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Sample records for therapy cancer-killing viruses

  1. Designing Cancer-Killing Artificial Viruses to Improve Student Understanding of Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniyuki, Andy; Sharp, Gwen

    2011-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a “learning by designing” group project used in a lower-division Microbiology course. Students used knowledge gained from the course to design an artificial virus that would kill cancer cells. The assignment required groups to integrate the individual course topics into a unified, complex understanding of the field of microbiology. Throughout the course, students and the instructor collaborated in creating a rubric to evaluate the groups’ final presentations. This paper reports the results of an assessment of the project by comparing the instructor’s and the students’ scores for the presentations. Students’ and the instructor’s scores were correlated; the Pearson coefficient of 0.52 was statistically significant. The results indicate that students gained sufficient knowledge to accurately evaluate proposed designs. Additionally, the overall course grade distribution improved compared to the semester before the project was introduced. Finally, in order to engage students in thinking about their own learning process, they completed a reflection assignment that required them to discuss the changes in their understanding of microbiology over the course of the semester. Our assessment indicates that a design project can serve as an effective and useful learning technique in undergraduate Microbiology courses, though modifications are suggested. PMID:23653757

  2. Designing Cancer-Killing Artificial Viruses to Improve Student Understanding of Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Kuniyuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a “learning by designing” group project used in a lower-division Microbiology course. Students used knowledge gained from the course to design an artificial virus that would kill cancer cells. The assignment required groups to integrate the individual course topics into a unified, complex understanding of the field of microbiology. Throughout the course, students and the instructor collaborated in creating a rubric to evaluate the groups’ final presentations. This paper reports the results of an assessment of the project by comparing the instructor’s and the students’ scores for the presentations. Students’ and the instructor’s scores were correlated; the Pearson coefficient of 0.52 was statistically significant. The results indicate that students gained sufficient knowledge to accurately evaluate proposed designs. Additionally, the overall course grade distribution improved compared to the semester before the project was introduced. Finally, in order to engage students in thinking about their own learning process, they completed a reflection assignment that required them to discuss the changes in their understanding of microbiology over the course of the semester. Our assessment indicates that a design project can serve as an effective and useful learning technique in undergraduate Microbiology courses, though modifications are suggested.

  3. Novel innate cancer killing activity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovato James

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we pilot tested an in vitro assay of cancer killing activity (CKA in circulating leukocytes of 22 cancer cases and 25 healthy controls. Methods Using a human cervical cancer cell line, HeLa, as target cells, we compared the CKA in circulating leukocytes, as effector cells, of cancer cases and controls. The CKA was normalized as percentages of total target cells during selected periods of incubation time and at selected effector/target cell ratios in comparison to no-effector-cell controls. Results Our results showed that CKA similar to that of our previous study of SR/CR mice was present in human circulating leukocytes but at profoundly different levels in individuals. Overall, males have a significantly higher CKA than females. The CKA levels in cancer cases were lower than that in healthy controls (mean ± SD: 36.97 ± 21.39 vs. 46.28 ± 27.22. Below-median CKA was significantly associated with case status (odds ratio = 4.36; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.06, 17.88 after adjustment of gender and race. Conclusions In freshly isolated human leukocytes, we were able to detect an apparent CKA in a similar manner to that of cancer-resistant SR/CR mice. The finding of CKA at lower levels in cancer patients suggests the possibility that it may be of a consequence of genetic, physiological, or pathological conditions, pending future studies with larger sample size.

  4. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldufsky J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Joe Goldufsky,1 Shanthi Sivendran,3 Sara Harcharik,4 Michael Pan,4 Sebastian Bernardo,4 Richard H Stern,5 Philip Friedlander,4 Carl E Ruby,1,2 Yvonne Saenger,4 Howard L Kaufman1,2 Departments of 1Immunology & Microbiology and 2Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL, USA 3Hematology/Oncology Medical Specialists, Lancaster General Health, Lancaster, PA, USA, and Departments of 4Medical Oncology and 5Radiology, Tisch Cancer Institute, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers. Keywords: cancer, gene therapy, oncolytic therapy, virus, treatment

  5. Replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J W; Kim, M

    2016-01-01

    Despite advanced therapeutic treatments, gynecologic malignancies such as cervical and ovarian cancers are still the top ten leading cause of cancer death among women in South Korea. Thus a novel and innovative approach is urgently needed. Naturally occurring viruses are live, replication-proficient viruses that specifically infect human cancer cells while sparing normal cell counterparts. Since the serendipitous discovery of the naturally oncotropic virus targeting gynecologic cancer in 1920s, various replicating viruses have shown various degrees of safety and efficacy in preclinical or clinical applications for gynecologic cancer therapy. Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which are frequently dysregulated in gynecologic malignancies, play an important role in determining viral oncotropism. Published articles describing replicating, oncolytic viruses for gynecologic cancers are thoroughly reviewed. This review outlines the discovery of replication-proficient virus strains for targeting gynecologic malignancies, recent progresses elucidating molecular connections between oncogene/tumor suppressor gene abnormalities and viral oncotropism, and the associated preclinical/clinical implications. The authors would also like to propose future directions in the utility of the replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

  6. Therapy of Experimental Nerve Sheath Tumors Using Oncolytic Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabkin, Samuel D

    2005-01-01

    .... To examine the combination of anti-angiogenic and oncolytic virus therapy, recombinant G47 deta vectors expressing anti- angiogenic factors dominant-negative fibroblast growth factor receptor (dnFGFR...

  7. Understanding the Complex Patterns Observed during Hepatitis B Virus Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo Rodriguez, Andrea; Chung, Matthias; Ciupe, Stanca M

    2017-05-19

    Data from human clinical trials have shown that the hepatitis B virus (HBV) follows complex profiles, such as bi-phasic, tri-phasic, stepwise decay and rebound. We utilized a deterministic model of HBV kinetics following antiviral therapy to uncover the mechanistic interactions behind HBV dynamics. Analytical investigation of the model was used to separate the parameter space describing virus decay and rebound. Monte Carlo sampling of the parameter space was used to determine the virological, pharmacological and immunological factors that separate the bi-phasic and tri-phasic virus profiles. We found that the level of liver infection at the start of therapy best separates the decay patterns. Moreover, drug efficacy, ratio between division of uninfected and infected cells, and the strength of cytotoxic immune response are important in assessing the amount of liver damage experienced over time and in quantifying the duration of therapy leading to virus resolution in each of the observed profiles.

  8. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-03-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection.

  9. Oncolytic Viruses for Cancer Therapy: Overcoming the Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaohe Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy of cancer using oncolytic viruses has generated much interest over the past few years in the light of the limited efficacy and side effects of standard cancer therapeutics for advanced disease. In 2006, the world witnessed the first government-approved oncolytic virus for the treatment of head and neck cancer. It has been known for many years that viruses have the ability to replicate in and lyse cancer cells. Although encouraging results have been demonstrated in vitro and in animal models, most oncolytic viruses have failed to impress in the clinical setting. The explanation is multifactorial, determined by the complex interactions between the tumor and its microenvironment, the virus, and the host immune response. This review focuses on discussion of the obstacles that oncolytic virotherapy faces and recent advances made to overcome them, with particular reference to adenoviruses.

  10. Antiviral therapy in herpes- virus infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    Herpesviruses are large, enveloped DNA viruses.There are currently 8 known human herpesviruses and 1 primate species that is a rare human pathogen. Most people have been infected with sev- eral human herpesviruses. In immuno- competent individuals primary infections with herpesviruses are generally mild, self-.

  11. Hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy: Appropriate risk stratification

    OpenAIRE

    Seto, Wai-Kay

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppresive therapy has increased remarkably during recent years. HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals has been well-described in certain immunosuppressive regimens, including therapies containing corticosteroids, anthracyclines, rituximab, antibody to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HBV reactivation could also occur in HBsAg-negati...

  12. Towards antiviral therapies for treating dengue virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Suzanne Jf; Neyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Dengue virus is an emerging human pathogen that poses a huge public health burden by infecting annually about 390 million individuals of which a quarter report with clinical manifestations. Although progress has been made in understanding dengue pathogenesis, a licensed vaccine or antiviral therapy against this virus is still lacking. Treatment of patients is confined to symptomatic alleviation and supportive care. The development of dengue therapeutics thus remains of utmost importance. This review focuses on the few molecules that were evaluated in dengue virus-infected patients: balapiravir, chloroquine, lovastatin, prednisolone and celgosivir. The lessons learned from these clinical trials can be very helpful for the design of future trials for the next generation of dengue virus inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Combined Therapy at Persistent Herpes Virus Infection in Sickly Children

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    F. S. Kharlamova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined 40 sickly children with recurrent croup (RC — 28 and bronchial obstruction (ROB — 8, (RC + ROB — 4 aged from 18 months till 14 years. We found that high frequency of persistent herpes viruses usually occurs as associations with CMV, EBV and human herpes virus 6 type. We substantiated anti viral and immune corrective therapy in two schemes compared in efficacy: the 1st group was administered monotherapy with Viferon, and the 2nd group received combined therapy Viferon + Arbidol in doses according to the age during three months. We received a more expressed clinical immunologic effect from the therapy with decreased antigenic load and frequency of recurrence of RC and ROB with Viferon application in suppositories in combination with Arbidol per orally in the intermittent scheme during three months. 

  14. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles

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    Angelica Loskog

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics.

  15. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Martini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR to the affected organ (lung. Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

  16. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loskog, Angelica

    2015-11-06

    Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics.

  17. Antiviral therapy in herpes- virus infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    ral therapy is unable to cure infection. (latency persists after ... is used to treat serious CMV infection almost exclusively in .... corneal ulcer. Topical aciclovir is effective for superficial ocular HSV infections. All cases should be fol- lowed up by an ophthalmologist. Mucocutaneous HSV in immuno- compromised patients.

  18. Antihepatitis C virus therapy in liver transplanted patients

    OpenAIRE

    Picciotto, Antonino

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) management in the transplant setting is still an open issue. The therapeutic strategies being addressed include: (a) pre-transplant prophylaxis (to prevent the infection of the transplanted organ); (b) post-transplant prophylaxis (to reduce the possibility of developing acute hepatitis); (c) management once the chronic disease has already set in and stabilized. Combination therapy with peginterferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin seems to play an important role for patients wi...

  19. Hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy: Appropriate risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Wai-Kay

    2015-04-28

    Our understanding of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppresive therapy has increased remarkably during recent years. HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals has been well-described in certain immunosuppressive regimens, including therapies containing corticosteroids, anthracyclines, rituximab, antibody to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HBV reactivation could also occur in HBsAg-negative, antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) positive individuals during therapies containing rituximab, anti-TNF or HSCT.For HBsAg-positive patients, prophylactic antiviral therapy is proven to the effective in preventing HBV reactivation. Recent evidence also demonstrated entecavir to be more effective than lamivudine in this aspect. For HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals, the risk of reactivations differs with the type of immunosuppression. For rituximab, a prospective study demonstrated the 2-year cumulative risk of reactivation to be 41.5%, but prospective data is still lacking for other immunosupressive regimes. The optimal management in preventing HBV reactivation would involve appropriate risk stratification for different immunosuppressive regimes in both HBsAg-positive and HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals.

  20. [Hepatitis B virus genotypes and the response to lamivudine therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska, Małgorzata; Domagała, Małgorzata; Simon, Krzysztof; Gładysz, Andrzej

    2005-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be classified into eight major genotypes (A-H) that have mainly a geographic distribution. The HBV genotype may influence disease progression, HBeAg seroconversion rates, response to antiviral treatment. The aim of study was to analyze the distribution and frequency of genotypes in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Response to lamivudine 100 mg daily therapy was examined in respect to genotype. Sixty six patients (45 (68,2%) male, 21 (31,8%) female) with chronic hepatits B were enrolled. HBV genotypes were assigned before treatment with INNO-LiPA HBV Genotyping, Innogenetics, N. V., Ghent assay, which is a line probe test based on the reverse hybridization principle. In baseline and after 12 months of treatment serological markers of HBV infection, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities and HBV DNA serum levels were tested. Patients with chronic hepatitis B were infected predominantly with genotype A. HBV genotype distribution was: 78,8% for genotype A, 13,6% for genotype D, 1,5% for mixed infection with genotypes A and D. Distribution of genotypes A and D was asymmetrically regardless of sex, HBeAg status, ALT and HBV DNA levels. Four (6,1%) specimens had indeterminate A results by LiPA. There were no significant differences between patients with genotypes A and D regarding age and sex. There were also no significant differences between these two groups regarding rates of HBeAg and anti-HBe positivity, ALT activity and viral load. Twenty months of lamivudine (100 mg daily) therapy resulted in significant decreases in serum HBV DNA and ALT activities in patients with genotype A as well as with genotype D. After 12 months of treatment there were no statistical differences in HBeAg seroconversion rates, ALT activities, viral loads, frequency of HBeAg and anti-HBe between genotypes A and D.

  1. Large Animal Models for Foamy Virus Vector Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Horn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Foamy virus (FV vectors have shown great promise for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC gene therapy. Their ability to efficiently deliver transgenes to multi-lineage long-term repopulating cells in large animal models suggests they will be effective for several human hematopoietic diseases. Here, we review FV vector studies in large animal models, including the use of FV vectors with the mutant O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, MGMTP140K to increase the number of genetically modified cells after transplantation. In these studies, FV vectors have mediated efficient gene transfer to polyclonal repopulating cells using short ex vivo transduction protocols designed to minimize the negative effects of ex vivo culture on stem cell engraftment. In this regard, FV vectors appear superior to gammaretroviral vectors, which require longer ex vivo culture to effect efficient transduction. FV vectors have also compared favorably with lentiviral vectors when directly compared in the dog model. FV vectors have corrected leukocyte adhesion deficiency and pyruvate kinase deficiency in the dog large animal model. FV vectors also appear safer than gammaretroviral vectors based on a reduced frequency of integrants near promoters and also near proto-oncogenes in canine repopulating cells. Together, these studies suggest that FV vectors should be highly effective for several human hematopoietic diseases, including those that will require relatively high percentages of gene-modified cells to achieve clinical benefit.

  2. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  3. Immunomodulatory therapy for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprengers, D.; Janssen, H. L. A.

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most prevalent viral pathogens of man with around 350 million chronically infected patients. It has been postulated that in persistently infected individuals the HBV-specific immune response is too weak to eliminate HBV from all infected hepatocytes, but

  4. Long-term Therapy With Tenofovir Is Effective for Patients Co-Infected With Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries-Sluijs, Theodora E. M. S.; Reijnders, Jurriën G. P.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Prins, Jan M.; Pas, Suzan D.; Schutten, Martin; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Richter, Clemens; Mulder, Jan W.; de Man, Rob A.; Janssen, Harry L. A.; van der Ende, Marchina E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We investigated the long-term efficacy and renal safety of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), administered to patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus (HBV) as part of an antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: We performed a multicenter, prospective

  5. Stopping Preemptive Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis B Virus Can Be Considered for Patients with Favorable Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Kim, Nam Jun; Kim, Jung Hee; Kim, Eun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Paik, Yong-Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2015-12-01

    Preemptive antiviral therapy is recommended for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, little data are available for the stopping therapy. We evaluated clinical outcome and predictors of off-treatment virological response of patients who discontinued therapy. Ninety-five adult patients who discontinued therapy were enrolled. They were analyzed for sustained off-treatment virological response, defined as HBV DNA levels below 2000 IU/ml for at least 12 months after the end of therapy. Sustained off-treatment virological response was seen in 52 patients (54.7%). The baseline HBV DNA level was an independent factor associated with sustained off-treatment virological response, and the rate was 72.1 and 23.5% for those with HBV DNA antiviral therapy. Consolidation treatment duration showed association with sustained off-treatment virological response only for those with low baseline HBV DNA levels.

  6. Oncotargeting by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV: Advances in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Bishnoi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern oncotherapy approaches are based on inducing controlled apoptosis in tumor cells. Although a number of apoptosis-induction approaches are available, site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents still remain the biggest hurdle in achieving the desired cancer treatment benefit. Additionally, systemic treatment-induced toxicity remains a major limiting factor in chemotherapy. To specifically address drug-accessibility and chemotherapy side effects, oncolytic virotherapy (OV has emerged as a novel cancer treatment alternative. In OV, recombinant viruses with higher replication capacity and stronger lytic properties are being considered for tumor cell-targeting and subsequent cell lysing. Successful application of OVs lies in achieving strict tumor-specific tropism called oncotropism, which is contingent upon the biophysical interactions of tumor cell surface receptors with viral receptors and subsequent replication of oncolytic viruses in cancer cells. In this direction, few viral vector platforms have been developed and some of these have entered pre-clinical/clinical trials. Among these, the Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based platform shows high promise, as it is not pathogenic to humans. Further, modern molecular biology techniques such as reverse genetics tools have favorably advanced this field by creating efficient recombinant VSVs for OV; some have entered into clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the current status of VSV based oncotherapy, challenges, and future perspectives regarding its therapeutic applications in the cancer treatment.

  7. Frequent hepatitis B virus rebound among HIV-hepatitis B virus-coinfected patients following antiretroviral therapy interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dore, Gregory J; Soriano, Vicente; Rockstroh, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption in HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients was examined in the Strategic Management of AntiRetroviral Therapy (SMART) study. METHODS: Plasma HBV DNA was measured in all hepatitis B surface antigen-positive (HBV......-positive) participants at baseline, and at months 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. RESULTS: Among HBV-positive participants in the ART interruption (drug conservation) (n = 72) and ART continuation (virological suppression) (n = 62) arms, HBV DNA rebound of more than 1 log from baseline at months 1-4 was seen in 31-33% (P = 0.......003) and 3-4% (P = 0.017), respectively. Thirteen HBV-positive participants had HBV DNA rebound of more than 3 log, including 12 in the drug conservation arm, of which eight were on tenofovir-containing regimens. Factors independently associated with a HBV DNA rebound were drug conservation arm (P = 0...

  8. [Impact of antiviral therapy on the natural history of hepatitis C virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Rodriguez, Conrado M; Gutierrez Garcia, Maria Luisa

    2014-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection affects around 150 million persons, and 350,000 persons worldwide die of this disease each year. Although the data on its natural history are incomplete, after the acute infection, most patients develop chronic forms of hepatitis C with variable stages of fibrosis. In these patients, continual inflammatory activity can cause significant fibrosis, cirrhosis, decompensation of the liver disease, or hepatocarcinoma. In the next few years, it is expected that hepatitis C virus infection and its complications will significantly increase, as will the incidence of hepatocarcinoma in Spain. This review presents the data on the natural history of hepatitis C virus infection and discusses the potential impact of antiviral therapy on the distinct stages of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  9. Persistent abnormalities in lymphoid tissues of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients successfully treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schacker, Timothy W.; Nguyen, Phuong L.; Martinez, Esteban; Reilly, Cavan; Gatell, Jose M.; Horban, Andrzej; Bakowska, Elzbieta; Berzins, Baiba; van Leeuwen, Remko; Wolinsky, Steven; Haase, Ashley T.; Murphy, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    Effective highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is associated with virus suppression and immune reconstitution. However, in some patients, this reconstitution is partial or incomplete because CD4(+) cell counts do not increase significantly. This may be

  10. Progress with Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors for Gene Therapy of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntman, Alisha M; Flotte, Terence R

    2015-06-01

    The pathway to a clinical gene therapy product often involves many changes of course and strategy before obtaining successful results. Here we outline the methodologies, both clinical and preclinical, that went into developing a gene therapy approach to the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency lung disease using muscle-targeted recombinant adeno-associated virus. From initial gene construct development in mouse models through multiple rounds of safety and biodistribution studies in rodents, rabbits, and nonhuman primates to ultimate human trials, this review seeks to provide insight into what clinical translation entails and could thereby inform the process for future investigators.

  11. A Danish nationwide questionnaire study of hepatitis B virus screening before immunosuppressive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunyoz, Kristine Ifigenia; Krarup, Henrik; Weis, Nina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Difficulty in identifying patients who are at risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation makes it import-ant to screen for HBV before initiating immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate screening procedures for HBV infection before initiation...... of immunosuppressive therapy and to explore HBV treatment strategies. METHODS: All Danish units of haematology, oncology, dermatology, rheumatology and gastroenterology using immunosuppressive agents were invited to fill out a questionnaire for The Danish Database for Hepatitis B and C. RESULTS: A total of 28 (53...

  12. Are Steroids a Beneficial Adjunctive Therapy in the Immunosuppressed Patient with Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo J. Lizarraga

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Few reports describe the reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus causing encephalitis (HSVE in patients undergoing brain radiation therapy and a concomitant steroid regimen. The role for steroid use in the treatment of patients with HSVE has not been fully elucidated. We report the case of a female patient immunosuppressed by steroids and brain radiation who developed HSVE and responded to acyclovir and dexamethasone.

  13. Antibody Prophylaxis and Therapy against West Nile Virus Infection in Wild-Type and Immunodeficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Engle, Michael J.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2003-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that causes encephalitis in a subset of susceptible humans. Current treatment for WNV infections is supportive, and no specific therapy or vaccine is available. In this study, we directly tested the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of polyclonal antibodies against WNV. Passive administration of human gamma globulin or mouse serum prior to WNV infection protected congenic wild-type, B-cell-deficient (μMT), and T- and B-cell-deficient (R...

  14. Systemic therapy with oncolytic myxoma virus cures established residual multiple myeloma in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bartee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignancy of plasma B-cells. Traditional chemotherapeutic regimes often induce initial tumor regression; however, virtually all patients eventually succumb to relapse caused by either reintroduction of disease during autologous transplant or expansion of chemotherapy resistant minimal residual disease. It has been previously demonstrated that an oncolytic virus known as myxoma can completely prevent myeloma relapse caused by reintroduction of malignant cells during autologous transplant. The ability of this virus to treat established residual disease in vivo, however, remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that intravenous administration of myxoma virus into mice bearing disseminated myeloma results in the elimination of 70–90% of malignant cells within 24 hours. This rapid debulking was dependent on direct contact of myxoma virus with residual myeloma and did not occur through destruction of the hematopoietic bone marrow niche. Importantly, systemic myxoma therapy also induced potent antimyeloma CD8+ T cell responses which localized to the bone marrow and were capable of completely eradicating established myeloma in some animals. These results demonstrate that oncolytic myxoma virus is not only effective at preventing relapse caused by reinfusion of tumor cells during stem cell transplant, but is also potentially curative for patients bearing established minimal residual disease.

  15. NIR-assisted orchid virus therapy using urchin bimetallic nanomaterials in phalaenopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shin-Yu; Cheng, Liang-Chien; Chen, Chieh-Wei; Lee, Po-Han; Yu, Fengjiao; Zhou, Wuzong; Liu, Ru-Shi; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2013-12-01

    The use of nanoparticles has drawn special attention, particularly in the treatment of plant diseases. Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) and Odontoglossum ring spot virus (ORSV) are the most prevalent and serious diseases that affect the development of the orchid industry. In this study we treated nanoparticles as a strategy for enhancing the resistance of orchids against CymMV and ORSV. After chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were injected into Phalaenopsis leaves, the injected leaves were exposed to 980 nm laser for light-heat conversion. To evaluate virus elimination in the treated Phalaenopsis leaves, the transcripts of coat protein genes and the production of viral proteins were assessed by reverse transcription-Polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The expression of coat protein genes for both CymMV and ORSV was significantly lower in the chitosan-modified Au NP-treated Phalaenopsis leaves than in the control. Similarly, the amount of coat proteins for both viruses in the Phalaenopsis leaves was lower than that in the control (without nanoparticle injection). We propose that the temperature increase in the chitosan-modified Au NP-treated Phalaenopsis tissues after laser exposure reduces the viral population, consequently conferring resistance against CymMV and ORSV. Our findings suggest that the application of chitosan-modified Au NPs is a promising new strategy for orchid virus therapy.

  16. Glycosylation of dengue virus glycoproteins and their interactions with carbohydrate receptors: possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Fakhriedzwan; Muharram, Siti Hanna; Diah, Suwarni

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus, an RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, affects 50 million individuals annually, and approximately 500,000-1,000,000 of these infections lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. With no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatments available to prevent dengue infection, dengue is considered a major public health problem in subtropical and tropical regions. The virus, like other enveloped viruses, uses the host's cellular enzymes to synthesize its structural (C, E, and prM/M) and nonstructural proteins (NS1-5) and, subsequently, to glycosylate these proteins to produce complete and functional glycoproteins. The structural glycoproteins, specifically the E protein, are known to interact with the host's carbohydrate receptors through the viral proteins' N-glycosylation sites and thus mediate the viral invasion of cells. This review focuses on the involvement of dengue glycoproteins in the course of infection and the virus' exploitation of the host's glycans, especially the interactions between host receptors and carbohydrate moieties. We also discuss the recent developments in antiviral therapies that target these processes and interactions, focusing specifically on the use of carbohydrate-binding agents derived from plants, commonly known as lectins, to inhibit the progression of infection.

  17. Otitis media in Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus infected children undergoing antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miziara, I D; Weber, R; Araújo Filho, B Cunha; Pinheiro Neto, C Diógenes

    2007-11-01

    To assess changes in the prevalence of otitis media, associated with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, in Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected children. Division of otorhinolaryngology, Hospital das Clínicas, Sao Paulo University Medical School, Brazil. A cohort of 459 HIV-infected children aged below 13 years. The prevalence of otitis media and the serum cluster of differentiation four glycoprotein T lymphocyte count were compared for children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (with protease inhibitors) and those receiving standard antiretroviral therapy (without protease inhibitors). Otitis media was present in 33.1 per cent of the children. Children aged from zero years to five years 11 months receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy had a higher prevalence of acute otitis media (p=0.02) and a lower prevalence of chronic otitis media (p=0.02). Children who were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy had a mean serum cluster of differentiation four glycoprotein T lymphocyte count greater than that of those who were receiving standard antiretroviral therapy (p<0.001). The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy in Brazilian HIV-infected children was associated with a lower prevalence of chronic otitis media.

  18. Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus before and after combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, José Manuel; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María Alma; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Wrobel, Boris; Carnicer, Fernando; del Olmo, Juan; Ortega, Enrique; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2008-08-26

    We present an analysis of the selective forces acting on two hepatitis C virus genome regions previously postulated to be involved in the viral response to combined antiviral therapy. One includes the three hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein, and the other encompasses the PKR binding domain and the V3 domain in the NS5A region. We used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin) for which samples were obtained before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were sequenced. These were used to detect general patterns of adaptation, to identify particular adaptation mechanisms and to analyze the patterns of evolutionary change in both genome regions. These analyses failed to detect a common adaptive mechanism for the lack of response to antiviral treatment in these patients. On the contrary, a wide range of situations were observed, from patients showing no positively selected sites to others with many, and with completely different topologies in the reconstructed phylogenetic trees. Altogether, these results suggest that viral strategies to evade selection pressure from the immune system and antiviral therapies do not result from a single mechanism and they are likely based on a range of different alternatives, in which several different changes, or their combination, along the HCV genome confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures.

  19. Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus before and after combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Cuevas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of the selective forces acting on two hepatitis C virus genome regions previously postulated to be involved in the viral response to combined antiviral therapy. One includes the three hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein, and the other encompasses the PKR binding domain and the V3 domain in the NS5A region. We used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin for which samples were obtained before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were sequenced. These were used to detect general patterns of adaptation, to identify particular adaptation mechanisms and to analyze the patterns of evolutionary change in both genome regions. These analyses failed to detect a common adaptive mechanism for the lack of response to antiviral treatment in these patients. On the contrary, a wide range of situations were observed, from patients showing no positively selected sites to others with many, and with completely different topologies in the reconstructed phylogenetic trees. Altogether, these results suggest that viral strategies to evade selection pressure from the immune system and antiviral therapies do not result from a single mechanism and they are likely based on a range of different alternatives, in which several different changes, or their combination, along the HCV genome confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  1. A Danish nationwide questionnaire study of hepatitis B virus screening before immunosuppressive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunyoz, Kristine Ifigenia; Krarup, Henrik; Weis, Nina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Difficulty in identifying patients who are at risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation makes it import-ant to screen for HBV before initiating immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate screening procedures for HBV infection before initiation...... of immunosuppressive therapy and to explore HBV treatment strategies. METHODS: All Danish units of haematology, oncology, dermatology, rheumatology and gastroenterology using immunosuppressive agents were invited to fill out a questionnaire for The Danish Database for Hepatitis B and C. RESULTS: A total of 28 (53......%) of the 53 included units answered the questionnaire, of which 25 (89.3%) had a guideline regarding screening for HBV serological markers prior to immunosuppressive therapy, but only ten (37%) had a guideline that is in line with the joint guidelines from the national Danish Societies of Infectious Diseases...

  2. Modeling hepatitis C virus kinetics under therapy using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shudo, Emi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models have proven helpful in analyzing the virological response to antiviral therapy in hepatitis C virus (HCY) infected subjects. Objective: To summarize the uses and limitations of different models for analyzing HCY kinetic data under pegylated interferon therapy. Methods: We formulate mathematical models and fit them by nonlinear least square regression to patient data in order estimate model parameters. We compare the goodness of fit and parameter values estimated by different models statistically. Results/Conclusion: The best model for parameter estimation depends on the availability and the quality of data as well as the therapy used. We also discuss the mathematical models that will be needed to analyze HCV kinetic data from clinical trials with new antiviral drugs.

  3. Hepatitis C virus molecular evolution: Transmission, disease progression and antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, Maria Victoria; Valva, Pamela; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Rahal, Paula; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Yamasaki, Lilian; Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos; Martinez-Guarneros, Armando; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents an important public health problem worldwide. Reduction of HCV morbidity and mortality is a current challenge owned to several viral and host factors. Virus molecular evolution plays an important role in HCV transmission, disease progression and therapy outcome. The high degree of genetic heterogeneity characteristic of HCV is a key element for the rapid adaptation of the intrahost viral population to different selection pressures (e.g., host immune responses and antiviral therapy). HCV molecular evolution is shaped by different mechanisms including a high mutation rate, genetic bottlenecks, genetic drift, recombination, temporal variations and compartmentalization. These evolutionary processes constantly rearrange the composition of the HCV intrahost population in a staging manner. Remarkable advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanism controlling HCV replication have facilitated the development of a plethora of direct-acting antiviral agents against HCV. As a result, superior sustained viral responses have been attained. The rapidly evolving field of anti-HCV therapy is expected to broad its landscape even further with newer, more potent antivirals, bringing us one step closer to the interferon-free era. PMID:25473152

  4. [Significance of hepatitis C virus baseline polymorphism during the antiviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornai, István

    2015-05-24

    The treatment of chronic hepatitis C has developed significantly during the last 25 years. In patients with genotype 1 infection 40-50% sustained virologic response could be achieved using pegylated interferon and ribavirin dual combination, which could be increased significantly with the introduction of direct acting antivirals. Three major groups of direct acting antivirals are known, which directly inhibit different phases of viral life cycle, by inhibiting the function of several non-structural proteins (NS3/4A protease, NS5A protein and NS5B polymerase). Due to the rapid replication rate of hepatitis C virus and the error-prone NS5B polymerase activity, mutant virions are generated, which might have reduced susceptibility to direct acting antiviral therapy. Since these resistance associated variants might exist before the antiviral therapy, they are still able to replicate during the direct acting antiviral treatment. Due to this selection pressure, the resistant virus will replace the wild type. This was especially detected during monotherapy, therefore, the first generation of direct acting antivirals have been combined with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, while recently interferon-free combinations are being developed including 2 or 3 direct acting antivirals. Using the first generation protease inhibitors boceprevir and telaprevir, it could have been seen, that the rate of resistance associated variants is higher and the therapeutic outcome is worse in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1a, than in 1b. Similar phenomenon was seen with the second generation of NS3/4A protease inhibitors as well as with NS5A or NS5B polymerase. This is due to the lower genetic barrier to resistance, ie. usually fewer mutations are enough for the emergence of resistance in genotype 1a. The selection of resistance associated variants is one of the most important challenges during the interferon-free therapy.

  5. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus-based Strategies: Toward a Breakthrough in Glioblastoma Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang eNing

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses are a class of antitumor agents that selectively kill tumor cells while sparing normal cells. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV has been investigated in clinical trials for patients with the malignant brain tumor glioblastoma for more than a decade. These clinical studies have shown the safety of oHSV administration to the human brain, however, therapeutic efficacy of oHSV as a single treatment remains unsatisfactory. Factors that could hamper the anti-glioblastoma efficacy of oHSV include: attenuated potency of oHSV due to deletion or mutation of viral genes involved in virulence, restricted viral replication and spread within the tumor; suboptimal oHSV delivery associated with intratumoral injection; virus infection-induced inflammatory and cellular immune responses which could inhibit oHSV replication and promote its clearance; lack of effective incorporation of oHSV into standard-of-care, and poor knowledge about the ability of oHSV to target glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs. In an attempt to address these issues, recent research efforts have been directed at: (1 design of new engineered viruses to enhance potency, (2 better understanding of the role of the cellular immunity elicited by oHSV infection of tumors, (3 combinatorial strategies with different antitumor agents with a mechanistic rationale, (4 armed viruses expressing therapeutic transgenes, (5 use of GSC-derived models in oHSV evaluation, and (6 combinations of these. In this review, we will describe the current status of oHSV clinical trials for glioblastoma, and discuss recent research advances and future directions toward successful oHSV-based therapy of glioblastoma.

  6. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus-based strategies: toward a breakthrough in glioblastoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jianfang; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) are a class of antitumor agents that selectively kill tumor cells while sparing normal cells. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has been investigated in clinical trials for patients with the malignant brain tumor glioblastoma for more than a decade. These clinical studies have shown the safety of oHSV administration to the human brain, however, therapeutic efficacy of oHSV as a single treatment remains unsatisfactory. Factors that could hamper the anti-glioblastoma efficacy of oHSV include: attenuated potency of oHSV due to deletion or mutation of viral genes involved in virulence, restricting viral replication and spread within the tumor; suboptimal oHSV delivery associated with intratumoral injection; virus infection-induced inflammatory and cellular immune responses which could inhibit oHSV replication and promote its clearance; lack of effective incorporation of oHSV into standard-of-care, and poor knowledge about the ability of oHSV to target glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). In an attempt to address these issues, recent research efforts have been directed at: (1) design of new engineered viruses to enhance potency, (2) better understanding of the role of the cellular immunity elicited by oHSV infection of tumors, (3) combinatorial strategies with different antitumor agents with a mechanistic rationale, (4) "armed" viruses expressing therapeutic transgenes, (5) use of GSC-derived models in oHSV evaluation, and (6) combinations of these. In this review, we will describe the current status of oHSV clinical trials for glioblastoma, and discuss recent research advances and future directions toward successful oHSV-based therapy of glioblastoma.

  7. Polyinosinic Acid Blocks Adeno-Associated Virus Macrophage Endocytosis In Vitro and Enhances Adeno-Associated Virus Liver-Directed Gene Therapy In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Remco; Montenegro-Miranda, Paula S.; Riviere, Christel; Schilderink, Ronald; ten Bloemendaal, Lysbeth; van Gorp, Jacqueline; Duijst, Suzanne; de Waart, Dirk R.; Beuers, Ulrich; Haisma, Hidde J.; Bosma, Piter J.

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) has been demonstrated to be effective for liver-directed gene therapy in humans. Although hepatocytes are the main target cell for AAV8, there is a loss of the viral vector because of uptake by macrophages and Kupffer cells. Reducing this loss would increase

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus Suppressive Therapy in Herpes Simplex Virus-2/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Coinfected Women Is Associated With Reduced Systemic CXCL10 But Not Genital Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen-Nissen, Erica; Chang, Joanne T; Thomas, Katherine K; Adams, Devin; Celum, Connie; Sanchez, Jorge; Coombs, Robert W; McElrath, M Juliana; Baeten, Jared M

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) may heighten immune activation and increase human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) replication, resulting in greater infectivity and faster HIV-1 disease progression. An 18-week randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial of 500 mg valacyclovir twice daily in 20 antiretroviral-naive women coinfected with HSV-2 and HIV-1 was conducted and HSV-2 suppression was found to significantly reduce both HSV-2 and HIV-1 viral loads both systemically and the endocervical compartment. To determine the effect of HSV-2 suppression on systemic and genital mucosal inflammation, plasma specimens, and endocervical swabs were collected weekly from volunteers in the trial and cryopreserved. Plasma was assessed for concentrations of 31 cytokines and chemokines; endocervical fluid was eluted from swabs and assayed for 14 cytokines and chemokines. Valacyclovir significantly reduced plasma CXCL10 but did not significantly alter other cytokine concentrations in either compartment. These data suggest genital tract inflammation in women persists despite HSV-2 suppression, supporting the lack of effect on transmission seen in large scale efficacy trials. Alternative therapies are needed to reduce persistent mucosal inflammation that may enhance transmission of HSV-2 and HIV-1.

  9. Perspective on Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Modification for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Michael E; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a X-linked, progressive childhood myopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, one of the largest genes in the genome. It is characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration and dysfunction leading to cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a highly promising gene therapy vector. AAV gene therapy has resulted in unprecedented clinical success for treating several inherited diseases. However, AAV gene therapy for DMD remains a significant challenge. Hurdles for AAV-mediated DMD gene therapy include the difficulty to package the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in an AAV vector, the necessity for whole-body gene delivery, the immune response to dystrophin and AAV capsid, and the species-specific barriers to translate from animal models to human patients. Capsid engineering aims at improving viral vector properties by rational design and/or forced evolution. In this review, we discuss how to use the state-of-the-art AAV capsid engineering technologies to overcome hurdles in AAV-based DMD gene therapy.

  10. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  11. High-Dose Mannose-Binding Lectin Therapy for Ebola Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    viruses . N-glycosylation of viral envelopes is an important such target shared between in- fluenza, HIV, HCV, West Nile virus , SARS-CoV, Hendra virus ...host cells. Therefore, MBL preferentially recognizes glycosylated viruses including influenza virus , human immunodeficiency virus , severe acute...are heavily glycosylated and contain high-mannose. As a result, MBL binds to Ebola and Marburg viruses and mediates com- plement-dependent virus

  12. Side effects of antiviral therapy in hepatitis C virus infection-sarcoidosis - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodor, D; Teodor, Andra; Grigore, Lucia; Jugănariu, Gabriela; Dorobăţ, Carmen Mihaela; Miftode, Egidia; Azoicăi, Doina

    2012-01-01

    Standard therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus infection is still a combination of peginterferon alfa2a/2b and ribavirin for 48 weeks. As of side effects, there are organic side effects, such as hematologic disorders, and functional side effects, reflected in the quality of life of hepatitis C patients. Up to 30% of the patients develop specific side effects such as headache, fever, fatigue. Sarcoidosis, known as a granulomatous disease of uncertain cause, is an uncommon finding in this category of patients. This cause-effect relation is accounted for by the convergent action of peginterferon and ribavirin of stimulating type 1 T helper cells and reducing type 2 helper T cells activation. We present the case of male patient known with chronic hepatitis C who developed pulmonary sarcoidosis following antiviral therapy. The first manifestation of the disease was unexplained fever accompanied by pulmonary tract disease. The diagnosis was established by immunophenotyping in bronchial aspirate

  13. Herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and in neonate: status of art of epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barucca Valentina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection is one of the most common viral sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. The first time infection of the mother may lead to severe illness in pregnancy and may be associated with virus transmission from mother to foetus/newborn. Since the incidence of this sexually transmitted infection continues to rise and because the greatest incidence of herpes simplex virus infections occur in women of reproductive age, the risk of maternal transmission of the virus to the foetus or neonate has become a major health concern. On these purposes the Authors of this review looked for the medical literature and pertinent publications to define the status of art regarding the epidemiology, the diagnosis, the therapy and the prevention of HSV in pregnant women and neonate. Special emphasis is placed upon the importance of genital herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and on the its prevention to avoid neonatal HSV infections.

  14. Evolution of Envelope Sequences of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Cellular Reservoirs in the Setting of Potent Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Frost, Simon D. W.; Leigh-Brown, Andrew J.; Ignacio, Caroline C.; Kee, Kristin; Perelson, Alan S.; Spina, Celsa A.; Havlir, Diane V.; Hezareh, Marjan; Looney, David J.; Richman, Douglas D.; Wong, Joseph K.

    1999-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients treated with potent antiretroviral therapy, the persistence of latently infected cells may reflect the long decay half-life of this cellular reservoir or ongoing viral replication at low levels with continuous replenishment of the population or both. To address these possibilities, sequences encompassing the C2 and V3 domains of HIV-1 env were analyzed from virus present in baseline plasma and from viral isolates obtained after 2 years of suppressive therapy in six patients. The presence of sequence changes consistent with evolution was demonstrated for three subjects and correlated with less complete suppression of viral replication, as indicated by the rapidity of the initial virus load decline or the intermittent reappearance of even low levels of detectable viremia. Together, these results provide evidence for ongoing replication. In the remaining three patients, virus recovered after 2 years of therapy was either genotypically contemporary with or ancestral to virus present in plasma 2 years before, indicating that virus recovery had indeed resulted from activation of latently infected cells. PMID:10516049

  15. Human Papilloma Virus Infection Does Not Predict Response to Interferon Therapy in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Anat; Garg, Nisha; Nanji, Afshan; Joag, Madhura; Nuovo, Gerard; Palioura, Sotiria; Wang, Gaofeng; Karp, Carol L

    2015-11-01

    To identify the frequency of human papilloma virus (HPV) in ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) and to evaluate differences in clinical features and treatment response of tumors with positive versus negative HPV results. Retrospective case series. Twenty-seven patients with OSSN. Ocular surface squamous neoplasia specimens were analyzed for the presence of HPV. Clinical features and response to interferon were determined retrospectively and linked to the presence (versus absence) of HPV. Clinical characteristics of OSSN by HPV status. Twenty-one of 27 tumors (78%) demonstrated positive HPV results. The HPV genotypes identified included HPV-16 in 10 tumors (48%), HPV-31 in 5 tumors, HPV-33 in 1 tumor, HPV-35 in 2 tumors, HPV-51 in 2 tumors, and a novel HPV in 3 tumors (total of 23 tumors because 1 tumor had 3 identified genotypes). Tumors found in the superior limbus were more likely to show positive HPV results (48% vs. 0%; P=0.06, Fisher exact test). Tumors with positive HPV-16 results were larger (68 vs. 34 mm2; P=0.08, Mann-Whitney U test) and were more likely to have papillomatous morphologic features (50% vs. 12%; P=0.07, Fisher exact test) compared with tumors showing negative results for HPV-16. Human papilloma virus status was not found to be associated with response to interferon therapy (P=1.0, Fisher exact test). Metrics found to be associated with a nonfavorable response to interferon were male gender and tumors located in the superior conjunctivae. The presence of HPV in OSSN seems to be more common in lesions located in the nonexposed, superior limbus. Human papilloma virus presence does not seem to be required for a favorable response to interferon therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of antiviral therapy in immunocompromised patients with herpes simplex virus meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noska, Amanda; Kyrillos, Ramona; Hansen, Glen; Hirigoyen, Diane; Williams, David N

    2015-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are important causes of acute neurologic illness. Although the role of acyclovir in treating HSV encephalitis is clear, the role of antiviral therapy in HSV meningitis remains controversial. In this retrospective observational study, we reviewed the charts of all patients with cerebrospinal fluid specimens positive for HSV-1 or HSV-2 by polymerase chain reaction between July 2000 and November 2012. Patients' charts were reviewed for demographic data, clinical presentation, treatment, and clinical outcomes. Forty-two patient-episodes were clinically classified as meningitis. In 6 episodes (14.3%), patients with meningitis received no antivirals, whereas the remaining episodes were treated with an oral antiviral (n = 11 [26.2%]), combination intravenous and oral therapy (n = 22 [52.4%]), or intravenous acyclovir alone (n = 3 [7.1%]). Six patients had recurrent episodes of meningitis and all recovered without any neurologic sequelae. Neurologic outcomes were significantly improved with antiviral therapy in immunocompromised patients with herpes meningitis (P meningitis rapidly improve, but immunocompromised hosts have more neurologic sequelae and may benefit from antiviral therapy. Our data suggest symptomatic treatment alone for immunocompetent patients with HSV meningitis, avoiding the cost and side effects of prolonged intravenous acyclovir therapy; in contrast, immunocompromised patients had improved outcomes and would therefore benefit from antiviral therapy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Ribavirin-induced anemia in hepatitis C virus patients undergoing combination therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeja M Krishnan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The current standard of care for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection - combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin - elicits sustained responses in only ∼50% of the patients treated. No alternatives exist for patients who do not respond to combination therapy. Addition of ribavirin substantially improves response rates to interferon and lowers relapse rates following the cessation of therapy, suggesting that increasing ribavirin exposure may further improve treatment response. A key limitation, however, is the toxic side-effect of ribavirin, hemolytic anemia, which often necessitates a reduction of ribavirin dosage and compromises treatment response. Maximizing treatment response thus requires striking a balance between the antiviral and hemolytic activities of ribavirin. Current models of viral kinetics describe the enhancement of treatment response due to ribavirin. Ribavirin-induced anemia, however, remains poorly understood and precludes rational optimization of combination therapy. Here, we develop a new mathematical model of the population dynamics of erythrocytes that quantitatively describes ribavirin-induced anemia in HCV patients. Based on the assumption that ribavirin accumulation decreases erythrocyte lifespan in a dose-dependent manner, model predictions capture several independent experimental observations of the accumulation of ribavirin in erythrocytes and the resulting decline of hemoglobin in HCV patients undergoing combination therapy, estimate the reduced erythrocyte lifespan during therapy, and describe inter-patient variations in the severity of ribavirin-induced anemia. Further, model predictions estimate the threshold ribavirin exposure beyond which anemia becomes intolerable and suggest guidelines for the usage of growth hormones, such as erythropoietin, that stimulate erythrocyte production and avert the reduction of ribavirin dosage, thereby improving treatment response. Our model thus facilitates, in

  18. Long-term use of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohui Zhu

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy currently used in China is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with good highly active antiretroviral therapy compliance. Human immunodeficiency virus may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis.

  19. Meeting report: 4th ISIRV antiviral group conference: Novel antiviral therapies for influenza and other respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Fry, Alicia M

    2016-05-01

    The International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (isirv) held its 4th Antiviral Group Conference at the University of Texas on 2-4 June, 2015. With emerging resistance to the drugs currently licensed for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza viruses, primarily the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) and the M2 inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine, and the lack of effective interventions against other respiratory viruses, the 3-day programme focused on the discovery and development of inhibitors of several virus targets and key host cell factors involved in virus replication or mediating the inflammatory response. Virus targets included the influenza haemagglutinin, neuraminidase and M2 proteins, and both the respiratory syncytial virus and influenza polymerases and nucleoproteins. Therapies for rhinoviruses and MERS and SARS coronaviruses were also discussed. With the emerging development of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics, the potential implications of antibody-dependent enhancement of disease were also addressed. Topics covered all aspects from structural and molecular biology to preclinical and clinical studies. The importance of suitable clinical trial endpoints and regulatory issues were also discussed from the perspectives of both industry and government. This meeting summary provides an overview, not only for the conference participants, but also for those interested in the current status of antivirals for respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-Lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  1. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Horino

    Full Text Available X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1 is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  2. Antibody prophylaxis and therapy against West Nile virus infection in wild-type and immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Michael J; Diamond, Michael S

    2003-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that causes encephalitis in a subset of susceptible humans. Current treatment for WNV infections is supportive, and no specific therapy or vaccine is available. In this study, we directly tested the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of polyclonal antibodies against WNV. Passive administration of human gamma globulin or mouse serum prior to WNV infection protected congenic wild-type, B-cell-deficient ( micro MT), and T- and B-cell-deficient (RAG1) C57BL/6J mice. Notably, no increased mortality due to immune enhancement was observed. Although immune antibody completely prevented morbidity and mortality in wild-type mice, its effect was not durable in immunocompromised mice: many micro MT and RAG1 mice eventually succumbed to infection. Thus, antibody by itself did not completely eliminate viral reservoirs in host tissues, consistent with an intact cellular immune response being required for viral clearance. In therapeutic postexposure studies, human gamma globulin partially protected against WNV-induced mortality. In micro MT mice, therapy had to be initiated within 2 days of infection to gain a survival benefit, whereas in the wild-type mice, therapy even 5 days after infection reduced mortality. This time point is significant because between days 4 and 5, WNV was detected in the brains of infected mice. Thus, passive transfer of immune antibody improves clinical outcome even after WNV has disseminated into the central nervous system.

  3. Structure and Function of the Non-Structural Protein of Dengue Virus and its Applications in Antiviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qian; Zhang, Bao; Yu, JianHai; Wu, Qinghua; Yang, Fangji; Cao, Hong; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever, a type of global and tropical infectious disease, and its prevention has become a challenging issue worldwide. Antibody-dependent enhancement effects and the virus pathogenic mechanism have not yet been fully elucidated, hindering the development of dengue fever prevention and suitable drug treatment. There is currently no specific prevention and therapy in clinical trials, however, in recent years, studies have focused on the pathogenesis and treatment of dengue. Research focusing on dengue virus nonstructural protein in special drugs for the prevention and control of dengue fever is a new progress leading to improved understanding regarding the prevention and control of dengue fever and suitable drugs for the treatment. The main challenges regarding the structure of dengue virus nonstructural protein and the drugs for antiviral therapy are summarized in this paper.

  4. Cellular automata approach for the dynamics of HIV infection under antiretroviral therapies: The role of the virus diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ramón E. R.; de Figueirêdo, Pedro Hugo; Coutinho, Sérgio

    2013-10-01

    We study a cellular automata model to test the timing of antiretroviral therapy strategies for the dynamics of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We focus on the role of virus diffusion when its population is included in previous cellular automata model that describes the dynamics of the lymphocytes cells population during infection. This inclusion allows us to consider the spread of infection by the virus-cell interaction, beyond that which occurs by cell-cell contagion. The results show an acceleration of the infectious process in the absence of treatment, but show better efficiency in reducing the risk of the onset of AIDS when combined antiretroviral therapies are used even with drugs of low effectiveness. Comparison of results with clinical data supports the conclusions of this study.

  5. Triple antiviral therapy in hepatitis C virus infection with or without mixed cryoglobulinaemia: a prospective, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnani, Laura; Fabbrizzi, Alessio; Triboli, Elisa; Urraro, Teresa; Boldrini, Barbara; Fognani, Elisa; Piluso, Alessia; Caini, Patrizio; Ranieri, Jessica; Monti, Monica; Laffi, Giacomo; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2014-09-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinaemia is strongly related to hepatitis C virus infection. Treatment with peg-interferon and ribavirin has been indicated as first-line therapy for mild/moderate hepatitis C virus-related mixed cryoglobulinaemia. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of triple boceprevir-based antiviral therapy in patients with or without mixed cryoglobulinaemia previously treated with peg-interferon and ribavirin, and with advanced liver disease. Thirty-five hepatitis C virus-positive patients (17 with asymptomatic mixed cryoglobulinaemia, 5 with symptomatic mixed cryoglobulinaemia, and 11 without mixed cryoglobulinaemia) were treated with triple boceprevir-based antiviral therapy. In 19/22 cryoglobulinaemic subjects (86%), the addition of boceprevir induced cryocrit disappearance. Cryocrit behaviour was related to virological response, with improvement of symptoms upon undetectable viraemia and reappearance after virological breakthrough. The rate of sustained virological response was lower in cryoglobulinaemic patients than in patients without mixed cryoglobulinaemia (23.8% vs 70% respectively, p=0.01). Boceprevir-based therapy was safe and effective in cryoglobulinaemic patients. The correlation between direct inhibition of hepatitis C virus replication and clinical improvement in mixed cryoglobulinaemic patients is definitive proof of the key pathogenetic role played by viral replication. Further studies are needed to confirm and clarify the reduced virological response in patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Gene therapy with adeno-associated virus vector 5-human factor IX in adults with hemophilia B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miesbach, Wolfgang; Meijer, Karina; Coppens, Michiel

    2018-01-01

    Hemophilia B gene therapy aims to ameliorate bleeding risk and provide endogenous factor IX (FIX) activity/synthesis through a single treatment, eliminating the requirement for FIX concentrate. AMT-060 combines an adeno-associated virus-5 (AAV5) vector with a liver-specific promoter driving...

  7. Arming viruses in multi-mechanistic oncolytic viral therapy: current research and future developments, with emphasis on poxviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampath P

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Padma Sampath, Steve H ThorneDepartment of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The field of oncolytic virology has made great strides in recent years. However, one key finding has been that the use of viral agents that replicate selectively in tumors is usually insufficient to achieve anything beyond small and transient responses. Instead, like most cancer therapies, oncolytic viruses are most effective in combination with other therapies, which is where they have proven therapeutic effects in clinical and preclinical studies. In cases of some of the smaller RNA viruses, effects can only be achieved through combination regimens with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or targeted conventional therapies. However, larger DNA viruses are able to express one or more transgenes; thus, therapeutic mechanisms can be built into the viral vector itself. The incorporated approaches into arming oncolytic viruses through transgene expression will be the main focus of this review, including use of immune activators, prodrug converting enzymes, anti-angiogenic factors, and targeting of the stroma. This will focus on poxviruses as model systems with large cloning capacities, which have routinely been used as transgene expression vectors in different settings, including vaccine and oncolytic viral therapy.Keywords: vaccinia, poxvirus, immunotherapy, angiogenesis, prodrug

  8. Adeno-associated virus-based gene therapy for inherited disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, Terence R

    2005-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus vectors are capable of long-term gene transfer without obvious adverse effects in a number of animal models. Over the last two decades, preclinical and early phase clinical trials in cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency were undertaken to test the feasibility of this approach. The results of those studies have been important since they have indicated that in vivo gene transfer is feasible and relatively safe. In addition, a number of key limitations to the current generation of AAV2 gene therapy vectors have been defined. The information about these limitations has been used to develop newer AAV vector approaches, based on new mutant and alternative serotype capsids and enhanced promoter systems. The evaluation of safety and efficacy of these newer agents is ongoing.

  9. Ocular herpes simplex virus: how are latency, reactivation, recurrent disease and therapy interrelated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dujaili, Lena J; Clerkin, Patrick P; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2012-01-01

    Most humans are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in early childhood and remain latently infected throughout life. While most individuals have mild or no symptoms, some will develop destructive HSV keratitis. Ocular infection with HSV-1 and its associated sequelae account for the majority of corneal blindness in industrialized nations. Neuronal latency in the peripheral ganglia is established when transcription of the viral genome is repressed (silenced) except for the latency-associated transcripts and microRNAs. The functions of latency-associated transcripts have been investigated since 1987. Roles have been suggested relating to reactivation, establishment of latency, neuronal protection, antiapoptosis, apoptosis, virulence and asymptomatic shedding. Here, we review HSV-1 latent infections, reactivation, recurrent disease and antiviral therapies for the ocular HSV diseases. PMID:21861620

  10. Research advances in microRNAs in regulating hepatitis C virus replication and antiviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUI Xianghua

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the most common causes of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small, non-coding RNA, are involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes in human bodies. The mechanism by which miRNAs regulate HCV replication is described, and the effects of liver-specific microRNA-122 antagonists on hepatitis C antiviral therapy are discussed. Our study indicates that miRNAs play an important regulatory role in HCV expression. Targeting miRNAs may be a potential therapeutic approach for treating HCV infection, but further studies are still in need.

  11. Advances in Developing Therapies to Combat Zika Virus: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Munjal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV remained largely quiescent for nearly six decades after its first appearance in 1947. ZIKV reappeared after 2007, resulting in a declaration of an international “public health emergency” in 2016 by the World Health Organization (WHO. Until this time, ZIKV was considered to induce only mild illness, but it has now been established as the cause of severe clinical manifestations, including fetal anomalies, neurological problems, and autoimmune disorders. Infection during pregnancy can cause congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly and neurological degeneration, and in other cases, Guillain-Barré syndrome, making infections with ZIKV a substantial public health concern. Genomic and molecular investigations are underway to investigate ZIKV pathology and its recent enhanced pathogenicity, as well as to design safe and potent vaccines, drugs, and therapeutics. This review describes progress in the design and development of various anti-ZIKV therapeutics, including drugs targeting virus entry into cells and the helicase protein, nucleosides, inhibitors of NS3 protein, small molecules, methyltransferase inhibitors, interferons, repurposed drugs, drugs designed with the aid of computers, neutralizing antibodies, convalescent serum, antibodies that limit antibody-dependent enhancement, and herbal medicines. Additionally, covalent inhibitors of viral protein expression and anti-Toll-like receptor molecules are discussed. To counter ZIKV-associated disease, we need to make rapid progress in developing novel therapies that work effectually to inhibit ZIKV.

