case of surgical wound dehiscence and 2 cases of seroma. Six months after surgery, 8 patients had an excellent degree of satisfaction, and 2 patients had a good degree of satisfaction related to the procedure. Although this intervention does not offer functional advantages, it improves the body contour, increases patients' self-esteem, and helps them to accept their body image. These advantages can lead to higher compliance with prolonged HAART. Gluteal augmentation with intramuscular silicone implant can be a viable option to treat patients with HIV with gluteal lipoatrophy related to the use of HAART. The patients were satisfied with the outcomes of the procedure, and there were only minor self-limited postoperative complications.

  13. Combination therapy for hepatitis C virus with heat-shock protein 90 inhibitor 17-AAG and proteasome inhibitor MG132.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujino, Saneyuki; Yamaguchi, Saori; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2010-03-09

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease. Here, we report a new and effective strategy for inhibiting HCV replication using an inhibitor of heat-shock protein 90, 17-AAG (17-allylamino-17demethoxygeldanamycin), and a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. To explore the virological basis of combination therapy, we analysed the effects of 17-AAG and MG132, singly and in combination on HCV replication in an HCV replicon cell system. In HCV replicon cells, HCV RNA replication was suppressed by 17-AAG in a dose-dependent manner. As shown in the present study, the 50% inhibitory concentration values were 0.82 nM for 17-AAG and 0.21 nM for MG132. Low concentrations of MG132 had strong synergistic inhibitory effects with low toxicity on HCV replicon cells. The results of this study suggest that the different effects and synergistic actions of 17-AAG and MG132 could provide a new therapeutic approach to HCV infection.

  14. Role of antiviral therapy in the natural history of hepatitis B virus-related chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Francesco Paolo; Rodríguez-Castro, Kryssia; Scribano, Laura; Gottardo, Giorgia; Vanin, Veronica; Farinati, Fabio

    2015-05-18

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a dynamic state of interactions among HBV, hepatocytes, and the host immune system. Natural history studies of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection have shown an association between active viral replication and adverse clinical outcomes such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The goal of therapy for CHB is to improve quality of life and survival by preventing progression of the disease to cirrhosis, decompensation, end-stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and death. This goal can be achieved if HBV replication is suppressed in a sustained manner. The accompanying reduction in histological activity of CHB lessens the risk of cirrhosis and of HCC, particularly in non-cirrhotic patients. However, CHB infection cannot be completely eradicated, due to the persistence of covalently closed circular DNA in the nucleus of infected hepatocytes, which may explain HBV reactivation. Moreover, the integration of the HBV genome into the host genome may favour oncogenesis, development of HCC and may also contribute to HBV reactivation.

  15. Variability of hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) during the early phase of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo Cortés, K; Laskus, T; Bukowska-Ośko, I; Pawełczyk, A; Berak, H; Horban, A; Fic, M; Radkowski, M

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered to be an important factor defining viral pathogenesis, persistence and resistance to treatment. The aim of the present study was to characterize HCV genetic heterogeneity within a hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) before and during the early period of pegylated interferon alfa (PEG-IFN-α) and ribavirin treatment in correlation with treatment outcome. The study involved 24 patients treated with PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin whose sera were collected before (baseline) and at 7, 14, 21 28 and 56 day of treatment. HCV HVR-1 region was amplified by nested RT- PCR and subjected to SSCP (single strand conformational polymorphism) analysis. SSCP changes of HCV HVR-1 over time in each patient were compared to treatment outcome results. In 2/11 (18%) SVR+ and 8/13 (62%) SVR- treated patients, HVR-1 genetic changes manifested by new SSCP bands (new genetic variants) and were significantly more frequent in nonresponders (P HVR-1 variability during the early phase of PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin therapy may be predictive of treatment outcome.

  16. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linde A Miles

    Full Text Available The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001 demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC, but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M(-1s(-1, was further optimized by a P2' N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M(-1s(-1. We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development.

  17. Adaptive T cell responses induced by oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor therapy expanded by dendritic cell and cytokine-induced killer cell adoptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Gwin, William R; Zhou, Xinna; Wang, Xiaoli; Huang, Hongyan; Jiang, Ni; Zhou, Lei; Agarwal, Pankaj; Hobeika, Amy; Crosby, Erika; Hartman, Zachary C; Morse, Michael A; H Eng, Kevin; Lyerly, H Kim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : Although local oncolytic viral therapy (OVT) may enhance tumor lysis, antigen release, and adaptive immune responses, systemic antitumor responses post-therapy are limited. Adoptive immunotherapy with autologous dendritic cells (DC) and cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIK) synergizes with systemic therapies. We hypothesized that OVT with Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (HSV-GM-CSF) would induce adaptive T cell responses that could be expanded systemically with sequential DC-CIK therapy. Patients and Methods : We performed a pilot study of intratumoral HSV-GM-CSF OVT followed by autologous DC-CIK cell therapy. In addition to safety and clinical endpoints, we monitored adaptive T cell responses by quantifying T cell receptor (TCR) populations in pre-oncolytic therapy, post-oncolytic therapy, and after DC-CIK therapy. Results : Nine patients with advanced malignancy were treated with OVT (OrienX010), of whom seven experienced stable disease (SD). Five of the OVT treated patients underwent leukapheresis, generation, and delivery of DC-CIKs, and two had SD, whereas three progressed. T cell receptor sequencing of TCR β sequences one month after OVT therapy demonstrates a dynamic TCR repertoire in response to OVT therapy in the majority of patients with the systematic expansion of multiple T cell clone populations following DC-CIK therapy. This treatment was well tolerated and long-term event free and overall survival was observed in six of the nine patients. Conclusions : Strategies inducing the local activation of tumor-specific immune responses can be combined with adoptive cellular therapies to expand the adaptive T cell responses systemically and further studies are warranted.

  18. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Morojele, Neo K

    2014-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics in Tshwane, South Africa. We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test), other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument). Additionally, patients' views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted. About half of the male drinkers' and three quarters of the female drinkers' Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour's duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an alcohol-focused adherence counseling program that employs motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy-type approaches. The association between alcohol use and ART nonadherence points to a need for alcohol-focused ART adherence

  19. Utilisation of hepatocellular carcinoma screening in Australians at risk of hepatitis B virus-related carcinoma and prescribed anti-viral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard-Law, Suzanne; Zablotska-Manos, Iryna; Kermeen, Melissa; Holdaway, Susan; Lee, Alice; George, Jacob; Zekry, Amany; Maher, Lisa

    2018-07-01

    To investigate hepatocellular carcinoma screening utilisation and factors associated with utilisation among patients prescribed hepatitis B virus anti-viral therapy and at risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma has increased in Australia over the past three decades with chronic hepatitis B virus infection a major contributor. hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance programs aim to detect cancers early enabling curative treatment options, longer survival and longer times to recurrence. Multi-site cross-sectional survey. An online study questionnaire was administered to eligible participants attending three Sydney tertiary hospitals. Data were grouped into six mutually exclusive hepatocellular carcinoma risk factor categories as per American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases guidelines. All analyses were undertaken in STATA. Logistic regression was used to assess the associations between covariates and screening utilisation. Multivariate models described were assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit. Of the 177 participants, 137 (77.4%) self-reported that US had been performed in the last six months. Awareness that screening should be performed and knowing the correct frequency of US screening were independently associated with screening utilisation. Participants who knew that screening should be undertaken were three times more likely to have had pretreatment education or were prescribed hepatitis B virus anti-viral treatment for >4 years. Participants reporting a family history of hepatocellular carcinoma were less likely to know that screening should be undertaken every 6 months. While utilisation of hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance programs was higher in this study than in previous reports, strategies to further improve surveillance remain necessary. Findings from this research form the basis for proposing strategies to improve utilisation of hepatocellular carcinoma screening, inform hepatitis B virus

  20. Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Sequence Diversity on Antiretroviral Therapy Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Langs-Barlow

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide circulating HIV-1 genomes show extensive variation represented by different subtypes, polymorphisms and drug-resistant strains. Reports on the impact of sequence variation on antiretroviral therapy (ART outcomes are mixed. In this review, we summarize relevant published data from both resource-rich and resource-limited countries in the last 10 years on the impact of HIV-1 sequence diversity on treatment outcomes. The prevalence of transmission of drug resistant mutations (DRMs varies considerably, ranging from 0% to 27% worldwide. Factors such as geographic location, access and availability to ART, duration since inception of treatment programs, quality of care, risk-taking behaviors, mode of transmission, and viral subtype all dictate the prevalence in a particular geographical region. Although HIV-1 subtype may not be a good predictor of treatment outcome, review of emerging evidence supports the fact that HIV-1 genome sequence-resulting from natural polymorphisms or drug-associated mutations-matters when it comes to treatment outcomes. Therefore, continued surveillance of drug resistant variants in both treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced populations is needed to reduce the transmission of DRMs and to optimize the efficacy of the current ART armamentarium.

  1. Sorafenib tosylate, Ribavirn and Sofosbuvir combination therapy for HCV virus infected patients with decompensated liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Bushra; Ahmed, Bilal; Kiran, Shumaila; Jalal, Fatima; Zahoor, Muhammad Kashif; Shehzadi, Saba; Oranab, Sadaf; Kamran, Sayed Kashif; Ghaffar, Abdul

    2017-11-01

    Hepatitis C is the most common health problem worldwide and is major cause of death due to proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma. The medicines available for HCV treatment overcome up-to 95% complications of HCV. However, liver cancer needs some additional care. Normally Sorafenib tosylate 200 mg is recommended for liver cancer. There is no such trial in which this drug could effectively be used in combination of direct acting antivirals for HCV. The study was conducted for HCV patients (n=30) with liver cancer having decompensated stage. Combination of Sorafenib tosylate, Ribavirn and Sofosbuvir were used for the pharmacokinetics of these medicines. Child pugh score less then 7 (CP A) in adults during treatment phase (received 12 weeks of Sorafenib tosylate 200 mg, Ribavirn and Sofosbuvir 400 mg once daily) have no side effect while child pugh score 7-9 (CP B) have evidence of hypertension. The main efficiency end point sustained virology response with overcoming liver cancer as well in 12 weeks after end treatment (SVR-LLC 12). Mean pharmacokinetic exposure to Sorafenib tosylate 200 mg, Ribavirn and Sofosbuvir at week 8th was 2.1, 1.5,1.2 times greater in CP B than in CP A. Adverse effects (AEs) were observed in 12 out of 30 patients but not severe as lethal for life. Treatment with Sorafenib tosylate, Ribavirn and Sofosbuvir for twelve weeks was harmless and well accepted, 100 % patients achieve (SVR LLC 12) with 10-fold cure rate more than previous ones. The combination therapy of Sorafenib tosylate, Ribavirn and Sofosbuvir was found helpful for the management of decompensated liver cancer.

  2. Impacts of HIV infection and long-term use of antiretroviral therapy on the prevalence of oral human papilloma virus type 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornthatree, Korntip; Sriplung, Hutcha; Mitarnun, Winyou; Nittayananta, Wipawee

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) the prevalence and the copy numbers of oral human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) in HIV-infected patients compared with non-HIV controls, and (ii) the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and its duration on the virus. A cross-sectional study was carried out in HIV-infected patients with and without ART and in non-HIV controls. Saliva samples were collected, and the DNA extracted from those samples was used as a template to detect HPV-16 E6 and E7 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Student's t-test and ANOVA test were performed to determine the prevalence rates among groups. Forty-nine HIV-infected patients: 37 on ART (age range, 23-54 years; mean, 37 years), 12 not on ART (age range, 20-40 years; mean, 31 years), and 20 non-HIV controls (age range, 19-53 years; mean, 31 years) were enrolled. The prevalence of oral HPV-16 infection and the copy numbers of the virus were significantly higher in HIV-infected patients than in non-HIV controls when using E6 assay (geometric mean = 10696 vs. 563 copies/10(5) cells, P prevalence of oral HPV-16 infection and the copy numbers of the virus (P = 0.567). We conclude that the prevalence of oral HPV-16 infection and the copy numbers of the virus are increased by HIV infection. Neither the use of ART nor its duration significantly affected the virus. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of antiviral therapy during late pregnancy to prevent perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV infections are perinatally transmitted from chronically infected mothers. Supplemental antiviral therapy during late pregnancy with lamivudine (LAM, telbivudine (LdT, or tenofovir (TDF can substantially reduce perinatal HBV transmission compared to postnatal immunoprophylaxis (IP alone. However, the cost-effectiveness of these measures is not clear. Aim. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of supplemental antiviral agents for preventing perinatal HBV transmission in mothers with high viral load (>6 log10 copies/mL. Methods. A systematic review and network meta-analysis were performed for the risk of perinatal HBV transmission with antiviral therapies. A decision analysis was conducted to evaluate the clinical and economic outcomes in China of four competing strategies: postnatal IP alone (strategy IP, or in combination with perinatal LAM (strategy LAM + IP, LdT (strategy LdT + IP, or TDF (strategy TDF + IP. Antiviral treatments were administered from week 28 of gestation to 4 weeks after birth. Outcomes included treatment-related costs, number of infections, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed to identify influential clinical and cost-related variables. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to estimate the probabilities of being cost-effective for each strategy. Results. LdT + IP and TDF + IP averted the most infections and HBV-related deaths, and gained the most QALYs. IP and TDF + IP were dominated as they resulted in less or equal QALYs with higher associated costs. LdT + IP had an incremental $2,891 per QALY gained (95% CI [$932–$20,372] compared to LAM + IP (GDP per capita for China in 2013 was $6,800. One-way sensitivity analyses showed that the cost-effectiveness of LdT + IP was only sensitive to the relative risk of HBV transmission comparing LdT + IP with LAM + IP. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses

  4. Ground glass hepatocytes provide targets for therapy or prevention of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yi Chang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ground glass hepatocyte (GGH represents a histologic hallmark of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection and is characterized by the accumulation of pre-S mutant surface antigens in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In the past decade, GGHs have been recognized as pre-neoplastic lesions of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The accumulation of pre-S mutant protein in ER may induce a misfolded protein response or ER stress signals with activation of VEGF/Akt/mTOR and COX-2/NF-κB signals, leading to oxidative DNA damage, aneuploidy, and genomic instability. Molecular studies revealed clonal HBV DNA integration in type II GGHs which continue to express and secrete surface antigens, representing the sustained surface antigens in the serum after NA antiviral treatment. The persistence of GGHs in the liver after anti-viral therapy not only constitute the challenge to eliminate HBV infection but also carry the high risk to develop HCC. DNA chip and ELISA kit are designing to detect the pre-S mutants in serum. Novel or second generation anti-HBV drugs are under phase II development and include the combination of anti-virals, immunomodulators, agents for host DNA damage, and siRNA to target at the transcription of HBsAg gene in cccDNA or integrated HBV DNA. In the past years, we explored the possibility to provide drugs or natural agents targeting at ER stress signals in GGHs to prevent HCC development. In a transgenic mice model of pre-S mutant and HBx, a combination of silymarin and resveratrol targeting at mTOR and NF-κB signals could reduce a 80% of HCC development. In a pilot clinical trial, liposomal curcumin (Meriva® combined with anti-virals and immumodulators P1101 have been designed and attempted to eliminate the serum surface antigen and hence the recurrence of HCC after surgical resection. Therefore, the detection of pre-S mutants in serum or GGHs in the liver should provide rational target design for therapy or prevention of HCC in these high

  5. Production of a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine Containing Inactivated Autologous Virus for Therapy of Patients with Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Riddler, Sharon A.

    2009-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus isolation; (ii) superinfection of CD4+ T cells with the virus; (iii) inactivation of the virus in CD4+ T cells, T-cell apoptosis, and coincubation of T cells with autologous DCs; and (iv) product testing and release. Endogenous virus was isolated from peripheral blood-derived CD4+ T cells of three HIV-1-positive subjects by coincubation with autologous OKT-3-stimulated CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T-cell supernatants were tested for p24 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (>25 ng/ml) and for the 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50; which ranged from 4,642 to 46,416/ml on day 19 of culture). Autologous CD4+ T cells that were separated on immunobeads (>95% purity) and superinfected with virus-expressed p24 (28 to 54%) had TCID50 of >400/ml on days 5 to 10. Virus inactivation with psoralen (20 μg/ml) and UVB irradiation (312 nm) reduced the TCID50 of the supernatants from 199,986 to 11/ml (>99%). 7-Amino-actinomycin D-positive, annexin V-positive CD4+ T cells were fed to autologous DCs generated by using the Elutra cell separation system and the Aastrom system. Flow analysis showed that DC loading was complete in 24 h. On the basis of these translational results and experience with the generation of DCs from HIV-1-infected patients in a previous clinical trial, the Investigational New Drug application for clinical vaccination was submitted and approved by the FDA (application no. BB-IND-13137). PMID:19038780

  6. Production of a dendritic cell-based vaccine containing inactivated autologous virus for therapy of patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C; Rinaldo, Charles R; Riddler, Sharon A

    2009-02-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus isolation; (ii) superinfection of CD4(+) T cells with the virus; (iii) inactivation of the virus in CD4(+) T cells, T-cell apoptosis, and coincubation of T cells with autologous DCs; and (iv) product testing and release. Endogenous virus was isolated from peripheral blood-derived CD4(+) T cells of three HIV-1-positive subjects by coincubation with autologous OKT-3-stimulated CD4(+) T cells. CD4(+) T-cell supernatants were tested for p24 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (>25 ng/ml) and for the 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID(50); which ranged from 4,642 to 46,416/ml on day 19 of culture). Autologous CD4(+) T cells that were separated on immunobeads (>95% purity) and superinfected with virus-expressed p24 (28 to 54%) had TCID(50) of >400/ml on days 5 to 10. Virus inactivation with psoralen (20 microg/ml) and UVB irradiation (312 nm) reduced the TCID(50) of the supernatants from 199,986 to 11/ml (>99%). 7-Amino-actinomycin D-positive, annexin V-positive CD4(+) T cells were fed to autologous DCs generated by using the Elutra cell separation system and the Aastrom system. Flow analysis showed that DC loading was complete in 24 h. On the basis of these translational results and experience with the generation of DCs from HIV-1-infected patients in a previous clinical trial, the Investigational New Drug application for clinical vaccination was submitted and approved by the FDA (application no. BB-IND-13137).

  7. Antiretroviral therapy-induced insulin resistance and oxidative deoxy nucleic acid damage in human immunodeficiency virus-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kolgiri Honnapurmath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Insulin resistance (IR is frequent in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and may be related to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Increased oxidative stress parameters and carbonyl protein are linked to insulin sensitivity. The present study is aimed to determine IR, its association with oxidative deoxy nucleic acid (DNA damage in HIV-1-infected patients with different ART status. Materials and Methods: In this case–control study, a total 600 subjects were included. We used plasma levels of the oxidized base, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, as our biomarker of oxidative DNA damage. 8-OHdG was measured with the highly sensitive 8-OHdG check enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. IR was determined using homeostasis model assessment. Results: All subjects were randomly selected and grouped as HIV-negative (control group (n = 300, HIV-positive without ART (n = 100, HIV-positive with ART first line (n = 100, and HIV-positive with ART second line (n = 100. IR and oxidative DNA damage were significantly higher in HIV-positive patients with second-line ART and HIV-positive patients with first-line ART than ART-naive patients. In a linear regression analysis, increased IR was positively associated with the increased DNA damage (odds ratio: 3.052, 95% confidence interval: 2.595–3.509 P < 0.001. Interpretation and Conclusions: In this study, we observed that ART plays a significant role in the development of IR and oxidative DNA damage in HIV-positive patients taking ART. Awareness and knowledge of these biomarkers may prove helpful to clinicians while prescribing ART to HIV/AIDS patients. Larger studies are warranted to determine the exact role of ART in the induction of IR and DNA damage.

  8. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Akshaya Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%. The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52% was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm 3 with comorbid conditions.

  9. Benefit of hepatitis C virus core antigen assay in prediction of therapeutic response to interferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hidetsugu; Higashimoto, Makiko; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and first-phase kinetics between commercially available core antigen (Ag) assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag (Lumipulse-Ag), and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, version 2 (Amplicor M), to estimate the predictive benefit of a sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 44 genotype 1b patients treated with interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. HCV core Ag negativity could predict SVR on day 1 (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 85.0%, accuracy = 86.4%), whereas RNA negativity could predict SVR on day 7 (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 87.2%, accuracy = 88.6%). None of the patients who had detectable serum core Ag or RNA on day 14 achieved SVR (specificity = 100%). The predictive accuracy on day 14 was higher by RNA negativity (93.2%) than that by core Ag negativity (75.0%). The combined predictive criterion of both viral load decline during the first 24 h and basal viral load was also predictive for SVR; the sensitivities of Lumipulse-Ag and Amplicor-M were 45.5 and 47.6%, respectively, and the specificity was 100%. Amplicor-M had better predictive accuracy than Lumipulse-Ag in 2-week disappearance tests because it had better sensitivity. On the other hand, estimates of kinetic parameters were similar regardless of the detection method. Although the correlations between Lumipulse-Ag and Amplicor-M were good both before and 24 h after IFN administration, HCV core Ag seemed to be relatively lower 24 h after IFN administration than before administration. Lumipulse-Ag seems to be useful for detecting the HCV concentration during IFN therapy; however, we still need to understand the characteristics of the assay.

  10. Broad, Intense Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Ex Vivo CD8+ Responses in HIV Type 1-Infected Patients: Comparison with Anti-Epstein-Barr Virus Responses and Changes during Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalod, Marc; Dupuis, Marion; Deschemin, Jean-Christophe; Sicard, Didier; Salmon, Dominique; Delfraissy, Jean-Francois; Venet, Alain; Sinet, Martine; Guillet, Jean-Gerard

    1999-01-01

    The ex vivo antiviral CD8+ repertoires of 34 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients with various CD4+ T-cell counts and virus loads were analyzed by gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot assay, using peptides derived from HIV type 1 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Most patients recognized many HIV peptides, with markedly high frequencies, in association with all the HLA class I molecules tested. We found no correlation between the intensity of anti-HIV CD8+ responses and the CD4+ counts or virus load. In contrast, the polyclonality of anti-HIV CD8+ responses was positively correlated with the CD4+ counts. The anti-EBV responses were significantly less intense than the anti-HIV responses and were positively correlated with the CD4+ counts. Longitudinal follow-up of several patients revealed the remarkable stability of the anti-HIV and anti-EBV CD8+ responses in two patients with stable CD4+ counts, while both antiviral responses decreased in two patients with obvious progression toward disease. Last, highly active antiretroviral therapy induced marked decreases in the number of anti-HIV CD8+ T cells, while the anti-EBV responses increased. These findings emphasize the magnitude of the ex vivo HIV-specific CD8+ responses at all stages of HIV infection and suggest that the CD8+ hyperlymphocytosis commonly observed in HIV infection is driven mainly by virus replication, through intense, continuous activation of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells until ultimate progression toward disease. Nevertheless, highly polyclonal anti-HIV CD8+ responses may be associated with a better clinical status. Our data also suggest that a decrease of anti-EBV CD8+ responses may occur with depletion of CD4+ T cells, but this could be restored by highly active antiretroviral treatment. PMID:10438796

  11. Enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 targeting of head and neck cancer in combination with radiation therapy or ZD6126 vascular disrupting agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alajez Nehad M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the 5th most common cancer worldwide. Locally advanced HNSCC are treated with either radiation or chemo-radiotherapy, but still associated with high mortality rate, underscoring the need to develop novel therapies. Oncolytic viruses have been garnering increasing interest as anti-cancer agents due to their preferential killing of transformed cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 against the human hypopharyngeal FaDu tumour model in vitro and in vivo. Results Our data demonstrated high toxicity of the virus against FaDu cells in vitro, which was associated with induction of apoptosis. In vivo, systemic injection of 1 × 109 pfu had minimal effect on tumour growth; however, when combined with two doses of ionizing radiation (IR; 5 Gy each or a single injection of the vascular disrupting agent (ZD6126, the virus exhibited profound suppression of tumour growth, which translated to a prolonged survival in the treated mice. Concordantly, VSVΔ51 combined with ZD6126 led to a significant increase in viral replication in these tumours. Conclusions Our data suggest that the combinations of VSVΔ51 with either IR or ZD6126 are potentially novel therapeutic opportunities for HNSCC.

  12. Reexamination of the relationship between the prevalence of hepatitis C virus and parenteral antischistosomal therapy among Egyptians resident in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derbala M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Moutaz Derbala,1,2 Prem Chandra,3 Aliaa Amer,4 Anil John,1 Manik Sharma,1 Ashraf Amin,1 Ragesh Babu Thandassery,1 Amr Faris5 1Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, Hamad Hospital, 2Medical Department, Weill Cornell Medical College, Qatar Branch, 3Medical Research Center, Hamad Medical Corporation, 4Laboratory Medicine and Pathology Department, 5Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Hamad Hospital, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Egypt has the highest prevalence of recorded hepatitis C virus (HCV worldwide, estimated nationally at 14.7%, which is attributed to extensive iatrogenic transmission during the era of parenteral antischistosomal therapy (PAT mass-treatment campaigns. The objective of our study was to attempt to highlight to what extent HCV transmission is ongoing and discuss the possible risk factors. We studied the prevalence of HCV among 7.8% of Egyptians resident in Qatar in relation to age, socioeconomic status, and PAT and discuss the possible risk factors. HCV testing was conducted in 2,335 participants, and results were positive for 13.5%, and 8.5% for those aged below 35 years. The prevalence of HCV in the PAT-positive population was 23.7% (123 of 518, 95% confidence interval [CI] 20.2%–27.6% compared with 11.2% in the PAT-negative group. Significantly higher HCV prevalence occurred in participants who were older than 50 years (23%, 95% CI 19.3%–27.1% compared to those aged 45–50 years (19.3%, 95% CI 15.2%–23.8%, 35–45 years (11.1%, 95% CI 8.9%–13.7%, and less than 35 years (8.5%, 95% CI 6.8%–10.4% (P<0.0001. Insignificant higher prevalence occurred in the low socioeconomic group (14.2%, 95% CI 11.3%–17.4%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that increasing age, history of PAT, bilharziasis, and praziquantel were common risk factors, but there was no relation with dental care. Host genetic predisposition seems to be a plausible underlying factor for susceptibility among Egyptians and intense ongoing infection

  13. Use of Non-Prescription Remedies by Ghanaian Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Persons on Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos K. Laar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInappropriate use of non-prescription remedies by persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV may result in adverse events or potentiate non-adherence to prescribed medications. This study investigated the use of non-prescription remedies among PLHIV receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART from four treatment centers in southern Ghana.MethodsA mixed method design using quantitative and qualitative methods was used. This article focuses on the quantitative survey of 540 respondents. Univariate analysis was used to generate descriptive tabulations of key variables. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression modeling, respectively, produced unadjusted and adjusted associations between background attributes of PLHIV and the use of non-prescription remedies. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. All analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 20.0.ResultsOne out of three respondents reported the use of non-prescription remedies at least once within 3 months of the survey. Most of these were locally made and included “Angel natural bitters, concoctions from the Christian prayer centers, garlic, and mahogany syrups.” These remedies were used concomitantly with antiretroviral medications (ARVs—46% or administered with ARVs but at different times during the day (43%. Some of the remedies were reportedly prescribed by health workers, or self-initiated during periods of ARVs shortage. Others took them based on their perception of their efficacy. Bivariate level analysis identified ART clinic site, place of residence, and ARV adherence monitoring to be significantly associated with the use of non-prescription remedies (p < 0.05. Multiple logistic regression analysis controlling for covariates confirmed the location of ART clinic as the only predictor of the use of non-prescription remedies. Compared to clients at the large urban teaching hospital (Korle-Bu Fevers Unit ART

  14. Use of Non-Prescription Remedies by Ghanaian Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Persons on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laar, Amos K; Kwara, Awewura; Nortey, Priscillia A; Ankomah, Augustine K; Okyerefo, Michael P K; Lartey, Margaret Y

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate use of non-prescription remedies by persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) may result in adverse events or potentiate non-adherence to prescribed medications. This study investigated the use of non-prescription remedies among PLHIV receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from four treatment centers in southern Ghana. A mixed method design using quantitative and qualitative methods was used. This article focuses on the quantitative survey of 540 respondents. Univariate analysis was used to generate descriptive tabulations of key variables. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression modeling, respectively, produced unadjusted and adjusted associations between background attributes of PLHIV and the use of non-prescription remedies. A p -value of antiretroviral medications (ARVs)-46% or administered with ARVs but at different times during the day (43%). Some of the remedies were reportedly prescribed by health workers, or self-initiated during periods of ARVs shortage. Others took them based on their perception of their efficacy. Bivariate level analysis identified ART clinic site, place of residence, and ARV adherence monitoring to be significantly associated with the use of non-prescription remedies ( p  < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis controlling for covariates confirmed the location of ART clinic as the only predictor of the use of non-prescription remedies. Compared to clients at the large urban teaching hospital (Korle-Bu Fevers Unit ART center), those at the district level (Atua ART center) were ninefold more likely to use non-prescription remedies [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 8.84; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.83-33.72]. Those from a district level mission hospital (St. Martin's ART center) were threefold as likely to use these remedies (AOR = 2.610; 95% CI 1.074-9.120). The use of non-prescription remedies by PLHIV on ART is common in southern Ghana. Usage is mostly self-initiated because of perceived

  15. Relationship between viral load and behavioral measures of adherence to antiretroviral therapy in children living with human immunodeficiency virus in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio A. Duarte

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have examined antiretroviral therapy adherence in Latin American children. Standardized behavioral measures were applied to a large cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children in Brazil, Mexico, and Peru to assess adherence to prescribed antiretroviral therapy doses during the three days prior to study visits, assess timing of last missed dose, and evaluate the ability of the adherence measures to predict viral suppression. Time trends in adherence were modeled using a generalized estimating equations approach to account for possible correlations in outcomes measured repeatedly in the same participants. Associations of adherence with human immunodeficiency virus viral load were examined using linear regression. Mean enrollment age of the 380 participants was 5 years; 57.6% had undetectable’ viral load ( 0.3. Last time missed any antiretroviral therapy dose was reported as “never” for 52.0% at enrollment, increasing to 60.7% and 65.9% at the 6- and 12-month visits, respectively (p < 0.001 for test of trend. The proportion with undetectable viral load was higher among those who never missed a dose at enrollment and the 12-month visit (p ≤ 0.005, but not at the 6-month visit (p = 0.2. While antiretroviral therapy adherence measures utilized in this study showed some association with viral load for these Latin American children, they may not be adequate for reliably identifying non-adherence and consequently children at risk for viral resistance. Other strategies are needed to improve the evaluation of adherence in this population.

  16. 寨卡病毒病诊治进展%Progression of Diagnosis and Therapy of Zika Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗伊; 冯萍

    2017-01-01

    寨卡病毒目前是世界上最紧急的病毒之一,属于黄病毒科病毒,主要依靠蚊媒传播.感染后症状与登革热类似,有自限性.成人感染病毒可能出现吉兰-巴雷综合征,孕早期妇女感染可导致新生儿小头畸形.寨卡病毒的实验室诊断方法主要包括病毒分离培养、核酸检测和血清免疫学检测,临床多采用核酸检测和血清免疫学检测结合的方式.寨卡病毒的防治目前尚无有效的疫苗和药物,临床上多采取对症支持治疗;对于普通人群,防蚊灭蚊是最经济且有效的的方法.%Zika virus has become one of the most urgent viruses in the world .The Zika virus is an arbovirus belonging to the family of Flaviviridae .The virus is mainly transmitted by the Aedes mosquitoes .The symptoms associated with Zika virus infection are generally mild ,which are similar to dengue fever ,and the course is self-limiting.There are some cases of Guillain-Barrésyndrome associated with Zika virus infection in adult ,while in pregnant women,the infection of Zika virus may cause fetal microcephaly .Diagnosis of Zika virus infection includes virus isolation ,nucleic acid detection and immuno-logical detection .The recommended way is the combination of nucleic acid detection and immunological detection .Currently there are no effective drugs or vaccines for Zika virus so the symptomatic and supportive treatment is still mostly used .At present,the most economical control measure for general population relies on public and individual strategies to cut down the mosquito population and to avoid mosquito bites .

  17. The Use of Recombinant Feline Interferon Omega Therapy as an Immune-Modulator in Cats Naturally Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Oliveira Leal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are well-known cytokines that, among their main functions, are key components of the host immune response against viral infections. Due to its immune modulation properties, they are commonly used in the therapeutic approach of various retroviral infections, namely human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV. In HIV infection, it has been shown that IFN therapy limits early viral replication, particularly useful on post-exposure prophylaxis. In veterinary medicine, recombinant feline interferon omega (rFeIFN-ω was the first interferon licensed for use in cats. Several studies have recently shown that this compound seems to stimulate the innate immunity, decreasing clinical signs and co-infections in naturally FIV-infected cats. More than summarizing the main conclusions about rFeIFN-ω in cats, this review emphasizes the immune-modulation properties of IFN therapy, opening new perspectives for its use in retroviral infections. Either in FIV-infected cats or in HIV individuals, type I IFNs seem to induce an innate immune-modulation and should not be overlooked as a therapeutic option in retroviral infections.

  18. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import via Vpr-Importin α interactions as a novel HIV-1 therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nonaka, Mizuho; Hashimoto, Yoshie; Matsuda, Go; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsuyama, Megumi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Kato, Shingo; Aida, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. One such target is the interaction between Vpr, one of the accessory gene products of HIV-1 and Importin α, which is crucial, not only for the nuclear import of Vpr, but also for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. We have identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses Vpr-Importin α interaction, thereby inhibiting HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner. Analysis by real-time PCR demonstrated that hematoxylin specifically inhibited nuclear import step of pre-integration complex. Thus, hematoxylin is a new anti-HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-Importin α interaction, suggesting that a specific inhibitor of the interaction between viral protein and the cellular factor may provide a new strategy for HIV-1 therapy.

  19. Randomized Trial Evaluating the Impact of Ribavirin Mono-Therapy and Double Dosing on Viral Kinetics, Ribavirin Pharmacokinetics and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldenström, Jesper; Westin, Johan; Nyström, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard-of-care (......In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard......, by day 14, double dosing entailed a greater hemoglobin decline as compared to SOC (2.2 vs. 1.4 g/dL; P = 0.03). Conclusion: Ribavirin down-regulates IP-10, and may have an anti-viral effect differently regulated across IL28B genotypes....

  20. The Use of Recombinant Feline Interferon Omega Therapy as an Immune-Modulator in Cats Naturally Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: New Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Rodolfo Oliveira; Gil, Solange

    2016-10-27

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are well-known cytokines that, among their main functions, are key components of the host immune response against viral infections. Due to its immune modulation properties, they are commonly used in the therapeutic approach of various retroviral infections, namely human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). In HIV infection, it has been shown that IFN therapy limits early viral replication, particularly useful on post-exposure prophylaxis. In veterinary medicine, recombinant feline interferon omega (rFeIFN-ω) was the first interferon licensed for use in cats. Several studies have recently shown that this compound seems to stimulate the innate immunity, decreasing clinical signs and co-infections in naturally FIV-infected cats. More than summarizing the main conclusions about rFeIFN-ω in cats, this review emphasizes the immune-modulation properties of IFN therapy, opening new perspectives for its use in retroviral infections. Either in FIV-infected cats or in HIV individuals, type I IFNs seem to induce an innate immune-modulation and should not be overlooked as a therapeutic option in retroviral infections.

  1. Clearance of hepatitis C virus after living-donor liver transplantation in spite of residual viremia on end date of interferon therapy before transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Hamasaki, Keisuke; Honda, Takuya; Shibata, Hidetaka; Akahoshi, Mana; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Kanematsu, Takashi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2007-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) therapy is the only treatment strategy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after liver transplantation (LT), but prophylactic and treatable IFN therapy after LT has been shown to be insufficient due to the adverse effects of IFN and rivabirin. In this paper, we describe the disappearance of HCV after LT without IFN therapy in the presence of residual viremia on the day of LT. We herein report our findings since this is considered an important case for the anti-HCV strategy of post LT. A 60-year old woman with LC and HCC was referred to Nagasaki University Hospital in August 2004. After she underwent LT on February 18, 2005, we injected peg-IFN-α-2a the 11th time at 18 wk and HCV-RNA was still positive in the serum at LT. The serum HCV-RNA was negative one month after operation and subsequently dissolved 15 mo after operation without IFN therapy. As a result, we speculate that if HCV-RNA is positive while HCV core antigen is negative before LT, then it may lead to clearance of HCV after LT. Therefore long acting peg-IFN-α-2a is thus considered a potentially effective agent for the treatment of HCV-related cirrhosis before LT. PMID:17696240

  2. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV/Anh-IL-2 expressing human IL-2 as a potential candidate for suppresses growth of hepatoma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease virus (NDV have shown oncolytic therapeutic efficacy in preclinical study and are currently approved for clinical trials. NDV Anhinga strain which is a mesogenic strain should be classified as lytic strain and has a therapeutic efficacy in hepatocellular cancer. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of NDV Anhinga strain to elicit immune reaction in vivo and the possibility for using as a vaccine vector for expressing tumor therapeutic factors. Interleukin-2 (IL-2 could boost the immune response against the tumor cells. Therefore, we use NDV Anhinga strain as backbone to construct a recombinant virus (NDV/Anh-IL-2 expressing IL-2. The virus growth curve showed that the production of recombinant NDV/Anh-IL-2 was slightly delayed compared to the wild type. The NDV/Anh-IL-2 strain could express soluble IL-2 and effectively inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo. 60 days post-treatment, mice which were completely cured by previous treatment were well protected when rechallenged with the same tumor cell. From the H&E-stained sections, intense infiltration of lymphocyte was observed in the NDV Anhinga strain treated group, especially in NDV/Anh-IL-2 group. The NDV Anhinga strain could not only kill the tumor directly, but could also elicit immune reaction and a potent immunological memory when killing tumor in vivo. In conclusion, the Anhinga strain could be an effective vector for tumor therapy; the recombinant NDV/Anh-IL-2 strain expressing soluble IL-2 is a promising candidate for hepatoma therapy.