  12. Combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin promotes multiple adaptive solutions in hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, José M; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María A; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Carnicer, Fernando; Olmo, Juan Del; Ortega, Enrique; González-Candelas, Fernando; Moya, Andrés

    2009-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) presents several regions involved potentially in evading antiviral treatment and host immune system. Two regions, known as PKR-BD and V3 domains, have been proposed to be involved in resistance to interferon. Additionally, hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein are also good candidates to participate in evasion from the immune system. In this study, we have used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin) for which samples obtained just before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment were available. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were obtained. The predominant amino acid sequences for each time sample and patient were determined. Next, the sequences of the PKR-BD and V3 domains and the hypervariable regions from different time samples were compared for each patient. The highest levels of variability were detected at the three hypervariable regions of the E2 protein and, to a lower extent, at the V3 domain of the NS5A protein. However, no clear patterns of adaptation to the host immune system or to antiviral treatment were detected. In summary, although high levels of variability are correlated to viral adaptive response, antiviral treatment does not seem to promote convergent adaptive changes. Consequently, other regions must be involved in evasion strategies likely based on a combination of multiple mechanisms, in which pools of changes along the HCV genome could confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Pegylated interferon plus ribavirin combination therapy in postliver transplant recipients with recurrent hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta-Ya Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant hepatitis C virus (HCV recurrence is universal in chronic hepatitis C recipients. Antiviral therapy is suggested after liver transplant to halt disease progression. Pegylated interferon plus ribavirin therapy remains the standard of care in many areas where direct antiviral agents are poorly accessible. This study aimed to assess the treatment efficacy and safety of the regimen for Taiwanese patients with post-transplant HCV recurrence. Nine patients with HCV recurrence postliver transplantation were allocated. Patients received either pegylated interferon α-2a 180 μg/wk or pegylated interferon α-2b 1.5 mg/kg/wk plus ribavirin for 24–48 weeks. The primary endpoint was the achievement of sustained virological response (SVR, defined as undetectable HCV RNA throughout 6 months of follow-up after the end of treatment. The safety profiles were also documented. The rates of rapid virological response, early virological response, end-of-treatment virological response, and SVR were 33%, 63%, 75%, and 56% respectively. Of the four patients who failed antiviral treatment, the treatment responses were nonresponse (n = 1, loss of follow-up (n = 1, and relapse (n = 2. Three patients terminated therapy early due to severe adverse events, including severe anemia, intra-abdomen infection, and hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence. One of the three patients who terminated treatment early at Week 6 experienced rapid virological response followed by SVR. Pegylated interferon/ribavirin combination allowed a chance for cure with a fair SVR rate in Taiwanese chronic hepatitis C patients postliver transplantation. Early identification of side effects and careful monitoring during therapy might enhance the treatment efficacy.

  14. Prophylactic antiviral therapy in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in hepatitis B virus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ya-Ping; Jiang, Jia-Lu; Zou, Wai-Yi; Xu, Duo-Rong; Li, Juan

    2015-04-14

    To investigate the timing, safety and efficacy of prophylactic antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). This prospective study recruited a total of 57 patients diagnosed with malignant hematological diseases and HBV infection at the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University between 2006 and 2013. The patients were classified as hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive or HBsAg-negative/ antiHBc-positive. Patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by antiviral therapy with nucleoside analogues. Patients underwent allo-HSCT when serum HBV DNA was antiviral therapy was continued for 1 year after the discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy. A total of 105 patients who underwent allo-HSCT and had no HBV infection were recruited as controls. The three groups were compared for incidence of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD), drug-induced liver injury, hepatic veno-occlusive disease, death and survival time. A total of 29 of the 41 subjects with chronic GVHD exhibited extensive involvement and 12 exhibited focal involvement. Ten of the 13 subjects with chronic GVHD in the HBsAg(-)/hepatitis B core antibody(+) group exhibited extensive involvement and 3 exhibited focal involvement. Five of the 10 subjects with chronic GVHD in the HBsAg(+) group exhibited extensive involvement and 5 exhibited focal involvement. The non HBV-infected group did not differ significantly from the HBsAg-negative/antiHBc-positive and the HBsAg-positive groups which were treated with nucleoside analogues in the incidence of graft-vs-host disease (acute GVHD; 37.1%, 46.9% and 40%, respectively; P = 0.614; chronic GVHD; 39%, 40.6% and 40%, respectively; P = 0.98), drug-induced liver injury (25.7%, 18.7% and 28%, respectively; P = 0.7), death (37.1%, 40.6% and 52%, respectively; P = 0.4) and survival times (P = 0.516). One patient developed HBV reactivation (HBsAg-positivity) due to

  15. Dynamics of melanoma tumor therapy with vesicular stomatitis virus: explaining the variability in outcomes using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, D M; Offord, C P; Dev, J; Bajzer, Z; Vile, R G; Dingli, D

    2012-05-01

    Tumor selective, replication competent viruses are being tested for cancer gene therapy. This approach introduces a new therapeutic paradigm due to potential replication of the therapeutic agent and induction of a tumor-specific immune response. However, the experimental outcomes are quite variable, even when studies utilize highly inbred strains of mice and the same cell line and virus. Recognizing that virotherapy is an exercise in population dynamics, we utilize mathematical modeling to understand the variable outcomes observed when B16ova malignant melanoma tumors are treated with vesicular stomatitis virus in syngeneic, fully immunocompetent mice. We show how variability in the initial tumor size and the actual amount of virus delivered to the tumor have critical roles on the outcome of therapy. Virotherapy works best when tumors are small, and a robust innate immune response can lead to superior tumor control. Strategies that reduce tumor burden without suppressing the immune response and methods that maximize the amount of virus delivered to the tumor should optimize tumor control in this model system.

  16. Attitudes and Willingness to Assume Risk of Experimental Therapy to Eradicate Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseso, Linda; Magaret, Amalia S; Jerome, Keith R; Fox, Julie; Wald, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment of genital herpes is focused on ameliorating signs and symptoms but is not curative. However, as potential herpes simplex virus (HSV) cure approaches are tested in the laboratory, we aimed to assess the interest in such studies by persons with genital herpes and the willingness to assume risks associated with experimental therapy. We constructed an anonymous online questionnaire that was posted on websites that provide information regarding genital herpes. The questions collected demographic and clinical information on adults who self-reported as having genital herpes, and assessed attitudes toward and willingness to participate in HSV cure clinical research. Seven hundred eleven participants provided sufficient responses to be included in the analysis. Sixty-six percent were women; the median age was 37 years, and the median time since genital HSV diagnosis was 4.7 years. The willingness to participate in trials increased from 59.0% in phase 1 to 68.5% in phase 2, and 81.2% in phase 3 trials, and 40% reported willingness to participate even in the absence of immediate, personal benefits. The most desirable outcome was the elimination of risk for transmission to sex partner or neonate. The mean perceived severity of receiving a diagnosis of genital HSV-2 was 4.2 on a scale of 1 to 5. Despite suppressive therapy available, persons with genital herpes are interested in participating in clinical research aimed at curing HSV, especially in more advanced stages of development.

  17. A review of palivizumab and emerging therapies for respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadman, Kristin A; Wald, Ellen R

    2011-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important pathogen in children and adults; however, current treatment options are primarily supportive. Palivizumab, the only approved specific monoclonal antibody for RSV is used prophylactically to reduce morbidity in a select population of high-risk children. The development and current use of palivizumab; the potential role of palivizumab as preventive therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis, asthma and compromised immune systems; and explores the limited research in which palivizumab has been used for treatment of RSV. The modified recommendations for the use of palivizumab espoused by the American Academy of Pediatrics and research on the cost-effectiveness of this product are presented. In addition, the authors discuss the development of enhanced monoclonal antibodies including motavizumab, which was recently denied FDA approval for preventative therapy. The authors explore the historical and current efforts to develop a vaccine targeting RSV. The current status of antiviral drug development is also reviewed. The literature search included RSV-Ig, palivizumab, and emerging drugs and vaccines for the treatment of RSV as keywords and titles from 1997 to 2011. Although there are potential drugs and vaccines in development to prevent or reduce the effects of RSV infection, palivizumab remains the only licensed product to reduce the severity of disease in high-risk pediatric patients.

  18. Adeno-Associated Virus Gene Therapy in a Sheep Model of Tay-Sachs Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Randle, Ashley N; Maitland, Stacy A; Benatti, Hector R; Hubbard, Spencer M; Canning, Peter F; Vogel, Matthew B; Brunson, Brandon L; Hwang, Misako; Ellis, Lauren E; Bradbury, Allison M; Gentry, Atoska S; Taylor, Amanda R; Wooldridge, Anne A; Wilhite, Dewey R; Winter, Randolph L; Whitlock, Brian K; Johnson, Jacob A; Holland, Merilee; Salibi, Nouha; Beyers, Ronald J; Sartin, James L; Denney, Thomas S; Cox, Nancy R; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2017-09-18

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme hexosaminidase A (HexA). TSD also occurs in sheep, the only experimental model of TSD that has clinical signs of disease. The natural history of sheep TSD was characterized using serial neurological evaluations, 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiograms, electrodiagnostics, and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Intracranial gene therapy was also tested using AAVrh8 monocistronic vectors encoding the α-subunit of Hex (TSD α) or a mixture of two vectors encoding both the α and β subunits separately (TSD α + β) injected at high (1.3 × 10 13 vector genomes) or low (4.2 × 10 12 vector genomes) dose. Delay of symptom onset and/or reduction of acquired symptoms were noted in all adeno-associated virus-treated sheep. Postmortem evaluation showed superior HexA and vector genome distribution in the brain of TSD α + β sheep compared to TSD α sheep, but spinal cord distribution was low in all groups. Isozyme analysis showed superior HexA formation after treatment with both vectors (TSD α + β), and ganglioside clearance was most widespread in the TSD α + β high-dose sheep. Microglial activation and proliferation in TSD sheep-most prominent in the cerebrum-were attenuated after gene therapy. This report demonstrates therapeutic efficacy for TSD in the sheep brain, which is on the same order of magnitude as a child's brain.

  19. Survival of Children Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Antiretroviral Therapy in Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ugra Mohan; Dhingra, Neeraj; Jones, Yujwal Raj; Rewari, Bharat Bhusan; Jeyaseelan, L; Harvey, Pauline; Chavan, Laxmikant; Saggurti, Niranjan; S Reddy, D C

    2018-02-09

    To assess the survival probability and associated factors among children living with human immunodeficiency virus (CLHIV) receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in India. The data on 5874 children (55% boys) from one of the high HIV burden states of India from the cohort were analyzed. Data were extracted from the computerized management information system of the National AIDS Control Organization (NACO). Children were eligible for inclusion if they had started ART during 2007-2013, and had at least one potential follow-up. Kaplan Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards models were used to measure survival probability. The baseline median (IQR) CD4 count at the start of antiretroviral therapy was 244 (153, 398). Overall, the mortality was 30 per 1000 child years; 39 in the <5 year age group and 25 in 5-9 year age group. Mortality was highest among infants (86 per 1000 child years). Those with CD4 count ≤ 200 were six times more likely to die (adjusted HR: 6.3, 95% CI 3.5, 11.4) as compared to those with a CD4 count of ≥350/mm3. Mortality rates among CLHIV is significantly higher among children less than five years when the CD4 count at the start of ART is above 200. Additionally, lower CD4 count, HIV clinical staging IV, and lack of functional status seems to be associated with high mortality in children who are on ART.

  20. Immunotherapy of murine leukemia. Efficacy of passive serum therapy of Friend leukemia virus-induced disease in immunocompromised mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genovesi, E.V.; Livnat, D.; Collins, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the passive therapy of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced disease with chimpanzee anti-F-MuLV serum is accompanied by the development of host antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, the latter measurable in adoptive transfer protocols and by the ability of serum-protected mice to resist virus rechallenge. The present study was designed to further examine the contribution of various compartments of the host immune system to serum therapy itself, as well as to the acquired antiviral immunity that develops in serum-protected mice, through the use of naturally immunocompromised animals [e.g., nude athymic mice and natural killer (NK)-deficient beige mutant mice] or mice treated with immunoabrogating agents such as sublethal irradiation, cyclophosphamide [Cytoxan (Cy)], cortisone, and 89 Sr. The studies in nude mice indicate that while mature T-cells are not needed for effective serum therapy, they do appear to be necessary for the long-term resistance of serum-protected mice to virus rechallenge and for the generation of the cell population(s) responsible for adoptive transfer of antiviral immunity. Furthermore, this acquired resistance is not due to virus neutralization by serum antibodies since antibody-negative, Cy-treated, serum-protected mice still reject the secondary virus infection. Lastly, while the immunocompromise systems examined did effect various host antiviral immune responses, none of them, including the NK-deficient beige mutation, significantly diminished the efficacy of the passive serum therapy of F-MuLV-induced disease

  1. Impact of a Rapid Herpes Simplex Virus PCR Assay on Duration of Acyclovir Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Tam T; Mongkolrattanothai, Kanokporn; Arevalo, Melissa; Lustestica, Maryann; Dien Bard, Jennifer

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates in children. This study assessed the impact of a direct HSV (dHSV) PCR assay on the time to result reporting and the duration of acyclovir therapy for children with signs and symptoms of meningitis and encephalitis. A total of 363 patients with HSV PCR results from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were included in this retrospective analysis, divided into preimplementation and postimplementation groups. For the preimplementation group, CSF testing was performed using a laboratory-developed real-time PCR assay; for the postimplementation group, CSF samples were tested using a direct sample-to-answer assay. All CSF samples were negative for HSV. Over 60% of patients from both groups were prescribed acyclovir. The average HSV PCR test turnaround time for the postimplementation group was reduced by 14.5 h (23.6 h versus 9.1 h; P < 0.001). Furthermore, 79 patients (43.6%) in the postimplementation group had dHSV PCR results reported <4 h after specimen collection. The mean time from specimen collection to acyclovir discontinuation was 17.1 h shorter in the postimplementation group (31.1 h versus 14 h; P < 0.001). The median duration of acyclovir therapy was also significantly reduced in the postimplementation group (29.2 h versus 14.3 h; P = 0.01). Our investigation suggests that implementation of rapid HSV PCR testing can decrease turnaround times and the duration of unnecessary acyclovir therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Reduced Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-HBV-Coinfected Individuals Receiving HBV-Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J. Judy; Wightman, Fiona; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Ayres, Anna; Kent, Stephen J.; Sasadeusz, Joseph; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2005-01-01

    Functional hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T cells are significantly diminished in individuals chronically infected with HBV compared to individuals with self-limiting HBV infection or those on anti-HBV therapy. In individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), coinfection with HBV is associated with an increased risk of worsening liver function following antiviral therapy and of more rapid HBV disease progression. Total HBV-specific T-cell responses in subjects with ...

  3. Improvement of therapy for escherichiosis in children infected with Epstein-Barr virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.S. Olkhovskyy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Escherichiosis remains one of the most common intestinal infections, especially among young children. Indigestion of essential nutrients, transient fermentopathy, imbalance of the symbiotic flora, which develop in escherichiosis in combination with general intoxication and water-electrolyte disturbances, can lead to unfavorable outcomes. One of the factors influencing the course of escherichiosis can be Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection in the child. Purpose of the research — improvement of treatment of children with escherichiosis and EBV infection in different periods of the disease. Materials and methods. We examined 74 children aged 2–3 years, who were treated at the Regional Children’s Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital in Kharkiv with a diagnosis of moderate-to-severe escherichiosis. A group of 36 children was selected, who received conventional therapy with early gradual restoration of nutrition according to the existing protocol, and the restoration of the qualitative and quantitative composition of food was carried out as soon as possible (first group. The second group was represented by 38 children, who received two-day prolonged gradual restoration of the diet: more gradual increasing the volume of food at each feeding and reducing the number of feedings per day. Children of the second group received drugs containing Lactobacillus, milk thistle extract and B vitamins (once daily with meals from the first day. Ultrasound examination of the abdominal cavity was performed in all children. Results. Analysis of the main clinical, laboratory and instrumental parameters of patients in both groups during their stay in the hospital and one month after the discharge from the hospital revealed that in children of the second group, in whom rational diet therapy was applied, there was a reduction in the duration of bowel dysfunction, abdominal syndrome, flatulence; the parameters of the coprological test and the echosonoscopy

  4. A Potent Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for the Therapy of Advanced Prostate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2006-01-01

    ONE OF THE MAJOR LIMITATIONS FACING THE THERAPEUTIC USE OF ONCOLYTIC VIRUSES INCLUDING ONCOLYTIC HSV IS THAT THE PRE-EXISTING ANTI-VECTOR IMMUNITY CAN SUBSTANTIALLY REDUCE THE INFECTIVITY OF THE VIRUS...

  5. The fourth front against cancer: The first clinical trials to test engineered viruses that attack tumour cells have yielded promising results for future cancer therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Engineered viruses that target and destroy tumour cells could become a fourth therapy option against cancer. The first clinical trials have demonstrated their ability to attack both solid tumours and metastases.

  6. Hepatitis B virus reactivation after withdrawal of prophylactic antiviral therapy in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei Ping; Wang, Xiao Pei; Zheng, Wen; Ping, Ling Yan; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Gui Qiang; Song, Yu Qin; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The exact incidence and severity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation after the withdrawal of prophylactic antiviral therapy (delayed HBV reactivation) is unknown. We retrospectively analyzed 107 newly diagnosed diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients with HBV infection who received chemotherapy. The median time from the cessation of antitumor therapy to the withdrawal of prophylactic antiviral therapy was 6.1 months. The incidence of delayed HBV reactivation was 21.7% in HBsAg-positive group and 0 in HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive group (P 8 cycles) were independent risk factors of HBV reactivation in HBsAg-positive patients. In conclusion, prophylactic antiviral therapy could be withdrawn 6 months after the cessation of chemotherapy in HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive patients. However, a longer course of prophylactic antiviral drug administration may be an optimal option to prevent delayed HBV reactivation for HBsAg-positive patients.

  7. Exercise therapy for human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS patients: Guidelines for clinical exercise therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M. Grace

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has infected > 60 million people since its discovery and 30 million people have died since the pandemic began. Antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV infection from an acute to a chronic disease, increasing life expectancy but also adding to the potential side effects associated with drug therapy and the comorbidity accompanying longevity. Exercise can play a valuable role in the management of HIV/AIDS patients by addressing various symptoms and improving their quality of life, but the optimum mode, intensity, frequency, and duration of exercise that take the different clinical stages of the disease into consideration are inadequately known. Searches of Medline, Embase, Science Citation Index, CINAHL database, HealthSTAR, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro, and SPORTDiscus were conducted between 2000 and January 2014. Searches of published and unpublished abstracts were conducted, as well as a hand search of reference lists and tables of contents of relevant journals and books. Identified studies were reviewed for methodological quality. A total of 33 studies met the inclusion criteria. Most studies failed to indicate the optimum type (mode, intensity, frequency, and duration of aerobic and progressive resistive exercise prescribed to HIV-infected individuals in relation to the different clinical stages of the disease. The purpose of this review is to provide evidence-based recommendations after revision of exercise guidelines for HIV patients, by highlighting practical guidelines that clinical exercise therapists should consider when prescribing exercise for patients in different stages of the disease.

  8. CYTOKINE RESPONSE ASSOCIATED WITH HEPATITIS C VIRUS CLEARANCE IN HIV COINFECTED PATIENTS INITIATING PEG INTERFERON- BASED THERAPY.

    OpenAIRE

    Truong Tam Nguyen; Reihani Niloofar; Pierre-Alain Rubbo; Kuster Nils; Karine Bollore; Jacques Ducos; Georges-Philippe Pageaux; Jacques Reynes; Philippe Van de Perre; Edouard Tuaillon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on peginterferon-a (pegIFNa) and ribavirin induces important changes on cytokine release and T cell activation. Objective: Immune response to pegIFNa-ribavirin therapy was explored in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. Methods: Concentrations of 25 cytokines and CD8+ T cell activation were monitored in HCV/HIV coinfected patients classified as sustained virological responders (SVR, n=19) and non-responders (NR, n=1...

  9. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with pegylated interferon α 2a therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Khiani, Vijay; Kelly, Thomas; Shibli, Adeel; Jensen, Donald; Mohanty, Smruti R

    2008-01-01

    The combination of pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin is the standard of care for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treatment. In general, common side effects related to this combination therapy are mild and are very well tolerated. However, peripheral neuropathy including demyelinating polyneuropathy related to Peg-IFN is extremely rare. We present the first case of an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) associated with Peg-IFN-α 2a (Pegasys) after 16 wk ...

  10. Failure of mefloquine therapy in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: report of two Japanese patients without human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Zen; Akaza, Miho; Numasawa, Yoshiyuki; Ishihara, Shoichiro; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Saijo, Masayuki; Morio, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Norio; Sanjo, Nobuo; Shintani, Shuzo; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-01-15

    Although progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) cases showing responses to mefloquine therapy have been reported, the efficacy of mefloquine for PML remains unclear. We report on the failure of mefloquine therapy in two Japanese patients with PML unrelated to human immunodeficiency virus. One of the patients was a 47-year-old male who had been treated with chemotherapy for Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and the other was an 81-year-old male with idiopathic CD4(+) lymphocytopenia. Diagnosis of PML was established based on MRI findings and increased JC virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid in both patients. Mefloquine was initiated about 5 months and 2 months after the onset of PML, respectively. During mefloquine therapy, clinical and radiological progression was observed, and JC virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid was increased in both patients. Both patients died about 4 months and 2 months after initiation of mefloquine, respectively. Further studies are necessary to clarify the differences between mefloquine responders and non-responders in PML. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeted Therapy of Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarene Koh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy using a patient’s own T cells redirected to recognize and kill tumor cells has achieved promising results in metastatic melanoma and leukemia. This technique involves harnessing a patient’s T cells and then delivering a gene that encodes a new T cell receptor (TCR or a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR that allow the cells to recognize specific cancer antigens. The prospect of using engineered T cell therapy for persistent viral infections like hepatitis B virus (HBV and their associated malignancies is promising. We recently tested in a first-in-man clinical trial, the ability of HBV-specific TCR-redirected T cells to target HBsAg-productive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and demonstrated that these redirected T cells recognized HCC cells with HBV–DNA integration [1] We discuss here the possibility to use HBV-specific TCR-redirected T cells targeting hepatitis B viral antigens as a tumor specific antigen in patients with HBV-related HCC, and the potential challenges facing the development of this new immunotherapeutic strategy.

  12. Epstein-Barr Virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: pathogenetic insights for targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourse, J P; Jones, K; Gandhi, M K

    2011-05-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a spectrum of major, life-threatening lymphoproliferative diseases occurring in the post-transplant setting. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and is associated with several risk factors, the most significant being Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. EBV's in vitro transforming abilities, distinctive latency, clonality within the malignant cells and response to targeted therapies implicate a critical role in the biology of PTLD. This minireview focuses on EBV-related PTLD pathogenesis, in particular the interplay between aspects of the EBV life cycle and latency with nonviral factors resulting in the wide spectrum of histology and clinical presentations encountered in PTLD. With the increased prevalence of transplantation a rise in the incidence of PTLD may be expected. Therefore the importance of laboratory and animal models in the understanding of PTLD and the development of novel therapeutic approaches is discussed. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. Oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy II. Cell-internal factors for conditional growth in neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stephanie A; Gromeier, Matthias

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of virus-host interactions have fueled new studies in the field of oncolytic viruses. The first part of this review explained how cell-external factors, such as cellular receptors, influence tumor tropism and specificity of oncolytic virus candidates. In the second part of this review, we focus on cellinternal factors that mediate tumor-specific virus growth. An oncolytic virus must be able to replicate within cancerous cells and kill them without collateral damage to healthy surrounding cells. This desirable property is inherent to some proposed oncolytic viral agents or has been achieved by genetic manipulation in others.

  14. Research for virus infectious protection on high-dose recipient host and its therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hideki; Takahashi, Hidemune

    2004-01-01

    Irradiation effects to infectious disease and infectious immunity were investigated using herpes virus and influenza virus of mouse. Protection mechanisms, in which virus infections to living body are protected under the irradiation, were analyzed. Mouse ligaments, dsRNA, Poly(I:C), Lipopolysaccharide(LPS) and Choleratoxin (CTB) were used as conductors to innate immunity. The Poly(I:C), LPS and CTB were injected to mice by intranasal inoculation. Influenza virus was given to the mice at 6 hrs, one day, 3 and 7 days after the inoculation. A virus titer of each group was measured. The infection of influenza virus was suppressed extremely at the groups of 6 hrs and one day after the LPS inoculation. The virus infectious protection was possible by innate immunity conduction, and the protection ability was kept at sublethal dose irradiation. (M. Suetake)

  15. Hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase - Target of current antiviral therapy and future drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel N; Hu, Jianming

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections rely on the proper functioning of the viral polymerase enzyme, a specialized reverse transcriptase (RT) with multiple activities. All currently approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of chronic HBV infection, except for interferon, target the RT and belong to the same chemical class - they are all nucleoside analogs. Viral DNA synthesis is carried out by the RT enzyme in several different steps, each with distinct RT conformational requirements. In principle, each stage may be targeted by distinct antiviral drugs. In particular, the HBV RT has the unique ability to initiate viral DNA synthesis using itself as a protein primer in a novel protein priming reaction. In order to help identify RT inhibitors and study their mechanisms of action, a number of experimental systems have been developed, each varying in its ability to dissect the protein priming stage and subsequent stages of viral DNA synthesis at the molecular level. Two of the most effective drugs to date, entecavir and tenofovir, can inhibit both the protein priming and the subsequent DNA elongation stages of HBV DNA synthesis. Interestingly, clevudine, a thymidine analog, can inhibit both protein priming and DNA elongation in a non-competitive manner and without being incorporated into the viral DNA. Thus, a nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI) can functionally mimic a non-NRTI (NNRTI) in its inhibition of the HBV RT. Therefore, novel NRTIs as well as NNRTIs may be developed to inhibit the DNA synthesis activity of the HBV RT. Furthermore, additional activities of the RT that are also essential to HBV replication, including specific recognition of the viral RNA and its packaging into viral nucleocapsids, may be exploited for antiviral development. To achieve a more potent inhibition of viral replication and ultimately cure chronic HBV infection, the next generation of anti-HBV therapies will likely need to include NRTIs, NNRTIs, and other agents that target the viral RT as

  16. Photodynamic therapy induced production of cytokines by latent Epstein Barr virus infected epithelial tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, H. K.; Lo, K. W.; Lung, M. L.; Chang, C. K. C.; Wong, R. N. S.; Mak, N. K.

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a method to treat cancer or non-cancer diseases by activation of the light-sensitive photosensitizers. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of certain cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and B cell lymphoma. This study aims to examine the effects of EBV infection on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cells after the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM PDT treatment. Epithelial tumor cell lines HONE-1 and latent EBV-infected HONE-1 (EBV-HONE-1) cells were used in this study. Cells were treated with the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM for 24 hours before light irradiation. RT-PCR and quantitative ELISA methods were used for the evaluation of mRNA expression and production of cytokines, respectively. Results show that Zn-BC-AM PDT increases the production of IL-1a and IL-1b in EBV-HONE-1. Over a 10-fold increase in the production of IL-6 was observed in the culture supernatant of Zn-BC-AM PDT-treated HONE-1 cells. PDT-induced IL-6 production was observed in HONE-1 cells. EBV-HONE-1 has a higher background level of IL-8 production than the HONE-1. The production of IL-8 was suppressed in EBV-HONE-1cells after Zn-BC-AM PDT. Our results indicate that the response of HONE-1 cells to Zn-BC-AM PDT depends on the presence of latent EBV infection. Since IL-8 is a cytokine with angiogenic activity, Zn-BC-AM PDT may exert an anti-angiogenic effect through the suppression of IL-8 production by the EBV-infected cells.

  17. Lymphocyte-Dominant Encephalitis and Meningitis in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangus, Lisa M; Beck, Sarah E; Queen, Suzanne E; Brill, Samuel A; Shirk, Erin N; Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Muth, Dillon C; Adams, Robert J; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2018-01-01

    A retrospective neuropathologic review of 30 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) was conducted. Seventeen animals with lymphocyte-dominant inflammation in the brain and/or meninges that clearly was morphologically distinct from prototypic SIV encephalitis and human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis were identified. Central nervous system (CNS) infiltrates in cART-treated macaques primarily comprised CD20 + B cells and CD3 + T cells with fewer CD68 + macrophages. Inflammation was associated with low levels of SIV RNA in the brain as shown by in situ hybridization, and generally was observed in animals with episodes of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) viral rebound or sustained plasma and CSF viremia during treatment. Although the lymphocytic CNS inflammation in these macaques shared morphologic characteristics with uncommon immune-mediated neurologic disorders reported in treated HIV patients, including CNS immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and neurosymptomatic CSF escape, the high prevalence of CNS lesions in macaques suggests that persistent adaptive immune responses in the CNS also may develop in neuroasymptomatic or mildly impaired HIV patients yet remain unrecognized given the lack of access to CNS tissue for histopathologic evaluation. Continued investigation into the mechanisms and outcomes of CNS inflammation in cART-treated, SIV-infected macaques will advance our understanding of the consequences of residual CNS HIV replication in patients on cART, including the possible contribution of adaptive immune responses to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunomodulatory Therapy of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Adriaensen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL–human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection experience increased drug toxicity and treatment failure rates compared to VL patients, with more frequent VL relapse and death. In the era of VL elimination strategies, HIV coinfection is progressively becoming a key challenge, because HIV-coinfected patients respond poorly to conventional VL treatment and play an important role in parasite transmission. With limited chemotherapeutic options and a paucity of novel anti-parasitic drugs, new interventions that target host immunity may offer an effective alternative. In this review, we first summarize current views on how VL immunopathology is significantly affected by HIV coinfection. We then review current clinical and promising preclinical immunomodulatory interventions in the field of VL and discuss how these may operate in the context of a concurrent HIV infection. Caveats are formulated as these interventions may unpredictably impact the delicate balance between boosting of beneficial VL-specific responses and deleterious immune activation/hyperinflammation, activation of latent provirus or increased HIV-susceptibility of target cells. Evidence is lacking to prioritize a target molecule and a more detailed account of the immunological status induced by the coinfection as well as surrogate markers of cure and protection are still required. We do, however, argue that virologically suppressed VL patients with a recovered immune system, in whom effective antiretroviral therapy alone is not able to restore protective immunity, can be considered a relevant target group for an immunomodulatory intervention. Finally, we provide perspectives on the translation of novel theories on synergistic immune cell cross-talk into an effective treatment strategy for VL–HIV-coinfected patients.

  19. [Pulmonary hypertension in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: the role of antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalla, Julián; Urdiales, Daniel; Pombo, Marta; del Arco, Alfonso; de la Torre, Javier; Prada, José Luis

    2014-03-20

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious disorder, more prevalent in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is not entirely clear what role is played by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in PAH development or course. Our aim was to describe PAH prevalence in a series of HIV-infected patients and identify possible links with cumulative and current use of different antiretrovirals. Cross-sectional study of a cohort of HIV-infected patients attending a hospital in southern Spain. Demographic data, data on HIV infection status and on cumulative and recent antiretroviral treatment were recorded. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all study participants. PAH was defined as pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 36mmHg or more. A total of 400 patients participated in the study; 178 presented with tricuspid regurgitation and 22 of these presented with PAH (5.5%). No differences were encountered in age, sex, CD4 lymphocytes, proportion of naive patients or patients with AIDS. No differences were encountered in cumulative use of antiretrovirals. However, recent use of lamivudine was associated with a greater presence of PAH, whereas recent use of tenofovir and emtricitabine was associated with a lower presence of PAH. Logistic regression analysis was performed including the use of lamivudine, emtricitabine and tenofovir. Only recent use of tenofovir was associated with a lower presence of PAH (odds ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.17-0.84). PAH prevalence in our study was similar to others series. Current use of tenofovir may be associated with lower PAH prevalence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunomodulatory Therapy of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Coinfected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaensen, Wim; Dorlo, Thomas P. C.; Vanham, Guido; Kestens, Luc; Kaye, Paul M.; van Griensven, Johan

    2018-01-01

    Patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL)–human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection experience increased drug toxicity and treatment failure rates compared to VL patients, with more frequent VL relapse and death. In the era of VL elimination strategies, HIV coinfection is progressively becoming a key challenge, because HIV-coinfected patients respond poorly to conventional VL treatment and play an important role in parasite transmission. With limited chemotherapeutic options and a paucity of novel anti-parasitic drugs, new interventions that target host immunity may offer an effective alternative. In this review, we first summarize current views on how VL immunopathology is significantly affected by HIV coinfection. We then review current clinical and promising preclinical immunomodulatory interventions in the field of VL and discuss how these may operate in the context of a concurrent HIV infection. Caveats are formulated as these interventions may unpredictably impact the delicate balance between boosting of beneficial VL-specific responses and deleterious immune activation/hyperinflammation, activation of latent provirus or increased HIV-susceptibility of target cells. Evidence is lacking to prioritize a target molecule and a more detailed account of the immunological status induced by the coinfection as well as surrogate markers of cure and protection are still required. We do, however, argue that virologically suppressed VL patients with a recovered immune system, in whom effective antiretroviral therapy alone is not able to restore protective immunity, can be considered a relevant target group for an immunomodulatory intervention. Finally, we provide perspectives on the translation of novel theories on synergistic immune cell cross-talk into an effective treatment strategy for VL–HIV-coinfected patients. PMID:29375567

  1. Impact of Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection on Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Outcome in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Nina Margrethe; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø.; Kronborg, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients may decrease the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We determined the impact of HCV infection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome among...... Danish patients with HIV-1 infection. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included all adult Danish HIV-1-infected patients who started highly active antiretroviral therapy from 1 January 1995 to 1 January 2004. Patients were classified as HCV positive (positive HCV serological test and/or HCV PCR...... results [443 patients [16%

  2. Impact of hepatitis C virus coinfection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome in HIV-infected individuals: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Nina Margrethe; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø.; Kronborg, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients may decrease the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We determined the impact of HCV infection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome among...... Danish patients with HIV-1 infection. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included all adult Danish HIV-1-infected patients who started highly active antiretroviral therapy from 1 January 1995 to 1 January 2004. Patients were classified as HCV positive (positive HCV serological test and/or HCV PCR...... results [443 patients [16%

  3. Novel perspectives for hepatitis A virus therapy revealed by comparative analysis of hepatitis C virus and hepatitis A virus RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser-Nobis, Katharina; Harak, Christian; Schult, Philipp; Kusov, Yuri; Lohmann, Volker

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are two positive-strand RNA viruses sharing a similar biology, but causing opposing infection outcomes, with HAV always being cleared and HCV establishing persistence in the majority of infections. To gain deeper insight into determinants of replication, persistence, and treatment, we established a homogenous cell-culture model allowing a thorough comparison of RNA replication of both viruses. By screening different human liver-derived cell lines with subgenomic reporter replicons of HAV as well as of different HCV genotypes, we found that Huh7-Lunet cells supported HAV- and HCV-RNA replication with similar efficiency and limited interference between both replicases. HAV and HCV replicons were similarly sensitive to interferon (IFN), but differed in their ability to establish persistent replication in cell culture. In contrast to HCV, HAV replicated independently from microRNA-122 and phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα and β (PI4KIII). Both viruses were efficiently inhibited by cyclosporin A and NIM811, a nonimmunosuppressive analog thereof, suggesting an overlapping dependency on cyclophilins for replication. However, analysis of a broader set of inhibitors revealed that, in contrast to HCV, HAV does not depend on cyclophilin A, but rather on adenosine-triphosphate-binding cassette transporters and FK506-binding proteins. Finally, silibinin, but not its modified intravenous formulation, efficiently inhibited HAV genome replication in vitro, suggesting oral silibinin as a potential therapeutic option for HAV infections. We established a cell-culture model enabling comparative studies on RNA replication of HAV and HCV in a homogenous cellular background with comparable replication efficiency. We thereby identified new host cell targets and potential treatment options for HAV and set the ground for future studies to unravel determinants of clearance and persistence. © 2015 by the American Association for the

  4. Evaluation of radiation effects against C6 glioma in combination with vaccinia virus-p53 gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, D. S.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Timiryasova, T.; Chen, B.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of recombinant vaccinia virus-p53 (rVV-p53) in combination with radiation therapy against the C6 rat glioma, a p53 deficient tumor that is relatively radioresistant. VV-LIVP, the parental virus (Lister strain), was used as a control. Localized treatment of subcutaneous C6 tumors in athymic mice with either rVV-p53 or VV-LIVP together with tumor irradiation resulted in low tumor incidence and significantly slower tumor progression compared to the agents given as single modalities. Assays of blood and spleen indicated that immune system activation may account, at least partly, for the enhance tumor inhibition seen with combined treatment. No overt signs of treatment-related toxicity were noted.

  5. Taking the bull by the horns: Ethical considerations in the design and implementation of an Ebola virus therapy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kombe, Francis; Folayan, Morenike O; Ambe, Jennyfer; Igonoh, Adaora; Abayomi, Akin

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus is categorized as one of the most dangerous pathogens in the world. Although there is no known cure for Ebola virus, there is some evidence that the severity of the disease can be curtailed using plasma from survivors. Although there is a general consensus on the importance of research, methodological and ethical challenges for conducting research in an emergency situation have been identified. Performing clinical trials is important, especially for health conditions that are of public health significance (including rare epidemics) to develop new therapies as well as to test the efficacy and effectiveness of new interventions. However, routine clinical trial procedures can be difficult to apply in emergency public health crises hence require a consideration of alternative approaches on how therapies in these situations are tested and brought to the market. This paper examines some of the ethical issues that arise when conducting clinical trials during a highly dangerous pathogen outbreak, with a special focus on the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa. The issues presented here come from a review of a protocol that was submitted to the Global Emerging Pathogens Treatment Consortium (GET). In reviewing the proposal, which was about conducting a clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of using convalescent plasma in the management of Ebola virus disease, the authors deliberated on various issues, which were documented as minutes and later used as a basis for this paper. The experiences and reflections shared by the authors, who came from different regions and disciplines across Africa, present wide-ranging perspectives on the conduct of clinical trials during a dangerous disease outbreak in a resource-poor setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Laninamivir octanoate and artificial surfactant combination therapy significantly increases survival of mice infected with lethal influenza H1N1 Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Fukushi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with influenza virus infection can develop severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS which have a high mortality. Influenza virus infection is treated worldwide mainly by neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs. However, monotherapy with NAIs is insufficient for severe pneumonia secondary to influenza virus infection. We previously demonstrated that mice infected with a lethal dose of influenza virus develop diffuse alveolar damage (DAD with alveolar collapse similar to that seen in ARDS in humans. Additionally, pulmonary surfactant proteins were gradually increased in mouse serum, suggesting a decrease in pulmonary surfactant in the lung. Therefore, the present study examined whether combination therapy of NAI with exogenous artificial surfactant affects mortality of influenza virus-infected mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c mice were inoculated with several viral doses of influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 virus (H1N1. The mice were additionally administered exogenous artificial surfactant in the presence or absence of a new NAI, laninamivir octanoate. Mouse survival, body weight and general condition were observed for up to 20 days after inoculation. Viral titer and cytokine/chemokine levels in the lungs, lung weight, pathological analysis, and blood O(2 and CO(2 pressures were evaluated. Infected mice treated with combination therapy of laninamivir octanoate with artificial surfactant showed a significantly higher survival rate compared with those that received laninamivir octanoate monotherapy (p = 0.003. However, virus titer, lung weight and cytokine/chemokine responses were not different between the groups. Histopathological examination, a hydrostatic lung test and blood gas analysis showed positive results in the combination therapy group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Combination therapy of laninamivir octanoate with artificial surfactant reduces lethality in mice infected with influenza virus, and

  7. Improvement of Proteinuria due to Combination Therapy with Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir in Hepatitis C Virus-associated Renal Disease without Cryoglobulinemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakusagi, Satoshi; Sato, Ken; Suzuki, Yuhei; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Kosone, Takashi; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Takagi, Hitoshi

    2018-03-09

    We herein report a unique case of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated renal disease without cryoglobulinemia that showed proteinuria, hypoproteinemia, ascites, and edema. Due to combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir, the patient achieved sustained virological response at week 24 of the therapy. Furthermore, the therapy caused marked amelioration of her proteinuria, ascites, edema, and hypoalbuminemia, and finally improved her estimated glomerular filtration rate. There were no adverse events, and the combination therapy was well-tolerated. We recommend that HCV eradication with antiviral therapy using direct-acting antiviral agents be attempted first for all renal disease with HCV infection, regardless of cryoglobulinemia, considering the existence of resistance-associated variants.

  8. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2004-01-01

    The tasks that were originally planned for the first year of this 3 year project are to demonstrate that the fusogenic oncolytic herpes simplex viruses are potent anti-tumor agents for advanced ovarian cancer...

  9. Potent Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for the Therapy of Advanced Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2007-01-01

    .... We proposed to develop a novel virotherapy for prostate cancer during the funding period. Our working hypothesis was that a fusogenic oncolytic virus would induce a widespread syncytia formation...

  10. Efficacy of Prompt Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in the Treatment of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Triggered by Uncontrolled Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan P. Fitzgerald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening, rapidly progressive hematologic disorder involving uncontrolled immune system activation. HLH has been associated with viral infections, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections. We report a case of a critically ill 30-year-old female who was hospitalized with HIV-associated HLH, with a CD4 count of 4 cells/mL and HIV viral load of 1,842,730 copies/mL. After ruling out other potential infectious causes of HLH, antiretroviral therapy (ART was initiated with darunavir, ritonavir, tenofovir, and emtricitabine. Within one week of initiation of ART, the patient began to improve clinically and hematologically and was stable enough for discharge from the hospital three weeks after starting therapy. This case suggests that treatment with ART in patients with HIV-associated HLH should be considered even in critically ill patients with low CD4 counts.

  11. Poor neurological sequelae of herpes simplex virus encephalitis in an infant despite adequate antiviral and adjunct corticosteroid therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna B Basak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old infant presented to our emergency department with fever, altered consciousness, and focal seizures of acute onset. He had vesicular skin lesions over the right preauricular region. CT brain showed a large hypodense lesion involving the left temporo-parietal region, left basal ganglia and left thalamus. MRI brain revealed bilateral multifocal corticomedullary lesions suggestive of encephalitis. CSF-PCR was positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV type I. He was treated with standard dose intravenous acyclovir for 15 days along with a trial of pulse methylprednisolone, but was readmitted within a week with features of an early relapse. The infant survived but developed significant neurological sequelae. Although treatment of HSV is available, the neurological outcome is guarded even with adequate antiviral therapy. Adjunct corticosteroid therapy did not appear to attenuate the neurological sequelae.

  12. Optimal therapies of a virus replication model with pharmacological delays based on reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Yongzhen; Li, Changguo; Liang, Xiyin

    2017-01-01

    A short delay in the pharmacological effect on account of the time required for drug absorption, distribution, and penetration into target cells after application of any anti-viral drug, is defined by the pharmacological delay (Herz et al 1996 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 93 7247–51). In this paper, a virus replication model with Beddington–DeAngelis incidence rate and the pharmacological and intracellular delays is presented to describe the treatment to cure the virus infection. The optimal controls represent the efficiency of reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors in suppressing viral production and prohibiting new infections. Due to the fact that both the control and state variables contain delays, we derive a necessary conditions for our optimal problem. Based on these results, numerical simulations are implemented not only to show the optimal therapeutic schedules for different infection and release rates, but also to compare the effective of three treatment programs. Furthermore, comparison of therapeutic effects under different maximum tolerable dosages is shown. Our research indicates that (1) the proper and specific treatment program should be determined according to the infection rates of different virus particles; (2) the optimal combined drug treatment is the most efficient; (3) the appropriate proportion of medicament must be formulated during the therapy due to the non-monotonic relationship between maximum tolerable dosages and therapeutic effects; (4) the therapeutic effect is advantageous when the pharmacological delay is considered. (paper)

  13. Optimal therapies of a virus replication model with pharmacological delays based on reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yongzhen; Li, Changguo; Liang, Xiyin

    2017-11-01

    A short delay in the pharmacological effect on account of the time required for drug absorption, distribution, and penetration into target cells after application of any anti-viral drug, is defined by the pharmacological delay (Herz et al 1996 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 93 7247-51). In this paper, a virus replication model with Beddington-DeAngelis incidence rate and the pharmacological and intracellular delays is presented to describe the treatment to cure the virus infection. The optimal controls represent the efficiency of reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors in suppressing viral production and prohibiting new infections. Due to the fact that both the control and state variables contain delays, we derive a necessary conditions for our optimal problem. Based on these results, numerical simulations are implemented not only to show the optimal therapeutic schedules for different infection and release rates, but also to compare the effective of three treatment programs. Furthermore, comparison of therapeutic effects under different maximum tolerable dosages is shown. Our research indicates that (1) the proper and specific treatment program should be determined according to the infection rates of different virus particles; (2) the optimal combined drug treatment is the most efficient; (3) the appropriate proportion of medicament must be formulated during the therapy due to the non-monotonic relationship between maximum tolerable dosages and therapeutic effects; (4) the therapeutic effect is advantageous when the pharmacological delay is considered.

  14. An efficient deletion mutant packaging system for defective herpes simplex virus vectors: Potential applications to human gene therapy and neuronal physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, A.I.; Keyomarsi, K.; Bryan, J.; Pardee, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have previously described a defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vector system that permits that introduction of virtually any gene into nonmitotic cells. pHSVlac, the prototype vector, stably expresses Escherichia coli β-galactosidase from a constitutive promoter in many human cell lines, in cultured rat neurons from throughout the nervous system, and in cells in the adult rat brain. HSV-1 vectors expressing other genes may prove useful for studying neuronal physiology or performing human gene therapy for neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease or brain tumors. A HSV-1 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, ts K, has been used as helper virus; ts mutants revert to wild type. In contrast, HSV-1 deletion mutants essentially cannot revert to wild type; therefore, use of a deletion mutant as helper virus might permit human gene therapy with HSV-1 vectors. They now report an efficient packaging system for HSV-1 VECTORS USING A DELETION MUTANT, d30EBA, as helper virus; virus is grown on the complementing cell line M64A. pHSVlac virus prepared using the deletion mutant packaging system stably expresses β-galactosidase in cultured rat sympathetic neurons and glia. Both D30EBA and ts K contain a mutation in the IE3 gene of HSV-1 strain 17 and have the same phenotype; therefore, changing the helper virus from ts K to D30EBA does not alter the host range or other properties of the HSV-1 vector system

  15. Long-term outcomes of chronic hepatitis B virus infection in the era of antiviral therapy in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon Hea; Kim, Beom Kyung; Kim, Ja Kyung; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Do Young; Park, Jun Yong; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kim, Seung Up; Shin, Seung Hwan; Hahn, Kyu Yeon; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) can progress to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and ultimately liver-related deaths. Recently, owing to potent antiviral therapy with minimal side-effects, sustained suppression of hepatitis B virus replication can be achieved, thereby preventing such complications. We aimed to reappraise clinical courses regarding disease progression in the era of antiviral therapy. Between 2001 and 2005, treatment-naïve Korean CHB patients without cirrhosis were enrolled and followed up for at least 5 years. During follow up, antiviral therapy was commenced according to Korean Association for the Study of the Liver guidelines, if eligible, and ultrasonography and laboratory and clinical assessment were performed regularly. Primary end-points were development of cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation, HCC, or liver-related deaths. Of 360 patients, 323 (89.7%) received antiviral therapy such as lamivudine (70.6%), entecavir (8.7%), or telbivudine (6.5%). During follow up, cirrhosis developed in 29 (8.1%), hepatic decompensation in 4 (1.1%), and HCC in 15 (4.2%) patients. Annual incidences of cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation, and HCC were 1.05%, 0.14%, and 0.53% per person-year, respectively. Age was an independent predictor for developing cirrhosis (hazard ratio [HR] 1.075, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.037-1.116; P antiviral therapy, overall clinical courses have been much improved since introduction of lamivudine in 1999. However, patients with older age or cirrhosis are still subject to HCC development despite appropriate antiviral therapy, necessitating cautious surveillance. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Yellow fever virus: genetic and phenotypic diversity and implications for detection, prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, David W C; McAuley, Alexander J; Bente, Dennis A

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is the prototypical hemorrhagic fever virus, yet our understanding of its phenotypic diversity and any molecular basis for observed differences in disease severity and epidemiology is lacking, when compared to other arthropod-borne and haemorrhagic fever viruses. This is, in part, due to the availability of safe and effective vaccines resulting in basic YFV research taking a back seat to those viruses for which no effective vaccine occurs. However, regular outbreaks occur in endemic areas, and the spread of the virus to new, previously unaffected, areas is possible. Analysis of isolates from endemic areas reveals a strong geographic association for major genotypes, and recent epidemics have demonstrated the emergence of novel sequence variants. This review aims to outline the current understanding of YFV genetic and phenotypic diversity and its sources, as well as the available animal models for characterizing these differences in vivo. The consequences of genetic diversity for detection and diagnosis of yellow fever and development of new vaccines and therapeutics are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on HIV response to antiretroviral therapy in a Chinese antiretroviral therapy center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Yang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: HBV co-infection can affect late immunological and virological responses to ART and increase the risk of hepatotoxicity. Mortality due to liver disease was high among HIV/HBV co-infected individuals in this study, despite HBV-active ART. As long as HIV/HBV co-infected persons need anti-HBV therapy, they should be recommended ART that includes agents with activity against both HIV and HBV, regardless of the CD4 cell count level.

  18. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation with immunosuppressive therapy in rheumatic diseases: assessment and preventive strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Calabrese, L H; Zein, N N; Vassilopoulos, D

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of the natural history and basic biology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has increased greatly in recent years. In view of this, the following are reviewed here: (a) recent advances in HBV biology pertinent to the rheumatic disease population; (b) the risks of HBV reactivation in patients with rheumatic disease undergoing immunosuppression; and (c) potential strategies to manage these risks.

  19. Development of a Highly Protective Combination Monoclonal Antibody Therapy against Chikungunya Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, Pankaj; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Brien, James D.; Edeling, Melissa A.; Gorlatov, Sergey; Johnson, Syd; Lee, Iris; Akahata, Wataru; Nabel, Gary J.; Richter, Mareike K. S.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Fremont, Daved H.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Heise, Mark T.; Diamond, Michael S.

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes global epidemics of a debilitating polyarthritis in humans. As there is a pressing need for the development of therapeutic agents, we screened 230 new mouse anti-CHIKV monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for their ability to inhibit

  20. Comparative effectiveness of induction therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-associated cryptococcal meningitis: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Kanters, Steve; Bennett, John E; Thorlund, Kristian; Tsai, Alexander C; Mills, Edward J; Siedner, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Multiple international treatment guidelines recommend amphotericin-based combination regimens for induction therapy of cryptococcal meningitis. Yet, only 1 trial has reported a mortality benefit for combination amphotericin-flucytosine, and none have reported a mortality benefit for combination amphotericin-fluconazole. Methods.  We conducted a Bayesian network meta-analysis to estimate the comparative effectiveness of recommended induction therapies for HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis. We searched PubMed and Cochrane CENTRAL for clinical reports of induction therapy for HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis. We extracted or calculated early (two-week) and late (six to 12-week) mortality by treatment arm for the following induction regimens: amphotericin B alone, amphotericin B + flucytosine, amphotericin B + triazoles, amphotericin B + flucytosine +triazoles, triazoles alone, triazoles + flucytosine, liposomal amphotericin B, and amphotericin B + other medicines. Results.  In the overall sample (35 studies, n = 2483), we found no evidence of decreased mortality from addition of flucytosine or triazoles to amphotericin B, compared with amphotericin B alone. Although we did find a nonsignificant benefit for addition of flucytosine to amphotericin B in studies including participants with altered levels of consciousness, we did not identify a benefit for combination therapy in restricted analyses in either resource-rich or resource-limited settings, studies conducted before or after 2004, and studies restricted to a high dose of amphotericin B and fluconazole. Conclusions.  Given considerations of drug availability and toxicity, there is an important need for additional data to clarify which populations are most likely to benefit from combination therapies for human immunodeficiency virus-associated cryptococcal meningitis.

  1. Human herpes virus-6 encephalitis causing severe anterograde amnesia associated with rituximab, azathioprine and prednisolone combination therapy for dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Thomas; Fry, Charlie; Luppe, Sebastian; Gunawardena, Harsha; Sieradzan, Kasia

    2017-06-01

    Human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) reactivation is a well-recognised complication following haematological stem cell transplantation, but it is novel in the context of combination immunomodulatory therapy for autoimmune disease. We report a case of severe anterograde amnesia caused by HHV-6 encephalitis in a young female patient on rituximab, azathioprine and prednisolone for dermatomyositis (DM). The use of targeted biologic treatments for systemic autoimmune connective tissue diseases (CTDs) is increasing, particularly when refractory to conventional management. The anti-CD20 B cell depleting monoclonal antibody, rituximab is now increasingly used, often in combination with conventional immunomodulatory treatments, in certain autoimmune neurological conditions and systemic CTDs including DM. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of HHV-6 in those who develop encephalitis while CD20 B cell deplete, especially in the presence of additional immunomodulatory therapies. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis with evidence-based anti-viral therapy may help reduce the extent of irreversible morbidity such as amnesia.

  2. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with inserted gene coding for GM-CSF as a new vector for cancer immunogene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janke, M.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Leeuw, de O.S.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Arnold, A.; Fournier, P.; Schirrmacher, V.

    2007-01-01

    This is the first report describing recombinant (rec) Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as vector for gene therapy of cancer. The gene encoding granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was inserted as an additional transcription unit at two different positions into the NDV genome. The

  3. Hepatitis B virus prevalence and vaccine response in HIV-infected children and adolescents on combination antiretroviral therapy in Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutwa, Philippe R.; Boer, Kimberly R.; Rusine, John B.; Muganga, Narcisse; Tuyishimire, Diane; Reiss, Peter; Lange, Joep M. A.; Geelen, Sibyl P. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a cohort of HIV-infected Rwandan children and adolescents on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and the success rate of HBV vaccination in those children found to be HBV negative. HIV-infected

  4. Have we found an optimal insertion site in a Newcastle disease virus vector to express a foreign gene for vaccine and gene therapy purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using reverse genetics technology, many strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) have been developed as vectors to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign gene is usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit. Eval...

  5. Randomized Trial Evaluating the Impact of Ribavirin Mono-Therapy and Double Dosing on Viral Kinetics, Ribavirin Pharmacokinetics and Anemia in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldenström, Jesper; Westin, Johan; Nyström, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    In this pilot study (RibaC), 58 hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients were randomized to (i) 2 weeks ribavirin double dosing concomitant with pegylated interferon-α (pegIFN-α), (ii) 4 weeks ribavirin mono-therapy prior to adding pegIFN-α, or (iii) standard-of-care (...

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 1-based amplicon vectors for fundamental research in neurosciences and gene therapy of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerusalinsky, Diana; Baez, María Verónica; Epstein, Alberto Luis

    2012-01-01

    Somatic manipulation of the nervous system without the involvement of the germinal line appears as a powerful counterpart of the transgenic strategy. The use of viral vectors to produce specific, transient and localized knockout, knockdown, ectopic expression or overexpression of a gene, leads to the possibility of analyzing both in vitro and in vivo molecular basis of neural function. In this approach, viral particles engineered to carry transgenic sequences are delivered into discrete brain regions, to transduce cells that will express the transgenic products. Amplicons are replication-incompetent helper-dependent vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), with several advantages that potentiate their use in neurosciences: (1) minimal toxicity: amplicons do not encode any virus proteins, are neither toxic for the infected cells nor pathogenic for the inoculated animals and elicit low levels of adaptive immune responses; (2) extensive transgene capacity to carry up to 150-kb of foreign DNA; i.e., entire genes with regulatory sequences could be delivered; (3) widespread cellular tropism: amplicons can experimentally infect several cell types including glial cells, though naturally the virus infects mainly neurons and epithelial cells; (4) since the viral genome does not integrate into cellular chromosomes there is low probability to induce insertional mutagenesis. Recent investigations on gene transfer into the brain using these vectors, have focused on gene therapy of inherited genetic diseases affecting the nervous system, such as ataxias, or on neurodegenerative disorders using experimental models of Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. Another group of studies used amplicons to investigate complex neural functions such as neuroplasticity, anxiety, learning and memory. In this short review, we summarize recent data supporting the potential of HSV-1 based amplicon vector model for gene delivery and modulation of gene expression in primary cultures

  7. Endobiont viruses sensed by the human host - beyond conventional antiparasitic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina N Fichorova

    Full Text Available Wide-spread protozoan parasites carry endosymbiotic dsRNA viruses with uncharted implications to the human host. Among them, Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasite adapted to the human genitourinary tract, infects globally ∼250 million each year rendering them more susceptible to devastating pregnancy complications (especially preterm birth, HIV infection and HPV-related cancer. While first-line antibiotic treatment (metronidazole commonly kills the protozoan pathogen, it fails to improve reproductive outcome. We show that endosymbiotic Trichomonasvirus, highly prevalent in T. vaginalis clinical isolates, is sensed by the human epithelial cells via Toll-like receptor 3, triggering Interferon Regulating Factor -3, interferon type I and proinflammatory cascades previously implicated in preterm birth and HIV-1 susceptibility. Metronidazole treatment amplified these proinflammatory responses. Thus, a new paradigm targeting the protozoan viruses along with the protozoan host may prevent trichomoniasis-attributable inflammatory sequelae.

  8. Evolving therapies for hepatitis C virus in chronic kidney disease: the beginning of a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Craig E; Nader, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    The current review highlights recent advances in treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection using new classes of agents, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), with a focus on the evidence for their use in the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 4-5, hemodialysis, and kidney transplantation. DAA agents target-specific proteins involved in the hepatitis C virus life cycle and interrupt viral replication. Sustained virologic response, a marker of viral eradication, occurs in more than 90% of patients treated with DAA agents in the general population. Emerging data demonstrate similar sustained virologic response rates for specific DAA-based regimens in patients with CKD stages 4-5, hemodialysis patients, and kidney-transplant recipients. High sustained virologic response rates are seen with DAA agents in CKD populations. A thoughtful approach to the timing of treatment is required to facilitate timely access to kidney transplantation.

  9. Virologic Monitoring of Hepatitis B Virus Therapy in Clinical Trials and Practice: Recommendations for a Standardized Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAWLOTSKY, JEAN–MICHEL; DUSHEIKO, GEOFFREY; HATZAKIS, ANGELOS; LAU, DARYL; LAU, GEORGE; LIANG, T. JAKE; LOCARNINI, STEPHEN; MARTIN, PAUL; RICHMAN, DOUGLAS D.; ZOULIM, FABIEN

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is aimed at suppressing viral replication to the lowest possible level, and thereby to halt the progression of liver disease and prevent the onset of complications. Two categories of drugs are used in HBV therapy: the interferons, including standard interferon alfa or pegylated interferon alfa, and specific nucleoside or nucleotide HBV inhibitors that target the reverse-transcriptase function of HBV-DNA polymerase. The reported results of clinical trials have used varying definitions of efficacy, failure, and resistance based on different measures of virologic responses. This article discusses HBV virologic markers and tests, and their optimal use both for planning and reporting clinical trials and in clinical practice. PMID:18242209

  10. Targeting Prostate Cancer for Gene Therapy Utilizing Lentivirus and Oncolytic VSV Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the...Exp Neurol, 2006. 65(9): p. 846-54. 13. Msaouel, P ., A . Dispenzieri, and E . Galanis, Clinical testing of engineered oncolytic measles virus strains...using ex vivo gene transfer as vaccines for the treatment of genitourinary malignancies. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol, 2000. 46 Suppl: p. S67-72. 32

  11. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tenofovir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients Taking Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jullien, Vincent; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Rey, Elisabeth; Jaffray, Patrick; Krivine, Anne; Moachon, Laurence; Lillo-Le Louet, Agnès; Lescoat, Anne; Dupin, Nicolas; Salmon, Dominique; Pons, Gérard; Urien, Saïk

    2005-01-01

    The influence of renal function on tenofovir pharmacokinetics was investigated in 193 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients by the use of a population approach performed with the nonlinear mixed effects modeling program NONMEM. Tenofovir pharmacokinetics was well described by a two-compartment open model in which the absorption and the distribution rate constants are equal. Typical population estimates of apparent central distribution volume (Vc/F), peripheral distribution volu...

  12. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    from the well, then the amount of the infectious virus in the organ was ᝺ pfu/ml; * Not done, due to bacteria contamination of the samples. 5... diploid gene encoding 34.5 and both copies of HSV packaging signal have been deleted (18). Infectious HSV cannot be generated from this construct...construct that contains a mutated HSV genome, in which the diploid gene encoding g34.5 and both copies of the HSV packaging signal (pac) have been deleted

  13. Impact of the timing of hepatitis B virus identification and anti-hepatitis B virus therapy initiation on the risk of adverse liver outcomes for patients receiving cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jessica P; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Cantor, Scott B; Barbo, Andrea; Lin, Heather Y; Ahmed, Sairah; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Donato-Santana, Christian; Eng, Cathy; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Fisch, Michael J; McLaughlin, Peter; Simon, George R; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Lok, Anna S

    2017-09-01

    Data on the incidence of adverse liver outcomes are limited for cancer patients with chronic (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]-positive/hepatitis B core antibody [anti-HBc]-positive) or past (HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive) hepatitis B virus (HBV) after chemotherapy. This study was aimed at determining the impact of test timing and anti-HBV therapy on adverse liver outcomes in these patients. Patients with solid or hematologic malignancies who received chemotherapy between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively studied. HBV testing and anti-HBV therapy were defined as early at the initiation of cancer therapy and as late after initiation. Outcomes included hepatitis flares, hepatic impairment, liver failure, and death. Time-to-event analysis was used to determine incidence, and multivariate hazard models were used to determine predictors of outcomes. There were 18,688 study patients (80.4% with solid tumors). The prevalence of chronic HBV was 1.1% (52 of 4905), and the prevalence of past HBV was 7.1% (350 of 4905). Among patients with solid tumors, late identification of chronic HBV was associated with a higher risk of hepatitis flare (hazard ratio [HR], 4.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-12.86), hepatic impairment (HR, 8.48; 95% CI, 1.86-38.66), liver failure (HR, 9.38; 95% CI, 1.50-58.86), and death (HR, 3.90; 95% CI, 1.19-12.83) in comparison with early identification. Among patients with hematologic malignancies and chronic HBV, the risk of death was 7.8 (95% CI, 1.73-35.27) times higher for persons with late initiation of anti-HBV therapy versus early initiation. Patients with late identification of chronic HBV had late or no anti-HBV therapy. Chronic HBV predicted liver failure in patients with solid or hematologic malignancies, whereas male sex and late identification were predictors for patients with solid tumors. Early identification correlates with early anti-HBV therapy and reduces the risk of liver failure and death in chronic HBV patients

  14. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications.

  15. Prolonged control of replication-competent dual- tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 following cessation of highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgado Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART during primary HIV-1 infection occasionally results in transient control of viral replication after treatment interruption, the vast majority of patients eventually experience a rebound in plasma viremia. Results Here we report a case of a patient who was started on HAART during symptomatic primary infection and who has subsequently maintained viral loads of + T cells. In addition, he does not have any known protective HLA alleles. Thus it is unlikely that he was destined to become a natural elite controller or suppressor. The mechanism of control of viral replication is unclear; he is infected with a CCR5/CXCR4 dual-tropic virus that is fully replication-competent in vitro. In addition, his spouse, who transmitted the virus to him, developed AIDS. The patient's CD4+ T cells are fully susceptible to HIV-1 infection, and he has low titers of neutralizing antibodies to heterologous and autologous HIV-1 isolates. Furthermore, his CD8+ T cells do not have potent HIV suppressive activity. Conclusion This report suggests that some patients may be capable of controlling pathogenic HIV-1 isolates for extended periods of time after the cessation of HAART through a mechanism that is distinct from the potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL mediated suppression that has been reported in many elite suppressors.

  16. Neonatal gene therapy of glycogen storage disease type Ia using a feline immunodeficiency virus-based vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshpun, Albert; Condiotti, Reba; Waddington, Simon N; Peer, Michael; Zeig, Eli; Peretz, Sima; Simerzin, Alina; Chou, Janice; Pann, Chi-Jiunn; Giladi, Hilla; Galun, Eithan

    2010-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), also known as von Gierke disease, is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-alpha (G6Pase), a key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. From birth, affected individuals cannot maintain normal blood glucose levels and suffer from a variety of metabolic disorders, leading to life-threatening complications. Gene therapy has been proposed as a possible option for treatment of this illness. Vectors have been constructed from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus, because the wild-type virus does not cause disease in humans. Previously, we have shown that these vectors are capable of integrating stably into hepatocyte cell lines and adult murine livers and lead to long-term transgene expression. In the current work, we have assessed the ability to attenuate disease symptoms in a murine model of GSD-Ia. Single administration of FIV vectors containing the human G6Pase gene to G6Pase-alpha(-/-) mice did not change the biochemical and pathological phenotype. However, a double neonatal administration protocol led to normalized blood glucose levels, significantly extended survival, improved body weight, and decreased accumulation of liver glycogen associated with the disease. This approach shows a promising paradigm for treating GSD-Ia patients early in life thereby avoiding long-term consequences.

  17. Simultaneous splenectomy during liver transplantation augments anti-viral therapy in patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Heng-Cheng; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Hsu, Kuo-Feng; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Chen, Teng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous splenectomy in liver transplantation (LT) is selectively indicated because of splenoportal venous thromboses and increased sepsis. Therefore, its impact should be further investigated. Of the 160 liver transplant patients, only 40 underwent simultaneous splenectomy. Clinicopathologic characteristics and outcomes were compared between the splenectomy and non-splenectomy group using retrospective analysis. Although the groups were similar and had no significant difference in the intra- and postoperative data, non-splenectomy group had more male patients. However, splenectomy group showed significantly higher platelet and leukocyte counts at 1 month and 6 months after the transplantation and higher hepatitis C virus anti-viral therapy completion. Furthermore, 3 patients developed portal or splenic vein thrombosis during the postoperative follow-up, but the overall survival rate did not significantly differ between these groups. Simultaneous splenectomy in LT can be safely performed, particularly in patients with hepatitis C virus cirrhosis, small-for-size grafts, hypersplenism, and ABO blood group incompatible (ABO - incompatible) LT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatic flare after telbivudine withdrawal and efficacy of postpartum antiviral therapy for pregnancies with chronic hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Wang, Jing; Jin, Dongfang; Qi, Caijing; Yan, TaoTao; Cao, Furong; Jin, Li; Tian, Zhen; Guo, Dandan; Yuan, Ningxia; Feng, Weihong; Zhang, Shulin; Zhao, Yingren; Chen, Tianyan

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of telbivudine for breaking vertical transmission of hepatitis B virus has been well established. Data on the risk of postpartum flare after telbivudine withdrawal and efficacy of extended antiviral therapy after delivery are limited. Chronic hepatitis B virus-infected women who received telbivudine beginning at week 24 or 28 of gestation were enrolled and then followed up to 52 weeks postpartum. Virological and biochemical parameters were assessed. Of the 241 women who finished 52 weeks of follow-up, 33.6% had elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) during pregnancy. Telbivudine administration resulted in ALT normalization in 85.2% before delivery. Compared with women having a normal ALT level throughout pregnancy, those with elevated ALT had a significantly higher rate of ALT flare after telbivudine withdrawal (25.0% vs 11.9%; χ 2  = 4.273, P = 0.039). Multivariate analysis indicated that only ALT elevation during pregnancy correlated with postpartum flare after telbivudine withdrawal. Those women with elevated ALT during pregnancy continued antiviral treatment to 52 weeks postpartum and had a significantly higher HBeAg seroconversion rate (P = 0.001) and a notable decrease in HBsAg titers (P = 0.001). It is safe for the majority of women to withdraw telbivudine after delivery, whereas exciting serological response encourages extended antiviral therapy for mother with ALT elevation during pregnancy. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology published by Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. CYTOKINE RESPONSE ASSOCIATED WITH HEPATITIS C VIRUS CLEARANCE IN HIV COINFECTED PATIENTS INITIATING PEG INTERFERON- BASED THERAPY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong Tam Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment against hepatitis C virus (HCV infection based on peginterferon-a (pegIFNa and ribavirin induces important changes on cytokine release and T cell activation. Objective: Immune response to pegIFNa-ribavirin therapy was explored in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. Methods: Concentrations of 25 cytokines and CD8+ T cell activation were monitored in HCV/HIV coinfected patients classified as sustained virological responders (SVR, n=19 and non-responders (NR, n=11.  Results: High pretreatment concentrations of IP-10 (CXCL-10 and MCP-1 (CCL-2 were associated with poor anti-HCV response. PegIFNa-ribavirin therapy increased CD8+ T cell activation and induced significant changes in levels of eleven cytokines related to both Th1 and Th2 responses in SVR (IL-1b, IL-1RA, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, IP-10, eotaxin, MCP-1 but only six cytokines in NR (IL-1b, IL-2, IL-5, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, eotaxin. Highest rise in MIP-1b and MCP-1 levels was observed four weeks after anti-HCV treatment initiation in SVR compared to NR (p=0.002 and p=0.03, respectively, whereas a decrease of IL-8 concentration was associated with treatment failure (p= 0.052. Conclusions: Higher and broader cytokine responses to pegIFNa-ribavirin therapy were observed in SVR patients compared to NR. Changes in IL-8, MIP-1b and MCP-1 serum concentrations may be associated with efficacy of pegIFNa- and ribavirin-based therapies in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV.

  20. Cytokine Response Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Clearance in HIV Coinfected Patients Initiating Peg Interferon-α Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong Tam; Niloofar, Reihani; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Nils, Kuster; Bollore, Karine; Ducos, Jacques; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Reynes, Jacques; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on peginterferon-α (pegIFNα) and ribavirin induces important changes in cytokine release and T cell activation. Immune response to pegIFNα-ribavirin therapy was explored in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. Concentrations of 25 cytokines and CD8(+) T cell activation were monitored in HCV/HIV coinfected patients classified as sustained virological responders (SVR, n=19) and non-responders (NR, n=11). High pretreatment concentrations of IP-10 (CXCL-10) and MCP-1 (CCL-2) were associated with a poor anti-HCV response. PegIFNα-ribavirin therapy increased CD8(+) T cell activation and induced significant changes in levels of eleven cytokines related to both Th1 and Th2 responses in SVR (IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, IP-10, eotaxin, MCP-1) but of only six cytokines in NR (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, eotaxin). The highest rise in MIP-1β and MCP-1 levels was observed four weeks after anti-HCV treatment initiation in SVR compared to NR (p=0.002 and p=0.03, respectively), whereas a decrease in IL-8 concentration was associated with treatment failure (p= 0.052). Higher and broader cytokine responses to pegIFNα-ribavirin therapy were observed in SVR patients compared to NR. Changes in IL-8, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 serum concentrations may be associated with efficacy of pegIFNα- and ribavirin-based therapies in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV.

  1. Improvements in hepatitis B virus screening before rituximab therapy: A community-based, safety-net hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junus, Kevin; Aguilar, Maria; Patel, Priya; Irwin, David; Yee, Stephen; Liu, Benny; Bhuket, Taft; Wong, Robert J

    2017-02-15

    Individuals with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) or previously resolved HBV are at increased risk of HBV exacerbation or reactivation when they receive treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (against B-lymphocyte antigen cluster of differentiation 20 [CD20], an activated-glycosylated phosphoprotein) like rituximab (RTX). The objective of the current study was to evaluate the rates of appropriate HBV screening before patients started receiving RTX, at the initiation of HBV treatment, and during HBV flares among an underserved safety-net population. In total, 244 consecutive adults who received treatment with RTX from 2006 to 2015 at an urban safety-net hospital were evaluated to determine appropriate HBV screening (HBV surface antigen [HBsAg] and HBV total core antibody [HBcAb]) before starting RTX. The initiation of prophylactic antiviral therapy and the development of HBV flares after starting RTX were evaluated. Predictors of appropriate HBV screening were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression models. Most patients were women (52.7%; n = 128) and of Hispanic ethnicity (30.7%; n = 74). Before starting RTX, 60.5% (n = 147) of patients received appropriate HBV screening. The HBV screening rates before RTX improved from 14.7% (2006-2009) to 74.7% (2010-2012), and to 87.1% (2013-2015; P HBcAb-positive/HBsAg-negative patients who did not receive antiviral therapy experienced HBV reactivation. No patient-specific or disease-specific predictors of receiving HBV screening before RTX therapy were identified. Among adults receiving RTX therapy in a single community-based hospital system, HBV screening rates were suboptimal, and 28.6% of HBsAg-positive patients and 7.4% of HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive patients who did not receive antiviral treatment experienced HBV reactivation or flare. Cancer 2017;123:650-656. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  2. Delivery of Adeno-Associated Virus Gene Therapy by Intravascular Limb Infusion Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntman, Alisha M; Flotte, Terence R

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) can be delivered to the skeletal muscle of the limb (pelvic or thoracic) by means of regional intravascular delivery. This review summarizes the evolution of this technique to deliver rAAV either via the arterial blood supply or via the peripheral venous circulation. The focus of this review is on applications in large animal models, including preclinical studies. Based on this overview of past research, we aim to inform the design of preclinical and clinical studies.

  3. Adenoassociated Virus Serotype 9-Mediated Gene Therapy for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Yi; Mu, Dakai; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Moser, Ann; Musolino, Patricia; Ren, JiaQian; Breakefield, Xandra O; Maguire, Casey A; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCD1) responsible for transport of CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome for degradation. We used recombinant adenoassociated virus serotype 9 (rAAV9) vector for delivery of the human ABCD1 gene (ABCD1) to mouse central nervous system (CNS). In vitro, efficient delivery of ABCD1 gene was...

  4. Concomitant highly active antiretroviral therapy leads to smaller decline and faster recovery of CD4+ cell counts during and after pegylated interferon plus ribavirin therapy in HIV-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiberger, T; Payer, B A; Kosi, L; Heil, P M; Rieger, A; Peck-Radosavljevic, M

    2011-06-15

    The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on CD4+ cell course during treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PegIFN-RBV) in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is unknown. We determined CD4(+) cell count in 94 HIV-HCV coinfected patients undergoing treatment with pegylated interferon plus RBV at baseline, treatment weeks 4-48 (W4-W48), and months 1, 3, and 6 of follow-up. Of the 94 patients, 70 underwent concomitant HAART (group A) and 24 did not (group B). Group A showed smaller CD4(+) cell decreases from W24-W48 (P = .027) and greater CD4(+) cell increases after cessation of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin therapy (P = .002) than group B showed. Concomitant HAART leads to smaller decreases and faster recovery of CD4(+) cells during and after pegylated interferon plus RBV therapy.

  5. Development of new therapy for canine mammary cancer with recombinant measles virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising treatment strategy for cancer. We previously generated a recombinant measles virus (rMV-SLAMblind that selectively uses a poliovirus receptor-related 4 (PVRL4/Nectin4 receptor, but not signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM. We demonstrated that the virus exerts therapeutic effects against human breast cancer cells. Here, we examined the applicability of rMV-SLAMblind to treating canine mammary cancers (CMCs. We found that the susceptibilities of host cells to rMV-SLAMblind were dependent on canine Nectin-4 expression. Nectin-4 was detected in four of nine CMC cell lines. The rMV-SLAMblind efficiently infected those four Nectin-4-positive cell lines and was cytotoxic for three of them (CF33, CHMm, and CTBm. In vivo experiment showed that the administration of rMV-SLAMblind greatly suppressed the progression of tumors in mice xenografted with a CMC cell line (CF33. Immunohistochemistry revealed that canine Nectin-4 was expressed in 45% of canine mammary tumors, and the tumor cells derived from one clinical specimen were efficiently infected with rMV-SLAMblind. These results suggest that rMV-SLAMblind infects CMC cells and displays antitumor activity in vitro, in xenografts, and ex vivo. Therefore, oncolytic virotherapy with rMV-SLAMblind can be a novel method for treating CMCs.

  6. Production of a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine Containing Inactivated Autologous Virus for Therapy of Patients with Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Riddler, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus is...

  7. Detection of lipoatrophy in human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected children treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, K.; Verweel, G.; Groot, R. de; Hartwig, N.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Highly active antiretroviral therapy has been associated with lipodystrophy in adults. Much is unknown about its characteristics, especially in children. OBJECTIVE: To obtain an objective case definition of the lipodystrophy syndrome. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. One

  8. Antiviral therapy in the improvement of survival of patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Gao, Hengjun; Huang, Junting; Wang, Haoyuan; Zhou, Zhongguo; Zhang, Yaojun; Li, Shaohua; Chen, Minshan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the role of antiviral therapy with nucleoside analogs (NAs) in sorafenib-treated patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A retrospective cohort study was done in 151 HBV-related HCC patients treated with sorafenib at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between 2007 and 2012. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival and adverse events were compared in patients treated with/without NAs. Subgroup analysis and Cox regression analysis were performed to determine the efficiency of NAs and prognostic factors for OS. HBV-related HCC patients (n=151) were identified from our database of HCC patients treated with sorafenib. Patients treated with NAs (antiviral group, n=88) had significantly improved OS compared with the patients who received no NAs (non-antiviral group, n=63; median OS: 16.47 months vs 13.10 months, P=0.03). Patients in the antiviral group had a significant risk reduction of death compared with the non-antiviral group (hazard ratio: 0.67, 95% confidence interval: 0.46-0.98, P=0.04). By subgroup analysis, patients of Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage C and patients with higher presorafenib HBV-DNA level achieved better survival improvement. Antiviral therapy with NAs was one of the independent prognostic factors for OS of HBV-related HCC patients who were treated with sorafenib. Antiviral therapy with NAs improved OS of HBV-related HCC patients treated with sorafenib, especially in patients with BCLC stage C disease and higher HBV-DNA level. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. First and Foremost Battle the Virus: Eliciting Patient Preferences in Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C Using a Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Axel; Bethge, Susanne

    There has been tremendous progress regarding treatment options for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Several interferon-free regimens are awaiting regulatory approval. These innovations promise substantial reductions in the burden of disease and side effects as well as a decrease in treatment duration. The aim of this quantitaitive study was to elicit patient preferences for attributes of innovative antiviral therapies for hepatitis C. A systematic literature search and 14 semi-structured interviews were performed, resulting in eight patient-relevant characteristics. For the discrete choice experiment, an experimental design (3×3 + 5×6) was generated using Ngene software. The survey was conducted in August 2014 through computer-assisted personal interviews. The data were effects-coded in a random parameter logit estimation. Participants were patients with HCV (N = 561; 58.1% men) in different treatment states. The analysis revealed a predominance of the attribute "reaching sustained virological response." When considering confidence intervals, the results showed three different preference ranks. At first place was "sustained virological response" (level difference [LD] 3.98), second was "anemia" (LD 1.10), followed by "number of interferon injections" (LD 0.92), "rash" (LD 0.82), "nausea and/or diarrhea" (LD 0.79), and "duration of antiviral therapy" (LD 0.78). The last position was occupied by both "tiredness/fatigue" (LD 0.31) and "headache" (LD 0.34). From the patients' point of view, sustained virological response is the most essential criterion for choosing an HCV therapy. It was ranked at the highest, dominating all side effects and modes of administration. Furthermore, this study proved that patients consider both the probability of occurrence and the severity of treatment-induced side effects. Results clearly point to valuation of probabilities that is separate from that of severity. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and

  10. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  11. Hepatitis C Virus: A Critical Appraisal of New Approaches to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The HCV council 2011 convened 11 leading clinicians and researchers in hepatitis C virus from academic medical centers in the United States to provide a forum for the practical and comprehensive evaluation of current data regarding best practices for integrating new direct-acting antiviral agents into existing treatment paradigms. The council investigated 10 clinical practice statements related to HCV treatment that reflect key topical areas. Faculty members reviewed and discussed the data related to each statement, and voted on the nature of the evidence and their level of support for each statement. In this new era of DAAs, a comprehensive and critical analysis of the literature is needed to equip clinicians with the knowledge necessary to design, monitor, and modify treatment regimens in order to optimize patient outcomes.

  12. Targeting microRNA-122: walking on cutting edge of hepatitis C virus infection therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motavaf, M; Safari, S; Alavian, S M

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, with an estimated 170 million carriers worldwide, remains a major cause of chronic liver disease. Current anti-HCV treatments have significant side effects and have met with only partial success. Therefore, a more effective therapeutic modality for HCV infection is needed. The stability and propagation of HCV is dependent on the interaction between its genome and a highly abundant liver microRNA (miRNA), known as microRNA-122 (miR-122). As a conserved host factor that would not be expected to evolve resistance mutations, miR-122 makes an attractive antiviral target. In this review we will discuss how targeting miR-122, using antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), can be a new anti-HCV treatment.

  13. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-03-26

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin(®)) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed.

  14. Predicting Early Viral Control under Direct-Acting Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Using Pretreatment Immunological Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Hutchinson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent introduction of all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA treatment has revolutionized care of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Regrettably, the high cost of DAA treatment is burdensome for healthcare systems and may be prohibitive for some patients who would otherwise benefit. Understanding how patient-related factors influence individual responses to DAA treatment may lead to more efficient prescribing. In this observational study, patients with chronic HCV infection were comprehensively monitored by flow cytometry to identify pretreatment immunological variables that predicted HCV RNA negativity within 4 weeks of commencing DAA treatment. Twenty-three patients [genotype 1a (n = 10, 1b (n = 9, and 3 (n = 4] were treated with daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir (SOF (n = 15, ledipasvir plus SOF (n = 4, or ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir (n = 4. DAA treatment most prominently altered the distribution of CD8+ memory T cell subsets. Knowing only pretreatment frequencies of CD3+ and naive CD8+ T cells allowed correct classification of 83% of patients as “fast” (HCV RNA-negative by 4 weeks or “slow” responders. In a prospective cohort, these parameters correctly classified 90% of patients. Slow responders exhibited higher frequencies of CD3+ T cells, CD8+ TEM cells, and CD5high CD27− CD57+ CD8+ chronically activated T cells, which is attributed to bystander hyperactivation of virus-non-specific CD8+ T cells. Taken together, non-specific, systemic CD8+ T cell activation predicted a longer time to viral clearance. This discovery allows pretreatment identification of individuals who may not require a full 12-week course of DAA therapy; in turn, this could lead to individualized prescribing and more efficient resource allocation.

  15. Understanding the hepatitis C virus life cycle paves the way for highly effective therapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Rice, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    . An exciting new era in HCV therapy dawned with the recent approval of two viral protease inhibitors, used in combination with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin; however, this is just the beginning. Multiple classes of antivirals with distinct targets promise highly efficient combinations, and interferon......, such as HCV diversity, viral resistance, the influence of host genetics, advanced liver disease and other co-morbidities....

  16. Toxicity of Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, James; Grew, David; DeLacure, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the acute morbidity of high dose head and neck RT and CRT in patients with infected with HIV. Methods and Materials: All HIV-positive patients who underwent radiation therapy for head and neck cancer in our department between 2004 and 2008 were reviewed. Treatment related data were examined. All treatments were delivered with megavoltage photon beams or electron beams. Patients were evaluated by an attending radiation oncologist for toxicity and response on a weekly basis during therapy and monthly after treatment in a multidisciplinary clinic. Acute toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group (RTOG) common toxicity criteria. Response to treatment was based on both physical exam as well as post-treatment imaging as indicated. Results: Thirteen patients who underwent RT with a diagnosis of HIV were identified. Median age was 53 years and median follow-up was 22 months. Twelve had squamous cell carcinoma and one had lymphoproliferative parotiditis. Median radiation dose was 66.4 Gy and median duration of treatment was 51 days. The median number of scheduled radiotherapy days missed was zero (range 0 to 7). One patient (8%) developed Grade 4 confluent moist desquamation. Eight patients (61%) developed Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Based on our results, HIV-positive individuals appear to tolerate treatment for head and neck cancer, with toxicity similar to that in HIV-negative individuals.

  17. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekwaletswe CT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinics in Tshwane, South Africa.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument. Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted.Results: About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an

  18. Preliminary guidelines for the evaluation and management of dyslipidemia in adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus and receiving antiretroviral therapy: Recommendations of the Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group Cardiovascular Disease Focus Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubé, M. P.; Sprecher, D.; Henry, W. K.; Aberg, J. A.; Torriani, F. J.; Hodis, H. N.; Schouten, J. [=Judith; Levin, J.; Myers, G.; Zackin, R.; Nevin, T.; Currier, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a prevalent condition that affects patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who are receiving antiretroviral therapy, These preliminary recommendations summarize the current understanding in this area and propose guidelines for management. Existing guidelines for the

  19. Opportunistic disease and mortality in patients coinfected with hepatitis B or C virus in the strategic management of antiretroviral therapy (SMART) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedaldi, Ellen; Peters, Lars; Neuhaus, Jacquie

    2008-01-01

    with the viral suppression (continued use of antiretroviral therapy) group. We assessed whether participants with concurrent hepatitis had an increased risk of the end points evaluated in the SMART study. METHODS: Participants were classified as being positive for hepatitis B virus (HBV) if they had positive...... enrolled from 8 January 2002 through 11 January 2006, 930 (17%) were HBV positive and/or HCV positive. The relative risk of non-OD death in participants randomized to the drug conservation group versus the viral suppression group was comparable regardless of hepatitis status (HR for coinfected and HIV...... of antiretroviral therapy is particularly unsafe in persons with hepatitis virus coinfection. Although HCV- and/or HBV-coinfected participants constituted 17% of participants in the SMART study, almost one-half of all non-OD deaths occurred in this population. Viral hepatitis was an unlikely cause of this excess...

  20. In vivo PET imaging with 18F-FHBG of hepatoma cancer gene therapy using herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and ganciclovir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, TaeSup; Kim, JunYoup; Moon, ByungSeok; Kang, JooHyun; Song, Inho; Kwon, HeeChung; Kim, KyungMin; Cheon, GiJeong; Choi, ChangWoon; Lim, SangMoo

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression in vivo to evaluate the gene therapy efficacy is a critical issue for scientists and physicians. Non-invasive nuclear imaging can offer information regarding the level of gene expression and its location when an appropriate reporter gene is constructed in the therapeutic gene therapy. Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (HSV1-tk) is the most common reporter gene and is used in cancer gene therapy by activating relatively nontoxic compounds, such as acyclovir or ganciclovir (GCV), to induce cell death. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of monitoring cancer gene therapy using retroviral vector transduced HSV1-tk and GCV, in vitro cellular uptake and in vivo animal studies, including biodistribution and small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, were performed in HSV1-tk and luciferase (Luc)-transduced MCA-TK/Luc and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-transduced MCA-eGFP hepatoma cell lines

  1. Preclinical evaluation of radiation and systemic, RGD-targeted, adeno-associated virus phage-TNF gene therapy in a mouse model of spontaneously metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T J; Healy, N; Sara, A; Maggi, E; Claros, C S; Kabarriti, R; Scandiuzzi, L; Liu, L; Gorecka, J; Adem, A; Basu, I; Yuan, Z; Guha, C

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma in the United States continues to rise, with metastatic lesions notoriously recalcitrant to therapy. There are limited effective treatment options available and a great need for more effective therapies that can be rapidly integrated in the clinic. In this study, we demonstrate that the combination of RGD-targeted adeno-associated virus phage (RGD-AAVP-TNF) with hypofractionated radiation therapy results in synergistic inhibition of primary syngeneic B16 melanoma in a C57 mouse model. Furthermore, this combination appeared to modify the tumor microenvironment, resulting in decreased Tregs in the draining LN and increased tumor-associated macrophages within the primary tumor. Finally, there appeared to be a reduction in metastatic potential and a prolongation of overall survival in the combined treatment group. These results indicate the use of targeted TNF gene therapy vector with radiation treatment could be a valuable treatment option for patients with metastatic melanoma.

  2. Hepatitis C virus induced insulin resistance impairs response to anti viral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zayadi, Abdel-Rahman; Anis, Mahmoud

    2012-01-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important risk factor for insulin resistance (IR). The latter is the pathogenic foundation underlying metabolic syndrome, steatosis and cirrhosis, and possibly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors ultimately leads to the development of IR. Obesity is considered a major risk factor, with dysregulation of levels of secreted adipokines from distended adipose tissue playing a major role in IR. HCV-induced IR may be due to the HCV core protein inducing proteasomal degradation of insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2, blocking intracellular insulin signaling. The latter is mediated by increased levels of both tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOC-3). IR, through different mechanisms, plays a role in the development of steatosis and its progression to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and even HCC. In addition, IR has a role in impairing TNF signaling cascade, which in turn blocks STAT-1 translocation and interferon stimulated genes production avoiding the antiviral effect of interferon.

  3. Ribavirin revisited in the era of direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Jordan J; Jacobson, Ira M; Sulkowski, Mark S; Poordad, Fred; Tatsch, Fernando; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, ribavirin has been an integral component of treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, where it has been shown to improve the efficacy of (pegylated) interferon. However, because of treatment-limiting side effects and its additive toxicity with interferon, the search for interferon- and ribavirin-free regimens has been underway. The recent approvals of all-oral direct acting antivirals (DAAs) have revolutionized the HCV therapeutic landscape, and initially it was expected that the role of ribavirin with DAA regimens would be eliminated. On the contrary, what we have witnessed is that ribavirin retains an important role in the optimal treatment of some subgroups of patients, particularly those that historically have been considered the most difficult to cure. Fortunately, it has also been recognized that the safety profile of ribavirin is improved when co-administered with all-oral DAA combinations in the absence of interferon. Despite the antiviral mechanism of action of ribavirin being poorly understood, we now have a range of novel insights into the potential role of ribavirin in all-oral DAA HCV treatment and greater insight into the antiviral mechanism by which it continues to provide clinical benefit for defined patient groups. © 2016 The Authors. Liver International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Adenoassociated virus serotype 9-mediated gene therapy for x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yi; Mu, Dakai; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Moser, Ann; Musolino, Patricia; Ren, JiaQian; Breakefield, Xandra O; Maguire, Casey A; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCD1) responsible for transport of CoA-activated very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) into the peroxisome for degradation. We used recombinant adenoassociated virus serotype 9 (rAAV9) vector for delivery of the human ABCD1 gene (ABCD1) to mouse central nervous system (CNS). In vitro, efficient delivery of ABCD1 gene was achieved in primary mixed brain glial cells from Abcd1-/- mice as well as X-ALD patient fibroblasts. Importantly, human ABCD1 localized to the peroxisome, and AAV-ABCD1 transduction showed a dose-dependent effect in reducing VLCFA. In vivo, AAV9-ABCD1 was delivered to Abcd1-/- mouse CNS by either stereotactic intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intravenous (IV) injections. Astrocytes, microglia and neurons were the major target cell types following ICV injection, while IV injection also delivered to microvascular endothelial cells and oligodendrocytes. IV injection also yielded high transduction of the adrenal gland. Importantly, IV injection of AAV9-ABCD1 reduced VLCFA in mouse brain and spinal cord. We conclude that AAV9-mediated ABCD1 gene transfer is able to reach target cells in the nervous system and adrenal gland as well as reduce VLCFA in culture and a mouse model of X-ALD.

  5. Liver ultrastructural morphology and mitochondrial DNA levels in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfection: no evidence of mitochondrial damage with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Motoi; Chu, Fanny F S; Au, May; Lu, Helen; Chen, Jennifer; Rietkerk, Sonja; Barrios, Rolando; Farley, John D; Montaner, Julio S; Montessori, Valentina C; Walker, David C; Côté, Hélène C F

    2008-06-19

    Liver mitochondrial toxicity is a concern, particularly in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. Liver biopsies from HIV/HCV co-infected patients, 14 ON-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and nine OFF-HAART, were assessed by electron microscopy quantitative morphometric analyses. Hepatocytes tended to be larger ON-HAART than OFF-HAART (P = 0.05), but mitochondrial volume, cristae density, lipid volume, mitochondrial DNA and RNA levels were similar. We found no evidence of increased mitochondrial toxicity in individuals currently on HAART, suggesting that concomitant HAART should not delay HCV therapy.

  6. Gut microbiota and hepatitis-B-virus-induced chronic liver disease: implications for faecal microbiota transplantation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Y; Cai, Y

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the most common infectious diseases globally. It has been estimated that there are 350 million chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers worldwide. The liver is connected to the small intestine by the bile duct, which carries bile formed in the liver to the intestine. Nearly all of the blood that leaves the stomach and intestines must pass through the liver. Human intestines contain a wide diversity of microbes, collectively termed the 'gut microbiota'. Gut microbiota play a significant role in host metabolic processes and host immune modulation, and influence host development and physiology (organ development). Altered gut microbiota is a common complication in liver disease. Changes in intestinal microbiota seem to play an important role in induction and promotion of HBV-induced chronic liver disease progression, and specific species among the intestinal commensal bacteria may play either a pathogenic or a protective role in the development of HBV-induced chronic liver disease. Thus, the gut microbiome may represent fertile targets for prevention or management of HBV-induced chronic liver disease. Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may be a useful therapy for HBV-related disease in the future. However, the data available in this field remain limited, and relevant scientific work has only just commenced. New technologies have enabled systematic studies of gut microbiota, and provided more realistic information about its composition and pathological variance. This review summarizes the cutting edge of research into the relationship between gut microbiota and HBV-induced chronic liver disease, and the future prospects of FMT therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co......-10 HIV-HCV co-infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  8. Variability of hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) during the early phase of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo Cortés, K; Laskus, T; Bukowska-Ośko, I; Pawełczyk, A; Berak, H; Horban, A; Fic, M; Radkowski, M

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered to be an important factor defining viral pathogenesis, persistence and resistance to treatment. The aim of the present study was to characterize HCV genetic heterogeneity within a hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) before and during the early period of pegylated interferon alfa (PEG-IFN-α) and ribavirin treatment in correlation with treatment outcome. The study involved 24 patients treated with PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin whose sera were collected before (baseline) and at 7, 14, 21 28 and 56 day of treatment. HCV HVR-1 region was amplified by nested RT- PCR and subjected to SSCP (single strand conformational polymorphism) analysis. SSCP changes of HCV HVR-1 over time in each patient were compared to treatment outcome results. In 2/11 (18%) SVR+ and 8/13 (62%) SVR- treated patients, HVR-1 genetic changes manifested by new SSCP bands (new genetic variants) and were significantly more frequent in nonresponders (P HVR-1 variability during the early phase of PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin therapy may be predictive of treatment outcome.

  9. Role of antiviral therapy in the natural history of hepatitis B virus-related chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Francesco Paolo; Rodríguez-Castro, Kryssia; Scribano, Laura; Gottardo, Giorgia; Vanin, Veronica; Farinati, Fabio

    2015-05-18

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a dynamic state of interactions among HBV, hepatocytes, and the host immune system. Natural history studies of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection have shown an association between active viral replication and adverse clinical outcomes such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The goal of therapy for CHB is to improve quality of life and survival by preventing progression of the disease to cirrhosis, decompensation, end-stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and death. This goal can be achieved if HBV replication is suppressed in a sustained manner. The accompanying reduction in histological activity of CHB lessens the risk of cirrhosis and of HCC, particularly in non-cirrhotic patients. However, CHB infection cannot be completely eradicated, due to the persistence of covalently closed circular DNA in the nucleus of infected hepatocytes, which may explain HBV reactivation. Moreover, the integration of the HBV genome into the host genome may favour oncogenesis, development of HCC and may also contribute to HBV reactivation.

  10. Difficulty swallowing and lack of receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy predict acute weight loss in human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Denise L; Bica, Ioana; Knox, Tamsin A; Wanke, Christine; Tchetgen, Eric; Spiegelman, Donna; Silva, Marisela; Gorbach, Sherwood; Wilson, Ira B

    2003-11-15

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, symptoms of underlying illness may promote weight loss through decreased caloric intake, increased metabolic needs, or nutrient malabsorption. We evaluated disease symptoms as predictors of acute weight loss (i.e., loss of > or =5% of weight). HIV-infected men and women (n=415) were telephoned every 5 weeks to obtain information about weight and recent symptoms. Weight change between each pair of consecutive calls (telephone intervals, 2814) was calculated. Acute weight loss occurred across 4.5% of intervals and among 24% of individuals. Patients reported > or =1 symptom before 58% of telephone intervals. The most common symptoms or symptom complexes before intervals were diarrhea (21% of patients), anorexia (17%), upper respiratory symptoms (16%), skin symptoms (12%), and abdominal pain (12%). Trouble swallowing (6%) and oral symptoms (7%) were less common. Risk of acute weight loss was significantly increased when oral symptoms or trouble swallowing were present, and it was decreased when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was used or when diarrhea was not present. Even when HAART is being administered, clinicians should remain vigilant regarding weight loss, oral symptoms, and trouble swallowing.

  11. Serum BAFF levels, Methypredsinolone therapy, Epstein-Barr Virus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in Multiple Sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Giuseppe; Cocco, Eleonora; Frau, Jessica; Arru, Giannina; Caggiu, Elisa; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2016-07-07

    Elevated B lymphocyte activating factor BAFF levels have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients; moreover, disease-modifying treatments (DMT) have shown to influence blood BAFF levels in MS patients, although the significance of these changes is still controversial. In addition, BAFF levels were reported increased during infectious diseases. In our study, we wanted to investigate on the serum BAFF concentrations correlated to the antibody response against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and their human homologous epitopes in MS and in patients affected with other neurological diseases (OND), divided in Inflammatory Neurological Diseases (IND), Non Inflammatory Neurological Diseases (NIND) and Undetermined Neurological Diseases (UND), in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). Our results confirmed a statistically significant high BAFF levels in MS and IND patients in comparison to HCs but not NIND and UND patients. Interestingly, BAFF levels were inversely proportional to antibodies level against EBV and MAP peptides and the BAFF levels significantly decreased in MS patients after methylprednisolone therapy. These results implicate that lower circulating BAFF concentrations were present in MS patients with humoral response against MAP and EBV. In conclusion MS patients with no IgGs against EBV and MAP may support the hypothesis that elevated blood BAFF levels could be associated with a more stable disease.

  12. Searching for synergy: Identifying optimal antiviral combination therapy using Hepatitis C virus (HCV) agents in a replicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Justin J; Drusano, George L; Rodriquez, Jaime L; Brown, Ashley N

    2017-10-01

    Direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) are potent inhibitors of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) that have revolutionized the treatment landscape for this important viral disease. There are currently four classes of DAAs that inhibit HCV replication via distinct mechanisms of action: nonstructural protein (NS) 3/4a protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, NS5B nucleoside polymerase inhibitors, and NS5B non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitors. Combination therapy with two or more DAAs has great potential to further enhance antiviral potency. The purpose of this study was to identify optimal combinations of DAAs against genotype 1 HCV replicons that maximized the inhibition of replicon replication. All possible two-drug combinations were evaluated against genotype 1a and 1b HCV replicons using a 96-well plate luciferase-based assay in triplicate. The Greco Universal Response Surface Area mathematical model was fit to the luciferase data to identify drug-drug interactions (i.e.: synergy, additivity, and antagonism) for antiviral effect against both genotypes. This information was used to rank-order combinations of DAAs based on their ability to inhibit replicon replication against genotype 1a and 1b HCV. These preclinical findings can provide information as to which antiviral regimens should move on in the development process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interactive Effects of Immunoglobulin Gamma and Human Leucocyte Antigen Genotypes on Response to Interferon Based Therapy of Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Howayda E; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Saad, Nevine E; Hussein, Amal S; Ismail, Somaia; Thabet, Eman H; Farouk, Hebatallah; Kandil, Dina; Heiba, Ahmed; Hafez, Wael

    2015-06-15

    We examined the role that immunoglobulin GM 23 and KM allotypes-genetic markers of γ and κ chains, respectively-play in response to treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Egyptian patients. A total of 120 persons who had responded to HCV treatment and 125 with persistent HCV infection were genotyped for the presence of GM23 and KM determinants. HLA -C genotyping was also done. Association of GM 23+ and KM3 was significantly associated with non response to treatment (P combinations of HLA and GM genotypes were associated significantly with the response to HCV treatment. The combination of HLAC2C2 and GM23+ was associated with persistence of infection (P = 0.027) while the association of HLAC2C2 and heterozygous GM23+/- was associated with SVR (P = 0.001). The association of HLAC1C1 and heterozygous GM23+/- was significantly associated with SVR (P = 0.001) and also subjects with HLA C1/C2 and heterozygous GM23+/- were likely to respond to treatment (P = 0.003) while subjects with HLA C1/C2 and GM23+ show tendency to resist to treatment (P = 0.0001). Our results didn't support a role for KM allotypes, GM23 allotype plays a role in the persistence of HCV infection in the presence or absence of KM1,3. Interaction between certain GM and HLA-C genotypes may favor adequate response to interferon based therapies.

  14. Combination therapy for hepatitis C virus with heat-shock protein 90 inhibitor 17-AAG and proteasome inhibitor MG132.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujino, Saneyuki; Yamaguchi, Saori; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2010-03-09

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease. Here, we report a new and effective strategy for inhibiting HCV replication using an inhibitor of heat-shock protein 90, 17-AAG (17-allylamino-17demethoxygeldanamycin), and a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. To explore the virological basis of combination therapy, we analysed the effects of 17-AAG and MG132, singly and in combination on HCV replication in an HCV replicon cell system. In HCV replicon cells, HCV RNA replication was suppressed by 17-AAG in a dose-dependent manner. As shown in the present study, the 50% inhibitory concentration values were 0.82 nM for 17-AAG and 0.21 nM for MG132. Low concentrations of MG132 had strong synergistic inhibitory effects with low toxicity on HCV replicon cells. The results of this study suggest that the different effects and synergistic actions of 17-AAG and MG132 could provide a new therapeutic approach to HCV infection.

  15. Adaptive T cell responses induced by oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor therapy expanded by dendritic cell and cytokine-induced killer cell adoptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Gwin, William R; Zhou, Xinna; Wang, Xiaoli; Huang, Hongyan; Jiang, Ni; Zhou, Lei; Agarwal, Pankaj; Hobeika, Amy; Crosby, Erika; Hartman, Zachary C; Morse, Michael A; H Eng, Kevin; Lyerly, H Kim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : Although local oncolytic viral therapy (OVT) may enhance tumor lysis, antigen release, and adaptive immune responses, systemic antitumor responses post-therapy are limited. Adoptive immunotherapy with autologous dendritic cells (DC) and cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIK) synergizes with systemic therapies. We hypothesized that OVT with Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (HSV-GM-CSF) would induce adaptive T cell responses that could be expanded systemically with sequential DC-CIK therapy. Patients and Methods : We performed a pilot study of intratumoral HSV-GM-CSF OVT followed by autologous DC-CIK cell therapy. In addition to safety and clinical endpoints, we monitored adaptive T cell responses by quantifying T cell receptor (TCR) populations in pre-oncolytic therapy, post-oncolytic therapy, and after DC-CIK therapy. Results : Nine patients with advanced malignancy were treated with OVT (OrienX010), of whom seven experienced stable disease (SD). Five of the OVT treated patients underwent leukapheresis, generation, and delivery of DC-CIKs, and two had SD, whereas three progressed. T cell receptor sequencing of TCR β sequences one month after OVT therapy demonstrates a dynamic TCR repertoire in response to OVT therapy in the majority of patients with the systematic expansion of multiple T cell clone populations following DC-CIK therapy. This treatment was well tolerated and long-term event free and overall survival was observed in six of the nine patients. Conclusions : Strategies inducing the local activation of tumor-specific immune responses can be combined with adoptive cellular therapies to expand the adaptive T cell responses systemically and further studies are warranted.

  16. Understanding early serum hepatitis D virus and HBsAg kinetics during pegylated interferon-alfa therapy via mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, Jeremie; Rotman, Yaron; Cotler, Scott J.; Koh, Christopher; Schmid, Peter; Albrecht, Jeff; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Liang, Jake T.; Hoofnagle, Jay H.; Heller, Theo; Dahari, Harel

    2014-01-01

    There is little information on the early kinetics of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) during interferon-α therapy. Here a mathematical model was developed and fitted to frequent HDV and HBsAg kinetic data from 10 patients during the first 28 weeks of pegylated-interferon-α2a (peg-IFN) therapy. Three patients achieved a complete virological response (CVR), defined as undetectable HDV 6 months after treatment stopped with loss of HBsAg and anti-HBsAg seroconversion. After initiation of therapy a median delay of 9 days (interquartile range IQR:[5;15]) was observed with no significant changes in HDV level. Thereafter, HDV declined in a biphasic manner, where a rapid first-phase lasting for 25 days (IQR:[23;58]) was followed by a slower or plateau second-phase. The model predicts that the main effect of peg-IFN is to reduce HDV production/release with a median effectiveness of 96% (IQR:[93;99.8]). Median serum HDV half-life (t1/2) was estimated to 2.9 days (IQR:[1.5;5.3]) with pretreatment production and clearance of about 1010 (IQR:[109.8-1010.8]) virions/day. None of the patients with flat 2nd phase in HDV achieved CVR. HBsAg kinetics of decline paralleled the second-phase of HDV decline consistent with HBsAg-productive-infected cells being the main source of production of HDV, with a median t1/2 of 135 days (IQR:[20-460]. The interferon lambda-3 polymorphism (rs12979860) was not associated with kinetic parameters. Conclusions Modeling results provide insights into HDV-host dynamics, the relationship between serum HBsAg levels and HBsAg-infected cells, IFN's mode of action and its effectiveness. The observation that a flat second phase in HDV and HBsAg kinetics was associated with failure to achieve CVR provides the basis to develop early stopping rules during peg-IFN treatment in HDV-infected patients. PMID:25098971

  17. Physician Decisions to Defer Antiretroviral Therapy in Key Populations: Implications for Reducing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Incidence and Mortality in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Enrico G; Culbert, Gabriel J; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Marcus, Ruthanne; Steffen, Alana D; Pauls, Heather A; Westergaard, Ryan P; Lee, Christopher K; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet physician attitudes and prescribing behaviors toward members of key risk populations may limit ART access and undermine treatment as prevention strategies. Physicians in Malaysia (N = 214) who prescribe antiretroviral therapy (ART) responded in an Internet-based survey to hypothetical clinical scenarios of HIV patients, varying by key risk population and CD4 + T-cell count, on whether they would initiate or defer ART compared with a control patient with sexually acquired HIV. The proportion of physicians who would defer ART in patients with advanced HIV (CD4 = 17 cells/μL) was significantly higher ( P social support (26.6%), compared with a control patient (4.2%). People who inject drugs with advanced HIV (CD4 = 17 cells/μL) were 19-fold (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 18.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.8-36.5) more likely to have ART deferred compared with the control. This effect was partially mitigated for PWID receiving methadone (AOR = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.5-5.7). At the highest CD4 + T-cell count (CD4 = 470 cells/μL), sex workers (AOR = 0.55; 95% CI, .44-.70) and patients with an HIV-uninfected sexual partner (AOR = 0.43; 95% CI, .34-.57) were significantly less likely to have ART deferred. Physicians who prescribe antiretroviral therapy in Malaysia may defer ART in some key populations including PWID and released prisoners, regardless of CD4 + T-cell count, which may help to explain very low rates of ART coverage among PWID in Malaysia. Reducing HIV incidence and mortality in Malaysia, where HIV is concentrated in PWID and other key populations, requires clinician-level interventions and monitoring physician adherence to international evidence-based treatment guidelines. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  18. Evaluating patient preference and satisfaction for human immunodeficiency virus therapy in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brégigeon-Ronot S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sylvie Brégigeon-Ronot,1 Antoine Cheret,2,3 André Cabié,4 Thierry Prazuck,5 Alain Volny-Anne,6 Shehzad Ali,7 Catherine Bottomley,7 Laurent Finkielsztejn,8 Caroline Philippe,9 Jean-Jacques Parienti10–12 1Clinical Immunohematology Department, Marseille Public University Hospital System (AP-HM, Sainte-Marguerite Hospital, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Guy-Chatilliez Hospital, Tourcoing, 3Internal Medicine Department, Paris Public University Hospital System (AP-HP, Bicêtre University Hospital Center, EA 7327, University Paris Descartes, Paris, 4Infectious and Tropical Diseases Department, French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM, CIC 1424, Martinique University Hospital Center, Fort De France, Martinique, 5Infectious Diseases Department, Orleans Regional Hospital Center, Orléans, 6Patient, Paris, France; 7ICON, Contract Research Organization, Patient Reported Outcomes Department, Oxford, United Kingdom; 8ViiV Healthcare, Medical affairs, Marly le Roi, 9Qualees, Contract Research Organization, Epidemilogy Department, Paris, 10Infectious Diseases Department, Caen University Hospital Center, 11Biostatistics and Clinical Research Unit, Caen University Hospital Center, 12EA2656 Microbial Adaptation Research Group (GRAM 2.0, Caen Normandy University, Caen, France Objectives: The objectives were 1 to elicit relative preferences for attributes of antiretroviral therapies (ART in people living with HIV (PLWH and 2 to explore satisfaction and adherence with current ART.Patients and methods: We conducted a multicenter cross-sectional study, consecutively enrolling PLWH receiving an ART. The quantitative part estimated the strength of preference for different attributes using an online discrete choice experiment (DCE. DCE data were analyzed using a mixed logit regression model. Qualitative data were collected through individual interviews. A preliminary coding framework was developed

  19. Bryostatin-1 for latent virus reactivation in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Madrid-Elena, Nadia; Pérez-Elías, Maria J; Martín, Maria Elena; Barbas, Coral; Ruipérez, Javier; Muñoz, Eduardo; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Angeles; Castor, Trevor; Moreno, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) agonist bryostatin-1 has shown significant ex-vivo potency to revert HIV-1 latency, compared with other latency reversing agents (LRA). The safety of this candidate LRA remains to be proven in treated HIV-1-infected patients. In this pilot, double-blind phase I clinical-trial (NCT 02269605), we included aviraemic HIV-1-infected patients on triple antiretroviral therapy to evaluate the effects of two different single doses of bryostatin-1 (10 or 20 μg/m) compared with placebo. Twelve patients were included, four in each arm. Bryostatin-1 was well tolerated in all participants. Two patients in the 20 μg/m arm developed grade 1 headache and myalgia. No detectable increases of cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1-RNA were observed in any study arm, nor differences in HIV-1 mRNA dynamics between arms (P = 0.44). The frequency of samples with low-level viraemia did not differ between arms and low-level viraemia did not correlate with CA-US HIV-1-RNA levels (P = 0.676). No changes were detected on protein kinase C (PKC) activity and in biomarkers of inflammation (sCD14 and interleukin-6) in any study arm. After the single dose of bryostatin-1, plasma concentrations were under detection limits in all the patients in the 10 μg/m arm, and below 50 pg/ml (0.05 nmol/l) in those in the 20 μg/m arm. Bryostatin-1 was safe at the single doses administered. However, the drug did not show any effect on PKC activity or on the transcription of latent HIV, probably due to low plasma concentrations. This study will inform next trials aimed at assessing higher doses, multiple dosing schedules or combination studies with synergistic drugs.