  3. Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus genotype 3a Hypervariable region 1 in patients achieved rapid virological response to alpha interferon and Ribavirin Combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badar Sadaf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus roots a chronic liver disease. Currently approved treatment strategy includes administration of alpha interferon and ribavirin combined therapy for 24-48 weeks. One of the predictor of sustained virological response is an early virological response to treatment characterized as rapid response. Hyper variable region 1 (HVR1 of E2 protein is responsible for viral entry and acts as a target for neutralizing antibodies. Any mutation in this region would effect virus interaction with target cell and viral persistence. Methods Thirty one clones of six pre-treatment samples subjected to combination therapy were investigated. Three of the patients were rapid responders (R1, R2 and R3 and two were breakthrough responders (BT1 and BT2. Envelope 2 gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced. Amino acid substitution, frequency, composition and antigenic properties of HVR 1 of E2 protein were studied. Results In both rapid responders (R.R (14 amino acid sites and breakthrough responders (BT.R (13 amino acid sites half of the amino acid sites were either conserved or resistant to any physiochemical change due to amino acid substitution. It also indicated that average composition of hydrophilic and basic amino acids were comparatively lower in rapid responders than other samples affecting probable interaction of virus with target cells. A central non antigenic region was constant among the breakthrough responders but differed in length significantly among rapid responders reflecting the adaptive nature of HVR1 to the immune response. Conclusions We observed that although HVR1is quite variable region in HCV 3a patients responding differently to treatment it still maintains its physiochemical properties for its proper functioning and viability.

  4. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Montoya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40 against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antiviral therapy in patients with advanced hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Yu; Wen, Feng; Wheeler, John; Fu, Ping; Li, Qiu

    2016-12-01

    Antiviral therapy has been demonstrated to significantly improve the survival in patients with advanced hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of the study was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of antiviral therapy in patients with advanced HBV-related HCC treated with sorafenib. To conduct the analysis, a Markov model comprising three health states (progression-free survival, progressive disease, and death) was created. The efficacy data were derived from medical records. Cost data were collected based on the Chinese national drug prices. Utility data came from the previously published studies. One-way sensitivity analyses as well as probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to explore model uncertainties. In the base-case analysis, addition of antiviral therapy to sorafenib generated an effectiveness of 0.68 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) at a cost of $25 026.04, while sorafenib monotherapy gained an effectiveness of 0.42 QALYs at a cost of $20 249.64. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $18 370.77/QALY for antiviral therapy group versus non-antiviral therapy group. On the other hand, the ICER between the two groups in patients with high or low HBV-DNA load, with or without cirrhosis, normal or elevated alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase were $16 613.97/QALY, $19 774.16/QALY, $14 587.66/QALY, $19 873.84/QALY, $17 947.07/QALY, and $18 785.58/QALY, respectively. Based on the cost-effectiveness threshold ($20 301.00/QALY in China), addition of antiviral therapy to sorafenib is considered to be a cost-effective option compared with sorafenib monotherapy in patients with advanced HBV-related HCC in China from the patient's perspective. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus co-infection among people living with HIV/AIDS visiting antiretroviral therapy centres in Nepal: a first nationally representative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, G; Malviya, A; Rajbhandari, R; Schluter, W William; Sharma, G; Kakchapati, S; Rijal, S; Dixit, S

    2017-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infections among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Nepal. A sample of 677 PLHIV representing key affected populations (KAP) in Nepal, who were undergoing antiretroviral (ART) therapy in ART clinics around the country, were voluntarily enrolled in the study. Rapid kit-based testing followed by ELISA for validation was performed, focusing on HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibodies against HCV (anti-HCV). A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with HBV and HCV co-infection. HCV and HBV co-infection among the 677 PLHIV was found to be 19% (95% confidence interval (CI) 16.6-22.7%) and 4.4% (95% CI 3.1-6.6%), respectively. The Eastern Region had the highest percentage of HCV infection (48%). The age group with the highest rates of co-infection was 30-39 years (58% and 70%, respectively, for HCV and HBV co-infection). After adjusting for confounding, males were more likely to have HBV co-infection than females (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 4.61, 95% CI 1.42-14.98). Similarly, PLHIV who were male (AOR 5.7, 95% CI 2.06-15.98), had a secondary level of education (AOR 3.04, 95% CI 1.06-8.70), or who were drug users (AOR 28.7, 95% CI 14.9-55.22) were significantly more likely to have HCV co-infection. This first ever national assessment of HIV, HBV, and HCV co-infection performed among PLHIV in Nepal demonstrates that HCV and HBV infections are a health threat to this population and that interventions are required to mitigate the effects of co-infection and to prevent further morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Combination of targeting gene-viro therapy with recombinant Fowl-pox viruses with HN and VP3 genes on mouse osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z-Y; Wang, L-Q; Fu, C-F; Li, X; Cui, Z-L; Zhang, J-Y; Xue, S-H; Sun, N; Xu, F

    2013-03-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive cancerous neoplasm arising from primitive transformed cells of mesenchymal origin that exhibit osteoblastic differentiation and produce malignant osteoid. With the rapid development of tumor molecular biology, gene and viral therapy, a highly promising strategy for the treatment, has shown some therapeutic effects. To study the strategy of cooperative cancer gene therapy, previously, we explored the antitumor effects of recombinant Fowl-pox viruses (FPVs) with both HN (hemagglutinin-neuramidinase) and VP3 genes on mouse osteosarcoma. We constructed vFV-HN, vFV-VP3 and vFV-HN-VP3 inserting CAV VP3 gene, NDV HN gene into fowlpox virus. S180 osteosarcoma were transfected with Recombinant Fowl-pox viruses (FPVs). These cell lines stably expressing tagged proteins were selected by culturing in medium containing puromycin (2 µg/ml) and confirmed by immunoblotting and immunostaining. S180 osteosarcoma model with BALB/c mice and nude mice were established and the vFPV viruses as control, vFV-HN, vFV-VP3, vFV-HN-VP3 were injected into the tumor directly. The rate of tumor growth, tumor suppression and the sialic acid levels in serum were examined and the tumor tissues were analyzed by the method of immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometric analysis was performed using a FACSCalibur flow cytometer. A total of 100,000 events were analyzed for each sample and the experiment was repeated at least twice. Our data indicated that vFV-HN, vFV-VP3 and vFV-HN-VP3 all had growth inhibition effects, the inhibition rate of vFV-HN-VP3 group was 51.7%, which was higher than that of vFV-HN, vFV-VP3 group and control group (p genes into mouse osteosarcoma cancer cells can cause cell a specificity anti-tumor immune activity, suppress tumor growth, and increase the survival rate of the tumor within host.

  8. Genetically engineered Newcastle disease virus expressing interleukin-2 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rNDV) has shown oncolytic therapeutic efficacy in preclinical studies and are currently in clinical trials. In this study, we have evaluated the possibility to enhance the cancer therapeutic potential of NDV by means of inserting both interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tu...

  9. Critical challenges and emerging opportunities in hepatitis C virus research in an era of potent antiviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenschlager, Ralf; Baumert, Thomas F.; Bukh, Jens

    2018-01-01

    The development and clinical implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Infection with any hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype can now be eliminated in more than 95% of patients with short courses of all-oral, well-tolerated drugs, even...

  10. Liver Fibrosis Regression Measured by Transient Elastography in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Coinfected Individuals on Long-Term HBV-Active Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Jennifer; Robson, Christopher; Aitchison, Stacey; Matthews, Gail V; Iser, David; Sasadeusz, Joe; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Advanced fibrosis occurs more commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfected individuals; therefore, fibrosis monitoring is important in this population. However, transient elastography (TE) data in HIV-HBV coinfection are lacking. We aimed to assess liver fibrosis using TE in a cross-sectional study of HIV-HBV coinfected individuals receiving combination HBV-active (lamivudine and/or tenofovir/tenofovir-emtricitabine) antiretroviral therapy, identify factors associated with advanced fibrosis, and examine change in fibrosis in those with >1 TE assessment. Methods.  We assessed liver fibrosis in 70 HIV-HBV coinfected individuals on HBV-active combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Change in fibrosis over time was examined in a subset with more than 1 TE result (n = 49). Clinical and laboratory variables at the time of the first TE were collected, and associations with advanced fibrosis (≥F3, Metavir scoring system) and fibrosis regression (of least 1 stage) were examined. Results.  The majority of the cohort (64%) had mild to moderate fibrosis at the time of the first TE, and we identified alanine transaminase, platelets, and detectable HIV ribonucleic acid as associated with advanced liver fibrosis. Alanine transaminase and platelets remained independently advanced in multivariate modeling. More than 28% of those with >1 TE subsequently showed liver fibrosis regression, and higher baseline HBV deoxyribonucleic acid was associated with regression. Prevalence of advanced fibrosis (≥F3) decreased 12.3% (32.7%-20.4%) over a median of 31 months. Conclusions.  The observed fibrosis regression in this group supports the beneficial effects of cART on liver stiffness. It would be important to study a larger group of individuals with more advanced fibrosis to more definitively assess factors associated with liver fibrosis regression.

  11. A dual function fusion protein of Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and firefly luciferase for noninvasive in vivo imaging of gene therapy in malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söling, Ariane; Theiss, Christian; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Rainov, Nikolai G

    2004-08-04

    BACKGROUND: Suicide gene therapy employing the prodrug activating system Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-TK)/ ganciclovir (GCV) has proven to be effective in killing experimental brain tumors. In contrast, glioma patients treated with HSV-TK/ GCV did not show significant treatment benefit, most likely due to insufficient transgene delivery to tumor cells. Therefore, this study aimed at developing a strategy for real-time noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the activity of a therapeutic gene in brain tumor cells. METHODS: The HSV-TK gene was fused to the firefly luciferase (Luc) gene and the fusion construct HSV-TK-Luc was expressed in U87MG human malignant glioma cells. Nude mice with subcutaneous gliomas stably expressing HSV-TK-Luc were subjected to GCV treatment and tumor response to therapy was monitored in vivo by serial bioluminescence imaging. Bioluminescent signals over time were compared with tumor volumes determined by caliper. RESULTS: Transient and stable expression of the HSV-TK-Luc fusion protein in U87MG glioma cells demonstrated close correlation of both enzyme activities. Serial optical imaging of tumor bearing mice detected in all cases GCV induced death of tumor cells expressing the fusion protein and proved that bioluminescence can be reliably used for repetitive and noninvasive quantification of HSV-TK/ GCV mediated cell kill in vivo. CONCLUSION: This approach may represent a valuable tool for the in vivo evaluation of gene therapy strategies for treatment of malignant disease.

  12. A Hepatitis C Virus-Associated Cirrhotic Patient Developing Interstitial Pneumonia during the Course of Antiviral Therapy with Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Tarao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral direct-acting antivirals (DAAs are the main therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV-associated liver disease in Japan. Daclatasvir/asunaprevir is the first agent and sofosbuvir/ledipasvir is the secondary agent for HCV genotype 1b. More recently, ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir is also recommended as a potent therapy for HCV genotype 1b. Among the adverse events associated with these oral DAAs, interstitial pneumonia is one of the most severe ones. Regarding treatment with daclatasvir plus asunaprevir or sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir, a few cases have already been reported in a postmarketing surveillance. Recently, we have encountered a HCV-associated genotype 1b cirrhosis patient who developed interstitial pneumonia during treatment with ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir and who recovered after drug discontinuation without corticosteroid therapy. Interstitial pneumonia was confirmed by chest x-ray and chest computed tomography. The serum KL-6 level was elevated to 1,180 U/mL. The total duration of the drug administration was 7 weeks, and she achieved SVR24. This is the first detailed report in the literature on the development of interstitial pneumonia during treatment with ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir. When dry cough appeared in the treatment with DAAs, chest computed tomography and the evaluation of serum KL-6 level were recommended.

  13. Hepatitis E Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before the discovery of hepatitis E virus (HEV), many epidemics of hepatitis in ... HEV was discovered in 1983 in the ... HEV infection is increased by HIV infection in pregnancy. (Caron et al. .... immunosuppressive therapy on the natural history.

  14. Systemic Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disease of Childhood With Good Response to Steroid Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo; Han, Kyungja; Han, Eunhee; Lee, Jae Wook; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin

    2017-11-01

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood is a rare disease and has a very fulminant clinical course with high mortality. A 21-month-old female patient was referred to our hospital with a 1 week history of fever and was subsequently diagnosed with systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood. After starting treatment with dexamethasone, she showed early defervescence and improvement of laboratory parameters, and has remained disease-free after stopping steroid treatment, although longer follow-up is necessary. Our report underscores the possibility that this disease entity may be heterogenous in terms of prognosis.

  15. Benefit of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Assay in Prediction of Therapeutic Response to Interferon and Ribavirin Combination Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hidetsugu; Higashimoto, Makiko; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and first-phase kinetics between commercially available core antigen (Ag) assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag (Lumipulse-Ag), and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, version 2 (Amplicor M), to estimate the predictive benefit of a sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 44 genotype 1b patients treated with interferon (IFN) ...

  16. Molecular analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV in an HIV co-infected patient with reactivation of occult HBV infection following discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantini Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection (OBI is characterized by HBV DNA persistence even though the pattern of serological markers indicates an otherwise resolved HBV infection. Although OBI is usually clinically silent, immunocompromised patients may experience reactivation of the liver disease. Case presentation We report the case of an individual with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and anti-HBV core antibody positivity, who experienced severe HBV reactivation after discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy (ART. HBV sequencing analysis showed a hepatitis B surface antigen escape mutant whose presence in an earlier sample excluded reinfection. Molecular sequencing showed some differences between two isolates collected at a 9-year interval, indicating HBV evolution. Resumption of ART containing an emtricitabine/tenofovir combination allowed control of plasma HBV DNA, which fell to undetectable levels. Conclusion This case stresses the ability of HBV to evolve continuously, even during occult infection, and the effectiveness of ART in controlling OBI reactivation in HIV-infected individuals.

  17. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Promoter-Containing Retroviral Promoter Conversion Vectors for Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy are Functional in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Klein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed-enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT is an approach for sensitization of tumor cells to an enzymatically activated, otherwise nontoxic, prodrug. Cytochrome P450 2B1 (CYP2B1 metabolizes the prodrugs cyclophosphamide (CPA and ifosfamide (IFA to produce the cytotoxic substances phosphoramide mustard and isophosphoramide mustard as well as the byproduct acrolein. We have constructed a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon vector for breast cancer GDEPT. The vector allows expression of CYP2B1 from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter known to be active in the mammary glands of transgenic animals. It is anticipated to be used for the generation of encapsulated viral vector producing cells which, when placed inside or close to a tumor, will act as suppliers of the therapeutic CYP2B1 protein as well as of the therapeutic vector itself. The generated vector was effectively packaged by virus producing cells and allowed the production of high levels of enzymatically active CYP2B1 in infected cells which sensitized them to killing upon treatment with both IFA and CPA. Determination of the respective IC50 values demonstrated that the effective IFA dose was reduced by sixteen folds. Infection efficiencies in vivo were determined using a reporter gene-bearing vector in a mammary cancer cell-derived xenograft tumor mouse model.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide, immune activation, and liver abnormalities in HIV/hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected individuals receiving HBV-active combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Megan; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Rajasuriar, Reena; Velayudham, Pushparaj; Iser, David; Solomon, Ajantha; Sebolao, Baotuti; Tran, Andrew; Spelman, Tim; Matthews, Gail; Cameron, Paul; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Dore, Gregory J; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Lewin, Sharon R

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the relationship between microbial translocation, immune activation, and liver disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), soluble CD14, CXCL10, and CCL-2 levels were elevated in patients with HIV/HBV coinfection. Levels of LPS, soluble CD14, and CCL-2 declined following receipt of HBV-active combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the CXCL10 level remained elevated. No markers were associated with liver disease severity on liver biopsy (n = 96), but CXCL10, interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor α, and interferon γ (IFN-γ) were all associated with elevated liver enzyme levels during receipt of HBV-active cART. Stimulation of hepatocyte cell lines in vitro with IFN-γ and LPS induced a profound synergistic increase in the production of CXCL10. LPS may contribute to liver disease via stimulating persistent production of CXCL10. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Anti-retroviral therapy fails to restore the severe Th-17: Tc-17 imbalance observed in peripheral blood during simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, M; Bixler, S; Piatak, M; Lifson, J; Mattapallil, J J

    2009-10-01

    Human immuno deficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus infections are characterized by a severe loss of Th-17 cells (IL-17(+)CD4(+) T cells) that has been associated with disease progression and systemic dissemination of bacterial infections. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has led to repopulation of CD4(+) T cells in peripheral tissues with little sustainable repopulation in mucosal tissues. Given the central importance of Th-17 cells in mucosal homeostasis, it is not known if the failure of ART to permanently repopulate mucosal tissues is associated with a failure to restore Th-17 cells that are lost during infection. Dynamics of alpha4(+)beta7(hi) CD4(+) T cells in peripheral blood of SIV infected rhesus macaques were evaluated and compared to animals that were treated with ART. The frequency of Th-17 and Tc-17 cells was determined following infection and after therapy. Relative expression of IL-21, IL-23, and TGFbeta was determined using Taqman PCR. Treatment of SIV infected rhesus macaques with anti-retroviral therapy was associated with a substantial repopulation of mucosal homing alpha4(+)beta7(hi)CD4(+) T cells in peripheral blood. This repopulation, however, was not accompanied by a restoration of Th-17 responses. Interestingly, SIV infection was associated with an increase in Tc-17 responses (IL-17(+)CD8(+) T cells) suggesting to a skewing in the ratio of Th-17: Tc-17 cells from a predominantly Th-17 phenotype to a predominantly Tc-17 phenotype. Surprisingly, Tc-17 responses remained high during the course of therapy suggesting that ART failed to correct the imbalance in Th-17 : Tc-17 responses induced following SIV infection. ART was associated with substantial repopulation of alpha4(+)beta7(hi) CD4(+) T cells in peripheral blood with little or no rebound of Th-17 cells. On the other hand, repopulation of alpha4(+)beta7(hi) CD4(+) T cells was accompanied by persistence of high levels of Tc-17 cells in peripheral blood. The dysregulation of Th-17

  20. Improving CART-Cell Therapy of Solid Tumors with Oncolytic Virus-Driven Production of a Bispecific T-cell Engager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Anna; Fajardo, Carlos Alberto; Posey, Avery D; Shaw, Carolyn; Da, Tong; Young, Regina M; Alemany, Ramon; June, Carl H; Guedan, Sonia

    2018-05-01

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CART) have shown significant promise in clinical trials to treat hematologic malignancies, but their efficacy in solid tumors has been limited. Oncolytic viruses have the potential to act in synergy with immunotherapies due to their immunogenic oncolytic properties and the opportunity of incorporating therapeutic transgenes in their genomes. Here, we hypothesized that an oncolytic adenovirus armed with an EGFR-targeting, bispecific T-cell engager (OAd-BiTE) would improve the outcome of CART-cell therapy in solid tumors. We report that CART cells targeting the folate receptor alpha (FR-α) successfully infiltrated preestablished xenograft tumors but failed to induce complete responses, presumably due to the presence of antigen-negative cancer cells. We demonstrated that OAd-BiTE-mediated oncolysis significantly improved CART-cell activation and proliferation, while increasing cytokine production and cytotoxicity, and showed an in vitro favorable safety profile compared with EGFR-targeting CARTs. BiTEs secreted from infected cells redirected CART cells toward EGFR in the absence of FR-α, thereby addressing tumor heterogeneity. BiTE secretion also redirected CAR-negative, nonspecific T cells found in CART-cell preparations toward tumor cells. The combinatorial approach improved antitumor efficacy and prolonged survival in mouse models of cancer when compared with the monotherapies, and this was the result of an increased BiTE-mediated T-cell activation in tumors. Overall, these results demonstrated that the combination of a BiTE-expressing oncolytic virus with adoptive CART-cell therapy overcomes key limitations of CART cells and BiTEs as monotherapies in solid tumors and encourage its further evaluation in human trials. Cancer Immunol Res; 6(5); 605-16. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Long-term monitoring shows hepatitis B virus resistance to entecavir in nucleoside-naïve patients is rare through 5 years of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Daniel J; Rose, Ronald E; Baldick, Carl J; Pokornowski, Kevin A; Eggers, Betsy J; Fang, Jie; Wichroski, Michael J; Xu, Dong; Yang, Joanna; Wilber, Richard B; Colonno, Richard J

    2009-05-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection who develop antiviral resistance lose benefits of therapy and may be predisposed to further resistance. Entecavir (ETV) resistance (ETVr) results from HBV reverse transcriptase substitutions at positions T184, S202, or M250, which emerge in the presence of lamivudine (LVD) resistance substitutions M204I/V +/- L180M. Here, we summarize results from comprehensive resistance monitoring of patients with HBV who were continuously treated with ETV for up to 5 years. Monitoring included genotypic analysis of isolates from all patients at baseline and when HBV DNA was detectable by polymerase chain reaction (> or = 300 copies/mL) from Years 1 through 5. In addition, genotyping was performed on isolates from patients experiencing virologic breakthrough (> or = 1 log(10) rise in HBV DNA). In vitro phenotypic ETV susceptibility was determined for virologic breakthrough isolates, and for HBV containing novel substitutions emerging during treatment. The results over 5 years of therapy showed that in nucleoside-naïve patients, the cumulative probability of genotypic ETVr and genotypic ETVr associated with virologic breakthrough was 1.2% and 0.8%, respectively. In contrast, a reduced barrier to resistance was observed in LVD-refractory patients, as the LVD resistance substitutions, a partial requirement for ETVr, preexist, resulting in a 5-year cumulative probability of genotypic ETVr and genotypic ETVr associated with breakthrough of 51% and 43%, respectively. Importantly, only four patients who achieved < 300 copies/mL HBV DNA subsequently developed ETVr. Long-term monitoring showed low rates of resistance in nucleoside-naïve patients during 5 years of ETV therapy, corresponding with potent viral suppression and a high genetic barrier to resistance. These findings support ETV as a primary therapy that enables prolonged treatment with potent viral suppression and minimal resistance.

  2. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Use of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.; Becker, N.; DelRowe, J.; Davis, L.

    1990-01-01

    A patient with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is presented. The patient had a localized lesion on his scalp. Evaluation for systemic lymphoma was negative. A biopsy specimen showed superficial and deep dermal infiltrates of pleomorphic lymphocytes. Immunohistochemistry was consistent with T-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated successfully with local irradiation. He remained free of further systemic and cutaneous recurrences of the lymphoma until he died 8 months after treatment of pneumonia. This case is the first to our knowledge to describe a localized CTCL in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)

  3. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  4. Tanshinone IIA increases the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir gene therapy via enhanced gap junctional intercellular communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Xiao

    Full Text Available The bystander effect is an intriguing phenomenon by which adjacent cells become sensitized to drug treatment during gene therapy with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV. This effect is reported to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC, and therefore, we postulated that upregulation of genes that facilitate GJIC may enhance the HSV-tk/GCV bystander effect. Previous findings have shown Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA, a chemical substance derived from a Chinese medicine herb, promotes the upregulation of the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in B16 cells. Because gap junctions are formed by connexins, we hypothesized that Tan IIA might increase GJIC. Our results show that Tan IIA increased GJIC in B16 melanoma cells, leading to more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in cells stably expressing HSV-tk. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that tumors in mice with 10% HSV-tk positive B16 cells and 90% wild-type B16 cells became smaller following treatment with the combination of GCV and Tan IIA as compared to GCV or Tan IIA alone. These data demonstrate that Tan IIA can augment the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system through increased gap junction coupling, which adds strength to the promising strategy that develops connexins inducer to potentiate the effects of suicide gene therapy.

  5. Anti-TNFα therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases is associated with Epstein-Barr virus lytic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsia, Sameer; Koganti, Siva; Spadaro, Salvatore; Rajapakse, Ramona; Chawla, Anupama; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita

    2016-02-01

    Anti-TNFα therapy, known to suppress T-cell immunity, is increasingly gaining popularity for treatment of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). T-cell suppression increases the risk of B-cell EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas. Since EBV-lytic activation is essential for development of EBV-lymphomas and there have been reports of EBV-lymphomas in patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy, we investigated if patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies demonstrate greater EBV-lytic activity in blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 10 IBD patients solely on anti-TNFα therapy compared to 3 control groups (10 IBD patients not on immunosuppressive therapy, 10 patients with abdominal pain but without IBD, and 10 healthy subjects) were examined for the percentage of T-cells, EBV load and EBV-lytic transcripts. Patients on anti-TNFα therapy had significantly fewer T-cells, greater EBV load, and increased levels of transcripts from EBV-lytic genes of all kinetic classes compared to controls. Furthermore, exposure of EBV-infected B-cell lines to anti-TNFα antibodies resulted in increased levels of BZLF1 mRNA; BZLF1 encodes for ZEBRA, the viral latency-to-lytic cycle switch. Thus, IBD patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies have greater EBV loads likely due to enhanced EBV-lytic gene expression and anti-TNFα antibodies may be sufficient to activate the EBV lytic cycle. Findings from this pilot study lay the groundwork for additional scientific and clinical investigation into the effects of anti-TNFα therapy on the life cycle of EBV, a ubiquitous oncovirus that causes lymphomas in the setting of immunocompromise. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Risk factors for Kaposi's sarcoma in human immunodeficiency virus patients after initiation of antiretroviral therapy: A nested case–control study in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodgers Lupia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the association between highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART adherence and development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/AIDS patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective nested case–control study of 165 participants (33 cases and 132 controls receiving HAART care at Maseno Hospital, Kenya, from January 2005 to October 2013. Cases were HIV-positive adults with KS, who were matched with controls in a ratio of 1:4 based on age (±5 years of each case, sex, and KS diagnosis date. Perfect adherence to HAART was assessed on every clinic visit by patients' self-reporting and pill counts. Chi-square tests were performed to compare socioeconomic and clinical statuses between cases and controls. A conditional logistic regression was used to assess the effects of perfect adherence to HAART, the latest CD4 count, education level, distance to health-care facility, initial World Health Organization stage, and number of regular sexual partners on the development of KS. Results: Only 63.6% participants reported perfect adherence, and the control group had a significantly higher percentage of perfect adherence (75.0% than did cases (18.2%. After adjustment for potential imbalances in the baseline and clinical characteristics, patients with imperfect HAART adherence had 20-times greater risk of developing KS than patients with perfect HAART adherence [hazard ratios: 21.0, 95% confidence interval: 4.2–105.1]. Patients with low latest CD4 count (≤350 cells/mm3 had a seven-times greater risk of developing KS than did their counterparts (HRs: 7.1, 95% CI: 1.4–36.2. Conclusion: Imperfect HAART adherence and low latest CD4 count are significantly associated with KS development. Keywords: antiretroviral therapy, highly active antiretroviral therapy, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS treatment, Kaposi's sarcoma, Kenya, Maseno

  7. Highly active antiretroviral therapy normalizes the function of progenitor cells in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Nielsen, S.; Ersbøll, A. K.; Mathiesen, L.

    1998-01-01

    -infected patients were determined prior to HAART and after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of therapy. The mean number of colony-forming units (cells) per milliliter (cfu/mL) was 15.0 prior to HAART vs. 109.8 in healthy controls (P.../mL eliminated the differences between HIV-infected patients and controls. Significant increases in numbers of CD34 cells were not detected. Of importance, the cloning efficiency of CD34 cells increased from 1.7% prior to therapy to a peak at 18.7% (P=.003). In conclusion, HAART normalized CD34 cell function...

  8. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: increase in numbers of naive CD4 cells and CD34 cells makes G-CSF a candidate for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Dam-Larsen, S

    1998-01-01

    The potential of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize CD4 cells and/or CD34 cells for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy was examined. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were treated with G-CSF (300 microg/day) for 5 days. Numbers of CD4.......01/microL (P CSF induced increases in numbers of CD34 cells and CD4 cells in HIV-infected patients...

  9. 3β-hydroxysterol δ24-reductase on the surface of hepatitis C virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma cells can be a target for molecular targeting therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Saito

    Full Text Available In our previous study, we demonstrated that 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24 was overexpressed in hepatitis C virus (HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and that its expression was induced by HCV. Using a monoclonal antibody against DHCR24 (2-152a MAb, we found that DHCR24 was specifically expressed on the surface of HCC cell lines. Based on these findings, we aimed to establish a novel targeting strategy using 2-152a MAb to treat HCV-related HCC. In the present study, we examined the antitumor activity of 2-152a MAb. In the presence of complement, HCC-derived HuH-7 cells were killed by treatment with 2-152a MAb, which was mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. In addition, the antigen recognition domain of 2-152a MAb was responsible for the unique anti-HCV activity. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using 2-152a MAb for antibody therapy against HCV-related HCC. In addition, surface DHCR24 on HCC cells exhibited a functional property, agonist-induced internalization. We showed that 2-152a MAb-mediated binding of a cytotoxic agent (a saponin-conjugated secondary antibody to surface DHCR24 led to significant cytotoxicity. This suggests that surface DHCR24 on HCC cells can function as a carrier for internalization. Therefore, surface DHCR24 could be a valuable target for HCV-related HCC therapy, and 2-152a MAb appears to be useful for this targeted therapy.

  10. 3β-Hydroxysterol Δ24-Reductase on the Surface of Hepatitis C Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Can Be a Target for Molecular Targeting Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Makoto; Takano, Takashi; Nishimura, Tomohiro; Kohara, Michinori; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we demonstrated that 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) was overexpressed in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and that its expression was induced by HCV. Using a monoclonal antibody against DHCR24 (2-152a MAb), we found that DHCR24 was specifically expressed on the surface of HCC cell lines. Based on these findings, we aimed to establish a novel targeting strategy using 2-152a MAb to treat HCV-related HCC. In the present study, we examined the antitumor activity of 2-152a MAb. In the presence of complement, HCC-derived HuH-7 cells were killed by treatment with 2-152a MAb, which was mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). In addition, the antigen recognition domain of 2-152a MAb was responsible for the unique anti-HCV activity. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using 2-152a MAb for antibody therapy against HCV-related HCC. In addition, surface DHCR24 on HCC cells exhibited a functional property, agonist-induced internalization. We showed that 2-152a MAb-mediated binding of a cytotoxic agent (a saponin-conjugated secondary antibody) to surface DHCR24 led to significant cytotoxicity. This suggests that surface DHCR24 on HCC cells can function as a carrier for internalization. Therefore, surface DHCR24 could be a valuable target for HCV-related HCC therapy, and 2-152a MAb appears to be useful for this targeted therapy. PMID:25875901

  11. Improvement of liver stiffness in patients with hepatitis C virus infection who received direct-acting antiviral therapy and achieved sustained virological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Toshifumi; Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Mizuno, Kazuyuki; Sone, Yasuhiro; Kataoka, Saki; Hashinokuchi, Shinichi

    2017-12-01

    There is insufficient research on whether direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy can improve liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). We evaluated sequential changes in liver stiffness using shear wave elastography in patients with HCV who received DAA therapy. A total of 210 patients with HCV who received daclatasvir and asunaprevir therapy and achieved sustained virological response (SVR) were analyzed. Liver stiffness, as evaluated by shear wave elastography, and laboratory data were assessed before treatment (baseline), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 24 weeks after EOT (SVR24). Alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) decreased over time, and there were significant differences between baseline and EOT and between EOT and SVR24. Although platelet counts did not significantly differ between baseline and EOT, they increased significantly from EOT to SVR24. The median (interquartile range) liver stiffness values at baseline, EOT, and SVR24 were 10.2 (7.7-14.7), 8.8 (7.1-12.1), and 7.6 (6.3-10.3) kPa, respectively (P liver) and Fibrosis-4 index > 2.0 (n = 75), the liver stiffness values at baseline, EOT, and SVR24 were 9.6 (7.7-15.2), 9.2 (7.3-12.1), and 7.7 (6.3-10.1) kPa, respectively (P liver stiffness starts during the administration of DAAs in patients who achieve SVR, and this effect is particularly pronounced in patients with progressive liver fibrosis. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Analysis of S gene mutation of the hepatitis B virus in adult liver transplant recipients showing resistance to hepatitis B immunoglobulin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, G-C; Hwang, S; Ahn, C-S; Kim, K-H; Moon, D-B; Ha, T-Y; Song, G-W; Jung, D-H; Shin, Y W; Kim, S-H; Chang, K-H; Namgoong, J-M; Park, C-S; Park, H-W; Park, Y-H; Kang, S-H; Jung, B-H; Lee, S-G

    2013-10-01

    A considerable proportion of recipients of liver transplantations who are presented hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) monotherapy for hepatitis B virus (HBV) prophylaxis develop HBIG resistance. In this study, we investigated the mutation patterns in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of amino acid sequences 100 to 160. Using the gene sequence analyzer for amino acid sequences 0 to 226 in the S/pre-S region we analyzed blood samples of 15 patients showing HBIG resistance after high-dose HBIG prophylaxis. Various mutations in the MHR were observed in 14/15 samples: Gly145Arg mutation in 8/13 Adr subtype and 1/2 Ayw subtype samples (60%). The next most common mutation was Gly165Trp in 8/13 Adr subtype but neither of 2 Ayw subtype samples (53.3%). Concurrent antiviral resistance was noted in 5 patients: lamivudine (n = 5), or entecavir (n = 3), but not adefovir, suggesting the occurrence of simultaneous, antiviral cross-resistances. Two patients underwent retransplantation due to the progression of HBV infection despite vigorous antiviral therapy. At diagnosis of HBV recurrence, the mean HBV DNA load was 6.5 × 10(6) copies/mL; 4 patients showed paradoxical coexistence of anti-HBs and HBsAg. Currently, 2 subjects show low-level HBV DNA replication in peripheral blood, although the other 12 had no DNA replication after prolonged antiviral therapy. This study suggested that various mutations in the "a" determinant were associated with HBIG resistance. Since treatment failure to rescue antiviral therapy was often associated with delayed detection of HBV recurrence rather than concurrent antiviral resistance, frequent HBV surveillance using more sensitive screening tests, such as HBeAg and HBV DNA polymerase chain reaction assay, seems to be mandatory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Consideration of Viral Resistance for Optimization of Direct Antiviral Therapy of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Julia; Susser, Simone; Berkowski, Caterina; Perner, Dany; Zeuzem, Stefan; Sarrazin, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Different highly effective interferon-free treatment options for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are currently available. Pre-existence of resistance associated variants (RAVs) to direct antiviral agents (DAAs) reduces sustained virologic response (SVR) rates by 3-53% in hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected patients depending on different predictors and the DAA regimen used. Frequencies of single and combined resistance to NS3, NS5A and NS5B inhibitors and consequences for the applicability of different treatment regimens are unknown. Parallel population based sequencing of HCV NS3, NS5A and NS5B genes in 312 treatment-naïve Caucasian HCV genotype 1 infected patients showed the presence of major resistant variants in 20.5% (NS3), 11.9% (NS5A), and 22.1% (NS5B) with important differences for HCV subtypes. In NS3, Q80K was observed in 34.7% and 2.1% of subtype 1a and 1b patients, respectively while other RAVs to second generation protease inhibitors were detected rarely (1.4%). Within NS5A RAVs were observed in 7.1% of subtype 1a and 17.6% in subtype 1b infected patients. RAVs to non-nucleoside NS5B inhibitors were observed in 3.5% and 44.4% of subtype 1a and 1b patients, respectively. Considering all three DAA targets all subtype 1a and 98.6% of subtype 1b infected patients were wildtype for at least one interferon free DAA regimen currently available. In conclusion, baseline resistance testing allows the selection of at least one RAVs-free treatment option for nearly all patients enabling a potentially cost- and efficacy-optimized treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  14. Consideration of Viral Resistance for Optimization of Direct Antiviral Therapy of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1-Infected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Dietz

    Full Text Available Different highly effective interferon-free treatment options for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection are currently available. Pre-existence of resistance associated variants (RAVs to direct antiviral agents (DAAs reduces sustained virologic response (SVR rates by 3-53% in hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infected patients depending on different predictors and the DAA regimen used. Frequencies of single and combined resistance to NS3, NS5A and NS5B inhibitors and consequences for the applicability of different treatment regimens are unknown. Parallel population based sequencing of HCV NS3, NS5A and NS5B genes in 312 treatment-naïve Caucasian HCV genotype 1 infected patients showed the presence of major resistant variants in 20.5% (NS3, 11.9% (NS5A, and 22.1% (NS5B with important differences for HCV subtypes. In NS3, Q80K was observed in 34.7% and 2.1% of subtype 1a and 1b patients, respectively while other RAVs to second generation protease inhibitors were detected rarely (1.4%. Within NS5A RAVs were observed in 7.1% of subtype 1a and 17.6% in subtype 1b infected patients. RAVs to non-nucleoside NS5B inhibitors were observed in 3.5% and 44.4% of subtype 1a and 1b patients, respectively. Considering all three DAA targets all subtype 1a and 98.6% of subtype 1b infected patients were wildtype for at least one interferon free DAA regimen currently available. In conclusion, baseline resistance testing allows the selection of at least one RAVs-free treatment option for nearly all patients enabling a potentially cost- and efficacy-optimized treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  15. Comparative analysis of drug resistance mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase gene in patients who are non-responsive, responsive and naive to antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misbah, Mohammad; Roy, Gaurav; Shahid, Mudassar; Nag, Nalin; Kumar, Suresh; Husain, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Drug resistance mutations in the Pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) are one of the critical factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure in HIV-1 patients. The issue of resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) in HIV infection has not been adequately addressed in the Indian subcontinent. We compared HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) gene sequences to identify mutations present in HIV-1 patients who were ART non-responders, ART responders and drug naive. Genotypic drug resistance testing was performed by sequencing a 655-bp region of the RT gene from 102 HIV-1 patients, consisting of 30 ART-non-responding, 35 ART-responding and 37 drug-naive patients. The Stanford HIV Resistance Database (HIVDBv 6.2), IAS-USA mutation list, ANRS_09/2012 algorithm, and Rega v8.02 algorithm were used to interpret the pattern of drug resistance. The majority of the sequences (96 %) belonged to subtype C, and a few of them (3.9 %) to subtype A1. The frequency of drug resistance mutations observed in ART-non-responding, ART-responding and drug-naive patients was 40.1 %, 10.7 % and 20.58 %, respectively. It was observed that in non-responders, multiple mutations were present in the same patient, while in responders, a single mutation was found. Some of the drug-naive patients had more than one mutation. Thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs), however, were found in non-responders and naive patients but not in responders. Although drug resistance mutations were widely distributed among ART non-responders, the presence of resistance mutations in the viruses of drug-naive patients poses a big concern in the absence of a genotyping resistance test.

  16. Short Communication: Hyperthyroidism in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients on Combined Antiretroviral Therapy: Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Emory; Phadke, Varun K; Nguyen, Minh Ly T

    2016-06-01

    We describe an HIV-infected patient initiated on combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) who subsequently developed immune restoration disease (IRD) hyperthyroidism-this case represents one of five such patients seen at our center within the past year. Similar to previous reports of hyperthyroidism due to IRD, all of our patients experienced a rapid early recovery in total CD4 count, but developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism on average 3 years (38 months) after beginning cART, which represents a longer time frame than previously reported. Awareness and recognition of this potential complication of cART, which may occur years after treatment initiation, will allow patients with immune restorative hyperthyroidism to receive timely therapy and avoid the long-term complications associated with undiagnosed thyroid disease.

  17. Hepatitis C virus therapy with peg-interferon and ribavirin in Myanmar: A resource-constrained country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Naomi Khaing Than; Banerjee, Debolina; Mitrani, Robert; Arker, Soe Htet; Win, Kyaw San; Tun, Nyan Lin; Thant, Zaw; Win, Khin Maung; Reddy, K Rajender

    2016-11-21

    To investigate peg-interferon (peg-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy in Myanmar and to predict sustained virologic response (SVR). This single-center, open-label, study was conducted in Myanmar between 2009 and 2014. A total of 288 patients infected with HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 6 were treated with peg-IFN alpha-2a (180 μg/wk) or alpha-2b (50 to 100 μg as a weight-based dose) and RBV as a weight-based dose (15 mg/kg/d). Treatment duration was 48 wk for genotypes 1 and 6, 24 wk for genotype 2, and 24 or 48 wk for genotype 3 based on rapid virologic response (RVR). Those co-infected with hepatitis B received 48 wk of therapy. Overall, SVR was achieved for 82% of patients and the therapy was well tolerated. All patients achieved SVR at equivalent rates regardless of HCV genotype ( P = 0.314). Low fibrosis scores ( P 96% positive predictive value for achieving SVR. Treatment duration did not significantly impact the likelihood of achieving SVR for patients infected with genotype 3 HCV ( P = 0.371). The most common adverse events were fatigue (71%) and poor appetite (60%). Among patients with genotype 3 HCV, more patients in the 48-wk treatment group required erythropoietin than in the 24-wk treatment group (61.1% vs 49.2%). SVR rates were high with peg-IFN and RBV therapy in Myanmar. Fibrosis scores, baseline albumin, HCV RNA levels and RVR independently predicted SVR.

  18. A Rapid Screening Assay Identifies Monotherapy with Interferon-ß and Combination Therapies with Nucleoside Analogs as Effective Inhibitors of Ebola Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D S McCarthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date there are no approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of Ebola virus disease (EVD. While a number of candidate drugs have shown limited efficacy in vitro and/or in non-human primate studies, differences in experimental methodologies make it difficult to compare their therapeutic effectiveness. Using an in vitro model of Ebola Zaire replication with transcription-competent virus like particles (trVLPs, requiring only level 2 biosafety containment, we compared the activities of the type I interferons (IFNs IFN-α and IFN-ß, a panel of viral polymerase inhibitors (lamivudine (3TC, zidovudine (AZT tenofovir (TFV, favipiravir (FPV, the active metabolite of brincidofovir, cidofovir (CDF, and the estrogen receptor modulator, toremifene (TOR, in inhibiting viral replication in dose-response and time course studies. We also tested 28 two- and 56 three-drug combinations against Ebola replication. IFN-α and IFN-ß inhibited viral replication 24 hours post-infection (IC50 0.038μM and 0.016μM, respectively. 3TC, AZT and TFV inhibited Ebola replication when used alone (50-62% or in combination (87%. They exhibited lower IC50 (0.98-6.2μM compared with FPV (36.8μM, when administered 24 hours post-infection. Unexpectedly, CDF had a narrow therapeutic window (6.25-25μM. When dosed >50μM, CDF treatment enhanced viral infection. IFN-ß exhibited strong synergy with 3TC (97.3% inhibition or in triple combination with 3TC and AZT (95.8% inhibition. This study demonstrates that IFNs and viral polymerase inhibitors may have utility in EVD. We identified several 2 and 3 drug combinations with strong anti-Ebola activity, confirmed in studies using fully infectious ZEBOV, providing a rationale for testing combination therapies in animal models of lethal Ebola challenge. These studies open up new possibilities for novel therapeutic options, in particular combination therapies, which could prevent and treat Ebola infection and potentially reduce drug

  19. [GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan: Consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (Updated January 2014)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This consensus document is an update of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) guidelines for HIV-1 infected adult patients. To formulate these recommendations a panel composed of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida reviewed the efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. Recommendations strength and the evidence in which they are supported are based on modified criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with the clinical circumstances: CDC stage B or C disease (A-I), asymptomatic patients (depending on the CD4+ T-lymphocyte count: 500 cells/μL, B-III), comorbid conditions (HIV nephropathy, chronic hepatitis caused by HBV or HCV, age >55years, high cardiovascular risk, neurocognitive disorders, and cancer, A-II), and prevention of transmission of HIV (mother-to-child or heterosexual, A-I; men who have sex with men, A-III). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). Some of the possible initial regimens have been considered alternatives. This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure where rescue ART should comprise 2 or 3 drugs that are fully active against the virus. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid

  20. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chun-Nun; Lin, Mien-Chun; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B) has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP) packaged with an SP-B promoter-driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk) for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp) or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk) under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter's tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP's gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV) were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter-driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and large cell carcinoma (H460) cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV), a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma.

  1. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Nun Chao

    Full Text Available Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP packaged with an SP-B promoter-driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter's tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP's gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter-driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549 and large cell carcinoma (H460 cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV, a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma.

  2. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co-infected...... patients (HCV genotype 1 (n = 16), 2 (n = 2), and 3 (n = 3)). Lower baseline IP-10 was significantly associated with a rapid decline in HCV RNA, in particular with the first phase reduction, and similar cut-off levels ( 600 pg/ml) as in HCV mono-infected patients apply. In conclusion, baseline IP......-10 infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  3. TO THE QUESTION ABOUT IMMUNOLOGIES CRITERIAS OF EFFICIENCY OF ANTIVIRUS THERAPY OF A CHRONIC VIRUS HEPATITES C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ph. Sklyar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The group of patients in amount 45 person received the standard combined therapy by preparations of recombinant IFN-α in combination with ribavirin. The positive effect of standard antivirus treatment at patients with chronic HCV-infection associated with increase of level of IL-2, decrease of levels of TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-12р40, IL-12р70 and IL-10 in peripheral serum. It has allowed to use them as noninvasive markers of the steady virologic answer during treatment of a chronic HCV-infection.

  4. Adeno-associated virus gene therapy vector scAAVIGF-I for transduction of equine articular chondrocytes and RNA-seq analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, D D; McIlwraith, C W; Slayden, R A; Samulski, R J; Goodrich, L R

    2016-05-01

    IGF-I is one of several anabolic factors being investigated for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Due to the short biological half-life, extended administration is required for more robust cartilage healing. Here we create a self-complimentary adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy vector utilizing the transgene for IGF-I. Various biochemical assays were performed to investigate the cellular response to scAAVIGF-I treatment vs an scAAVGFP positive transduction control and a negative for transduction control culture. RNA-sequencing analysis was also performed to establish a differential regulation profile of scAAVIGF-I transduced chondrocytes. Biochemical analyses indicated an average media IGF-I concentration of 608 ng/ml in the scAAVIGF-I transduced chondrocytes. This increase in IGF-I led to increased expression of collagen type II and aggrecan and increased protein concentrations of cellular collagen type II and media glycosaminoglycan vs both controls. RNA-seq revealed a global regulatory pattern consisting of 113 differentially regulated GO categories including those for chondrocyte and cartilage development and regulation of apoptosis. This research substantiates that scAAVIGF-I gene therapy vector increased production of IGF-I to clinically relevant levels with a biological response by chondrocytes conducive to increased cartilage healing. The RNA-seq further established a set of differentially expressed genes and gene ontologies induced by the scAAVIGF-I vector while controlling for AAV infection. This dataset provides a static representation of the cellular transcriptome that, while only consisting of one time point, will allow for further gene expression analyses to compare additional cartilage healing therapeutics or a transient cellular response. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Gene therapy strategy for long-term myocardial protection using adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of heme oxygenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Luis G; Agrawal, Reitu; Zhang, Lunan; Rezvani, Mojgan; Mangi, Abeel A; Ehsan, Afshin; Griese, Daniel P; Dell'Acqua, Giorgio; Mann, Michael J; Oyama, Junichi; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Layne, Matthew D; Perrella, Mark A; Dzau, Victor J

    2002-02-05

    Ischemia and oxidative stress are the leading mechanisms for tissue injury. An ideal strategy for preventive/protective therapy would be to develop an approach that could confer long-term transgene expression and, consequently, tissue protection from repeated ischemia/reperfusion injury with a single administration of a therapeutic gene. In the present study, we used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as a vector for direct delivery of the cytoprotective gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) into the rat myocardium, with the purpose of evaluating this strategy as a therapeutic approach for long-term protection from ischemia-induced myocardial injury. Human HO-1 gene (hHO-1) was delivered to normal rat hearts by intramyocardial injection. AAV-mediated transfer of the hHO-1 gene 8 weeks before acute coronary artery ligation and release led to a dramatic reduction (>75%) in left ventricular myocardial infarction. The reduction in infarct size was accompanied by decreases in myocardial lipid peroxidation and in proapoptotic Bax and proinflammatory interleukin-1beta protein abundance, concomitant with an increase in antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein level. This suggested that the transgene exerts its cardioprotective effects in part by reducing oxidative stress and associated inflammation and apoptotic cell death. This study documents the beneficial therapeutic effect of rAAV-mediated transfer, before myocardial injury, of a cytoprotective gene that confers long-term myocardial protection from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Our data suggest that this novel "pre-event" gene transfer approach may provide sustained tissue protection from future repeated episodes of injury and may be beneficial as preventive therapy for patients with or at risk of developing coronary ischemic events.

  6. Long-term Therapeutic Impact of the Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients Diagnosed With Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Sophie; Lécuroux, Camille; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique; Seng, Rémonie; Essat, Asma; Morlat, Philippe; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Goujard, Cécile

    2018-05-02

    We aimed to determine the consequences of delayed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection diagnosis by comparing long-term outcomes depending on the time of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation in patients diagnosed during primary HIV infection (PHI). We selected patients from the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis (ANRS) PRIMO cohort, treated for ≥36 months, with sustained HIV RNA 12 months after infection (deferred ART). We measured inflammatory biomarkers from PHI through the last visit on cART, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell activation and plasma ultrasensitive HIV RNA at the last visit. Inflammation/activation levels were compared with those of uninfected controls. We modeled CD4+ count, CD4:CD8 ratio, and HIV DNA dynamics on cART. The decrease of HIV DNA levels was more marked in the immediate than deferred ART group, leading to a sustained mean difference of -0.6 log10 copies/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Immediate ART led to improved CD4+ T-cell counts and CD4:CD8 ratios over the first 4 years of cART. At the last visit (median, 82 months), there was no difference between groups in CD4+ counts, CD4:CD8 ratio, ultrasensitive HIV RNA, or inflammation/activation marker levels. Long-term suppressive cART failed to normalize inflammation levels, which were not associated with immunovirological markers. Antiretroviral therapy initiated during PHI promotes long-term reduction of HIV reservoir size. In patients with sustained virologic suppression, inflammation may be driven by non-HIV-related factors.

  7. Giant condyloma acuminate due human papilloma virus type 16 in an infant successfully treated with topical imiquimod therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Dinleyici

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anogenital warts related to human papillomavirus (HPV have been observed in children. Definition of the transmission mode, therapy, and follow-up for long term potential complications is important. A 27-month old girl was admitted with multiple pedunculated red-purple colored cauliflower-like lesions of 1.5 years duration. Clinical/histopathological and microbiological diagnosis was condyloma acuminate due to HPV type 16. After 12 weeks of imiquimod 5% cream application (pea-sized overnight three times per week, the perianal warts had completely disappeared. The mode of transmission of HPV 16 in our case was probably horizontal, related to the sharing of common personal hygiene items in the women’s shelter. We report herein the case of an infant living in a women’s shelter with giant condyloma acuminata due to HPV 16, which was successfully treated with topical imiquimod therapy. This patient should be followed up for recurrence and potential malignant lesions related to HPV type 16.

  8. Antiviral therapy and outcomes of patients with pneumonia caused by influenza A pandemic (H1N1 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-gui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is limited data on the clinical outcome of patients with pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1 pneumonia who received oseltamivir treatment, especially when the treatment was administered more than 48 hours after symptom onset. METHODS: During the pandemic in 2009, a cohort of pH1N1 influenza pneumonia was built in China, and their clinical information was collected systematically, and analyzed with Cox models. RESULTS: 920 adults and 541 children with pneumonia who didn't receive corticosteroids were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was higher in adults who did not receive antiviral therapy (18.2% than those with who received oseltamivir ≤ 2 days (2.9%, between 2-5 days (4.6% and >5 days after illness onset (4.9%, p5 days, respectively. For males patients, aged ≥ 14 years and baseline PaO(2/FiO(23.8 mg/kg/d did not improve clinical outcome (mortality, higher dose 2.5% vs standard dose 2.8%, p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Antiviral therapy might reduce mortality of patients with pH1N1 pneumonia, even when initiated more than 48 hours after onset of illness. Greater protective effects might be in males, patients aged 14-60 years, and patients with PaO(2/FiO(2<200.

  9. Application of shRNA-containing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based gene therapy for HSV-2-induced genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihong; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Zhun; Yu, Bo; Shao, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Hong; Li, Manmei; Guan, Ming; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    HSV-1-based vectors have been widely used to achieve targeted delivery of genes into the nervous system. In the current study, we aim to use shRNA-containing HSV-1-based gene delivery system for the therapy of HSV-2 infection. Guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with HSV-2 and scored daily for 100 days for the severity of vaginal disease. HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 was applied intravaginally daily between 8 and 14 days after HSV-2 challenge. Delivery of HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 had no effect on the onset of disease and acute virus shedding in animals, but resulted in a significant reduction in both the cumulative recurrent lesion days and the number of days with recurrent disease. Around half of the animals in the HSV-2 shRNA group did not develop recurrent disease 100 days post HSV-2 infection. In conclusion, HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 particles are effective in reducing the recurrence of genital herpes caused by HSV-2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Associated oral lesions in human immunodefeciency virus infected children of age 1 to 14 years in anti retroviral therapy centers in Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Krishna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of oral lesions status in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected children of age 1 to 14 years in Anti Retro viral therapy (ART centres in Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: A of total 326 HIV infected children, age 1 to 14 years of which 174 male children and 152 female children were examined for Oral lesions in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Rajah Muthiah Dental College and Hospital, Annamalai University in association with the ART centers in Villupuram, Vellore and HIV Homes in Thiruvannamalai, Trichy and Salem in Tamil Nadu towns. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package for Social Science for Windows (version 11 code: 3000135939012345. Result: Of the total 326 children, 201 (61.65% had oral lesions. (68 [20.86%] with Oral Candidiasis [OC], 54 [16.56%] with Angular Cheilitis, 27 [8.28%] with Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis [NUG], 25 [7.66%] with Necrotizing Ulcerative Periodontitis [NUP], 18 [5.53%] with Linear Gingival Erythema [LGE] and 9 [2.76%] with Apthous Ulcer. Conclusion Among the oral lesions in HIV infected children, OC 20.86% was the predominant oral lesion followed by Angular Chelitis 16.56%, NUG 8.28%, NUP 7.66%, LGE5.53% and Apthous Ulcer 2.76%.

  11. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on Antiretroviral Therapy in Adults Infected by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Updated January 2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should comprise 3 drugs, namely, 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), and 1 drug from another family. Four of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) as the third drug, are considered a preferred regimen; a further 6 regimens, which are based on an INSTI, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), or a protease inhibitor boosted with cobicistat or ritonavir (PI/COBI, PI/r), are considered alternatives. The reasons and criteria for switching ART are presented both for patients with an undetectable PVL and for patients who experience virological failure, in which case the rescue regimen should include 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against HIV. The specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbid conditions (tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer) are updated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (updated January 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, Juan; Polo, Rosa; Aldeguer, José López; Lozano, Fernando; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, José Ramón; Blanco, José Ramón; Boix, Vicente; Casado, José Luis; Clotet, Bonaventura; Crespo, Manuel; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; García, Federico; Gatell, José María; González-García, Juan; Gutiérrez, Félix; Iribarren, José Antonio; Knobel, Hernando; Llibre, Josep María; Locutura, Jaime; López, Juan Carlos; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Podzamczer, Daniel; Portilla, Joaquín; Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Riera, Melchor; Rubio, Rafael; Santos, Jesús; Sanz-Moreno, José; Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, María Jesús; Tuset, Montserrat; Rivero, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation vary depending on the CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, the presence of opportunistic infections or comorbid conditions, age, and the efforts to prevent the transmission of HIV. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should comprise three drugs, namely, two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and one drug from another family. Three of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) as the third drug, are considered a preferred regimen; a further seven regimens, which are based on an INSTI, an non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), or a protease inhibitor boosted with ritonavir (PI/r), are considered alternatives. The reasons and criteria for switching ART are presented both for patients with an undetectable PVL and for patients who experience virological failure, in which case the rescue regimen should include three (or at least two) drugs that are fully active against HIV. The specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbid conditions (tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer) are updated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Executive summary of the GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (updated January 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, Juan; Polo, Rosa; Lozano, Fernando; López Aldeguer, José; Antela, Antonio; Arribas, José Ramón; Asensi, Víctor; Blanco, José Ramón; Clotet, Bonaventura; Domingo, Pere; Galindo, María José; Gatell, José María; González-García, Juan; Iribarren, José Antonio; Locutura, Jaime; López, Juan Carlos; Mallolas, Josep; Martínez, Esteban; Miralles, Celia; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Palacios, Rosario; Pérez Elías, María Jesús; Pineda, Juan Antonio; Podzamczer, Daniel; Portilla, Joaquín; Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Riera, Melchor; Rubio, Rafael; Santos, Jesús; Sanz, Jesús; Tuset, Montserrat; Vidal, Francesc; Rivero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with clinical circumstances, number of CD4 cells, comorbid conditions and prevention of transmission of HIV. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection induces severe loss of intestinal central memory T cells which impairs CD4+ T-cell restoration during antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, D; Sankaran, S; Dandekar, S

    2007-08-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection leads to severe loss of intestinal CD4(+) T cells and, as compared to peripheral blood, restoration of these cells is slow during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Mechanisms for this delay have not been examined in context of which specific CD4(+) memory subsets or lost and fail to regenerate during ART. Fifteen rhesus macaques were infected with SIV, five of which received ART (FTC/PMPA) for 30 weeks. Viral loads were measured by real-time PCR. Flow cytometric analysis determined changes in T-cell subsets and their proliferative state. Changes in proliferative CD4(+) memory subsets during infection accelerated their depletion. This reduced the central memory CD4(+) T-cell pool and contributed to slow CD4(+) T-cell restoration during ART. There was a lack of restoration of the CD4(+) central memory and effector memory T-cell subsets in gut-associated lymphoid tissue during ART, which may contribute to the altered intestinal T-cell homeostasis in SIV infection.

  15. Epstein Barr virus Latent Membrane Protein-1 enhances dendritic cell therapy lymph node migration, activation, and IL-12 secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Termini

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are a promising cell type for cancer vaccines due to their high immunostimulatory capacity. However, improper maturation of DC prior to treatment may account for the limited efficacy of DC vaccine clinical trials. Latent Membrane Protein-1 (LMP1 of Epstein-Barr virus was examined for its ability to mature and activate DC as a gene-based molecular adjuvant for DC vaccines. DC were transduced with an adenovirus 5 vector (Ad5 expressing LMP1 under the control of a Tet-inducible promoter. Ad5-LMP1 was found to mature and activate both human and mouse DC. LMP1 enhanced in vitro migration of DC toward CCL19, as well as in vivo migration of DC to the inguinal lymph nodes of mice following intradermal injection. LMP1-transduced DC increased T cell proliferation in a Pmel-1 adoptive transfer model and enhanced survival in B16-F10 melanoma models. LMP1-DC also enhanced protection in a vaccinia-Gag viral challenge assay. LMP1 induced high levels of IL-12p70 secretion in mouse DC when compared to standard maturation protocols. Importantly, LMP1-transduced human DC retained the capacity to secrete IL-12p70 and TNF in response to DC restimulation. In contrast, DC matured with Monocyte Conditioned Media-Mimic cocktail (Mimic were impaired in IL-12p70 secretion following restimulation. Overall, LMP1 matured and activated DC, induced migration to the lymph node, and generated high levels of IL-12p70 in a murine model. We propose LMP1 as a promising molecular adjuvant for DC vaccines.

  16. Dual Therapy With Darunavir and Ritonavir Plus Lamivudine vs Triple Therapy With Darunavir and Ritonavir Plus Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate and Emtricitabine or Abacavir and Lamivudine for Maintenance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Viral Suppression: Randomized, Open-Label, Noninferiority DUAL-GESIDA 8014-RIS-EST45 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Lagarde, María; Pérez-Valero, Ignacio; Palacios, Rosario; Iribarren, José A; Payeras, Antoni; Domingo, Pere; Sanz, José; Cervero, Miguel; Curran, Adrián; Rodríguez-Gómez, Francisco J; Téllez, María J; Ryan, Pablo; Barrufet, Pilar; Knobel, Hernando; Rivero, Antonio; Alejos, Belén; Yllescas, María; Arribas, José R

    2017-11-29

    Our objective was to assess the therapeutic noninferiority of dual therapy with darunavir/ritonavir and lamivudine compared to triple therapy with darunavir/ritonavir plus 2 nucleos(t)ides for maintenance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) suppression. This was a multicenter, open-label, noninferiority trial (margin 12%). Patients with HIV-1 RNA dual- and triple-therapy arms was 88.9% (112/126) and 92.7% (114/123; difference, -3.8%; 95% confidence interval, -11.0 to 3.4), respectively. Four participants in the dual-therapy arm and 2 in the triple-therapy arm developed protocol-defined virological failure. Switching to dual therapy was associated with a significant increase in total, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but not in the total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio. Serious adverse events and study drug discontinuations due to adverse events occurred in 4.8% vs 4.9%P = .97) and in 0.8% (1/126) vs 1.6% P = .55) in dual therapy vs triple therapy, respectively. Dual therapy with darunavir/ritonavir and lamivudine demonstrated noninferior therapeutic efficacy and similar tolerability compared to triple therapy. NCT02159599. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Epidemiology and clinical parameters of adult human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome at the initiation of antiretroviral therapy in South eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleje, Gu; Ele, Pu; Okocha, Ec; Iloduba, Uc

    2014-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has continued to ravage the teeming populations in Nigeria, with disastrous consequences. Despite many studies and progress on HIV/AIDS in Africa, the data on the status of the patients at the commencement of therapy is lacking. The aim of this study is to determine the demographic, clinical and some laboratory features of adult HIV/AIDS patients, seen at the commencement of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, south-east Nigeria between July 2002 and October 2004. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Adult patients living with HIV/AIDS were studied using an interview administered questionnaire. Data was analyzed using Epi Info 2008 version 3.5.1. A total of 400 respondents participated in this study. The mean age was 36.8 (8.8) years. Almost 60% patients were married and the HIV concordance rate was 53.3% (136/255). Nearly 30% of the families had at least one child positive for HIV. The most common associated risky behavior was injection administered in patent medicine stores 74.5%(302/400) and the most common clinical symptom was respiratory. Of the 400 patients recruited in this study, 19 (4.8%) were lost to follow-up on the 6 months' visit, giving a follow-up rate of 95.2% (381/400). There was statistically significant difference in the mean body weight (P = 0.02), mean total white blood cell count (P < 0.001) and mean CD4(+) count (P < 0.001) at presentation and after 6 months of ART therapy. HIV/AIDS patients present late and body weight, CD4(+) count and total white blood cell count seemed to recover quickly on commencement of ART. The prevalence of concordance among couples and mother to child transmission rates tended to be high. Administration of injectable at patent medicine stores and multiple sexual partners are the most significant risk factors.

  18. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin C for Invasive Anal Carcinoma in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraunholz, Ingeborg; Weiss, Christian; Eberlein, Klaus; Haberl, Annette; Roedel, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcomes of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for anal carcinoma in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2008, 21 HIV-positive patients who were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy were treated with CRT (50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction plus a 5.4-10.8-Gy external boost; 5-fluorouracil, 1,000 mg/m 2 , Days 1-4 and 29-32; and mitomycin C, 10 mg/m 2 , Days 1 and 29). A retrospective analysis was performed with respect to the tumor response, local control, cancer-specific and overall survival, and toxicity. The immunologic parameters, including pre- and post-treatment CD4 count, viral load, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-specific morbidity was recorded during follow-up (median, 53 months; range, 10-99). Results: CRT could be completed in all 21 patients with a reduction in the chemotherapy dose and/or interruption of radiotherapy in 5 and 5 cases, respectively. Acute Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 8 (38%) of the 21 patients. A complete response was achieved in 17 patients (81%), and tumor persistence or early progression was noted in 4 (19%). Six patients (29%) died, 5 of cancer progression and 1 of treatment-related toxicity. The 5-year local control, cancer-specific, and overall survival rate was 59%, 75%, and 67%, respectively. The median CD4 count significantly decreased from 347.5 cells/μL before CRT to 125 cells/μL 3-7 weeks after CRT completion (p <.001). In 6 (32%) of 19 patients, an increase of the HIV viral load was noted. Both parameters returned to the pretreatment values with additional follow-up. Conclusion: Our data have confirmed that in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-related anal cancer can be treated with standard CRT without dose reductions. Close surveillance of the immunologic parameters is necessary.

  19. Interferon alpha as antiviral therapy in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease with interstitial pneumonia - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roliński, Jacek; Grywalska, Ewelina; Pyzik, Aleksandra; Dzik, Michał; Opoka-Winiarska, Violetta; Surdacka, Agata; Maj, Maciej; Burdan, Franciszek; Pirożyński, Michał; Grabarczyk, Piotr; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2018-04-20

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) disease (CAEBV) is defined as a severe, progressive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with active EBV infection persisting longer than 6 months and developing in patients without recognised immunodeficiency. Rarely, interstitial pneumonitis (IP) occurs as a serious complication in CAEBV patients. The standard therapeutic regimen for IP in CAEBV has not yet been defined. Although interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) is known to suppress viral DNA replication by affecting its basal promoter activation process, it is rarely used in CAEBV patients. A 22-year-old Caucasian woman, diagnosed with CAEBV 1.5 years earlier, was admitted to the Immunology Clinic due to a 4-week history of productive cough, fever and general weakness. Cultures of blood, urine and sputum were negative, but EBV DNA copies were found in the sputum, whole blood, isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in the blood plasma. Cytokine assessment in peripheral blood revealed the lack of IFN-alpha synthesis. Disseminated maculate infiltrative areas in both lungs were observed on a computed tomography (CT) chest scan. The patient was not qualified for the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) due to the risk of immunosuppression-related complications of infectious IP. Inhaled (1.5 million units 3 times a day) and subcutaneous (6 million units 3 times a week) IFN-alpha was implemented. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first documented use of inhaled IFN-alpha in a patient with CAEBV and concomitant IP. Patient's status has improved, and she was eventually qualified to allo-HSCT with reduced conditioning. Currently, the patient feels well, no EBV was detected and further regression of pulmonary changes was documented. CAEBV should be considered in patients who present with interstitial lung infiltration and involvement of other organs. Although more promising results have been obtained with allo-HSCT, inhaled IFN-alpha may

  20. [GESIDA/National AIDS Plan: Consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (Updated January 2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This consensus document is an update of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) guidelines and recommendations for HIV-1 infected adult patients. To formulate these recommendations, a panel composed of members of the AIDS Study Group and the AIDS National Plan (GeSIDA/Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) reviewed the efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, and cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. The strength of the recommendations, and the evidence that supports them, are based on modified criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. In this update, cART is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and level of the recommendation depends on the CD4+T-lymphocyte count, the presence of opportunistic diseases or comorbid conditions, age, and prevention of transmission of HIV. The objective of cART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial cART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and a third drug from a different family. Three out of the ten recommended regimes are regarded as preferential (all of them with an integrase inhibitor as the third drug), and the other seven (based on a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor, or an integrase inhibitor) as alternatives. This update presents the causes and criteria for switching cART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load, and in cases of virological failure where rescue cART should comprise 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against the virus. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for cART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer). These new guidelines

  1. Viruses, bacteria, and parasites - oh my! a resurgence of interest in microbial-based therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zloza, Andrew

    2018-01-08

    As infections and cancer are two of the most common maladies affecting human beings, a concerted effort is needed to better understand their potential interactions and to further explore their use in microbial-based cancer treatments. Studies focusing on the interaction between pathogens and cancer began over 4000 years ago, but therapeutic application of pathogens has often been bypassed as other cancer therapies have gained wider interest. To many, the field of microbial-based cancer treatment may feel antiquated and already sufficiently explored. However, closer examination reveals that our current knowledge is but a series of dim reflections amongst many yet-unexplored shadows. Particularly, with our increased understanding of pathogen entry, replication, and senescence, coupled with our quickly increasing knowledge regarding cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis, and capped by our realization of the complexity and plasticity of the immune response, we are just now beginning to realize the vastness of the undiscovered area encompassing this field. At the same time, we are now uniquely poised with gained knowledge and discovered tools to join together across disciplines, uncover new positive and negative interactions between pathogens and cancer, and make important progress toward saving cancer patient lives.

  2. Anti-viral therapy is associated with improved survival but is underutilised in patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma: real-world east and west experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, V L; Yeh, M-L; Le, A K; Jun, M; Saeed, W K; Yang, J D; Huang, C-F; Lee, H Y; Tsai, P-C; Lee, M-H; Giama, N; Kim, N G; Nguyen, P P; Dang, H; Ali, H A; Zhang, N; Huang, J-F; Dai, C-Y; Chuang, W-L; Roberts, L R; Jun, D W; Lim, Y-S; Yu, M-L; Nguyen, M H

    2018-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide. It remains incompletely understood in the real world how anti-viral therapy affects survival after HCC diagnosis. This was an international multicentre cohort study of 2518 HBV-related HCC cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2015. Cox proportional hazards models were utilised to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% (CI) for anti-viral therapy and cirrhosis on patients' risk of death. Approximately, 48% of patients received anti-viral therapy at any time, but only 17% were on therapy at HCC diagnosis (38% at US centres, 11% at Asian centres). Anti-viral therapy would have been indicated for >60% of the patients not on anti-viral therapy based on American criteria. Patients with cirrhosis had lower 5-year survival (34% vs 46%; P < 0.001) while patients receiving anti-viral therapy had increased 5-year survival compared to untreated patients (42% vs 25% with cirrhosis and 58% vs 36% without cirrhosis; P < 0.001 for both). Similar findings were seen for other patient subgroups by cancer stages and cancer treatment types. Anti-viral therapy was associated with a decrease in risk of death, whether started before or after HCC diagnosis (adjusted HR 0.62 and 0.79, respectively; P < 0.001). Anti-viral therapy improved overall survival in patients with HBV-related HCC across cancer stages and treatment types but was underutilised at both US and Asia centres. Expanded use of anti-viral therapy in HBV-related HCC and better linkage-to-care for HBV patients are needed. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Cost analysis of initial highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens for managing human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients according to clinical practice in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo GL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio L Colombo,1,2 Antonella Castagna,3 Sergio Di Matteo,2 Laura Galli,3 Giacomo Bruno,2 Andrea Poli,3 Stefania Salpietro,3 Alessia Carbone,3 Adriano Lazzarin3,41Department of Drug Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Pavia, Italy; 2Studi Analisi Valutazioni Economiche (S.A.V.E., Milan, 3Infectious Diseases Department, San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, 4Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, ItalyObjective: In the study reported here, single-tablet regimen (STR versus (vs multi-tablet regimen (MTR strategies were evaluated through a cost analysis in a large cohort of patients starting their first highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV 1-naïve patients, followed at the San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy, starting their first-line regimen from June 2008 to April 2012 were included in the analysis.Methods: The most frequently used first-line HAART regimens (>10% were grouped into two classes: 1 STR of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF + emtricitabine (FTC + efavirenz (EFV and 2 MTR including TDF + FTC + EFV, TDF + FTC + atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r, TDF + FTC + darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r, and TDF + FTC + lopinavir/ritoavir (LPV/r. Data were analyzed from the point of view of the Lombardy Regional Health Service. HAART, hospitalizations, visits, medical examinations, and other concomitant non-HAART drug costs were evaluated and price variations included. Descriptive statistics were calculated for baseline demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics; associations between categorical variables and type of antiretroviral strategy (STR vs MTR were examined using chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. At multivariate analysis, the generalized linear model was used to identify the predictive factors of the overall costs of the first-line HAART regimens.Results: A total of 474 naïve patients (90% male, mean age 42.2 years, mean baseline HIV-RNA 4.50 log10 copies/mL, and cluster of

  4. Initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children in Europe and the United States: comparing clinical practice to guidelines and literature evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweel, Gwenda; Saavedra-Lozano, Jesus; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; Ramilo, Octavio; de Groot, Ronald

    2006-11-01

    Several guidelines are available to guide the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children. The recommendations in these guidelines show significant variability. Because there is no well-established evidence on when to start HAART, it is left to the discretion of the pediatrician which guidelines to follow. We conducted a survey concerning the indications for starting antiretroviral therapy among pediatricians involved in the treatment of HIV-infected patients in Europe and the United States. We compared the results of this survey with the guidelines available at the time, the recently adapted guidelines and literature evidence. Our results indicate that in clinical practice HAART was initiated at higher viral loads and lower CD4 counts than recommended by the guidelines. American guidelines recommended and still recommend more aggressive treatment than the European guidelines, and this is reflected in clinical practice. Until recently all guidelines were based on long term risk analyses of progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and death performed in cohort data. A recent short term risk analysis makes it possible to calculate the 6 or 12-month risk for progression to AIDS or death for an individual child. Because viral load and CD4 count are typically measured every 3 months, one can argue that it is clinically more relevant to base the decision of when to start HAART on the short term probability of disease progression. Guidelines in Europe are now based on this type of analysis. The American guidelines only adopted the thresholds for CD4 and viral load. The short term risk analysis also shows that the risk for developing AIDS varies markedly with age. This should be reflected in all guidelines. Determining the acceptable risk of disease progression is difficult and influenced by patient-, doctor- and culture-related factors. The controversy over whether or not to treat

  5. Baseline prediction of combination therapy outcome in hepatitis C virus 1b infected patients by discriminant analysis using viral and host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saludes, Verónica; Bracho, Maria Alma; Valero, Oliver; Ardèvol, Mercè; Planas, Ramón; González-Candelas, Fernando; Ausina, Vicente; Martró, Elisa

    2010-11-30

    Current treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has limited efficacy -especially among genotype 1 infected patients-, is costly, and involves severe side effects. Thus, predicting non-response is of major interest for both patient wellbeing and health care expense. At present, treatment cannot be individualized on the basis of any baseline predictor of response. We aimed to identify pre-treatment clinical and virological parameters associated with treatment failure, as well as to assess whether therapy outcome could be predicted at baseline. Forty-three HCV subtype 1b (HCV-1b) chronically infected patients treated with pegylated-interferon alpha plus ribavirin were retrospectively studied (21 responders and 22 non-responders). Host (gender, age, weight, transaminase levels, fibrosis stage, and source of infection) and viral-related factors (viral load, and genetic variability in the E1-E2 and Core regions) were assessed. Logistic regression and discriminant analyses were used to develop predictive models. A "leave-one-out" cross-validation method was used to assess the reliability of the discriminant models. Lower alanine transaminase levels (ALT, p=0.009), a higher number of quasispecies variants in the E1-E2 region (number of haplotypes, nHap_E1-E2) (p=0.003), and the absence of both amino acid arginine at position 70 and leucine at position 91 in the Core region (p=0.039) were significantly associated with treatment failure. Therapy outcome was most accurately predicted by discriminant analysis (90.5% sensitivity and 95.5% specificity, 85.7% sensitivity and 81.8% specificity after cross-validation); the most significant variables included in the predictive model were the Core amino acid pattern, the nHap_E1-E2, and gamma-glutamyl transferase and ALT levels. Discriminant analysis has been shown as a useful tool to predict treatment outcome using baseline HCV genetic variability and host characteristics. The discriminant models obtained in this

  6. Moderate Sustained Virologic Response Rates With 6-Week Combination Directly Acting Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Therapy in Patients With Advanced Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattakuzhy, Sarah; Wilson, Eleanor; Sidharthan, Sreetha; Sims, Zayani; McLaughlin, Mary; Price, Angie; Silk, Rachel; Gross, Chloe; Akoth, Elizabeth; McManus, Maryellen; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Shrivastava, Shikha; Tang, Lydia; Nelson, Amy; Teferi, Gebeyehu; Chavez, Jose; Lam, Brian; Mo, Hongmei; Osinusi, Anuoluwapo; Polis, Michael A; Masur, Henry; Kohli, Anita; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran

    2016-02-15

    Treatment of genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with combination directly acting antivirals (DAA) for 8-24 weeks is associated with high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR). We previously demonstrated that adding a third DAA to ledipasvir and sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) can result in high SVR rates in patients without cirrhosis. In this study, we investigated whether a similar regimen would yield equivalent rates of cure in patients with advanced liver fibrosis. Fifty patients were enrolled at the Clinical Research Center of the National Institutes of Health and associated healthcare centers. Enrollment and follow-up data from April 2014 to June 2015 are reported here. Eligible participants were aged ≥18 years, had chronic HCV genotype 1 infection (serum HCV RNA ≥2000 IU/mL), and stage 3-4 liver fibrosis. HCV RNA was measured using a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay. Of patients treated with LDV, SOF, and the NS3/4A protease inhibitor GS-9451 for 6 weeks, 76% (38 of 50; 95% confidence interval, 60%-85%) had SVR achieved 12 weeks after the end of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in treatment efficacy between treatment-naive patients (72%, 18 of 25) and those with treatment experience (80%; 20 of 25) (P = .51). Overall, 11 patients (22%) experienced virologic relapse, and 1 (2%) was lost to follow-up at 4 weeks after treatment. No serious adverse events, discontinuations, or deaths were associated with this regimen. Adding a third DAA to LDV/SOF may result in a moderate SVR rate, lower than that observed in patients without cirrhosis. Significant liver fibrosis remains an impediment to achieving SVR with short-duration DAA therapy. CT01805882. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Evaluation of oral manifestations and oral health status among pediatric human immunodeficiency virus patients-under anti-retroviral therapy: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aroquiadasse

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV acquired immunodeficiency syndrome disease has evolved to become a social and economic catastrophe, with far-reaching implications affecting every phase of life of the diseased individual. Data on adults and children diagnosed with HIV infection are useful for determining populations needing prevention and treatment services. Oral lesions may be the presenting symptoms of HIV infection and may differ entirely from those manifested in the adult population. Aim and Objective: We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HIV related oral lesions among pediatric HIV patients and to assess the oral health status of HIV infected children residing in a selected childcare facility in Puducherry. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during September 2015 in child care facility for HIV infected children located in Puducherry U.T, India. All children <18 years, who are diagnosed with HIV infection and are put on anti-retroviral therapy (ART or pre-ART care, were included in the study. After obtaining informed consent from the care-givers and assent of the children, they were interviewed and examined by a team comprising a qualified dental surgeon and a trained physician. Results: Majority of the children were under first-line ART (73% and were on ART for more than 4 years. The CD4 count of 23 (52.3 was between 500–1000 cells/μL. The recent viral load assay in 32 (72.7 patients was <150/not detected. Tooth decay was the most common oral manifestation with 28 (63.6 being affected. Nonspecific lymphadenopathy 26 (59.1 was the most common coexisting systemic illness. Conclusion: This study proves that constant surveillance by monitoring the general health status, CD4 counts, viral load coupled with stringent ART care has improved the overall quality of life of these children and consequently resulted in lesser oral manifestations.