  20. Evaluation of the prognostic value of liver stiffness in patients with hepatitis C virus treated with triple or dual antiviral therapy: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Cristina; Piluso, Alessia; Arena, Umberto; Salomoni, Elena; Montalto, Paolo; Monti, Monica; Boldrini, Barbara; Corti, Giampaolo; Marra, Fabio; Laffi, Giacomo; Milani, Stefano; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2015-03-14

    To evaluate the association between liver stiffness (LS) prior to the initiation of dual/triple therapy and viral response. LS was measured in all patients before treatment was administered. The therapeutic approach was based on hepatic, virological, and immunological evaluations and considered the fact that patients with severe fibrosis (F3) or compensated cirrhosis (F4) in Child-Pugh class A are the primary candidates for triple therapy. In total, 65 hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients were treated with Peg-interferon/ribavirin (Peg-IFN/RBV); 24 patients were classified as genotypes 1/4 (36.92%), and 41 patients were classified as genotypes 2/3 (63.08%) (dual therapy). In addition, 20 HCV treatment-experienced genotype 1 patients were treated with PegIFN-RBV and boceprevir (triple therapy). Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to compare the groups. LS significantly differed between dual therapy and triple therapy (P = 0.002). The mean LS value before dual therapy treatment was 8.61 ± 5.79 kPa and was significantly different between patients achieving a sustained virologic response (SVR) 24 weeks after therapy and those who did not (7.23 ± 5.18 kPa vs 11.72 ± 5.99 kPa, respectively, P = 0.0003). The relative risk of non-response to therapy was 4.45 (95%CI: 2.32-8.55). The attributable risk of non-response to therapy was 49%. The mean LS value before triple therapy treatment was 13.29 ± 8.57 kPa and was significantly different between patients achieving and not achieving SVR24 (9.41 ± 5.05 vs 19.11 ± 9.74, respectively; P = 0.008). The relative risk of non-response to therapy was 5.57% (95%CI: 1.50-20.65). The attributable risk of non-response to therapy (70%) was increased compared with dual therapy patients. Pre-treatment stiffness > 12 kPa was significantly associated with non-SVR (P < 0.025) in both groups. Pre-treatment liver stiffness may be useful for predicting the response to treatment in patients treated with either dual or triple anti-HCV therapy.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of antiviral therapy during late pregnancy to prevent perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV infections are perinatally transmitted from chronically infected mothers. Supplemental antiviral therapy during late pregnancy with lamivudine (LAM, telbivudine (LdT, or tenofovir (TDF can substantially reduce perinatal HBV transmission compared to postnatal immunoprophylaxis (IP alone. However, the cost-effectiveness of these measures is not clear. Aim. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of supplemental antiviral agents for preventing perinatal HBV transmission in mothers with high viral load (>6 log10 copies/mL. Methods. A systematic review and network meta-analysis were performed for the risk of perinatal HBV transmission with antiviral therapies. A decision analysis was conducted to evaluate the clinical and economic outcomes in China of four competing strategies: postnatal IP alone (strategy IP, or in combination with perinatal LAM (strategy LAM + IP, LdT (strategy LdT + IP, or TDF (strategy TDF + IP. Antiviral treatments were administered from week 28 of gestation to 4 weeks after birth. Outcomes included treatment-related costs, number of infections, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses were performed to identify influential clinical and cost-related variables. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to estimate the probabilities of being cost-effective for each strategy. Results. LdT + IP and TDF + IP averted the most infections and HBV-related deaths, and gained the most QALYs. IP and TDF + IP were dominated as they resulted in less or equal QALYs with higher associated costs. LdT + IP had an incremental $2,891 per QALY gained (95% CI [$932–$20,372] compared to LAM + IP (GDP per capita for China in 2013 was $6,800. One-way sensitivity analyses showed that the cost-effectiveness of LdT + IP was only sensitive to the relative risk of HBV transmission comparing LdT + IP with LAM + IP. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses

  2. Stability and compatibility of recombinant adeno-associated virus under conditions commonly encountered in human gene therapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntman, Alisha M; Su, Lin; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R

    2015-04-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are rapidly becoming the first choice for human gene therapy studies, as clinical efficacy has been demonstrated in several human trials and proof-of-concept data have been demonstrated for correction of many others. When moving into human use under the auspices of an FDA Investigational New Drug (IND) application, it is necessary to demonstrate the stability of vector material under various conditions of storage, dilution, and administration when used in humans. Limited data are currently available in the literature regarding vector compatibility and stability, leading most IND sponsors to repeat all necessary studies. The current study addresses this issue with an rAAV vector (rAAV1-CB-chAATmyc) containing AAV2-inverted terminal repeat sequences packaged into an AAV1 capsid. Aliquots of vector were exposed to a variety of temperatures, diluents, container constituents, and other environmental conditions, and its functional biological activity (after these various treatments) was assessed by measuring transgene expression after intramuscular injection in mice. rAAV was found to be remarkably stable at temperatures ranging from 4°C to 55°C (with only partial loss of potency after 20 min at 70°C), at pH ranging from 5.5 to 8.5, after contact with mouse or human serum (with or without complement depletion) or with gadolinium and after contact with glass, polystyrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, and stainless steel. The only exposure resulting in near-total loss of vector activity (10,000-fold loss) was UV exposure for 10 min. The stability of rAAV1 preparations bodes well for future dissemination of this therapeutic modality.

  3. Antiretroviral therapy-induced insulin resistance and oxidative deoxy nucleic acid damage in human immunodeficiency virus-1 patients

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    Vaishali Kolgiri Honnapurmath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Insulin resistance (IR is frequent in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and may be related to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Increased oxidative stress parameters and carbonyl protein are linked to insulin sensitivity. The present study is aimed to determine IR, its association with oxidative deoxy nucleic acid (DNA damage in HIV-1-infected patients with different ART status. Materials and Methods: In this case–control study, a total 600 subjects were included. We used plasma levels of the oxidized base, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, as our biomarker of oxidative DNA damage. 8-OHdG was measured with the highly sensitive 8-OHdG check enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. IR was determined using homeostasis model assessment. Results: All subjects were randomly selected and grouped as HIV-negative (control group (n = 300, HIV-positive without ART (n = 100, HIV-positive with ART first line (n = 100, and HIV-positive with ART second line (n = 100. IR and oxidative DNA damage were significantly higher in HIV-positive patients with second-line ART and HIV-positive patients with first-line ART than ART-naive patients. In a linear regression analysis, increased IR was positively associated with the increased DNA damage (odds ratio: 3.052, 95% confidence interval: 2.595–3.509 P < 0.001. Interpretation and Conclusions: In this study, we observed that ART plays a significant role in the development of IR and oxidative DNA damage in HIV-positive patients taking ART. Awareness and knowledge of these biomarkers may prove helpful to clinicians while prescribing ART to HIV/AIDS patients. Larger studies are warranted to determine the exact role of ART in the induction of IR and DNA damage.

  4. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    B Akshaya Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%. The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52% was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm 3 with comorbid conditions.

  5. Benefit of hepatitis C virus core antigen assay in prediction of therapeutic response to interferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hidetsugu; Higashimoto, Makiko; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and first-phase kinetics between commercially available core antigen (Ag) assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag (Lumipulse-Ag), and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, version 2 (Amplicor M), to estimate the predictive benefit of a sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 44 genotype 1b patients treated with interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. HCV core Ag negativity could predict SVR on day 1 (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 85.0%, accuracy = 86.4%), whereas RNA negativity could predict SVR on day 7 (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 87.2%, accuracy = 88.6%). None of the patients who had detectable serum core Ag or RNA on day 14 achieved SVR (specificity = 100%). The predictive accuracy on day 14 was higher by RNA negativity (93.2%) than that by core Ag negativity (75.0%). The combined predictive criterion of both viral load decline during the first 24 h and basal viral load was also predictive for SVR; the sensitivities of Lumipulse-Ag and Amplicor-M were 45.5 and 47.6%, respectively, and the specificity was 100%. Amplicor-M had better predictive accuracy than Lumipulse-Ag in 2-week disappearance tests because it had better sensitivity. On the other hand, estimates of kinetic parameters were similar regardless of the detection method. Although the correlations between Lumipulse-Ag and Amplicor-M were good both before and 24 h after IFN administration, HCV core Ag seemed to be relatively lower 24 h after IFN administration than before administration. Lumipulse-Ag seems to be useful for detecting the HCV concentration during IFN therapy; however, we still need to understand the characteristics of the assay.

  6. Interactive Effects of Immunoglobulin Gamma and Human Leucocyte Antigen Genotypes on Response to Interferon Based Therapy of Hepatitis C Virus

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    Howayda E. Gomaa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: We examined the role that immunoglobulin GM 23 and KM allotypes—genetic markers of γ and κ chains, respectively—play in response to treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egyptian patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 120 persons who had responded to HCV treatment and 125 with persistent HCV infection were genotyped for the presence of GM23 and KM determinants. HLA –C genotyping was also done. RESULTS: Association of GM 23+ and KM3 was significantly associated with non response to treatment (P < 0.0001. Individuals who lacked this GM genotype (but were positive for KM1,2 and 3 were likely to respond to treatment (P=0.045. Association of heterozygous GM23 (+/- with KM 1,2 and 3 or KM3 alone was significantly associated with SVR (P = 0.001 and (P = 0.0001 respectively. Particular combinations of HLA and GM genotypes were associated significantly with the response to HCV treatment. The combination of HLAC2C2 and GM23+ was associated with persistence of infection (P = 0.027 while the association of HLAC2C2 and heterozygous GM23+/- was associated with SVR (P = 0.001.The association of HLAC1C1 and heterozygous GM23+/- was significantly associated with SVR (P = 0.001 and also subjects with HLA C1/C2 and heterozygous GM23+/- were likely to respond to treatment (P = 0.003 while subjects with HLA C1/C2 and GM23+ show tendency to resist to treatment (P = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Our results didn’t support a role for KM allotypes, GM23 allotype plays a role in the persistence of HCV infection in the presence or absence of KM1,3. Interaction between certain GM and HLA-C genotypes may favor adequate response to interferon based therapies.

  7. Advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease in Botswana Following Successful Antiretroviral Therapy Rollout: Incidence of and Temporal Trends in Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Mark W; Mokomane, Margaret; Leeme, Tshepo; Patel, Raju K K; Lekwape, Nametso; Ramodimoosi, Chandapiwa; Dube, Bonno; Williams, Elizabeth A; Mokobela, Kelebeletse O; Tawanana, Ephraim; Pilatwe, Tlhagiso; Hurt, William J; Mitchell, Hannah; Banda, Doreen L; Stone, Hunter; Molefi, Mooketsi; Mokgacha, Kabelo; Phillips, Heston; Mullan, Paul C; Steenhoff, Andrew P; Mashalla, Yohana; Mine, Madisa; Jarvis, Joseph N

    2017-09-01

    Botswana has a well-developed antiretroviral therapy (ART) program that serves as a regional model. With wide ART availability, the burden of advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and associated opportunistic infections would be expected to decline. We performed a nationwide surveillance study to determine the national incidence of cryptococcal meningitis (CM), and describe characteristics of cases during 2000-2014 and temporal trends at 2 national referral hospitals. Cerebrospinal fluid data from all 37 laboratories performing meningitis diagnostics in Botswana were collected from the period 2000-2014 to identify cases of CM. Basic demographic and laboratory data were recorded. Complete national data from 2013-2014 were used to calculate national incidence using UNAIDS population estimates. Temporal trends in cases were derived from national referral centers in the period 2004-2014. A total of 5296 episodes of CM were observed in 4702 individuals; 60.6% were male, and median age was 36 years. Overall 2013-2014 incidence was 17.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.6-19.2) cases per 100000 person-years. In the HIV-infected population, incidence was 96.8 (95% CI, 90.0-104.0) cases per 100000 person-years; male predominance was seen across CD4 strata. At national referral hospitals, cases decreased during 2007-2009 but stabilized during 2010-2014. Despite excellent ART coverage in Botswana, there is still a substantial burden of advanced HIV, with 2013-2014 incidence of CM comparable to pre-ART era rates in South Africa. Our findings suggest that a key population of individuals, often men, is developing advanced disease and associated opportunistic infections due to a failure to effectively engage in care, highlighting the need for differentiated care models. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Relationship between regulatory T cells and immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients interrupting antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Weiss

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Persistent immune activation plays a central role in driving Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV disease progression. Whether CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are harmful by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses and/or beneficial through a decrease in immune activation remains debatable. We analysed the relationship between proportion and number of regulatory T cells (Tregs and immune activation in HIV-infected patients interrupting an effective antiretroviral therapy (ART. Twenty-five patients were included in a substudy of a prospective multicenter trial of treatment interruption (TI (ANRS 116. Proportions and numbers of Tregs and the proportion of activated CD4 and CD8 T cells were assessed at baseline and month 12 (M12 of TI. Specific anti-HIV CD4 and CD8 responses were investigated at baseline and M12. Non parametric univariate analyses and multivariate linear regression models were conducted. At baseline, the proportion of Tregs negatively correlated with the proportion of HLA-DR+CD8+T cells (r=-0.519. Following TI, the proportion of Tregs increased from 6.3% to 7.2% (p=0.029; absolute numbers of Tregs decreased. The increase in the proportion of HLA-DR+CD38+CD8+T cells was significantly related to the increase in proportion of Tregs (p=0.031. At M12, the proportion of Tregs did not negatively correlate with CD8 T-cell activation. Nevertheless, Tregs retain a suppressive function since depletion of Treg-containing CD4+CD25+ cells led to an increase in lymphoproliferative responses in most patients studied. Our data suggest that Tregs are efficient in controlling residual immune activation in patients with ART-mediated viral suppression. However, the insufficient increase in the proportion and/or the decrease in the absolute number of Tregs result in a failure to control immune activation following TI.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00118677.

  9. Production of a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine Containing Inactivated Autologous Virus for Therapy of Patients with Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Riddler, Sharon A.

    2009-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus isolation; (ii) superinfection of CD4+ T cells with the virus; (iii) inactivation of the virus in CD4+ T cells, T-cell apoptosis, and coincubation of T cells with autologous DCs; and (iv) product testing and release. Endogenous virus was isolated from peripheral blood-derived CD4+ T cells of three HIV-1-positive subjects by coincubation with autologous OKT-3-stimulated CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T-cell supernatants were tested for p24 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (>25 ng/ml) and for the 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50; which ranged from 4,642 to 46,416/ml on day 19 of culture). Autologous CD4+ T cells that were separated on immunobeads (>95% purity) and superinfected with virus-expressed p24 (28 to 54%) had TCID50 of >400/ml on days 5 to 10. Virus inactivation with psoralen (20 μg/ml) and UVB irradiation (312 nm) reduced the TCID50 of the supernatants from 199,986 to 11/ml (>99%). 7-Amino-actinomycin D-positive, annexin V-positive CD4+ T cells were fed to autologous DCs generated by using the Elutra cell separation system and the Aastrom system. Flow analysis showed that DC loading was complete in 24 h. On the basis of these translational results and experience with the generation of DCs from HIV-1-infected patients in a previous clinical trial, the Investigational New Drug application for clinical vaccination was submitted and approved by the FDA (application no. BB-IND-13137). PMID:19038780

  10. Production of a dendritic cell-based vaccine containing inactivated autologous virus for therapy of patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C; Rinaldo, Charles R; Riddler, Sharon A

    2009-02-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus isolation; (ii) superinfection of CD4(+) T cells with the virus; (iii) inactivation of the virus in CD4(+) T cells, T-cell apoptosis, and coincubation of T cells with autologous DCs; and (iv) product testing and release. Endogenous virus was isolated from peripheral blood-derived CD4(+) T cells of three HIV-1-positive subjects by coincubation with autologous OKT-3-stimulated CD4(+) T cells. CD4(+) T-cell supernatants were tested for p24 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (>25 ng/ml) and for the 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID(50); which ranged from 4,642 to 46,416/ml on day 19 of culture). Autologous CD4(+) T cells that were separated on immunobeads (>95% purity) and superinfected with virus-expressed p24 (28 to 54%) had TCID(50) of >400/ml on days 5 to 10. Virus inactivation with psoralen (20 microg/ml) and UVB irradiation (312 nm) reduced the TCID(50) of the supernatants from 199,986 to 11/ml (>99%). 7-Amino-actinomycin D-positive, annexin V-positive CD4(+) T cells were fed to autologous DCs generated by using the Elutra cell separation system and the Aastrom system. Flow analysis showed that DC loading was complete in 24 h. On the basis of these translational results and experience with the generation of DCs from HIV-1-infected patients in a previous clinical trial, the Investigational New Drug application for clinical vaccination was submitted and approved by the FDA (application no. BB-IND-13137).

  11. The effect of antiviral therapy on patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu-Xiao; Cheng, Jian-Wen; Huang, Ao; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Xin-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Studies suggest that antiviral therapy performed after curative resection improves the postoperative prognosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the evidence has been contradictory. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the effect of antiviral therapy with nucleoside analogs (NAs) after curative resection on the long-term postoperative survival of patients with HBV-related HCC. MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library were systematically searched up to August 2017 with no limits. Outcome measures were the primary parameter of overall survival (OS) after radical resection of HBV-related HCC and the secondary parameter of postoperative recurrence-free survival (RFS). A total of 9,009 patients (2,546 of whom received antiviral therapy and 6,463 received no treatment) were included. The pooled analysis revealed that antiviral therapy was associated with significantly improved OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.51-0.67; P antiviral drug. In the subgroup analysis, anti-viral therapy significantly prolonged both OS (HR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.52-0.92; P =0.01) and RFS (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.49-0.70; P Antiviral therapy with NAs confers significant survival benefits in patients with HBV-related HCC after curative resection, especially in patients with high baseline HBV DNA level (≥20,000 IU/mL).

  12. Enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 targeting of head and neck cancer in combination with radiation therapy or ZD6126 vascular disrupting agent

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    Alajez Nehad M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the 5th most common cancer worldwide. Locally advanced HNSCC are treated with either radiation or chemo-radiotherapy, but still associated with high mortality rate, underscoring the need to develop novel therapies. Oncolytic viruses have been garnering increasing interest as anti-cancer agents due to their preferential killing of transformed cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 against the human hypopharyngeal FaDu tumour model in vitro and in vivo. Results Our data demonstrated high toxicity of the virus against FaDu cells in vitro, which was associated with induction of apoptosis. In vivo, systemic injection of 1 × 109 pfu had minimal effect on tumour growth; however, when combined with two doses of ionizing radiation (IR; 5 Gy each or a single injection of the vascular disrupting agent (ZD6126, the virus exhibited profound suppression of tumour growth, which translated to a prolonged survival in the treated mice. Concordantly, VSVΔ51 combined with ZD6126 led to a significant increase in viral replication in these tumours. Conclusions Our data suggest that the combinations of VSVΔ51 with either IR or ZD6126 are potentially novel therapeutic opportunities for HNSCC.

  13. Antiviral therapy and long-term outcome for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma after curative liver resection in a Japanese cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Keita; Beppu, Toru; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Okabe, Hirohisa; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Imai, Katsunori; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Chikamoto, Akira; Isiko, Takatoshi; Kikuchi, Ken; Baba, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether antiviral therapy with nucleotide/nucleoside analog (NA) is beneficial for Japanese patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who underwent initial curative liver resection. In 162 patients with positive hepatitis B surface antigen and negative anti-hepatitis C virus antibody, sixty-two patients received antiviral therapy with NA (NA group) and the remaining 100 patients did not (non-NA group). Prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Moreover, to equalize the background covariates, a one-to-one propensity case-matched analysis was used. NA administered were lamivudine (LAM) solely for 21 patients, LAM plus adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) for 6, LAM switched to entecavir (ETV) for 5 and ETV solely for 31. DFS did not significantly differ between the NA group and non-NA group (p=0.19). However, OS was significantly different (p=0.0063); 1-,3- and 5-year OS were 100% and 85.9%, 88.3% and 61.9% and 65.1% and 58.0%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, no antiviral therapy with NA was an independent poor prognostic factor (hazard ratio (HR)=2.72; p=0.0229). However, after propensity case-matched analysis, disease-free and overall survival were not significantly different between the two groups. In a Japanese cohort, antiviral therapy with NAs might provide longer survival for postoperative HBV-related HCC patients compared to patients without antiviral therapy. However, deterministic evaluation was impossible by this study alone. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Association between larger thymic size and higher thymic output in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, L.; Dreves, A.-M.; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2002-01-01

    To examine the impact of thymic size on immune recovery in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the thymus was visualized, using computed tomographic scans, in 25 HIV-infected patients who had received highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for 6-18 months and had...... recovery was evaluated by determination of CD4+ T cell receptor repertoire in 19 of the HIV-infected patients. Larger thymic size was associated with higher CD4+ cell counts (r=0.498; P=.011) and higher CD4+ TREC frequency (r=0.652; P

  15. Use of Non-Prescription Remedies by Ghanaian Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Persons on Antiretroviral Therapy

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    Amos K. Laar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInappropriate use of non-prescription remedies by persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV may result in adverse events or potentiate non-adherence to prescribed medications. This study investigated the use of non-prescription remedies among PLHIV receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART from four treatment centers in southern Ghana.MethodsA mixed method design using quantitative and qualitative methods was used. This article focuses on the quantitative survey of 540 respondents. Univariate analysis was used to generate descriptive tabulations of key variables. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression modeling, respectively, produced unadjusted and adjusted associations between background attributes of PLHIV and the use of non-prescription remedies. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. All analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 20.0.ResultsOne out of three respondents reported the use of non-prescription remedies at least once within 3 months of the survey. Most of these were locally made and included “Angel natural bitters, concoctions from the Christian prayer centers, garlic, and mahogany syrups.” These remedies were used concomitantly with antiretroviral medications (ARVs—46% or administered with ARVs but at different times during the day (43%. Some of the remedies were reportedly prescribed by health workers, or self-initiated during periods of ARVs shortage. Others took them based on their perception of their efficacy. Bivariate level analysis identified ART clinic site, place of residence, and ARV adherence monitoring to be significantly associated with the use of non-prescription remedies (p < 0.05. Multiple logistic regression analysis controlling for covariates confirmed the location of ART clinic as the only predictor of the use of non-prescription remedies. Compared to clients at the large urban teaching hospital (Korle-Bu Fevers Unit ART

  16. Reexamination of the relationship between the prevalence of hepatitis C virus and parenteral antischistosomal therapy among Egyptians resident in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derbala M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Moutaz Derbala,1,2 Prem Chandra,3 Aliaa Amer,4 Anil John,1 Manik Sharma,1 Ashraf Amin,1 Ragesh Babu Thandassery,1 Amr Faris5 1Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, Hamad Hospital, 2Medical Department, Weill Cornell Medical College, Qatar Branch, 3Medical Research Center, Hamad Medical Corporation, 4Laboratory Medicine and Pathology Department, 5Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Hamad Hospital, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Egypt has the highest prevalence of recorded hepatitis C virus (HCV worldwide, estimated nationally at 14.7%, which is attributed to extensive iatrogenic transmission during the era of parenteral antischistosomal therapy (PAT mass-treatment campaigns. The objective of our study was to attempt to highlight to what extent HCV transmission is ongoing and discuss the possible risk factors. We studied the prevalence of HCV among 7.8% of Egyptians resident in Qatar in relation to age, socioeconomic status, and PAT and discuss the possible risk factors. HCV testing was conducted in 2,335 participants, and results were positive for 13.5%, and 8.5% for those aged below 35 years. The prevalence of HCV in the PAT-positive population was 23.7% (123 of 518, 95% confidence interval [CI] 20.2%–27.6% compared with 11.2% in the PAT-negative group. Significantly higher HCV prevalence occurred in participants who were older than 50 years (23%, 95% CI 19.3%–27.1% compared to those aged 45–50 years (19.3%, 95% CI 15.2%–23.8%, 35–45 years (11.1%, 95% CI 8.9%–13.7%, and less than 35 years (8.5%, 95% CI 6.8%–10.4% (P<0.0001. Insignificant higher prevalence occurred in the low socioeconomic group (14.2%, 95% CI 11.3%–17.4%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that increasing age, history of PAT, bilharziasis, and praziquantel were common risk factors, but there was no relation with dental care. Host genetic predisposition seems to be a plausible underlying factor for susceptibility among Egyptians and intense ongoing infection

  17. The physical activity levels among people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome receiving high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, J M; Murenzi, A

    2013-01-01

    The accessibility of high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for local human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients is improving in Rwanda. It is well known that this therapy is associated with serious adverse effects, such as metabolic and morphologic changes. One of the recommended preventive modalities for these complications is participation in physical activity. The current study aims to determine the anthropometric profile and physical activity levels among people living with HIV and receiving HAART in Kigali, Rwanda. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive quantitative survey. The participant's levels of physical activity participation and their association with anthropometric profiles were measured, using a structured self-administered questionnaire for 407 clients passing through the clinics. Of the participants, approximately 70% were inactive and in addition, 40% were obese and 43% overweight. Obesity was found to be strongly associated with inactivity. Lack of motivation, and time as well as fear of worsening the disease were found to be barriers to participation in physical activity.

  18. Association between risk factors, basal viral load, virus genotype and the degree of liver fibrosis with the response to the therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Vuk R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Hepatitis C is an important sociomedical problem worldwide due to frequent progression to chronic disease, occurrence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Standard pegylated interferon alfa 2a plus ribavirin therapy results in resolution of infection only in 50% of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the association of various factors with response to the therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Age and sex of patients, inoculation risk factors, histopathological changes in the liver, viral load and HCV genotype were analyzed. Methods. The study included a group of 121 patients with chronic HCV infection. The treatment was carried out 24 weeks for virus genotype 2 and 3, and 48 weeks for genotype 1 and 4. The degree of histopathological changes in the liver was determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining, whereas polimerase chain reaction was used for HCV genotyping. Results. In the group of non-responding patients genotype 1 was represented with 100%, while in the other groups, although predominantly present, its percentage was lower. Unresponsiveness to therapy and relapse of disease were associated with higher viral load and advanced fibrosis. Intravenous use of psychoactive substances, as a risk factor, was present in a high percentage in the group of patients with sustained response, while blood transfusion and dialysis were leading risk factors in the group of relapse responders and non-responders. Conclusion. The results of our study showed that the treatment outcome of chronic HCV infection was associated with baseline HCV ribonucleic acid, HCV genotype, route of infection and the degree of histopathological changes in the liver. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41010

  19. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import via Vpr-Importin α interactions as a novel HIV-1 therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nonaka, Mizuho; Hashimoto, Yoshie; Matsuda, Go; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsuyama, Megumi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Kato, Shingo; Aida, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. One such target is the interaction between Vpr, one of the accessory gene products of HIV-1 and Importin α, which is crucial, not only for the nuclear import of Vpr, but also for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. We have identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses Vpr-Importin α interaction, thereby inhibiting HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner. Analysis by real-time PCR demonstrated that hematoxylin specifically inhibited nuclear import step of pre-integration complex. Thus, hematoxylin is a new anti-HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-Importin α interaction, suggesting that a specific inhibitor of the interaction between viral protein and the cellular factor may provide a new strategy for HIV-1 therapy.

  20. The Use of Recombinant Feline Interferon Omega Therapy as an Immune-Modulator in Cats Naturally Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: New Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Rodolfo Oliveira; Gil, Solange

    2016-10-27

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are well-known cytokines that, among their main functions, are key components of the host immune response against viral infections. Due to its immune modulation properties, they are commonly used in the therapeutic approach of various retroviral infections, namely human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). In HIV infection, it has been shown that IFN therapy limits early viral replication, particularly useful on post-exposure prophylaxis. In veterinary medicine, recombinant feline interferon omega (rFeIFN-ω) was the first interferon licensed for use in cats. Several studies have recently shown that this compound seems to stimulate the innate immunity, decreasing clinical signs and co-infections in naturally FIV-infected cats. More than summarizing the main conclusions about rFeIFN-ω in cats, this review emphasizes the immune-modulation properties of IFN therapy, opening new perspectives for its use in retroviral infections. Either in FIV-infected cats or in HIV individuals, type I IFNs seem to induce an innate immune-modulation and should not be overlooked as a therapeutic option in retroviral infections.

  1. The Use of Recombinant Feline Interferon Omega Therapy as an Immune-Modulator in Cats Naturally Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Oliveira Leal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are well-known cytokines that, among their main functions, are key components of the host immune response against viral infections. Due to its immune modulation properties, they are commonly used in the therapeutic approach of various retroviral infections, namely human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV. In HIV infection, it has been shown that IFN therapy limits early viral replication, particularly useful on post-exposure prophylaxis. In veterinary medicine, recombinant feline interferon omega (rFeIFN-ω was the first interferon licensed for use in cats. Several studies have recently shown that this compound seems to stimulate the innate immunity, decreasing clinical signs and co-infections in naturally FIV-infected cats. More than summarizing the main conclusions about rFeIFN-ω in cats, this review emphasizes the immune-modulation properties of IFN therapy, opening new perspectives for its use in retroviral infections. Either in FIV-infected cats or in HIV individuals, type I IFNs seem to induce an innate immune-modulation and should not be overlooked as a therapeutic option in retroviral infections.

  2. Human γδ T Cell Receptor Repertoires in Peripheral Blood Remain Stable Despite Clearance of Persistent Hepatitis C Virus Infection by Direct-Acting Antiviral Drug Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarina Ravens

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Human γδ T cells can contribute to clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection but also mediate liver inflammation. This study aimed to understand the clonal distribution of γδ T cells in peripheral blood of chronic HCV patients and following HCV clearance by interferon-free direct-acting antiviral drug therapies. To this end, γδ T cell receptor (TCR repertoires were monitored by mRNA-based next-generation sequencing. While the percentage of Vγ9+ T cells was higher in patients with elevated liver enzymes and a few expanded Vδ3 clones could be identified in peripheral blood of 23 HCV-infected non-cirrhotic patients, overall clonality and complexity of γδ TCR repertoires were largely comparable to those of matched healthy donors. Monitoring eight chronic HCV patients before, during and up to 1 year after therapy revealed that direct-acting antiviral (DAA drug therapies induced only minor alterations of TRG and TRD repertoires of Vγ9+ and Vγ9− cells. Together, we show that peripheral γδ TCR repertoires display a high stability (1 by chronic HCV infection in the absence of liver cirrhosis and (2 by HCV clearance in the course of DAA drug therapy.

  3. Abnormal humoral immune response to influenza vaccination in pediatric type-1 human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Montoya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been demonstrated useful to restore immune competence in type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1-infected subjects, we evaluated the specific antibody response to influenza vaccine in a cohort of HIV-1-infected children on HAART so as to analyze the quality of this immune response in patients under antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-1-infected children and 10 HIV-1 seronegative controls were immunized with a commercially available trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine containing the strains A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Serum hemagglutinin inhibition (HI antibody titers were determined for the three viral strains at the time of vaccination and 1 month later. Immunization induced a significantly increased humoral response against the three influenza virus strains in controls, and only against A/H3N2 in HIV-1-infected children. The comparison of post-vaccination HI titers between HIV-1+ patients and HIV-1 negative controls showed significantly higher HI titers against the three strains in controls. In addition, post vaccination protective HI titers (defined as equal to or higher than 1:40 against the strains A/H3N2 and B were observed in a lower proportion of HIV-1+ children than in controls, while a similar proportion of individuals from each group achieved protective HI titers against the A/H1N1 strain. The CD4+ T cell count, CD4/CD8 T cells ratio, and serum viral load were not affected by influenza virus vaccination when pre- vs post-vaccination values were compared. These findings suggest that despite the fact that HAART is efficient in controlling HIV-1 replication and in increasing CD4+ T cell count in HIV-1-infected children, restoration of immune competence and response to cognate antigens remain incomplete, indicating that additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve a full reconstitution of immune functions.

  4. Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus genotype 3a Hypervariable region 1 in patients achieved rapid virological response to alpha interferon and Ribavirin Combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badar Sadaf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus roots a chronic liver disease. Currently approved treatment strategy includes administration of alpha interferon and ribavirin combined therapy for 24-48 weeks. One of the predictor of sustained virological response is an early virological response to treatment characterized as rapid response. Hyper variable region 1 (HVR1 of E2 protein is responsible for viral entry and acts as a target for neutralizing antibodies. Any mutation in this region would effect virus interaction with target cell and viral persistence. Methods Thirty one clones of six pre-treatment samples subjected to combination therapy were investigated. Three of the patients were rapid responders (R1, R2 and R3 and two were breakthrough responders (BT1 and BT2. Envelope 2 gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced. Amino acid substitution, frequency, composition and antigenic properties of HVR 1 of E2 protein were studied. Results In both rapid responders (R.R (14 amino acid sites and breakthrough responders (BT.R (13 amino acid sites half of the amino acid sites were either conserved or resistant to any physiochemical change due to amino acid substitution. It also indicated that average composition of hydrophilic and basic amino acids were comparatively lower in rapid responders than other samples affecting probable interaction of virus with target cells. A central non antigenic region was constant among the breakthrough responders but differed in length significantly among rapid responders reflecting the adaptive nature of HVR1 to the immune response. Conclusions We observed that although HVR1is quite variable region in HCV 3a patients responding differently to treatment it still maintains its physiochemical properties for its proper functioning and viability.

  5. Risk for hepatitis B and C virus reactivation in patients with psoriasis on biologic therapies: A retrospective cohort study and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snast, Igor; Atzmony, Lihi; Braun, Marius; Hodak, Emmilia; Pavlovsky, Lev

    2017-07-01

    Patients with psoriasis on biologic therapies and a history of viral hepatitis carry a risk for reactivation. We evaluated safety of biologic therapies in psoriasis patients seropositive for hepatitis B or C viruses (HBV, HCV). A retrospective cohort study design was used. Clinical and laboratory data for 30 patients undergoing biologic therapy who were seropositive for HBV or HCV were evaluated. Next, a systematic review was performed. Primary outcomes were hepatitis and viral reactivation during therapy. Treatment duration and antiviral prophylaxis were also recorded. Serology indicated HCV infection in 4 patients, past HBV infection in 17 patients, isolated core antibody in 8 patients, and chronic HBV infection in 1 patient. During follow-up (mean 4.85 ± 3.1 years), no patients experienced hepatitis or viral reactivation. The systematic review of the literature included 49 studies comprising 312 patients followed for a mean of 30.9 months. Viral reactivation occurred in 2/175 patients who were seropositive for core antibody and 3/97 with HCV infection (yearly rates, 0.32% and 2.42%, respectively) compared with 8/40 patients with chronic HBV infection (yearly rate, 13.92%). Three of these 8 patients with reactivated HBV infection received antiviral prophylaxis. We pooled heterogeneous studies evaluating different biologic therapies. Biologic therapies pose minimal risk for viral reactivation in low-risk patients without hepatitis seropositive for HCV or HBV core antibody but are a considerable risk in patients with chronic HBV infection, highlighting the necessity of antiviral prophylaxis. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antiviral therapy in patients with advanced hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Yu; Wen, Feng; Wheeler, John; Fu, Ping; Li, Qiu

    2016-12-01

    Antiviral therapy has been demonstrated to significantly improve the survival in patients with advanced hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of the study was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of antiviral therapy in patients with advanced HBV-related HCC treated with sorafenib. To conduct the analysis, a Markov model comprising three health states (progression-free survival, progressive disease, and death) was created. The efficacy data were derived from medical records. Cost data were collected based on the Chinese national drug prices. Utility data came from the previously published studies. One-way sensitivity analyses as well as probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to explore model uncertainties. In the base-case analysis, addition of antiviral therapy to sorafenib generated an effectiveness of 0.68 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) at a cost of $25 026.04, while sorafenib monotherapy gained an effectiveness of 0.42 QALYs at a cost of $20 249.64. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $18 370.77/QALY for antiviral therapy group versus non-antiviral therapy group. On the other hand, the ICER between the two groups in patients with high or low HBV-DNA load, with or without cirrhosis, normal or elevated alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase were $16 613.97/QALY, $19 774.16/QALY, $14 587.66/QALY, $19 873.84/QALY, $17 947.07/QALY, and $18 785.58/QALY, respectively. Based on the cost-effectiveness threshold ($20 301.00/QALY in China), addition of antiviral therapy to sorafenib is considered to be a cost-effective option compared with sorafenib monotherapy in patients with advanced HBV-related HCC in China from the patient's perspective. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. The Role of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Testing in the Era of Direct Acting Antiviral Therapies: What We Can Learn from the Protease Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh Thuy Nguyen

    Full Text Available Direct-acting antiviral (DAA therapies have revolutionised the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV. The financial cost of DAAs however is significant, and first generation protease inhibitors (PIs also require frequent monitoring of viral RNA levels to guide treatment. In this context, we examined the relevance of HCV antigen testing to evaluate the potential role in monitoring virological response to HCV antiviral treatment with the PI-based triple therapies, telaprevir (TVR and boceprevir (BOC. Chronic HCV-infected individuals (n = 152 enrolled in the Irish Hepatitis C Outcomes Research Network (ICORN study were prospectively analysed for baseline markers and the early viral kinetics associated with SVR. The sustained virological response (SVR rates in the cohort receiving TVR and BOC were 87.3% and 73.8%, respectively. Baseline factors associated with successful outcome in TVR therapy were age (P = 0.0098, IFNL3 genotype (P = 0.0330 and viral load (P = 0.0456. RNA level at week 4 (P = 0.0068 and viral antigen negativity at week 2 (P = 0.0359 were predictive of SVR for TVR-based therapy. In BOC therapy, prior interferon treatment (P = 0.0209 and IFNL3 genotype (P = 0.0410 were baseline predictors of SVR. Evidence of viraemia based either on viral RNA or antigen at week 4 predicted SVR in these patients. Our data showed that rapid decline of HCV antigen to negative level at week 2 in TVR treatment and <0.96 log fmol/l in BOC treatment after commencement of PI triple therapy were associated with SVR. HCV antigen measurement should be considered as a potential alternative for monitoring treatment response during DAA-based regimens.

  8. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: increase in numbers of naive CD4 cells and CD34 cells makes G-CSF a candidate for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Dam-Larsen, S

    1998-01-01

    The potential of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize CD4 cells and/or CD34 cells for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy was examined. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were treated with G-CSF (300 microg/day) for 5 days. Numbers of CD4....... Furthermore, the fraction of naive CD4 cells increased. These findings have implications for the design of immunotherapy or gene therapy protocols....

  9. Endothelial progenitor cells as cellular vehicles to deliver oncolytic virus therapies to metastatic tumors: the "Trojan horse" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Jia, Jun

    2008-01-01

    In view of the limited success of available treatment modalities for metastatic tumor, alternative and complementary strategies need to be developed. Oncolytic viruses are capable of selective replication in malignant cells and therefore offer levels of potency and specificity that are potentially far higher than conventional treatments for tumor. However, lack of systemic delivery technique for therapeutic viruses impacts their application in treating patients with multiple disseminated metastases. Recent studies have demonstrated that when being transplanted, endothelial progenitor cells can migrate via peripheral blood and home exclusively to the site of tumor neovasculature. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cells can act as "Trojan horse" to systemically deliver oncolytic virus to metastases in order to inhibit tumor neovascularization formation and eventually eradicate the metastatic tumor.

  10. Critical challenges and emerging opportunities in hepatitis C virus research in an era of potent antiviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenschlager, Ralf; Baumert, Thomas F; Bukh, Jens

    2018-01-01

    The development and clinical implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Infection with any hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype can now be eliminated in more than 95% of patients with short courses of all-oral, well-tolerated drugs, even...... in those with advanced liver disease and liver transplant recipients. DAAs have proven so successful that some now consider HCV amenable to eradication, and continued research on the virus of little remaining medical relevance. However, given 400,000 HCV-related deaths annually important challenges remain...

  11. MicroRNAs, Hepatitis C Virus, and HCV/HIV-1 Co-Infection: New Insights in Pathogenesis and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Archana; Swaminathan, Gokul; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Navas-Martin, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can exert a profound effect on Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. The interaction of HCV with the highly liver-enriched miRNA, miR-122 represents one such unique example of viruses having evolved mechanism(s) to usurp the host miRNA machinery to support viral life cycle. Furthermore, HCV infection can also trigger changes in the cellular miRNA profile, which may ultimately contribute to the outcome of viral infection. Accumulating knowledge on HCV-host miRNA interactions ...

  12. Critical challenges and emerging opportunities in hepatitis C virus research in an era of potent antiviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartenschlager, Ralf; Baumert, Thomas F.; Bukh, Jens

    2018-01-01

    The development and clinical implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Infection with any hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype can now be eliminated in more than 95% of patients with short courses of all-oral, well-tolerated drugs, even...

  13. Genetically engineered Newcastle disease virus expressing interleukin-2 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rNDV) has shown oncolytic therapeutic efficacy in preclinical studies and are currently in clinical trials. In this study, we have evaluated the possibility to enhance the cancer therapeutic potential of NDV by means of inserting both interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tu...

  14. Combination of targeting gene-viro therapy with recombinant Fowl-pox viruses with HN and VP3 genes on mouse osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z-Y; Wang, L-Q; Fu, C-F; Li, X; Cui, Z-L; Zhang, J-Y; Xue, S-H; Sun, N; Xu, F

    2013-03-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive cancerous neoplasm arising from primitive transformed cells of mesenchymal origin that exhibit osteoblastic differentiation and produce malignant osteoid. With the rapid development of tumor molecular biology, gene and viral therapy, a highly promising strategy for the treatment, has shown some therapeutic effects. To study the strategy of cooperative cancer gene therapy, previously, we explored the antitumor effects of recombinant Fowl-pox viruses (FPVs) with both HN (hemagglutinin-neuramidinase) and VP3 genes on mouse osteosarcoma. We constructed vFV-HN, vFV-VP3 and vFV-HN-VP3 inserting CAV VP3 gene, NDV HN gene into fowlpox virus. S180 osteosarcoma were transfected with Recombinant Fowl-pox viruses (FPVs). These cell lines stably expressing tagged proteins were selected by culturing in medium containing puromycin (2 µg/ml) and confirmed by immunoblotting and immunostaining. S180 osteosarcoma model with BALB/c mice and nude mice were established and the vFPV viruses as control, vFV-HN, vFV-VP3, vFV-HN-VP3 were injected into the tumor directly. The rate of tumor growth, tumor suppression and the sialic acid levels in serum were examined and the tumor tissues were analyzed by the method of immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometric analysis was performed using a FACSCalibur flow cytometer. A total of 100,000 events were analyzed for each sample and the experiment was repeated at least twice. Our data indicated that vFV-HN, vFV-VP3 and vFV-HN-VP3 all had growth inhibition effects, the inhibition rate of vFV-HN-VP3 group was 51.7%, which was higher than that of vFV-HN, vFV-VP3 group and control group (p genes into mouse osteosarcoma cancer cells can cause cell a specificity anti-tumor immune activity, suppress tumor growth, and increase the survival rate of the tumor within host.

  15. Prospective analysis of tiopronin in prevention of sorafenib and antiviral therapy inducing liver toxicity in advanced hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhua; Qiu, Xinguang; Guo, Wenzhi; Yan, Bing; Zhang, Shuijun

    2015-10-01

    Hepatotoxicity induced by sorafenib and antiviral therapy is a limitation for its continuation treatment for patients with advanced hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This prospective study determined the efficacy of tiopronin in hepatotoxicity prevention of HBV-related HCC treatment. Eighty-two patients (median age, 50 years; 71 % male) of advanced HCC treated with sorafenib and antiviral therapy were included, of whom 40 were given the supplementation of tiopronin. The primary endpoint was liver function which was checked before the treatment and every week during the therapy. Besides, course discontinuations, dose reductions, HBV DNA levels and treatment efficacy were evaluated. Patient characteristics and liver function were comparable (p > 0.05). The proportion of abnormal liver function was significantly lower in tiopronin group than in control group including alanine transaminase (ALT, p = 0.035), aspartate aminotransferase (AST, p = 0.041), total bilirubin (TBIL, p = 0.021) and albumin (ALB, p = 0.001). Rates of course discontinuations (p = 0.024) and dose reductions (p = 0.046) were significantly lower in tiopronin groups, and disease control rate (p = 0.036) was higher. No difference was found in HBV DNA level. Multivariate regression analysis showed that sorafenib (OR 7.837; 95 % CI 3.845-15.333; p = 0.004), antiviral therapy (OR 3.871; 95 % CI 1.572-9.569; p = 0.044) and hepatoprotective drug (OR 3.007; 95 % CI 1.321-6.308; p = 0.046) played important roles in clinical outcome. Tiopronin tends to prevent the HCC patients from the treatment-induced hepatotoxicity, enhance patients' tolerance to sorafenib and antiviral therapy and even improve the cancer treatment efficacy.

  16. Safety and efficacy of dual direct-acting antiviral therapy (daclatasvir and asunaprevir) for chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection in patients on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Tada, Toshifumi; Takaguchi, Koichi; Ishikawa, Toru; Tsuji, Kunihiko; Zeniya, Mikio; Iio, Etsuko; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major comorbidity in patients receiving hemodialysis. Interferon-based antiviral therapy to eradicate HCV is less effective in patients receiving hemodialysis than patients without renal dysfunction. Recently reported combination therapy with two oral direct-acting antiviral drugs, daclatasvir and asunaprevir, both of which are metabolized in the liver and excreted into the bile ducts, reportedly showed a high rate of HCV eradication. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of this therapy in patients receiving hemodialysis. The safety and viral responses were compared among patients infected with HCV genotype 1, between 28 patients receiving hemodialysis, and propensity score-matched 56 patients without renal dysfunction. The reduction in serum HCV RNA levels 1 day after the start of therapy was significantly larger (p = 0.0329) and the disappearance of serum HCV RNA occurred significantly earlier (p = 0.0017) in patients receiving hemodialysis than those without renal dysfunction. The rates of sustained virologic response, i.e., the eradication of HCV, were comparable between two groups; the rate of SVR12 was 100 % in patients receiving hemodialysis and 94.6 % in patients without renal dysfunction. No adverse constitutional events were observed in either of the groups. The elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase levels, a known adverse effect of these drugs, was observed in comparable rate of patients between the two groups. The therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir has high antiviral efficacy in patients receiving hemodialysis with a comparable safety profile to patients without renal dysfunction.

  17. Antiviral therapy improves post-hepatectomy survival in patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective-retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, C C N; Wong, G L H; Wong, V W S; Ip, P C T; Cheung, Y S; Wong, J; Lee, K F; Lai, P B S; Chan, H L Y

    2015-01-01

    The effect of antiviral therapy on the post-hepatectomy long-term survival in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains uncertain. To evaluate the effect of antiviral therapy on post-hepatectomy survival and recurrence in patients with HBV-related HCC. This was a prospective-retrospective study of a total of 404 patients who underwent hepatectomy for HBV-related HCC in a tertiary academic hospital. Data on patient and tumour characteristics, tumour recurrence, treatment for recurrence and survival were compared between antiviral and no antiviral groups. Patient's and tumour characteristics were comparable between the two groups, except a higher proportion of patients with cirrhosis in the antiviral group. With a mean follow-up time of 52.4 months, antiviral group had a better 5-year overall survival (66.7% vs. 56.0%, P = 0.001) while there was no significant difference in the 5-year disease-free survival (44.7% vs. 38.1%, P = 0.166). Use of antiviral therapy was associated with better liver function reserve at the time of recurrence and a greater proportion of patients could receive curative treatment for recurrence (38.5% vs. 24.3%, P = 0.041). There was no significant different in the hazard ratios of patients who started antiviral therapy before or after operation (P = 0.054). Use of antiviral therapy improves the long-term post-hepatectomy survival in patients with HBV-related HCC. With a better liver function reserve at the time of recurrence, a greater proportion of patients in antiviral group could receive curative treatment for recurrence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A Hepatitis C Virus-Associated Cirrhotic Patient Developing Interstitial Pneumonia during the Course of Antiviral Therapy with Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Tarao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral direct-acting antivirals (DAAs are the main therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV-associated liver disease in Japan. Daclatasvir/asunaprevir is the first agent and sofosbuvir/ledipasvir is the secondary agent for HCV genotype 1b. More recently, ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir is also recommended as a potent therapy for HCV genotype 1b. Among the adverse events associated with these oral DAAs, interstitial pneumonia is one of the most severe ones. Regarding treatment with daclatasvir plus asunaprevir or sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir, a few cases have already been reported in a postmarketing surveillance. Recently, we have encountered a HCV-associated genotype 1b cirrhosis patient who developed interstitial pneumonia during treatment with ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir and who recovered after drug discontinuation without corticosteroid therapy. Interstitial pneumonia was confirmed by chest x-ray and chest computed tomography. The serum KL-6 level was elevated to 1,180 U/mL. The total duration of the drug administration was 7 weeks, and she achieved SVR24. This is the first detailed report in the literature on the development of interstitial pneumonia during treatment with ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir. When dry cough appeared in the treatment with DAAs, chest computed tomography and the evaluation of serum KL-6 level were recommended.

  19. Systemic Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disease of Childhood With Good Response to Steroid Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo; Han, Kyungja; Han, Eunhee; Lee, Jae Wook; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin

    2017-11-01

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood is a rare disease and has a very fulminant clinical course with high mortality. A 21-month-old female patient was referred to our hospital with a 1 week history of fever and was subsequently diagnosed with systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood. After starting treatment with dexamethasone, she showed early defervescence and improvement of laboratory parameters, and has remained disease-free after stopping steroid treatment, although longer follow-up is necessary. Our report underscores the possibility that this disease entity may be heterogenous in terms of prognosis.

  20. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases CD4+ T cell counts of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving stable, highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aladdin, H; Ullum, H; Dam Nielsen, S.

    2000-01-01

    Thirty human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with CD4+ T cell counts active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for at least 24 weeks were randomized to receive either placebo or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; 0.3 mg/mL 3 times...... counts resulted from increases in CD45RO+ memory T cells and cells expressing the CD38 activation marker. Lymphocyte proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin and Candida antigen decreased, whereas NK cell activity and plasma HIV RNA did not change during G-CSF treatment. After 24 weeks, all immune...... a week) for 12 weeks. Blood samples were collected at specified time points. G-CSF treatment enhanced the total lymphocyte count (P=.002) and increased CD3+ (P=.005), CD4+ (P=.03), and CD8+ (P=.004) T cell counts as well as numbers of CD3-CD16+CD56+ NK cells (P=.001). The increases in CD4+ and CD8+ cell...

  1. Benefit of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Assay in Prediction of Therapeutic Response to Interferon and Ribavirin Combination Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hidetsugu; Higashimoto, Makiko; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and first-phase kinetics between commercially available core antigen (Ag) assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag (Lumipulse-Ag), and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, version 2 (Amplicor M), to estimate the predictive benefit of a sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 44 genotype 1b patients treated with interferon (IFN) ...

  2. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Promoter-Containing Retroviral Promoter Conversion Vectors for Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy are Functional in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Klein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed-enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT is an approach for sensitization of tumor cells to an enzymatically activated, otherwise nontoxic, prodrug. Cytochrome P450 2B1 (CYP2B1 metabolizes the prodrugs cyclophosphamide (CPA and ifosfamide (IFA to produce the cytotoxic substances phosphoramide mustard and isophosphoramide mustard as well as the byproduct acrolein. We have constructed a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon vector for breast cancer GDEPT. The vector allows expression of CYP2B1 from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter known to be active in the mammary glands of transgenic animals. It is anticipated to be used for the generation of encapsulated viral vector producing cells which, when placed inside or close to a tumor, will act as suppliers of the therapeutic CYP2B1 protein as well as of the therapeutic vector itself. The generated vector was effectively packaged by virus producing cells and allowed the production of high levels of enzymatically active CYP2B1 in infected cells which sensitized them to killing upon treatment with both IFA and CPA. Determination of the respective IC50 values demonstrated that the effective IFA dose was reduced by sixteen folds. Infection efficiencies in vivo were determined using a reporter gene-bearing vector in a mammary cancer cell-derived xenograft tumor mouse model.

  3. MicroRNAs, Hepatitis C Virus, and HCV/HIV-1 Co-Infection: New Insights in Pathogenesis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Navas-Martin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs can exert a profound effect on Hepatitis C virus (HCV replication. The interaction of HCV with the highly liver-enriched miRNA, miR-122 represents one such unique example of viruses having evolved mechanism(s to usurp the host miRNA machinery to support viral life cycle. Furthermore, HCV infection can also trigger changes in the cellular miRNA profile, which may ultimately contribute to the outcome of viral infection. Accumulating knowledge on HCV-host miRNA interactions has ultimately influenced the design of therapeutic interventions against chronic HCV infection. The importance of microRNA modulation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 replication has been reported, albeit only in the context of HIV-1 mono-infection. The development of HCV infection is dramatically influenced during co-infection with HIV-1. Here, we review the current knowledge on miRNAs in HCV mono-infection. In addition, we discuss the potential role of some miRNAs, identified from the analyses of public data, in HCV/HIV-1 co-infection.

  4. MicroRNAs, hepatitis C virus, and HCV/HIV-1 co-infection: new insights in pathogenesis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Archana; Swaminathan, Gokul; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Navas-Martin, Sonia

    2012-10-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can exert a profound effect on Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. The interaction of HCV with the highly liver-enriched miRNA, miR-122 represents one such unique example of viruses having evolved mechanism(s) to usurp the host miRNA machinery to support viral life cycle. Furthermore, HCV infection can also trigger changes in the cellular miRNA profile, which may ultimately contribute to the outcome of viral infection. Accumulating knowledge on HCV-host miRNA interactions has ultimately influenced the design of therapeutic interventions against chronic HCV infection. The importance of microRNA modulation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) replication has been reported, albeit only in the context of HIV-1 mono-infection. The development of HCV infection is dramatically influenced during co-infection with HIV-1. Here, we review the current knowledge on miRNAs in HCV mono-infection. In addition, we discuss the potential role of some miRNAs, identified from the analyses of public data, in HCV/HIV-1 co-infection.

  5. Development of a Gene Therapy Virus with a Glucocorticoid-Inducible MMP1 for the Treatment of Steroid Glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Spiga, Maria-Grazia; Borrás, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    A glucocorticoid-inducible adenovirus vector overproduces active MMP1 only in the presence of dexamethasone. The overexpression degrades collagen type I and sets up the vector as a candidate for gene therapy treatment of steroid-induced hypertension.