  8. Long-Term Follow-Up of Resistance-Associated Substitutions in Hepatitis C Virus in Patients in Which Direct Acting Antiviral-Based Therapy Failed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kanako; Hai, Hoang; Tamori, Akihiro; Teranishi, Yuga; Kozuka, Ritsuzo; Motoyama, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Etsushi; Hagihara, Atsushi; Uchida-Kobayashi, Sawako; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Enomoto, Masaru; Murakami, Yoshiki; Kawada, Norifumi

    2017-05-03

    We evaluated the transition of dominant resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) in hepatitis C virus during long-term follow-up after the failure of DAAs (direct acting antivirals)-based therapy. RASs in non-structure (NS)3/4A, NS5A, NS5B, and deletions in NS5A from 20 patients who failed simeprevir/pegylated-interferon/ribavirin (SMV/PEG-IFN/RBV) and 25 patients who failed daclatasvir/asunaprevir (DCV/ASV) treatment were examined by direct sequencing. With respect to SMV/PEG-IFN/RBV treatment, RAS was detected at D168 in NS3/4A but not detected in NS5A and NS5B at treatment failure in 16 of 20 patients. During the median follow-up period of 64 weeks, the RAS at D168 became less dominant in 9 of 16 patients. Among 25 DCV/ASV failures, RASs at D168, L31, and Y93 were found in 57.1%, 72.2%, and 76.9%, respectively. NS5A deletions were detected in 3 of 10 patients treated previously with SMV/PEG-IFN/RBV. The number of RASs in the breakthrough patients exceeded that in relapsers (mean 3.9 vs. 2.7, p < 0.05). RAS at D168 in NS3/4A became less dominant in 6 of 15 patients within 80 weeks. Y93H emerged at the time of relapse, then decreased gradually by 99% at 130 weeks post-treatment. Emerged RASs were associated with the clinical course of treatment and could not be detected during longer follow-up.

  9. Risk factors for Kaposi's sarcoma in human immunodeficiency virus patients after initiation of antiretroviral therapy: A nested case-control study in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupia, Rodgers; Wabuyia, Peter B; Otiato, Peter; Fang, Chi-Tai; Tsai, Feng-Jen

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence and development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients. We conducted a retrospective nested case-control study of 165 participants (33 cases and 132 controls) receiving HAART care at Maseno Hospital, Kenya, from January 2005 to October 2013. Cases were HIV-positive adults with KS, who were matched with controls in a ratio of 1:4 based on age (±5 years of each case), sex, and KS diagnosis date. Perfect adherence to HAART was assessed on every clinic visit by patients' self-reporting and pill counts. Chi-square tests were performed to compare socioeconomic and clinical statuses between cases and controls. A conditional logistic regression was used to assess the effects of perfect adherence to HAART, the latest CD4 count, education level, distance to health-care facility, initial World Health Organization stage, and number of regular sexual partners on the development of KS. Only 63.6% participants reported perfect adherence, and the control group had a significantly higher percentage of perfect adherence (75.0%) than did cases (18.2%). After adjustment for potential imbalances in the baseline and clinical characteristics, patients with imperfect HAART adherence had 20-times greater risk of developing KS than patients with perfect HAART adherence [hazard ratios: 21.0, 95% confidence interval: 4.2-105.1]. Patients with low latest CD4 count (≤350 cells/mm 3 ) had a seven-times greater risk of developing KS than did their counterparts (HRs: 7.1, 95% CI: 1.4-36.2). Imperfect HAART adherence and low latest CD4 count are significantly associated with KS development. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  11. Non-invasive in vivo imaging with radiolabelled FIAU for monitoring cancer gene therapy using herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and ganciclovir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Win-Ping; Lai, Wen-Fu [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Taiwan); Yang, Wen K.; Yang, Den-Mei [Institute of Biological Science, Academic Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan); Liu, Ren-Shyan [Department of Nuclear Medicine and National PET Cyclotron Center, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Wang, Hsin-Ell [Institute of Radiological Science, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Lih-Nong Street, 112, Pei-tou, Taipei (Taiwan); Fu, Ying-Kai [Institute of Nuclear Energy, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan (Taiwan)

    2004-01-01

    An experimental cancer gene therapy model was employed to develop a non-invasive imaging procedure using radiolabelled 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodo-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyluracil (FIAU) as an enzyme substrate for monitoring retroviral vector-mediated herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (HSV1-tk) transgene expression. Iodine-131 labelled FIAU was prepared by a no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) synthesis process and lyophilised to give ''hot kits''. The labelling yield was over 95%, with a radiochemical purity of more than 98%. The stability of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in the form of lyophilised powder (the hot kit) was much better than that in the normal saline solution. The shelf life of the final [{sup 131}I]FIAU hot kit product is as long as 4 weeks. Cellular uptake of [{sup 131}I]FIAU after different periods of storage was investigated in vitro with HSV1-tk-retroviral vector transduced NG4TL4-STK and parental non-transduced NG4TL4 murine sarcoma cell lines over an 8-h incubation period. The NG4TL4-STK cells accumulated more radioactivity than NG4TL4 cells in all conditions, and accumulation increased with time up to 8 h. The kinetic profile of the cellular uptake of n.c.a. [{sup 131}I]FIAU formulated from the lyophilised hot kit or from the stock solution was qualitatively similar. For animal model cancer gene therapy studies, FVB/N mice were inoculated subcutaneously with the HSV1-tk(+) and tk(-) sarcoma cells into the flank to produce tumours. Biodistribution studies showed that tumour/blood ratios were 2, 3.5, 8.2 and 386.8 at 1, 4, 8 and 24 h post injection, respectively, for the HSV1-tk(+) tumours, and 0.5, 0.5, 0.7 and 5.4, respectively, for the HSV1-tk(-) tumours. Radiotracer clearance from blood was completed in 24 h and was bi-exponential. A significant difference in radioactivity accumulation was revealed among the HSV1-tk(+) tumours, the tk(-) tumours and other tissues. At 24 h p.i., higher activity retention was observed

  12. Long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV response to lamivudine-containing highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-HBV co-infected patients in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woottichai Khamduang

    Full Text Available Approximately 4 million of people are co-infected with HIV and Hepatitis B virus (HBV. In resource-limited settings, the majority of HIV-infected patients initiate first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy containing lamivudine (3TC-containing-HAART and long-term virological response of HBV to lamivudine-containing HAART in co-infected patients is not well known.HIV-HBV co-infected patients enrolled in the PHPT cohort (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00433030 and initiating a 3TC-containing-HAART regimen were included. HBV-DNA, HIV-RNA, CD4+ T-cell counts and alanine transaminase were measured at baseline, 3 months, 12 months and then every 6 months up to 5 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the cumulative rates of patients who achieved and maintained HBV-DNA suppression. Of 30 co-infected patients, 19 were positive for HBe antigen (HBeAg. At initiation of 3TC-containing-HAART, median HBV DNA and HIV RNA levels were 7.35 log(10 IU/mL and 4.47 log(10 copies/mL, respectively. At 12 months, 67% of patients achieved HBV DNA suppression: 100% of HBeAg-negative patients and 47% of HBeAg-positive. Seventy-three percent of patients had HIV RNA below 50 copies/mL. The cumulative rates of maintained HBV-DNA suppression among the 23 patients who achieved HBV-DNA suppression were 91%, 87%, and 80% at 1, 2, and 4 years respectively. Of 17 patients who maintained HBV-DNA suppression while still on 3TC, 4 (24% lost HBsAg and 7 of 8 (88% HBeAg-positive patients lost HBeAg at their last visit (median duration, 59 months. HBV breakthrough was observed only in HBeAg-positive patients and 6 of 7 patients presenting HBV breakthrough had the rtM204I/V mutations associated with 3TC resistance along with rtL180M and/or rtV173L.All HBeAg-negative patients and 63% of HBeAg-positive HIV-HBV co-infected patients achieved long-term HBV DNA suppression while on 3TC-containing-HAART. This study provides information useful for the management of co-infected patients

  13. B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma associated with Epstein-Barr virus-reactivation and T-cell suppression following antithymocyte globulin therapy in a patient with severe aplastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Hanaoka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (B-LPD is generally characterized by the proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-infected B lymphocytes. We here report the development of EBV-negative B-LPD associated with EBV-reactivation following antithymocyte globulin (ATG therapy in a patient with aplastic anemia. The molecular autopsy study showed the sparse EBV-infected clonal T cells could be critically involved in the pathogenesis of EBV-negative oligoclonal B-LPD through cytokine amplification and escape from T-cell surveillances attributable to ATG-based immunosuppressive therapy, leading to an extremely rare B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma. This report helps in elucidating the complex pathophysiology of intractable B-LPD refractory to rituximab.

  14. Stability of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels among interferon-naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals treated with combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D; Peters, L; Reekie, J

    2013-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. High HCV RNA levels have been associated with poor treatment response. This study aimed to examine the natural history of HCV RNA in chronically HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals.......Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. High HCV RNA levels have been associated with poor treatment response. This study aimed to examine the natural history of HCV RNA in chronically HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals....

  15. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is Found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  16. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  17. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding CDC Activities For Healthcare Providers Clinical Evaluation & Disease Sexual Transmission HIV Infection & Zika Virus Testing for Zika Test Specimens – At Time of Birth Diagnostic Tests Understanding Zika Virus Test Results ...

  18. High Cellular Monocyte Activation in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy and Lifestyle-Matched Controls Is Associated With Greater Inflammation in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booiman, Thijs; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Maurer, Irma; de Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A.; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Prins, Maria; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Franceschi, Claudio; Fuchs, Dietmar; Gisslén, Magnus; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Schouten, J.; Kooij, K. W.; van Zoest, R. A.; Elsenga, B. C.; Janssen, F. R.; Heidenrijk, M.; Zikkenheiner, W.; van der Valk, M.; Booiman, T.; Harskamp-Holwerda, A. M.; Boeser-Nunnink, B.; Maurer, I.; Mangas Ruiz, M. M.; Girigorie, A. F.; Villaudy, J.; Frankin, E.; Pasternak, A.; Berkhout, B.; van der Kuyl, T.; Portegies, P.; Schmand, B. A.; Geurtsen, G. J.; ter Stege, J. A.; Klein Twennaar, M.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Caan, M. W. A.; Su, T.; Weijer, K.; Bisschop, P. H. L. T.; Kalsbeek, A.; Wezel, M.; Visser, I.; Ruhé, H. G.; Franceschi, C.; Garagnani, P.

    2017-01-01

    Increased monocyte activation and intestinal damage have been shown to be predictive for the increased morbidity and mortality observed in treated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). A cross-sectional analysis of cellular and soluble markers of monocyte activation, coagulation,

  19. High Cellular Monocyte Activation in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy and Lifestyle-Matched Controls Is Associated With Greater Inflammation in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booiman, Thijs; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Maurer, Irma; De Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A; Harskamp, Agnes M; Prins, Maria; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Franceschi, Claudio; Fuchs, Dietmar; Gisslén, Magnus; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Kalsbeek, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased monocyte activation and intestinal damage have been shown to be predictive for the increased morbidity and mortality observed in treated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of cellular and soluble markers of monocyte

  20. Opportunistic disease and mortality in patients coinfected with hepatitis B or C virus in the strategic management of antiretroviral therapy (SMART) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedaldi, Ellen; Peters, Lars; Neuhaus, Jacquie

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Strategic Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study, the risk of opportunistic disease (OD) and/or death due to any cause was elevated in the drug conservation (i.e., interrupt antiretroviral therapy until the CD4(+) cell count is

  1. Pharmacological inhibition of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hakimeh; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2012-05-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a member of the retroviridae family of viruses and causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in domestic and non-domestic cats worldwide. Genome organization of FIV and clinical characteristics of the disease caused by the virus are similar to those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Both viruses infect T lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and their replication cycle in infected cells is analogous. Due to marked similarity in genomic organization, virus structure, virus replication and disease pathogenesis of FIV and HIV, infection of cats with FIV is a useful tool to study and develop novel drugs and vaccines for HIV. Anti-retroviral drugs studied extensively in HIV infection have targeted different steps of the virus replication cycle: (1) inhibition of virus entry into susceptible cells at the level of attachment to host cell surface receptors and co-receptors; (2) inhibition of fusion of the virus membrane with the cell membrane; (3) blockade of reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA; (4) interruption of nuclear translocation and viral DNA integration into host genomes; (5) prevention of viral transcript processing and nuclear export; and (6) inhibition of virion assembly and maturation. Despite much success of anti-retroviral therapy slowing disease progression in people, similar therapy has not been thoroughly investigated in cats. In this article we review current pharmacological approaches and novel targets for anti-lentiviral therapy, and critically assess potentially suitable applications against FIV infection in cats.

  2. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Melanie; Heath, Sonya L; Sweeton, Bentley; Williams, Kathy; Cunningham, Pamela; Keele, Brandon F; Sen, Sharon; Palmer, Brent E; Chomont, Nicolas; Xu, Yongxian; Basu, Rahul; Hellerstein, Michael S; Kwa, Suefen; Robinson, Harriet L

    2016-01-01

    GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine (GOVX-B11), was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART) to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI). Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine. clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156.

  3. Pembrolizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Mismatch-Repair Deficient and Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Epstein-Barr Virus Positive; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency; Stage IB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer AJCC v7

  4. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  5. Effect of branched-chain amino acid-enriched nutritional supplementation on interferon therapy in Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagao Yumiko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of nutritional supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA with zinc component (Aminofeel® on adherence to and outcome of therapy in patients treated with interferon (IFN for chronic hepatitis C and cirrhosis and to determine whether to recommend the supplement. Methods In this retrospective study, 51 patients who received IFN therapy were investigated among 203 consecutive patients who visited our hospital and were advised regarding the potential benefit of taking Aminofeel®. Each patient was free to choose whether to purchase and take Aminofeel®. Results Twenty four patients (group 1-A took Aminofeel® during standard IFN therapy and 13 (group 1-B did not. Low-dose, long-term IFN (maintenance therapy, mainly peglated (Peg-IFN alpha 2a, was administered to 14 patients who were difficult to treat, because of no effect or harmful side effects with standard IFN therapy, and who had advanced liver fibrosis. Among the 14, 11 patients (group 2-A took Aminofeel® and 3 (group 2-B did not. The prevalence of obesity was significantly higher (P=0.04 in group 1-A than in group 1-B. The rate of adherence to IFN therapy was higher in group 1-A (83.3% than in group 1-B (53.8%, P=0.05. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the rates of sustained virological response (SVR to IFN therapy. According to multivariate analysis, two factors, SVR and intake of Aminofeel®, were associated with successful adherence to IFN therapy. The adjusted odds ratios for these two factors were 13.25 and 12.59, respectively, and each was statistically significant. The SVR rate of maintenance IFN therapy was in 18.2% group 2-A and 0% in group 2-B. Conclusion Our data show that BCAA intake is useful for adherence to and effect of IFN therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C. Nutritional supplementation with BCAA seems to be useful for HCV-infected patients receiving

  6. Burden of non-AIDS-defining and non-virus-related cancers among HIV-infected patients in the combined antiretroviral therapy era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Laura; Calabresi, Alessandra; Gotti, Daria; Ferraresi, Alice; Festa, Andrea; Donato, Francesco; Magoni, Michele; Castelli, Francesco; Quiros-Roldan, Eugenia

    2013-08-01

    The risk of cancer is substantially increased in HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) without an infectious etiology. A total of 5,090 HIV-infected patients registered in the Local Health Authority (LHA) of Brescia and receiving primary care at our clinic were included in a retrospective (1999-2009) analysis. The cancer diagnoses were obtained through a record-linkage procedure between our database and the LHA general database and population-based Cancer Registry of LHA. We compared risks of these malignancies with those of the general population living in the same health area by using age-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Poisson regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with non-virus-related NADCs. We recorded an increase in the SIR of non-virus-related NADCs over time, with 138 cancers diagnosed in 131 patients. The mean incidence rate was 42.6/10,000 person years and the median age at the diagnosis was 49 (range, 28-78) years old. Stratifying for gender, only HIV-infected males had an increased risk of non-virus-related NADCs [SIR=1.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.55-2.26]. Risk was higher for lung (SIR=3.59; 95% CI, 2.36-5.45) and testis cancer (SIR=3.11; 95% CI, 1.48-6.52). However,, cancers of the prostate and breast in HIV-positive men and women were null (SIR=1.10; 95% CI, 0.53-2.32 and SIR=0.91; 95% CI, 0.47-1.74, respectively). The only predictors of non-virus-related NADCs included older age [incidence rate ratio (IRR)=1.10; 95% CI, 1.08-1.12 per each additional year, prisk of non-virus-related NADCs compared to the general population. However, the use of cART appeared to be beneficial in protecting against the development of these malignancies.

  7. HCVpro: Hepatitis C virus protein interaction database

    KAUST Repository

    Kwofie, Samuel K.; Schaefer, Ulf; Sundararajan, Vijayaraghava Seshadri; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Christoffels, Alan G.

    2011-01-01

    It is essential to catalog characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and the associated plethora of vital functional information to augment the search for therapies, vaccines and diagnostic biomarkers

  8. New frontiers in oncolytic viruses: optimizing and selecting for virus strains with improved efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundstrom K

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth Lundstrom PanTherapeutics, Lutry, Switzerland Abstract: Oncolytic viruses have demonstrated selective replication and killing of tumor cells. Different types of oncolytic viruses – adenoviruses, alphaviruses, herpes simplex viruses, Newcastle disease viruses, rhabdoviruses, Coxsackie viruses, and vaccinia viruses – have been applied as either naturally occurring or engineered vectors. Numerous studies in animal-tumor models have demonstrated substantial tumor regression and prolonged survival rates. Moreover, clinical trials have confirmed good safety profiles and therapeutic efficacy for oncolytic viruses. Most encouragingly, the first cancer gene-therapy drug – Gendicine, based on oncolytic adenovirus type 5 – was approved in China. Likewise, a second-generation oncolytic herpes simplex virus-based drug for the treatment of melanoma has been registered in the US and Europe as talimogene laherparepvec. Keywords: immunotherapy, viral vectors, clinical trials, drug approval

  9. Optimizing celgosivir therapy in mouse models of dengue virus infection of serotypes 1 and 2: The search for a window for potential therapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Chan, Kitti Wing-Ki; Dow, Geoffrey; Ooi, Eng Eong; Low, Jenny G; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2016-03-01

    Although the antiviral drug celgosivir, an α-glucosidase I inhibitor, is highly protective when given twice daily to AG129 mice infected with dengue virus, a similar regimen of twice daily dosing did not significantly reduce serum viral loads in patients in a recent clinical trial. This failure presumably might reflect the initiation of treatment when patients were already viremic. To better mimic the clinical setting, we used viruses isolated from patients to develop new mouse models of DENV1 and DENV2 infection and employed the models to test the twice daily treatment, begun either on the day of infection or on the third day post-infection, when the mice had peak of viremia. We found that, although the treatment started on day 0 was effective on viral load reduction, it provided no benefit when begun on day 3, indicating that in vivo antiviral efficacy becomes less prominent once viremia reaches the peak level. To determine if the therapeutic regimen in humans could be improved, we tested regimen of four-times daily treatment and found that the treatment significantly reduced viremia, suggesting that a similar regimen may be effective in a human clinical trial. A new clinical trial to investigate an altered dosing regimen has been approved (NCT02569827). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The RNA Template Channel of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase as a Target for Development of Antiviral Therapy of Multiple Genera within a Virus Family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Vives-Adrián, Laia; Selisko, Barbara; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Liu, Xinran; Lanke, Kjerstin; Ulferts, Rachel; De Palma, Armando M; Tanchis, Federica; Goris, Nesya; Lefebvre, David; De Clercq, Kris; Leyssen, Pieter; Lacroix, Céline; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Boehr, David D; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Verdaguer, Nuria; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-01-01

    The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71) for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy.

  11. Phytophthora viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guohong; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora sp. is a genus in the oomycetes, which are similar to filamentous fungi in morphology and habitat, but phylogenetically more closely related to brown algae and diatoms and fall in the kingdom Stramenopila. In the past few years, several viruses have been characterized in Phytophthora species, including four viruses from Phytophthora infestans, the late blight pathogen, and an endornavirus from an unnamed Phytophthora species from Douglas fir. Studies on Phytophthora viruses have revealed several interesting systems. Phytophthora infestans RNA virus 1 (PiRV-1) and PiRV-2 are likely the first members of two new virus families; studies on PiRV-3 support the establishment of a new virus genus that is not affiliated with established virus families; PiRV-4 is a member of Narnaviridae, most likely in the genus Narnavirus; and Phytophthora endornavirus 1 (PEV1) was the first nonplant endornavirus at the time of reporting. Viral capsids have not been found in any of the above-mentioned viruses. PiRV-1 demonstrated a unique genome organization that requires further examination, and PiRV-2 may have played a role in late blight resurgence in 1980s-1990s. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Schmallenberg Virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    explore the potential of this infection crossing the species barrier and thereby .... The virus targets mainly the brain of the unborn animal resulting in neurological ... The virus is located in the blood of the adult infected animal or in the central ...

  13. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Zika Virus Credit: NIAID A female Aedes mosquito. This type of mosquito can transmit Zika, ... transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Zika virus can be transmitted from an infected pregnant woman ...

  14. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  15. Nucleoside Inhibitors of Zika Virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eyer, L.; Nencka, Radim; Huvarová, I.; Palus, Martin; Alves, M. J.; Gould, E. A.; De Clercq, E.; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 214, č. 5 (2016), s. 707-711 ISSN 0022-1899 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Zika virus * flavivirus * nucleoside analogue * antiviral * therapy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 6.273, year: 2016

  16. The role of antiviral and immunoglobulin therapy in the prevention of Epstein-Barr virus infection and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease following solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M; Reyes, J; Webber, S; Rowe, D

    2001-06-01

    The recognition of the importance of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, including EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), has led to a new focus on the prevention of this problem. This paper reviews the scientific rationale behind, and clinical experience with, the use of chemoprophylaxis (using acyclovir or ganciclovir) and immunoprophylaxis (using intravenous immunoglobulin) in the prevention of EBV/PTLD. While some centers have already introduced the use of one or both of these agents as standard prophylaxis against the development of this complication, published data in support of these protocols are currently lacking. Well designed clinical trials are necessary to evaluate the potential role of both antiviral and immunoglobulin agents in the prevention of EBV/PTLD in organ transplant recipients.

  17. Urinary β-2 Microglobulin Levels Sensitively Altered in an Osteomalacia Patient Receiving Add-on Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Junko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Ito, Kiyoaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Hirase, Sho; Ito, Tatsuo; Morishima, Takkan; Otake, Kazuo; Yoneda, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is effective for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection; however, ADV may provoke renal injury resulting in osteomalacia, and this side effect is seldom recognized until bone fractures emerge. We herein present a 66-year-old woman with HBV infection who received ADV for 6 years. Although she exhibited no sign of bone fractures, her urinary β-2 microglobulin (β2MG) level increased to 83,837 μg/L and scintigraphy revealed minimal fractures of the third rib. ADV was subsequently reduced and her urinary β2MG rapidly fell to 3,637 μg/L. Conversely, her urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, and serum phosphate, alkaline phosphatase levels did not respond.

  18. Antiviral therapy during primary simian immunodeficiency virus infection fails to prevent acute loss of CD4+ T cells in gut mucosa but enhances their rapid restoration through central memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, David; Sankaran, Sumathi; Silvey, Melanie; Dandekar, Satya

    2008-04-01

    Gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) is an early target of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and a site for severe CD4+ T-cell depletion. Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective in suppressing HIV replication and restoring CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood, restoration in GALT is delayed. The role of restored CD4+ T-cell help in GALT during ART and its impact on antiviral CD8+ T-cell responses have not been investigated. Using the SIV model, we investigated gut CD4+ T-cell restoration in infected macaques, initiating ART during either the primary stage (1 week postinfection), prior to acute CD4+ cell loss (PSI), or during the chronic stage at 10 weeks postinfection (CSI). ART led to viral suppression in GALT and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of PSI and CSI animals at comparable levels. CSI animals had incomplete CD4+ T-cell restoration in GALT. In PSI animals, ART did not prevent acute CD4+ T-cell loss by 2 weeks postinfection in GALT but supported rapid and complete CD4+ T-cell restoration thereafter. This correlated with an accumulation of central memory CD4+ T cells and better suppression of inflammation. Restoration of CD4+ T cells in GALT correlated with qualitative changes in SIV gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, with a dominance of interleukin-2-producing responses in PSI animals, while both CSI macaques and untreated SIV-infected controls were dominated by gamma interferon responses. Thus, central memory CD4+ T-cell levels and qualitative antiviral CD8+ T-cell responses, independent of viral suppression, were the immune correlates of gut mucosal immune restoration during ART.

  19. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Thompson

    Full Text Available GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA boost vaccine (GOVX-B11, was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI. Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 6 months were enrolled. Median age was 38 years, median pre-ART HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156.

  20. Live Attenuated Recombinant Vaccine Protects Nonhuman Primates Against Ebola and Marburg Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Steven M; Feldmann, Heinz; Stroher, Ute; Geisbert, Joan B; Fernando, Lisa; Grolla, Allen; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Sullivan, Nancy J; Volchkov, Viktor E; Fritz, Elizabeth A; Daddario, Kathleen M; Hensley, Lisa E; Jahrling, Peter B; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2005-01-01

    Vaccines and therapies are urgently needed to address public health needs stemming from emerging pathogens and biological threat agents such as the filoviruses Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV...

  1. Tunable protease-activatable virus nanonodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Justin; Ho, Michelle L; Tiwari, Abhinav; Gomez, Eric J; Dempsey, Christopher; Van Vliet, Kim; Igoshin, Oleg A; Silberg, Jonathan J; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Suh, Junghae

    2014-05-27

    We explored the unique signal integration properties of the self-assembling 60-mer protein capsid of adeno-associated virus (AAV), a clinically proven human gene therapy vector, by engineering proteolytic regulation of virus-receptor interactions such that processing of the capsid by proteases is required for infection. We find the transfer function of our engineered protease-activatable viruses (PAVs), relating the degree of proteolysis (input) to PAV activity (output), is highly nonlinear, likely due to increased polyvalency. By exploiting this dynamic polyvalency, in combination with the self-assembly properties of the virus capsid, we show that mosaic PAVs can be constructed that operate under a digital AND gate regime, where two different protease inputs are required for virus activation. These results show viruses can be engineered as signal-integrating nanoscale nodes whose functional properties are regulated by multiple proteolytic signals with easily tunable and predictable response surfaces, a promising development toward advanced control of gene delivery.

  2. A national multicenter phase 2 study of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) pox virus vaccine with sequential androgen ablation therapy in patients with PSA progression: ECOG 9802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Robert S; Chen, Yu-Hui; Bubley, Glenn J; Stein, Mark N; Hahn, Noah M; Carducci, Michael A; Lattime, Edmund C; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Philip M; Butterfield, Lisa H; Wilding, George

    2015-09-01

    E9802 was a phase 2 multi-institution study conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of vaccinia and fowlpox prostate-specific antigen (PSA) vaccine (step 1) followed by combination with androgen ablation therapy (step 2) in patients with PSA progression without visible metastasis. To test the hypothesis that vaccine therapy in this early disease setting will be safe and have a biochemical effect that would support future studies of immunotherapy in patients with minimal disease burden. Patients who had PSA progression following local therapy were treated with PROSTVAC-V (vaccinia)/TRICOM on cycle 1 followed by PROSTVAC-F (fowlpox)/TRICOM for subsequent cycles in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (step 1). Androgen ablation was added on progression (step 2). Step 1 primary end points included progression at 6 mo and characterization of change in PSA velocity pretreatment to post-treatment. Step 2 end points included PSA response with combined vaccine and androgen ablation. In step 1, 25 of 40 eligible patients (63%) were progression free at 6 mo after registration (90% confidence interval [CI], 48-75). The median pretreatment PSA velocity was 0.13 log(PSA)/mo, in contrast to median postregistration velocity of 0.09 log(PSA)/mo (p=0.02), which is an increase in median PSA doubling time from 5.3 mo to 7.7 mo. No grade ≥4 treatment-related toxicity was observed. In the 27 patients eligible and treated for step 2, 20 patients achieved a complete response (CR) at 7 mo (CR rate: 74%; 90% CI, 57-87). Although supportive of larger studies in the cooperative group setting, this study is limited by the small number of patients and the absence of a control group as in a phase 3 study. A viral PSA vaccine can be administered safely in the multi-institutional cooperative group setting to patients with minimal disease volume alone and combined with androgen ablation, supporting the feasibility of future phase 3 studies in this

  3. Hematological parameters of human immunodeficiency virus positive pregnant women on antiretroviral therapy in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital Kano, North Western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulqadir, Ibrahim; Ahmed, Sagir Gumel; Kuliya, Aisha Gwarzo; Tukur, Jamilu; Yusuf, Aminu Abba; Musa, Abubakar Umar

    2018-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) scourge continues to affect young women within the reproductive age group and pregnancy is a recognized indication for the use antiretroviral (ARV) drugs among HIV-positive women. The aim is to determine the combined effect of pregnancy, HIV and ARV drugs on the hematological parameters of the pregnant women. This was a comparative cross-sectional study conducted among 70 each of HIV-positive and negative pregnant women. Bio-demographic and clinical data were extracted from the client folder and 4 ml of blood sample was obtained from each participant. Full blood count was generated using Swelab automatic hematology analyzer while reticulocyte count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were conducted manually. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version software 16 while P women with HIV had statistically significant lower hematocrit and white blood cell (WBC) and higher ESR than pregnant women without HIV ( P 0.05). However, among HIV positive pregnant women, those with CD4 count 0.050) between women on first- and second-line ARV regimens. There is a significant difference in terms of hematological parameters between HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women in this environment.

  4. Pediatric tuberculosis-human immunodeficiency virus co-infection in the United Kingdom highlights the need for better therapy monitoring tools: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Honeyborne, Isobella; McHugh, Timothy D; Klein, Nigel; Shingadia, Delane

    2017-02-26

    Tuberculosis is an infection that requires at least 6 months of chemotherapy in order to clear the bacteria from the patient's lungs. Usually, therapeutic monitoring is dependent on smear microscopy where a decline in acid-fast bacilli is observed. However, this might not be indicative of the actual decline of bacterial load and thus other tools such as culture and molecular assays are required for patient management. Here, we report the case of a 12-year-old Black African boy co-infected with tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus who remained smear culture positive and liquid culture negative for a prolonged period of time following chemotherapy. In order to determine whether there was any live bacteria present in his specimens, we applied the newly developed molecular bacterial load assay that detects the presence of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid derived from the bacteria. Using this methodology, we were able to quantify his bacterial load and inform the management of his treatment in order to reduce the disease burden. Following this intervention he went on to make a complete recovery. This case report highlights the value of improved biomarkers for monitoring the treatment of tuberculosis and the role of molecular assays such as the molecular bacterial load assay applied here. The molecular bacterial load assay detects bacterial ribonucleic acid which corresponds closely with the number of live bacilli as compared with polymerase chain reaction that detects deoxyribonucleic acid and may include dead bacteria.

  5. The cost of treatment failure: resource use and costs incurred by hepatitis C virus genotype 1-infected patients who do or do not achieve sustained virological response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backx, M; Lewszuk, A; White, J R; Cole, J; Sreedharan, A; van Sanden, S; Diels, J; Lawson, A; Neal, K R; Wiselka, M J; Ito, T; Irving, W L

    2014-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection places a considerable economic burden on health services. Cost-effectiveness analyses of antiviral treatment for patients with chronic HCV infection are dependent on assumptions about cost reductions following sustained virological response (SVR) to therapy. This study quantified the medium-term difference in health resource usage and costs depending on treatment outcome. Retrospective chart review of patients with HCV genotype 1 infection who had received at least 2 months pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy, with known treatment outcome was conducted. Disease status was categorized as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis or decompensated liver disease. Health resource use was documented for each patient in each disease state. Unit costs were from the NHS 'Payment by Results' database and the British National Formulary. One hundred and ninety three patients (108 SVR, 85 non-SVR) with mean follow-up of 3.5 (SVR) and 4.9 (non-SVR) years were enrolled. No SVR patient progressed to a more severe liver disease state. Annual transition rates for non-SVR patients were 7.4% (chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis) and 4.9% (cirrhosis to decompensated liver disease). By extrapolation of modelled data over a 5-year post-treatment period, failure of patients with chronic hepatitis to achieve SVR was associated with a 13-fold increase (roughly £2300) in costs, whilst for patients who were retreated, the increase was 56-fold, equating to more than £10 000. Achievement of an SVR has significant effects on health service usage and costs. This work provides real-life data for future cost-effectiveness analyses related to the treatment for chronic HCV infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Efficacy of initial antiretroviral therapy based on lopinavir/ritonavir plus 2 nucleoside/nucleotide analogs in patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Laura; Gatell, José M

    2014-11-01

    Triple combination regimens consisting of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus 2 nucleoside/nucleotide analogs continue to be a valid option in initial antiretroviral therapy. Other protease inhibitors boosted with ritonavir (and in future with cobicistat) have been introduced, as well as other non-nucleoside analogs (rilpivirin) and 3 integrase inhibitors. None of the new regimens have shown superiority over LPV/r or comparisons are lacking. Therefore, regimens including LPV/r continue to be recommended as initial first-line or alternative strategies in most treatment guidelines. Dual combinations with LPV/r (plus raltegravir or lamivudine) are described in another article and can provide a similar response rate to triple combinations, better tolerance, and an improved cost-efficacy ratio, both for initial therapy and in simplification strategies. In contrast, LPV/r or darunavir/r monotherapy does not seem an acceptable option in treatment-naïve patients and is becoming increasingly less acceptable in simplification strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péré, Héléne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jérome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frédéric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Launay, Odile; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Thematic review of family therapy journals 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    2013-01-01

    In this article the contents of the principal English-language family therapy journals, and key family therapy articles published in other journals in 2012 are reviewed under these headings: therapy processes in the treatment of child-focused problems, autism, adolescent substance use, human immunodeficiency virus, depression and grief, fragile families, mental health recovery, medical family therapy, family business and systemic practice, couple therapy, intimate partner violence, key issues...

  9. Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudeep, A B; Jadi, R S; Mishra, A C

    2009-11-01

    Ganjam virus (GANV), a member of genus Nairovirus of family Bunyavirdae is of considerable veterinary importance in India. Though, predominantly tick borne, GANV was also isolated from mosquitoes, man and sheep. Neutralizing and complement fixing antibodies to GANV have been detected in animal and human sera collected from different parts of the country. Thirty three strains of GANV have been isolated from India, mainly from Haemaphysalis ticks. The virus replicated in certain vertebrate and mosquito cell lines and found pathogenic to laboratory animals. One natural infection and five laboratory-acquired infections in men were also reported. GANV is antigenically related to Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) of Africa, which is highly pathogenic for sheep and goats causing 70-90 per cent mortality among the susceptible population. Recent molecular studies have demonstrated that GANV is an Asian variant of NSDV and both these viruses are related to the dreaded Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) group viruses. The versatility of the virus to replicate in different arthropod species, its ability to infect sheep, goat and man makes it an important zoonotic agent.

  10. Significant Depletion of CD4+ T Cells Occurs in the Oral Mucosa during Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection with the Infected CD4+ T Cell Reservoir Continuing to Persist in the Oral Mucosa during Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffy George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV infections are characterized by manifestation of numerous opportunistic infections and inflammatory conditions in the oral mucosa. The loss of CD4+ T cells that play a critical role in maintaining mucosal immunity likely contributes to this process. Here we show that CD4+ T cells constitute a minor population of T cells in the oral mucosa and display a predominantly central memory phenotype mirroring other mucosal sites such as the rectal mucosa. Chronic SIV infection was associated with a near total depletion of CD4+ T cells in the oral mucosa that appear to repopulate during antiretroviral therapy (ART. Repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored a large fraction of Th17 cells suggesting that ART potentially reconstitutes oral mucosal immunity. However, a minor fraction of repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored SIV DNA suggesting that the viral reservoir continues to persist in the oral mucosa during ART. Therapeutic approaches aimed at obtaining sustainable CD4+ T cell repopulation in combination with strategies that can eradicate the latent viral reservoir in the oral mucosa are essential for better oral health and long-term outcome in HIV infected patients.

  11. Characterization of complete particles (VSV-G/SIN-GFP) and empty particles (VSV-G/EMPTY) in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-based lentiviral products for gene therapy: potential applications for improvement of product quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Keating, Kenneth; Dolman, Carl; Thorpe, Robin

    2008-05-01

    Lentiviral vectors persist in the host and are therefore ideally suited for long-term gene therapy. To advance the use of lentiviral vectors in humans, improvement of their production, purification, and characterization has become increasingly important and challenging. In addition to cellular contaminants derived from packaging cells, empty particles without therapeutic function are the major impurities that compromise product safety and efficacy. Removal of empty particles is difficult because of their innate similarity in particle size and protein composition to the complete particles. We propose that comparison of the properties of lentiviral products with those of purposely expressed empty particles may reveal potential differences between empty and complete particles. For this, three forms of recombinant lentiviral samples, that is, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) proteins, empty particles (VSV-G/Empty), and complete particles (VSV-G/SIN-GFP) carrying viral RNA, were purified by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The SEC-purified samples were further analyzed by immunoblotting with six antibodies to examine viral and cellular proteins associated with the particles. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, important differences between VSV-G/Empty particles and complete VSV-G/SIN-GFP particles. Differences include the processing of Gag protein and the inclusion of cellular proteins in the particles. Our findings support the development of improved production, purification, and characterization methods for lentiviral products.