  6. Add-on effects of fluvastatin in simeprevir/pegylated-interferon/ribavirin combination therapy for patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Goki; Ito, Jun; Nagasaka, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Furuya, Ken; Okamoto, Munenori; Terashita, Katsumi; Kobayashi, Tomoe; Tsunematsu, Izumi; Yoshida, Junichi; Meguro, Takashi; Ohara, Masatsugu; Kawagishi, Naoki; Kimura, Megumi; Umemura, Machiko; Izumi, Takaaki; Tsukuda, Yoko; Nakai, Masato; Sho, Takuya; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Morikawa, Kenichi; Ogawa, Koji; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2018-02-01

    The Japan Society of Hepatology guidelines indicate that hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor combination therapy with simeprevir (SMV), pegylated-interferon (Peg-IFN), and ribavirin (RBV) is a therapeutic option for patients who fail to respond to a direct direct-acting antiviral-containing regimen. However, treatment outcomes have room for improvement. Fluvastatin (FLV) add-on treatment in Peg-IFN and RBV combination therapy for HCV-infected patients significantly improved the sustained virologic response (SVR), but the add-on effect of FLV on SMV combination therapy is not well understood. This was a prospective, randomized, multicenter study in which a total of 61 HCV genotype 1b-infected patients were recruited and 60 eligible patients were randomly allocated to two groups that received 12 weeks of SMV/Peg-IFN/RBV followed by 12 weeks of Peg-IFN/RBV with or without 24 weeks of FLV. The SVR rate and adverse events were compared between the two groups. Thirty-one patients were allocated to the FLV add-on group and 29 patients were allocated to the control group. Baseline clinical factors, including median age, baseline platelet count, alanine aminotransferase level, HCV RNA titer, Fibrosis-4 index, and rate of IL28B minor genotype, were all similar between the two groups. The rapid virologic response, end-of-treatment response rates, SVR rates at 24 weeks after treatment, and safety profiles were also similar between the two groups. This prospective, randomized, multicenter study indicated that FLV had no add-on effect when given with SMV/Peg-IFN/RBV combination therapy for genotype 1b HCV-infected patients. © 2017 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  7. Serum apolipoprotein B-100 concentration predicts the virological response to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin combination therapy in patients infected with chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Kai; Abe, Hiroshi; Aida, Yuta; Ishiguro, Haruya; Ika, Makiko; Shimada, Noritomo; Tsubota, Akihito; Aizawa, Yoshio

    2013-07-01

    Host lipoprotein metabolism is associated closely with the life cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV), and serum lipid profiles have been linked to the response to pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) therapy. Polymorphisms in the human IL28B gene and amino acid substitutions in the core and interferon sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) in NS5A of HCV genotype 1b (G1b) were also shown to strongly affect the outcome of Peg-IFN plus RBV therapy. In this study, an observational cohort study was performed in 247 HCV G1b-infected patients to investigate whether the response to Peg-IFN and RBV combination therapy in these patients is independently associated with the level of lipid factors, especially apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), an obligatory structural component of very low density lipoprotein and low density lipoprotein. The multivariate logistic analysis subsequently identified apoB-100 (odds ratio (OR), 1.602; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.046-2.456), alpha-fetoprotein (OR, 0.764; 95% CI, 0.610-0.958), non-wild-type ISDR (OR, 5.617; 95% CI, 1.274-24.754), and the rs8099917 major genotype (OR, 34.188; 95% CI, 10.225-114.308) as independent factors affecting rapid initial virological response (decline in HCV RNA levels by ≥3-log10 at week 4). While lipid factors were not independent predictors of complete early or sustained virological response, the serum apoB-100 level was an independent factor for sustained virological response in patients carrying the rs8099917 hetero/minor genotype. Together, we conclude that serum apoB-100 concentrations could predict virological response to Peg-IFN plus RBV combination therapy in patients infected with HCV G1b, especially in those with the rs8099917 hetero/minor genotype. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Viruses versus bacteria-novel approaches to phage therapy as a tool against multidrug-resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viertel, Tania Mareike; Ritter, Klaus; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2014-09-01

    Bacteriophage therapy (the application of phages to treat bacterial infections) has a tradition dating back almost a century, but interest in phage therapy slowed down in the West when antibiotics were discovered. With the emerging threat of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria and scarce prospects of newly introduced antibiotics in the future, phages are currently being reconsidered as alternative therapeutics. Conventional phage therapy uses lytic bacteriophages for treatment and recent human clinical trials have revealed encouraging results. In addition, several other modern approaches to phages as therapeutics have been made in vitro and in animal models. Dual therapy with phages and antibiotics has resulted in significant reductions in the number of bacterial pathogens. Bioengineered phages have overcome many of the problems of conventional phage therapy, enabled targeted drug delivery or reversed the resistance of drug-resistant bacteria. The use of enzymes derived from phages, such as endolysin, as therapeutic agents has been efficient in the elimination of Gram-positive pathogens. This review presents novel strategies for phage-related therapies and describes our current knowledge of natural bacteriophages within the human microbiome. Our aim is to provide an overview of the high number of different methodological concepts, thereby encouraging further research on this topic, with the ultimate goal of using phages as therapeutic or preventative medicines in daily clinical practice. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co......-infected patients (HCV genotype 1 (n = 16), 2 (n = 2), and 3 (n = 3)). Lower baseline IP-10 was significantly associated with a rapid decline in HCV RNA, in particular with the first phase reduction, and similar cut-off levels ( 600 pg/ml) as in HCV mono-infected patients apply. In conclusion, baseline IP......-10 HCV therapy in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  10. [AIDS Study Group/Spanish AIDS Plan consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults with human immunodeficiency virus infection (updated January 2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This consensus document is an update of antiretroviral therapy recommendations for adult patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. To formulate these recommendations a panel made up of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (Gesida, AIDS Study Group) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS, Spanish AIDS Plan) reviewed the advances in the current understanding of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the efficacy and safety of clinical trials, and cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals or presented at scientific meetings. Three levels of evidence were defined according to the data source: randomized studies (level A), cohort or case-control studies (level B), and expert opinion (level C). The decision to recommend, consider or not to recommend ART was established in each situation. Currently, the treatment of choice for chronic HIV infection is the combination of three drugs of two different classes, including 2 nucleosides or nucleotide analogs (NRTI) plus 1 non-nucleoside (NNRTI) or 1 boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r), but other combinations are possible. Initiation of ART is recommended in patients with symptomatic HIV infection. In asymptomatic patients, initiation of ART is recommended on the basis of CD4 lymphocyte counts, plasma viral load and patient co-morbidities, as follows: 1) therapy should be started in patients with CD4 counts below 350 cells/microl; 2) When CD4 counts are between 350 and 500 cells/microl, therapy should be started in case of cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C, high cardiovascular risk, HIV nephropathy, HIV viral load above 100,000 copies/ml, proportion of CD4 cells under 14%, and in people aged over 55; 3) Therapy should be deferred when CD4 are above 500 cells/microl, but could be considered if any of previous considerations concurs. Treatment should be initiated in case of hepatitis B requiring treatment and should be considered for reduce sexual transmission

  11. Effects of Smoking on Pegylated Interferon alpha 2a and First Generation Protease Inhibitor-based Antiviral Therapy in Naïve Patients Infected with Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Tim; Hueppe, Dietrich; Mauss, Stefan; Buggisch, Peter; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, Heike; Grimm, Daniel; Galle, Peter R; Alshuth, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Smoking has multiple effects on factors influencing hepatitis C and antiviral therapy, including lipid metabolism, fibrosis, platelet count and adherence aspects. The aim of this analysis was to determine the impact of smoking on hepatitis C virus antiviral therapy. Data of two cohorts of an observational multicenter study including therapy-naïve patients infected with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) treated with dual antiviral therapy (n=7,796) with pegylated interferon alpha 2a in combination with ribavirin, or triple antiviral therapy (n=1,122) containing telaprevir or boceprevir, were analysed. In the univariate matched pair analysis of dual antiviral therapy patients (n=584), smoking was significantly associated with lower sustained viral response rates (p=0.026, OR 0.69 CI: 0.50 - 0.96). The effect of smoking on sustained viral response remained significant (p=0.028, OR 0.67 CI: 0.47 - 0.96) in the multivariate analysis when adjusting for all other baseline parameters with a significant association in the univariate analysis, i.e. diabetes, fibrosis, body mass index, transaminases and baseline viral load. Under protease inhibitors the influence of smoking on virological response did not arise. Smoking has a negative impact on antiviral therapy in naïve patients infected with HCV genotype 1 independently of age, gender, history of drug use or alcoholic liver disease. The effects of smoking might be overcome by the new antiviral agents.

  12. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Use of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.; Becker, N.; DelRowe, J.; Davis, L.

    1990-01-01

    A patient with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is presented. The patient had a localized lesion on his scalp. Evaluation for systemic lymphoma was negative. A biopsy specimen showed superficial and deep dermal infiltrates of pleomorphic lymphocytes. Immunohistochemistry was consistent with T-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated successfully with local irradiation. He remained free of further systemic and cutaneous recurrences of the lymphoma until he died 8 months after treatment of pneumonia. This case is the first to our knowledge to describe a localized CTCL in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)

  13. Predictive role of acute phase reactants in the response to therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ayten; Atay, Ahmet Engin; Tas, Adnan; Seven, Gulseren; Koruk, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical parameters and acute-phase proteins (APPs) may provide complementary data in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We aimed to evaluate the predictive role of APPs in the response to antiviral therapy. Forty-five patients underwent antiviral therapy. Serum ferritin, C-reactive protein (CRP), transferrin, albumin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (A1AG), and alpha-2 macroglobulin (A2MG) levels were examined at the initial evaluation and at the 4th, 12th, and 48th weeks. HCV RNA levels were examined at the initial evaluation and at the 12th and 48th weeks. Ferritin, transferrin, A1AG, and A2MG levels were significantly higher in the patient group (pacute-phase reactants may provide supplementary data for evaluating responses to antiviral therapy.

  14. [Development of approaches to enhancing of patient adherence to antivirus therapy in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliaeva, V V; Kravchenko, A V; Pokrovskiĭ, V V

    2003-01-01

    To study approaches to enhancing adherence of HIV-infected patients receiving antiretrovirus therapy. 25 patients (including 3 females) aged 18 to 45 years receiving VAART (fortovasa + norvir + videx, and viramun) were examined. While treating the patients, group classes were conducted to enhance their adherence to the therapy, followed by individual consultations in order to consolidate the obtained effect. The adherence to the therapy was rated by the patients' self-reports. There was an increase in the activity and openness of those who attended group classes and positive changes in their self-assessment. Approaches to enhancing adherence and a model of school for HIV-infected individuals were developed. It has been shown that a combination of patients' awareness of different HIV-infection-associated problems with consulting allows treatment motivation to be increased.

  15. Tanshinone IIA increases the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir gene therapy via enhanced gap junctional intercellular communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Xiao

    Full Text Available The bystander effect is an intriguing phenomenon by which adjacent cells become sensitized to drug treatment during gene therapy with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV. This effect is reported to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC, and therefore, we postulated that upregulation of genes that facilitate GJIC may enhance the HSV-tk/GCV bystander effect. Previous findings have shown Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA, a chemical substance derived from a Chinese medicine herb, promotes the upregulation of the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in B16 cells. Because gap junctions are formed by connexins, we hypothesized that Tan IIA might increase GJIC. Our results show that Tan IIA increased GJIC in B16 melanoma cells, leading to more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in cells stably expressing HSV-tk. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that tumors in mice with 10% HSV-tk positive B16 cells and 90% wild-type B16 cells became smaller following treatment with the combination of GCV and Tan IIA as compared to GCV or Tan IIA alone. These data demonstrate that Tan IIA can augment the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system through increased gap junction coupling, which adds strength to the promising strategy that develops connexins inducer to potentiate the effects of suicide gene therapy.

  16. Safety of Biologic and Nonbiologic Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drug Therapy in Veterans with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Mary Jane; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Lang; Singh, Jasvinder A; Mikuls, Ted R; Winthrop, Kevin L; Baddley, John W

    2017-05-01

    To examine the effect of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy on hepatotoxicity among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We identified biologic and nonbiologic treatment episodes of patients with RA using the 1997-2011 national data from the US Veterans Health Administration. Eligible episodes had HCV infection (defined by detectable HCV RNA) and subsequently initiated a new biologic or nonbiologic DMARD. Cohort entry required a baseline alanine aminotransferase (ALT) biologic/DMARD therapy. The primary outcome of interest was hepatotoxicity, defined as ALT elevation ≥ 100 IU/l or increase in HCV RNA of 1 log or more, and was examined within the first year of biologic/DMARD use. Results were reported as the cumulative incidence of treatment episodes achieving predefined hepatotoxicity at 3, 6, and 12 months after biologic/DMARD initiation. RA patients with HCV (n = 748) were identified and contributed 1097 biologic/DMARD treatment episodes. Overall, ALT elevations were uncommon, with 37 (3.4%) hepatotoxicity events occurring within 12 months. Treatment episodes with biologic DMARD demonstrated more frequency of hepatotoxicity than did nonbiologic DMARD (4.8% vs 2.3%, p = 0.03). Among treatment episodes involving hepatotoxicity events, the majority occurred within 6 months of DMARD initiation (29/37, 78%). In US veterans with HCV and RA receiving biologic and nonbiologic DMARD, the frequency of hepatotoxicity (ALT ≥ 100 IU/l) was low, with a higher frequency observed in treatment episodes with current biologic use.

  17. Highly active antiretroviral therapy normalizes the function of progenitor cells in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Nielsen, S.; Ersbøll, A. K.; Mathiesen, L.

    1998-01-01

    -infected patients were determined prior to HAART and after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of therapy. The mean number of colony-forming units (cells) per milliliter (cfu/mL) was 15.0 prior to HAART vs. 109.8 in healthy controls (P.../mL eliminated the differences between HIV-infected patients and controls. Significant increases in numbers of CD34 cells were not detected. Of importance, the cloning efficiency of CD34 cells increased from 1.7% prior to therapy to a peak at 18.7% (P=.003). In conclusion, HAART normalized CD34 cell function...

  18. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  19. 3β-hydroxysterol δ24-reductase on the surface of hepatitis C virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma cells can be a target for molecular targeting therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Saito

    Full Text Available In our previous study, we demonstrated that 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24 was overexpressed in hepatitis C virus (HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and that its expression was induced by HCV. Using a monoclonal antibody against DHCR24 (2-152a MAb, we found that DHCR24 was specifically expressed on the surface of HCC cell lines. Based on these findings, we aimed to establish a novel targeting strategy using 2-152a MAb to treat HCV-related HCC. In the present study, we examined the antitumor activity of 2-152a MAb. In the presence of complement, HCC-derived HuH-7 cells were killed by treatment with 2-152a MAb, which was mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. In addition, the antigen recognition domain of 2-152a MAb was responsible for the unique anti-HCV activity. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using 2-152a MAb for antibody therapy against HCV-related HCC. In addition, surface DHCR24 on HCC cells exhibited a functional property, agonist-induced internalization. We showed that 2-152a MAb-mediated binding of a cytotoxic agent (a saponin-conjugated secondary antibody to surface DHCR24 led to significant cytotoxicity. This suggests that surface DHCR24 on HCC cells can function as a carrier for internalization. Therefore, surface DHCR24 could be a valuable target for HCV-related HCC therapy, and 2-152a MAb appears to be useful for this targeted therapy.

  20. Improvement of liver stiffness in patients with hepatitis C virus infection who received direct-acting antiviral therapy and achieved sustained virological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Toshifumi; Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Mizuno, Kazuyuki; Sone, Yasuhiro; Kataoka, Saki; Hashinokuchi, Shinichi

    2017-12-01

    There is insufficient research on whether direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy can improve liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). We evaluated sequential changes in liver stiffness using shear wave elastography in patients with HCV who received DAA therapy. A total of 210 patients with HCV who received daclatasvir and asunaprevir therapy and achieved sustained virological response (SVR) were analyzed. Liver stiffness, as evaluated by shear wave elastography, and laboratory data were assessed before treatment (baseline), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 24 weeks after EOT (SVR24). Alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) decreased over time, and there were significant differences between baseline and EOT and between EOT and SVR24. Although platelet counts did not significantly differ between baseline and EOT, they increased significantly from EOT to SVR24. The median (interquartile range) liver stiffness values at baseline, EOT, and SVR24 were 10.2 (7.7-14.7), 8.8 (7.1-12.1), and 7.6 (6.3-10.3) kPa, respectively (P  2.0 (n = 75), the liver stiffness values at baseline, EOT, and SVR24 were 9.6 (7.7-15.2), 9.2 (7.3-12.1), and 7.7 (6.3-10.1) kPa, respectively (P < 0.001, baseline vs EOT; P < 0.001, EOT vs SVR24). These results suggest that early improvement of liver stiffness starts during the administration of DAAs in patients who achieve SVR, and this effect is particularly pronounced in patients with progressive liver fibrosis. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Opportunistic disease and mortality in patients coinfected with hepatitis B or C virus in the strategic management of antiretroviral therapy (SMART) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedaldi, Ellen; Peters, Lars; Neuhaus, Jacquie; Puoti, Massimo; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Klein, Marina B; Dore, Gregory J; Mocroft, Amanda; Soriano, Vincent; Clotet, Bonaventura; Lundgren, Jens D

    2008-12-01

    In the Strategic Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study, the risk of opportunistic disease (OD) and/or death due to any cause was elevated in the drug conservation (i.e., interrupt antiretroviral therapy until the CD4(+) cell count is 6 months and positive for HCV if they tested HCV antibody positive. The rate and hazard ratio (HR) of OD and/or death and its 2 components were compared by hepatitis status and drug conservation versus the viral suppression group. Among 5472 participants enrolled from 8 January 2002 through 11 January 2006, 930 (17%) were HBV positive and/or HCV positive. The relative risk of non-OD death in participants randomized to the drug conservation group versus the viral suppression group was comparable regardless of hepatitis status (HR for coinfected and HIV-monoinfected participants, respectively, 1.9 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.0-3.9 and 1.8 [95% CI, 0.9-3.4]). The rate of OD or death was 3.9 events per 100 person-years in the coinfected group and 2.0 per 100 person-years in the HIV-monoinfected group. This excess risk was due to a higher risk of non-OD death among the coinfected participants (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.3-5.6), whereas the risk of OD was comparable (HR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.7-1.8). The 3 leading causes of non-OD death in coinfected participants were unknown cause, substance abuse, and non-acquired immunodeficiency disease cancer. Interruption of antiretroviral therapy is particularly unsafe in persons with hepatitis virus coinfection. Although HCV- and/or HBV-coinfected participants constituted 17% of participants in the SMART study, almost one-half of all non-OD deaths occurred in this population. Viral hepatitis was an unlikely cause of this excess risk.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Patients Receiving Opioid Substitution Therapy Experience Improvement in Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Treatment With Interferon-Free Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Maria; Thompson, Alexander; Doyle, Joseph; Younossi, Issah; de Avila, Leyla; Younossi, Zobair M

    2018-03-13

    There is a paucity of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) data for people undergoing hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment who are treated with opioid substitution therapy (OST) for addiction. Patients enrolled in phase 3 clinical trials of sofosbuvir completed 4 PRO instruments-SF-36v2, FACIT-F, CLDQ-HCV, and WPAI-HCV-before, during, and after treatment. A total of 8450 HCV-infected subjects were included; 4.8% (407) were receiving OST. At baseline, OST recipients had significantly (P < .0001) lower PRO scores (by -3.5 to -15.6 on a 0-100 scale). By the end of treatment, subjects receiving pegylated interferon, ribavirin, and sofosbuvir (IFN+RBV+SOF) experienced significant decreases in PROs regardless of OST use. Subjects receiving IFN-free RBV-containing regimens had significant but smaller PRO decreases, again similar in the OST and non-OST groups. Finally, subjects treated with regimens free of both IFN and RBV (IFN/RBV-free) showed improvements in nearly all PROs during treatment, with improvements more pronounced in OST recipients. Achieving a sustained virological response for 12 consecutive weeks after treatment cessation (SVR-12) was associated with improvement of PROs in OST recipients treated with IFN/RBV-free regimens. In contrast, OST recipients who achieved SVR-12 with IFN+RBV+SOF did not have consistent PRO gains after the SVR-12. Receiving IFN-free regimens leads to PRO improvement during treatment and after the SVR-12, regardless of OST status. HCV-infected subjects receiving OST did not experience similar PRO improvements with IFN-containing therapy, suggesting that IFN-based therapy may be less suitable for this vulnerable population.

  3. Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation Is Not Associated With Risky Sexual Behavior Among Heterosexual Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Persons in Serodiscordant Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujugira, Andrew; Celum, Connie; Ngure, Kenneth; Thomas, Katherine K; Katabira, Elly; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-01-01

    Few prospective studies have assessed whether antiretroviral therapy (ART) use is associated with changes in sexual risk behavior of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in known HIV-serodiscordant partnerships. We conducted a longitudinal analysis of HIV-infected persons with known uninfected partners enrolled in the Partners Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Study in Kenya and Uganda. Antiretroviral therapy use and self-reported sexual behavior were ascertained every 3 months. We assessed the effect of ART on sexual risk behaviors using zero-inflated negative binomial regression. Primary outcomes were condomless vaginal sex acts, pregnancy incidence and new sexually transmitted infection diagnoses. We followed 1817 HIV-infected persons (58% women) for 864 person-years before ART initiation and 771 person-years after ART. Median CD4 and plasma viral load at ART initiation were 277 cells/μL and 4.18 log10 copies/mL. Antiretroviral therapy use was associated with a significant decrease in condomless vaginal sex acts with HIV-uninfected partners (0.65 vs 0.39 per month; rate ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55-0.75; P sexually transmitted infection diagnoses were similar (odds ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.86-1.29; P = 0.63). Substantial risk compensation did not occur after ART initiation among East African HIV-infected persons with known HIV-uninfected partners. These data inform modelling studies of ART for HIV prevention by suggesting that risky sexual behavior did not appear to offset decreased HIV infectiousness in this key population.

  4. Development of Treatment Strategies to Combat Ebola and Marburg Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-02

    be needed. Several viruses require combination therapy to be effective; HIV and hepatits C virus . There is a paucity of compounds that are ready for...filovirus, Marburg virus , therapy, treatment Ebola and Marburg viruses are emerging/re-emerging pathogens that pose a significant threat to human...Previous library screening efforts were based on the use of surrogate viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus as a predictor of potential antivirals

  5. Sequencing of hepatitis C virus for detection of resistance to direct‐acting antiviral therapy: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebely, Jason; Eltahla, Auda A.; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Howe, Anita Y.M.; Miller, Veronica; Ceccherini‐Silberstein, Francesca; Bull, Rowena A.; Douglas, Mark W.; Dore, Gregory J.; Harrington, Patrick; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Jacka, Brendan; Matthews, Gail V.; Wang, Gary P.; Pawlotsky, Jean‐Michel; Feld, Jordan J.; Schinkel, Janke; Garcia, Federico; Lennerstrand, Johan; Applegate, Tanya L.

    2017-01-01

    The significance of the clinical impact of direct‐acting antiviral (DAA) resistance‐associated substitutions (RASs) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) on treatment failure is unclear. No standardized methods or guidelines for detection of DAA RASs in HCV exist. To facilitate further evaluations of the impact of DAA RASs in HCV, we conducted a systematic review of RAS sequencing protocols, compiled a comprehensive public library of sequencing primers, and provided expert guidance on the most appropriate methods to screen and identify RASs. The development of standardized RAS sequencing protocols is complicated due to a high genetic variability and the need for genotype‐ and subtype‐specific protocols for multiple regions. We have identified several limitations of the available methods and have highlighted areas requiring further research and development. The development, validation, and sharing of standardized methods for all genotypes and subtypes should be a priority. (Hepatology Communications 2017;1:379–390) PMID:29404466

  6. Impact of Antiretroviral Therapy on Liver Fibrosis Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults With and Without HBV Coinfection in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinikoor, Michael J; Sinkala, Edford; Chilengi, Roma; Mulenga, Lloyd B; Chi, Benjamin H; Zyambo, Zude; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Saag, Michael S; Davies, Mary-Ann; Egger, Matthias; Wandeler, Gilles

    2017-05-15

    We investigated changes in hepatic fibrosis, based on transient elastography (TE), among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with and without hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Zambia. Patients' liver stiffness measurements (LSM; kiloPascals [kPa]) at ART initiation were categorized as no or minimal fibrosis (equivalent to Metavir F0-F1), significant fibrosis (F2-F3), and cirrhosis (F4). TE was repeated following 1 year of ART. Stratified by HBV coinfection status (hepatitis B surface antigen positive at baseline), we described LSM change and the proportion with an increase/decrease in fibrosis category. Using multivariable logistic regression, we assessed correlates of significant fibrosis/cirrhosis at 1 year on ART. Among 463 patients analyzed (61 with HBV coinfection), median age was 35 years, 53.7% were women, and median baseline CD4+ count was 240 cells/mm3. Nearly all (97.6%) patients received tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-containing ART, in line with nationally recommended first-line treatment. The median LSM change was -0.70 kPa (95% confidence interval, -3.0 to +1.7) and was similar with and without HBV coinfection. Significant fibrosis/cirrhosis decreased in frequency from 14.0% to 6.7% (P < .001). Increased age, male sex, and HBV coinfection predicted significant fibrosis/cirrhosis at 1 year (all P < .05). The percentage of HIV-infected Zambian adults with elevated liver stiffness suggestive of significant fibrosis/cirrhosis decreased following ART initiation-regardless of HBV status. This suggests that HIV infection plays a role in liver inflammation. HBV-coinfected patients were more likely to have significant fibrosis/cirrhosis at 1 year on ART. NCT02060162. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 Cervicovaginal Shedding Among Women Living With HIV-1 and Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Burkina Faso: An 8-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Andrea J; Nagot, Nicolas; Weiss, Helen A; Konate, Issouf; Kania, Dramane; Segondy, Michel; Meda, Nicolas; van de Perre, Philippe; Mayaud, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    The impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) replication is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess factors associated with cervicovaginal HSV-2 DNA shedding and genital ulcer disease (GUD) in a cohort of women living with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) in Burkina Faso. Participants were screened for cervicovaginal HSV-2 DNA, GUD, cervicovaginal and systemic HIV-1 RNA, and reproductive tract infections every 3-6 months over 8 years. Associations with HSV-2 shedding and quantity were examined using random-effects logistic and linear regression, respectively. Of the 236 women with data on HSV-2 shedding, 151 took ART during the study period. Cervicovaginal HSV-2 DNA was detected in 42% of women (99 of 236) in 8.2% of visits (151 of 1848). ART was associated with a reduction in the odds of HSV-2 shedding, which declined for each year of ART use (odds ratio [OR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], .59-.92). In the multivariable model, the impact of ART was primarily associated with suppression of systemic HIV-1 RNA (adjusted OR, 0.32; 95% CI, .15-.67). A reduction in the odds of GUD was also observed during ART, mainly in those with HIV-1 suppression (adjusted OR, 0.53; 95% CI, .25-1.11). ART is strongly associated with a decrease in cervicovaginal HSV-2 shedding, and the impact was sustained over several years. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  8. Hepatitis C virus therapy with peg-interferon and ribavirin in Myanmar: A resource-constrained country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Naomi Khaing Than; Banerjee, Debolina; Mitrani, Robert; Arker, Soe Htet; Win, Kyaw San; Tun, Nyan Lin; Thant, Zaw; Win, Khin Maung; Reddy, K Rajender

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate peg-interferon (peg-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy in Myanmar and to predict sustained virologic response (SVR). METHODS This single-center, open-label, study was conducted in Myanmar between 2009 and 2014. A total of 288 patients infected with HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 6 were treated with peg-IFN alpha-2a (180 μg/wk) or alpha-2b (50 to 100 μg as a weight-based dose) and RBV as a weight-based dose (15 mg/kg/d). Treatment duration was 48 wk for genotypes 1 and 6, 24 wk for genotype 2, and 24 or 48 wk for genotype 3 based on rapid virologic response (RVR). Those co-infected with hepatitis B received 48 wk of therapy. RESULTS Overall, SVR was achieved for 82% of patients and the therapy was well tolerated. All patients achieved SVR at equivalent rates regardless of HCV genotype (P = 0.314). Low fibrosis scores (P 96% positive predictive value for achieving SVR. Treatment duration did not significantly impact the likelihood of achieving SVR for patients infected with genotype 3 HCV (P = 0.371). The most common adverse events were fatigue (71%) and poor appetite (60%). Among patients with genotype 3 HCV, more patients in the 48-wk treatment group required erythropoietin than in the 24-wk treatment group (61.1% vs 49.2%). CONCLUSION SVR rates were high with peg-IFN and RBV therapy in Myanmar. Fibrosis scores, baseline albumin, HCV RNA levels and RVR independently predicted SVR. PMID:27920482

  9. Herpes Simplex I virus impairs regenerative outcomes of periodontal regenerative therapy in intrabony defects: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Carlo; Pellacani, Chiara; Lalla, Michele; Consolo, Ugo; Pinti, Marcello; Cortellini, Pierpaolo; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of herpesvirus type-1 and -2 on the clinical outcomes of periodontal regenerative procedures in isolated deep intrabony pockets, in an experimental population with no detectable periodontal pathogens. Seventeen periodontal intraosseous defects in 17 moderate-to-advanced periodontitis patients were treated with regenerative therapy and amelogenins. Microbiological evaluation was performed at baseline (after the completion of initial therapy) and at 1 year to exclude the presence of periodontal pathogens. Herpesviruses-1 and -2 DNA were quantified in the pocket tissues associated to the intrabony defect using molecular assays. Clinical attachment level (CAL), probing pocket depth (PPD) and gingival recession (REC) were recorded at baseline and at 1 year. After 1 year, the 17 defects resulted in significant CAL gain, PPD reduction and REC increase. HSV-1 was detected in five patients. Herpesvirus-2 was never found. The two subpopulations positive or negative to herpesvirus-1 were homogeneous at baseline. At 1 year, the five herpesvirus-1 positive patients resulted in lower amounts of CAL-gain and PPD reduction and greater amount of REC with respect to the 12 herpesvirus-1 negative patients. The presence of herpesvirus-1 at baseline is associated with poor clinical outcomes following regenerative therapy. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Genetic variation in interleukin 28B and response to antiviral therapy in patients with dual chronic infection with hepatitis B and C viruses.

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    Xiaoyan Guo

    Full Text Available Concurrent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV was not uncommon in China. To date, information on predictors of response to treatment of dually-infected HCV/HBV is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluated whether determination of the interleukin 28B (IL-28B polymorphism statuses sufficient to predict treatment response of interferon (IFN-based therapy in patients chronically infected with both hepatitis B and C viruses. We investigated the role of IL28B variations (rs8099917 and rs12979860 in response to IFN-based treatment and evaluated its association with the risk of the null virological response (NVR in HCV /HBV dually-infected patients. We found that the overall distributions of the genotypes among the sustained virological response (SVR, NVR groups were significantly different (P<0.001: patients with the rs8099917 TG genotype had an increased risk of NVR (odds ratio [OR] =2.37 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.16-4.83, P =0.017, and those with the GG genotype had a further increased risk of NVR (OR=4.23, 95% CI =1.17-15.3, P=0.027. The rs12979860 allele was also highly associated with treatment failure (CT/TT vs. CC; OR =2.04, 95%CI =1.05-3.97, P =0.037. Moreover, we found that IL28B rs8099917 G variants (TG+GG interact with HCV genotype 1(G1 to result in higher risk of NVR (P=0.009, and that they are also associated with HBV DNA reactivation (TG+GG vs. TT, P=0.005. Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis show that the rs8099917 G allele was the most important factor significantly associated with a NVR in HCV G1 patients. This study suggest that IL28B genotyping may be a valid pretreatment predictor of which patients are likely to respond to treatment in this group of difficult-to-treat HCV/HBV dually-infected patients.

  11. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer for the potential therapy of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency.

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    Silver, Jared N; Elder, Melissa; Conlon, Thomas; Cruz, Pedro; Wright, Amy J; Srivastava, Arun; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-08-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, potentially fatal pediatric disease, which results from mutations within the ADA gene, leading to metabolic abnormalities and ultimately profound immunologic and nonimmunologic defects. In this study, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors based on serotypes 1 and 9 were used to deliver a secretory version of the human ADA (hADA) gene to various tissues to promote immune reconstitution following enzyme expression in a mouse model of ADA deficiency. Here, we report that a single-stranded rAAV vector, pTR2-CB-Igκ-hADA, (1) facilitated successful gene delivery to multiple tissues, including heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney, (2) promoted ectopic expression of hADA, and (3) allowed enhanced serum-based enzyme activity over time. Moreover, the rAAV-hADA vector packaged in serotype 9 capsid drove partial, prolonged, and progressive immune reconstitution in ADA-deficient mice. Overview Summary Gene therapies for severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency (ADA-SCID) over two decades have exclusively involved retroviral vectors targeted to lymphocytes and hematopoietic progenitor cells. These groundbreaking gene therapies represented an unprecedented revolution in clinical medicine but in most cases did not fully correct the immune deficiency and came with the potential risk of insertional mutagenesis. Alternatively, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained attention as valuable tools for gene transfer, having demonstrated no pathogenicity in humans, minimal immunogenicity, long-term efficacy, ease of administration, and broad tissue tropism (Muzyczka, 1992 ; Flotte et al., 1993 ; Kessler et al., 1996 ; McCown et al., 1996 ; Lipkowitz et al., 1999 ; Marshall, 2001 ; Chen et al., 2003 ; Conlon and Flotte, 2004 ; Griffey et al., 2005 ; Pacak et al., 2006 ; Stone et al., 2008 ; Liu et al., 2009 ; Choi et al., 2010

  12. A Rapid Screening Assay Identifies Monotherapy with Interferon-ß and Combination Therapies with Nucleoside Analogs as Effective Inhibitors of Ebola Virus.

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    Stephen D S McCarthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date there are no approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of Ebola virus disease (EVD. While a number of candidate drugs have shown limited efficacy in vitro and/or in non-human primate studies, differences in experimental methodologies make it difficult to compare their therapeutic effectiveness. Using an in vitro model of Ebola Zaire replication with transcription-competent virus like particles (trVLPs, requiring only level 2 biosafety containment, we compared the activities of the type I interferons (IFNs IFN-α and IFN-ß, a panel of viral polymerase inhibitors (lamivudine (3TC, zidovudine (AZT tenofovir (TFV, favipiravir (FPV, the active metabolite of brincidofovir, cidofovir (CDF, and the estrogen receptor modulator, toremifene (TOR, in inhibiting viral replication in dose-response and time course studies. We also tested 28 two- and 56 three-drug combinations against Ebola replication. IFN-α and IFN-ß inhibited viral replication 24 hours post-infection (IC50 0.038μM and 0.016μM, respectively. 3TC, AZT and TFV inhibited Ebola replication when used alone (50-62% or in combination (87%. They exhibited lower IC50 (0.98-6.2μM compared with FPV (36.8μM, when administered 24 hours post-infection. Unexpectedly, CDF had a narrow therapeutic window (6.25-25μM. When dosed >50μM, CDF treatment enhanced viral infection. IFN-ß exhibited strong synergy with 3TC (97.3% inhibition or in triple combination with 3TC and AZT (95.8% inhibition. This study demonstrates that IFNs and viral polymerase inhibitors may have utility in EVD. We identified several 2 and 3 drug combinations with strong anti-Ebola activity, confirmed in studies using fully infectious ZEBOV, providing a rationale for testing combination therapies in animal models of lethal Ebola challenge. These studies open up new possibilities for novel therapeutic options, in particular combination therapies, which could prevent and treat Ebola infection and potentially reduce drug

  13. [GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan: Consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (Updated January 2014)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This consensus document is an update of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) guidelines for HIV-1 infected adult patients. To formulate these recommendations a panel composed of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida reviewed the efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. Recommendations strength and the evidence in which they are supported are based on modified criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with the clinical circumstances: CDC stage B or C disease (A-I), asymptomatic patients (depending on the CD4+ T-lymphocyte count: 500 cells/μL, B-III), comorbid conditions (HIV nephropathy, chronic hepatitis caused by HBV or HCV, age >55years, high cardiovascular risk, neurocognitive disorders, and cancer, A-II), and prevention of transmission of HIV (mother-to-child or heterosexual, A-I; men who have sex with men, A-III). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). Some of the possible initial regimens have been considered alternatives. This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure where rescue ART should comprise 2 or 3 drugs that are fully active against the virus. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid

  14. AIDS-related cancer in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART): a model of the interplay of the immune system, virus, and cancer. "On the offensive--the Trojan Horse is being destroyed"--Part B: Malignant lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Tony W

    2004-01-01

    The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was less obvious initially, although primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) has dropped precipitously since the introduction of HAART. The pathogenesis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related lymphoma is multifactorial. Epstein-Barr virus plays a significant role in these diseases, especially Burkitt lymphoma and PCNSL. Data regarding the effect of HAART on the natural history and treatment outcomes of these malignancies are emerging. The possibility of direct and indirect roles of human immunodeficiency virus in the carcinogenesis suggests that antiretroviral therapy may be an important component of the treatment for these malignancies. The simultaneous administration of HAART and chemotherapy does not appear to significantly alter the toxicity profile, although the information with respect to the interaction of HAART and chemotherapy is limited. The use of biological agents, for example, monoclonal antibody against CD-20, is being explored to improve the clinical outcome of this disease.

  15. TO THE QUESTION ABOUT IMMUNOLOGIES CRITERIAS OF EFFICIENCY OF ANTIVIRUS THERAPY OF A CHRONIC VIRUS HEPATITES C

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    L. Ph. Sklyar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The group of patients in amount 45 person received the standard combined therapy by preparations of recombinant IFN-α in combination with ribavirin. The positive effect of standard antivirus treatment at patients with chronic HCV-infection associated with increase of level of IL-2, decrease of levels of TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-12р40, IL-12р70 and IL-10 in peripheral serum. It has allowed to use them as noninvasive markers of the steady virologic answer during treatment of a chronic HCV-infection.

  16. Tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children starting antiretroviral therapy in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, A F; Tuho, M Z; Ekra, K A; Kouakou, J; Shiraishi, R W; Adjorlolo-Johnson, G; Marlink, R; Ellerbrock, T V

    2014-04-01

    In Côte d'Ivoire, more than 2000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected children aged tuberculosis (TB) incidence and determinants among ART enrollees. A nationally representative retrospective cohort study among 2110 children starting ART during 2004-2008 at 29 facilities. At ART initiation, the median age was 5.1 years; 82% had World Health Organization Stage III/IV, median CD4% was 11%, 42% were severely undernourished (weight-for-age Z-score [WAZ] tuberculosis treatment. Documentation of TB screening before ART declined from 63% to 46% during 2004-2008. Children taking anti-tuberculosis treatment at ART enrollment had a lower median CD4% (9.0% vs. 11.0%, P = 0.037) and a higher prevalence of WAZ children considered TB-free at ART enrollment, TB incidence was 6.28/100 child-years during days 0-90 of ART, declining to 0.56/100 child-years after 180 days. Children with one unit higher WAZ at ART enrollment had 13% lower TB incidence (adjusted HR 0.87, 95%CI 0.77-1.00, P= 0.047). Ensuring clinician compliance with TB screening before ART and ensuring earlier ART initiation before children suffer from advanced HIV disease and nutritional compromise might reduce TB morbidity during ART.

  17. Adeno-associated virus gene therapy vector scAAVIGF-I for transduction of equine articular chondrocytes and RNA-seq analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, D D; McIlwraith, C W; Slayden, R A; Samulski, R J; Goodrich, L R

    2016-05-01

    IGF-I is one of several anabolic factors being investigated for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Due to the short biological half-life, extended administration is required for more robust cartilage healing. Here we create a self-complimentary adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy vector utilizing the transgene for IGF-I. Various biochemical assays were performed to investigate the cellular response to scAAVIGF-I treatment vs an scAAVGFP positive transduction control and a negative for transduction control culture. RNA-sequencing analysis was also performed to establish a differential regulation profile of scAAVIGF-I transduced chondrocytes. Biochemical analyses indicated an average media IGF-I concentration of 608 ng/ml in the scAAVIGF-I transduced chondrocytes. This increase in IGF-I led to increased expression of collagen type II and aggrecan and increased protein concentrations of cellular collagen type II and media glycosaminoglycan vs both controls. RNA-seq revealed a global regulatory pattern consisting of 113 differentially regulated GO categories including those for chondrocyte and cartilage development and regulation of apoptosis. This research substantiates that scAAVIGF-I gene therapy vector increased production of IGF-I to clinically relevant levels with a biological response by chondrocytes conducive to increased cartilage healing. The RNA-seq further established a set of differentially expressed genes and gene ontologies induced by the scAAVIGF-I vector while controlling for AAV infection. This dataset provides a static representation of the cellular transcriptome that, while only consisting of one time point, will allow for further gene expression analyses to compare additional cartilage healing therapeutics or a transient cellular response. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Psychological factors, beliefs about medication, and adherence of youth with human immunodeficiency virus in a multisite directly observed therapy pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie, Patricia A; Flynn, Patricia M; Belzer, Marvin; Britto, Paula; Hu, Chengcheng; Graham, Bobbie; Neely, Michael; McSherry, George D; Spector, Stephen A; Gaur, Aditya H

    2011-06-01

    This study examined psychological functioning and beliefs about medicine in adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on highly active antiretroviral therapy in a community-based directly observed therapy (DOT) pilot feasibility study. Participants were youth with behaviorally acquired HIV (n = 20; 65% female; median age, 21 years) with adherence problems, who received once-daily DOT. Youth were assessed at baseline, week 12 (post-DOT), and week 24 (follow-up). At baseline, 55% of youth reported having clinical depressive symptoms compared to 27% at week 12 with sustained improvements at week 24. At baseline, substance use was reported within the borderline clinical range (T(score) = 68), with clinical but statistically nonsignificant improvement (T(score) = 61) at week 12. Hopelessness scores reflected optimism for the future. Coping strategies showed significantly decreased cognitive avoidance (p = .02), emotional discharge (p = .004), and acceptance/resignation ("nothing I can do," p = .004), whereas positive reappraisal and seeking support emerged. With the exception of depressive symptoms, week 12 improvements were not sustained at week 24. DOT adherence was predicted by higher baseline depression (p = .05), beliefs about medicine (p = .006) and perceived threat of illness scores (p = .03). Youth with behaviorally acquired HIV and adherence problems who participated in a community-based DOT intervention reported clinically improved depressive symptoms, and temporarily reduced substance use and negative coping strategies. Depressive symptoms, beliefs about medicine, and viewing HIV as a potential threat predicted better DOT adherence. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Audiologic and vestibular findings in a sample of human immunodeficiency virus type-1-infected Mexican children under highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Gerardo C; Montalvo, Martha S; Fraire, Maria I; Leon, Ernesto; Alvarez, Maria T; Solorzano, Fortino

    2008-11-01

    There is little information about audiologic and vestibular disorders in pediatric patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1). The aim of this study was to evaluate audiologic and vestibular disorders in a sample of HIV-1-infected children receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. Patients underwent pure tone audiometry, speech discrimination testing, auditory brainstem responses, electronystagmography, and rotatory testing. HIV-1 viral load and absolute CD4+ cell counts were registered. Twenty-three patients were included, aged 4.5 years (median, range 5 months to 16 years). Pure tone audiometry was carried out in 12 children over 4 years of age: 4 (33%) showed hearing loss, 2 were conductive. Auditory brainstem responses were measured in all 23 patients, suggesting conductive hearing loss in 6 and sensorineural hearing loss in 2. Most patients with conductive hearing loss had the antecedent of acute or chronic suppurative otitis media but with dry ears at the time of evaluation (p=0.003). Abnormal prolongations of interwave intervals in auditory brainstem responses were observed in 3 children (13%, 4 ears), an abnormal morphology in different components of auditory brainstem responses in 4 (17.4%, 7 ears), and abnormal amplitude patterns in 11 patients (48%, 17 ears). Vestibular tests were abnormal in all six patients tested, with asymmetries in caloric and rotatory tests. Although differences were not significant, in general, audiologic abnormalities were more frequent in patients with more prolonged HIV-1 infections, higher viral loads, or lower absolute CD4+ cell counts. Conductive hearing loss associated with previous otitis media events, abnormalities in auditory brainstem responses suggesting disorders at different levels of the auditory pathways, and unilateral vestibular hyporeflexia were frequent findings in our sample of HIV-1-infected children under Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. These findings suggest that HIV

  20. Antiviral therapy and outcomes of patients with pneumonia caused by influenza A pandemic (H1N1 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-gui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is limited data on the clinical outcome of patients with pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1 pneumonia who received oseltamivir treatment, especially when the treatment was administered more than 48 hours after symptom onset. METHODS: During the pandemic in 2009, a cohort of pH1N1 influenza pneumonia was built in China, and their clinical information was collected systematically, and analyzed with Cox models. RESULTS: 920 adults and 541 children with pneumonia who didn't receive corticosteroids were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was higher in adults who did not receive antiviral therapy (18.2% than those with who received oseltamivir ≤ 2 days (2.9%, between 2-5 days (4.6% and >5 days after illness onset (4.9%, p5 days, respectively. For males patients, aged ≥ 14 years and baseline PaO(2/FiO(23.8 mg/kg/d did not improve clinical outcome (mortality, higher dose 2.5% vs standard dose 2.8%, p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Antiviral therapy might reduce mortality of patients with pH1N1 pneumonia, even when initiated more than 48 hours after onset of illness. Greater protective effects might be in males, patients aged 14-60 years, and patients with PaO(2/FiO(2<200.

  1. Periodontal Conditions in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients Under Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy From a Metropolitan Area of Rio De Janeiro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz Barreto, Luis Paulo; Melo Dos Santos, Marcela; Gomes, Bruno da Silva; Lamas, Cristiane da Cruz; Silva, Denise Gomes da; Silva-Boghossian, Carina Maciel; Soares, Léo Guimarães; Vieira Falabella, Marcio Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the periodontal status and the presence of opportunistic oral lesions in human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and their association with cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ and CD4+ nadir T-cell counts and viral load levels. Clinical periodontal parameters and the presence of opportunistic oral lesions along with records of CD4+ counts and viral load levels were evaluated in 29 individuals (16 females; mean age: 42.7 years) with previous serologic diagnosis of HIV, from the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome program of the Health Center of Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. All individuals presented gingivitis or periodontitis. A higher non-significant prevalence of periodontitis was found in smokers (93.8%) compared with non-smokers (76.9%). A significant weak positive correlation was observed between CD4+ counts and missing teeth (ρ = 0.380, P counts may present a weak to moderate correlation to the number of missing teeth, periodontal diagnosis, moderate PD, and moderate CAL, which may also reflect some effect of these systemic conditions on the periodontal status.

  2. Application of shRNA-containing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based gene therapy for HSV-2-induced genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihong; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Zhun; Yu, Bo; Shao, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Hong; Li, Manmei; Guan, Ming; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    HSV-1-based vectors have been widely used to achieve targeted delivery of genes into the nervous system. In the current study, we aim to use shRNA-containing HSV-1-based gene delivery system for the therapy of HSV-2 infection. Guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with HSV-2 and scored daily for 100 days for the severity of vaginal disease. HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 was applied intravaginally daily between 8 and 14 days after HSV-2 challenge. Delivery of HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 had no effect on the onset of disease and acute virus shedding in animals, but resulted in a significant reduction in both the cumulative recurrent lesion days and the number of days with recurrent disease. Around half of the animals in the HSV-2 shRNA group did not develop recurrent disease 100 days post HSV-2 infection. In conclusion, HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 particles are effective in reducing the recurrence of genital herpes caused by HSV-2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High Cellular Monocyte Activation in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy and Lifestyle-Matched Controls Is Associated With Greater Inflammation in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booiman, Thijs; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Maurer, Irma; De Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A.; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Prins, Maria; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Franceschi, Claudio; Fuchs, Dietmar; Gisslén, Magnus; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Reiss, P.; Wit, F. W. N. M.; Schouten, J.; Kooij, K. W.; van Zoest, R. A.; Elsenga, B. C.; Janssen, F. R.; Heidenrijk, M.; Zikkenheiner, W.; van der Valk, M.; Kootstra, N. A.; Booiman, T.; Harskamp-Holwerda, A. M.; Boeser-Nunnink, B.; Maurer, I.; Mangas Ruiz, M. M.; Girigorie, A. F.; Villaudy, J.; Frankin, E.; Pasternak, A.; Berkhout, B.; van der Kuyl, T.; Portegies, P.; Schmand, B. A.; Geurtsen, G. J.; ter Stege, J. A.; Klein Twennaar, M.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Caan, M. W. A.; Su, T.; Weijer, K.; Bisschop, P. H. L. T.; Kalsbeek, A.; Wezel, M.; Visser, I.; Ruhé, H. G.; Franceschi, C.; Garagnani, P.; Pirazzini, C.; Capri, M.; Dall’Olio, F.; Chiricolo, M.; Salvioli, S.; Hoeijmakers, J.; Pothof, J.; Prins, M.; Martens, M.; Moll, S.; Berkel, J.; Totté, M.; Kovalev, S.; Gisslén, M.; Fuchs, D.; Zetterberg, H.; Winston, A.; Underwood, J.; McDonald, L.; Stott, M.; Legg, K.; Lovell, A.; Erlwein, O.; Doyle, N.; Kingsley, C.; Sharp, D. J.; Leech, R.; Cole, J. H.; Zaheri, S.; Hillebregt, M. M. J.; Ruijs, Y. M. C.; Benschop, D. P.; Burger, D.; de Graaff-Teulen, M.; Guaraldi, G.; Bürkle, A.; Sindlinger, T.; Moreno-Villanueva, M.; Keller, A.; Sabin, C.; de Francesco, D.; Libert, C.; Dewaele, S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Increased monocyte activation and intestinal damage have been shown to be predictive for the increased morbidity and mortality observed in treated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of cellular and soluble markers of monocyte activation, coagulation, intestinal damage, and inflammation in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of PLHIV with suppressed plasma viremia on combination antiretroviral therapy and age and demographically comparable HIV-negative individuals participating in the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) cohort and, where appropriate, age-matched blood bank donors (BBD). Results. People living with HIV, HIV-negative individuals, and BBD had comparable percentages of classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes. Expression of CD163, CD32, CD64, HLA-DR, CD38, CD40, CD86, CD91, CD11c, and CX3CR1 on monocytes did not differ between PLHIV and HIV-negative individuals, but it differed significantly from BBD. Principal component analysis revealed that 57.5% of PLHIV and 62.5% of HIV-negative individuals had a high monocyte activation profile compared with 2.9% of BBD. Cellular monocyte activation in the COBRA cohort was strongly associated with soluble markers of monocyte activation and inflammation in the CSF. Conclusions. People living with HIV and HIV-negative COBRA participants had high levels of cellular monocyte activation compared with age-matched BBD. High monocyte activation was predictive for inflammation in the CSF. PMID:28680905

  4. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (updated January 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, Juan; Polo, Rosa; Aldeguer, José López; Lozano, Fernando; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, José Ramón; Blanco, José Ramón; Boix, Vicente; Casado, José Luis; Clotet, Bonaventura; Crespo, Manuel; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; García, Federico; Gatell, José María; González-García, Juan; Gutiérrez, Félix; Iribarren, José Antonio; Knobel, Hernando; Llibre, Josep María; Locutura, Jaime; López, Juan Carlos; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Podzamczer, Daniel; Portilla, Joaquín; Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Riera, Melchor; Rubio, Rafael; Santos, Jesús; Sanz-Moreno, José; Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, María Jesús; Tuset, Montserrat; Rivero, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation vary depending on the CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, the presence of opportunistic infections or comorbid conditions, age, and the efforts to prevent the transmission of HIV. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should comprise three drugs, namely, two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and one drug from another family. Three of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) as the third drug, are considered a preferred regimen; a further seven regimens, which are based on an INSTI, an non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), or a protease inhibitor boosted with ritonavir (PI/r), are considered alternatives. The reasons and criteria for switching ART are presented both for patients with an undetectable PVL and for patients who experience virological failure, in which case the rescue regimen should include three (or at least two) drugs that are fully active against HIV. The specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbid conditions (tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer) are updated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on Antiretroviral Therapy in Adults Infected by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Updated January 2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should comprise 3 drugs, namely, 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), and 1 drug from another family. Four of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) as the third drug, are considered a preferred regimen; a further 6 regimens, which are based on an INSTI, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), or a protease inhibitor boosted with cobicistat or ritonavir (PI/COBI, PI/r), are considered alternatives. The reasons and criteria for switching ART are presented both for patients with an undetectable PVL and for patients who experience virological failure, in which case the rescue regimen should include 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against HIV. The specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbid conditions (tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer) are updated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Executive summary of the GeSIDA/National AIDS Plan consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (updated January 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, Juan; Polo, Rosa; Lozano, Fernando; López Aldeguer, José; Antela, Antonio; Arribas, José Ramón; Asensi, Víctor; Blanco, José Ramón; Clotet, Bonaventura; Domingo, Pere; Galindo, María José; Gatell, José María; González-García, Juan; Iribarren, José Antonio; Locutura, Jaime; López, Juan Carlos; Mallolas, Josep; Martínez, Esteban; Miralles, Celia; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Palacios, Rosario; Pérez Elías, María Jesús; Pineda, Juan Antonio; Podzamczer, Daniel; Portilla, Joaquín; Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Riera, Melchor; Rubio, Rafael; Santos, Jesús; Sanz, Jesús; Tuset, Montserrat; Vidal, Francesc; Rivero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and grade of the recommendation varies with clinical circumstances, number of CD4 cells, comorbid conditions and prevention of transmission of HIV. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial ART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a third drug from a different family (non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, protease inhibitor, or integrase inhibitor). This update presents the causes and criteria for switching ART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load and in cases of virological failure. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and subsequent HIV viral load among women with HIV initiating antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Sarah J; Cole, Stephen R; Westreich, Daniel; Edmonds, Andrew; Hurt, Christopher B; Albrecht, Svenja; Anastos, Kathryn; Augenbraun, Michael; Fischl, Margaret; French, Audrey L; Kalapila, Aley G; Karim, Roksana; Peters, Marion G; Plankey, Michael; Seaberg, Eric C; Tien, Phyllis C; Adimora, Adaora A

    2018-03-13

    One in four persons living with HIV is coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Biological and behavioral mechanisms may increase HIV viral load among coinfected persons. Therefore, we estimated the longitudinal effect of chronic HCV on HIV suppression after ART initiation among women with HIV (WWH). HIV RNA was measured every 6 months among 441 WWH in the Women's Interagency HIV Study who initiated ART from 2000 to 2015. Log-binomial regression models were used to compare the proportion of study visits with detectable HIV RNA between women with and without chronic HCV. Robust sandwich variance estimators accounted for within-person correlation induced by repeated HIV RNA measurements during follow-up. We controlled for confounding and selection bias (because of loss to follow-up and death) using inverse probability-of-exposure-and-censoring weights. One hundred and fourteen women (25%) had chronic HCV before ART initiation. Overall, the proportion of visits with detectable HIV RNA was similar among women with and without chronic HCV [relative risk (RR) 1.19 (95% CI 0.72, 1.95)]. Six months after ART initiation, the proportion of visits with detectable HIV RNA among women with chronic HCV was 1.88 (95% CI 1.41-2.51) times that among women without HCV, at 2 years, the ratio was 1.60 (95% CI 1.17-2.19), and by 6 years there was no difference (1.03; 95% CI 0.60-1.79). Chronic HCV may negatively impact early HIV viral response to ART. These findings reaffirm the need to test persons with HIV for HCV infection, and increase engagement in HIV care and access to HCV treatment among persons with HIV/HCV coinfection.

  8. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus antibody response and viremia following highly active antiretroviral therapy in the Swiss HIV Cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sheena G; Hirsch, Hans H; Franceschi, Silvia; Steffen, Ingrid; Amari, Emmanuelle Boffi El; Mueller, Nicolas J; Magouras, Ioannis; Biggar, Robert J; Rickenbach, Martin; Clifford, Gary M

    2010-09-10

    To describe the effect of HAART on Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) antibody response and viremia among HIV-positive MSM. A follow-up study of 272 HIV-positive MSM (including 22 with Kaposi sarcoma) who first initiated HAART between January 1996 and July 2004 in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. For each individual, two serum samples, one at HAART initiation and another 24 months later, were tested for latent and lytic KSHV antibodies using immunofluorescence assays, and for KSHV viremia using PCR. Factors associated with changes in KSHV antibody titers and viremia were evaluated. At HAART initiation, 69.1 and 75.0% of patients were seropositive to latent and lytic KSHV antibodies, respectively. Seropositivity was associated with the presence of Kaposi sarcoma, older age, lower CD8 cell count and higher CD4/CD8 ratio. Prevalence of KSHV viremia at HAART initiation was 6.4%, being significantly higher among patients with Kaposi sarcoma (35.0%), and those with HIV viral loads 100 000 copies/ml (11.7%) or higher. At 24-month follow-up, geometric mean titers (GMTs) among KSHV seropositive patients increased and antibody seroprevalence was higher. Having Kaposi sarcoma and/or CD4 cell counts less than 50 cells/microl at HAART initiation was associated both with higher probability for antibody titers to increase (including seroconversion) and larger increases in GMTs. Only one of 17 viremic patients at HAART initiation had viremia at 24-month follow-up. HAART increases KSHV-specific humoral immune response and clearance of viremia among HIV-infected MSM, consistent with the dramatic protection offered by HAART against Kaposi sarcoma.

  9. Dual Therapy With Darunavir and Ritonavir Plus Lamivudine vs Triple Therapy With Darunavir and Ritonavir Plus Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate and Emtricitabine or Abacavir and Lamivudine for Maintenance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Viral Suppression: Randomized, Open-Label, Noninferiority DUAL-GESIDA 8014-RIS-EST45 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Federico; Ribera, Esteban; Lagarde, María; Pérez-Valero, Ignacio; Palacios, Rosario; Iribarren, José A; Payeras, Antoni; Domingo, Pere; Sanz, José; Cervero, Miguel; Curran, Adrián; Rodríguez-Gómez, Francisco J; Téllez, María J; Ryan, Pablo; Barrufet, Pilar; Knobel, Hernando; Rivero, Antonio; Alejos, Belén; Yllescas, María; Arribas, José R

    2017-11-29

    Our objective was to assess the therapeutic noninferiority of dual therapy with darunavir/ritonavir and lamivudine compared to triple therapy with darunavir/ritonavir plus 2 nucleos(t)ides for maintenance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) suppression. This was a multicenter, open-label, noninferiority trial (margin 12%). Patients with HIV-1 RNA dual- and triple-therapy arms was 88.9% (112/126) and 92.7% (114/123; difference, -3.8%; 95% confidence interval, -11.0 to 3.4), respectively. Four participants in the dual-therapy arm and 2 in the triple-therapy arm developed protocol-defined virological failure. Switching to dual therapy was associated with a significant increase in total, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but not in the total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio. Serious adverse events and study drug discontinuations due to adverse events occurred in 4.8% vs 4.9%P = .97) and in 0.8% (1/126) vs 1.6% P = .55) in dual therapy vs triple therapy, respectively. Dual therapy with darunavir/ritonavir and lamivudine demonstrated noninferior therapeutic efficacy and similar tolerability compared to triple therapy. NCT02159599. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Understanding early serum hepatitis D virus and hepatitis B surface antigen kinetics during pegylated interferon-alpha therapy via mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, Jeremie; Rotman, Yaron; Cotler, Scott J; Koh, Christopher; Schmid, Peter; Albrecht, Jeff; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Liang, T Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H; Heller, Theo; Dahari, Harel

    2014-12-01

    There is little information on the early kinetics of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) during interferon-α therapy. Here a mathematical model was developed and fitted to frequent HDV and HBsAg kinetic data from 10 patients during the first 28 weeks of pegylated-interferon-α2a (peg-IFN) therapy. Three patients achieved a complete virological response (CVR), defined as undetectable HDV 6 months after treatment stopped with loss of HBsAg and anti-HBsAg seroconversion. After initiation of therapy, a median delay of 9 days (interquartile range [IQR]: 5-15) was observed with no significant changes in HDV level. Thereafter, HDV declined in a biphasic manner, where a rapid first phase lasting for 25 days (IQR: 23-58) was followed by a slower or plateau second phase. The model predicts that the main effect of peg-IFN is to reduce HDV production/release with a median effectiveness of 96% (IQR: 93-99.8). Median serum HDV half-life (t1/2 ) was estimated as 2.9 days (IQR: 1.5-5.3) corresponding to a pretreatment production and clearance of about 10(10) (IQR: 10(9.7) -10(10.7) ) virions/day. None of the patients with flat second phase in HDV achieved CVR. HBsAg kinetics of decline paralleled the second phase of HDV decline consistent with HBsAg-productive-infected cells being the main source of production of HDV, with a median t1/2 of 135 days (IQR: 20-460). The interferon lambda-3 polymorphism (rs12979860) was not associated with kinetic parameters. Modeling results provide insights into HDV-host dynamics, the relationship between serum HBsAg levels and HBsAg-infected cells, IFN's mode of action, and its effectiveness. The observation that a flat second phase in HDV and HBsAg kinetics was associated with failure to achieve CVR provides the basis to develop early stopping rules during peg-IFN treatment in HDV-infected patients. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This article has been contributed to by U

  11. Epidemiology and clinical parameters of adult human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome at the initiation of antiretroviral therapy in South eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleje, Gu; Ele, Pu; Okocha, Ec; Iloduba, Uc

    2014-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has continued to ravage the teeming populations in Nigeria, with disastrous consequences. Despite many studies and progress on HIV/AIDS in Africa, the data on the status of the patients at the commencement of therapy is lacking. The aim of this study is to determine the demographic, clinical and some laboratory features of adult HIV/AIDS patients, seen at the commencement of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, south-east Nigeria between July 2002 and October 2004. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Adult patients living with HIV/AIDS were studied using an interview administered questionnaire. Data was analyzed using Epi Info 2008 version 3.5.1. A total of 400 respondents participated in this study. The mean age was 36.8 (8.8) years. Almost 60% patients were married and the HIV concordance rate was 53.3% (136/255). Nearly 30% of the families had at least one child positive for HIV. The most common associated risky behavior was injection administered in patent medicine stores 74.5%(302/400) and the most common clinical symptom was respiratory. Of the 400 patients recruited in this study, 19 (4.8%) were lost to follow-up on the 6 months' visit, giving a follow-up rate of 95.2% (381/400). There was statistically significant difference in the mean body weight (P = 0.02), mean total white blood cell count (P < 0.001) and mean CD4(+) count (P < 0.001) at presentation and after 6 months of ART therapy. HIV/AIDS patients present late and body weight, CD4(+) count and total white blood cell count seemed to recover quickly on commencement of ART. The prevalence of concordance among couples and mother to child transmission rates tended to be high. Administration of injectable at patent medicine stores and multiple sexual partners are the most significant risk factors.