  12. Oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and their correlation to cluster of differentiation lymphocyte count in population of North-East India in highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarat Kumar Nayak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection which manifests as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is a disease involving the defects of the T-lymphocyte arm of the immune system. Certain laboratory parameters such as the cluster of differentiation (CD4 count and clinical parameters have long been used as markers of disease progression. In industrialized countries, many studies show a highly correlation between the incidence of oral lesions and immunosuppression and hence, can be used as a marker of immunosuppression. This might not be applicable to a developing country like India. In this study, efforts have been made to supplement the present knowledge on various aspects of oral manifestations in HIV patients in the Indian subcontinent. Aims: To correlate the oral manifestations in HIV/AIDS patients to the level of circulating CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and their effect in anti-retroviral therapy (ART. Subjects and Methods: A total of 104 HIV positive patients were examined for oral lesions. The CD4 count estimated on the same day by fluorescent activated cell sort count machine was then correlated with various oral lesions. Results: Oral manifestations appeared when CD4 count decreased below 500 cells/mm3. Moreover, oral lesions found at different stages showed very strong correlation to their respective CD4 count. Furthermore, there was considerable decline in the incidence of oral manifestations in patients undergoing highly active ART. Conclusions: Oral manifestations are highly predictive markers of severe immune deterioration and disease progression in HIV patients.

  13. Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among HIV-infected pregnant women on highly active anti-retroviral therapy with premature rupture of membranes at term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleje, George Uchenna; Edokwe, Emeka Stephen; Ikechebelu, Joseph Ifeanyichukwu; Onubogu, Chinyere Ukamaka; Ugochukwu, Ebele Francesca; Okam, Princeston Chukwuemeka; Ibekwe, Adaobi Maryann

    2018-01-01

    To determine mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) rate and associated risk factors of human immune-deficiency virus (HIV) among HIV-infected pregnant women with term premature rupture of membranes (PROM) in comparison with those without PROM at term. All optimally managed HIV-positive pregnant women of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, on highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) who had PROM at term were enrolled. Maternal HIV-1 viral load was not assessed. Follow up was for a minimum of 18 months for evidence of HIV infection. Of the 121 women with PROM at term, 46 (38.0%) were HIV sero-positive, 22/46 (47.8%) of which had their babies followed up till 18 months. The mean latency period was 10.5 ± 5.3 h in PROM group. Apart from duration of PROM (OR = 0.01; 95%CI = 0.00-0.13; p  0.05). Of the 22 (47.8%) babies followed-up in the PROM group and 13 in non-PROM group, none tested positive to HIV, given an MTCT rate of 0%. MTCT rate was 0% following term PROM and in women without PROM. Since maternal HIV-1 viral load was not assessed, we need to be critical while interpreting the findings.

  14. Protease inhibitor associated mutations compromise the efficacy of therapy in human immunodeficiency virus – 1 (HIV-1 infected pediatric patients: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova Anna

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the introduction of combined therapy with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors has resulted in considerable decrease in HIV related mortality; it has also induced the development of multiple drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. The few studies on HIV-1 mutagenesis in HIV infected children have not evaluated the impact of HIV-1 mutations on the clinical, virological and immunological presentation of HIV disease that is fundamental to optimizing the treatment regimens for these patients. Results A cross sectional study was conducted to evaluate the impact of treatment regimens and resistance mutation patterns on the clinical, virological, and immunological presentation of HIV disease in 41 children (25 male and 16 female at the Robert Wood Johnson Pediatric AIDS Program in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The study participants were symptomatic and had preceding treatment history with combined ARV regimens including protease inhibitors (PIs, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. Fifteen (36.6% children were treated with NRTI+NNRTI+ PI, 6 (14.6% with NRTI+NNRTIs, 13 (31.7% with NRTI+PIs, and the remaining 7 (17.1% received NRTIs only. Combined ARV regimens did not significantly influence the incidence of NRTI and NNRTI associated mutations. The duration of ARV therapy and the child's age had no significant impact on the ARV related mutations. The clinico-immunological presentation of the HIV disease was not associated with ARV treatment regimens or number of resistance mutations. However, primary mutations in the protease (PR gene increased the likelihood of plasma viral load (PVL ≥ 10,000 copies/mL irrespective of the child's age, duration of ARV therapy, presence of NRTI and NNRTI mutation. Viremia ≥ 10,000 copies/mL was recorded in almost all the children with primary mutations in the PR region (n = 12/13, 92.3% as compared with only 50.0% (n

  15. Identity of zinc finger nucleases with specificity to herpes simplex virus type II genomic DNA: novel HSV-2 vaccine/therapy precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex type II (HSV-2 is a member of the family herpesviridae. Human infection with this double stranded linear DNA virus causes genital ulcerative disease and existing treatment options only serve to resolve the symptomatology (ulcers associated with active HSV-2 infection but do not eliminate latent virus. As a result, infection with HSV-2 follows a life-long relapsing (active versus latent course. On the basis of a primitive bacterium anti-phage DNA defense, the restriction modification (R-M system, we previously identified the Escherichia coli restriction enzyme (REase EcoRII as a novel peptide to excise or irreversibly disrupt latent HSV-2 DNA from infected cells. However, sequences of the site specificity palindrome of EcoRII 5'-CCWGG-3' (W = A or T are equally present within the human genome and are a potential source of host-genome toxicity. This feature has limited previous HSV-2 EcoRII based therapeutic models to microbicides only, and highlights the need to engineer artificial REases (zinc finger nucleases-ZFNs with specificity to HSV-2 genomic-DNA only. Herein, the therapeutic-potential of zinc finger arrays (ZFAs and ZFNs is identified and modeled, with unique specificity to the HSV-2 genome. Methods and results Using the whole genome of HSV-2 strain HG52 (Dolan A et al.,, and with the ZFN-consortium's CoDA-ZiFiT software pre-set at default, more than 28,000 ZFAs with specificity to HSV-2 DNA were identified. Using computational assembly (through in-silico linkage to the Flavobacterium okeanokoites endonuclease Fok I of the type IIS class, 684 ZFNs with specificity to the HSV-2 genome, were constructed. Graphic-analysis of the HSV-2 genome-cleavage pattern using the afore-identified ZFNs revealed that the highest cleavage-incidence occurred within the 30,950 base-pairs (~between the genomic context coordinates 0.80 and 1.00 at the 3' end of the HSV-2 genome. At approximately 3,095 bp before and after the

  16. Effects of Antiretroviral Therapy on the Survival of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive Adult Patients in Andhra Pradesh, India: A Retrospective Cohort Study, 2007-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Bajpai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The survival outcomes of antiretroviral treatment (ART programs have not been systematically evaluated at the state level in India. This retrospective study assessed the survival rates and factors associated with survival among adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients in Andhra Pradesh, India. Methods The present study used data from 139 679 HIV patients aged ≥15 years on ART who were registered from 2007 to 2011 and were followed up through December 2013. The primary end point was death of the patient. Mortality densities (per 1000 person-years were calculated. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression models were used to estimate survival and explore the factors associated with survival. Results The overall median follow-up time was 16.0 months (2.0 months for the deceased and 14.0 months for those lost to follow-up. Approximately 13.2% of those newly initiated on ART died during follow-up. Of those deaths, 56% occurred in the first three months. The crude mortality rate was 80.9 per 1000 person-years at risk. The CD4 count (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR],4.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.36 to 5.46 for 350 cells/mm3, functional status (aHR, 3.05; 95% CI, 2.82 to 3.30 for bedridden vs. normal, and body weight (aHR, 3.69; 95% CI, 3.42 to 3.97 for 60 kg were strongly associated with the survival of HIV patients. Conclusions The study findings revealed that high mortality was observed within the first three months of ART initiation. Patients with poor baseline clinical characteristics had a higher risk of mortality. Expanded testing and counseling should be encouraged, with the goal of ensuring early enrollment into the program followed by the initiation of ART in HIV-infected patients.

  17. The Female Genital Tract Microbiome Is Associated With Vaginal Antiretroviral Drug Concentrations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue Carlson, Renee; Sheth, Anandi N; Read, Timothy D; Frisch, Michael B; Mehta, C Christina; Martin, Amy; Haaland, Richard E; Patel, Anar S; Pau, Chou-Pong; Kraft, Colleen S; Ofotokun, Igho

    2017-11-15

    The female genital tract (FGT) microbiome may affect vaginal pH and other factors that influence drug movement into the vagina. We examined the relationship between the microbiome and antiretroviral concentrations in the FGT. Over one menstrual cycle, 20 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women virologically suppressed on tenofovir (TFV) disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV) underwent serial paired cervicovaginal and plasma sampling for antiretroviral concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of cervicovaginal lavage clustered each participant visit into a unique microbiome community type (mCT). Participants were predominantly African American (95%), with a median age of 38 years. Cervicovaginal lavage sequencing (n = 109) resulted in a low-diversity mCT dominated by Lactobacillus (n = 40), and intermediate-diversity (n = 28) and high-diversity (n = 41) mCTs with abundance of anaerobic taxa. In multivariable models, geometric mean FGT:plasma ratios varied significantly by mCT for all 3 drugs. For both ATV and TFV, FGT:plasma was significantly lower in participant visits with high- and low-diversity mCT groups (all P < .02). For emtricitabine, FGT:plasma was significantly lower in participant visits with low- vs intermediate-diversity mCT groups (P = .002). Certain FGT mCTs are associated with decreased FGT antiretroviral concentrations. These findings are relevant for optimizing antiretrovirals used for biomedical HIV prevention in women. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Ebola virus. Two-pore channels control Ebola virus host cell entry and are drug targets for disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yasuteru; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Tidwell, Michael W; Bauta, William E; Klugbauer, Norbert; Grimm, Christian; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Davey, Robert A

    2015-02-27

    Ebola virus causes sporadic outbreaks of lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans, but there is no currently approved therapy. Cells take up Ebola virus by macropinocytosis, followed by trafficking through endosomal vesicles. However, few factors controlling endosomal virus movement are known. Here we find that Ebola virus entry into host cells requires the endosomal calcium channels called two-pore channels (TPCs). Disrupting TPC function by gene knockout, small interfering RNAs, or small-molecule inhibitors halted virus trafficking and prevented infection. Tetrandrine, the most potent small molecule that we tested, inhibited infection of human macrophages, the primary target of Ebola virus in vivo, and also showed therapeutic efficacy in mice. Therefore, TPC proteins play a key role in Ebola virus infection and may be effective targets for antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan Virus Disease Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for ... Virus Disease Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan virus is a tickborne flavivirus that is ...

  20. Virus wars: using one virus to block the spread of another

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Paff

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The failure of traditional interventions to block and cure HIV infections has led to novel proposals that involve treating infections with therapeutic viruses–infectious viruses that specifically inhibit HIV propagation in the host. Early efforts in evaluating these proposals have been limited chiefly to mathematical models of dynamics, for lack of suitable empirical systems. Here we propose, develop and analyze an empirical system of a therapeutic virus that protects a host cell population against a lethal virus. The empirical system uses E. coli bacteria as the host cell population, an RNA phage as the lethal virus and a filamentous phage as the therapeutic virus. Basic dynamic properties are established for each virus alone and then together. Observed dynamics broadly agree with those predicted by a computer simulation model, although some differences are noted. Two cases of dynamics are contrasted, differing in whether the therapeutic virus is introduced before the lethal virus or after the lethal virus. The therapeutic virus increases in both cases but by different mechanisms. With the therapeutic virus introduced first, it spreads infectiously without any appreciable change in host dynamics. With the therapeutic virus introduced second, host abundance is depressed at the time therapy is applied; following an initial period of therapeutic virus spread by infection, the subsequent rise of protection is through reproduction by hosts already protected. This latter outcome is due to inheritance of the therapeutic virus state when the protected cell divides. Overall, the work establishes the feasibility and robustness to details of a viral interference using a therapeutic virus.

  1. Myxovirus resistance, osteopontin and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 polymorphisms predict hepatitis C virus therapy response in an admixed patient population: comparison with IL28B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Ana Luiza Dias; Cavalcante, Lourianne Nascimento; Abe-Sandes, Kiyoko; Machado, Taísa Bonfim; Lemaire, Denise Carneiro; Malta, Fernanda; Pinho, João Renato; Lyra, Luiz Guilherme Costa; Lyra, Andre Castro

    2013-10-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3, myxovirus resistance protein and osteopontin gene polymorphisms may influence the therapeutic response in patients with chronic hepatitis C, and an association with IL28 might increase the power to predict sustained virologic response. Our aims were to evaluate the association between myxovirus resistance protein, osteopontin and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 gene polymorphisms in combination with IL28B and to assess the therapy response in hepatitis C patients treated with pegylated-interferon plus ribavirin. Myxovirus resistance protein, osteopontin, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 and IL28B polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, direct sequencing and real-time PCR. Ancestry was determined using genetic markers. We analyzed 181 individuals, including 52 who were sustained virologic responders. The protective genotype frequencies among the sustained virologic response group were as follows: the G/G suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (rs4969170) (62.2%); T/T osteopontin (rs2853744) (60%); T/T osteopontin (rs11730582) (64.3%); and the G/T myxovirus resistance protein (rs2071430) genotype (54%). The patients who had ≥3 of the protective genotypes from the myxovirus resistance protein, the suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 and osteopontin had a greater than 90% probability of achieving a sustained response (pC/C IL28B genotype was present in 58.8% of the subjects in this group. The sustained virological response rates increased to 85.7% and 91.7% by analyzing C/C IL28B with the T/T osteopontin genotype at rs11730582 and the G/G suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 genotype, respectively. Genetic ancestry analysis revealed an admixed population. Hepatitis C genotype 1 patients who were responders to interferon-based therapy had a high frequency of multiple protective polymorphisms in the myxovirus resistance protein, osteopontin and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 genes. The combined

  2. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  3. Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes for the therapy of cervical carcinoma elicit humoral and cell-mediated responses in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, Antonia; Pozzi, Eleana; Pacchioni, Sole; Zanotto, Carlo; Morghen, Carlo De Giuli

    2010-04-21

    Around half million new cases of cervical cancer arise each year, making the development of an effective therapeutic vaccine against HPV a high priority. As the E6 and E7 oncoproteins are expressed in all HPV-16 tumour cells, vaccines expressing these proteins might clear an already established tumour and support the treatment of HPV-related precancerous lesions. Three different immunisation regimens were tested in a pre-clinical trial in rabbits to evaluate the humoral and cell-mediated responses of a putative HPV-16 vaccine. Fowlpoxvirus (FP) recombinants separately expressing the HPV-16 E6 (FPE6) and E7 (FPE7) transgenes were used for priming, followed by E7 protein boosting. All of the protocols were effective in eliciting a high antibody response. This was also confirmed by interleukin-4 production, which increased after simultaneous priming with both FPE6 and FPE7 and after E7 protein boost. A cell-mediated immune response was also detected in most of the animals. These results establish a preliminary profile for the therapy with the combined use of avipox recombinants, which may represent safer immunogens than vaccinia-based vectors in immuno-compromised individuals, as they express the transgenes in most mammalian cells in the absence of a productive replication.

  4. Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes for the therapy of cervical carcinoma elicit humoral and cell-mediated responses in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacchioni Sole

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around half million new cases of cervical cancer arise each year, making the development of an effective therapeutic vaccine against HPV a high priority. As the E6 and E7 oncoproteins are expressed in all HPV-16 tumour cells, vaccines expressing these proteins might clear an already established tumour and support the treatment of HPV-related precancerous lesions. Methods Three different immunisation regimens were tested in a pre-clinical trial in rabbits to evaluate the humoral and cell-mediated responses of a putative HPV-16 vaccine. Fowlpoxvirus (FP recombinants separately expressing the HPV-16 E6 (FPE6 and E7 (FPE7 transgenes were used for priming, followed by E7 protein boosting. Results All of the protocols were effective in eliciting a high antibody response. This was also confirmed by interleukin-4 production, which increased after simultaneous priming with both FPE6 and FPE7 and after E7 protein boost. A cell-mediated immune response was also detected in most of the animals. Conclusion These results establish a preliminary profile for the therapy with the combined use of avipox recombinants, which may represent safer immunogens than vaccinia-based vectors in immuno-compromised individuals, as they express the transgenes in most mammalian cells in the absence of a productive replication.

  5. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on Antiretroviral Therapy in Adults Infected by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Updated January 2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-31

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by HIV-1. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should be based on a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (tenofovir in either of its two formulations plus emtricitabine or abacavir plus lamivudine) and another drug from a different family. Four of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase inhibitor as the third drug (dolutegravir, elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat or raltegravir), are considered preferential, whereas a further 3 regimens (based on elvitegravir/cobicistat, rilpivirine, or darunavir boosted with cobicistat or ritonavir) are considered alternatives. We present the reasons and criteria for switching ART in patients with an undetectable PVL and in those who present virological failure, in which case salvage ART should include 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against HIV. We also update the criteria for ART in specific situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbidities (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease and cancer). Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  6. Factors for incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapy including drug refill and clinic visits among older adults living with human immunodeficiency virus - cross-sectional study in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Abbie; Ford, Nathan; El-Khatib, Ziad

    2018-03-01

    To assess adherence outcomes to antiretroviral therapy (ART) of recipients ≥50 years in Soweto, South Africa. This was a secondary data analysis for a cross-sectional study at two HIV clinics in Soweto. Data on ART adherence and covariates were gathered through structured interviews with HIV 878 persons living with HIV (PLHIV) receiving ART. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations. PLHIV ≥50 years (n = 103) were more likely to miss clinic visits during the last six months than PLHIV aged 25-49 (OR 2.15; 95%CI 1.10-4.18). PLHIV ≥50 years with no or primary-level education were less likely to have missed a clinic visit during the last six months than PLHIV with secondary- or tertiary-level education in the same age category (OR 0.3; 95%CI 0.1-1.1), as were PLHIV who did not disclose their status (OR 0.2; 95%CI 0-1.1). There was no evidence of increased risk for non-adherence to ART pills and drug refill visits among older PLHIV. Missing a clinic visit was more common among older PLHIV who were more financially vulnerable. Further studies are needed to verify these findings and identify new risk factors associated with ART adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Executive summary of the GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (updated January 2018).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-11

    This update to the document on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in adults, which has been prepared jointly by GeSIDA and the Spanish National AIDS Plan for the last two decades, supersedes the document published in 2017. 1 The update provides physicians treating HIV-1-infected adults with evidence-based recommendations to guide their therapeutic decisions. The main difference with respect to the previous document concerns recommended initial ART regimens, only three of which are maintained as preferential. All three include dolutegravir or raltegravir, together with emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide or abacavir/lamivudine. Other differences concern the section on switching ART in patients with suppressed viral replication, which now includes new two- and three-drug regimens, and the antiretroviral drugs recommended for pregnant women and patients with tuberculosis. A recommendation has also been added for patients who present with acute HIV infection after pre-exposure prophylaxis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Ebola Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Rangare Lakshman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The disease Ebola takes its name from the Ebola River situated near a village in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the disease first appeared in 1976. It is caused by a virus from the Filoviridae family (filovirus. The present outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD concerns four countries in West Africa, namely Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria till date. Further to widespread transmission of the disease, it has been declared as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the World Health Organisation on 8 August 2014. As of 4 August 2014, countries have reported 1,711 cases (1,070 confirmed, 436 probable, 205 suspect, including 932 deaths. This review paper enlightens about the awareness of Ebola virus and its preventive measures. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 296-305

  9. The value of oncolysis virus in treating liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Zhuang; Wang Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    The effect of traditional therapy is limited for liver cancer, gene therapy gets more and more recognition in recent years. Oncolysis virus is a kind of conditionally replicating virus, with special reproductivity in cancer cells, and then kills them. Gene agents are usually introduced into tumor tissue by intra-tumor and intra-arterial injection, and the technique of interventional therapy is able to satisfy the demand excellently. So, some breakthrough is expected in treating liver cancer by skillfully combining oncolysis virus and interventional technique. (authors)

  10. Frequency of thyroid dysfunctions during interferon alpha treatment of single and combination therapy in hepatitis C virus-infected patients: a systematic review based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekharan Nair Kesavachandran

    Full Text Available Thyroid dysfunction is the commonest endocrinopathy associated with HCV infection due to interferon-based treatment. This comprehensive and systematic review presents the available evidence for newly developed thyroid antibodies and dysfunctions during interferon treatment (both single and combination in HCV patients.This systematic review was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. The data generated were used to analyze the risk for thyroid dysfunctions during interferon (IFN treatment in HCV patients. There was a wide range in the incidence of newly developed thyroid dysfunctions and thyroid antibodies in HCV patients during IFN treatment (both single and combination. The wide range of incidence also denoted the possibility of factors other than IFN treatment for thyroid-related abnormalities in HCV patients. These other factors include HCV viral factors, genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and patho-physiological factors. Variations in IFN dosage, treatment duration of IFN, definition/criteria followed in each study for thyroid dysfunction and irregular thyroid function testing during treatment in different studies influence the outcome of the single studies and jeopardise the validity of a pooled risk estimate of side effects of thyroid dysfunction. Importantly, reports differ as to whether the thyroid-related side effects disappear totally after withdrawal of the IFN treatment.The present review shows that there is a wide range in the incidence of newly developed thyroid dysfunctions and thyroid antibodies in IFN treated HCV patients. This is a comprehensive attempt to collate relevant data from 56 publications across several nations about IFN (both mono and combination therapy related thyroid dysfunction among HCV patients. The role of each factor in causing thyroid dysfunctions in HCV patients treated with IFN should be analyzed in detail in future studies, for a better understanding of the problem and sounder

  11. [Analysis of costs and cost-effectiveness of preferred GESIDA/National AIDS Plan regimens for initial antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus infected adult patients in 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Antonio Javier; Llibre, Josep M; Arribas, José Ramón; Boix, Vicente; Clotet, Bonaventura; Domingo, Pere; González-García, Juan; Knobel, Hernando; López, Juan Carlos; Lozano, Fernando; Miró, José M; Podzamczer, Daniel; Santamaría, Juan Miguel; Tuset, Montserrat; Zamora, Laura; Lázaro, Pablo; Gatell, Josep M

    2013-11-01

    The GESIDA and National AIDS Plan panel of experts have proposed "preferred regimens" of antiretroviral treatment (ART) as initial therapy in HIV infected patients for 2013. The objective of this study is to evaluate the costs and effectiveness of initiating treatment with these "preferred regimens". An economic assessment of costs and effectiveness (cost/effectiveness) was performed using decision tree analysis models. Effectiveness was defined as the probability of having viral load <50copies/mL at week48, in an intention-to-treat analysis. Cost of initiating treatment with an ART regime was defined as the costs of ART and its consequences (adverse effects, changes of ART regime and drug resistance analyses) during the first 48weeks. The perspective of the analysis is that of the National Health System was applied, only taking into account differential direct costs: ART (official prices), management of adverse effects, resistance studies, and determination of HLA B*5701. The setting is Spain and the costs are those of 2013. A sensitivity deterministic analysis was performed, constructing three scenarios for each regimen: baseline, most favourable, and most unfavourable cases. In the baseline case scenario, the cost of initiating treatment ranges from 6,747euros for TDF/FTC+NVP to 12,059euros for TDF/FTC+RAL. The effectiveness ranges between 0.66 for ABC/3TC+LPV/r and ABC/3TC+ATV/r, and 0.87 for TDF/FTC+RAL and ABC/3TC+RAL. Effectiveness, in terms of cost/effectiveness, varies between 8,396euros and 13,930euros per responder at 48weeks, for TDF/FTC/RPV and TDF/FTC+RAL, respectively. Taking ART at official prices, the most effective regimen was TDF/FTC/RPV, followed by the rest of non-nucleoside containing regimens. The sensitivity analysis confirms the robustness of these findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Pharmacological Inhibition of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Bienzle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is a member of the retroviridae family of viruses and causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in domestic and non-domestic cats worldwide. Genome organization of FIV and clinical characteristics of the disease caused by the virus are similar to those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Both viruses infect T lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and their replication cycle in infected cells is analogous. Due to marked similarity in genomic organization, virus structure, virus replication and disease pathogenesis of FIV and HIV, infection of cats with FIV is a useful tool to study and develop novel drugs and vaccines for HIV. Anti-retroviral drugs studied extensively in HIV infection have targeted different steps of the virus replication cycle: (1 inhibition of virus entry into susceptible cells at the level of attachment to host cell surface receptors and co-receptors; (2 inhibition of fusion of the virus membrane with the cell membrane; (3 blockade of reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA; (4 interruption of nuclear translocation and viral DNA integration into host genomes; (5 prevention of viral transcript processing and nuclear export; and (6 inhibition of virion assembly and maturation. Despite much success of anti-retroviral therapy slowing disease progression in people, similar therapy has not been thoroughly investigated in cats. In this article we review current pharmacological approaches and novel targets for anti-lentiviral therapy, and critically assess potentially suitable applications against FIV infection in cats.

  13. The RNA template channel of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase as a target for development of antiviral therapy of multiple genera within a virus family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van der Linden

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71 for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Nucleoside-based inhibitors have broad-spectrum activity but often exhibit off-target effects. Most non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNIs target surface cavities, which are structurally more flexible than the nucleotide-binding pocket, and hence have a more narrow spectrum of activity and are more prone to resistance development. Here, we report a novel NNI, GPC-N114 (2,2'-[(4-chloro-1,2-phenylenebis(oxy]bis(5-nitro-benzonitrile with broad-spectrum activity against enteroviruses and cardioviruses (another genus in the picornavirus family. Surprisingly, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 and poliovirus displayed a high genetic barrier to resistance against GPC-N114. By contrast, EMCV, a cardiovirus, rapidly acquired resistance due to mutations in 3Dpol. In vitro polymerase activity assays showed that GPC-N114 i inhibited the elongation activity of recombinant CVB3 and EMCV 3Dpol, (ii had reduced activity against EMCV 3Dpol with the resistance mutations, and (iii was most efficient in inhibiting 3Dpol when added before the RNA template-primer duplex. Elucidation of a crystal structure of the inhibitor bound to CVB3 3Dpol confirmed the RNA-binding channel as the target for GPC-N114. Docking studies of the compound into the crystal structures of the compound-resistant EMCV 3Dpol mutants suggested that the resistant phenotype is due to subtle changes that interfere with the binding of GPC-N114 but not of the RNA template-primer. In conclusion, this study presents the first NNI that targets the RNA template channel of the picornavirus polymerase and identifies a new pocket that can be used for the design of broad-spectrum inhibitors. Moreover, this study provides important new insight

  14. Disabled infectious single cycle herpes simplex virus (DISC-HSV) is a candidate vector system for gene delivery/expression of GM-CSF in human prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Richard J; Mian, Shahid; Bishop, Michael C; Gray, Trevor; Li, Geng; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Ali, Selman; Rees, Robert C

    2003-06-15

    DISC-HSV is a replication incompetent herpes simplex virus that is a highly efficient vector for the transduction of genes in vivo and in vitro. We examine the ability of DISC-HSV to infect human prostate cancer cell-lines and xenograft tumor models, and induce expression of reporter and therapeutic cytokine genes. Infection was confirmed by cellular staining for the beta-galactosidase reporter gene product, and by EM. Human GM-CSF production following DISC-hGMCSF infection was measured using ELISA. The metabolic activity of infected cells was determined by NADP/NADPH assay. Cell death was estimated by cell-cycle analysis using flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining. Infection of DU145, PC3 and LNCaP cells with DISC-HSV was dose dependent. Cells infected with DISC-hGM-CSF released significant levels of hGM-CSF for 3 days. NADP/NADPH assay suggested that infected cells continued to be metabolically active for 3 days post-infection, which was consistent with flow cytometry findings that cell death did not occur within 7 days of infection. Tumor xenografts injected with DISC-HSV expressed beta-galactosidase, and intracellular viral particles were demonstrated using EM. We have previously reported the rejection of established tumors following intra-tumoral injection of DISC-GMCSF. This study demonstrates the ability of DISC-HSV to infect prostate cancer and express GMCSF at significant levels. We suggest that prostate cancer is a potential target for therapy using DISC-HSV containing GM-CSF. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. SARS virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... consequence.Protein spike similar. HE gene absent. 2787 nucleotides. Largest genome. Jumps species by genetic deletion. < 300 compounds screened. Glycyrrhizin (liquorics/mullatha) seems attractive. Antivirals not effective. Vaccines – animal model only in monkeys. Killed corona or knockout weakened virus as targets.

  16. Overcoming tumor resistance by heterologous adeno-poxvirus combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Vähä-Koskela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful cancer control relies on overcoming resistance to cell death and on activation of host antitumor immunity. Oncolytic viruses are particularly attractive in this regard, as they lyse infected tumor cells and trigger robust immune responses during the infection. However, repeated injections of the same virus promote antiviral rather than antitumor immunity and tumors may mount innate antiviral defenses to restrict oncolytic virus replication. In this article, we have explored if alternating the therapy virus could circumvent these problems. We demonstrate in two virus-resistant animal models a substantial delay in antiviral immune- and innate cellular response induction by alternating injections of two immunologically distinct oncolytic viruses, adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Our results are in support of clinical development of heterologous adeno-/vaccinia virus therapy of cancer.

  17. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  18. Hepatitis B Virus infection in Nigeria – a review | Emechebe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... virus in the general population also play role in Nigeria. Conclusion: Reduction in the of hepatitis B virus infection could be achieved by public enlightenment campaign, mass immunization of the children and adults at risk while antiviral drugs and immunostimulatory therapy should be provided for those already infected.

  19. Antiretroviral therapy: current drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Alice K; George, Jomy M

    2014-09-01

    The rapid advances in drug discovery and the development of antiretroviral therapy is unprecedented in the history of modern medicine. The administration of chronic combination antiretroviral therapy targeting different stages of the human immunodeficiency virus' replicative life cycle allows for durable and maximal suppression of plasma viremia. This suppression has resulted in dramatic improvement of patient survival. This article reviews the history of antiretroviral drug development and discusses the clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and toxicities of the antiretroviral agents most commonly used in clinical practice to date. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. HCVpro: Hepatitis C virus protein interaction database

    KAUST Repository

    Kwofie, Samuel K.

    2011-12-01

    It is essential to catalog characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and the associated plethora of vital functional information to augment the search for therapies, vaccines and diagnostic biomarkers. In furtherance of these goals, we have developed the hepatitis C virus protein interaction database (HCVpro) by integrating manually verified hepatitis C virus-virus and virus-human protein interactions curated from literature and databases. HCVpro is a comprehensive and integrated HCV-specific knowledgebase housing consolidated information on PPIs, functional genomics and molecular data obtained from a variety of virus databases (VirHostNet, VirusMint, HCVdb and euHCVdb), and from BIND and other relevant biology repositories. HCVpro is further populated with information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related genes that are mapped onto their encoded cellular proteins. Incorporated proteins have been mapped onto Gene Ontologies, canonical pathways, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and extensively cross-referenced to other essential annotations. The database is enriched with exhaustive reviews on structure and functions of HCV proteins, current state of drug and vaccine development and links to recommended journal articles. Users can query the database using specific protein identifiers (IDs), chromosomal locations of a gene, interaction detection methods, indexed PubMed sources as well as HCVpro, BIND and VirusMint IDs. The use of HCVpro is free and the resource can be accessed via http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/hcvpro/ or http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hcvpro/. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Favorable outcome of Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder complicated by immunoglobulin G4-related disease treated with rituximab-based therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Koki; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Sukegawa, Masumi; Sano, Takahiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Hashimoto, Yuko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-08-24

    After acute infection of Epstein-Barr virus, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells survive but usually do not show clonal proliferation. However, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells occasionally acquire a proliferative capacity that provokes clonal lymphoproliferative disorders. We herein present a case with Epstein-Barr virus-infected CD30+ B cell and immunoglobulin G4+ plasmacytoid cell proliferation in the lymph nodes, suggesting a pathological and clinical interaction between Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and immunoglobulin G4-related disease. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease has been recognized as a benign disease with proliferation of IgG4-related disease+ plasmacytoid cells. Several studies have recently reported the coexistence of immunoglobulin G4-related disease+ plasmacytoid cells with Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells in lymph nodes in some immunoglobulin G4-related disease cases. However, the pathogenic role of the clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells in immunoglobulin G4-related disease, as well as the treatments for patients with both Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells and immunoglobulin G4-related disease, have never been discussed. A 50-year-old Japanese man was referred to us for persistent fatigue and lymphadenopathy. His blood examination showed elevated IgG4, and detected high levels of Epstein-Barr virus DNA. A lymph node biopsy revealed IgG4+ plasmacytoid cells and infiltration of large lymphoid cells, which were positive for CD20, CD30, Epstein-Barr virus-related late membrane protein 1, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA, and were negative for IgG4. Based on the diagnosis of both Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and IgG4-related disease, the patient received eight cycles of rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, which resulted in the complete disappearance of lymphadenopathy. Moreover, his serum IgG4 level was significantly

  2. Influenza (Flu) Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Influenza (Flu) Viruses Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... influenza circulate and cause illness. More Information about Flu Viruses Types of Influenza Viruses Influenza A and ...

  3. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  4. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  5. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  6. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  7. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page ... Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus if you ...

  8. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  9. Polyomavirus specific cellular immunity: from BK-virus-specific cellular immunity to BK-virus-associated nephropathy ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    manon edekeyser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control virus replication and prevent chronic disease. Monitoring of specific immunity combined with viral load could be used to individually assess the risk of viral reactivation and virus control. We review the current knowledge on BK-virus specific cellular immunity and, more specifically, in immunocompromised patients. In the future, immune-based therapies could allow us to treat and prevent BK-virus-associated nephropathy.

  10. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  11. Computer Virus and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tutut Handayani; Soenarto Usna,Drs.MMSI

    2004-01-01

    Since its appearance the first time in the mid-1980s, computer virus has invited various controversies that still lasts to this day. Along with the development of computer systems technology, viruses komputerpun find new ways to spread itself through a variety of existing communications media. This paper discusses about some things related to computer viruses, namely: the definition and history of computer viruses; the basics of computer viruses; state of computer viruses at this time; and ...

  12. Antiviral therapy: a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidi Bonjar AH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Amir Hashem Shahidi Bonjar Clinician Scientist, Institute of Applied Research in Dentistry, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran Abstract: This paper discusses extracorporeal removal of viral particles and their antigens from the blood as an auxiliary therapy. This hypothesis has not been reported before. In some chronic blood-borne viral infections, the virus remains systemic and persistent for extended periods of time, with adverse effects that weaken the immune system. Blood titers of virus and its toxins are proportional to the severity of the disease, and their reduction can alleviate symptoms, leading to improved health. Several blood-borne viral infections can be overcome by the young, but are life-threatening in the elderly. It is known that some older people have extreme difficulty tolerating viral infections such as influenza and the common cold. Further, several types of viral infection persist throughout the life of the individual and cannot be eliminated by conventional treatments. Well-known infections of this type include HIV and hepatitis B. In the case of Ebola virus, patients remain infectious as long as their blood contains the virus. According to the present hypothesis, an extracorporeal viral antibody column (EVAC is proposed for elimination or reduction of the blood viral titer when treating blood-borne viral infection. EVAC would selectively trap viral antigens and toxins in the blood into an extracorporeal circuit, while returning detoxified blood back to the patient’s body. It is anticipated that EVAC would reduce mortality caused by blood-borne viral infections in the elderly since reduction of blood virus titers would improve health, leading to improved overall patient performance. Such enhancement would also make conventional therapies even more effective. EVAC could have a lifesaving role in treatment of viral illness, especially those involving lethal viruses such as Ebola, where the patient

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients.

  14. Early transduction produces highly functional chimeric antigen receptor-modified virus-specific T-cells with central memory markers: a Production Assistant for Cell Therapy (PACT) translational application

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jiali; Huye, Leslie E; Lapteva, Natalia; Mamonkin, Maksim; Hiregange, Manasa; Ballard, Brandon; Dakhova, Olga; Raghavan, Darshana; Durett, April G; Perna, Serena K; Omer, Bilal; Rollins, Lisa A; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2015-01-01

    Background Virus-specific T-cells (VSTs) proliferate exponentially after adoptive transfer into hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, eliminate virus infections, then persist and provide long-term protection from viral disease. If VSTs behaved similarly when modified with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), they should have potent anti-tumor activity. This theory was evaluated by Cruz et al. in a previous clinical trial with CD19.CAR-modified VSTs, but there was ...

  15. Antiviral therapy in herpes- virus infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    tolerated, although renal dysfunction may occur with high intravenous doses. It is ... latent in either sensory nerve ganglia or immune. c e l l s . ... mother has acquired HSV infec- tion in the third .... transplant recipients or using high- ly active ...

  16. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Nandy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles, Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi′s sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis.

  17. Transurethral prostatectomy in human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 63-year old man was admitted to our Hospital with urethral catheter in situ and having failed medical therapy, he opted for transurethral prostatectomy (TURP) which was done without any post-operative complication. He was known to be afflicted with human immunodeficiency virus and on treatment for 3 years. He also ...

  18. Transurethral prostatectomy in human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is increasing world-wide and highly active antiretroviral treatment ... Hospital with urethral catheter in situ and having failed medical therapy, he opted for transurethral ... endoscopic visualization of operation field, the .... percutaneous exposure: Centers for Disease Control and.