  12. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin C for Invasive Anal Carcinoma in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraunholz, Ingeborg; Weiss, Christian; Eberlein, Klaus; Haberl, Annette; Roedel, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcomes of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for anal carcinoma in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2008, 21 HIV-positive patients who were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy were treated with CRT (50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction plus a 5.4-10.8-Gy external boost; 5-fluorouracil, 1,000 mg/m 2 , Days 1-4 and 29-32; and mitomycin C, 10 mg/m 2 , Days 1 and 29). A retrospective analysis was performed with respect to the tumor response, local control, cancer-specific and overall survival, and toxicity. The immunologic parameters, including pre- and post-treatment CD4 count, viral load, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-specific morbidity was recorded during follow-up (median, 53 months; range, 10-99). Results: CRT could be completed in all 21 patients with a reduction in the chemotherapy dose and/or interruption of radiotherapy in 5 and 5 cases, respectively. Acute Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 8 (38%) of the 21 patients. A complete response was achieved in 17 patients (81%), and tumor persistence or early progression was noted in 4 (19%). Six patients (29%) died, 5 of cancer progression and 1 of treatment-related toxicity. The 5-year local control, cancer-specific, and overall survival rate was 59%, 75%, and 67%, respectively. The median CD4 count significantly decreased from 347.5 cells/μL before CRT to 125 cells/μL 3-7 weeks after CRT completion (p <.001). In 6 (32%) of 19 patients, an increase of the HIV viral load was noted. Both parameters returned to the pretreatment values with additional follow-up. Conclusion: Our data have confirmed that in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-related anal cancer can be treated with standard CRT without dose reductions. Close surveillance of the immunologic parameters is necessary.

  13. [GESIDA/National AIDS Plan: Consensus document on antiretroviral therapy in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (Updated January 2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This consensus document is an update of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) guidelines and recommendations for HIV-1 infected adult patients. To formulate these recommendations, a panel composed of members of the AIDS Study Group and the AIDS National Plan (GeSIDA/Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) reviewed the efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, and cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented in medical scientific meetings. The strength of the recommendations, and the evidence that supports them, are based on modified criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. In this update, cART is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The strength and level of the recommendation depends on the CD4+T-lymphocyte count, the presence of opportunistic diseases or comorbid conditions, age, and prevention of transmission of HIV. The objective of cART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load. Initial cART should always comprise a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and a third drug from a different family. Three out of the ten recommended regimes are regarded as preferential (all of them with an integrase inhibitor as the third drug), and the other seven (based on a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor, or an integrase inhibitor) as alternatives. This update presents the causes and criteria for switching cART in patients with undetectable plasma viral load, and in cases of virological failure where rescue cART should comprise 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against the virus. An update is also provided for the specific criteria for cART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, and pregnancy) and with comorbid conditions (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer). These new guidelines

  14. Panobinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, for latent-virus reactivation in HIV-infected patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy: a phase 1/2, single group, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Thomas A; Tolstrup, Martin; Brinkmann, Christel R; Olesen, Rikke; Erikstrup, Christian; Solomon, Ajantha; Winckelmann, Anni; Palmer, Sarah; Dinarello, Charles; Buzon, Maria; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Lewin, Sharon R; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S

    2014-10-01

    Activating the expression of latent virus is an approach that might form part of an HIV cure. We assessed the ability of the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat to disrupt HIV-1 latency and the safety of this strategy. In this phase 1/2 clinical trial, we included aviraemic adults with HIV treated at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Participants received oral panobinostat (20 mg) three times per week every other week for 8 weeks while maintaining combination antiretroviral therapy. The primary outcome was change from baseline of cell-associated unspliced HIV RNA. Secondary endpoints were safety, plasma HIV RNA, total and integrated HIV DNA, infectious units per million CD4 T cells, and time to viral rebound during an optional analytical treatment interruption of antiretroviral therapy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov, number NCT01680094. We enrolled 15 patients. The level of cell-associated unspliced HIV RNA increased significantly at all timepoints when patients were taking panobinostat (p HIV RNA during panobinostat treatment was 3·5-fold (range 2·1-14·4). Panobinostat induced plasma viraemia with an odds ratio of 10·5 (95% CI 2·2-50·3; p = 0·0002) compared with baseline. We recorded a transient decrease in total HIV DNA, but no cohort-wide reduction in total HIV DNA, integrated HIV DNA, or infectious units per million. Nine patients participated in the analytical treatment interruption, median time to viral rebound was 17 days (range 14-56). Panobinostat was well tolerated. 45 adverse events were reported, but only 16 (all grade 1) were presumed related to panobinostat. Panobinostat effectively disrupts HIV latency in vivo and is a promising candidate for future combination clinical trials aimed at HIV eradication. However, panobinostat did not reduce the number of latently infected cells and this approach may need to be combined with others to significantly affect the latent HIV reservoir. The Danish Council for Strategic

  15. Baseline prediction of combination therapy outcome in hepatitis C virus 1b infected patients by discriminant analysis using viral and host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saludes, Verónica; Bracho, Maria Alma; Valero, Oliver; Ardèvol, Mercè; Planas, Ramón; González-Candelas, Fernando; Ausina, Vicente; Martró, Elisa

    2010-11-30

    Current treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has limited efficacy -especially among genotype 1 infected patients-, is costly, and involves severe side effects. Thus, predicting non-response is of major interest for both patient wellbeing and health care expense. At present, treatment cannot be individualized on the basis of any baseline predictor of response. We aimed to identify pre-treatment clinical and virological parameters associated with treatment failure, as well as to assess whether therapy outcome could be predicted at baseline. Forty-three HCV subtype 1b (HCV-1b) chronically infected patients treated with pegylated-interferon alpha plus ribavirin were retrospectively studied (21 responders and 22 non-responders). Host (gender, age, weight, transaminase levels, fibrosis stage, and source of infection) and viral-related factors (viral load, and genetic variability in the E1-E2 and Core regions) were assessed. Logistic regression and discriminant analyses were used to develop predictive models. A "leave-one-out" cross-validation method was used to assess the reliability of the discriminant models. Lower alanine transaminase levels (ALT, p=0.009), a higher number of quasispecies variants in the E1-E2 region (number of haplotypes, nHap_E1-E2) (p=0.003), and the absence of both amino acid arginine at position 70 and leucine at position 91 in the Core region (p=0.039) were significantly associated with treatment failure. Therapy outcome was most accurately predicted by discriminant analysis (90.5% sensitivity and 95.5% specificity, 85.7% sensitivity and 81.8% specificity after cross-validation); the most significant variables included in the predictive model were the Core amino acid pattern, the nHap_E1-E2, and gamma-glutamyl transferase and ALT levels. Discriminant analysis has been shown as a useful tool to predict treatment outcome using baseline HCV genetic variability and host characteristics. The discriminant models obtained in this

  16. Effect of Dahuang Zhechong pill combined with antiviral therapy on serum virus replication indexes as well as immunity and inflammation indexes in patients with chronic hepatitis B cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Gang Huang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Dahuang Zhechong pill combined with antiviral therapy on serum virus replication indexes as well as immunity and inflammation indexes in patients with chronic hepatitis B cirrhosis. Methods: A total of 104 patients with chronic hepatitis B cirrhosis who were treated in our hospital between May 2013 and April 2016 were selected and randomly divided into combined treatment group and western medicine treatment group who accepted Dahuang Zhechong pill combined with entecavir treatment and entecavir monotherapy respectively. Before and after treatment, the HBV-DNA loads, liver fibrosis index and immune cell levels as well as inflammatory cytokine levels were determined. Results: HBV-DNA loads of both groups of patients at 48 weeks after treatment were significantly lower than those before treatment, and the HBV-DNA loads were not significantly different between the two groups after treatment; serum HA, LN, PC-III, IV-C, IL-15, IL-16 and TGF- β1 levels as well as peripheral blood Treg cell levels of both groups at 24 weeks and 48 weeks after treatment were significantly lower than those before treatment while peripheral blood NK cell levels were higher than those before treatment, and serum HA, LN, PC-III, IV-C, IL-15, IL-16 and TGF-β1 levels as well as peripheral blood Treg cell levels of combined treatment group were significantly lower than those of western medicine treatment group while peripheral blood NK cell levels were higher than those of western medicine treatment group. Conclusion: Dahuang Zhechong pill combined with antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis B cirrhosis can regulate the immune response and inflammatory reaction without affecting the inhibiting effect of antiviral drugs on viral replication.

  17. Evaluation of oral manifestations and oral health status among pediatric human immunodeficiency virus patients-under anti-retroviral therapy: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aroquiadasse

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV acquired immunodeficiency syndrome disease has evolved to become a social and economic catastrophe, with far-reaching implications affecting every phase of life of the diseased individual. Data on adults and children diagnosed with HIV infection are useful for determining populations needing prevention and treatment services. Oral lesions may be the presenting symptoms of HIV infection and may differ entirely from those manifested in the adult population. Aim and Objective: We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HIV related oral lesions among pediatric HIV patients and to assess the oral health status of HIV infected children residing in a selected childcare facility in Puducherry. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during September 2015 in child care facility for HIV infected children located in Puducherry U.T, India. All children <18 years, who are diagnosed with HIV infection and are put on anti-retroviral therapy (ART or pre-ART care, were included in the study. After obtaining informed consent from the care-givers and assent of the children, they were interviewed and examined by a team comprising a qualified dental surgeon and a trained physician. Results: Majority of the children were under first-line ART (73% and were on ART for more than 4 years. The CD4 count of 23 (52.3 was between 500–1000 cells/μL. The recent viral load assay in 32 (72.7 patients was <150/not detected. Tooth decay was the most common oral manifestation with 28 (63.6 being affected. Nonspecific lymphadenopathy 26 (59.1 was the most common coexisting systemic illness. Conclusion: This study proves that constant surveillance by monitoring the general health status, CD4 counts, viral load coupled with stringent ART care has improved the overall quality of life of these children and consequently resulted in lesser oral manifestations.

  18. Prevalence of renal disease in Nigerian children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus and on highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iduoriyekemwen, Nosakhare J; Sadoh, Wilson E; Sadoh, Ayebo E

    2013-01-01

    Access to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has improved the prognosis of Nigerian children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); thus, more children are surviving. Long-term exposure to HAART is potentially nephrotoxic. We therefore aimed at assessing the prevalence of renal disease in Nigerian children infected with HIV, who are on HAART. In this cross-sectional study, we studied children, aged ten months to 17 years, infected with HIV, attending the pediatric HIV clinics of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. Demographic and clinical data were obtained by parental interview as well as from the medical records. Each child's urine was tested for albumin and microalbuminuria using multi test strips and mitral test strips, respectively. The serum creatinine level of each child was also estimated and used in calculating the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Renal disease was defined as the presence of significant proteinuria of 1+ and above on dipstick or the presence of microalbuminuria of ≥20 mg and/or GFR children recruited, 60 were males and 39 were females. The mean age of the children was 6.6 ± 3.5 years. All the children were on HAART and 85% had acquired the HIV infection by vertical transmission. The overall prevalence of renal disease was 16.2%. Microalbuminuria was seen in 11 children with renal disease (11.1%); 3 of them had significant proteinuria. GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 was seen in five children (5.1%) with renal disease, but none had end-stage renal disease (GFR less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ). Renal disease was found to be significantly associated with advanced stage of HIV infection (P renal disease in HAART-treated Nigerian children is high and majority of them are asymptomatic of renal disease, but in the advanced stages of HIV infection.

  19. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  20. AIDS-related cancer in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART): a model of the interplay of the immune system, virus, and cancer. "On the offensive--the Trojan Horse is being destroyed"--Part A: Kaposi's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Tony W

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), aimed at controlling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), has been associated with a dramatic decrease in the incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-Kaposi's sarcoma (AIDS-KS) and the clinical manifestations of KS appear to be less aggressive. The pathogenesis of AIDS-related KS is related to a system of cytokines (e.g., interleukin-6) driven by autocrine and paracrine loops. More recently, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), was discovered to be the putative etiological agent of this disease. This virus encodes several unique open reading frames that are homologs of human cellular proteins involved in cellular regulations, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and immune regulation. The treatment of this disease depends on whether it is "limited" disease or "extensive" disease. For "limited" disease, local therapy or non-bone marrow suppressive agents should be used. For "extensive" disease, new chemotherapeutic agents, such as liposomal anthracycline, which are active and have little adverse reactions, are indicated. The control of HIV infection continues to be essential. Knowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease has led to the development of novel treatment strategies, aimed at the inflammatory or angiogenesis cytokines necessary for growth or at HHV-8 as the target of therapy.

  1. Influence of the Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy on the Potential for Normalization of Immune Status in Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1–Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulicz, Jason F.; Le, Tuan D.; Agan, Brian K.; Camargo, Jose F.; Landrum, Michael L.; Wright, Edwina; Dolan, Matthew J.; Ganesan, Anuradha; Ferguson, Tomas M.; Smith, Davey M.; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Clark, Robert A.; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE In individuals with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection who are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), factors that promote full immune recovery are not well characterized. OBJECTIVE To investigate the influence of the timing of ART relative to HIV-1 infection on normalization of CD4+ T-cell counts, AIDS risk, and immune function. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Participants in the observational US Military HIV Natural History Study with documented estimated dates of seroconversion (EDS) who achieved virologic suppression with ART were evaluated. Markers indicative of immune activation, dysfunction, and responsiveness were determined. Responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine, an indicator of in vivo immune function, were also assessed. The timing of ART was indexed to the EDS and/or entry into the cohort. The CD4+ counts in HIV-1–uninfected populations were surveyed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Normalization of CD4+ counts to 900 cells/μL or higher, AIDS development, HBV vaccine response, as well as T-cell activation, dysfunction, and responsiveness. RESULTS The median CD4+ count in HIV-1–uninfected populations was approximately 900 cells/μL. Among 1119 HIV-1–infected participants, CD4+ normalization was achieved in 38.4% vs 28.3% of those initiating ART within 12 months vs after 12 months from the EDS (P = .001). Incrementally higher CD4+ recovery (<500,500–899, and ≥900 cells/μL) was associated with stepwise decreases in AIDS risk and reversion of markers of immune activation, dysfunction, and responsiveness to levels approximating those found in HIV-1–uninfected persons. Participants with CD4+ counts of 500 cells/μL or higher at study entry (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.00; 95% CI, 1.51–2.64; P < .001) or ART initiation (aOR, 4.08; 95% CI, 3.14–5.30; P < .001) had significantly increased CD4+ normalization rates compared with other participants. However, even among individuals with a CD4+ count of 500 cells

  2. Long-term hepatitis B virus (HBV response to lamivudine-containing highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-HBV co-infected patients in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woottichai Khamduang

    Full Text Available Approximately 4 million of people are co-infected with HIV and Hepatitis B virus (HBV. In resource-limited settings, the majority of HIV-infected patients initiate first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy containing lamivudine (3TC-containing-HAART and long-term virological response of HBV to lamivudine-containing HAART in co-infected patients is not well known.HIV-HBV co-infected patients enrolled in the PHPT cohort (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00433030 and initiating a 3TC-containing-HAART regimen were included. HBV-DNA, HIV-RNA, CD4+ T-cell counts and alanine transaminase were measured at baseline, 3 months, 12 months and then every 6 months up to 5 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the cumulative rates of patients who achieved and maintained HBV-DNA suppression. Of 30 co-infected patients, 19 were positive for HBe antigen (HBeAg. At initiation of 3TC-containing-HAART, median HBV DNA and HIV RNA levels were 7.35 log(10 IU/mL and 4.47 log(10 copies/mL, respectively. At 12 months, 67% of patients achieved HBV DNA suppression: 100% of HBeAg-negative patients and 47% of HBeAg-positive. Seventy-three percent of patients had HIV RNA below 50 copies/mL. The cumulative rates of maintained HBV-DNA suppression among the 23 patients who achieved HBV-DNA suppression were 91%, 87%, and 80% at 1, 2, and 4 years respectively. Of 17 patients who maintained HBV-DNA suppression while still on 3TC, 4 (24% lost HBsAg and 7 of 8 (88% HBeAg-positive patients lost HBeAg at their last visit (median duration, 59 months. HBV breakthrough was observed only in HBeAg-positive patients and 6 of 7 patients presenting HBV breakthrough had the rtM204I/V mutations associated with 3TC resistance along with rtL180M and/or rtV173L.All HBeAg-negative patients and 63% of HBeAg-positive HIV-HBV co-infected patients achieved long-term HBV DNA suppression while on 3TC-containing-HAART. This study provides information useful for the management of co-infected patients

  3. High frequency of potential interactions between direct-acting antivirals and concomitant therapy in HIV/hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, J; Monge, P; Mancebo, M; Merchante, N; Neukam, K; Real, L M; Pineda, J A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the frequency and degree of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) and concomitant medication used by HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected patients, including antiretroviral therapy (ART) and other drugs. All patients with HIV infection and viraemic HCV genotype 1, 3 or 4 coinfection attending a tertiary care centre in Spain (November 2014 to November 2015) were included in the study. DDIs were classified as major, i.e. drugs should not be co-administered, or minor, i.e. close monitoring, dosage alteration or change in timing may be required if drugs are co-administered, following the http://www.hep-druginteractions.org database recommendations. A total of 244 patients were included in the study, of whom 224 (92%) were previous injecting drug users. Major DDIs were found for: paritaprevir-r/ombitasvir plus dasabuvir (3D), in 60 (44%) of 138 individuals with genotype 1; paritaprevir-r/ombitasvir (2D), in 22 (37%) of 60 individuals with genotype 4; sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (SOF/LDV), in four (2%) of 198 patients with genotype 1 or 4; simeprevir (SMV) plus SOF, in 160 (81%) of 198 patients with genotype 1 or 4; daclatasvir (DCV) plus SOF, in seven (3%) of 244 patients with genotype 1, 3 or 4 (P < 0.001). Minor DDIs were found for: 3D, in 123 (89%) individuals with genotype 1; 2D, in 52 (87%) individuals with genotype 4; SOF/LDV, in 154 (78%) patients with genotype 1 or 4; SMV plus SOF, in 129 (65%) patients with genotype 1 or 4; DCV plus SOF, in 149 (61%) patients with genotype 1, 3 or 4 (P < 0.001). Drug-drug interactions between DAAs and ART or other commonly prescribed medications are frequently found among HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Potential major and minor DDIs are more frequent with 3D, 2D and SMV plus SOF regimens. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  4. Viruses and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulston, A; Marcellus, R C; Branton, P E

    1999-01-01

    Successful viral replication requires not only the efficient production and spread of progeny, but also evasion of host defense mechanisms that limit replication by killing infected cells. In addition to inducing immune and inflammatory responses, infection by most viruses triggers apoptosis or programmed cell death of the infected cell. This cell response often results as a compulsory or unavoidable by-product of the action of critical viral replicative functions. In addition, some viruses seem to use apoptosis as a mechanism of cell killing and virus spread. In both cases, successful replication relies on the ability of certain viral products to block or delay apoptosis until sufficient progeny have been produced. Such proteins target a variety of strategic points in the apoptotic pathway. In this review we summarize the great amount of recent information on viruses and apoptosis and offer insights into how this knowledge may be used for future research and novel therapies.

  5. B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma associated with Epstein-Barr virus-reactivation and T-cell suppression following antithymocyte globulin therapy in a patient with severe aplastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Hanaoka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (B-LPD is generally characterized by the proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-infected B lymphocytes. We here report the development of EBV-negative B-LPD associated with EBV-reactivation following antithymocyte globulin (ATG therapy in a patient with aplastic anemia. The molecular autopsy study showed the sparse EBV-infected clonal T cells could be critically involved in the pathogenesis of EBV-negative oligoclonal B-LPD through cytokine amplification and escape from T-cell surveillances attributable to ATG-based immunosuppressive therapy, leading to an extremely rare B-cell-rich T-cell lymphoma. This report helps in elucidating the complex pathophysiology of intractable B-LPD refractory to rituximab.

  6. CD4:CD8 Ratio and CD8 Count as Prognostic Markers for Mortality in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy: The Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickey, Adam; May, Margaret T; Schommers, Philipp; Tate, Jan; Ingle, Suzanne M; Guest, Jodie L; Gill, M John; Zangerle, Robert; Saag, Mike; Reiss, Peter; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Johnson, Margaret; Lima, Viviane D; Sterling, Tim R; Cavassini, Matthias; Wittkop, Linda; Costagliola, Dominique; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2017-09-15

    We investigated whether CD4:CD8 ratio and CD8 count were prognostic for all-cause, AIDS, and non-AIDS mortality in virologically suppressed patients with high CD4 count. We used data from 13 European and North American cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus-infected, antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive adults who started ART during 1996-2010, who were followed from the date they had CD4 count ≥350 cells/μL and were virologically suppressed (baseline). We used stratified Cox models to estimate unadjusted and adjusted (for sex, people who inject drugs, ART initiation year, and baseline age, CD4 count, AIDS, duration of ART) all-cause and cause-specific mortality hazard ratios for tertiles of CD4:CD8 ratio (0-0.40, 0.41-0.64 [reference], >0.64) and CD8 count (0-760, 761-1138 [reference], >1138 cells/μL) and examined the shape of associations using cubic splines. During 276526 person-years, 1834 of 49865 patients died (249 AIDS-related; 1076 non-AIDS-defining; 509 unknown/unclassifiable deaths). There was little evidence that CD4:CD8 ratio was prognostic for all-cause mortality after adjustment for other factors: the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for lower vs middle tertile was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.25). The association of CD8 count with all-cause mortality was U-shaped: aHR for higher vs middle tertile was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.01-1.26). AIDS-related mortality declined with increasing CD4:CD8 ratio and decreasing CD8 count. There was little evidence that CD4:CD8 ratio or CD8 count was prognostic for non-AIDS mortality. In this large cohort collaboration, the magnitude of adjusted associations of CD4:CD8 ratio or CD8 count with mortality was too small for them to be useful as independent prognostic markers in virally suppressed patients on ART. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  7. Early emergence of entecavir-resistant hepatitis B virus in a patient with hepatitis B virus/human immunodeficiency virus coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Aimi; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohkawa, Kazuyoshi; Kato, Michio; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Miyagi, Takuya; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Uemura, Akio; Kohga, Keisuke; Sasakawa, Akira; Hikita, Hayato; Kawamura, Kiyomi; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Hayashi, Norio

    2008-06-01

    The efficacy of entecavir for patients with hepatitis B virus/human immunodeficiency virus coinfection has not been fully elucidated. Here we examined a patient coinfected with both viruses in whom entecavir-resistant hepatitis B virus appeared. The 60-year-old Japanese male with the coinfection received antiretroviral therapy including lamivudine. The therapy initially suppressed replication of both viruses, followed by reactivation of the hepatitis B virus alone by 2 years of therapy. He subsequently received entecavir therapy in addition to the antiretroviral regimen. After entecavir administration, the hepatitis B virus DNA level was slightly reduced, but then increased after 6 months of entecavir therapy. In the sequencing analysis of hepatitis B virus, no drug resistance-associated amino acid substitutions were observed in the reverse transcriptase (rt) domain before antiretroviral therapy. The lamivudine-resistant amino acid substitutions at rt173, rt180 and rt204 were detected before entecavir administration, and further the entecavir-resistant rt202 substitution was observed after 6 months of entecavir therapy. The full-length hepatitis B sequences showed that the viral strain derived from the patient belonged to genotype H. In summary, this report describes a patient with hepatitis B virus/human immunodeficiency virus coinfection who received entecavir therapy in addition to an antiretroviral regimen and showed the early emergence of entecavir-resistance hepatitis B virus. In entecavir therapy for patients infected with both viruses, great care should be taken with respect to the emergence of entecavir-resistant hepatitis B virus, especially in patients with pre-existing lamivudine-resistant virus.

  8. Ultra-deep sequencing analysis of resistance-associated variants during retreatment with simeprevir-based triple therapy after failure of telaprevir-based triple therapy in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Naoki; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Oze, Tsugiko; Urabe, Ayako; Tahata, Yuki; Yamada, Ryoko; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Hosui, Atsushi; Iio, Sadaharu; Yamada, Akira; Hagiwara, Hideki; Mita, Eiji; Yamada, Yukinori; Ito, Toshifumi; Inada, Masami; Katayama, Kazuhiro; Yabuuchi, Iwao; Imai, Yasuharu; Hikita, Hayato; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yoshida, Yuichi; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Hayashi, Norio; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2017-07-01

    Simeprevir (SMV)-based triple therapy is an effective retreatment option following failure of telaprevir (TVR)-based triple therapy. However, it is unclear whether the persistence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) induced by TVR-based therapy may reduce the treatment effect of SMV-based therapy. The factors associated with the treatment effect, including RAVs in the NS3 region, were examined in 21 patients with genotype 1b HCV infection who were treated with SMV-based therapy after failure of TVR-based therapy. Ultra-deep sequencing was carried out to detect RAVs. With the exception of one patient who discontinued treatment owing to adverse events, the sustained virologic response (SVR) rate was 50% (10/20). Ultra-deep sequencing at the start of SMV-based therapy revealed that TVR-resistant variants were detected in six patients (29%), and no variants were observed at position 168. Cross-resistance between TVR and SMV with low frequency was detected in only one patient, and this patient achieved SVR. Higher SVRs for SMV-based therapy were attained in patients who discontinued treatment owing to the adverse effects of prior TVR-based therapy (discontinuation 100% vs. non-discontinuation 29%, P = 0.005), and patients who relapsed following prior pegylated interferon plus ribavirin therapy (relapse 100% vs. non-response 20%, P = 0.007). In this study, ultra-deep sequencing analysis revealed that TVR and/or SMV-resistant variants may have no influence on the effect of SMV-based therapy after failure of TVR-based therapy. Patients who discontinued treatment owing to adverse effects of TVR-based therapy and relapsers to previous pegylated interferon/ribavirin therapy would be good candidates for retreatment with SMV-based therapy. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  9. Stability of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels among interferon-naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals treated with combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D; Peters, L; Reekie, J

    2013-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. High HCV RNA levels have been associated with poor treatment response. This study aimed to examine the natural history of HCV RNA in chronically HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals.......Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. High HCV RNA levels have been associated with poor treatment response. This study aimed to examine the natural history of HCV RNA in chronically HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals....

  10. High Cellular Monocyte Activation in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy and Lifestyle-Matched Controls Is Associated With Greater Inflammation in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booiman, Thijs; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Maurer, Irma; de Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A.; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Prins, Maria; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Franceschi, Claudio; Fuchs, Dietmar; Gisslén, Magnus; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Schouten, J.; Kooij, K. W.; van Zoest, R. A.; Elsenga, B. C.; Janssen, F. R.; Heidenrijk, M.; Zikkenheiner, W.; van der Valk, M.; Booiman, T.; Harskamp-Holwerda, A. M.; Boeser-Nunnink, B.; Maurer, I.; Mangas Ruiz, M. M.; Girigorie, A. F.; Villaudy, J.; Frankin, E.; Pasternak, A.; Berkhout, B.; van der Kuyl, T.; Portegies, P.; Schmand, B. A.; Geurtsen, G. J.; ter Stege, J. A.; Klein Twennaar, M.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Caan, M. W. A.; Su, T.; Weijer, K.; Bisschop, P. H. L. T.; Kalsbeek, A.; Wezel, M.; Visser, I.; Ruhé, H. G.; Franceschi, C.; Garagnani, P.; Pirazzini, C.; Capri, M.; Dall'Olio, F.; Chiricolo, M.; Salvioli, S.; Hoeijmakers, J.; Pothof, J.; Prins, M.; Martens, M.; Moll, S.; Berkel, J.; Totté, M.; Kovalev, S.; Gisslén, M.; Fuchs, D.; Zetterberg, H.; Winston, A.; Underwood, J.; McDonald, L.; Stott, M.; Legg, K.; Lovell, A.; Erlwein, O.; Doyle, N.; Kingsley, C.; Sharp, D. J.; Leech, R.; Cole, J. H.; Zaheri, S.; Hillebregt, M. M. J.; Ruijs, Y. M. C.; Benschop, D. P.; Burger, D.; de Graaff-Teulen, M.; Guaraldi, G.; Bürkle, A.; Sindlinger, T.; Moreno-Villanueva, M.; Keller, A.; Sabin, C.; de Francesco, D.; Libert, C.; Dewaele, S.

    2017-01-01

    Increased monocyte activation and intestinal damage have been shown to be predictive for the increased morbidity and mortality observed in treated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). A cross-sectional analysis of cellular and soluble markers of monocyte activation, coagulation,

  11. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  12. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which is responsible for transmitting Zika virus. Photo Courtesy of: James Gathany, Centers for Disease Control and ... National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Photo Courtesy of NIH "You could have a Zika virus ...

  13. Chikungunya Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gaines, PhD, MPH, MA, CHES Differentiating Chikungunya From Dengue: A Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya virus in the United States ...

  14. The Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy Versus Ongoing Triple Therapy (PIVOT) trial: a randomised controlled trial of a protease inhibitor monotherapy strategy for long-term management of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Nicholas I; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Oddershede, Lars; Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Walker, Simon; Sculpher, Mark; Dunn, David T

    2016-03-01

    Standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection uses a combination of drugs, until now considered essential to minimise treatment failure and development of drug resistance. Protease inhibitors (PIs) are potent with a high genetic barrier to resistance and have the potential for use as monotherapy after viral load (VL) suppression achieved on combination therapy. However, longer-term resistance and toxicity risks are uncertain. To compare the effectiveness, toxicity profile and cost-effectiveness of PI monotherapy with those of standard-of-care triple therapy in a pragmatic long-term clinical trial. Open-label, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial. Forty-three HIV clinical centres in the UK NHS. HIV-positive adults taking standard combination ART with a suppressed VL for ≥ 6 months. Patients were randomised to maintain ongoing triple therapy (OT) or switch to a strategy of physician-selected ritonavir-boosted PI monotherapy (PI-mono), with prompt return to combination therapy in the event of VL rebound. The primary outcome was reduction of future drug options, defined as new intermediate-/high-level resistance to one or more drugs to which the patient's virus was considered to be sensitive at trial entry (non-inferiority comparison, 10% margin). Secondary outcomes included confirmed virological rebound, serious drug- or disease-related complications, total grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs), neurocognitive function change, cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count change, change in health-related quality of life, cardiovascular risk change, health-care costs and health economic analysis. In total, 587 participants were randomised (77% male, 68% white) to OT (n = 291) or PI-mono (n = 296) and followed for a median of 44 months, of whom 2.7% withdrew/were lost to follow-up. One or more episodes of confirmed VL rebound were observed in eight patients (Kaplan-Meier estimate 3.2%) in the OT group and

  15. Hepadna viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.; Koike, K.; Will, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the molecular biology, disease pathogenesis, epidemiology, and clinical features of hepadna and other viruses with hepatic tropism and outlines future directions and approaches for their management. The volume's six sections provide a review of the various features, mechanisms, and functions of these viruses, ranging from hepadna virus replication and regulation of gene expression to the structure and function of hepadna-virus gene products.

  16. Effect of gender, age, transmission category, and antiretroviral therapy on the progression of human immunodeficiency virus infection using multistate Markov models. Groupe d'Epidémiologie Clinique du SIDA en Aquitaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioum, A; Leroy, V; Commenges, D; Dabis, F; Salamon, R

    1998-11-01

    This article illustrates the use of time-homogeneous Markov models with covariates to estimate the AIDS incubation period distribution from prevalent cohorts and to evaluate the effect of factors such as gender, age, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission category, and antiretroviral therapy on disease progression. We applied this methodology to the analysis of data from a cohort of 3,027 patients enrolled from a hospital-based surveillance system of HIV infection in the Bordeaux University Hospital and four secondary public hospitals in southwestern France. A total of 998 individuals (33%) progressed to AIDS during a median follow-up period of 34 months. Based on a progressive three-state Markov model, the estimated mean and median incubation periods were 9.1 years [95% confidence interval (CI) = 8.7-9.6] and 7.5 years (95% CI = 7.2-7.9), respectively. Our analyses showed a similar disease progression in men and women; we observed a more rapid progression for older subjects compared with younger ones and for homosexual men compared with heterosexuals, intravenous drug users, and transfusion recipients, who had similar disease progression rates after adjusting for age. The use of antiretroviral therapy appeared to slow disease progression. Moreover, the results indicated that a combination therapy of zidovudine with another antiretroviral drug may be more efficient than zidovudine monotherapy.

  17. Pharmacological inhibition of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hakimeh; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2012-05-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a member of the retroviridae family of viruses and causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in domestic and non-domestic cats worldwide. Genome organization of FIV and clinical characteristics of the disease caused by the virus are similar to those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Both viruses infect T lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and their replication cycle in infected cells is analogous. Due to marked similarity in genomic organization, virus structure, virus replication and disease pathogenesis of FIV and HIV, infection of cats with FIV is a useful tool to study and develop novel drugs and vaccines for HIV. Anti-retroviral drugs studied extensively in HIV infection have targeted different steps of the virus replication cycle: (1) inhibition of virus entry into susceptible cells at the level of attachment to host cell surface receptors and co-receptors; (2) inhibition of fusion of the virus membrane with the cell membrane; (3) blockade of reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA; (4) interruption of nuclear translocation and viral DNA integration into host genomes; (5) prevention of viral transcript processing and nuclear export; and (6) inhibition of virion assembly and maturation. Despite much success of anti-retroviral therapy slowing disease progression in people, similar therapy has not been thoroughly investigated in cats. In this article we review current pharmacological approaches and novel targets for anti-lentiviral therapy, and critically assess potentially suitable applications against FIV infection in cats.

  18. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  19. Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Of 168 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection-related liver disease, 20 patients who had received 100 mg of lamivudine plus 10 mg/day of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV (ADV group and 124 patients who had received 0.5 mg/day of entecavir or 100 mg/day of lamivudine (non-ADV group for >1 year were enrolled. For comparative analyses, 19 well-matched pairs were obtained from the groups by propensity scores. At the time of enrollment, serum creatinine and phosphate concentrations were similar between the ADV and non-ADV groups; however, urinary phosphate ( and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP ( concentrations were significantly higher in the ADV group than in the non-ADV group. Serum BAP was significantly higher at the time of enrollment than before ADV administration in the ADV group (, although there was no significant change in serum BAP concentration in the non-ADV group. There was a significant positive correlation between the period of ADV therapy and ΔBAP (, . Serum BAP concentration increased before increase in serum creatinine concentration and was useful for early detection of adverse events and for developing adequate measures for continuing ADV for chronic HBV infection-related liver disease.

  20. The virologic, immunologic, and clinical effects of interleukin 2 with potent antiretroviral therapy in patients with moderately advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection: a randomized controlled clinical trial--AIDS Clinical Trials Group 328.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuyasu, Ronald; Gelman, Rebecca; Cherng, Deborah Weng; Landay, Alan; Fahey, John; Reichman, Richard; Erice, Alejo; Bucy, R Pat; Kilby, J Michael; Lederman, Michael M; Hamilton, Carol D; Lertora, Juan; White, Becky L; Tebas, Pablo; Duliege, Anne-Marie; Pollard, Richard B

    2007-03-26

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) administration increases CD4 counts in persons with higher counts. This study investigated persons with moderately advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Two hundred four patients with CD4 T-cell counts from 50/microL to 350/microL who were treatment naive or had been treated only with reverse transcriptase inhibitors began a specified protease inhibitor HAART regimen. Virologic responders (< or =5000 copies/mL) at 12 weeks were randomized to open-label continuous-infusion IL-2 (IV IL-2), subcutaneous IL-2 (SC IL-2), or HAART alone. Thirty were not randomized and 15 enrolled in a substudy, leaving 159 for analysis. Subjects continued HAART alone for 72 weeks (n = 52) or with IV IL-2 (n = 53) or SC IL-2 (n = 54) for 5 days every 8 weeks. The IV IL-2 subjects could switch to SC IL-2 if their CD4 T-cell count increased by 100/microL or by 25%. Patients receiving IV or SC IL-2 had greater increases in CD4 cell counts. At week 84, median increases were 459/microL, 312/microL, and 102/microL. Increases of greater than 50% at week 60 (primary end point) were achieved in 39 patients (81%) and 32 (67%) in the IV and SC IL-2 arms, respectively, compared with 13 (29%) in the HAART arm (P<.001 for both). Treatment with IL-2 did not increase plasma human immunodeficiency virus RNA levels. There were fewer new AIDS-defining events in the IV (P = .006) and SC (P = .03) IL-2 groups than in the HAART group (0, 1, and 7, respectively). Drug-related adverse events were more frequent with IL-2 treatment. Addition of IL-2 to HAART can significantly expand CD4 T-cell counts in moderately advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection, without loss of virologic control.

  1. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Melanie; Heath, Sonya L; Sweeton, Bentley; Williams, Kathy; Cunningham, Pamela; Keele, Brandon F; Sen, Sharon; Palmer, Brent E; Chomont, Nicolas; Xu, Yongxian; Basu, Rahul; Hellerstein, Michael S; Kwa, Suefen; Robinson, Harriet L

    2016-01-01

    GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine (GOVX-B11), was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART) to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI). Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine. clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156.

  2. Increased levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients after 5 years of highly active anti-retroviral therapy may be due to increased thymic production of naive Tregs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, L.; Gaardbo, J.C.; Skogstrand, K.

    2009-01-01

    in HIV-infected patients compared with controls, both after 1 and 5 years of HAART (Pcounts, immune activation and cytokine patterns. Furthermore, levels of naive T(regs) were elevated significantly in HIV-infected patients (P...This study determines levels of regulatory T cells (T(regs)), naive T(regs), immune activation and cytokine patterns in 15 adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) who have known thymic output, and explores if naive...... T(regs) may represent recent thymic emigrant T(regs). HIV-infected patients treated with HAART with a median of 1 and 5 years were compared with healthy controls. Percentages of T(regs) (CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)), naive T(regs) (CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)CD45RA(+)) and activation markers (CD38(+)human...

  3. Increased levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients after 5 years of highly active anti-retroviral therapy may be due to increased thymic production of naive Tregs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, L.; Gaardbo, J.C.; Skogstrand, Kristin

    2008-01-01

    higher in HIV-infected patients compared with controls, both after 1 and 5 years of HAART (P counts, immune activation and cytokine patterns. Furthermore, levels of naive T(regs) were elevated significantly in HIV-infected patients......Summary This study determines levels of regulatory T cells (T(regs)), naive T(regs), immune activation and cytokine patterns in 15 adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) who have known thymic output, and explores...... if naive T(regs) may represent recent thymic emigrant T(regs). HIV-infected patients treated with HAART with a median of 1 and 5 years were compared with healthy controls. Percentages of T(regs) (CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)), naive T(regs) (CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)CD45RA(+)) and activation markers (CD38...

  4. Increased levels of regulatory T cells (T(regs)) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients after 5 years of highly active anti-retroviral therapy may be due to increased thymic production of naive T(regs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, L; Gaardbo, J C; Skogstrand, K

    2008-01-01

    higher in HIV-infected patients compared with controls, both after 1 and 5 years of HAART (P counts, immune activation and cytokine patterns. Furthermore, levels of naive T(regs) were elevated significantly in HIV-infected patients......Summary This study determines levels of regulatory T cells (T(regs)), naive T(regs), immune activation and cytokine patterns in 15 adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) who have known thymic output, and explores...... if naive T(regs) may represent recent thymic emigrant T(regs). HIV-infected patients treated with HAART with a median of 1 and 5 years were compared with healthy controls. Percentages of T(regs) (CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)), naive T(regs) (CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)CD45RA(+)) and activation markers (CD38...

  5. Pembrolizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Mismatch-Repair Deficient and Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Epstein-Barr Virus Positive; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency; Stage IB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer AJCC v7

  6. [Immune evasion by herpes simplex viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal-Díaz, Angello R; Suazo, Paula A; Garrido, Ignacio; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses and humans have co-existed for tens of thousands of years. This long relationship has translated into the evolution and selection of viral determinants to evade the host immune response and reciprocally the evolution and selection of host immune components for limiting virus infection and damage. Currently there are no vaccines available to avoid infection with these viruses or therapies to cure them. Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic and reside latently in neurons at the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, occasionally reactivating. Most viral recurrences are subclinical and thus, unnoticed. Here, we discuss the initial steps of infection by herpes simplex viruses and the molecular mechanisms they have developed to evade innate and adaptive immunity. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to evade host immunity should help us envision novel vaccine strategies and therapies that limit infection and dissemination.

  7. Bone Marrow Transplantation Augments the Effect of Brain- and Spinal Cord-Directed Adeno-Associated Virus 2/5 Gene Therapy by Altering Inflammation in the Murine Model of Globoid-Cell Leukodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Adarsh S.; Kim, Joong H.; Hawkins-Salsbury, Jacqueline A.; Macauley, Shannon L.; Tracy, Elisabeth T.; Vogler, Carole A.; Han, Xialin; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Wozniak, David F.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Klein, Robyn S.; Sands, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Globoid-cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an inherited demyelinating disease caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC). A previous study in the murine model of GLD (twitcher) demonstrated a dramatic synergy between CNS-directed adeno-associated virus 2/5 (AAV2/5) gene therapy and myeloreductive bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, the mechanism by which these two disparate therapeutic approaches synergize is not clear. In addition, the therapeutic efficacy may have been limited since the CNS-directed gene therapy was restricted to the forebrain and thalamus. In the current study, intrathecal and intracerebellar injections were added to the therapeutic regimen and the mechanism of synergy between BMT and gene therapy was determined. Although AAV2/5 alone provided supraphysiological levels of GALC activity and reduced psychosine levels in both the brain and spinal cord, it significantly increased CNS inflammation. Bone marrow transplantation alone provided essentially no GALC activity to the CNS and did not reduce psychosine levels. When AAV2/5 is combined with BMT, there are sustained improvements in motor function and the median life span is increased to 123 d (range, 92–282 d) compared with 41 d in the untreated twitcher mice. Interestingly, addition of BMT virtually eliminates both the disease and AAV2/5-associated inflammatory response. These data suggest that the efficacy of AAV2/5-mediated gene therapy is limited by the associated inflammatory response and BMT synergizes with AAV2/5 by modulating inflammation. PMID:21734286

  8. High levels of chronic immune activation in the T-cell compartments of patients coinfected with hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and on highly active antiretroviral therapy are reverted by alpha interferon and ribavirin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Veronica D; Falconer, Karolin; Blom, Kim G

    2009-01-01

    , despite effective antiretroviral therapy, in both CD8 and CD4 T cells and is more pronounced than in the appropriate monoinfected control groups. Interestingly, the suppression of HCV by pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin treatment reduces activation. High HCV loads and elevated levels of chronic...

  9. Combined Analysis of the Prevalence of Drug-Resistant Hepatitis B Virus in Antiviral Therapy-Experienced Patients in Europe (CAPRE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermans, Lucas Etienne; Svicher, Valentina; Pas, Suzan Diepstraten

    2016-01-01

    was performed to gain insight in prevalence and characteristics of NA resistance in Europe. METHODS: A survey was performed on genotypic resistance testing results acquired during routine monitoring of CHB patients with detectable serum hepatitis B virus DNA in European tertiary referral centers. RESULTS: Data...... from 1568 patients were included. The majority (73.8%) were exposed to lamivudine monotherapy. Drug-resistant strains were detected in 52.7%. The most frequently encountered primary mutation was M204V/I (48.7%), followed by A181T/V (3.8%) and N236T (2.6%). In patients exposed to entecavir (n = 102...

  10. New frontiers in oncolytic viruses: optimizing and selecting for virus strains with improved efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundstrom K

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth Lundstrom PanTherapeutics, Lutry, Switzerland Abstract: Oncolytic viruses have demonstrated selective replication and killing of tumor cells. Different types of oncolytic viruses – adenoviruses, alphaviruses, herpes simplex viruses, Newcastle disease viruses, rhabdoviruses, Coxsackie viruses, and vaccinia viruses – have been applied as either naturally occurring or engineered vectors. Numerous studies in animal-tumor models have demonstrated substantial tumor regression and prolonged survival rates. Moreover, clinical trials have confirmed good safety profiles and therapeutic efficacy for oncolytic viruses. Most encouragingly, the first cancer gene-therapy drug – Gendicine, based on oncolytic adenovirus type 5 – was approved in China. Likewise, a second-generation oncolytic herpes simplex virus-based drug for the treatment of melanoma has been registered in the US and Europe as talimogene laherparepvec. Keywords: immunotherapy, viral vectors, clinical trials, drug approval

  11. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  12. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte therapy with donor T cells prevents and treats adenovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infections after haploidentical and matched unrelated stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, Anne; Myers, Gary D.; Liu, Hao; Cruz, Conrad R.; Hanley, Patrick J.; Kennedy-Nasser, Alana A.; Leung, Kathryn S.; Gee, Adrian P.; Krance, Robert A.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Viral infection or reactivation remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We now show that infusions of single cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lines (5 × 106-1.35 × 108 cells/m2) with specificity for 2 commonly detected viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and adenovirus, can be safely administered to pediatric transplantation recipients receiving partially human leukocyte antigen–matched and haploidentical stem cell grafts (n = 13), without inducing graft-versus-host disease. The EBV-specific component of the CTLs expanded in vivo and persisted for more than 12 weeks, but the adenovirus-specific component only expanded in vivo in the presence of concomitant adenoviral infection. Nevertheless, adenovirus-specific T cells could be detected for at least 8 weeks in peripheral blood, even in CTL recipients without viral infection, provided the adenovirus-specific component of their circulating lymphocytes was first expanded by exposure to adenoviral antigens ex vivo. After infusion, none of these 13 high-risk recipients developed EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease, while 2 of the subjects had resolution of their adenoviral disease. Hence, bispecific CTLs containing both EBV- and adenovirus-specific T cells can safely reconstitute an antigen responsive “memory” population of CTLs after human leukocyte antigen–mismatched stem cell transplantation and may provide antiviral activity. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00590083. PMID:19700662

  13. Optimizing celgosivir therapy in mouse models of dengue virus infection of serotypes 1 and 2: The search for a window for potential therapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Chan, Kitti Wing-Ki; Dow, Geoffrey; Ooi, Eng Eong; Low, Jenny G; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2016-03-01

    Although the antiviral drug celgosivir, an α-glucosidase I inhibitor, is highly protective when given twice daily to AG129 mice infected with dengue virus, a similar regimen of twice daily dosing did not significantly reduce serum viral loads in patients in a recent clinical trial. This failure presumably might reflect the initiation of treatment when patients were already viremic. To better mimic the clinical setting, we used viruses isolated from patients to develop new mouse models of DENV1 and DENV2 infection and employed the models to test the twice daily treatment, begun either on the day of infection or on the third day post-infection, when the mice had peak of viremia. We found that, although the treatment started on day 0 was effective on viral load reduction, it provided no benefit when begun on day 3, indicating that in vivo antiviral efficacy becomes less prominent once viremia reaches the peak level. To determine if the therapeutic regimen in humans could be improved, we tested regimen of four-times daily treatment and found that the treatment significantly reduced viremia, suggesting that a similar regimen may be effective in a human clinical trial. A new clinical trial to investigate an altered dosing regimen has been approved (NCT02569827). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Critical challenges and emerging opportunities in hepatitis C virus research in an era of potent antiviral therapy: Considerations for scientists and funding agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartenschlager, Ralf; Baumert, Thomas F; Bukh, Jens; Houghton, Michael; Lemon, Stanley M; Lindenbach, Brett D; Lohmann, Volker; Moradpour, Darius; Pietschmann, Thomas; Rice, Charles M; Thimme, Robert; Wakita, Takaji

    2018-02-28

    The development and clinical implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Infection with any hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype can now be eliminated in more than 95% of patients with short courses of all-oral, well-tolerated drugs, even in those with advanced liver disease and liver transplant recipients. DAAs have proven so successful that some now consider HCV amenable to eradication, and continued research on the virus of little remaining medical relevance. However, given 400,000 HCV-related deaths annually important challenges remain, including identifying those who are infected, providing access to treatment and reducing its costs. Moreover, HCV infection rarely induces sterilizing immunity, and those who have been cured with DAAs remain at risk for reinfection. Thus, it is very unlikely that global eradication and elimination of the cancer risk associated with HCV infection can be achieved without a vaccine, yet research in that direction receives little attention. Further, over the past two decades HCV research has spearheaded numerous fundamental discoveries in the fields of molecular and cell biology, immunology and microbiology. It will continue to do so, given the unique opportunities afforded by the reagents and knowledge base that have been generated in the development and clinical application of DAAs. Considering these critical challenges and new opportunities, we conclude that funding for HCV research must be sustained. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The RNA Template Channel of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase as a Target for Development of Antiviral Therapy of Multiple Genera within a Virus Family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Vives-Adrián, Laia; Selisko, Barbara; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Liu, Xinran; Lanke, Kjerstin; Ulferts, Rachel; De Palma, Armando M; Tanchis, Federica; Goris, Nesya; Lefebvre, David; De Clercq, Kris; Leyssen, Pieter; Lacroix, Céline; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Boehr, David D; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Verdaguer, Nuria; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-01-01

    The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71) for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy.

  16. The Association of Substitutions in the Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 1b Core Gene and IL28B Polymorphisms With the Response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV Combination Therapy in Azerbaijani Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Sadeghi, Farzin; Esghaei, Maryam; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Fakhim, Shahin; Keyvani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been identified as a leading cause of progressive liver diseases worldwide. Despite new treatment strategies, pegylated interferon alfa-2a (Peg-IFNα-2a), in combination with ribavirin (RBV), still represents the gold standard of therapy for hepatitis C in developing countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association of substitutions in the HCV subtype 1b (HCV-1b) core protein and the rs12979860 polymorphism in the interleukin 28B gene (IL28B) with the response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV combination therapy in Azerbaijani patients. Patients and Methods A total of fifty-one chronically HCV-1b-infected Azerbaijani patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study from March 2010 to June 2015. After RNA extraction from pre-treatment plasma, the core region of the HCV genome was amplified using the nested reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, followed by standard sequencing. In addition, genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens, and the rs12979860 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was identified using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Results In this study, a significant association was observed between the non-responders and relapsers to antiviral therapy and substitutions in the HCV-1b core region at positions 43 (R43K, P = 0.047), 70 (R70Q, P M91L, P = 0.037), and 106 (S106N, P = 0.018). Concerning the IL28B polymorphism, the results showed that sustained virological response was significantly associated with homozygous CC patients (P = 0.009) as compared with other genotypes, while homozygous TT subjects were associated with HCV relapse after therapy (P = 0.006). Conclusions The data of the present study suggest that amino acid substitutions at position 43, 70, 91, and 106 in the HCV-1b core protein are correlated with the response to the Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV treatment in Azerbaijani

  17. SARS virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. SARS virus. Novel corona virus emerges in the new millenia. Genome sequences invariant- global isolates do not show differences of consequence.Protein spike similar. HE gene absent. 2787 nucleotides. Largest genome. Jumps species by genetic deletion.

  18. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  19. Schmallenberg Virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    challenged with emerging and re-emerging infections that pose a constant threat to human and animal health. Indeed, researchers around the globe are still fighting deadly diseases like malaria, trypanosomosis and AIDS. In this article, we focus on a recently identified virus, namely, Schmallenberg virus as an example of a.

  20. Phytophthora viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guohong; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora sp. is a genus in the oomycetes, which are similar to filamentous fungi in morphology and habitat, but phylogenetically more closely related to brown algae and diatoms and fall in the kingdom Stramenopila. In the past few years, several viruses have been characterized in Phytophthora species, including four viruses from Phytophthora infestans, the late blight pathogen, and an endornavirus from an unnamed Phytophthora species from Douglas fir. Studies on Phytophthora viruses have revealed several interesting systems. Phytophthora infestans RNA virus 1 (PiRV-1) and PiRV-2 are likely the first members of two new virus families; studies on PiRV-3 support the establishment of a new virus genus that is not affiliated with established virus families; PiRV-4 is a member of Narnaviridae, most likely in the genus Narnavirus; and Phytophthora endornavirus 1 (PEV1) was the first nonplant endornavirus at the time of reporting. Viral capsids have not been found in any of the above-mentioned viruses. PiRV-1 demonstrated a unique genome organization that requires further examination, and PiRV-2 may have played a role in late blight resurgence in 1980s-1990s. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with chronic renal failure, whose JC virus in cerebrospinal fluid disappeared after mefloquine-mirtazapine dual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Eiichi; Asayama, Shinya; Asayama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Saijo, Masayuki; Kosaka, Satoru

    2016-10-28

    An 83-year-old man with chronic renal failure was referred to our hospital because of subacute progressive right hemiparesis. A brain MRI showed high-intensity lesions in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles and white matter of the left frontal lobe on T 2 -weighted images. The lesions increased gradually, so we suspected a brain tumor because 1 H-MRS images showed elevated Cho and decreased NAA, and also pathologic findings of the brain biopsy suggested glioblastoma. However, JC virus (JCV) in cerebrospinal fluid was revealed highly positive by PCR. So we reconsidered pathologically and finally found bizarre astrocytes which were infected with JCV in immunohistochemical studies and we diagnosed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy at last. Then we medicated with mefloquine and mirtazapine, and the JCV in cerebrospinal fluid disappeared, without new MRI lesions. This is a rare case in respect of the background of the patient and the clinical course.

  2. Nucleoside Inhibitors of Zika Virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eyer, L.; Nencka, Radim; Huvarová, I.; Palus, Martin; Alves, M. J.; Gould, E. A.; De Clercq, E.; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 214, č. 5 (2016), s. 707-711 ISSN 0022-1899 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Zika virus * flavivirus * nucleoside analogue * antiviral * therapy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 6.273, year: 2016

  3. Experimental therapies for yellow fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julander, Justin G.

    2013-01-01

    A number of viruses in the family Flaviviridae are the focus of efforts to develop effective antiviral therapies. Success has been achieved with inhibitors for the treatment of hepatitis C, and there is interest in clinical trials of drugs against dengue fever. Antiviral therapies have also been evaluated in patients with Japanese encephalitis and West Nile encephalitis. However, no treatment has been developed against the prototype flavivirus, yellow fever virus (YFV). Despite the availability of the live, attenuated 17D vaccine, thousands of cases of YF continue to occur each year in Africa and South America, with a significant mortality rate. In addition, a small number of vaccinees develop severe systemic infections with the 17D virus. This paper reviews current efforts to develop antiviral therapies, either directly targeting the virus or blocking detrimental host responses to infection. PMID:23237991

  4. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Thompson

    Full Text Available GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA boost vaccine (GOVX-B11, was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI. Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 6 months were enrolled. Median age was 38 years, median pre-ART HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156.