  19. Rates of sustained virological response 12 weeks after the scheduled end of direct-acting antiviral (DAA)-based hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy from the National German HCV registry: does HIV coinfection impair the response to DAA combination therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, J; Mauss, S; Cordes, C; Lutz, T; Scholten, S; Moll, A; Jäger, H; Cornberg, M; Manns, M P; Baumgarten, A; Rockstroh, J K

    2018-04-01

    The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) treatment recommendations for hepatitis C no longer discriminate between HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected and HCV-monoinfected patients. However, recent data from Spain are questioning these recommendations on the basis of the findings of higher relapse rates and lower cure rates in HIV/HCV-infected subjects. The aim of our study was to compare HCV cure rates in monoinfected and coinfected patients from Germany. Data acquired from the Deutsches Hepatitis C-Registry were analysed. A total of 5657 HCV-monoinfected subjects and 488 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients were included in the study. Rates of sustained virological response 12 weeks after the scheduled end of therapy (SVR12) were collected in both subgroups and in cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients. HIV/HCV-coinfected patients were more frequently male (84.6% vs. 56.4%, respectively; P  350 cells/μL in 63.1% of HIV-positive subjects and 88.7% were on antiretroviral therapy. SVR12 rates were 90.3% (5111 of 5657) in our HCV-monoinfected cohort and 91.2% (445 of 488) in our coinfected patients. Liver cirrhosis was confirmed in 1667 of 5657 (29.5%) monoinfected patients and 84 of 488 (17.2%; P < 0.001) coinfected patients. SVR12 rates did not differ between HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with liver cirrhosis (87.8% vs. 89.3%, respectively; P = 0.864). A treatment duration of 8 weeks did not reduce the percentage of patients with SVR12 in either subgroup (93.7% in both groups). We found high SVR12 rates in monoinfected as well as coinfected individuals. No differences were detected between the two subgroups regardless of whether there was accompanying liver cirrhosis or a shortened treatment duration. © 2018 British HIV Association.

  20. Coinfecting viruses as determinants of HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2009-02-01

    The human body constitutes a balanced ecosystem of its own cells together with various microbes ("host-microbe ecosystem"). The transmission of HIV-1 and the progression of HIV disease in such an ecosystem are accompanied by de novo infection by other microbes or by activation of microbes that were present in the host in homeostatic equilibrium before HIV-1 infection. In recent years, data have accumulated on the interactions of these coinfecting microbes-viruses in particular-with HIV. Coinfecting viruses generate negative and positive signals that suppress or upregulate HIV-1. We suggest that the signals generated by these viruses may largely affect HIV transmission, pathogenesis, and evolution. The study of the mechanisms of HIV interaction with coinfecting viruses may indicate strategies to suppress positive signals, enhance negative signals, and lead to the development of new and original anti-HIV therapies.

  1. BREATHER (PENTA 16) short-cycle therapy (SCT) (5 days on/2 days off) in young people with chronic human immunodeficiency virus infection: an open, randomised, parallel-group Phase II/III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Karina; Inshaw, Jamie; Ford, Deborah; Bernays, Sarah; Scott, Karen; Kenny, Julia; Klein, Nigel; Turkova, Anna; Harper, Lynda; Nastouli, Eleni; Paparini, Sara; Choudhury, Rahela; Rhodes, Tim; Babiker, Abdel; Gibb, Diana

    2016-06-01

    For human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adolescents facing lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART), short-cycle therapy (SCT) with long-acting agents offers the potential for drug-free weekends, less toxicity, better adherence and cost savings. To determine whether or not efavirenz (EFV)-based ART in short cycles of 5 days on and 2 days off is as efficacious (in maintaining virological suppression) as continuous EFV-based ART (continuous therapy; CT). Secondary objectives included the occurrence of new clinical HIV events or death, changes in immunological status, emergence of HIV drug resistance, drug toxicity and changes in therapy. Open, randomised, non-inferiority trial. Europe, Thailand, Uganda, Argentina and the USA. Young people (aged 8-24 years) on EFV plus two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and with a HIV-1 ribonucleic acid level [viral load (VL)] of  12 months. Young people were randomised to continue daily ART (CT) or change to SCT (5 days on, 2 days off ART). Follow-up was for a minimum of 48 weeks (0, 4 and 12 weeks and then 12-weekly visits). The primary outcome was the difference between arms in the proportion with VL > 50 copies/ml (confirmed) by 48 weeks, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method (12% non-inferiority margin) adjusted for region and age. In total, 199 young people (11 countries) were randomised (n = 99 SCT group, n = 100 CT group) and followed for a median of 86 weeks. Overall, 53% were male; the median age was 14 years (21% ≥ 18 years); 13% were from the UK, 56% were black, 19% were Asian and 21% were Caucasian; and the median CD4% and CD4 count were 34% and 735 cells/mm(3), respectively. By week 48, only one participant (CT) was lost to follow-up. The SCT arm had a 27% decreased drug exposure as measured by the adherence questionnaire and a MEMSCap(™) Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMSCap Inc., Durham, NC, USA) substudy (median cap openings per week: SCT group, n = 5; CT group, n

  2. Oncolytic Sendai virus-based virotherapy for cancer: recent advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saga K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Kotaro Saga, Yasufumi Kaneda Division of Gene Therapy Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Many drugs have been developed and optimized for the treatment of cancer; however, it is difficult to completely cure cancer with anticancer drugs alone. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic technologies, in addition to new anticancer drugs, is necessary for more effective oncotherapy. Oncolytic viruses are one potential new anticancer strategy. Various oncolytic viruses have been developed for safe and effective oncotherapy. Recently, Sendai virus-based oncotherapy has been reported by several groups, and attention has been drawn to its unique anticancer mechanisms, which are different from those of the conventional oncolytic viruses that kill cancer cells by cancer cell-selective replication. Here, we introduce Sendai virus-based virotherapy and its anticancer mechanisms. Keywords: HVJ-E, cancer therapy, apoptosis, necroptosis, anticancer immunity 

  3. Genital herpes simplex virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M S

    1979-09-01

    In recent years, a great increase in interest in genital herpes has been stimulated partly by the rising prevalence of this disease and partly by observations suggesting that genital herpes is a cause of cervical cancer. The clinical pictures produced by genital herpes simplex virus infections are similar in men and women. In contrast to recurrent attacks, initial episodes of infection are generally more extensive, last longer, and are more often associated with regional lymphadenopathy and systemic symptoms. Genital herpes in pregnancy may pose a serious threat to the newborn infant. Although the data suggesting genital herpes simplex virus infection is a cause of cervical cancer are quite extensive, the evidence is largely circumstantial. In spite of these more serious aspects of genital herpes simplex virus infection, episodes of genital herpes are almost always self-limited and benign. Frequent recurrences pose the major therapeutic and management problem. At present, there is no satisfactory treatment for recurrent genital herpes simplex virus in fection. Many of the suggested therapies, although some sound very promising, are potentially dangerous and should be used only under carefully controlled conditions.

  4. Antiviral therapy: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi Bonjar, Amir Hashem

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses extracorporeal removal of viral particles and their antigens from the blood as an auxiliary therapy. This hypothesis has not been reported before. In some chronic blood-borne viral infections, the virus remains systemic and persistent for extended periods of time, with adverse effects that weaken the immune system. Blood titers of virus and its toxins are proportional to the severity of the disease, and their reduction can alleviate symptoms, leading to improved health. Several blood-borne viral infections can be overcome by the young, but are life-threatening in the elderly. It is known that some older people have extreme difficulty tolerating viral infections such as influenza and the common cold. Further, several types of viral infection persist throughout the life of the individual and cannot be eliminated by conventional treatments. Well-known infections of this type include HIV and hepatitis B. In the case of Ebola virus, patients remain infectious as long as their blood contains the virus. According to the present hypothesis, an extracorporeal viral antibody column (EVAC) is proposed for elimination or reduction of the blood viral titer when treating blood-borne viral infection. EVAC would selectively trap viral antigens and toxins in the blood into an extracorporeal circuit, while returning detoxified blood back to the patient's body. It is anticipated that EVAC would reduce mortality caused by blood-borne viral infections in the elderly since reduction of blood virus titers would improve health, leading to improved overall patient performance. Such enhancement would also make conventional therapies even more effective. EVAC could have a lifesaving role in treatment of viral illness, especially those involving lethal viruses such as Ebola, where the patient's recovery to a large extent depends on their general health status. EVAC would be for single use and appropriately disposed of after each detoxification procedure. When sufficient

  5. Research progress in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Guoying

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral therapy is the most important treatment for chronic hepatitis C. This paper reviews the progress in antiviral treatment over recent years, including the combination therapy with polyethylene glycol-Interferon (PEG-IFN and ribavirin (RBV, specific target therapy, and gene therapy. The paper believes that the anti-hepatitis C virus treatment needs more effective drug combination therapies, shorter courses, less side effect, higher drug resistance threshold, etc.

  6. Progress and prospects: foamy virus vectors enter a new age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlwein, O; McClure, M O

    2010-12-01

    Foamy viruses, distantly related to the major subfamily of Retroviruses, Orthoretroviruses that include oncoviruses (for example, murine leukemia virus (MLV)) and lentiviruses (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)), are endemic in mammalian species, but not in human populations. Humans infected by accidental or occupational exposure remain well. The virus is not transmitted to others, nor is it associated with any disease. These features added to its broad host range, efficient transduction of progenitor cells and an integration profile less likely to induce insertional mutagenesis, make these viruses attractive as vectors. Long-term reversal of disease phenotype in dogs with the genetic defect, leukocyte adhesion deficiency, by foamy virus vector therapy strengthens the case for their clinical exploitation.

  7. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  8. Photodynamic treatment of Herpes simplex virus infection in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Hester, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of photodynamic action on in vitro herpes simplex virus infections of CV-1 monkey kidney fibroblasts or human skin fibroblasts were determined using proflavine sulfate and white fluorescent lamps. Photodynamic treatment of confluent cell monolayers prior to virus infection inactivated cell capacity, i.e. the capacity of the treated cells to support subsequent virus growth as measured by plaque formation. The capacity of human cells was more sensitive to inactivation than the capacity of monkey cells when 6 μM proflavine was used. Treated cell monolayers recovered the capacity to support virus plaque formation when virus infection was delayed four days after the treatment. Experiments in which the photodynamically treated monolayers were infected with UV-irradiated virus demonstrated that this treatment induced Weigle reactivation in both types of cells. This reactivation occurred for virus infection just after treatment or 4 days later. A Luria-Latarjet-type experiment was also performed in which cultures infected with unirradiated virus were photodynamically treated at different times after the start of infection. The results showed that for the first several hours of the virus infection the infected cultures were more sensitive to inactivation by photodynamic treatment than cell capacity. By the end of the eclipse period the infected cultures were less sensitive to inactivation than cell capacity. Results from extracellular inactivation of virus growth in monkey cells at 6 μM proflavine indicated that at physiological pH the virus has a sensitivity to photodynamic inactivation similar to that for inactivation of cell capacity. The combined data indicated that photodynamic treatment of the cell before or after virus infection could prevent virus growth. Thus, photodynamic inactivation of infected and uninfected cells may be as important as inactivation of virus particles when considering possible mechanisms in clinical photodynamic therapy for herpes

  9. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  10. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Marschang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  11. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  12. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family therapy Overview Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided by a psychologist, ...

  13. Oncolytic viruses: a step into cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol JG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan G Pol, Julien Rességuier, Brian D LichtyMcMaster Immunology Research Centre, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is currently under investigation in phase I–III clinical trials for approval as a new cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses (OVs selectively infect, replicate in, and kill tumor cells. For a long time, the therapeutic efficacy was thought to depend on the direct viral oncolysis (virocentric view. The host immune system was considered as a brake that impaired virus delivery and spread. Attention was paid primarily to approaches enhancing virus tumor selectivity and cytotoxicity and/or that limited antiviral responses. Thinking has changed over the past few years with the discovery that OV therapy was also inducing indirect oncolysis mechanisms. Among them, induction of an antitumor immunity following OV injection appeared to be a key factor for an efficient therapeutic activity (immunocentric view. Indeed, tumor-specific immune cells persist post-therapy and can search and destroy any tumor cells that escape the OVs, and thus immune memory may prevent relapse of the disease. Various strategies, which are summarized in this manuscript, have been developed to enhance the efficacy of OV therapy with a focus on its immunotherapeutic aspects. These include genetic engineering and combination with existing cancer treatments. Several are currently being evaluated in human patients and already display promising efficacy.Keywords: oncolytic virus, cancer immunotherapy, tumor antigen, cancer vaccine, combination strategies

  14. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2018-04-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) is an uncommon but devastating infection in the newborn, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The use of PCR for identification of infected infants and acyclovir for treatment has significantly improved the prognosis for affected infants. The subsequent use of suppressive therapy with oral acyclovir following completion of parenteral treatment of acute disease has further enhanced the long-term prognosis for these infants. This review article will discuss the epidemiology, risk factors and routes of acquisition, clinical presentation, and evaluation of an infant suspected to have the infection, and treatment of proven neonatal HSV disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Research Advances: DNA Computing Targets West Nile Virus, Other Deadly Diseases, and Tic-Tac-Toe; Marijuana Component May Offer Hope for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment; New Wound Dressing May Lead to Maggot Therapy--Without the Maggots

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents three reports of research advances. The first report describes a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based computer that could lead to faster, more accurate tests for diagnosing West Nile Virus and bird flu. Representing the first "medium-scale integrated molecular circuit," it is the most powerful computing device of its type to…

  16. Selection of an entecavir-resistant mutant despite prolonged hepatitis B virus DNA suppression, in a chronic hepatitis B patient with preexistent lamivudine resistance : successful rescue therapy with tenofovir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, Wilhelmus F; Niesters, Hubert G; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Janssen, Harry L; Schalm, Solko W; de Man, Robert A

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Entecavir has potent activity against hepatitis B virus. Drug resistance has not been reported in nucleoside-naïve patients and is low in lamivudine-refractory patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: A 43-year-old man was treated with lamivudine for hepatitis B e antigen-positive

  17. Cyclosporin A inhibits the propagation of influenza virus by interfering with a late event in the virus life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Itsuki; Harazaki, Kazuhiro; Inase, Naohiko; Takaku, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Masato; Yamamoto, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a global public health problem that causes a serious respiratory disease. Influenza virus frequently undergoes amino acid substitutions, which result in the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. To control influenza viruses that are resistant to currently available drugs, it is essential to develop new antiviral drugs with a novel molecular target. Here, we report that cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibits the propagation of influenza virus in A549 cells by interfering with a late event in the virus life cycle. CsA did not affect adsorption, internalization, viral RNA replication, or synthesis of viral proteins in A549 cells, but inhibited the step(s) after viral protein synthesis, such as assembly or budding. In addition, siRNA-mediated knockdown of the expression of the major CsA targets, namely cyclophilin A (CypA), cyclophilin B (CypB), and P-glycoprotein (Pgp), did not inhibit influenza virus propagation. These results suggest that CsA inhibits virus propagation by mechanism(s) independent of the inhibition of the function of CypA, CypB, and Pgp. CsA may target an unknown molecule that works as a positive regulator in the propagation of influenza virus. Our findings would contribute to the development of a novel anti-influenza virus therapy and clarification of the regulatory mechanism of influenza virus multiplication.

  18. Zika virus disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel I Al-Afaleq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Zika virus is an arbovirus belonging to the virus family Flaviviridae. The virus was isolated in 1947 from a rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest of Uganda. The virus causes sporadic mild human infections in Africa and later in Asia. However, by 2007 a major shift in its infection pattern was noticed and thousands of human infections were reported in the State of Yap and Federated States of Micronesia. In the last 3 years, major outbreaks have continued to occur and the virus has spread to several Pacific and American countries. These outbreaks were mostly asymptomatic; however, there were more severe clinical signs associated with the infections. Those signs included microcephaly and Guillain–Barre syndrome. It is believed that various species of mosquitoes can biologically transmit the virus. However, Aedes aegypti is most widely associated with the Zika virus. Recently, new modes of virus transmission have been reported, including mother-to-fetus, sexual, blood transfusion, animal bites, laboratory exposure and breast milk. Differential diagnosis is very important as some other arboviruses such as yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, dengue virus, and chikungunya virus have similar clinical manifestations to the Zika virus infection as well as relating serologically to some of these viruses. Established laboratory diagnostic tests to detect the Zika virus are limited, with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction being the most widely used test. Taking into consideration the quickness of the spread of infection, size of the infected population and change of the infection severity pattern, the Zika virus infection merits collective efforts on all levels to prevent and control the disease. Limited research work and data, concurrent infection with other arboviruses, involvement of biological vectors, mass crowd events, human and trade movements and lack of vaccines are some of the challenges that we face in our efforts to prevent and

  19. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a rare and deadly disease ...

  20. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  1. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  2. Zika virus disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May 2015, the virus was discovered for the first time in Brazil. It has now spread to many territories, states, and countries in: Caribbean Islands Central America Mexico South America Pacific Islands Africa The virus ...

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Credit: CDC This is the ... the United States. Why Is the Study of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) a Priority for NIAID? In ...

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  5. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix

  6. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  7. Zika Virus - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Zika Virus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Zika Virus - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  8. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd. Minus strand RNA viruses. Rhabdovirus e.g. rabies. Paramyxovirus e.g. measles, mumps. Orthomyxovirus e.g. influenza. Retroviruses. RSV, HTLV, MMTV, HIV. Notes:

  9. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  10. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy ...

  11. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  12. Low-level viremia and proviral DNA impede immune reconstitution in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Thim, Per T.

    2005-01-01

    Immunological and virological consequences of low-level viremia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) remain to be determined....

  13. Clinical infection control in gene therapy : A multidisciplinary conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, ME; Jordan, CT; Chang, SMW; Conrad, C; Gerberding, JL; Kaufman, HL; Mayhall, CG; Nolta, JA; Pilaro, AM; Sullivan, S; Weber, DJ; Wivel, NA

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy is being studied for the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited disorders. Retroviruses, adenoviruses, poxviruses, adeno-associated viruses, herpesviruses, and others are being engineered to transfer genes into humans. Treatment protocols using recombinant viruses are being

  14. West Nile Virus Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Pheng Lim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV in 1999 in the USA, and its continued spread throughout the Americas, parts of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, underscored the need for WNV antiviral development. Here, we review the current status of WNV drug discovery. A number of approaches have been used to search for inhibitors of WNV, including viral infection-based screening, enzyme-based screening, structure-based virtual screening, structure-based rationale design, and antibody-based therapy. These efforts have yielded inhibitors of viral or cellular factors that are critical for viral replication. For small molecule inhibitors, no promising preclinical candidate has been developed; most of the inhibitors could not even be advanced to the stage of hit-to-lead optimization due to their poor drug-like properties. However, several inhibitors developed for related members of the family Flaviviridae, such as dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, exhibited cross-inhibition of WNV, suggesting the possibility to re-purpose these antivirals for WNV treatment. Most promisingly, therapeutic antibodies have shown excellent efficacy in mouse model; one of such antibodies has been advanced into clinical trial. The knowledge accumulated during the past fifteen years has provided better rationale for the ongoing WNV and other flavivirus antiviral development.

  15. [Mumps vaccine virus transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, E V; Kulak, M V; Otrashevskaia, A V; Karpov, I A; Fisenko, E G; Ignat'ev, G M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report the mumps vaccine virus shedding based on the laboratory confirmed cases of the mumps virus (MuV) infection. The likely epidemiological sources of the transmitted mumps virus were children who were recently vaccinated with the mumps vaccine containing Leningrad-Zagreb or Leningrad-3 MuV. The etiology of the described cases of the horizontal transmission of both mumps vaccine viruses was confirmed by PCR with the sequential restriction analysis.

  16. Viral coinfection is shaped by host ecology and virus-virus interactions across diverse microbial taxa and environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Muñoz, Samuel L

    2017-01-01

    virus-virus interactions in coinfection with implications for phage therapy, microbiome dynamics, and viral infection treatments.

  17. Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M D, Baron; B, Holzer

    2015-08-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.

  18. What's West Nile Virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español What's West Nile Virus? KidsHealth / For Kids / What's West Nile Virus? Print en español ¿Qué es el Virus del Nilo Occidental? What exactly is the West ...

  19. Characteristic of pandemic virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Characteristic of pandemic virus. The virus was highly transmissible. Risk of hospitalization was 2X and risk of death was about 11X more in comparison to seasonal influenza. Virus continues to be susceptible to Osaltamivir, the only drug available. Vaccines are available but ...

  20. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is caused by a virus transmitted primarily by Aedes mosquitoes. People with Zika virus disease can have symptoms including mild fever, skin ... framework. Q&A: Zika virus and complication ... mosquito from the Aedes genus, mainly Aedes aegypti in tropical regions. Aedes ...

  1. Increased T cell trafficking as adjunct therapy for HIV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Fryer, HR; Wolinsky, SM; McLean, AR

    2018-01-01

    Although antiretroviral drug therapy suppresses human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) to undetectable levels in the blood of treated individuals, reservoirs of replication competent HIV-1 endure. Upon cessation of antiretroviral therapy, the reservoir usually allows outgrowth of virus and approaches to targeting the reservoir have had limited success. Ongoing cycles of viral replication in regions with low drug penetration contribute to this persistence. Here, we use a mathematical mode...

  2. Regulatory T cells in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients are elevated and independent of immunological and virological status, as well as initiation of highly active anti-retroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, J.C.; Nielsen, S.D.; Vedel, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes a dysregulation of the immune system. This is caused by HIV-specific as well as non-specific mechanisms and has not been explained fully. In particular, knowledge is lacking about the potential role of host-mediated immunosuppressive mechan......(regs) was found to be independent of both immunological and virological status, indicating that initiation of HAART has minor effects on the T(reg) level in HIV-infected patients....

  3. Treatment of ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Paul E; Grabenstein, John D; Salim, Abdulbaset M; Rybak, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In March 2014, the largest Ebola outbreak in history exploded across West Africa. As of November 14, 2014, the World Health Organization has reported a total of 21,296 Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases, including 13,427 laboratory-confirmed EVD cases reported from the three most affected countries (Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone). As the outbreak of EVD has spread, clinical disease severity and national EVD case-fatality rates have remained high (21.2-60.8%). Prior to 2013, several EVD outbreaks were controlled by using routine public health interventions; however, the widespread nature of the current EVD outbreak as well as cultural practices in the affected countries have challenged even the most active case identification efforts. In addition, although treatment centers provide supportive care, no effective therapeutic agents are available for EVD-endemic countries. The ongoing EVD outbreak has stimulated investigation of several different therapeutic strategies that target specific viral structures and mechanisms of Ebola viruses. Six to eight putative pharmacotherapies or immunologically based treatments have demonstrated promising results in animal studies. In addition, agents composed of small interfering RNAs targeting specific proteins of Ebola viruses, traditional hyperimmune globulin isolated from Ebola animal models, monoclonal antibodies, and morpholino oligomers (small molecules used to block viral gene expression). A number of EVD therapeutic agents are now entering accelerated human trials in EVD-endemic countries. The goal of therapeutic agent development includes postexposure prevention and EVD cure. As knowledge of Ebola virus virology and pathogenesis grows, it is likely that new therapeutic tools will be developed. Deployment of novel Ebola therapies will require unprecedented cooperation as well as investment to ensure that therapeutic tools become available to populations at greatest risk for EVD and its complications. In this article, we

  4. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)-Virus Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    At least six viruses have been found in highbush blueberry plantings in the Pacific Northwest: Blueberry mosaic virus, Blueberry red ringspot virus, Blueberry scorch virus, Blueberry shock virus, Tobacco ringspot virus, and Tomato ringspot virus. Six other virus and virus-like diseases of highbush b...

  5. Viruses of asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoli, Laura; Tiberini, Antonio; Vetten, Heinrich-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The current knowledge on viruses infecting asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is reviewed. Over half a century, nine virus species belonging to the genera Ilarvirus, Cucumovirus, Nepovirus, Tobamovirus, Potexvirus, and Potyvirus have been found in this crop. The potyvirus Asparagus virus 1 (AV1) and the ilarvirus Asparagus virus 2 (AV2) are widespread and negatively affect the economic life of asparagus crops reducing yield and increasing the susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stress. The main properties and epidemiology of AV1 and AV2 as well as diagnostic techniques for their detection and identification are described. Minor viruses and control are briefly outlined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding Ebola Virus Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Judson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus.

  7. Real-time dynamic imaging of virus distribution in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean E Hofherr

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of viruses and gene therapy vectors is difficult to assess in a living organism. For instance, trafficking in murine models can usually only be assessed after sacrificing the animal for tissue sectioning or extraction. These assays are laborious requiring whole animal sectioning to ascertain tissue localization. They also obviate the ability to perform longitudinal or kinetic studies in one animal. To track viruses after systemic infection, we have labeled adenoviruses with a near-infrared (NIR fluorophore and imaged these after intravenous injection in mice. Imaging was able to track and quantitate virus particles entering the jugular vein simultaneous with injection, appearing in the heart within 500 milliseconds, distributing in the bloodstream and throughout the animal within 7 seconds, and that the bulk of virus distribution was essentially complete within 3 minutes. These data provide the first in vivo real-time tracking of the rapid initial events of systemic virus infection.

  8. Protoplasts and plant viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakishi, H.; Lesney, M.S.; Carlson, P.

    1984-01-01

    The use of protoplasts in the study of plant viruses has attracted considerable attention since its inception in the late 1960s. This article is an attempt to assess the current status of protoplasts (primarily) and all cell cultures (in some instances) in studies of virus infection, virus replication, cytopathology, cross-protection, virus resistance, and the use of in vitro methods and genetic engineering to recover virus-resistant plants. These areas of study proved difficult to do entirely with whole plants or plant parts. However, because protoplasts could be synchronously infected with virus, they provided a valuable alternative means of following biochemical and cytological events in relation to the virus growth cycle in a more precise manner than previously possible

  9. Sofosbuvir treatment and hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yasui, Shin; Arai, Makoto; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious problem worldwide. The use of interferon-based therapy has made HCV eradication challenging. The recent appearance of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) has changed HCV therapy. Combining the use of DAAs with peginterferon and ribavirin has improved treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the combination of different orally administered DAAs has enabled interferon-free therapy with much higher efficacy and safety. In particular, sofosbuvir, a nucleotide-based NS5B inhibitor, prevents HCV RNA synthesis by acting as a “chain terminator”. Treatment with sofosbuvir has attained an extremely high rate of sustained virologic response. The current review summarizes the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir therapy. PMID:26839641

  10. Activity of andrographolide against chikungunya virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Phitchayapak Wintachai; Parveen Kaur; Regina Ching Hua Lee; Suwipa Ramphan; Atichat Kuadkitkan; Nitwara Wikan; Sukathida Ubol; Sittiruk Roytrakul; Justin Jang Hann Chu; Duncan R. Smith

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has recently engendered large epidemics around the world. There is no specific antiviral for treatment of patients infected with CHIKV, and development of compounds with significant anti-CHIKV activity that can be further developed to a practical therapy is urgently required. Andrographolide is derived from Andrographis paniculata, a herb traditionally used to treat a number of conditions including infections. This stud...

  11. Prospects for Foamy Viral Vector Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Nalla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell gene therapy approaches for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection have been explored in clinical trials and several anti-HIV genes delivered by retroviral vectors were shown to block HIV replication. However, gammaretroviral and lentiviral based retroviral vectors have limitations for delivery of anti-HIV genes into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC. Foamy virus vectors have several advantages including efficient delivery of transgenes into HSC in large animal models, and a potentially safer integration profile. This review focuses on novel anti-HIV transgenes and the potential of foamy virus vectors for HSC gene therapy of HIV.

  12. Zika Virus: Medical Countermeasure Development Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert W.; Homan, Jane; Callahan, Michael V.; Glasspool-Malone, Jill; Damodaran, Lambodhar; Schneider, Adriano De Bernardi; Zimler, Rebecca; Talton, James; Cobb, Ronald R.; Ruzic, Ivan; Smith-Gagen, Julie; Janies, Daniel; Wilson, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reports of high rates of primary microcephaly and Guillain–Barré syndrome associated with Zika virus infection in French Polynesia and Brazil have raised concerns that the virus circulating in these regions is a rapidly developing neuropathic, teratogenic, emerging infectious public health threat. There are no licensed medical countermeasures (vaccines, therapies or preventive drugs) available for Zika virus infection and disease. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) predicts that Zika virus will continue to spread and eventually reach all countries and territories in the Americas with endemic Aedes mosquitoes. This paper reviews the status of the Zika virus outbreak, including medical countermeasure options, with a focus on how the epidemiology, insect vectors, neuropathology, virology and immunology inform options and strategies available for medical countermeasure development and deployment. Methods Multiple information sources were employed to support the review. These included publically available literature, patents, official communications, English and Lusophone lay press. Online surveys were distributed to physicians in the US, Mexico and Argentina and responses analyzed. Computational epitope analysis as well as infectious disease outbreak modeling and forecasting were implemented. Field observations in Brazil were compiled and interviews conducted with public health officials. PMID:26934531

  13. Zika Virus: Medical Countermeasure Development Challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Malone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reports of high rates of primary microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with Zika virus infection in French Polynesia and Brazil have raised concerns that the virus circulating in these regions is a rapidly developing neuropathic, teratogenic, emerging infectious public health threat. There are no licensed medical countermeasures (vaccines, therapies or preventive drugs available for Zika virus infection and disease. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO predicts that Zika virus will continue to spread and eventually reach all countries and territories in the Americas with endemic Aedes mosquitoes. This paper reviews the status of the Zika virus outbreak, including medical countermeasure options, with a focus on how the epidemiology, insect vectors, neuropathology, virology and immunology inform options and strategies available for medical countermeasure development and deployment.Multiple information sources were employed to support the review. These included publically available literature, patents, official communications, English and Lusophone lay press. Online surveys were distributed to physicians in the US, Mexico and Argentina and responses analyzed. Computational epitope analysis as well as infectious disease outbreak modeling and forecasting were implemented. Field observations in Brazil were compiled and interviews conducted with public health officials.

  14. Characterization of the virus-cell interactions by HIV-1 subtype C variants from an antiretroviral therapy-naïve subject with baseline resistance to the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Martin Roelsgaard

    The CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc (MVC) exerts its antiviral activity by binding to- and altering the conformation of the CCR5 extracellular loops such that HIV-1 gp120 no longer recognizes CCR5. Viruses that have become resistant to MVC through long-term in vitro culture, or from treatment failure...... in vivo, can use the MVCbound form of CCR5 for HIV-1 entry via adaptive alterations in gp120. Partial baseline resistance to another CCR5 inhibitor through this mechanism, AD101, has been noted recently in one subject (1). Here, we identified and characterized envelope (Env) clones with baseline...

  15. Early transduction produces highly functional chimeric antigen receptor-modified virus-specific T-cells with central memory markers: a Production Assistant for Cell Therapy (PACT) translational application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiali; Huye, Leslie E; Lapteva, Natalia; Mamonkin, Maksim; Hiregange, Manasa; Ballard, Brandon; Dakhova, Olga; Raghavan, Darshana; Durett, April G; Perna, Serena K; Omer, Bilal; Rollins, Lisa A; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F; Dotti, Gianpietro; Gee, Adrian P; Brenner, Malcolm K; Myers, Douglas G; Rooney, Cliona M

    2015-01-01

    Virus-specific T-cells (VSTs) proliferate exponentially after adoptive transfer into hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, eliminate virus infections, then persist and provide long-term protection from viral disease. If VSTs behaved similarly when modified with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), they should have potent anti-tumor activity. This theory was evaluated by Cruz et al. in a previous clinical trial with CD19.CAR-modified VSTs, but there was little apparent expansion of these cells in patients. In that study, VSTs were gene-modified on day 19 of culture and we hypothesized that by this time, sufficient T-cell differentiation may have occurred to limit the subsequent proliferative capacity of the transduced T-cells. To facilitate the clinical testing of this hypothesis in a project supported by the NHLBI-PACT mechanism, we developed and optimized a good manufacturing practices (GMP) compliant method for the early transduction of VSTs directed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Adenovirus (AdV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) using a CAR directed to the tumor-associated antigen disialoganglioside (GD2). Ad-CMVpp65-transduced EBV-LCLs effectively stimulated VSTs directed to all three viruses (triVSTs). Transduction efficiency on day three was increased in the presence of cytokines and high-speed centrifugation of retroviral supernatant onto retronectin-coated plates, so that under optimal conditions up to 88% of tetramer-positive VSTs expressed the GD2.CAR. The average transduction efficiency of early-and late transduced VSTs was 55 ± 4% and 22 ± 5% respectively, and early-transduced VSTs maintained higher frequencies of T cells with central memory or intermediate memory phenotypes. Early-transduced VSTs also had higher proliferative capacity and produced higher levels of TH1 cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, MIP-1β and other cytokines in vitro. We developed a rapid and GMP compliant method for the early transduction of

  16. Ebola virus disease: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Rajak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease is one of the most deadly ailments known to mankind due to its high mortality rate (up to 90% accompanying with the disease. Ebola haemorrhagic fever (EHF is an infectious disease of animal that can be transmitted to both human and non-human primates. The first epidemic of EHF occurred in 1976 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The incubation period of ebola is less than 21 days. Ebola virus infections are depicted by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that leads to damage of the vascular, coagulation and immune systems, causing multi-organ failure and shock. Five genetically distinct members of the Filoviridae family responsible for EHF are as follows: Zaire ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, Côte d’Ivoire ebolavirus, Bundibugyo ebolavirus and Reston ebolavirus. The ongoing 2014 West Africa ebola epidemic has been considered as the most serious panic in the medical field with respect to both the number of human cases and death toll. The natural host for ebola virus is unknown, thus it is not possible to carry out programs to regulate or abolish virus from transmission to people. The ebola virus infection provides little chance to develop acquired immunity causing rapid progression of the disease. It is pertinent to mention that at present, there is no antiviral therapy or vaccine that is helpful against ebola virus infection in humans. The impediment of EHF necessitates much better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease, particularly the role of wildlife, as well as bats, in the spread of ebola virus to humans.

  17. [The great virus comeback].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Viruses have been considered for a long time as by-products of biological evolution. This view is changing now as a result of several recent discoveries. Viral ecologists have shown that viral particles are the most abundant biological entities on our planet, whereas metagenomic analyses have revealed an unexpected abundance and diversity of viral genes in the biosphere. Comparative genomics have highlighted the uniqueness of viral sequences, in contradiction with the traditional view of viruses as pickpockets of cellular genes. On the contrary, cellular genomes, especially eukaryotic ones, turned out to be full of genes derived from viruses or related elements (plasmids, transposons, retroelements and so on). The discovery of unusual viruses infecting archaea has shown that the viral world is much more diverse than previously thought, ruining the traditional dichotomy between bacteriophages and viruses. Finally, the discovery of giant viruses has blurred the traditional image of viruses as small entities. Furthermore, essential clues on virus history have been obtained in the last ten years. In particular, structural analyses of capsid proteins have uncovered deeply rooted homologies between viruses infecting different cellular domains, suggesting that viruses originated before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). These studies have shown that several lineages of viruses originated independently, i.e., viruses are polyphyletic. From the time of LUCA, viruses have coevolved with their hosts, and viral lineages can be viewed as lianas wrapping around the trunk, branches and leaves of the tree of life. Although viruses are very diverse, with genomes encoding from one to more than one thousand proteins, they can all be simply defined as organisms producing virions. Virions themselves can be defined as infectious particles made of at least one protein associated with the viral nucleic acid, endowed with the capability to protect the viral genome and ensure its

  18. Postmortem stability of Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Joseph; Bushmaker, Trenton; Fischer, Robert; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Judson, Seth; Munster, Vincent J

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has highlighted questions regarding stability of the virus and detection of RNA from corpses. We used Ebola virus-infected macaques to model humans who died of Ebola virus disease. Viable virus was isolated <7 days posteuthanasia; viral RNA was detectable for 10 weeks.

  19. Feminist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  20. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  1. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  2. Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Laurence; Thill, Chloé; Pougnet, Richard; Auvinet, Henri; Giacardi, Christophe; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    A 21-year old woman from New-Caledonia had 40 ̊C fever with vomiting, arthralgia, myalgia, and measles-like rash. Etiological analyses showed primary infection with Zika virus. Because of severe clinical presentation, she was hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the Brest military Hospital. Zika virus is mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. If they settle in Metropolitan France, Zika virus might also spread there.

  3. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  4. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) What is Ebola Virus Disease? ...

  5. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) What is Ebola Virus Disease? ...

  6. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) What is Ebola Virus Disease? ...

  7. Yeast for virus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Richard Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) are two popular model organisms for virus research. They are natural hosts for viruses as they carry their own indigenous viruses. Both yeasts have been used for studies of plant, animal and human viruses. Many positive sense (+) RNA viruses and some DNA viruses replicate with various levels in yeasts, thus allowing study of those viral activities during viral life cycle. Yeasts are single cell eukaryotic organisms. Hence, many of the fundamental cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation or programed cell death are highly conserved from yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Therefore, they are particularly suited to study the impact of those viral activities on related cellular activities during virus-host interactions. Yeasts present many unique advantages in virus research over high eukaryotes. Yeast cells are easy to maintain in the laboratory with relative short doubling time. They are non-biohazardous, genetically amendable with small genomes that permit genome-wide analysis of virologic and cellular functions. In this review, similarities and differences of these two yeasts are described. Studies of virologic activities such as viral translation, viral replication and genome-wide study of virus-cell interactions in yeasts are highlighted. Impacts of viral proteins on basic cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation and programed cell death are discussed. Potential applications of using yeasts as hosts to carry out functional analysis of small viral genome and to develop high throughput drug screening platform for the discovery of antiviral drugs are presented. PMID:29082230

  8. Viruses infecting marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, Isabelle; Corbeil, Serge; Morga, Benjamin; Renault, Tristan

    2017-07-01

    Although a wide range of viruses have been reported in marine molluscs, most of these reports rely on ultrastructural examination and few of these viruses have been fully characterized. The lack of marine mollusc cell lines restricts virus isolation capacities and subsequent characterization works. Our current knowledge is mostly restricted to viruses affecting farmed species such as oysters Crassostrea gigas, abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta or the scallop Chlamys farreri. Molecular approaches which are needed to identify virus affiliation have been carried out for a small number of viruses, most of them belonging to the Herpesviridae and birnaviridae families. These last years, the use of New Generation Sequencing approach has allowed increasing the number of sequenced viral genomes and has improved our capacity to investigate the diversity of viruses infecting marine molluscs. This new information has in turn allowed designing more efficient diagnostic tools. Moreover, the development of experimental infection protocols has answered some questions regarding the pathogenesis of these viruses and their interactions with their hosts. Control and management of viral diseases in molluscs mostly involve active surveillance, implementation of effective bio security measures and development of breeding programs. However factors triggering pathogen development and the life cycle and status of the viruses outside their mollusc hosts still need further investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene therapy for ocular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Melissa M; Tuo, Jingsheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2011-05-01

    The eye is an easily accessible, highly compartmentalised and immune-privileged organ that offers unique advantages as a gene therapy target. Significant advancements have been made in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of ocular diseases, and gene replacement and gene silencing have been implicated as potentially efficacious therapies. Recent improvements have been made in the safety and specificity of vector-based ocular gene transfer methods. Proof-of-concept for vector-based gene therapies has also been established in several experimental models of human ocular diseases. After nearly two decades of ocular gene therapy research, preliminary successes are now being reported in phase 1 clinical trials for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis. This review describes current developments and future prospects for ocular gene therapy. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the performance and regulation of recombinant adeno-associated virus- and lentivirus-mediated ocular gene transfer. Gene therapy prospects have advanced for a variety of retinal disorders, including retinitis pigmentosa, retinoschisis, Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration. Advances have also been made using experimental models for non-retinal diseases, such as uveitis and glaucoma. These methodological advancements are critical for the implementation of additional gene-based therapies for human ocular diseases in the near future.