  5. Innate Immunity and BK Virus: Prospective Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Yaghobi, Ramin; Dabiri, Shahriar

    2016-03-01

    Recent information demonstrated that BK virus reactivation is a dominant complication after kidney transplantation, which occurs because of immunosuppression. BK virus reactivation is the main reason of transplanted kidney losing. Immune response against BK virus is the major inhibitor of the virus reactivation. Therefore, improving our knowledge regarding the main parameters that fight against BK viruses can shed light on to direct new treatment strategies to suppress BK infection. Innate immunity consists of numerous cell systems and also soluble molecules, which not only suppress virus replication, but also activate adaptive immunity to eradicate the infection. Additionally, it appears that immune responses against reactivated BK virus are the main reasons for induction of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKAN). Thus, improving our knowledge regarding the parameters and detailed mechanisms of innate immunity and also the status of innate immunity of the patients with BK virus reactivation and its complications can introduce new prospective strategies to either prevent or as therapy of the complication. Therefore, this review was aimed to collate the most recent data regarding the roles played by innate immunity against BK virus and also the status of innate immunity in the patients with reactivation BK virus and BKAN.

  6. Computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  7. A national multicenter phase 2 study of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) pox virus vaccine with sequential androgen ablation therapy in patients with PSA progression: ECOG 9802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Robert S; Chen, Yu-Hui; Bubley, Glenn J; Stein, Mark N; Hahn, Noah M; Carducci, Michael A; Lattime, Edmund C; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Philip M; Butterfield, Lisa H; Wilding, George

    2015-09-01

    E9802 was a phase 2 multi-institution study conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of vaccinia and fowlpox prostate-specific antigen (PSA) vaccine (step 1) followed by combination with androgen ablation therapy (step 2) in patients with PSA progression without visible metastasis. To test the hypothesis that vaccine therapy in this early disease setting will be safe and have a biochemical effect that would support future studies of immunotherapy in patients with minimal disease burden. Patients who had PSA progression following local therapy were treated with PROSTVAC-V (vaccinia)/TRICOM on cycle 1 followed by PROSTVAC-F (fowlpox)/TRICOM for subsequent cycles in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (step 1). Androgen ablation was added on progression (step 2). Step 1 primary end points included progression at 6 mo and characterization of change in PSA velocity pretreatment to post-treatment. Step 2 end points included PSA response with combined vaccine and androgen ablation. In step 1, 25 of 40 eligible patients (63%) were progression free at 6 mo after registration (90% confidence interval [CI], 48-75). The median pretreatment PSA velocity was 0.13 log(PSA)/mo, in contrast to median postregistration velocity of 0.09 log(PSA)/mo (p=0.02), which is an increase in median PSA doubling time from 5.3 mo to 7.7 mo. No grade ≥4 treatment-related toxicity was observed. In the 27 patients eligible and treated for step 2, 20 patients achieved a complete response (CR) at 7 mo (CR rate: 74%; 90% CI, 57-87). Although supportive of larger studies in the cooperative group setting, this study is limited by the small number of patients and the absence of a control group as in a phase 3 study. A viral PSA vaccine can be administered safely in the multi-institutional cooperative group setting to patients with minimal disease volume alone and combined with androgen ablation, supporting the feasibility of future phase 3 studies in this

  8. Live Attenuated Recombinant Vaccine Protects Nonhuman Primates Against Ebola and Marburg Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Steven M; Feldmann, Heinz; Stroher, Ute; Geisbert, Joan B; Fernando, Lisa; Grolla, Allen; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Sullivan, Nancy J; Volchkov, Viktor E; Fritz, Elizabeth A; Daddario, Kathleen M; Hensley, Lisa E; Jahrling, Peter B; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2005-01-01

    Vaccines and therapies are urgently needed to address public health needs stemming from emerging pathogens and biological threat agents such as the filoviruses Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV...

  9. Pediatric tuberculosis-human immunodeficiency virus co-infection in the United Kingdom highlights the need for better therapy monitoring tools: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Honeyborne, Isobella; McHugh, Timothy D; Klein, Nigel; Shingadia, Delane

    2017-02-26

    Tuberculosis is an infection that requires at least 6 months of chemotherapy in order to clear the bacteria from the patient's lungs. Usually, therapeutic monitoring is dependent on smear microscopy where a decline in acid-fast bacilli is observed. However, this might not be indicative of the actual decline of bacterial load and thus other tools such as culture and molecular assays are required for patient management. Here, we report the case of a 12-year-old Black African boy co-infected with tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus who remained smear culture positive and liquid culture negative for a prolonged period of time following chemotherapy. In order to determine whether there was any live bacteria present in his specimens, we applied the newly developed molecular bacterial load assay that detects the presence of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid derived from the bacteria. Using this methodology, we were able to quantify his bacterial load and inform the management of his treatment in order to reduce the disease burden. Following this intervention he went on to make a complete recovery. This case report highlights the value of improved biomarkers for monitoring the treatment of tuberculosis and the role of molecular assays such as the molecular bacterial load assay applied here. The molecular bacterial load assay detects bacterial ribonucleic acid which corresponds closely with the number of live bacilli as compared with polymerase chain reaction that detects deoxyribonucleic acid and may include dead bacteria.

  10. Predictors of treatment efficacy and ALT non-normalization with sofosbuvir/ribavirin therapy for patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takao; Tokumoto, Yoshio; Joko, Kouji; Michitaka, Kojiro; Horiike, Norio; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Tada, Fujimasa; Kisaka, Yoshiyasu; Nakanishi, Seiji; Nonaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Kazuhiko; Hirooka, Masashi; Abe, Masanori; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2017-09-01

    The tolerability and efficacy of sofosbuvir and ribavirin in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2 were investigated under actual clinical conditions. A total of 208 patients with chronic HCV genotype 2 infection were treated with sofosbuvir 400 mg and ribavirin (weight-based dosing) for 12 weeks. Treatment discontinuation and sustained virological response 12 (SVR12) were evaluated. Moreover, factors associated with SVR12, hemoglobin decreasing to less than 10 g/dL during treatment, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) non-normalization after treatment were evaluated. In all patients, SVR12 responses were 96.1% (200/208). About 6 of 8 patients (3.8%) who did not achieve SVR12 were re-treatment patients, and eight patients who did not achieve SVR all had liver cirrhosis. Multivariate analysis also identified body mass index (OR = 0.79; P ALT non-normalization after treatment. Cirrhotic patients may have a relatively high rate of treatment failure. In patients whose M2BpGi levels are elevated, their ALT tended to not normalize after treatment completion. These patients who did not achieve normalization of ALT after sofosbuvir plus RBV treatment need more careful observation for emergence of hepatocellular carcinoma even after achievement of SVR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Enhanced MDR1 gene expression in human T-cell leukemia virus-I-infected patients offers new prospects for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, A; Nightingale, S; Taylor, G P; Gant, T W; Cann, A J

    1998-04-01

    Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the protein product of the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1), confers a drug resistant phenotype on cells. This phenotype is reminiscent of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-transformed leukemic cells, for which no consistently effective chemotherapeutic regime has been found. The presence of an active multiple drug resistance (MDR) phenotype in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HTLV-I-infected subjects was investigated. Significant P-gp-mediated efflux activity and enhanced MDR1 mRNA expression was observed in nine of 10 HTLV-infected subjects. The development of MDR phenotypes was found to be independent of disease type or status with significant MDR activities being observed in adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), HTLV-associated myelopathy (HAM)/tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP), and asymptomatic HTLV-infected individuals. P-gp-mediated drug efflux was also found to be restricted to CD3+ T-cell populations. Furthermore, we show the novel finding that the MDR1 gene promoter is transcriptionally activated by the HTLV-I tax protein, suggesting a molecular basis for the development of drug resistance in HTLV-I infections. These observations open up the possibility of new chemotherapeutic approaches to HTLV-associated diseases through the use of P-gp inhibitors.

  12. CD4:CD8 Ratio and CD8 Count as Prognostic Markers for Mortality in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trickey, Adam; May, Margaret T; Schommers, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Background: We investigated whether CD4:CD8 ratio and CD8 count were prognostic for all-cause, AIDS, and non-AIDS mortality in virologically suppressed patients with high CD4 count. Methods: We used data from 13 European and North American cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus......, and baseline age, CD4 count, AIDS, duration of ART) all-cause and cause-specific mortality hazard ratios for tertiles of CD4:CD8 ratio (0-0.40, 0.41-0.64 [reference], >0.64) and CD8 count (0-760, 761-1138 [reference], >1138 cells/μL) and examined the shape of associations using cubic splines. Results: During...... 276526 person-years, 1834 of 49865 patients died (249 AIDS-related; 1076 non-AIDS-defining; 509 unknown/unclassifiable deaths). There was little evidence that CD4:CD8 ratio was prognostic for all-cause mortality after adjustment for other factors: the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for lower vs middle...

  13. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péré, Héléne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jérome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frédéric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Launay, Odile; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. [Efficacy of initial antiretroviral therapy based on lopinavir/ritonavir plus 2 nucleoside/nucleotide analogs in patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Laura; Gatell, José M

    2014-11-01

    Triple combination regimens consisting of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus 2 nucleoside/nucleotide analogs continue to be a valid option in initial antiretroviral therapy. Other protease inhibitors boosted with ritonavir (and in future with cobicistat) have been introduced, as well as other non-nucleoside analogs (rilpivirin) and 3 integrase inhibitors. None of the new regimens have shown superiority over LPV/r or comparisons are lacking. Therefore, regimens including LPV/r continue to be recommended as initial first-line or alternative strategies in most treatment guidelines. Dual combinations with LPV/r (plus raltegravir or lamivudine) are described in another article and can provide a similar response rate to triple combinations, better tolerance, and an improved cost-efficacy ratio, both for initial therapy and in simplification strategies. In contrast, LPV/r or darunavir/r monotherapy does not seem an acceptable option in treatment-naïve patients and is becoming increasingly less acceptable in simplification strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Time-Degenerative Factors and the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Antiviral Therapy among Hepatitis C Virus Patients: A Model for Prioritization of Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming-Lung; Huang, Chung-Feng; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Huang, Ching-I; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Jee-Fu; Dai, Chia-Yen; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: Age and hepatic fibrosis are the factors that increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma over time. We aimed to explore their impact at the initiation of antiviral therapy on hepatocellular carcinoma among chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. Experimental Design: A total of 1,281 biopsy-proven CHC patients receiving IFN-based therapy were followed for a mean period of 5.5 years. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma did not differ between non-sustained virological response (SVR) and SVR patients who were 55 years old (15.1% vs. 7.9%, P = 0.03). Compared with SVR, non-SVR was independently predictive of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients 40 to 55 years old [HR/95% confidence intervals (CI), 10.92/3.78-31.56; P 55 years old (HR/CI, 1.96/1.06-3.63; P = 0.03) but not in patients 40 years old or with a fibrosis stage >2 increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma over time. Clin Cancer Res; 23(7); 1690-7. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Thematic review of family therapy journals 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan

    2013-01-01

    In this article the contents of the principal English-language family therapy journals, and key family therapy articles published in other journals in 2012 are reviewed under these headings: therapy processes in the treatment of child-focused problems, autism, adolescent substance use, human immunodeficiency virus, depression and grief, fragile families, mental health recovery, medical family therapy, family business and systemic practice, couple therapy, intimate partner violence, key issues...

  17. Oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and their correlation to cluster of differentiation lymphocyte count in population of North-East India in highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarat Kumar Nayak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection which manifests as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is a disease involving the defects of the T-lymphocyte arm of the immune system. Certain laboratory parameters such as the cluster of differentiation (CD4 count and clinical parameters have long been used as markers of disease progression. In industrialized countries, many studies show a highly correlation between the incidence of oral lesions and immunosuppression and hence, can be used as a marker of immunosuppression. This might not be applicable to a developing country like India. In this study, efforts have been made to supplement the present knowledge on various aspects of oral manifestations in HIV patients in the Indian subcontinent. Aims: To correlate the oral manifestations in HIV/AIDS patients to the level of circulating CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and their effect in anti-retroviral therapy (ART. Subjects and Methods: A total of 104 HIV positive patients were examined for oral lesions. The CD4 count estimated on the same day by fluorescent activated cell sort count machine was then correlated with various oral lesions. Results: Oral manifestations appeared when CD4 count decreased below 500 cells/mm3. Moreover, oral lesions found at different stages showed very strong correlation to their respective CD4 count. Furthermore, there was considerable decline in the incidence of oral manifestations in patients undergoing highly active ART. Conclusions: Oral manifestations are highly predictive markers of severe immune deterioration and disease progression in HIV patients.

  18. Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among HIV-infected pregnant women on highly active anti-retroviral therapy with premature rupture of membranes at term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleje, George Uchenna; Edokwe, Emeka Stephen; Ikechebelu, Joseph Ifeanyichukwu; Onubogu, Chinyere Ukamaka; Ugochukwu, Ebele Francesca; Okam, Princeston Chukwuemeka; Ibekwe, Adaobi Maryann

    2018-01-01

    To determine mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) rate and associated risk factors of human immune-deficiency virus (HIV) among HIV-infected pregnant women with term premature rupture of membranes (PROM) in comparison with those without PROM at term. All optimally managed HIV-positive pregnant women of Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, on highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) who had PROM at term were enrolled. Maternal HIV-1 viral load was not assessed. Follow up was for a minimum of 18 months for evidence of HIV infection. Of the 121 women with PROM at term, 46 (38.0%) were HIV sero-positive, 22/46 (47.8%) of which had their babies followed up till 18 months. The mean latency period was 10.5 ± 5.3 h in PROM group. Apart from duration of PROM (OR = 0.01; 95%CI = 0.00-0.13; p  0.05). Of the 22 (47.8%) babies followed-up in the PROM group and 13 in non-PROM group, none tested positive to HIV, given an MTCT rate of 0%. MTCT rate was 0% following term PROM and in women without PROM. Since maternal HIV-1 viral load was not assessed, we need to be critical while interpreting the findings.

  19. Significant Depletion of CD4+ T Cells Occurs in the Oral Mucosa during Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection with the Infected CD4+ T Cell Reservoir Continuing to Persist in the Oral Mucosa during Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffy George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV infections are characterized by manifestation of numerous opportunistic infections and inflammatory conditions in the oral mucosa. The loss of CD4+ T cells that play a critical role in maintaining mucosal immunity likely contributes to this process. Here we show that CD4+ T cells constitute a minor population of T cells in the oral mucosa and display a predominantly central memory phenotype mirroring other mucosal sites such as the rectal mucosa. Chronic SIV infection was associated with a near total depletion of CD4+ T cells in the oral mucosa that appear to repopulate during antiretroviral therapy (ART. Repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored a large fraction of Th17 cells suggesting that ART potentially reconstitutes oral mucosal immunity. However, a minor fraction of repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored SIV DNA suggesting that the viral reservoir continues to persist in the oral mucosa during ART. Therapeutic approaches aimed at obtaining sustainable CD4+ T cell repopulation in combination with strategies that can eradicate the latent viral reservoir in the oral mucosa are essential for better oral health and long-term outcome in HIV infected patients.

  20. Protease inhibitor associated mutations compromise the efficacy of therapy in human immunodeficiency virus – 1 (HIV-1 infected pediatric patients: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova Anna

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the introduction of combined therapy with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors has resulted in considerable decrease in HIV related mortality; it has also induced the development of multiple drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. The few studies on HIV-1 mutagenesis in HIV infected children have not evaluated the impact of HIV-1 mutations on the clinical, virological and immunological presentation of HIV disease that is fundamental to optimizing the treatment regimens for these patients. Results A cross sectional study was conducted to evaluate the impact of treatment regimens and resistance mutation patterns on the clinical, virological, and immunological presentation of HIV disease in 41 children (25 male and 16 female at the Robert Wood Johnson Pediatric AIDS Program in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The study participants were symptomatic and had preceding treatment history with combined ARV regimens including protease inhibitors (PIs, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. Fifteen (36.6% children were treated with NRTI+NNRTI+ PI, 6 (14.6% with NRTI+NNRTIs, 13 (31.7% with NRTI+PIs, and the remaining 7 (17.1% received NRTIs only. Combined ARV regimens did not significantly influence the incidence of NRTI and NNRTI associated mutations. The duration of ARV therapy and the child's age had no significant impact on the ARV related mutations. The clinico-immunological presentation of the HIV disease was not associated with ARV treatment regimens or number of resistance mutations. However, primary mutations in the protease (PR gene increased the likelihood of plasma viral load (PVL ≥ 10,000 copies/mL irrespective of the child's age, duration of ARV therapy, presence of NRTI and NNRTI mutation. Viremia ≥ 10,000 copies/mL was recorded in almost all the children with primary mutations in the PR region (n = 12/13, 92.3% as compared with only 50.0% (n

  1. Identity of zinc finger nucleases with specificity to herpes simplex virus type II genomic DNA: novel HSV-2 vaccine/therapy precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex type II (HSV-2 is a member of the family herpesviridae. Human infection with this double stranded linear DNA virus causes genital ulcerative disease and existing treatment options only serve to resolve the symptomatology (ulcers associated with active HSV-2 infection but do not eliminate latent virus. As a result, infection with HSV-2 follows a life-long relapsing (active versus latent course. On the basis of a primitive bacterium anti-phage DNA defense, the restriction modification (R-M system, we previously identified the Escherichia coli restriction enzyme (REase EcoRII as a novel peptide to excise or irreversibly disrupt latent HSV-2 DNA from infected cells. However, sequences of the site specificity palindrome of EcoRII 5'-CCWGG-3' (W = A or T are equally present within the human genome and are a potential source of host-genome toxicity. This feature has limited previous HSV-2 EcoRII based therapeutic models to microbicides only, and highlights the need to engineer artificial REases (zinc finger nucleases-ZFNs with specificity to HSV-2 genomic-DNA only. Herein, the therapeutic-potential of zinc finger arrays (ZFAs and ZFNs is identified and modeled, with unique specificity to the HSV-2 genome. Methods and results Using the whole genome of HSV-2 strain HG52 (Dolan A et al.,, and with the ZFN-consortium's CoDA-ZiFiT software pre-set at default, more than 28,000 ZFAs with specificity to HSV-2 DNA were identified. Using computational assembly (through in-silico linkage to the Flavobacterium okeanokoites endonuclease Fok I of the type IIS class, 684 ZFNs with specificity to the HSV-2 genome, were constructed. Graphic-analysis of the HSV-2 genome-cleavage pattern using the afore-identified ZFNs revealed that the highest cleavage-incidence occurred within the 30,950 base-pairs (~between the genomic context coordinates 0.80 and 1.00 at the 3' end of the HSV-2 genome. At approximately 3,095 bp before and after the

  2. Predictive value of pharmacokinetics-adjusted phenotypic susceptibility on response to ritonavir-enhanced protease inhibitors (PIs) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects failing prior PI therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eron, Joseph J; Park, Jeong-Gun; Haubrich, Richard; Aweeka, Francesca; Bastow, Barbara; Pakes, Gary E; Yu, Song; Wu, Hulin; Richman, Douglas D

    2009-06-01

    The activities of protease inhibitors in vivo may depend on plasma concentrations and viral susceptibility. This nonrandomized, open-label study evaluated the relationship of the inhibitory quotient (IQ [the ratio of drug exposure to viral phenotypic susceptibility]) to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral load (VL) change for ritonavir-enhanced protease inhibitors (PIs). Subjects on PI-based regimens replaced their PIs with ritonavir-enhanced indinavir (IDV/r) 800/200 mg, fosamprenavir (FPV/r) 700/100 mg, or lopinavir (LPV/r) 400/200 mg twice daily. Pharmacokinetics were assessed at day 14; follow-up lasted 24 weeks. Associations between IQ and VL changes were examined. Fifty-three subjects enrolled, 12 on IDV/r, 33 on FPV/r, and 8 on LPV/r. Median changes (n-fold) (FC) of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) to the study PI were high. Median 2-week VL changes were -0.7, -0.1, and -1.0 log(10) for IDV/r, FPV/r, and LPV/r. With FPV/r, correlations between the IQ and the 2-week change in VL were significant (Spearman's r range, -0.39 to -0.50; P PI-experienced subjects with highly resistant HIV-1, short-term VL responses to RTV-enhanced FPV/r correlated best with baseline susceptibility. The IQ improved correlation in analyses of all arms where a greater range of virologic responses was observed.

  3. Effect of oral antiviral treatment on long-term outcomes of radiofrequency ablation therapy for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Won; Kang, Tae Wook; Choi, Sun-Kyu; Jung, Sin-Ho; Lee, Min Woo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Cho, Ju-Yeon; Shim, Sang Goon; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Rhim, Hyunchul; Paik, Yong-Han

    2016-07-26

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of oral antiviral treatment on the prognosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Between January 2003 and December 2010, 228 patients without a history of antiviral treatment were treated with RF ablation for a single HBV-related HCC. We divided the patients into two groups, patients who received (n=125) or did not receive antiviral treatment (n=103), based on whether oral antiviral treatment was administered after RF ablation. The median duration of antiviral treatment was 60.1 months. HCC recurrence and overall survival were compared in the two groups in the full cohort and the propensity score-matched cohort. In the matched cohort, the probability of HCC recurrence at 5 years was 43.8% for the non-antiviral treatment group and 14.7% for the antiviral treatment group (pantiviral treatment group and 93.5% for the antiviral treatment group (p=0.002). Multivariable analysis showed that risk factors for HCC recurrence included large tumor size (hazard ratio (HR)=1.30, p=0.022), HBV DNA serum level (HR=1.11, p=0.005), and serum AFP level ≥20 ng/mL (HR=1.66, p=0.005). Overall survival was associated with larger tumor size (HR=1.86, p=0.001) and Child-Pugh Class B (HR=2.13, p=0.019). Oral antiviral treatment after RF ablation was significantly associated with a lower risk of tumor recurrence and death (HR=0.33, pantiviral treatment after curative RF ablation was associated with favorable outcomes in terms of tumor recurrence and overall survival in patients with HBV-related HCC.

  4. Anti-cancer effects of oncolytic viral therapy combined with photodynamic therapy in human pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Yazan S; Wright, Kathleen; Melcher, Alan; Jayne, David

    2015-02-26

    Oncolytic viral therapy and photodynamic therapy are potential therapies for inoperable or advanced pancreatic cancer. Our aim was to investigate the anti-cancer killing effects of reovirus therapy combined with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-mediated photodynamic therapy on a variety of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Pancreatic cancer cell lines (PsPC-1 and BXPC-3) and a non-cancer control cell line (HEK293) were infected with reovirus serotype 3 strain Dearing (T3D) at 0, 0·1, 1, and 10 plaque-forming units (PFU) per cell for 48 h. Cells were incubated with PpIX pro-drug 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 mM for 4 h. Then, cells were photo-irradiated for 15 min with visible red light-emitting diodes with a light-fluence of 0·54 J/cm(2) of 653 nm (PpIX optimal excitation wavelength). The killing effects of reovirus combined with PpIX-mediated photodynamic therapy were analysed in methylthiazoltetrazolium (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The effect of adding reovirus after photodynamic therapy was also assessed. The statistical significance of the difference between groups was assessed with the two-tailed Student's t test. pphotodynamic therapy resulted in a significantly increased cytotoxic effect compared with reovirus monotherapy and photodynamic therapy (p=0·042) with 100% cell death observed across pancreatic cell lines with 10 PFU per cell combined with 1 and 2 mM 5-ALA. There was no difference in cytotoxicity observed between added reovirus before or after photodynamic therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first in-vitro study to combine reovirus oncolytic viral therapy with PpIX-mediated photodynamic therapy to treat pancreatic cancer. These results show a significant additive effect in cell killing and they provide initial evidence for a novel combined therapeutic intervention. National Institute for Health Research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  6. Virophages or satellite viruses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupovic, Mart; Cvirkaite-Krupovic, Virginija

    2011-11-01

    It has been argued that the smaller viruses associated with giant DNA viruses are a new biological entity. However, Mart Krupovic and Virginija Cvirkaite-Krupovic argue here that these smaller viruses should be classified with the satellite viruses.

  7. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  8. Factors for incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapy including drug refill and clinic visits among older adults living with human immunodeficiency virus - cross-sectional study in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Abbie; Ford, Nathan; El-Khatib, Ziad

    2018-03-01

    To assess adherence outcomes to antiretroviral therapy (ART) of recipients ≥50 years in Soweto, South Africa. This was a secondary data analysis for a cross-sectional study at two HIV clinics in Soweto. Data on ART adherence and covariates were gathered through structured interviews with HIV 878 persons living with HIV (PLHIV) receiving ART. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess associations. PLHIV ≥50 years (n = 103) were more likely to miss clinic visits during the last six months than PLHIV aged 25-49 (OR 2.15; 95%CI 1.10-4.18). PLHIV ≥50 years with no or primary-level education were less likely to have missed a clinic visit during the last six months than PLHIV with secondary- or tertiary-level education in the same age category (OR 0.3; 95%CI 0.1-1.1), as were PLHIV who did not disclose their status (OR 0.2; 95%CI 0-1.1). There was no evidence of increased risk for non-adherence to ART pills and drug refill visits among older PLHIV. Missing a clinic visit was more common among older PLHIV who were more financially vulnerable. Further studies are needed to verify these findings and identify new risk factors associated with ART adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on Antiretroviral Therapy in Adults Infected by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Updated January 2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-31

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by HIV-1. The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should be based on a combination of 3 drugs, including 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (tenofovir in either of its two formulations plus emtricitabine or abacavir plus lamivudine) and another drug from a different family. Four of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase inhibitor as the third drug (dolutegravir, elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat or raltegravir), are considered preferential, whereas a further 3 regimens (based on elvitegravir/cobicistat, rilpivirine, or darunavir boosted with cobicistat or ritonavir) are considered alternatives. We present the reasons and criteria for switching ART in patients with an undetectable PVL and in those who present virological failure, in which case salvage ART should include 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against HIV. We also update the criteria for ART in specific situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbidities (tuberculosis or other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease and cancer). Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes for the therapy of cervical carcinoma elicit humoral and cell-mediated responses in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, Antonia; Pozzi, Eleana; Pacchioni, Sole; Zanotto, Carlo; Morghen, Carlo De Giuli

    2010-04-21

    Around half million new cases of cervical cancer arise each year, making the development of an effective therapeutic vaccine against HPV a high priority. As the E6 and E7 oncoproteins are expressed in all HPV-16 tumour cells, vaccines expressing these proteins might clear an already established tumour and support the treatment of HPV-related precancerous lesions. Three different immunisation regimens were tested in a pre-clinical trial in rabbits to evaluate the humoral and cell-mediated responses of a putative HPV-16 vaccine. Fowlpoxvirus (FP) recombinants separately expressing the HPV-16 E6 (FPE6) and E7 (FPE7) transgenes were used for priming, followed by E7 protein boosting. All of the protocols were effective in eliciting a high antibody response. This was also confirmed by interleukin-4 production, which increased after simultaneous priming with both FPE6 and FPE7 and after E7 protein boost. A cell-mediated immune response was also detected in most of the animals. These results establish a preliminary profile for the therapy with the combined use of avipox recombinants, which may represent safer immunogens than vaccinia-based vectors in immuno-compromised individuals, as they express the transgenes in most mammalian cells in the absence of a productive replication.

  11. Fowlpox virus recombinants expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes for the therapy of cervical carcinoma elicit humoral and cell-mediated responses in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacchioni Sole

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around half million new cases of cervical cancer arise each year, making the development of an effective therapeutic vaccine against HPV a high priority. As the E6 and E7 oncoproteins are expressed in all HPV-16 tumour cells, vaccines expressing these proteins might clear an already established tumour and support the treatment of HPV-related precancerous lesions. Methods Three different immunisation regimens were tested in a pre-clinical trial in rabbits to evaluate the humoral and cell-mediated responses of a putative HPV-16 vaccine. Fowlpoxvirus (FP recombinants separately expressing the HPV-16 E6 (FPE6 and E7 (FPE7 transgenes were used for priming, followed by E7 protein boosting. Results All of the protocols were effective in eliciting a high antibody response. This was also confirmed by interleukin-4 production, which increased after simultaneous priming with both FPE6 and FPE7 and after E7 protein boost. A cell-mediated immune response was also detected in most of the animals. Conclusion These results establish a preliminary profile for the therapy with the combined use of avipox recombinants, which may represent safer immunogens than vaccinia-based vectors in immuno-compromised individuals, as they express the transgenes in most mammalian cells in the absence of a productive replication.

  12. Evaluation of the Impact of Anti-Retroviral Therapy on the Prevalence of Oral Lesions in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Davoodi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Oral lesions have important diagnostic and prognostic roles in HIV infected patients. It seems that HAART reduces the prevalence of oral lesions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral lesions in HIV infected patients on/not on HAART. Materials & Methods: In this retrospective study, 40 HIV infected patients receiving HAART and 40 who were not on HAART were evaluated in Behavioral Consultation Center in Kermanshah. The diagnosis of the oral lesions was recorded by using established presump-tive clinical criteria. Data were gathered and analyzed using SPSS version 16 by chi-square test. Results: In the current study 80 HIV infected patients with mean age of 38.86 were chosen. 72.5% and 27.5% of participants were male and female respectively. The most common le-sions in those receiving HAART were hairy leukoplakia, hairy tongue and oral pigmentation. However the prevalence of these lesions had declined in comparison to those who were not on HAART but the difference was not significant (P>0.05. Although comparing lesions in the two groups showed no significant difference, the total number of lesions significantly reduced in patients receiving HAART (P=0.046 Conclusion: According to the results of the present study using anti retroviral therapy leaded to reduction in the oral lesions in HIV infected patients. However, more research in this field seems necessary. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (3:215-222

  13. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  14. Virus wars: using one virus to block the spread of another

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Paff

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The failure of traditional interventions to block and cure HIV infections has led to novel proposals that involve treating infections with therapeutic viruses–infectious viruses that specifically inhibit HIV propagation in the host. Early efforts in evaluating these proposals have been limited chiefly to mathematical models of dynamics, for lack of suitable empirical systems. Here we propose, develop and analyze an empirical system of a therapeutic virus that protects a host cell population against a lethal virus. The empirical system uses E. coli bacteria as the host cell population, an RNA phage as the lethal virus and a filamentous phage as the therapeutic virus. Basic dynamic properties are established for each virus alone and then together. Observed dynamics broadly agree with those predicted by a computer simulation model, although some differences are noted. Two cases of dynamics are contrasted, differing in whether the therapeutic virus is introduced before the lethal virus or after the lethal virus. The therapeutic virus increases in both cases but by different mechanisms. With the therapeutic virus introduced first, it spreads infectiously without any appreciable change in host dynamics. With the therapeutic virus introduced second, host abundance is depressed at the time therapy is applied; following an initial period of therapeutic virus spread by infection, the subsequent rise of protection is through reproduction by hosts already protected. This latter outcome is due to inheritance of the therapeutic virus state when the protected cell divides. Overall, the work establishes the feasibility and robustness to details of a viral interference using a therapeutic virus.

  15. Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Hendra virus infection of horses occurred sporadically between 1994 and 2010 as a result of spill-over from the viral reservoir in Australian mainland flying-foxes, and occasional onward transmission to people also followed from exposure to affected horses. An unprecedented number of outbreaks were recorded in 2011 leading to heightened community concern. Release of an inactivated subunit vaccine for horses against Hendra virus represents the first commercially available product that is focused on mitigating the impact of a Biosafety Level 4 pathogen. Through preventing the development of acute Hendra virus disease in horses, vaccine use is also expected to reduce the risk of transmission of infection to people. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequency of thyroid dysfunctions during interferon alpha treatment of single and combination therapy in hepatitis C virus-infected patients: a systematic review based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekharan Nair Kesavachandran

    Full Text Available Thyroid dysfunction is the commonest endocrinopathy associated with HCV infection due to interferon-based treatment. This comprehensive and systematic review presents the available evidence for newly developed thyroid antibodies and dysfunctions during interferon treatment (both single and combination in HCV patients.This systematic review was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. The data generated were used to analyze the risk for thyroid dysfunctions during interferon (IFN treatment in HCV patients. There was a wide range in the incidence of newly developed thyroid dysfunctions and thyroid antibodies in HCV patients during IFN treatment (both single and combination. The wide range of incidence also denoted the possibility of factors other than IFN treatment for thyroid-related abnormalities in HCV patients. These other factors include HCV viral factors, genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and patho-physiological factors. Variations in IFN dosage, treatment duration of IFN, definition/criteria followed in each study for thyroid dysfunction and irregular thyroid function testing during treatment in different studies influence the outcome of the single studies and jeopardise the validity of a pooled risk estimate of side effects of thyroid dysfunction. Importantly, reports differ as to whether the thyroid-related side effects disappear totally after withdrawal of the IFN treatment.The present review shows that there is a wide range in the incidence of newly developed thyroid dysfunctions and thyroid antibodies in IFN treated HCV patients. This is a comprehensive attempt to collate relevant data from 56 publications across several nations about IFN (both mono and combination therapy related thyroid dysfunction among HCV patients. The role of each factor in causing thyroid dysfunctions in HCV patients treated with IFN should be analyzed in detail in future studies, for a better understanding of the problem and sounder

  17. [Analysis of costs and cost-effectiveness of preferred GESIDA/National AIDS Plan regimens for initial antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus infected adult patients in 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Antonio Javier; Llibre, Josep M; Arribas, José Ramón; Boix, Vicente; Clotet, Bonaventura; Domingo, Pere; González-García, Juan; Knobel, Hernando; López, Juan Carlos; Lozano, Fernando; Miró, José M; Podzamczer, Daniel; Santamaría, Juan Miguel; Tuset, Montserrat; Zamora, Laura; Lázaro, Pablo; Gatell, Josep M

    2013-11-01

    The GESIDA and National AIDS Plan panel of experts have proposed "preferred regimens" of antiretroviral treatment (ART) as initial therapy in HIV infected patients for 2013. The objective of this study is to evaluate the costs and effectiveness of initiating treatment with these "preferred regimens". An economic assessment of costs and effectiveness (cost/effectiveness) was performed using decision tree analysis models. Effectiveness was defined as the probability of having viral load <50copies/mL at week48, in an intention-to-treat analysis. Cost of initiating treatment with an ART regime was defined as the costs of ART and its consequences (adverse effects, changes of ART regime and drug resistance analyses) during the first 48weeks. The perspective of the analysis is that of the National Health System was applied, only taking into account differential direct costs: ART (official prices), management of adverse effects, resistance studies, and determination of HLA B*5701. The setting is Spain and the costs are those of 2013. A sensitivity deterministic analysis was performed, constructing three scenarios for each regimen: baseline, most favourable, and most unfavourable cases. In the baseline case scenario, the cost of initiating treatment ranges from 6,747euros for TDF/FTC+NVP to 12,059euros for TDF/FTC+RAL. The effectiveness ranges between 0.66 for ABC/3TC+LPV/r and ABC/3TC+ATV/r, and 0.87 for TDF/FTC+RAL and ABC/3TC+RAL. Effectiveness, in terms of cost/effectiveness, varies between 8,396euros and 13,930euros per responder at 48weeks, for TDF/FTC/RPV and TDF/FTC+RAL, respectively. Taking ART at official prices, the most effective regimen was TDF/FTC/RPV, followed by the rest of non-nucleoside containing regimens. The sensitivity analysis confirms the robustness of these findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of human papilloma virus infection on the response of head and neck cancers to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelski, M; Ting, S; Gauler, T C; Breitenbuecher, F; Vossebein, I; Hoffarth, S; Markowetz, J; Lang, S; Bergmann, C; Brandau, S; Jawad, J A; Schmid, K W; Schuler, M; Kasper, S

    2014-02-27

    Infection with human papillomaviruses (HPVs) characterizes a distinct subset of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs). HPV-positive HNSCC preferentially affect the oropharynx and tonsils. Localized HPV-positive HNSCCs have a favorable prognosis and treatment outcome. However, the impact of HPV in advanced or metastatic HNSCC remains to be defined. In particular, it is unclear whether HPV modulates the response to cetuximab, an antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is a mainstay of treatment of advanced HNSCC. To this end, we have examined the sensitivity of HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC models to cetuximab and cytotoxic drugs in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we have stably expressed the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 in cetuximab-sensitive cancer cell lines to specifically investigate their role in the antibody response. The endogenous HPV status or the expression of HPV oncogenes had no significant impact on cetuximab-mediated suppression of EGFR signaling and proliferation in vitro. Cetuximab effectively inhibited the growth of E6- and E7-expressing tumors grafted in NOD/SCID mice. In support, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples from cetuximab-treated patients with recurrent or metastatic HNSCC were probed for p16(INK4a) expression, an established biomarker of HPV infection. Response rates (45.5% versus 45.5%) and median progression-free survival (97 versus 92 days) following cetuximab-based therapy were similar in patients with p16(INK4A)-positive and p16(INK4A)-negative tumors. In conclusion, HPV oncogenes do not modulate the anti-EGFR antibody response in HSNCC. Cetuximab treatment should be administered independently of HPV status.

  19. Effect of ritonavir-boosted danoprevir, a potent hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor, on the pharmacokinetics of methadone in healthy subjects undergoing methadone maintenance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Sebastian A; Morcos, Peter N; Navarro, Mercidita T; Bech, Nuria; Smith, Patrick F; Brennan, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the steady-state pharmacokinetics of methadone when coadministered with ritonavir-boosted danoprevir (DNVr). Open-label, two-period, single-sequence pharmacokinetic study. Two U.S. research centers. Eighteen methadone-maintained healthy adults. In Period 1 (Day -1), subjects received their daily methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). In Period 2 (Days 1-10), subjects received MMT plus DNVr 100/100 mg twice/day. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the total concentrations of (R)- and (S)-methadone on Days -1 and 10 were determined using noncompartmental methods. Unbound (R)- and (S)-methadone concentrations at 3 hours postdose were also assessed on Days -1 and 10. Geometric mean ratios (GMRs) and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare steady-state (R)- and (S)-methadone pharmacokinetics when MMT was administered with or without DNVr. Methadone withdrawal was assessed using the Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale. Compared with MMT alone, methadone AUCtau and Cmax GMR (90% CI) following coadministration with DNVr were 1.02 (0.91-1.15) and 1.01 (0.90-1.13) for (R)-methadone, and 1.01 (0.90-1.13) and 0.99 (0.89-1.10) for (S)-methadone, respectively. Unbound (R- and (S)-methadone concentrations were comparable with or without DNVr. No instances of methadone withdrawal were reported. MMT in combination with DNVr was well tolerated. Coadministration of DNVr with MMT resulted in no significant pharmacokinetic interactions or signs of methadone withdrawal. No dosage adjustment is needed for MMT when coadministered with DNVr. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  20. Pharmacological Inhibition of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Bienzle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is a member of the retroviridae family of viruses and causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in domestic and non-domestic cats worldwide. Genome organization of FIV and clinical characteristics of the disease caused by the virus are similar to those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Both viruses infect T lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and their replication cycle in infected cells is analogous. Due to marked similarity in genomic organization, virus structure, virus replication and disease pathogenesis of FIV and HIV, infection of cats with FIV is a useful tool to study and develop novel drugs and vaccines for HIV. Anti-retroviral drugs studied extensively in HIV infection have targeted different steps of the virus replication cycle: (1 inhibition of virus entry into susceptible cells at the level of attachment to host cell surface receptors and co-receptors; (2 inhibition of fusion of the virus membrane with the cell membrane; (3 blockade of reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA; (4 interruption of nuclear translocation and viral DNA integration into host genomes; (5 prevention of viral transcript processing and nuclear export; and (6 inhibition of virion assembly and maturation. Despite much success of anti-retroviral therapy slowing disease progression in people, similar therapy has not been thoroughly investigated in cats. In this article we review current pharmacological approaches and novel targets for anti-lentiviral therapy, and critically assess potentially suitable applications against FIV infection in cats.

  1. The RNA template channel of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase as a target for development of antiviral therapy of multiple genera within a virus family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van der Linden

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71 for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Nucleoside-based inhibitors have broad-spectrum activity but often exhibit off-target effects. Most non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNIs target surface cavities, which are structurally more flexible than the nucleotide-binding pocket, and hence have a more narrow spectrum of activity and are more prone to resistance development. Here, we report a novel NNI, GPC-N114 (2,2'-[(4-chloro-1,2-phenylenebis(oxy]bis(5-nitro-benzonitrile with broad-spectrum activity against enteroviruses and cardioviruses (another genus in the picornavirus family. Surprisingly, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 and poliovirus displayed a high genetic barrier to resistance against GPC-N114. By contrast, EMCV, a cardiovirus, rapidly acquired resistance due to mutations in 3Dpol. In vitro polymerase activity assays showed that GPC-N114 i inhibited the elongation activity of recombinant CVB3 and EMCV 3Dpol, (ii had reduced activity against EMCV 3Dpol with the resistance mutations, and (iii was most efficient in inhibiting 3Dpol when added before the RNA template-primer duplex. Elucidation of a crystal structure of the inhibitor bound to CVB3 3Dpol confirmed the RNA-binding channel as the target for GPC-N114. Docking studies of the compound into the crystal structures of the compound-resistant EMCV 3Dpol mutants suggested that the resistant phenotype is due to subtle changes that interfere with the binding of GPC-N114 but not of the RNA template-primer. In conclusion, this study presents the first NNI that targets the RNA template channel of the picornavirus polymerase and identifies a new pocket that can be used for the design of broad-spectrum inhibitors. Moreover, this study provides important new insight

  2. Response of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251 to raltegravir: a basis for a new treatment for simian AIDS and an animal model for studying lentiviral persistence during antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenhouse Jack

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we successfully created a new approach to ART in SIVmac251 infected nonhuman primates. This drug regimen is entirely based on drugs affecting the pre-integration stages of replication and consists of only two nucleotidic/nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors (Nt/NRTIs and raltegravir, a promising new drug belonging to the integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI class. Results In acutely infected human lymphoid CD4+ T-cell lines MT-4 and CEMx174, SIVmac251 replication was efficiently inhibited by raltegravir, which showed an EC90 in the low nanomolar range. This result was confirmed in primary macaque PBMCs and enriched CD4+ T cell fractions. In vivo monotherapy with raltegravir for only ten days resulted in reproducible decreases in viral load in two different groups of animals. When emtricitabine (FTC and tenofovir (PMPA were added to treatment, undetectable viral load was reached in two weeks, and a parallel increase in CD4 counts was observed. In contrast, the levels of proviral DNA did not change significantly during the treatment period, thus showing persistence of this lentiviral reservoir during therapy. Conclusions In line with the high conservation of the three main amino acids Y143, Q148 and N155 (responsible for raltegravir binding and molecular docking simulations showing similar binding modes of raltegravir at the SIVmac251 and HIV-1 IN active sites, raltegravir is capable of inhibiting SIVmac251 replication both in tissue culture and in vivo. This finding may help to develop effective ART regimens for the simian AIDS model entirely based on drugs adopted for treatment in humans. This ART-treated AIDS nonhuman primate model could be employed to find possible strategies for virus eradication from the body.

  3. Negative labeling and social exclusion of people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome in the antiretroviral therapy era: insight from attitudes and behavioral intentions of female heads of households in Zambézia Province, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukolo, Abraham; Blevins, Meridith; Hinton, Nicole; Victor, Bart; Vaz, Lara M E; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E

    2014-01-01

    In the age of antiretroviral therapy (ART), unraveling specific aspects of stigma that impede uptake and adherence to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) services and the complex intersections among them might enhance the efficacy of stigma-reduction interventions targeted at the general public. Few studies have described community stigma in high HIV prevalence regions of Mozambique where program scale-up has been concentrated, but fear of stigma persists as a barrier to HIV service uptake. Principal components analysis of attitudinal data from 3749 female heads of households surveyed in Zambézia Province was used to examine patterns of agreement with stigmatizing attitudes and behavior toward people living with HIV. Inferences were based on comparison of factor loadings and commonality estimates. Construct validity was established through correlations with levels of knowledge about HIV transmission and consistency with the labeling theory of stigma. Two unique domains of community stigma were observed: negative labeling and devaluation (NLD, α = 0.74) and social exclusion (SoE, α = 0.73). NLD is primarily an attitudinal construct, while SoE captures behavioral intent. About one-third of the respondents scored in the upper tertile of the NLD stigma scale (scale: 0-100 stigma points) and the equivalent was 41.3% in the SoE stigma scale. Consistent with literature, NLD and SoE stigma scores were inversely correlated with HIV transmission route knowledge. In item level analysis, fear of being labeled a prostitute/immoral and of negative family affect defined the nature of stigma in this sample. Thus, despite ART scale-up and community education about HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), NLD and SoE characterized the community stigma of HIV in this setting. Follow-up studies could compare the impact of these stigma domains on HIV services uptake, in order to inform domain-focused stigma-reduction interventions.

  4. Hepatitis B and C Viruses Infections and Their Association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Cross-Sectional Study among Blood Donors in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yami, Alemeshet; Alemseged, Fissehaye; Hassen, Alima

    2011-03-01

    Since the introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy and the dramatic improvement in the prognosis of individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, liver disease due to chronic viral hepatitis has become as important cause of morbidity and mortality in co-infected individuals. The objective of the study was to determine the Sero-prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the association of the virus with Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus infection. As Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus infections are highly prevalent and they are among the major public health concern in developing countries including Ethiopia investigating this problem is of paramount benefit. Although studies on co-infection of Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus have clearly identified adverse effects of co-infection, the prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus infection and the association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in developing countries including Ethiopia has not been know for sure. A cross sectional study was conducted from January 1 to 31, 2010, in Jimma University specialized hospital Blood Bank. The inclusion criteria of the study was adult who donated blood to Jimma University specialized hospital blood bank any time from establishment of the unit until January 2010 and whose record was retrieved. Accordingly 9,204 adults were included of which 6,063 were selected by lottery method. Data on socio-demographic variables (age and sex), laboratory test result for Hepatitis B surface Antigen, anti-Hepatitis C Virus antibody, anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 antibody, and Rapid Plasma Reagin tests were collected using structured questionnaire. After the data were collected, they were entered into a computer and analyzed using SPSS -16 for windows. P-Value of Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and syphilis infection were 2.1%, 0.2%, 2.1% and 0.7%, respectively. Sex and age had

  5. Schmallenberg Virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    combat many infectious-disease-causing agents over the years. However, evolution is a continuous process ... newly emerging virus infection that poses threat to the livestock industries. In addition to describing the life ... are the Symptoms of Infection by SBV. The first clinical signs in adult animals are acute diarrhoea, a dip.

  6. Immunotherapy against cancer-related viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Haruko; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 12% of all cancers worldwide are associated with viral infections. To date, eight viruses have been shown to contribute to the development of human cancers, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Hepatitis B and C viruses, and Human papilloma virus, among others. These DNA and RNA viruses produce oncogenic effects through distinct mechanisms. First, viruses may induce sustained disorders of host cell growth and survival through the genes they express, or may induce DNA damage response in host cells, which in turn increases host genome instability. Second, they may induce chronic inflammation and secondary tissue damage favoring the development of oncogenic processes in host cells. Viruses like HIV can create a more permissive environment for cancer development through immune inhibition, but we will focus on the previous two mechanisms in this review. Unlike traditional cancer therapies that cannot distinguish infected cells from non-infected cells, immunotherapies are uniquely equipped to target virus-associated malignancies. The targeting and functioning mechanisms associated with the immune response can be exploited to prevent viral infections by vaccination, and can also be used to treat infection before cancer establishment. Successes in using the immune system to eradicate established malignancy by selective recognition of virus-associated tumor cells are currently being reported. For example, numerous clinical trials of adoptive transfer of ex vivo generated virus-specific T cells have shown benefit even for established tumors in patients with EBV-associated malignancies. Additional studies in other virus-associated tumors have also been initiated and in this review we describe the current status of immunotherapy for virus-associated malignancies and discuss future prospects. PMID:28008927

  7. Rates of sustained virological response 12 weeks after the scheduled end of direct-acting antiviral (DAA)-based hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy from the National German HCV registry: does HIV coinfection impair the response to DAA combination therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, J; Mauss, S; Cordes, C; Lutz, T; Scholten, S; Moll, A; Jäger, H; Cornberg, M; Manns, M P; Baumgarten, A; Rockstroh, J K

    2018-04-01

    The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) treatment recommendations for hepatitis C no longer discriminate between HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected and HCV-monoinfected patients. However, recent data from Spain are questioning these recommendations on the basis of the findings of higher relapse rates and lower cure rates in HIV/HCV-infected subjects. The aim of our study was to compare HCV cure rates in monoinfected and coinfected patients from Germany. Data acquired from the Deutsches Hepatitis C-Registry were analysed. A total of 5657 HCV-monoinfected subjects and 488 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients were included in the study. Rates of sustained virological response 12 weeks after the scheduled end of therapy (SVR12) were collected in both subgroups and in cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients. HIV/HCV-coinfected patients were more frequently male (84.6% vs. 56.4%, respectively; P  350 cells/μL in 63.1% of HIV-positive subjects and 88.7% were on antiretroviral therapy. SVR12 rates were 90.3% (5111 of 5657) in our HCV-monoinfected cohort and 91.2% (445 of 488) in our coinfected patients. Liver cirrhosis was confirmed in 1667 of 5657 (29.5%) monoinfected patients and 84 of 488 (17.2%; P HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with liver cirrhosis (87.8% vs. 89.3%, respectively; P = 0.864). A treatment duration of 8 weeks did not reduce the percentage of patients with SVR12 in either subgroup (93.7% in both groups). We found high SVR12 rates in monoinfected as well as coinfected individuals. No differences were detected between the two subgroups regardless of whether there was accompanying liver cirrhosis or a shortened treatment duration. © 2018 British HIV Association.

  8. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  9. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS — ONCOGENIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  10. Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are RNA viruses that affect animals and plants; they have five genera and four of them affect humans: Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Phlebovirus and Hantavirus. All of them are Arbovirus, except Hantavirus. The Orthobunyaviruses comprise Oropouche, Tahyna, La Crosse virus, California encephalitis virus and Heartland virus recently discovered (1. Except for Heartland virus which is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyoma, these Phleboviruses have as vectors mosquitoes, which bite small mammals which are able to be as reservoirs amplifiers.

  11. Folate-receptor-targeted NIR-sensitive polydopamine nanoparticles for chemo-photothermal cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Jin, Zhen; Cho, Sunghoon; Jeon, Mi Jeong; Du Nguyen, Van; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2017-10-01

    We propose the use of folate-receptor-targeted, near-infrared-sensitive polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs) for chemo-photothermal cancer therapy as an enhanced type of drug-delivery system which can be synthesized by in situ polymerization and conjugation with folic acid. The NPs consist of a Fe3O4/Au core, coated polydopamine, conjugated folic acid, and loaded anti-cancer drug (doxorubicin). The proposed multifunctional NPs show many advantages for therapeutic applications such as good biocompatibility and easy bioconjugation. The polydopamine coating of the NPs show a higher photothermal effect and thus more effective cancer killing compared to Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles at the same intensity as near-infrared laser irradiation. In addition, the conjugation of folic acid was shown to enhance cancer cellular uptake efficiency via the folate receptor and thus improve chemotherapeutic efficiency. Through in vitro cancer cell treatment testing, the proposed multifunctional NPs showed advanced photothermal and chemotherapeutic performance. Based on these enhanced anti-cancer properties, we expect that the proposed multifunctional NPs can be used as a drug-delivery system in cancer therapy.

  12. Viruses of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    , when one examines the archaeal viruses, the picture appears complex. Most viruses that are known to infect members of the kingdom Euryarchaeota resemble bacterial viruses, whereas those associated with the kingdom Crenarchaeota show little resemblance to either bacterial or eukaryal viruses....... This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of exceptional and highly diverse archaeal viruses....

  13. Hepatitis B Virus infection in Nigeria – a review | Emechebe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... virus in the general population also play role in Nigeria. Conclusion: Reduction in the of hepatitis B virus infection could be achieved by public enlightenment campaign, mass immunization of the children and adults at risk while antiviral drugs and immunostimulatory therapy should be provided for those already infected.

  14. HCVpro: Hepatitis C virus protein interaction database

    KAUST Repository

    Kwofie, Samuel K.

    2011-12-01

    It is essential to catalog characterized hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and the associated plethora of vital functional information to augment the search for therapies, vaccines and diagnostic biomarkers. In furtherance of these goals, we have developed the hepatitis C virus protein interaction database (HCVpro) by integrating manually verified hepatitis C virus-virus and virus-human protein interactions curated from literature and databases. HCVpro is a comprehensive and integrated HCV-specific knowledgebase housing consolidated information on PPIs, functional genomics and molecular data obtained from a variety of virus databases (VirHostNet, VirusMint, HCVdb and euHCVdb), and from BIND and other relevant biology repositories. HCVpro is further populated with information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) related genes that are mapped onto their encoded cellular proteins. Incorporated proteins have been mapped onto Gene Ontologies, canonical pathways, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and extensively cross-referenced to other essential annotations. The database is enriched with exhaustive reviews on structure and functions of HCV proteins, current state of drug and vaccine development and links to recommended journal articles. Users can query the database using specific protein identifiers (IDs), chromosomal locations of a gene, interaction detection methods, indexed PubMed sources as well as HCVpro, BIND and VirusMint IDs. The use of HCVpro is free and the resource can be accessed via http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/hcvpro/ or http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hcvpro/. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Influenza virus replication in macrophages: balancing protection and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Troy D; Beck, Donald; Bianchini, Elizabeth

    2017-10-01

    Macrophages are essential for protection against influenza A virus infection, but are also implicated in the morbidity and mortality associated with severe influenza disease, particularly during infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus. While influenza virus infection of macrophages was once thought to be abortive, it is now clear that certain virus strains can replicate productively in macrophages. This may have important consequences for the antiviral functions of macrophages, the course of disease and the outcome of infection for the host. In this article, we review findings related to influenza virus replication in macrophages and the impact of productive replication on macrophage antiviral functions. A clear understanding of the interactions between influenza viruses and macrophages may lead to new antiviral therapies to relieve the burden of severe disease associated with influenza viruses.

  16. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  17. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page ... Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus if you ...

  18. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  19. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  20. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  1. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  2. Polyomavirus specific cellular immunity: from BK-virus-specific cellular immunity to BK-virus-associated nephropathy ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    manon edekeyser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control virus replication and prevent chronic disease. Monitoring of specific immunity combined with viral load could be used to individually assess the risk of viral reactivation and virus control. We review the current knowledge on BK-virus specific cellular immunity and, more specifically, in immunocompromised patients. In the future, immune-based therapies could allow us to treat and prevent BK-virus-associated nephropathy.

  3. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  4. Computer Virus and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tutut Handayani; Soenarto Usna,Drs.MMSI

    2004-01-01

    Since its appearance the first time in the mid-1980s, computer virus has invited various controversies that still lasts to this day. Along with the development of computer systems technology, viruses komputerpun find new ways to spread itself through a variety of existing communications media. This paper discusses about some things related to computer viruses, namely: the definition and history of computer viruses; the basics of computer viruses; state of computer viruses at this time; and ...

  5. Feline immunodeficiency virus latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Despite highly effective anti-retroviral therapy, HIV is thought to persist in patients within long-lived cellular reservoirs in the form of a transcriptionally inactive (latent) integrated provirus. Lentiviral latency has therefore come to the forefront of the discussion on the possibility of a cure for HIV infection in humans. Animal models of lentiviral latency provide an essential tool to study mechanisms of latency and therapeutic manipulation. Of the three animal models that have been described, the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cat is the most recent and least characterized. However, several aspects of this model make it attractive for latency research, and it may be complementary to other model systems. This article reviews what is known about FIV latency and chronic FIV infection and how it compares with that of other lentiviruses. It thereby offers a framework for the usefulness of this model in future research aimed at lentiviral eradication. PMID:23829177

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients.

  7. IL28B, HLA-C, and KIR Variants Additively Predict Response to Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection in a European Cohort: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Suppiah, Vijayaprakash; Gaudieri, Silvana; Armstrong, Nicola J.; O'Connor, Kate S.; Berg, Thomas; Weltman, Martin; Abate, Maria Lorena; Spengler, Ulrich; Bassendine, Margaret; Dore, Gregory J.; Irving, William L.; Powell, Elizabeth; Hellard, Margaret; Riordan, Stephen; Matthews, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background About 170 million people harbor long-term (chronic) infections with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and 3–4 million people are newly infected with the virus every year. HCV—a leading cause of chronic hepatitis (inflammation of the liver)—is spread though contact with infected blood. Transmission can occur during medical procedures (for example, transfusions with unscreened blood or reuse of inadequately sterilized medical instruments) but in developed countries, where ...