  10. Characterization of Chemokine Receptor Utilization of Viruses in the Latent Reservoir for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Theodore; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Blankson, Joel; Finzi, Diana; Chadwick, Karen; Margolick, Joseph B.; Buck, Christopher; Siliciano, Janet D.; Doms, Robert W.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2000-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4+ T cells provide a long-term reservoir for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and are likely to represent the major barrier to virus eradication in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms by which viruses enter the latent reservoir and the nature of the chemokine receptors involved have not been determined. To evaluate the phenotype of the virus in this compartment with respect to chemokine receptor utilization, full-length HIV-1 env genes were cloned from latently infected cells and assayed functionally. We demonstrate that the majority of the viruses in the latent reservoir utilize CCR5 during entry, although utilization of several other receptors, including CXCR4, was observed. No alternative coreceptors were shown to be involved in a systematic fashion. Although R5 viruses are present in the latent reservoir, CCR5 was not expressed at high levels on resting CD4+ T cells. To understand the mechanism by which R5 viruses enter latent reservoir, the ability of an R5 virus, HIV-1 Ba-L, to infect highly purified resting CD4+ T lymphocytes from uninfected donors was evaluated. Entry of Ba-L could be observed when virus was applied at a multiplicity approaching 1. However, infection was limited to a subset of cells expressing low levels of CCR5 and markers of immunologic memory. Naive cells could not be infected by an R5 virus even when challenged with a large inoculum. Direct cell fractionation studies showed that latent virus is present predominantly in resting memory cells but also at lower levels in resting naive cells. Taken together, these findings provide support for the hypothesis that the direct infection of naive T cells is not the major mechanism by which the latent infection of resting T cells is established. PMID:10933689

  11. Tumor regression induced by intratumor therapy with a disabled infectious single cycle (DISC) herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector, DISC/HSV/murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, correlates with antigen-specific adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Selman A; Lynam, June; McLean, Cornelia S; Entwisle, Claire; Loudon, Peter; Rojas, José M; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Li, Geng; Mian, Shahid; Rees, Robert C

    2002-04-01

    Direct intratumor injection of a disabled infectious single cycle HSV-2 virus encoding the murine GM-CSF gene (DISC/mGM-CSF) into established murine colon carcinoma CT26 tumors induced a significant delay in tumor growth and complete tumor regression in up to 70% of animals. Pre-existing immunity to HSV did not reduce the therapeutic efficacy of DISC/mGM-CSF, and, when administered in combination with syngeneic dendritic cells, further decreased tumor growth and increased the incidence of complete tumor regression. Direct intratumor injection of DISC/mGM-CSF also inhibited the growth of CT26 tumor cells implanted on the contralateral flank or seeded into the lungs following i.v. injection of tumor cells (experimental lung metastasis). Proliferation of splenocytes in response to Con A was impaired in progressor and tumor-bearer, but not regressor, mice. A potent tumor-specific CTL response was generated from splenocytes of all mice with regressing, but not progressing tumors following in vitro peptide stimulation; this response was specific for the gp70 AH-1 peptide SPSYVYHQF and correlated with IFN-gamma, but not IL-4 cytokine production. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells from regressor splenocytes before in vitro stimulation with the relevant peptide abolished their cytolytic activity, while depletion of CD4(+) T cells only partially inhibited CTL generation. Tumor regression induced by DISC/mGM-CSF virus immunotherapy provides a unique model for evaluating the immune mechanism(s) involved in tumor rejection, upon which tumor immunotherapy regimes may be based.

  12. Oncolytic viral therapy: targeting cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith TT

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tyrel T Smith,1 Justin C Roth,1 Gregory K Friedman,1 G Yancey Gillespie2 1Department of Pediatrics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are defined as rare populations of tumor-initiating cancer cells that are capable of both self-renewal and differentiation. Extensive research is currently underway to develop therapeutics that target CSCs for cancer therapy, due to their critical role in tumorigenesis, as well as their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. To this end, oncolytic viruses targeting unique CSC markers, signaling pathways, or the pro-tumor CSC niche offer promising potential as CSCs-destroying agents/therapeutics. We provide a summary of existing knowledge on the biology of CSCs, including their markers and their niche thought to comprise the tumor microenvironment, and then we provide a critical analysis of the potential for targeting CSCs with oncolytic viruses, including herpes simplex virus-1, adenovirus, measles virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. Specifically, we review current literature regarding first-generation oncolytic viruses with their innate ability to replicate in CSCs, as well as second-generation viruses engineered to enhance the oncolytic effect and CSC-targeting through transgene expression. Keywords: oncolytic virotherapy, cancer stem cell niche

  13. A literature review on cardiovascular risk in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: implications for clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansueto Gomes Neto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In recent years, there has been growing concern about an increasing rate of cardiovascular diseases in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, which could be associated with side effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy. It is likely that the metabolic disorders related to anti-human immunodeficiency virus treatment will eventually translate into a increased cardiovascular risk in patients submitted to such regimens. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than human immunodeficiency virus infected patients not receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, or the general population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a computer-based search in representative databases, and also performed manual tracking of citations in selected articles. RESULT: The available evidence suggests an excess risk of cardiovascular events in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons compared to non-human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and morphological signs of cardiovascular diseases. Some evidence suggested that human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens are at increased risk of dyslipidemia, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction, particularly if the highly active antiretroviral therapy regimen contains a protease inhibitor. CONCLUSION: Physicians must weigh the cardiovascular risk against potential benefits when prescribing highly active antiretroviral therapy. Careful cardiac screening is warranted for patients who are being evaluated for, or who are receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens, particularly for those with known underlying cardiovascular risk

  14. Effective lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus by three nucleoside analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Matthew D; Lauring, Adam S

    2015-04-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and low mutational tolerance of many RNA viruses. This approach uses mutagenic drugs to increase viral mutation rates and burden viral populations with mutations that reduce the number of infectious progeny. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis as a strategy against influenza virus using three nucleoside analogs, ribavirin, 5-azacytidine, and 5-fluorouracil. All three drugs were active against a panel of seasonal H3N2 and laboratory-adapted H1N1 strains. We found that each drug increased the frequency of mutations in influenza virus populations and decreased the virus' specific infectivity, indicating a mutagenic mode of action. We were able to drive viral populations to extinction by passaging influenza virus in the presence of each drug, indicating that complete lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus populations can be achieved when a sufficient mutational burden is applied. Population-wide resistance to these mutagenic agents did not arise after serial passage of influenza virus populations in sublethal concentrations of drug. Sequencing of these drug-passaged viral populations revealed genome-wide accumulation of mutations at low frequency. The replicative capacity of drug-passaged populations was reduced at higher multiplicities of infection, suggesting the presence of defective interfering particles and a possible barrier to the evolution of resistance. Together, our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be a particularly effective therapeutic approach with a high genetic barrier to resistance for influenza virus. Influenza virus is an RNA virus that causes significant morbidity and mortality during annual epidemics. Novel therapies for RNA viruses are needed due to the ease with which these viruses evolve resistance to existing therapeutics. Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and the low

  15. Combination treatment with hepatitis C virus protease and NS5A inhibitors is effective against recombinant genotype 1a, 2a, and 3a viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Jensen, Sanne B; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    With the development of directly acting antivirals, hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy entered a new era. However, rapid selection of resistance mutations necessitates combination therapy. To study combination therapy in infectious culture systems, we aimed at developing HCV semi-full-length (semi...... to single-drug treatment, combination treatment with relatively low concentrations of asunaprevir and daclatasvir suppressed infection with all five recombinants. Escaped viruses primarily had substitutions at amino acids in the NS3 protease and NS5A domain I reported to be genotype 1 resistance mutations...

  16. Pepino mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is a relatively new plant virus that has become a signifi cant agronomical problem in a relatively short period of time. It is a member of the genus Potexvirus within the family Flexiviridae and is readily mechanically transmissible. It is capable of infecting tomato

  17. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  18. Hepatitis viruses overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis is major cause of morbidity or mortality worldwide, particularly in the developing world. The major causes of infective hepatitis are hepatitis viruses. A, B, C, D or E. In the acute phase, there are no clinical features that can reliably differentiate between these viruses. Infection may be asymptomatic or can present as.

  19. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  20. Tobacco ringspot virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), and its vector, the dagger nematodes (Xiphinema americanum and related species) are widely distributed throughout the world. Cucumber, melon, and watermelon are particularly affected by TRSV. Symptoms can vary with plant age, the strain of the virus, and environment...

  1. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.

  2. Viruses in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Ellen

    2011-09-21

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself.

  3. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of small enveloped viruses with RNA genomes of 9000-13 000 bases. Most infect mammals and birds. Many flaviviruses are host-specific and pathogenic, such as hepatitis C virus in the genus Hepacivirus. The majority of known members in the genus Flavivirus are arthropod...

  4. ICTV virus taxonomy profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purdy, Michael A.; Harrison, Tim J.; Jameel, S.; Meng, X.J.; Okamoto, H.; Poel, Van Der W.H.M.; Smith, Donald B.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Davison, Andrew J.; Siddell, Stuart G.; Simmonds, Peter; Adams, Michael J.; Smith, Donald B.; Orton, Richard J.; Knowles, Nick J.

    2017-01-01

    The family Hepeviridae includes enterically transmitted small non-enveloped positive-sense RNA viruses. It includes the genera Piscihepevirus, whose members infect fish, and Orthohepevirus, whose members infect mammals and birds. Members of the genus Orthohepevirus include hepatitis E virus, which

  5. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili,, David; Basta, Tamara; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting members of Archaea, the third domain of life, constitute an integral, yet unique part of the virosphere. Many of these viruses, specifically the species that infect hyperthermophilic hosts, display morphotypes – for example, bottle shaped, spindle shaped, droplet shaped, coil sh...

  6. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  7. [Genetic therapy in oncology: ethical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, L M; Fazio, V M

    2001-01-01

    The more advanced oncologic therapies are directing toward new frontiers, on account of the remarkable undesirable effects of chemio- and radio-therapies. This new therapeutic experiences are of type biological (vaccines), or genic (substitution again genes with shutters meaning-tumoral). This therapies involve, to be effected, some ethical shrewdnesses: choice of the patient, the engineering modality of the genes, the transfer of the genes in cells of the exclusively somatic line, the elimination of the pathogenic risk of the vector virus, the obligatory use of sterile rooms, the attention to the administration of the drug, a legal issue of the judgment of notoriety.

  8. Strategy as a Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obed Madsen, Søren

    This article is based on virus theory (Røvik, 2007, 2011), and proposes to develop a framework that defines technology as a virus that penetrates the organism of an organization. The framework develops a new vocabulary, which can help in analyzing technologies and their negative effects on actors...... and organizations. In this paper, the virus theory is used to analyze a strategy process in an organization as an example of a technology. It shows how the strategy over time creates a memory loss, where the managers who are exposed to the virus forget their critique of the new strategy concept. The article also...... shows how resistant can be understood as being immune to a virus, since the strategy concepts bears resemblance to a former strategy concept. The article also argues that there should be more focus on the negative impacts of management tool and especially how organizations and managers are dealing...

  9. [Current dilemmas on the transmission of hepatitis E virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, E de; Peters, A.M.; Rahamat-Langendoen, J.C.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are especially at risk for developing chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, which may result in progressive liver disease and cirrhosis. In addition, treatment of chronic HEV infection in these patients often includes dose reduction of immunosuppressive therapy and

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 diversity has an impact on vaccine efficacy and drug resistance. It is important to know the circulating genetic variants and associated drug-resistance mutations in the context of scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nigeria. The objective of this study was to ...

  11. Reproduction and fertility in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, E.; Prins, J. M.; Jurriaans, S.; Boer, K.; Reiss, P.; Repping, S.; van der Veen, F.

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) affects mostly men and women in their reproductive years. For those who have access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the course of HIV-1 infection has shifted from a lethal to a chronic disease. As a result of this, many patients with HIV-1

  12. [EBOLA HEMORRHAGIC FEVER: DIAGNOSTICS, ETIOTROPIC AND PATHOGENETIC THERAPY, PREVENTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, K V; Zakharenko, S M; Kovalenko, A N; Semenov, A V; Fisun, A Ya

    2015-01-01

    The data on diagnostics, etiotropic and pathogenetic therapy, prevention of Ebola hemorrhagic fever are presented including diagnostic algorithms for different clinical situations. Fundamentals of pathogenetic therapy are described. Various groups of medications used for antiviral therapy of conditions caused by Ebola virus are characterized. Experimental drugs at different stages of clinical studies are considered along with candidate vaccines being developed for the prevention of the disease.

  13. Ficus septica plant extracts for treating Dengue virus in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Chieh Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus types 1-4 (DENV-1-4 are positive-strand RNA viruses with an envelope that belongs to the Flaviviridae. DENV infection threatens human health worldwide. However, other than supportive treatments, no specific therapy is available for the infection. In order to discover novel medicine against DENV, we tested 59 crude extracts, without cytotoxicity, from 23 plants in vitro; immunofluorescence assay revealed that the methanol extracts of fruit, heartwood, leaves and stem from Ficus septica Burm. f. had a promising anti-DENV-1 and DENV-2 effect. However, infection with the non-envelope picornavirus, Aichi virus, was not inhibited by treatment with F. septica extracts. F. septica may be a candidate antiviral drug against an enveloped virus such as DENV.

  14. Prolonged influenza virus shedding and emergence of antiviral resistance in immunocompromised patients and ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhard van der Vries

    Full Text Available Immunocompromised individuals tend to suffer from influenza longer with more serious complications than otherwise healthy patients. Little is known about the impact of prolonged infection and the efficacy of antiviral therapy in these patients. Among all 189 influenza A virus infected immunocompromised patients admitted to ErasmusMC, 71 were hospitalized, since the start of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. We identified 11 (15% cases with prolonged 2009 pandemic virus replication (longer than 14 days, despite antiviral therapy. In 5 out of these 11 (45% cases oseltamivir resistant H275Y viruses emerged. Given the inherent difficulties in studying antiviral efficacy in immunocompromised patients, we have infected immunocompromised ferrets with either wild-type, or oseltamivir-resistant (H275Y 2009 pandemic virus. All ferrets showed prolonged virus shedding. In wild-type virus infected animals treated with oseltamivir, H275Y resistant variants emerged within a week after infection. Unexpectedly, oseltamivir therapy still proved to be partially protective in animals infected with resistant virus. Immunocompromised ferrets offer an attractive alternative to study efficacy of novel antiviral therapies.

  15. Hepatitis B and C virus co-infections in human immunodeficiency virus positive North Indian patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swati; Singh, Sarman

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis B and C virus infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients at a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. METHODS: Serum samples from 451 HIV positive patients were analyzed for HBsAg and HCV antibodies during three years (Jan 2003-Dec 2005). The control group comprised of apparently healthy bone-marrow and renal donors. RESULTS: The study population comprised essentially of heterosexually transmitted HIV infection. The prevalence rate of HBsAg in this population was 5.3% as compared to 1.4% in apparently healthy donors (P < 0.001). Though prevalence of HCV co-infection (2.43%) was lower than HBV in this group of HIV positive patients, the prevalence was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than controls (0.7%). Triple infection of HIV, HBV and HCV was not detected in any patient. CONCLUSION: Our study shows a significantly high prevalence of hepatitis virus infections in HIV infected patients. Hepatitis viruses in HIV may lead to faster progression to liver cirrhosis and a higher risk of antiretroviral therapy induced hepatotoxicity. Therefore, it would be advisable to detect hepatitis virus co-infections in these patients at the earliest. PMID:17106941

  16. Improving the selective cancer killing ability of ZnO nanoparticles using Fe doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Aaron; Wingett, Denise G; Rasmussen, John W; Layne, Janet; Johnson, Lydia; Tenne, Dmitri A; Zhang, Jianhui; Hanna, Charles B; Punnoose, Alex

    2012-06-01

    This work reports a new method to improve our recent demonstration of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) selectively killing certain human cancer cells, achieved by incorporating Fe ions into the NPs. Thoroughly characterized cationic ZnO NPs (∼6 nm) doped with Fe ions (Zn(1-x )Fe (x) O, x = 0-0.15) were used in this work, applied at a concentration of 24 μg/ml. Cytotoxicity studies using flow cytometry on Jurkat leukemic cancer cells show cell viability drops from about 43% for undoped ZnO NPs to 15% for ZnO NPs doped with 7.5% Fe. However, the trend reverses and cell viability increases with higher Fe concentrations. The non-immortalized human T cells are markedly more resistant to Fe-doped ZnO NPs than cancerous T cells, confirming that Fe-doped samples still maintain selective toxicity to cancer cells. Pure iron oxide samples displayed no appreciable toxicity. Reactive oxygen species generated with NP introduction to cells increased with increasing Fe up to 7.5% and decreased for >7.5% doping.

  17. Comparison of hepatitis B virus core-related antigen and hepatitis B surface antigen for predicting HBeAg seroconversion in chronic hepatitis B patients with pegylated interferon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng-Lan; Liao, Juan; Wei, Bing; Zhang, Dong-Mei; He, Ming; Tao, Ming-Chuan; Chen, En-Qiang; Tang, Hong

    2018-02-20

    Recent studies revealed that both quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) and hepatitis B core-related antigen (qHBcrAg) could serve as a good marker for predicting treatment response and indirectly reflecting intrahepatic cccDNA levels. This study aimed to compare the value of qHBsAg and qHBcrAg in predicting HBeAg seroconversion among patients undergoing PEG-IFN therapy. A total of 31 HBeAg-positive patients, who underwent PEG-IFN therapy for 12 months and follow-up for six months were retrospectively included in this study. The serum qHBsAg level was measured using Elecsys® HBsAg II Quant Assay and serum qHBcrAg level was measured using chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay. During the 12-month treatment, the absolute levels of serum qHBsAg and qHBcrAg were both lower in patients with HBeAg seroconversion as compared to patients without HBeAg seroconversion, but only the difference in qHBcrAg was significant. During the 6-month follow-up period, both qHBsAg and qHBcrAg levels were rebounded significantly among patients without HBeAg seroconversion. Among patients with HBeAg seroconversion, no sustained significant decline of qHBsAg was observed, but serum qHBcrAg levels continued to decline significantly. The ROC curves analysis showed that both absolute qHBcrAg level and the extent of qHBcrAg decline at month 1 had better performance for the prediction of HBeAg seroconversion at month 6 after treatment, as compared to that of qHBsAg. Early on-treatment qHBcrAg may be a good biomarker for predicting off-treatment HBeAg seroconversion in patients receiving PEG-IFN therapy.

  18. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J. Breitbach

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OV are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a “one-size fits all” approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms.

  19. Glutamine supplementation suppresses herpes simplex virus reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Hoshino, Yo; Dowdell, Kennichi; Bosch-Marce, Marta; Myers, Timothy G; Sarmiento, Mayra; Pesnicak, Lesley; Krause, Philip R; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-06-30

    Chronic viral infections are difficult to treat, and new approaches are needed, particularly those aimed at reducing reactivation by enhancing immune responses. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) establishes latency and reactivates frequently, and breakthrough reactivation can occur despite suppressive antiviral therapy. Virus-specific T cells are important to control HSV, and proliferation of activated T cells requires increased metabolism of glutamine. Here, we found that supplementation with oral glutamine reduced virus reactivation in latently HSV-1-infected mice and HSV-2-infected guinea pigs. Transcriptome analysis of trigeminal ganglia from latently HSV-1-infected, glutamine-treated WT mice showed upregulation of several IFN-γ-inducible genes. In contrast to WT mice, supplemental glutamine was ineffective in reducing the rate of HSV-1 reactivation in latently HSV-1-infected IFN-γ-KO mice. Mice treated with glutamine also had higher numbers of HSV-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells in latently infected ganglia. Thus, glutamine may enhance the IFN-γ-associated immune response and reduce the rate of reactivation of latent virus infection.

  20. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal and gastric cancer, bladder cancer and other types of malignant tumors, and palliative care (including tumor pleuritis, gastrointestinal tumors and others. Photodynamic therapy delivers results which are not available for other methods of cancer therapy. Thus, photodynamic therapy allows to avoid gross scars (that is very important, for example, in gynecology for treatment of patients of reproductive age with cervical and vulvar cancer, delivers good cosmetic effect for skin tumors, allows minimal trauma for intact tissue surrounding tumor. Photodynamic therapy is also used in other fields of medicine, such as otorhinolaryngology, dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, for treatment of papilloma virus infection and purulent wounds as antibacterial therapy.

  1. Efficacy and safety of direct-acting antivirals-based antiviral therapies for hepatitis C virus patients with stage 4-5 chronic kidney disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Qu, Yundong; Guo, Ying; Wang, Yan; Wang, Lei

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of direct-acting antivirals (DAA)-based antiviral therapies for HCV patients with stage 4-5 chronic kidney disease. We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and CENTRAL on the Cochrane Library without time and language limitations. The search strategy used was "(End stage renal disease OR chronic kidney failure OR severe renal impairment OR chronic kidney disease OR dialysis) AND (sofosbuvir OR simeprevir OR grazoprevir OR elbasvir OR ombitasvir OR paritaprevir OR ritonavir OR dasabuvir OR daclatasvir OR asuparevir OR direct-acting antiviral OR DAA)". Sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after the end of treatment (SVR12), adverse events (AEs) and/or serious adverse events (SAEs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were pooled. Eleven studies, comprising a total of 264 patients were included for our meta-analysis. The pooled SVR12 rate were 93.2% (95% CI 89.9%-95.9%, I 2 =0.0%), 89.4% (95% CI 82.0%-95.0%, I 2 =0.0%) and 94.7% (95% CI 91.0%-97.5%, I 2 =0.0%) in total population, patients with sofosbuvir-based therapies and patients with non-sofosbuvir-based therapies respectively. For HCV genotype 1 patients, the pooled SVR12 rate was 93.1% (95% CI 88.3%-96.7%, I 2 =20.0%). The pooled incidence of SAEs was 12.1% (95% CI 6.2%-19.7%, I 2 =55.0%). The pooled discontinuation rate because of AEs or SAEs in our meta-analysis was 2.2% (95% CI 0.8%-4.4%, I 2 =0.0%). DAA-based antiviral therapies are effective and well-tolerated for HCV patients with stage 4-5 chronic kidney disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Vaccinia virus as a subhelper for AAV replication and packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R Moore

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated virus (AAV has been widely used as a gene therapy vector to treat a variety of disorders. While these vectors are increasingly popular and successful in the clinic, there is still much to learn about the viruses. Understanding the biology of these viruses is essential in engineering better vectors and generating vectors more efficiently for large-scale use. AAV requires a helper for production and replication making this aspect of the viral life cycle crucial. Vaccinia virus (VV has been widely cited as a helper virus for AAV. However, to date, there are no detailed analyses of its helper function. Here, the helper role of VV was studied in detail. In contrast to common belief, we demonstrated that VV was not a sufficient helper virus for AAV replication. Vaccinia failed to produce rAAV and activate AAV promoters. While this virus could not support rAAV production, Vaccinia could initiate AAV replication and packaging when AAV promoter activation is not necessary. This activity is due to the ability of Vaccinia-driven Rep78 to transcribe in the cytoplasm and subsequently translate in the nucleus and undergo typical functions in the AAV life cycle. As such, VV is subhelper for AAV compared to complete helper functions of adenovirus.

  3. [Zika virus infection in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjasi, Gabriella; Póka, Róbert

    2017-04-01

    The Zika virus is a flavivirus spread by mosquitoes. Its primary vectors are the Aedes aegypti and the Aedes albopictus. Before 2007 it sporadically caused benign morbidity. Since 2015, it started spreading "explosively" in America, especially in Brazil. In August 2016 they reported cases from New York and Poland, too. Most of the infections don't produce any symptoms, but can cause grave complications. The most important lesion is microcephalia that forms in fetuses. Microcephalia's most serious consequence is mental retardation, which puts great burden on both the family and the society. The viral infection increases the incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome. This is an acute autoimmune disease which causes demyelination and, in the worst cases, it can also be fatal. Yet we do not possess adequate and specific vaccination nor antiviral therapy, although, since July 2016, the effectiveness of a DNA based vaccine is being tested on humans. More than half of the world's population lives in areas contaminated by infected mosquitoes so there is a great need for the development of an effective method against the vector mosquitoes. Sadly, even the vector control strategies aren't effective enough to push back the epidemic. Pregnant or fertile women must take the highest precautions against mosquito bites, especially if they travel to regions ravaged by the epidemic. The safest solution would be to postpone both the trip and the childbearing. In Europe, the vectors aren't spread enough to cause major threat, except maybe the warmer regions bordered by the Mediterranean Sea. However, it is possible that in the near future other viruses spread by Aedes mosquitoes could appear. Naturally, the travellers and immigrants, who came from endemic regions can also contribute to the spread of the epidemic. Thanks to the changes in global weather, there were reported findings of mosquitoes of the Aedes albopictus species in Hungary, which are slowly invading the continent, although

  4. Diskitis, Osteomyelitis, Spinal Epidural Abscess, Meningitis, and Endocarditis Following Sacroiliac Joint Injection for the Treatment of Low-Back Pain in a Patient on Therapy for Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Geeta; Flaherty, John P; Benzon, Honorio T

    Sacroiliac joint injections are frequently performed procedures in the management of acute and chronic low-back pain, including patients with various immunocompromised states. Infectious complications following these procedures along with other spinal injections are rarely reported, but the true incidence is unknown. The purpose of this report is to highlight the devastating neurologic sequela that can occur, and to discuss potential future management strategies. We present a patient who developed diskitis, osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis, and endocarditis from Staphylococcus aureus, all of which developed shortly after a sacroiliac joint injection. The patient was on treatment for hepatitis C virus, and the resulting immunocompromised state likely contributed to the outcome. Immunocompromised patients should be identified prior to treatment, and the small possibility of devastating complications should be thoughtfully weighed against the potential benefit of the procedure. Conservative management should be maximized initially, and if a procedure is done, strict asepsis must be maintained. Prophylaxis for S. aureus should be considered for immunocompromised patients undergoing interventional spine procedures.

  5. Computer Viruses: Pathology and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, John R.; Lamon, William E.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how computer viruses were originally created, how a computer can become infected by a virus, how viruses operate, symptoms that indicate a computer is infected, how to detect and remove viruses, and how to prevent a reinfection. A sidebar lists eight antivirus resources. (four references) (LRW)

  6. Zika virus infection: a public health emergency!

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Muhammad Salman Haider; Qureshi, Bakhtawar Wajeeha; Khan, Ramsha

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus belongs to the family of Flaviviridae. The Flaviviridae family also includes other human pathogens like West Nile virus (WNV), Yellow fever virus (YFV), mosquito transmitted Dengue virus (DENV), Tick borne encephalitic virus (TBEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Zika virus is a mosquito-borne disease and is transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquito.

  7. Concomitant herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis in a man with ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Varun K.; Friedman-Moraco, Rachel J.; Quigley, Brian C.; Farris, Alton B.; Norvell, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Herpesvirus infections often complicate the clinical course of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; however, invasive disease due to herpes simplex virus is distinctly uncommon. Methods: We present a case of herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis, review all the previously published cases of herpes simplex virus colitis, and discuss common clinical features and outcomes. We also discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of herpes simplex virus infections, focusing specifically on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Results: A 43-year-old man with ulcerative colitis, previously controlled with an oral 5-aminosalicylic agent, developed symptoms of a colitis flare that did not respond to treatment with systemic corticosteroid therapy. One week later he developed orolabial ulcers and progressive hepatic dysfunction, with markedly elevated transaminases and coagulopathy. He underwent emergent total colectomy when imaging suggested bowel micro-perforation. Pathology from both the colon and liver was consistent with herpes simplex virus infection, and a viral culture of his orolabial lesions and a serum polymerase chain reaction assay also identified herpes simplex virus. He was treated with systemic antiviral therapy and made a complete recovery. Conclusions: Disseminated herpes simplex virus infection with concomitant involvement of the colon and liver has been reported only 3 times in the published literature, and to our knowledge this is the first such case in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of invasive herpes simplex virus infections increases with some, but not all immunomodulatory therapies. Optimal management of herpes simplex virus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease includes targeted prophylactic therapy for patients with evidence of latent infection, and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for those patients suspected to have invasive disease. PMID:27759636

  8. Individualization of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Pavlos, Elizabeth J PhillipsInstitute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has evolved considerably over the last three decades. From the early days of monotherapy with high toxicities and pill burdens, through to larger pill burdens and more potent combination therapies, and finally, from 2005 and beyond where we now have the choice of low pill burdens and once-daily therapies. More convenient and less toxic regimens are also becoming available, even in resource-poor settings. An understanding of the individual variation in response to ART, both efficacy and toxicity, has evolved over this time. The strong association of the major histocompatibility class I allele HLA-B*5701 and abacavir hypersensitivity, and its translation and use in routine HIV clinical practice as a predictive marker with 100% negative predictive value, has been a success story and a notable example of the challenges and triumphs in bringing pharmacogenetics to the clinic. In real clinical practice, however, it is going to be the exception rather than the rule that individual biomarkers will definitively guide patient therapy. The need for individualized approaches to ART has been further increased by the importance of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV clinical practice. In the future, the ideal utilization of the individualized approach to ART will likely consist of a combined approach using a combination of knowledge of drug, virus, and host (pharmacogenetic and pharmacoecologic [factors in the individual's environment that may be dynamic over time] information to guide the truly personalized prescription. This review will focus on our knowledge of the pharmacogenetics of the efficacy and toxicity of currently available antiretroviral agents and the current and potential utility of such information and approaches in present and future HIV clinical care.Keywords: HIV

  9. Oscillations in serum ferritin associated with antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C Oscilaciones de la ferritina sérica asociadas al tratamiento antiviral en la hepatitis crónica por virus C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Ladero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: hyperferritinemia is often found in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC and is predictive of poorer response to antiviral therapy. Objective: to investigate changes in ferritinemia during and after antiviral therapy. Patients and methods: serum ferritin levels were measured in 262 CHC patients (163 males, mean age 48.5 years ± 10.1 before and during antiviral therapy, and six months post-treatment in all 154 patients whit undetectable serum HCV-RNA after therapy completion. Results: baseline serum ferritin was higher in patients with primary therapeutic failure than in those reaching sustained viral response (330 ± 291 ng/mL vs. 211 ± 192 ng/mL, p = 0.002. Serum ferritin transiently increased during therapy from baseline (257 ± 242 ng/mL vs. 875 ± 630 ng/mL, p Antecedentes: la hiperferritinemia es frecuente en los enfermos con hepatitis crónica C (HCC y reduce las probabilidades de respuesta al tratamiento antiviral. Objetivo: investigar las variaciones de la ferritina sérica durante y después del tratamiento y su relación con la respuesta al mismo. Pacientes y métodos: la ferritina sérica se ha medido en 262 enfermos con HCC (163 hombres, edad media 48,5 años ± 10,1 antes y durante el tratamiento antiviral, y a los 6 meses de finalizado en los 154 enfermos con viremia indetectable al final del tratamiento. Resultados: la ferritina sérica basal era más alta en enfermos con fracaso terapéutico primario que en los que consiguieron respuesta viral sostenida (RVS (330 ± 291 ng/ml vs. 211 ± 192 ng/ml, p = 0,002. La ferritina sérica aumentó transitoriamente durante el tratamiento (257 ± 242 ng/ml vs. 875 ± 630 ng/ml, p < 0,001. La ferritina sérica descendió a valores inferiores a los basales seis meses después de finalizado el tratamiento en los pacientes con RVS (117 ± 102 ng/ml vs. 211± 192 ng/ml, p < 0,001 y, en menor grado, en los que sufrieron recidiva viral (217 ± 174 ng/ml vs. 257 ± 221 ng/m, p = 0

  10. Surface properties, more than size, limiting convective distribution of virus-sized particles and viruses in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michael Y; Hoffer, Alan; Morrison, Paul F; Hamilton, John F; Hughes, Jeffrey; Schlageter, Kurt S; Lee, Jeongwu; Kelly, Brandon R; Oldfield, Edward H

    2005-08-01

    Achieving distribution of gene-carrying vectors is a major barrier to the clinical application of gene therapy. Because of the blood-brain barrier, the distribution of genetic vectors to the central nervous system (CNS) is even more challenging than delivery to other tissues. Direct intraparenchymal microinfusion, a minimally invasive technique, uses bulk flow (convection) to distribute suspensions of macromolecules widely through the extracellular space (convection-enhanced delivery [CED]). Although acute injection into solid tissue is often used for delivery of oligonucleotides, viruses, and liposomes, and there is preliminary evidence that certain of these large particles can spread through the interstitial space of the brain by the use of convection, the use of CED for distribution of viruses in the brain has not been systematically examined. That is the goal of this study. Investigators used a rodent model to examine the influence of size, osmolarity of buffering solutions, and surface coating on the volumetric distribution of virus-sized nanoparticles and viruses (adeno-associated viruses and adenoviruses) in the gray matter of the brain. The results demonstrate that channels in the extracellular space of gray matter in the brain are large enough to accommodate virus-sized particles and that the surface characteristics are critical determinants for distribution of viruses in the brain by convection. These results indicate that convective distribution can be used to distribute therapeutic viral vectors in the CNS.

  11. Hepatitis A virus antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.; Kselikova, M.; Urbankova, J.

    1980-01-01

    A description is presented of a radioimmunoassay designed to prove the presence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus (HA Ab, anti-Ha) using an Abbott HAVAB set. This proof as well as the proof of the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis B virus is based on competition between a normal antibody against hepatitis A virus and a 125 I-labelled antibody for the binding sites of a specific antigen spread all over the surface of a tiny ball; this is then indirect proof of the antibody under investigation. The method is described of reading the results from the number of impulses per 60 seconds: the higher the titre of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in the serum examined, the lower the activity of the specimen concerned. The rate is reported of incidence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in a total of 68 convalescents after hepatitis A; the antibody was found in 94.1%. The immunoglobulin made from the convalescents' plasma showed the presence of antibodies in dilutions as high as 1:250 000 while the comparable ratio for normal immunoglobulin Norga was only 1:2500. Differences are discussed in the time incidence of the antibodies against the hepatitis A virus, the antibodies against the surface antigen of hepatitis B, and the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis V virus. (author)

  12. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  13. siRNA as an alternative therapy against viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana A. Pawestri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available siRNA (small interfering ribonucleic acid adalah sebuah metode yang dapat digunakan untuk mengatasi infeksi virus yang prinsip kerjanya berdasarkan metode komplementer dsRNA (double stranded RNA pada RNA virus sehingga menyebabkan kegagalan proses transkripsi (silencing.  Untuk lebih memahami bagaimana proses kerja dan ulasan penelitian siRNA yang terkini, di dalam tulisan ini ditinjau siRNA sebagai metoda yang dikembangkan untuk mengatasi infeksi dan meneliti efeknya pada replikasi beberapa virus seperti Hepatitis C, Influenza, Polio, dan HIV. Kami menemukan bahwa urutan basa nukleotida dari target siRNA sangat penting. Hal tersebut harus homolog dengan target RNA virus dan tidak menganggu RNA sel inang. Untuk mengurangi kegagalan terapi siRNA oleh adanya mutasi, digunakan beberapa siRNA yang sekaligus menjadi target RNA virus yang berbeda. Namun demikian, terapi siRNA masih menghadapi beberapa kesulitan seperti pengiriman (transfer khusus ke jaringan yang terinfeksi dan perlindungan siRNA dari perusakan oleh nuklease. Berdasarkan beberapa penelitian yang telah dilakukan, siRNA dapat digunakan sebagai alternatif untuk mengobati infeksi yang disebabkan oleh virus. Terapi tersebut direkomendasikan untuk dilakukan uji klinis dengan memperhatikan beberapa aspek seperti desain siRNA dan mekanisme transfer. (Health Science Indones 2010; 1: 58 - 65 Kata kunci: siRNA, infeksi virus, target virus, alternatif terapi Abstract SiRNA is a promising method to deal with viral infections. The principle of siRNA is based on the complementarily of (synthetic dsRNA to an RNA virus which, in consequence, will be silenced. Many studies are currently examining the effects of siRNA on replication of diverse virus types like Hepatitis C, polio and HIV. The choice of the siRNA target sequence is crucial. It has to be very homologous to the target RNA, but it cannot target RNA of the host cell. To reduce the possibility for the virus to escape from the siRNA therapy by

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanapathipillai, Rupa; Hickey, Martha; Giles, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    This article aims to review currently available evidence for women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and menopause and to propose clinical management algorithms. Key studies addressing HIV and menopause have been reviewed, specifically age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women, frequency of menopausal symptoms, comorbidities associated with HIV and aging (including cardiovascular disease and bone disease), treatment of menopausal symptoms, and prevention of comorbidities in HIV-infected women. Studies suggest an earlier onset of menopause in HIV-infected women, with increased frequency of symptoms. Cardiovascular disease risk may be increased in this population, with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and chronic inflammation associated with HIV, contributing to increased risk. Chronic inflammation and cART have been independently implicated in bone disease. No published data have assessed the safety and efficacy of hormone therapy in relation to symptoms of menopause, cardiovascular risk, and bone disease among HIV-infected women. Few studies on menopause have been conducted in HIV-infected women compared with HIV-uninfected women. Many questions regarding age of menopause onset, frequency of menopausal symptoms and associated complications such as bone disease and cardiovascular disease, and efficacy of treatment among HIV-infected women remain. The incidence and severity of some of these factors may be increased in the setting of HIV and cART.

  15. Activity of andrographolide against chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintachai, Phitchayapak; Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ramphan, Suwipa; Kuadkitkan, Atichat; Wikan, Nitwara; Ubol, Sukathida; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Smith, Duncan R

    2015-09-18

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has recently engendered large epidemics around the world. There is no specific antiviral for treatment of patients infected with CHIKV, and development of compounds with significant anti-CHIKV activity that can be further developed to a practical therapy is urgently required. Andrographolide is derived from Andrographis paniculata, a herb traditionally used to treat a number of conditions including infections. This study sought to determine the potential of andrographolide as an inhibitor of CHIKV infection. Andrographolide showed good inhibition of CHIKV infection and reduced virus production by approximately 3log10 with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 77 μM without cytotoxicity. Time-of-addition and RNA transfection studies showed that andrographolide affected CHIKV replication and the activity of andrographolide was shown to be cell type independent. This study suggests that andrographolide has the potential to be developed further as an anti-CHIKV therapeutic agent.

  16. Zika Virus in the Male Reproductive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesel Stassen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses are resurging across the globe. Zika virus (ZIKV has caused significant concern in recent years because it can lead to congenital malformations in babies and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. Unlike other arboviruses, ZIKV can be sexually transmitted and may persist in the male reproductive tract. There is limited information regarding the impact of ZIKV on male reproductive health and fertility. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie persistent ZIKV infections in men is critical to developing effective vaccines and therapies. Mouse and macaque models have begun to unravel the pathogenesis of ZIKV infection in the male reproductive tract, with the testes and prostate gland implicated as potential reservoirs for persistent ZIKV infection. Here, we summarize current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of ZIKV in the male reproductive tract, the development of animal models to study ZIKV infection at this site, and prospects for vaccines and therapeutics against persistent ZIKV infection.

  17. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-11-15

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens.

  18. Chronic Active Epstein–Barr Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (CAEBV infection is a systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV positive lymphoprolifetative disease characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, unusual pattern of anti- EBV antibodies, and/or increased EBV genomes in affected tissues. Most cases are from Asia. So far, there is hardly any adult case reported from mainland of China. We herein presented a 33-year-old man with fever, facial erythema and rash, lymphadenopathy, lower limbs weakness, splenomegaly and liver lesion. EBV VCA, EA and EBNA were all positive. EBV DNA could be found in serum and PBMC. In situ hybridization of EBV encoded RNA in skin and liver biopsy was positive. Viral load in serum decreased under interferon alpha therapy. To our knowledge, it’s the first adult case reported from mainland of China.

  19. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  20. VHS virus - present situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    of the worldwide distribution of the disease will be given. Virus evolution: Recent studies indicate that only a few amino acid changes in the structural proteins of VHSV can change the virulence patterns significantly, thereby coming closer to assessing the risk of none to low virulent viruses becoming high...... virulent. Virulence factors both depend on the ability of VHSV to enter a cell and on the speed and efficiencyof virus replication in the cells. Apparently the viral nucleocapsid protein plays a very important role for the later and seems to be the target for determination of a virulence marker....

  1. Zika virus in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veasna Duong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that was first isolated from a sentinel rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest in Uganda in 1947. In Asia, the virus was isolated in Malaysia from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in 1966, and the first human infections were reported in 1977 in Central Java, Indonesia. In this review, all reported cases of ZIKV infection in Asia as of September 1, 2016 are summarized and some of the hypotheses that could currently explain the apparently low incidence of Zika cases in Asia are explored.

  2. Zika virus in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Veasna Duong; Philippe Dussart; Philippe Buchy

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that was first isolated from a sentinel rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest in Uganda in 1947. In Asia, the virus was isolated in Malaysia from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in 1966, and the first human infections were reported in 1977 in Central Java, Indonesia. In this review, all reported cases of ZIKV infection in Asia as of September 1, 2016 are summarized and some of the hypotheses that could currently explain the apparently low incidence of...

  3. Zika virus in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Veasna; Dussart, Philippe; Buchy, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that was first isolated from a sentinel rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest in Uganda in 1947. In Asia, the virus was isolated in Malaysia from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in 1966, and the first human infections were reported in 1977 in Central Java, Indonesia. In this review, all reported cases of ZIKV infection in Asia as of September 1, 2016 are summarized and some of the hypotheses that could currently explain the apparently low incidence of Zika cases in Asia are explored. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Viruses in reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Ellen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself. 1. Introduction 2. Methods for working with reptilian viruses 3. Reptilian viruses described by virus families 3.1. Herpesviridae 3.2. Iridoviridae 3.2.1 Ranavirus 3.2.2 Erythrocytic virus 3.2.3 Iridovirus 3.3. Poxviridae 3.4. Adenoviridae 3.5. Papillomaviridae 3.6. Parvoviridae 3.7. Reoviridae 3.8. Retroviridae and inclusion body disease of Boid snakes 3.9. Arboviruses 3.9.1. Flaviviridae 3

  5. BS-virus-finder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shengjie; Hu, Xuesong; Xu, Fengping

    2018-01-01

    Background: DNA methylation plays a key role in the regulation of gene expression and carcinogenesis. Bisulfite sequencing studies mainly focus on calling SNP, DMR, and ASM. Until now, only a few software tools focus on virus integration using bisulfite sequencing data. Findings: We have developed...... a new and easy-to-use software tool, named BS-virus-finder (BSVF, RRID:SCR_015727), to detect viral integration breakpoints in whole human genomes. The tool is hosted at https://github.com/BGI-SZ/BSVF. Conclusions: BS-virus-finder demonstrates high sensitivity and specificity. It is useful in epigenetic...

  6. Rhabdomyolysis in a hepatitis C virus infected patient treated with telaprevir and simvastatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanter, C.T.M.M. de; Luin, M. van; Solas, C.; Burger, D.M.; Vrolijk, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year old man with a chronic hepatitis C virus infection received triple therapy with ribavirin, pegylated interferon and telaprevir. The patient also received simvastatin. One month after starting the antiviral therapy, the patient was admitted to the hospital because he developed

  7. Carotid artery thickness is associated with chronic use of highly active antiretroviral therapy in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBounty, T M; Hardy, W D; Fan, Z; Yumul, R; Li, D; Dharmakumar, R; Conte, A Hernandez

    2016-08-01

    While patients with HIV infection have an elevated stroke risk, ultrasound studies of carotid artery wall thickness have reported variable results. We hypothesized that subjects with HIV infection on chronic highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) would have increased carotid artery wall thickness by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This cross-sectional study compared carotid artery wall thickness between 26 individuals infected with HIV on chronic HAART and 20 controls, without HIV infection but with similar cardiovascular risk factors, using 3.0-T noncontrast MRI. Inclusion criteria included male gender, age 35-55 years, and chronic HAART (≥ 3 years) among HIV-seropositive subjects; those with known cardiovascular disease or diabetes were excluded. Between subjects with HIV infection and controls, there were no differences in mean (±SD) age (47.8 ± 5.0 vs. 47.8 ± 4.7 years, respectively; P = 0.19) or cardiovascular risk factors (P > 0.05 for each). Mean (±SD) wall thickness was increased in those with HIV infection vs. controls for the left (0.88 ± 0.08 vs. 0.83 ± 0.08 mm, respectively; P = 0.03) and right (0.90 ± 0.10 vs. 0.85 ± 0.07 mm, respectively; P = 0.046) common carotid arteries. Among individuals with HIV infection, variables associated with increased mean carotid artery wall thickness included lipoaccumulation [+0.09 mm; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03-0.14 mm; P = 0.003], Framingham risk score ≥ 5% (+0.07 mm; 95% CI 0.01-0.12; P = 0.02 mm), and increased duration of protease inhibitor therapy (+0.03 mm per 5 years; 95% CI 0.01-0.06 mm; P = 0.02). Individuals with HIV infection on chronic HAART had increased carotid artery wall thickness as compared to similar controls. In subjects with HIV infection, the presence of lipoaccumulation and longer duration of protease inhibitor therapy were associated with greater wall thickness. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  8. Does Awareness of Status and Risks of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Impact Risky Transmission Behavior Among Infected Adolescents? A Case Study of Clients Attending an Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Clinic in Kano, Kano State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawan, Umar Muhammad; Envuladu, Esther Awazzi; Abubakar, Sanusi

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive adolescents by virtue of their position are prone to dangerous behaviors including risk-taking for HIV transmission. To determine the awareness of HIV status and risk factors for HIV transmission among HIV-positive adolescents, and how these impact their behavior. A case study approach was used to study a random sample of 400 HIV-positive adolescent children attending an antiretroviral (ART) clinic in Kano, Kano State, Nigeria. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 16.0 computer statistical software. The mean age of the adolescents was 14.9 ± 3.15 years. The majority were females (54.8%) from a polygamous family (57.5%). About two-thirds or 251 (62.8%) patients knew their HIV status. The age of 14 years and above (z = 11.36, P = 0.0001) and having at least secondary school level of education (z = 2.78, P = 0.005) were significantly associated with awareness of HIV status on binary logistic regression. Up to 311 (77.8%) patients had good awareness of the risks of HIV transmission. Awareness of risk of HIV transmission was associated with awareness of HIV status (X(2) = 166.2, P = 0.0001). There was a significant variation in the behaviors between those who were aware of their HIV status and those who were not. Paradoxically, the percentage differences in risk-taking were remarkably high in all the variables examined, and were all in the direction of the adolescents who had good knowledge of the risk factors for HIV transmission. Health ministries, development partners working in this field, and behavioral change communication experts should develop formidable strategies for addressing this menace. There is also a dire need for further research in this area.

  9. A pandemic in disguise: Zika virus vaccine development and counteractive measures analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owais Fazal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, Zika virus has engendered concerns throughout the world, prompting the World Health Organization to promote the virus to epidemic status. This dramatic rise to prominence demands comprehensive research oriented towards effectively controlling the spread of this virulent disease. Despite the influx of information afforded by modern technology regarding the virus, there are yet to be licensed medical countermeasures (vaccines, therapies or preventive drugs available for Zika virus infection and disease. Thus, diverting sizable funds towards prospective Zika virus vaccine candidates as well as appropriately educating the modern healthcare worker regarding the epidemiology of Zika virus is becoming increasingly imperative. Fortunately, a multitude of researchers are working towards instituting pragmatic measures directed towards limiting Zika virus′s spread in an interconnected global climate.

  10. Role of the ubiquitin system and tumor viruses in AIDS-related cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagano Joseph S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor viruses are linked to approximately 20% of human malignancies worldwide. This review focuses on examples of human oncogenic viruses that manipulate the ubiquitin system in a subset of viral malignancies; those associated with AIDS. The viruses include Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus and human papilloma virus, which are causally linked to Kaposi's sarcoma, certain B-cell lymphomas and cervical cancer, respectively. We discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these viruses subvert the ubiquitin system and potential viral targets for anti-cancer therapy from the perspective of this system. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com.

  11. Immune cells: more than simple carriers for systemic delivery of oncolytic viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenstein S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Samuel Eisenstein,1 Shu-Hsia Chen,2 Ping-Ying Pan21Department of Surgery, 2Department of Oncological Sciences and Tisch Cancer Institute, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Oncolytic virotherapy on its own has numerous drawbacks, including an inability of the virus to actively target tumor cells and systemic toxicities at the high doses necessary to effectively treat tumors. Addition of immune cell-based carriers of oncolytic viruses holds promise as a technique in which oncolytic virus can be delivered directly to tumors in smaller and less toxic doses. Interestingly, the cell carriers themselves have also demonstrated antitumor effects, which can be augmented further by tailoring the appropriate oncolytic virus to the appropriate cell type. This review discusses the multiple factors that go into devising an effective, cell-based delivery system for oncolytic viruses.Keywords: oncolytic virus, cell carrier, immune cells, cancer therapy, myeloid-derived suppressor cells

  12. Efficient cellular release of Rift Valley fever virus requires genomic RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Piper

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Rift Valley fever virus is responsible for periodic, explosive epizootics throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The development of therapeutics targeting this virus is difficult due to a limited understanding of the viral replicative cycle. Utilizing a virus-like particle system, we have established roles for each of the viral structural components in assembly, release, and virus infectivity. The envelope glycoprotein, Gn, was discovered to be necessary and sufficient for packaging of the genome, nucleocapsid protein and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase into virus particles. Additionally, packaging of the genome was found to be necessary for the efficient release of particles, revealing a novel mechanism for the efficient generation of infectious virus. Our results identify possible conserved targets for development of anti-phlebovirus therapies.

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus Infections of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    This article summarizes knowledge of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of the central nervous system (CNS). Disease pathogenesis, detection of DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis and prognosis, and approaches to therapy warrant consideration. HSV infection of the CNS is one of few treatable viral diseases. Clinical trials indicate that outcome following neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections of the CNS is significantly improved when 6 months of suppressive oral acyclovir therapy follows IV antiviral therapy. In contrast, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections of the brain do not benefit from extended oral antiviral therapy. This implies a difference in disease pathogenesis between HSV-2 and HSV-1 infections of the brain. PCR detection of viral DNA in the CSF is the gold standard for diagnosis. Use of PCR is now being adopted as a basis for determining the duration of therapy in the newborn. HSV infections are among the most common encountered by humans; seropositivity occurs in 50% to 90% of adult populations. Herpes simplex encephalitis, however, is an uncommon result of this infection. Since no new antiviral drugs have been introduced in nearly 3 decades, much effort has focused on learning how to better use acyclovir and how to use existing databases to establish earlier diagnosis.

  14. Otitis media: viruses, bacteria, biofilms and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Helen M; Cripps, Allan W; Lehmann, Deborah

    2009-11-02

    Otitis media typically presents as either acute otitis media (AOM), with symptoms including fever, otalgia, otorrhoea or irritability and short duration; or as otitis media with effusion (OME), which is often asymptomatic and characterised by accumulation of fluid in the middle ear. Diagnostic certainty of otitis media is challenging, given the young age of patients and variability of symptoms. Otitis media predominantly occurs as coincident to viral upper respiratory tract infections and/or bacterial infections. Common viruses that cause upper respiratory tract infection are frequently associated with AOM and new-onset OME. These include respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, adenovirus, parainfluenza and coronavirus. Predominant bacteria that cause otitis media are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. Antibiotic therapy does not significantly benefit most patients with AOM, but long-term prophylactic antibiotic therapy can reduce the risk of otitis media recurrence among children at high risk. In Australia, 84% of AOM is treated with antibiotic therapy, which contributes to development of antibiotic resistance. Vaccine development is a key future direction for reducing the world burden of otitis media, but requires polymicrobial formulation and ongoing monitoring and modification to ensure sustained reduction in disease burden.

  15. FIRST EXPERIENCE OF CYMEVEN IN THE COMBINED THERAPY OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R M Balabanova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ummary Objective. To reveal J'reguency of accompaning virus infection and possibility to use antivirus therapy together in therapy RA. Material. 40 patients with RA at the age of 17-45 were studied. The duration of disease was not more than 6 months; patients had 2-3 degrees of activity. Every one had a positive rheumatoid factor. Results. 78,2% of the examined patients connected the beginning of the illness with virus infection they have had. The most difficalt variant of RA course and uneffectiveness of basic therapy were registerd among the patients with combination HSV and CMV infection. Inclusion of Cymevene in complex therapy RA has exerted positive influence on clinical-laboratory, signs stregthened effect of basic therapy. Conclusion. The most difficult variant of RA course was registered among the patients with virus infection. Inclusion of antivirus drugs had a positive influence on effectiveness of basic therapy.

  16. Ebola Virus Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast provides general information about Ebola virus disease and the outbreak in West Africa. The program contains remarks from CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden, as well as a brief description of CDC’s response efforts.

  17. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG ... Virus and Pregnancy Infographic Resources & Publications Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Clinical Updates Practice ...

  18. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ...

  19. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ... pregnant. Related: Zika Virus and Pregnancy Infographic Resources & Publications Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal ...

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CLASSIFICATION OF VIRUSES. On basis of morphology. On basis of chemical composition. On basis of structure of genome. On basis of mode of replication. Notes:

  1. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ACOG Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and ... on Patient Safety For Patients Patient FAQs Spanish Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & Governance ...

  2. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ... and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September ...

  3. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ... Infographic Resources & Publications Committee Opinions Practice ... Coding Health Info Technology Professional Liability Managing Your ...

  4. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  5. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ... pregnant. Related: Zika Virus and Pregnancy ... Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal ...

  6. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy ... Council on Patient Safety For Patients Patient FAQs Spanish Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  7. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Login My ACOG Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ...

  8. VIRUS instrument enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.; Mondrik, N.; Rheault, J. P.; Sauseda, M.; Boster, E.; James, M.; Rodriguez-Patino, M.; Torres, G.; Ham, J.; Cook, E.; Baker, D.; DePoy, Darren L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Hill, G. J.; Perry, D.; Savage, R. D.; Good, J. M.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2014-08-01

    The Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument will be installed at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope† in the near future. The instrument will be housed in two enclosures that are mounted adjacent to the telescope, via the VIRUS Support Structure (VSS). We have designed the enclosures to support and protect the instrument, to enable servicing of the instrument, and to cool the instrument appropriately while not adversely affecting the dome environment. The system uses simple HVAC air handling techniques in conjunction with thermoelectric and standard glycol heat exchangers to provide efficient heat removal. The enclosures also provide power and data transfer to and from each VIRUS unit, liquid nitrogen cooling to the detectors, and environmental monitoring of the instrument and dome environments. In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication of the VIRUS enclosures and their subsystems.

  9. The virus of management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Peter; Frankel, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The virus metaphor may be used in studies of management knowledge not only as a way ofdescribing diffusion processes but also as a way of thinking about viral elements of knowledgeproduction. In the present article, organizational viruses are viewed as ensembles of basicdistinctions...... that are constitutive of concrete bodies of knowledge and which form mutable enginesof organizational self-descriptions. Organizational viruses, we contend, are both characterized bystability in terms of their basic productive configuration, while at the same time allowing for a highdegree of variation in terms...... of concrete management knowledge and practice. The article isstructured as follows. After the introduction, we first develop the notion of organizational virus asinto an analytical approach. Second, we discern in the work of Frederick Taylor on scientificmanagement and Max Weber on bureaucracy, two quite...

  10. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and ... Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Clinical Updates ... Annual Meeting CME Overview CREOG Meetings Calendar Congressional ...

  11. Play Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  12. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  13. Late Ebola virus relapse causing meningoencephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Michael; Rodger, Alison; Bell, David J; Bhagani, Sanjay; Cropley, Ian; Filipe, Ana; Gifford, Robert J; Hopkins, Susan; Hughes, Joseph; Jabeen, Farrah; Johannessen, Ingolfur; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos; Lackenby, Angie; Lester, Rebecca; Liu, Rebecca S N; MacConnachie, Alisdair; Mahungu, Tabitha; Martin, Daniel; Marshall, Neal; Mepham, Stephen; Orton, Richard; Palmarini, Massimo; Patel, Monika; Perry, Colin; Peters, S Erica; Porter, Duncan; Ritchie, David; Ritchie, Neil D; Seaton, R Andrew; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Templeton, Kate; Warren, Simon; Wilkie, Gavin S; Zambon, Maria; Gopal, Robin; Thomson, Emma C

    2016-07-30

    There are thousands of survivors of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in west Africa. Ebola virus can persist in survivors for months in immune-privileged sites; however, viral relapse causing life-threatening and potentially transmissible disease has not been described. We report a case of late relapse in a patient who had been treated for severe Ebola virus disease with high viral load (peak cycle threshold value 13.2). A 39-year-old female nurse from Scotland, who had assisted the humanitarian effort in Sierra Leone, had received intensive supportive treatment and experimental antiviral therapies, and had been discharged with undetectable Ebola virus RNA in peripheral blood. The patient was readmitted to hospital 9 months after discharge with symptoms of acute meningitis, and was found to have Ebola virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). She was treated with supportive therapy and experimental antiviral drug GS-5734 (Gilead Sciences, San Francisco, Foster City, CA, USA). We monitored Ebola virus RNA in CSF and plasma, and sequenced the viral genome using an unbiased metagenomic approach. On admission, reverse transcriptase PCR identified Ebola virus RNA at a higher level in CSF (cycle threshold value 23.7) than plasma (31.3); infectious virus was only recovered from CSF. The patient developed progressive meningoencephalitis with cranial neuropathies and radiculopathy. Clinical recovery was associated with addition of high-dose corticosteroids during GS-5734 treatment. CSF Ebola virus RNA slowly declined and was undetectable following 14 days of treatment with GS-5734. Sequencing of plasma and CSF viral genome revealed only two non-coding changes compared with the original infecting virus. Our report shows that previously unanticipated, late, severe relapses of Ebola virus can occur, in this case in the CNS. This finding fundamentally redefines what is known about the natural history of Ebola virus infection. Vigilance should be maintained in the thousands of Ebola survivors

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  15. Genome packaging in viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Siyang; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Genome packaging is a fundamental process in a viral life cycle. Many viruses assemble preformed capsids into which the genomic material is subsequently packaged. These viruses use a packaging motor protein that is driven by the hydrolysis of ATP to condense the nucleic acids into a confined space. How these motor proteins package viral genomes had been poorly understood until recently, when a few X-ray crystal structures and cryo-electron microscopy structures became available. Here we discu...

  16. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Herrera-Carrillo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described.

  17. Correlation of virus load in plasma and lymph node tissue in human immunodeficiency virus infection. INCAS Study Group. Italy, Netherlands, Canada, Australia, and (United) States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M; Patenaude, P; Cooperberg, P; Filipenko, D; Thorne, A; Raboud, J; Rae, S; Dailey, P; Chernoff, D; Todd, J; Conway, B; Montaner, J S

    1997-11-01

    The impact of long-term changes in plasma viremia, produced by effective combination antiretroviral therapy, on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) burden within tissue reservoirs is unknown. Fifteen patients who had received at least 1 year of therapy with two or three drug combinations of zidovudine, didanosine, and nevirapine had suitable samples of lymph node tissue obtained by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy. HIV RNA was extracted from homogenized tissue samples and quantitated using a modified branched DNA assay. Results were correlated with antiretroviral treatment effect on the basis of plasma virus load measurements over the preceding 12-18 months. A statistically significant negative correlation was observed between magnitude of treatment effect on plasma viremia and lymph node virus load. These data suggest that combinations of antiretroviral drugs that produce sustained suppression of plasma HIV RNA may also be able to reduce the virus burden in lymphoid tissues.

  18. Manual Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hakgüder, Aral; Kokino, Siranuş

    2002-01-01

    Manual therapy has been used in the treatment of pain and dysfunction of spinal and peripheral joints for more than a hundred years. Manual medicine includes manipulation, mobilization, and postisometric relaxation techniques. The aim of manual therapy is to enhance restricted movement caused by blockage of joints keeping postural balance, restore function and maintain optimal body mechanics. Anatomic, biomechanical, and neurophysiological evaluations of the leucomotor system is essential for...

  19. Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified GPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, Nancy J.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Shedlock, Devon J.; Xu, Ling; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Popernack, Paul M.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Pau, Maria G.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Jahrling, Peter B.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic fever syndrome that is associated with high mortality in humans. In the absence of effective therapies for Ebola virus infection, the development of a vaccine becomes an important strategy to contain outbreaks. Immunization with DNA and/or

  20. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection impact on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT SUVmax, CT volumetric and KRAS-based parameters of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Claudio V. [Instituto de Radiomedicina, Department of Radiation Oncology, Santiago (Chile); School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, Felipe A. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute for Sanitary Research, Madrid (Spain); Ferrer, Carlos [Hospital Provincial de Castellon, Institute of Oncology, Castellon de la Plana (Spain); School of Medicine Cardenal Herrera-CEU University, Castellon de la Plana (Spain); Alvarez, Emilio [School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Pathology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute for Sanitary Research, Madrid (Spain); Carreras, Jose L. [School of Medicine Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Radiology and Medical Physics, Madrid (Spain); Ochoa, Enrique [Hospital Provincial de Castellon, Institute of Oncology, Castellon de la Plana (Spain)

    2014-10-01

    It has long been debated whether human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are associated with rectal cancer. The gene products of HCMV and EBV contribute to cell-cycle progression, mutagenesis, angiogenesis and immune evasion. The aim of this prospective study was to analyse the association between infection of a tumour by HCMV and EBV and clinical, histological, metabolic ({sup 18}F-FDG uptake), volumetric (from CT) and molecular (KRAS status) features and long-term outcomes in a homogeneously treated group of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. HCMV and EBV were detected in pretreatment biopsies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to explore associations between viral infection and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). We analysed 37 patients with a median follow-up of 74 months (range 5-173 months). Locoregional control, OS and DFS at 5 years were 93 %, 74 % and 71 %, respectively. Patients with HCMV/EBV coinfection had a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value than patients without viral coinfection (p = 0.02). Significant differences were also observed in staging and percentage relative reduction in tumour volume between patients with and without HCMV infection (p < 0.01) and EBV infection (p < 0.01). KRAS wildtype status was significantly more frequently observed in patients with EBV infection (p <0.01) and HCMV/EBV co-infection (p = 0.04). No significant differences were observed in OS or DFS between patients with and without EBV infection (p = 0.88 and 0.73), HCMV infection (p = 0.84 and 0.79), and EBV/CMV coinfection (p = 0.24 and 0.39). This pilot study showed that viral infections were associated with metabolic staging differences, and differences in the evolution of metabolic and volumetric parameters and KRAS mutations. Further findings of specific features will help determine the best candidates for metabolic and volumetric staging and

  1. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection impact on 18F-FDG PET/CT SUVmax, CT volumetric and KRAS-based parameters of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, Claudio V.; Calvo, Felipe A.; Ferrer, Carlos; Alvarez, Emilio; Carreras, Jose L.; Ochoa, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    It has long been debated whether human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are associated with rectal cancer. The gene products of HCMV and EBV contribute to cell-cycle progression, mutagenesis, angiogenesis and immune evasion. The aim of this prospective study was to analyse the association between infection of a tumour by HCMV and EBV and clinical, histological, metabolic ( 18 F-FDG uptake), volumetric (from CT) and molecular (KRAS status) features and long-term outcomes in a homogeneously treated group of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. HCMV and EBV were detected in pretreatment biopsies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to explore associations between viral infection and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). We analysed 37 patients with a median follow-up of 74 months (range 5-173 months). Locoregional control, OS and DFS at 5 years were 93 %, 74 % and 71 %, respectively. Patients with HCMV/EBV coinfection had a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value than patients without viral coinfection (p = 0.02). Significant differences were also observed in staging and percentage relative reduction in tumour volume between patients with and without HCMV infection (p < 0.01) and EBV infection (p < 0.01). KRAS wildtype status was significantly more frequently observed in patients with EBV infection (p <0.01) and HCMV/EBV co-infection (p = 0.04). No significant differences were observed in OS or DFS between patients with and without EBV infection (p = 0.88 and 0.73), HCMV infection (p = 0.84 and 0.79), and EBV/CMV coinfection (p = 0.24 and 0.39). This pilot study showed that viral infections were associated with metabolic staging differences, and differences in the evolution of metabolic and volumetric parameters and KRAS mutations. Further findings of specific features will help determine the best candidates for metabolic and volumetric staging and

  2. In Vitro Characterization of a Nineteenth-Century Therapy for Smallpox

    OpenAIRE

    Arndt, William; Mitnik, Chandra; Denzler, Karen L.; White, Stacy; Waters, Robert; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Rochon, Yvan; Olson, Victoria A.; Damon, Inger K.; Langland, Jeffrey O.

    2012-01-01

    In the nineteenth century, smallpox ravaged through the United States and Canada. At this time, a botanical preparation, derived from the carnivorous plant Sarracenia purpurea, was proclaimed as being a successful therapy for smallpox infections. The work described characterizes the antipoxvirus activity associated with this botanical extract against vaccinia virus, monkeypox virus and variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. Our work demonstrates the in vitro characterization of Sarra...

  3. Viruses and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jussi Oskari; Jacobson, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a heterogeneous disease that develops as an interplay between the immune system and environmental stimuli in genetically susceptible individuals. There is increasing evidence that viruses may play a role in MS pathogenesis acting as these environmental triggers. However, it is not known if any single virus is causal, or rather several viruses can act as triggers in disease development. Here, we review the association of different viruses to MS with an emphasis on two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). These two agents have generated the most impact during recent years as possible co-factors in MS disease development. The strongest argument for association of EBV with MS comes from the link between symptomatic infectious mononucleosis and MS and from seroepidemiological studies. In contrast to EBV, HHV-6 has been found significantly more often in MS plaques than in MS normal appearing white matter or non-MS brains and HHV-6 re-activation has been reported during MS clinical relapses. In this review we also suggest new strategies, including the development of new infectious animal models of MS and antiviral MS clinical trials, to elucidate roles of different viruses in the pathogenesis of this disease. Furthermore, we introduce the idea of using unbiased sequence-independent pathogen discovery methodologies, such as next generation sequencing, to study MS brain tissue or body fluids for detection of known viral sequences or potential novel viral agents. PMID:22583435

  4. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY OF CONDYLOMATA ACUMINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Galkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliably established a causal role of human papillomavirus in the formation of condylomata acuminate. In 10% of people with the human papilloma virus develops condylomata acuminate, which can be transformed into malignant tumors. The most common treatment of condylomata acuminate is a conservative treatment, namely, the local chemical or physical destruction of the lesions and immunotherapy. With the ineffectiveness of conservative treatment resort to surgical excision. At the same time the traditional methods of treatment condylomata acuminate associated with high rates of recurrence. Moreover, these treatments are often associated with significant risk of bleeding, ulceration and scarring. The emergence of new methods of diagnosis and treatment of condylomata acuminate – fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy has opened up new opportunities to improve the treatment of this pathology. Topical administration of photosensitizers during photodynamic therapy is more convenient and less phototoxic and broaden the range of clinical applications of this technology in the medical dermatology. An increasing amount of evidence that photodynamic therapy with topical application of the photosensitizer is highly effective in the treatment of a variety of benign skin diseases, including condylomata acuminataca, for which traditional methods are ineffective treatment. However, many parameters of photodynamic therapy of this disease has not yet been optimized. It is necessary to conduct large-scale clinical studies on the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy of condylomata acuminatain order to standardize the treatment parameters.

  5. Transmission of Influenza A Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to ‘novel’ viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  6. Targeting an Oncolytic Influenza A Virus to Tumor Tissue by Elastase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kuznetsova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses are currently established as a novel type of immunotherapy. The challenge is to safely target oncolytic viruses to tumors. Previously, we have generated influenza A viruses (IAVs containing deletions in the viral interferon antagonist. Those deletions have attenuated the virus in normal tissue but allowed replication in tumor cells. IAV entry is mediated by hemagglutinin (HA, which needs to be activated by a serine protease, for example, through trypsin. To further target the IAV to tumors, we have changed the trypsin cleavage site to an elastase cleavage site. We chose this cleavage site because elastase is expressed in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, the exchange of the cleavage site previously has been shown to attenuate viral growth in lungs. Newly generated elastase-activated influenza viruses (AE viruses grew to similar titers in tumor cells as the trypsin-activated counterparts (AT viruses. Intratumoral injection of AE viruses into syngeneic B16f1 melanoma-derived tumors in mice reduced tumor growth similar to AT viruses and had a better therapeutic effect in heterologous human PANC-1-derived tumors. Therefore, the introduction of the attenuation marker “elastase cleavage site” in viral HA allows for safe, effective oncolytic virus therapy.

  7. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy

  8. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S., E-mail: mviapiano@partners.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy.

  9. Evolutionary ecology of virus emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, John J

    2017-02-01

    The cross-species transmission of viruses into new host populations, termed virus emergence, is a significant issue in public health, agriculture, wildlife management, and related fields. Virus emergence requires overlap between host populations, alterations in virus genetics to permit infection of new hosts, and adaptation to novel hosts such that between-host transmission is sustainable, all of which are the purview of the fields of ecology and evolution. A firm understanding of the ecology of viruses and how they evolve is required for understanding how and why viruses emerge. In this paper, I address the evolutionary mechanisms of virus emergence and how they relate to virus ecology. I argue that, while virus acquisition of the ability to infect new hosts is not difficult, limited evolutionary trajectories to sustained virus between-host transmission and the combined effects of mutational meltdown, bottlenecking, demographic stochasticity, density dependence, and genetic erosion in ecological sinks limit most emergence events to dead-end spillover infections. Despite the relative rarity of pandemic emerging viruses, the potential of viruses to search evolutionary space and find means to spread epidemically and the consequences of pandemic viruses that do emerge necessitate sustained attention to virus research, surveillance, prophylaxis, and treatment. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV types Western blot (WB band profiles as potential surrogate markers of HIV disease progression and predictors of vertical transmission in a cohort of infected but antiretroviral therapy naïve pregnant women in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirenje Mike Z

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expensive CD4 count and viral load tests have failed the intended objective of enabling access to HIV therapy in poor resource settings. It is imperative to develop simple, affordable and non-subjective disease monitoring tools to complement clinical staging efforts of inexperienced health personnel currently manning most healthcare centres because of brain drain. Besides accurately predicting HIV infection, sequential appearance of specific bands of WB test offers a window of opportunity to develop a less subjective tool for monitoring disease progression. Methods HIV type characterization was done in a cohort of infected pregnant women at 36 gestational weeks using WB test. Student-t test was used to determine maternal differences in mean full blood counts and viral load of mothers with and those without HIV gag antigen bands. Pearson Chi-square test was used to assess differences in lack of bands appearance with vertical transmission and lymphadenopathy. Results Among the 64 HIV infected pregnant women, 98.4% had pure HIV-1 infection and one woman (1.7% had dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infections. Absence of HIV pol antigen bands was associated with acute infection, p = 0.002. All women with chronic HIV-1 infection had antibody reactivity to both the HIV-1 envelope and polymerase antigens. However, antibody reactivity to gag antigens varied among the women, being 100%, 90%, 70% and 63% for p24, p17, p39 and p55, respectively. Lack of antibody reactivity to gag p39 antigen was associated with disease progression as confirmed by the presence of lymphadenopathy, anemia, higher viral load, p = 0.010, 0.025 and 0.016, respectively. Although not statistically significant, women with p39 band missing were 1.4 times more likely to transmit HIV-1 to their infants. Conclusion Absence of antibody reactivity to pol and gag p39 antigens was associated with acute infection and disease progression, respectively. Apart from its use in HIV disease

  11. Advances in the design and development of oncolytic measles viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutzen B

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Brian Hutzen,1 Corey Raffel,2 Adam W Studebaker1 1Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Neurological Surgery and Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: A successful oncolytic virus is one that selectively propagates and destroys cancerous tissue without causing excessive damage to the normal surrounding tissue. Oncolytic measles virus (MV is one such virus that exhibits this characteristic and thus has rapidly emerged as a potentially useful anticancer modality. Derivatives of the Edmonston MV vaccine strain possess a remarkable safety record in humans. Promising results in preclinical animal models and evidence of biological activity in early phase trials contribute to the enthusiasm. Genetic modifications have enabled MV to evolve from a vaccine agent to a potential anticancer therapy. Specifically, alterations of the MV genome have led to improved tumor selectivity and delivery, therapeutic potency, and immune system modulation. In this article, we will review the advancements that have been made in the design and development of MV that have led to its use as a cancer therapy. In addition, we will discuss the evidence supporting its use, as well as the challenges associated with MV as a potential cancer therapeutic. Keywords: virotherapy, measles virus, oncolytic therapy

  12. Optimal Control of Drug Therapy in a Hepatitis B Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Forde

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Combination antiviral drug therapy improves the survival rates of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus by controlling viral replication and enhancing immune responses. Some of these drugs have side effects that make them unsuitable for long-term administration. To address the trade-off between the positive and negative effects of the combination therapy, we investigated an optimal control problem for a delay differential equation model of immune responses to hepatitis virus B infection. Our optimal control problem investigates the interplay between virological and immunomodulatory effects of therapy, the control of viremia and the administration of the minimal dosage over a short period of time. Our numerical results show that the high drug levels that induce immune modulation rather than suppression of virological factors are essential for the clearance of hepatitis B virus.

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection in nephrology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostaing, Lionel; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to chronic liver disease, but also to extra-hepatic manifestations. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Herein, we provide an overview of renal diseases related to HCV and their therapies, as well as the treatment options available for HCV (+)/RNA (+) dialysis patients. We will not mention, however, HCV infection-related complications in the post-kidney transplantation setting. Extra-hepatic manifestations of HCV infection include mixed cryoglobulinemia, lymphoproliferative disorders, and renal disease. HCV infection has been reported in association with distinct histological patterns of glomerulonephritis in native kidneys.

  14. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  15. Hepatitis C Virus: Virology and Genotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major causative agent of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV is characterized by genetic heterogeneity, with at least six genotypes identified. The geographic distribution of genotypes has shown variations in different parts of the world over the past decade because of variations in population structure, immigration, and routes of transmission. Genotype differences are of epidemiologic interest and help the study of viral transmission dynamics to trace the source of HCV infection in a given population. HCV genotypes are also of considerable clinical importance because they affect response to antiviral therapy and represent a challenging obstacle for vaccine development.

  16. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ironson, Gail

    2001-01-01

    ... (immune measures that fight tumors and viruses). During the course of the three-year study, 60 women diagnosed with Stage 1 and 2 breast cancer will be recruited and assigned to a massage therapy (n=20...

  17. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tronson, Gail

    2000-01-01

    ... (immune measures that fight tumors and viruses). During the course of the three-year study, 60 women diagnosed with Stage 1 and 2 breast cancer will be recruited and assigned to a massage therapy (n=20...

  18. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mostafa Elbadawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis.

  20. Acute Hepatitis E Virus infection with coincident reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus infection in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Detlev; Mani, Bernhard; Dollenmaier, Günter; Sahli, Roland; Zbinden, Andrea; Krayenbühl, Pierre Alexandre

    2015-10-29

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most recently discovered of the hepatotropic viruses, and is considered an emerging pathogen in developed countries with the possibility of fulminant hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. Especially in the latter elevated transaminases should be taken as a clue to consider HEV infection, as it can be treated by discontinuation of immunosuppression and/or ribavirin therapy. To our best knowledge, this is a unique case of autochthonous HEV infection with coincident reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 68-year-old Swiss woman with RA developed hepatitis initially diagnosed as methotrexate-induced liver injury, but later diagnosed as autochthonous HEV infection accompanied by reactivation of her latent EBV infection. She showed confounding serological results pointing to three hepatotropic viruses (HEV, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and EBV) that could be resolved by detection of HEV and EBV viraemia. The patient recovered by temporary discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy. In immunosuppressed patients with RA and signs of liver injury, HEV infection should be considered, as infection can be treated by discontinuation of immunosuppression. Although anti-HEV-IgM antibody assays can be used as first line virological tools, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) for detection of HEV RNA are recommended--as in our case--if confounding serological results from other hepatotropic viruses are obtained. After discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy, our patient recovered from both HEV infection and reactivation of latent EBV infection without sequelae.