  8. Accessing antiretroviral therapy for children: Caregivers' voices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite efforts to scale up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly at primary health care (PHC) facilities, antiretroviral therapy (ART) continues to be out of reach for many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive children in sub-Saharan Africa. In resource limited settings decentralisation of ART is required to ...

  9. Motivational interviewing and concordance with antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michelle; Bennett, Clare

    Concordance with therapy is essential in maintaining quality of life for individuals who have human immunodeficiency virus. This article examines the use of motivational interviewing in assisting people to increase their concordance with antiretroviral therapy. It investigates the evidence base for motivational interviewing and discusses its principles and techniques. The article highlights the benefits of adopting a holistic approach to the intervention.

  10. BREATHER (PENTA 16) short-cycle therapy (SCT) (5 days on/2 days off) in young people with chronic human immunodeficiency virus infection: an open, randomised, parallel-group Phase II/III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Karina; Inshaw, Jamie; Ford, Deborah; Bernays, Sarah; Scott, Karen; Kenny, Julia; Klein, Nigel; Turkova, Anna; Harper, Lynda; Nastouli, Eleni; Paparini, Sara; Choudhury, Rahela; Rhodes, Tim; Babiker, Abdel; Gibb, Diana

    2016-06-01

    For human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adolescents facing lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART), short-cycle therapy (SCT) with long-acting agents offers the potential for drug-free weekends, less toxicity, better adherence and cost savings. To determine whether or not efavirenz (EFV)-based ART in short cycles of 5 days on and 2 days off is as efficacious (in maintaining virological suppression) as continuous EFV-based ART (continuous therapy; CT). Secondary objectives included the occurrence of new clinical HIV events or death, changes in immunological status, emergence of HIV drug resistance, drug toxicity and changes in therapy. Open, randomised, non-inferiority trial. Europe, Thailand, Uganda, Argentina and the USA. Young people (aged 8-24 years) on EFV plus two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and with a HIV-1 ribonucleic acid level [viral load (VL)] of  12 months. Young people were randomised to continue daily ART (CT) or change to SCT (5 days on, 2 days off ART). Follow-up was for a minimum of 48 weeks (0, 4 and 12 weeks and then 12-weekly visits). The primary outcome was the difference between arms in the proportion with VL > 50 copies/ml (confirmed) by 48 weeks, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method (12% non-inferiority margin) adjusted for region and age. In total, 199 young people (11 countries) were randomised (n = 99 SCT group, n = 100 CT group) and followed for a median of 86 weeks. Overall, 53% were male; the median age was 14 years (21% ≥ 18 years); 13% were from the UK, 56% were black, 19% were Asian and 21% were Caucasian; and the median CD4% and CD4 count were 34% and 735 cells/mm(3), respectively. By week 48, only one participant (CT) was lost to follow-up. The SCT arm had a 27% decreased drug exposure as measured by the adherence questionnaire and a MEMSCap(™) Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMSCap Inc., Durham, NC, USA) substudy (median cap openings per week: SCT group, n = 5; CT group, n

  11. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Nandy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles, Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi′s sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis.

  12. Antiviral drug resistance of herpes simplex virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranska, Ruzena

    2004-01-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) usually have an asymptomatic or benign course. However, severe infections do occur, particularly in HIV/AIDS patients or transplant recipients, and may be life-threatening unless adequate antiviral therapy is given. Since its introduction in the early

  13. Transurethral prostatectomy in human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients and wise selection of patients that would benefit from such surgical therapy. Keywords: Human immunodeficiency virus infected patients, morbidity, risk of transmission, ... predominates in developed countries, in Africa, heterosexual route is the leading cause of HIV infection. This has not excluded older people.

  14. Transurethral prostatectomy in human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 63-year old man was admitted to our Hospital with urethral catheter in situ and having failed medical therapy, he opted for transurethral prostatectomy (TURP) which was done without any post-operative complication. He was known to be afflicted with human immunodeficiency virus and on treatment for 3 years. He also ...

  15. Application of CRISPR/Cas9 system in virus research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHENG Qingfen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9 system has been widely used to edit the genome in many species and cells. The system is the third generation of artificial endonuclease, which can edit DNA by recognizing short DNA sequences. This paper reviews the structural features of the system and its application in virus research, such as the functional studies of virus-related genes and the exploration of antiviral therapies (including HIV, HBV, and EB virus, looking forward to the future direction of virus research.

  16. Coinfecting viruses as determinants of HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2009-02-01

    The human body constitutes a balanced ecosystem of its own cells together with various microbes ("host-microbe ecosystem"). The transmission of HIV-1 and the progression of HIV disease in such an ecosystem are accompanied by de novo infection by other microbes or by activation of microbes that were present in the host in homeostatic equilibrium before HIV-1 infection. In recent years, data have accumulated on the interactions of these coinfecting microbes-viruses in particular-with HIV. Coinfecting viruses generate negative and positive signals that suppress or upregulate HIV-1. We suggest that the signals generated by these viruses may largely affect HIV transmission, pathogenesis, and evolution. The study of the mechanisms of HIV interaction with coinfecting viruses may indicate strategies to suppress positive signals, enhance negative signals, and lead to the development of new and original anti-HIV therapies.

  17. Impact of viruses on airway diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Johnston

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available There is strong epidemiological evidence that respiratory viral infections are associated with 80–85% of asthma exacerbations in children. There is less evidence in adults, but the available data suggest viruses are associated with around two-thirds to three-quarters of exacerbations in adults. These associations include severe exacerbations requiring hospitalisation. The most common viruses detected in these studies were rhinoviruses, accounting for two-thirds of viruses detected. Asthmatics have increased susceptibility to respiratory virus infection and have recently been shown to have profoundly defective interferon-beta responses to virus infection, resulting in increased virus replication. Atypical bacterial infections are also associated with chronic asthma and asthma exacerbations and a recent study indicates antibiotic therapy active against atypical bacteria is effective in treatment of exacerbations. Recent data also indicates asthmatics are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease, suggesting they may also have impaired antibacterial immunity. Research is urgently required to determine whether augmenting anti-infective immunity is beneficial in the treatment/prevention of asthma exacerbations. More recent data also implicates viruses in the majority of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Studies are also required investigating anti-infective host defence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  18. Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) Gene Therapy Equine Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist (IL-1Ra) Post-traumatic OA (PTOA) Self...AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0498 TITLE: Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven C...COVERED 30Sept 2014 - 29 Sept 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Gene Therapy for Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  19. The mechanisms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses for the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Artrish; Cadet, Valerie E; Hielscher, Abigail

    2015-09-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses for the treatment of cancer is an emerging field of cancer research and therapy. Oncolytic viruses are designed to induce tumor specific immunity while replicating selectively within cancer cells to cause lysis of the tumor cells. While there are several forms of oncolytic viruses, the use of vaccinia viruses for oncolysis may be more beneficial than other forms of oncolytic viruses. For example, vaccinia viruses have been shown to exert their anti-tumor effects through genetic engineering strategies which enhance their therapeutic efficacy. This paper will address some of the most common forms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses and will explore the mechanisms whereby they selectively target, enter and destroy cancer cells. Furthermore, this review will highlight how vaccinia viruses activate host immune responses against cancer cells and will address clinical trials evaluating the tumor-directed and killing efficacy of these viruses against solid tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards the Determination of the Structure of HIV-1 p24: A Possible Target for Antiviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prongay, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of targeting certain stages in the life cycle of the virus for antiviral therapy is discussed with reference to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1. Research conducted on a core antigen, p24, is described. (MSE)

  1. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B

    2016-08-02

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy.

  2. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  3. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  4. Photodynamic treatment of Herpes simplex virus infection in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Hester, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of photodynamic action on in vitro herpes simplex virus infections of CV-1 monkey kidney fibroblasts or human skin fibroblasts were determined using proflavine sulfate and white fluorescent lamps. Photodynamic treatment of confluent cell monolayers prior to virus infection inactivated cell capacity, i.e. the capacity of the treated cells to support subsequent virus growth as measured by plaque formation. The capacity of human cells was more sensitive to inactivation than the capacity of monkey cells when 6 μM proflavine was used. Treated cell monolayers recovered the capacity to support virus plaque formation when virus infection was delayed four days after the treatment. Experiments in which the photodynamically treated monolayers were infected with UV-irradiated virus demonstrated that this treatment induced Weigle reactivation in both types of cells. This reactivation occurred for virus infection just after treatment or 4 days later. A Luria-Latarjet-type experiment was also performed in which cultures infected with unirradiated virus were photodynamically treated at different times after the start of infection. The results showed that for the first several hours of the virus infection the infected cultures were more sensitive to inactivation by photodynamic treatment than cell capacity. By the end of the eclipse period the infected cultures were less sensitive to inactivation than cell capacity. Results from extracellular inactivation of virus growth in monkey cells at 6 μM proflavine indicated that at physiological pH the virus has a sensitivity to photodynamic inactivation similar to that for inactivation of cell capacity. The combined data indicated that photodynamic treatment of the cell before or after virus infection could prevent virus growth. Thus, photodynamic inactivation of infected and uninfected cells may be as important as inactivation of virus particles when considering possible mechanisms in clinical photodynamic therapy for herpes

  5. Changing faces in virology: the dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaid, Zineb; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Hoeben, Rob C

    2014-10-01

    Viruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transformation and cancer. On the other hand, viruses may provide hope: hope for an efficacious treatment of serious disease. Examples of the latter are the use of viruses as a vaccine, as transfer vector for therapeutic genes in a gene therapy setting, or, more directly, as therapeutic anticancer agent in an oncolytic-virus therapy setting. Already there is evidence for antitumor activity of oncolytic viruses. The antitumor efficacy seems linked to their capacity to induce a tumor-directed immune response. Here, we will provide an overview on the development of oncolytic viruses and their clinical evaluation from the Dutch perspective.

  6. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  7. Targeting Viral Proteostasis Limits Influenza Virus, HIV, and Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Nicholas S; Moshkina, Natasha; Fenouil, Romain; Gardner, Thomas J; Aguirre, Sebastian; Shah, Priya S; Zhao, Nan; Manganaro, Lara; Hultquist, Judd F; Noel, Justine; Sachs, David; Hamilton, Jennifer; Leon, Paul E; Chawdury, Amit; Tripathi, Shashank; Melegari, Camilla; Campisi, Laura; Hai, Rong; Metreveli, Giorgi; Gamarnik, Andrea V; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Simon, Viviana; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Krogan, Nevan J; Mulder, Lubbertus C F; van Bakel, Harm; Tortorella, Domenico; Taunton, Jack; Palese, Peter; Marazzi, Ivan

    2016-01-19

    Viruses are obligate parasites and thus require the machinery of the host cell to replicate. Inhibition of host factors co-opted during active infection is a strategy hosts use to suppress viral replication and a potential pan-antiviral therapy. To define the cellular proteins and processes required for a virus during infection is thus crucial to understanding the mechanisms of virally induced disease. In this report, we generated fully infectious tagged influenza viruses and used infection-based proteomics to identify pivotal arms of cellular signaling required for influenza virus growth and infectivity. Using mathematical modeling and genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we revealed that modulation of Sec61-mediated cotranslational translocation selectively impaired glycoprotein proteostasis of influenza as well as HIV and dengue viruses and led to inhibition of viral growth and infectivity. Thus, by studying virus-human protein-protein interactions in the context of active replication, we have identified targetable host factors for broad-spectrum antiviral therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oncolytic viruses: a step into cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol JG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan G Pol, Julien Rességuier, Brian D LichtyMcMaster Immunology Research Centre, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is currently under investigation in phase I–III clinical trials for approval as a new cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses (OVs selectively infect, replicate in, and kill tumor cells. For a long time, the therapeutic efficacy was thought to depend on the direct viral oncolysis (virocentric view. The host immune system was considered as a brake that impaired virus delivery and spread. Attention was paid primarily to approaches enhancing virus tumor selectivity and cytotoxicity and/or that limited antiviral responses. Thinking has changed over the past few years with the discovery that OV therapy was also inducing indirect oncolysis mechanisms. Among them, induction of an antitumor immunity following OV injection appeared to be a key factor for an efficient therapeutic activity (immunocentric view. Indeed, tumor-specific immune cells persist post-therapy and can search and destroy any tumor cells that escape the OVs, and thus immune memory may prevent relapse of the disease. Various strategies, which are summarized in this manuscript, have been developed to enhance the efficacy of OV therapy with a focus on its immunotherapeutic aspects. These include genetic engineering and combination with existing cancer treatments. Several are currently being evaluated in human patients and already display promising efficacy.Keywords: oncolytic virus, cancer immunotherapy, tumor antigen, cancer vaccine, combination strategies

  9. Research Advances: DNA Computing Targets West Nile Virus, Other Deadly Diseases, and Tic-Tac-Toe; Marijuana Component May Offer Hope for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment; New Wound Dressing May Lead to Maggot Therapy--Without the Maggots

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents three reports of research advances. The first report describes a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based computer that could lead to faster, more accurate tests for diagnosing West Nile Virus and bird flu. Representing the first "medium-scale integrated molecular circuit," it is the most powerful computing device of its type to…

  10. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Guided by the Single-Chain Fv of a Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Specifically and Effectively Eradicate Virus Reactivated from Latency in CD4+ T Lymphocytes Isolated from HIV-1-Infected Individuals Receiving Suppressive Combined Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingfeng; Zou, Fan; Lu, Lijuan; Chen, Cancan; He, Dalian; Zhang, Xu; Tang, Xiaoping; Liu, Chao; Li, Linghua; Zhang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Despite the advent of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), the persistence of viral reservoirs remains a major barrier to curing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Recently, the shock and kill strategy, by which such reservoirs are eradicated following reactivation of latent HIV-1 by latency-reversing agents (LRAs), has been extensively practiced. It is important to reestablish virus-specific and reliable immune surveillance to eradicate the reactivated virus-harboring cells. In this report, we attempted to reach this goal by using newly developed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell technology. To generate anti-HIV-1 CAR-T cells, we connected the single-chain variable fragment of the broadly neutralizing HIV-1-specific antibody VRC01 to a third-generation CAR moiety as the extracellular and intracellular domains and subsequently transduced this into primary CD8 + T lymphocytes. We demonstrated that the resulting VC-CAR-T cells induced T cell-mediated cytolysis of cells expressing HIV-1 Env proteins and significantly inhibited HIV-1 rebound after removal of antiviral inhibitors in a viral infectivity model in cell culture that mimics the termination of the cART in the clinic. Importantly, the VC-CAR-T cells also effectively induced the cytolysis of LRA-reactivated HIV-1-infected CD4 + T lymphocytes isolated from infected individuals receiving suppressive cART. Our data demonstrate that the special features of genetically engineered CAR-T cells make them a particularly suitable candidate for therapeutic application in efforts to reach a functional HIV cure. The presence of latently infected cells remains a key obstacle to the development of a functional HIV-1 cure. Reactivation of dormant viruses is possible with latency-reversing agents, but the effectiveness of these compounds and the subsequent immune response require optimization if the eradication of HIV-1-infected cells is to be achieved. Here, we describe the use of a chimeric antigen

  11. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man.

  12. Low primary and secondary HIV drug-resistance after 12 months of antiretroviral therapy in human immune-deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals from Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusine, John; Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Boer, Kimberly Rachel; Mukantwali, Enatha; Karita, Etienne; Gasengayire, Agnes; Jurriaans, Suzanne; de Jong, Menno; Ondoa, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Treatment outcomes of HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Rwanda are scarcely documented. HIV viral load (VL) and HIV drug-resistance (HIVDR) outcomes at month 12 were determined in a prospective cohort study of antiretroviral-naïve HIV patients initiating first-line therapy in

  13. Synthetic virology: engineering viruses for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Caitlin M; Kuypers, Brianna E; Lam, Michael T; Robinson, Tawana M; Zhao, Julia; Suh, Junghae

    2014-01-01

    The success of gene therapy relies heavily on the performance of vectors that can effectively deliver transgenes to desired cell populations. As viruses have evolved to deliver genetic material into cells, a prolific area of research has emerged over the last several decades to leverage the innate properties of viruses as well as to engineer new features into them. Specifically, the field of synthetic virology aims to capitalize on knowledge accrued from fundamental virology research in order to design functionally enhanced gene delivery vectors. The enhanced viral vectors, or 'bionic' viruses, feature engineered components, or 'parts', that are natural (intrinsic to viruses or from other organisms) and synthetic (such as man-made polymers or inorganic nanoparticles). Various design strategies--rational, combinatorial, and pseudo-rational--have been pursued to create the hybrid viruses. The gene delivery vectors of the future will likely criss-cross the boundaries between natural and synthetic domains to harness the unique strengths afforded by the various functional parts that can be grafted onto virus capsids. Such research endeavors will further expand and enable enhanced control over the functional capacity of these nanoscale devices for biomedicine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Reverse genetics of rabies virus: new strategies to attenuate virus virulence for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shimao; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunhua; Luo, Farui; Guo, Caiping

    2015-08-01

    Rabies is an ancient neurological disease that is almost invariably fatal once the clinical symptoms develop. Currently, prompt wound cleansing after exposing to a potentially rabid animal and vaccination using rabies vaccine combined with administration of rabies immune globulin are the only effective methods for post-exposure prophylaxis against rabies. Reverse genetic technique is a novel approach to investigate the function of a specific gene by analyzing the phenotypic effects through directly manipulating the gene sequences. It has revolutionized and provided a powerful tool to study the molecular biology of RNA viruses and has been widely used in rabies virus research. The attenuation of rabies virus virulence is the prerequisite for rabies vaccine development. Given the current challenge that sufficient and affordable high-quality vaccines are limited and lacking for global rabies prevention and control, highly cell-adapted, stable, and attenuated rabies viruses with broad cross-reactivity against different viral variants are ideal candidates for consideration to meet the need for human rabies control in the future. A number of approaches have been pursued to reduce the virulence of the virus and improve the safety of rabies vaccines. The application of reverse genetic technique has greatly advanced the engineering of rabies virus and paves the avenue for utilizing rabies virus for vaccine against rabies, viral vectors for exogenous antigen expression, and gene therapy in the future.

  15. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  16. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  17. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  18. Influenza (Flu) Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and antigenic shift. Transmission of Influenza Viruses from Animals to People Influenza A viruses also are found in many different animals, including ducks, chickens, pigs, whales, horses and seals. ...

  19. Zika Virus - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Zika Virus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Zika Virus - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  20. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  1. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  2. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix

  3. West Nile Virus Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Pheng Lim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV in 1999 in the USA, and its continued spread throughout the Americas, parts of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, underscored the need for WNV antiviral development. Here, we review the current status of WNV drug discovery. A number of approaches have been used to search for inhibitors of WNV, including viral infection-based screening, enzyme-based screening, structure-based virtual screening, structure-based rationale design, and antibody-based therapy. These efforts have yielded inhibitors of viral or cellular factors that are critical for viral replication. For small molecule inhibitors, no promising preclinical candidate has been developed; most of the inhibitors could not even be advanced to the stage of hit-to-lead optimization due to their poor drug-like properties. However, several inhibitors developed for related members of the family Flaviviridae, such as dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, exhibited cross-inhibition of WNV, suggesting the possibility to re-purpose these antivirals for WNV treatment. Most promisingly, therapeutic antibodies have shown excellent efficacy in mouse model; one of such antibodies has been advanced into clinical trial. The knowledge accumulated during the past fifteen years has provided better rationale for the ongoing WNV and other flavivirus antiviral development.

  4. Characterization of the virus-cell interactions by HIV-1 subtype C variants from an antiretroviral therapy-naïve subject with baseline resistance to the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Martin Roelsgaard

    The CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc (MVC) exerts its antiviral activity by binding to- and altering the conformation of the CCR5 extracellular loops such that HIV-1 gp120 no longer recognizes CCR5. Viruses that have become resistant to MVC through long-term in vitro culture, or from treatment failure...... in vivo, can use the MVCbound form of CCR5 for HIV-1 entry via adaptive alterations in gp120. Partial baseline resistance to another CCR5 inhibitor through this mechanism, AD101, has been noted recently in one subject (1). Here, we identified and characterized envelope (Env) clones with baseline...... related abstract by Jakobsen et al., “Preferential CCR5-usage by R5X4 subtype C HIV-1 imparts sensitivity to maraviroc and tempers disease progression”), nine subjects persistently harboured CCR5-using (R5) Envs to late stages of infection. Virus inhibition assays in NP2-CD4/CCR5 cells using Env...

  5. Regulatory T cells in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients are elevated and independent of immunological and virological status, as well as initiation of highly active anti-retroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, J.C.; Nielsen, S.D.; Vedel, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes a dysregulation of the immune system. This is caused by HIV-specific as well as non-specific mechanisms and has not been explained fully. In particular, knowledge is lacking about the potential role of host-mediated immunosuppressive mechan......(regs) was found to be independent of both immunological and virological status, indicating that initiation of HAART has minor effects on the T(reg) level in HIV-infected patients....

  6. Viral coinfection is shaped by host ecology and virus-virus interactions across diverse microbial taxa and environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Muñoz, Samuel L

    2017-01-01

    virus-virus interactions in coinfection with implications for phage therapy, microbiome dynamics, and viral infection treatments.

  7. Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M D, Baron; B, Holzer

    2015-08-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.

  8. Immunomodulation by viruses: the myxoma virus story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, P; Barrett, J; Cao, J X; Hota-Mitchell, S; Lalani, A S; Everett, H; Xu, X M; Robichaud, J; Hnatiuk, S; Ainslie, C; Seet, B T; McFadden, G

    1999-04-01

    Myxoma virus is a poxvirus pathogen of rabbits that has evolved to replicate successfully in the presence of an active immune response by an infected host. To accomplish this, the virus has developed a variety of strategies to avoid detection by or obstruct specific aspects of the antiviral response whose consolidated action is antagonistic to virus survival. We describe two distinct viral strategies carried out by viral proteins with which myxoma virus subverts the host immune response. The first strategy is the production of virus-encoded proteins known as viroceptors or virokines that mimic host receptors or cytokines. These seek to actively block extracellular immune signals required for effective virus clearance and produce a local environment in the infected tissue that is "virus friendly". The second strategy, carried out by intracellular viral proteins, seeks to retard the innate antiviral responses such as apoptosis, and hinder attempts by the infected cell to communicate with the cellular arm of the immune system. By studying these viral strategies of immune evasion, the myxoma system can provide insights into virus-host interactions and also provide new insights into the complex immune system.

  9. Increased T cell trafficking as adjunct therapy for HIV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Fryer, HR; Wolinsky, SM; McLean, AR

    2018-01-01

    Although antiretroviral drug therapy suppresses human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) to undetectable levels in the blood of treated individuals, reservoirs of replication competent HIV-1 endure. Upon cessation of antiretroviral therapy, the reservoir usually allows outgrowth of virus and approaches to targeting the reservoir have had limited success. Ongoing cycles of viral replication in regions with low drug penetration contribute to this persistence. Here, we use a mathematical mode...

  10. Characteristic of pandemic virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Characteristic of pandemic virus. The virus was highly transmissible. Risk of hospitalization was 2X and risk of death was about 11X more in comparison to seasonal influenza. Virus continues to be susceptible to Osaltamivir, the only drug available. Vaccines are available but ...

  11. Computer Virus Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  12. Myeloradiculopathy associated with chikungunya virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Anna M; Batra, Ayush; Colorado, Rene A; Lyons, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that is endemic to parts of Africa, South and Southeast Asia, and more recently the Caribbean. Patients typically present with fever, rash, and arthralgias, though neurologic symptoms, primarily encephalitis, have been described. We report the case of a 47-year-old woman who was clinically diagnosed with CHIKV while traveling in the Dominican Republic and presented 10 days later with left lower extremity weakness, a corresponding enhancing thoracic spinal cord lesion, and positive CHIKV serologies. She initially responded to corticosteroids, followed by relapsing symptoms and gradual clinical improvement. The time lapse between acute CHIKV infection and the onset of myelopathic sequelae suggests an immune-mediated phenomenon rather than direct activity of the virus itself. Chikungunya virus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of myelopathy in endemic areas. The progression of symptoms despite corticosteroid administration suggests more aggressive immunomodulatory therapies may be warranted at disease onset.

  13. Treatment of ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Paul E; Grabenstein, John D; Salim, Abdulbaset M; Rybak, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In March 2014, the largest Ebola outbreak in history exploded across West Africa. As of November 14, 2014, the World Health Organization has reported a total of 21,296 Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases, including 13,427 laboratory-confirmed EVD cases reported from the three most affected countries (Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone). As the outbreak of EVD has spread, clinical disease severity and national EVD case-fatality rates have remained high (21.2-60.8%). Prior to 2013, several EVD outbreaks were controlled by using routine public health interventions; however, the widespread nature of the current EVD outbreak as well as cultural practices in the affected countries have challenged even the most active case identification efforts. In addition, although treatment centers provide supportive care, no effective therapeutic agents are available for EVD-endemic countries. The ongoing EVD outbreak has stimulated investigation of several different therapeutic strategies that target specific viral structures and mechanisms of Ebola viruses. Six to eight putative pharmacotherapies or immunologically based treatments have demonstrated promising results in animal studies. In addition, agents composed of small interfering RNAs targeting specific proteins of Ebola viruses, traditional hyperimmune globulin isolated from Ebola animal models, monoclonal antibodies, and morpholino oligomers (small molecules used to block viral gene expression). A number of EVD therapeutic agents are now entering accelerated human trials in EVD-endemic countries. The goal of therapeutic agent development includes postexposure prevention and EVD cure. As knowledge of Ebola virus virology and pathogenesis grows, it is likely that new therapeutic tools will be developed. Deployment of novel Ebola therapies will require unprecedented cooperation as well as investment to ensure that therapeutic tools become available to populations at greatest risk for EVD and its complications. In this article, we

  14. Smac mimetics and oncolytic viruses synergize in driving anticancer T-cell responses through complementary mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Sun; Dastidar, Himika; Zhang, Chunfen; Zemp, Franz J; Lau, Keith; Ernst, Matthias; Rakic, Andrea; Sikdar, Saif; Rajwani, Jahanara; Naumenko, Victor; Balce, Dale R; Ewanchuk, Ben W; Taylor, Pankaj; Yates, Robin M; Jenne, Craig; Gafuik, Chris; Mahoney, Douglas J

    2017-08-24

    Second mitochondrial activator of caspase (Smac)-mimetic compounds and oncolytic viruses were developed to kill cancer cells directly. However, Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies also modulate host immune responses in ways we hypothesized would complement one another in promoting anticancer T-cell immunity. We show that Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies synergize in driving CD8 + T-cell responses toward tumors through distinct activities. Smac-mimetic compound treatment with LCL161 reinvigorates exhausted CD8 + T cells within immunosuppressed tumors by targeting tumor-associated macrophages for M1-like polarization. Oncolytic virus treatment with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV ΔM51 ) promotes CD8 + T-cell accumulation within tumors and CD8 + T-cell activation within the tumor-draining lymph node. When combined, LCL161 and VSV ΔM51 therapy engenders CD8 + T-cell-mediated tumor control in several aggressive mouse models of cancer. Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies are both in clinical development and their combination therapy represents a promising approach for promoting anticancer T-cell immunity.Oncolytic viruses (OV) and second mitochondrial activator of caspase (Smac)-mimetic compounds (SMC) synergistically kill cancer cells directly. Here, the authors show that SMC and OV therapies combination also synergize in vivo by promoting anticancer immunity through an increase in CD8 + T-cell response.

  15. Viruses of asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoli, Laura; Tiberini, Antonio; Vetten, Heinrich-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The current knowledge on viruses infecting asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is reviewed. Over half a century, nine virus species belonging to the genera Ilarvirus, Cucumovirus, Nepovirus, Tobamovirus, Potexvirus, and Potyvirus have been found in this crop. The potyvirus Asparagus virus 1 (AV1) and the ilarvirus Asparagus virus 2 (AV2) are widespread and negatively affect the economic life of asparagus crops reducing yield and increasing the susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stress. The main properties and epidemiology of AV1 and AV2 as well as diagnostic techniques for their detection and identification are described. Minor viruses and control are briefly outlined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding Ebola Virus Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Judson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus.

  17. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of small enveloped viruses with RNA genomes of 9000-13 000 bases. Most infect mammals and birds. Many flaviviruses are host-specific and pathogenic, such as hepatitis C virus in the genus Hepacivirus. The majority of known members in the genus Flavivirus are arthropod...... borne, and many are important human and veterinary pathogens (e.g. yellow fever virus, dengue virus). This is a summary of the current International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) report on the taxonomy of the Flaviviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/flaviviridae....

  18. Drosophila as a genetic model for studying pathogenic human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tamara T; Allen, Amanda L; Bardin, Joseph E; Christian, Megan N; Daimon, Kansei; Dozier, Kelsey D; Hansen, Caom L; Holcomb, Lisa M; Ahlander, Joseph

    2012-02-05

    Viruses are infectious particles whose viability is dependent on the cells of living organisms, such as bacteria, plants, and animals. It is of great interest to discover how viruses function inside host cells in order to develop therapies to treat virally infected organisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for studying the molecular mechanisms of replication, amplification, and cellular consequences of human viruses. In this review, we describe the advantages of using Drosophila as a model system to study human viruses, and highlight how Drosophila has been used to provide unique insight into the gene function of several pathogenic viruses. We also propose possible directions for future research in this area. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Real-time dynamic imaging of virus distribution in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean E Hofherr

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of viruses and gene therapy vectors is difficult to assess in a living organism. For instance, trafficking in murine models can usually only be assessed after sacrificing the animal for tissue sectioning or extraction. These assays are laborious requiring whole animal sectioning to ascertain tissue localization. They also obviate the ability to perform longitudinal or kinetic studies in one animal. To track viruses after systemic infection, we have labeled adenoviruses with a near-infrared (NIR fluorophore and imaged these after intravenous injection in mice. Imaging was able to track and quantitate virus particles entering the jugular vein simultaneous with injection, appearing in the heart within 500 milliseconds, distributing in the bloodstream and throughout the animal within 7 seconds, and that the bulk of virus distribution was essentially complete within 3 minutes. These data provide the first in vivo real-time tracking of the rapid initial events of systemic virus infection.

  20. Association of Adjuvant Antiviral Therapy with Risk of Cancer Progression and Deaths in Patients with Hepatitis-B-Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma following Curative Treatment: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Liu, Chun-Jen; Kuo, Raymond Nienchen; Lai, Chiu-Ling; Shau, Wen-Yi; Chen, Pei-Jer; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information about tumor status and the time at which antiviral therapy was initiated may have influenced effect estimation in previous research. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of antiviral therapies on HBV-related HCC progression and deaths in patients receiving curative treatment based on clear clinical-pathological cancer status and the association of start time of adjuvant antiviral therapy initiation and outcomes. Methodology A nationwide inception cohort study of newly diagnosed HCC patients who suffered from viral hepatitis B and received curative HCC therapy as the first course of treatment were identified from the Taiwan Cancer Registry between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009. Matched Cox proportional hazards models based on propensity score matching and incorporated time-varying exposure were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Findings Among 3,855 HCC patients with HBV, antiviral therapy was administered to 490 (12.7%) following curative treatment. Antiviral-treated patients had a higher percentage of young age, early stage, and smaller tumor size of HCC compared with untreated patients. After propensity score matching, treated patients demonstrated a higher risk of HCC progression (hazard ratio, 1.42; 95%CI, 1.20–1.69) and death from all causes (1.45; 1.15–1.82) than untreated patients. Similar results were also obtained in sub-cohort of patients who were alive with cancer-free status at least one year after receiving curative treatment and the sub-cohort of patients with liver resection. The interval length between initiation of antiviral therapy and first-line curative treatment did not show a significant association with all-cause mortality. Conclusions This study found that adjuvant antiviral therapy did not reduce the risk of HCC progression or mortality in HBV-related HCC patients after cancer status adjusting. PMID:25025231

  1. Protoplasts and plant viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakishi, H.; Lesney, M.S.; Carlson, P.

    1984-01-01

    The use of protoplasts in the study of plant viruses has attracted considerable attention since its inception in the late 1960s. This article is an attempt to assess the current status of protoplasts (primarily) and all cell cultures (in some instances) in studies of virus infection, virus replication, cytopathology, cross-protection, virus resistance, and the use of in vitro methods and genetic engineering to recover virus-resistant plants. These areas of study proved difficult to do entirely with whole plants or plant parts. However, because protoplasts could be synchronously infected with virus, they provided a valuable alternative means of following biochemical and cytological events in relation to the virus growth cycle in a more precise manner than previously possible

  2. Vaccinia virus immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G L

    1999-01-01

    Vaccinia virus expresses many virulence factors that are non-essential for virus replication in cell culture but are important in vivo. In this paper three mechanisms are described that are used by vaccinia virus to evade the host immune response to infection. One of these is the release of a soluble protein that binds CC chemokines and that is unrelated to cellular chemokine receptors. The other two mechanisms are displayed by virus particles that are released from infected cells. This form of vaccinia virus is called extracellular enveloped virus (EEV) and is resistant to neutralisation by antibody and to destruction by complement. Resistance to complement is mediated by the acquisition of host complement control proteins, particularly CD55, during virus release from infected cells.

  3. Optimization of Herpes Virus Infection Treatment in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.P. Kharchenko

    2012-03-01

    There was revealed the polymorphism of human herpes virus 6 in children associated with virus replication activity. The important role of chronic human herpes virus 6 in forming of sickly children group with involvement of nervous and cardiovascular systems and presence of the various clinical variants correlating with the form of an infection contamination is confirmed. Principles of stratification of patients, diagnostic and treatment approaches with account of clinical semiology and complex of molecular-genetic, serological, bacteriological, neurofunctional and cardiovascular examinations were developed. The treatment positive results allow to confirm the benefit from integrative multidisciplinary therapy.

  4. Antiviral resistance in herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piret, Jocelyne; Boivin, Guy

    2016-12-01

    Aciclovir (ACV) is the first-line drug for the management of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections. Long-term administration of ACV for the treatment of severe infections in immunocompromised patients can lead to the development of drug resistance. Furthermore, the emergence of isolates resistant to ACV is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent individuals with herpetic keratitis. This review describes the mechanisms involved in drug resistance for HSV and VZV, the laboratory diagnosis and management of patients with infections refractory to ACV therapy. Genotypic testing is more frequently performed for the diagnosis of infections caused by drug-resistant HSV or VZV isolates. Molecular biology-based systems for the generation of recombinant viruses have been developed to link unknown mutations with their drug phenotypes. Fast and sensitive methods based on next-generation sequencing will improve the detection of heterogeneous viral populations of drug-resistant viruses and their temporal changes during antiviral therapy, which could allow better patient management. Novel promising compounds acting on targets that differ from the viral DNA polymerase are under clinical development. Antiviral drug resistance monitoring for HSV and VZV is required for a rational use of antiviral therapy in high-risk populations.

  5. Activity of andrographolide against chikungunya virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Phitchayapak Wintachai; Parveen Kaur; Regina Ching Hua Lee; Suwipa Ramphan; Atichat Kuadkitkan; Nitwara Wikan; Sukathida Ubol; Sittiruk Roytrakul; Justin Jang Hann Chu; Duncan R. Smith

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has recently engendered large epidemics around the world. There is no specific antiviral for treatment of patients infected with CHIKV, and development of compounds with significant anti-CHIKV activity that can be further developed to a practical therapy is urgently required. Andrographolide is derived from Andrographis paniculata, a herb traditionally used to treat a number of conditions including infections. This stud...

  6. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  7. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION Hand Therapy is a type of rehabilitation performed by an occupational or physical therapist with patients that suffer from conditions affecting the hands and upper extremities. Therapy enables patients to hasten ...

  8. Electroconvulsive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007474.htm Electroconvulsive therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression ...

  9. Prospects for Foamy Viral Vector Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Nalla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell gene therapy approaches for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection have been explored in clinical trials and several anti-HIV genes delivered by retroviral vectors were shown to block HIV replication. However, gammaretroviral and lentiviral based retroviral vectors have limitations for delivery of anti-HIV genes into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC. Foamy virus vectors have several advantages including efficient delivery of transgenes into HSC in large animal models, and a potentially safer integration profile. This review focuses on novel anti-HIV transgenes and the potential of foamy virus vectors for HSC gene therapy of HIV.

  10. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  11. Therapy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Independent School District, TX.

    Reviewed are the goals and activities of the therapy services in the Austin Early Childhood Special Education Program. Specific sections detail activities for speech therapy (such as diagnostic assessment, habilitation, consultation, and reporting procedures), occupational therapy (including identification and assessment, and services to children,…

  12. Zika Virus: Medical Countermeasure Development Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert W.; Homan, Jane; Callahan, Michael V.; Glasspool-Malone, Jill; Damodaran, Lambodhar; Schneider, Adriano De Bernardi; Zimler, Rebecca; Talton, James; Cobb, Ronald R.; Ruzic, Ivan; Smith-Gagen, Julie; Janies, Daniel; Wilson, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reports of high rates of primary microcephaly and Guillain–Barré syndrome associated with Zika virus infection in French Polynesia and Brazil have raised concerns that the virus circulating in these regions is a rapidly developing neuropathic, teratogenic, emerging infectious public health threat. There are no licensed medical countermeasures (vaccines, therapies or preventive drugs) available for Zika virus infection and disease. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) predicts that Zika virus will continue to spread and eventually reach all countries and territories in the Americas with endemic Aedes mosquitoes. This paper reviews the status of the Zika virus outbreak, including medical countermeasure options, with a focus on how the epidemiology, insect vectors, neuropathology, virology and immunology inform options and strategies available for medical countermeasure development and deployment. Methods Multiple information sources were employed to support the review. These included publically available literature, patents, official communications, English and Lusophone lay press. Online surveys were distributed to physicians in the US, Mexico and Argentina and responses analyzed. Computational epitope analysis as well as infectious disease outbreak modeling and forecasting were implemented. Field observations in Brazil were compiled and interviews conducted with public health officials. PMID:26934531

  13. Zika Virus: Medical Countermeasure Development Challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Malone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reports of high rates of primary microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with Zika virus infection in French Polynesia and Brazil have raised concerns that the virus circulating in these regions is a rapidly developing neuropathic, teratogenic, emerging infectious public health threat. There are no licensed medical countermeasures (vaccines, therapies or preventive drugs available for Zika virus infection and disease. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO predicts that Zika virus will continue to spread and eventually reach all countries and territories in the Americas with endemic Aedes mosquitoes. This paper reviews the status of the Zika virus outbreak, including medical countermeasure options, with a focus on how the epidemiology, insect vectors, neuropathology, virology and immunology inform options and strategies available for medical countermeasure development and deployment.Multiple information sources were employed to support the review. These included publically available literature, patents, official communications, English and Lusophone lay press. Online surveys were distributed to physicians in the US, Mexico and Argentina and responses analyzed. Computational epitope analysis as well as infectious disease outbreak modeling and forecasting were implemented. Field observations in Brazil were compiled and interviews conducted with public health officials.

  14. Ebola virus disease: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Rajak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease is one of the most deadly ailments known to mankind due to its high mortality rate (up to 90% accompanying with the disease. Ebola haemorrhagic fever (EHF is an infectious disease of animal that can be transmitted to both human and non-human primates. The first epidemic of EHF occurred in 1976 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The incubation period of ebola is less than 21 days. Ebola virus infections are depicted by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that leads to damage of the vascular, coagulation and immune systems, causing multi-organ failure and shock. Five genetically distinct members of the Filoviridae family responsible for EHF are as follows: Zaire ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, Côte d’Ivoire ebolavirus, Bundibugyo ebolavirus and Reston ebolavirus. The ongoing 2014 West Africa ebola epidemic has been considered as the most serious panic in the medical field with respect to both the number of human cases and death toll. The natural host for ebola virus is unknown, thus it is not possible to carry out programs to regulate or abolish virus from transmission to people. The ebola virus infection provides little chance to develop acquired immunity causing rapid progression of the disease. It is pertinent to mention that at present, there is no antiviral therapy or vaccine that is helpful against ebola virus infection in humans. The impediment of EHF necessitates much better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease, particularly the role of wildlife, as well as bats, in the spread of ebola virus to humans.

  15. Herpes virus: A key missing piece of the periodontopathogenic jigsaw puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Babita R Pawar; Avneesh H Tejnani; Pramod P Marawar; Ameet M Mani

    2012-01-01

    A solid understanding of the etiology of periodontitis is critical for developing therapies that can ensure long-lasting disease control. Research during the past 15 years has implied that herpes viruses are involved in the etiopathogeny of destructive periodontal disease. Because of the high copy counts of Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus in aggressive and chronic periodontitis, it is unlikely that these pathogenic viruses are acting merely as innocuous bystanders present in proportion...

  16. Computational Studies of Benzoxazinone Derivatives as Antiviral Agents against Herpes Virus Type 1 Protease

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Juliana; Botelho, Nathália; Souza, Alessandra; Oliveira, Riethe; Brito, Monique; Abrahim-Vieira, Bárbara; Sodero, Ana; Castro, Helena; Cabral, Lucio; Miceli, Leonardo; Rodrigues, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus infections have been described in the medical literature for centuries, yet the the drugs available nowadays for therapy are largely ineffective and low oral bioavailability plays an important role on the inefficacy of the treatments. Additionally, the details of the inhibition of Herpes Virus type 1 are still not fully understood. Studies have shown that several viruses encode one or more proteases required for the production new infectious virions. This study presents a...

  17. Viruses of botrytis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Michael N; Bailey, Andrew M

    2013-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea (gray mold) is one of the most widespread and destructive fungal diseases of horticultural crops. Propagation and dispersal is usually by asexual conidia but the sexual stage (Botryotinia fuckeliana (de Bary) Whetzel) also occurs in nature. DsRNAs, indicative of virus infection, are common in B. cinerea, but only four viruses (Botrytis virus F (BVF), Botrytis virus X (BVX), Botrytis cinerea mitovirus 1 (BcMV1), and Botrytis porri RNA virus) have been sequenced. BVF and BVX are unusual mycoviruses being ssRNA flexous rods and have been designated the type species of the genera Mycoflexivirus and Botrexvirus (family Betaflexivirdae), respectively. The reported effects of viruses on Botrytis range from negligible to severe, with Botrytis cinerea mitovirus 1 causing hypovirulence. Little is currently known about the effects of viruses on Botrytis metabolism but recent complete sequencing of the B. cinerea genome now provides an opportunity to investigate the host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. There is interest in the possible use of mycoviruses as biological controls for Botrytis because of the common problem of fungicide resistance. Unfortunately, hyphal anastomosis is the only known mechanism of horizontal virus transmission and the large number of vegetative incompatibility groups in Botrytis is a potential constraint on the spread of an introduced virus. Although some Botrytis viruses, such as BVF and BVX, are known to have international distribution, there is a distinct lack of epidemiological data and the means of spread are unknown. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of occult hepatitis B virus among chronic hepatitis C patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ola Abd El Kader Mahmoud

    2015-09-12

    HBV) and hepatitis C virus ..... Table 2 Distribution of S, X, C and pol genes profile and liver enzymes among the 100 HCV positive patients. Gene profile. No ..... affect liver histology or response to therapy with interferon alpha.

  19. Postmortem stability of Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Joseph; Bushmaker, Trenton; Fischer, Robert; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Judson, Seth; Munster, Vincent J

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has highlighted questions regarding stability of the virus and detection of RNA from corpses. We used Ebola virus-infected macaques to model humans who died of Ebola virus disease. Viable virus was isolated <7 days posteuthanasia; viral RNA was detectable for 10 weeks.

  20. Hepatitis viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma. Michael C. Kew. Of the hepatitis viruses that have been identified and their pathological consequences characterised, three - hepatitis. B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis D virus. (HDV) - have been implicated as risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ...

  1. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  2. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  3. Long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy in chronic HIV-1 infection: evidence for reconstitution of antiviral immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Christine A.; Piriou, Erwan; de Cuyper, Iris M.; van Dort, Karel; Lange, Joep M. A.; Miedema, Frank; van Baarle, Debbie

    2006-01-01

    In this study we investigated the long-term effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on HIV-specific CD4+ T-cell responses in comparison with virus-specific CD4+ T-cell responses against the persistent herpes viruses cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). To this end, HIV-

  4. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili,, David; Basta, Tamara; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting members of Archaea, the third domain of life, constitute an integral, yet unique part of the virosphere. Many of these viruses, specifically the species that infect hyperthermophilic hosts, display morphotypes – for example, bottle shaped, spindle shaped, droplet shaped, coil...... proteins with exceptional structures and unknown functions. Moreover, the ways in which these viruses interact with their hosts are also unique, as indicated by a unique virion egress mechanism, which involves formation of pyramidal portals on the cell surface. Some viruses that infect extremely halophilic...... Archaea are morphologically highly similar to head‐tail bacterial viruses of the order Caudovirales and apparently share an ancestry with them. Identified archaeal viruses almost exclusively carry double‐stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genomes and only a few species have single‐stranded DNA genomes....

  5. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  6. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological features...... which have not been observed for viruses from the other domains of life, the Bacteria and the Eukarya. This exceptional status of the archaeal viruses is reinforced by the finding that a large majority of their predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public sequence databases, and their functions...... remain unknown. One of the viruses, the bicaudavirus ATV (Acidianus two-tailed virus), is quite unique in that it undergoes a major morphological change, growing long tail structures, extracellularly. A small minority of archaeal viruses, which exclusively infect mesophilic or moderately thermophilic...

  7. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, L.A. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom) Dept. of Computer Science; Goldberg, P.W. [Aston Univ., Birmingham (United Kingdom) Dept. of Applied Mathematics; Phillips, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorkin, G.B. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  8. Viruses infecting bivalve molluscs

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan; Novoa, Beatriz

    2004-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are filter feeders and as a consequence they may bioaccumulate in their tissues viruses that infect humans and higher vertebrates. However, there have also been described mortalities of bivalve molluscs associated with viruses belonging to different families. Mass mortalities of adult Portuguese oysters, Crassostrea angulata, among French livestocks (between 1967 and 1973) were associated with irido-like virus infections. Herpesviruses were reported in the eastern oyster, Pac...

  9. Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Laurence; Thill, Chloé; Pougnet, Richard; Auvinet, Henri; Giacardi, Christophe; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    A 21-year old woman from New-Caledonia had 40 ̊C fever with vomiting, arthralgia, myalgia, and measles-like rash. Etiological analyses showed primary infection with Zika virus. Because of severe clinical presentation, she was hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the Brest military Hospital. Zika virus is mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. If they settle in Metropolitan France, Zika virus might also spread there.

  10. The human oncogenic viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  11. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physicians patient education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • ... HIV Testing • For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the ...

  12. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological features...... remain unknown. One of the viruses, the bicaudavirus ATV (Acidianus two-tailed virus), is quite unique in that it undergoes a major morphological change, growing long tail structures, extracellularly. A small minority of archaeal viruses, which exclusively infect mesophilic or moderately thermophilic...

  13. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ...

  14. Water system virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    A monitoring system developed to test the capability of a water recovery system to reject the passage of viruses into the recovered water is described. A nonpathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, is fed into the process stream before the recovery unit and the reclaimed water is assayed for its presence. Detection of the marker virus consists of two major components, concentration and isolation of the marker virus, and detection of the marker virus. The concentration system involves adsorption of virus to cellulose acetate filters in the presence of trivalent cations and low pH with subsequent desorption of the virus using volumes of high pH buffer. The detection of the virus is performed by a passive immune agglutination test utilizing specially prepared polystyrene particles. An engineering preliminary design was performed as a parallel effort to the laboratory development of the marker virus test system. Engineering schematics and drawings of a fully functional laboratory prototype capable of zero-G operation are presented. The instrument consists of reagent pump/metering system, reagent storage containers, a filter concentrator, an incubation/detector system, and an electronic readout and control system.

  15. Viruses in renovated waters

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nupen, EM

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available to three logs ?4-. in a water treatment plant, a total of seven to eight log reduction in virus results. This leaves a water containing perhaps one TOlD of virus. per 1 000 litres. Shuval? ? suggests thht this is not an unimportant amount. On the basis...~~ water resources and by the direct treatment of waste water, is examined, as is the virus risk involved in the discharge of insufficiently treated wastewater into the environment. -~ VIRUSES IN RENOVATED WATERS Ethel 14. Nupen [National Institute...

  16. Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Michelle M.; Cotler, Scott J.

    2003-12-01

    Current treatment for hepatitis C virus infection consists of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The most important predictors of response to antiviral therapy for HCV include genotype 2 or 3 infection, baseline viral load less than 2 million copies/mL, and the absence of cirrhosis. Hepatitis C genotype and viral load should be obtained prior to initiating therapy. Liver biopsy can be used to stage the liver disease, to provide prognostic information, and to evaluate for coexisting causes of liver injury. Patients with genotype 1 infection require 48 weeks of therapy and a ribavirin dosage of 1000 to 1200 mg/d to achieve an optimal response. Patients with genotype 2 or 3 infection require only 24 weeks of treatment and a ribavirin dose of 800 mg/d. Treatment may be discontinued in patients who do not have a 100-fold reduction in hepatitis C virus RNA level from baseline at week 12 because they are unlikely to achieve a sustained response with further therapy. Patients with cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation or a small hepatocellular carcinoma should be evaluated for liver transplantation.

  17. Characterization of chemokine receptor utilization of viruses in the latent reservoir for human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, T; Hoffman, T L; Blankson, J; Finzi, D; Chadwick, K; Margolick, J B; Buck, C; Siliciano, J D; Doms, R W; Siliciano, R F

    2000-09-01

    Latently infected resting CD4(+) T cells provide a long-term reservoir for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and are likely to represent the major barrier to virus eradication in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms by which viruses enter the latent reservoir and the nature of the chemokine receptors involved have not been determined. To evaluate the phenotype of the virus in this compartment with respect to chemokine receptor utilization, full-length HIV-1 env genes were cloned from latently infected cells and assayed functionally. We demonstrate that the majority of the viruses in the latent reservoir utilize CCR5 during entry, although utilization of several other receptors, including CXCR4, was observed. No alternative coreceptors were shown to be involved in a systematic fashion. Although R5 viruses are present in the latent reservoir, CCR5 was not expressed at high levels on resting CD4(+) T cells. To understand the mechanism by which R5 viruses enter latent reservoir, the ability of an R5 virus, HIV-1 Ba-L, to infect highly purified resting CD4(+) T lymphocytes from uninfected donors was evaluated. Entry of Ba-L could be observed when virus was applied at a multiplicity approaching 1. However, infection was limited to a subset of cells expressing low levels of CCR5 and markers of immunologic memory. Naive cells could not be infected by an R5 virus even when challenged with a large inoculum. Direct cell fractionation studies showed that latent virus is present predominantly in resting memory cells but also at lower levels in resting naive cells. Taken together, these findings provide support for the hypothesis that the direct infection of naive T cells is not the major mechanism by which the latent infection of resting T cells is established.

  18. Characterization of Chemokine Receptor Utilization of Viruses in the Latent Reservoir for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Theodore; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Blankson, Joel; Finzi, Diana; Chadwick, Karen; Margolick, Joseph B.; Buck, Christopher; Siliciano, Janet D.; Doms, Robert W.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2000-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4+ T cells provide a long-term reservoir for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and are likely to represent the major barrier to virus eradication in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms by which viruses enter the latent reservoir and the nature of the chemokine receptors involved have not been determined. To evaluate the phenotype of the virus in this compartment with respect to chemokine receptor utilization, full-length HIV-1 env genes were cloned from latently infected cells and assayed functionally. We demonstrate that the majority of the viruses in the latent reservoir utilize CCR5 during entry, although utilization of several other receptors, including CXCR4, was observed. No alternative coreceptors were shown to be involved in a systematic fashion. Although R5 viruses are present in the latent reservoir, CCR5 was not expressed at high levels on resting CD4+ T cells. To understand the mechanism by which R5 viruses enter latent reservoir, the ability of an R5 virus, HIV-1 Ba-L, to infect highly purified resting CD4+ T lymphocytes from uninfected donors was evaluated. Entry of Ba-L could be observed when virus was applied at a multiplicity approaching 1. However, infection was limited to a subset of cells expressing low levels of CCR5 and markers of immunologic memory. Naive cells could not be infected by an R5 virus even when challenged with a large inoculum. Direct cell fractionation studies showed that latent virus is present predominantly in resting memory cells but also at lower levels in resting naive cells. Taken together, these findings provide support for the hypothesis that the direct infection of naive T cells is not the major mechanism by which the latent infection of resting T cells is established. PMID:10933689

  19. Low-level viremia and proviral DNA impede immune reconstitution in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Thim, Per T.

    2005-01-01

    Immunological and virological consequences of low-level viremia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) remain to be determined.......Immunological and virological consequences of low-level viremia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) remain to be determined....

  20. A new acyclic heterodinucleotide active against human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, P; Abu Sheikha, G; Cappellacci, L; Marchetti, S; Grifantini, M; Balestra, E; Perno, C; Benatti, U; Brandi, G; Rossi, L; Magnani, M

    2000-09-01

    The most common therapies against human herpes virus (HSV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infectivity are based on the administration of nucleoside analogues. Acyclovir (ACV) is the drug of choice against HSV-1 infection, while the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogue PMPA has shown marked anti-HIV activity in a phase I and II clinical studies. As monocyte-derived macrophages are assumed to be important as reservoirs of both HSV-1 and HIV-1 infection, new approaches able to inhibit replication of both viruses in macrophages should be welcome. ACVpPMPA, a new heterodinucleotide consisting of both an antiherpetic and an antiretroviral drug bound by a phosphate bridge, was synthesized and encapsulated into autologous erythrocytes modified to increase their phagocytosis by human macrophages. ACVpPMPA-loaded erythrocytes provided an effective in vitro protection against both HSV-1 and HIV-1 replication in human macrophages.

  1. Functional Reconstitution of Thymopoiesis after Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Scott G.; Killian, Scott; Giorgi, Janis V.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2000-01-01

    We have utilized combination antiretroviral therapy following human immunodeficiency virus type 1-induced human CD4+ thymocyte depletion in the SCID-hu mouse to examine the immune competence of reconstituting thymocytes which appear following administration of combination therapy. These cells express a normal distribution of T-cell receptor variable gene families and are responsive to costimulatory signals. These results suggest that normal thymic function may be restored following antiretroviral treatment. PMID:10684316

  2. A literature review on cardiovascular risk in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: implications for clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansueto Gomes Neto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In recent years, there has been growing concern about an increasing rate of cardiovascular diseases in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, which could be associated with side effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy. It is likely that the metabolic disorders related to anti-human immunodeficiency virus treatment will eventually translate into a increased cardiovascular risk in patients submitted to such regimens. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than human immunodeficiency virus infected patients not receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, or the general population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a computer-based search in representative databases, and also performed manual tracking of citations in selected articles. RESULT: The available evidence suggests an excess risk of cardiovascular events in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons compared to non-human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and morphological signs of cardiovascular diseases. Some evidence suggested that human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens are at increased risk of dyslipidemia, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction, particularly if the highly active antiretroviral therapy regimen contains a protease inhibitor. CONCLUSION: Physicians must weigh the cardiovascular risk against potential benefits when prescribing highly active antiretroviral therapy. Careful cardiac screening is warranted for patients who are being evaluated for, or who are receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens, particularly for those with known underlying cardiovascular risk

  3. Antiviral Perspectives for Chikungunya Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Parashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen that has a major health impact in humans and causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and, in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting for weeks to years. CHIKV reemerged in 2005-2006 in several parts of the Indian Ocean islands and India after a gap of 32 years, causing millions of cases. The re-emergence of CHIKV has also resulted in numerous outbreaks in several countries in the eastern hemisphere, with a threat to further expand in the near future. However, there is no vaccine against CHIKV infection licensed for human use, and therapy for CHIKV infection is still mainly limited to supportive care as antiviral agents are yet in different stages of testing or development. In this review we explore the different perspectives for chikungunya treatment and the effectiveness of these treatment regimens and discuss the scope for future directions.

  4. Acute encephalomyelitis with multiple herpes viral reactivations during abatacept therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideto; Takayama, Ayami; Ito, Takumi; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2013-05-09

    To describe the case of a patient who had been receiving abatacept, a T-cell costimulatory molecule blocker for rheumatoid arthritis, and developed an acute encephalomyelitis associated with reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). A 61-year-old woman receiving abatacept therapy for rheumatoid arthritis developed a disturbance of consciousness. MRI indicated multifocal parenchymal lesions in the brainstem, supratentorial areas and cervical spinal cord. Although steroid therapy significantly improved the neurological symptoms and MRI findings, the patient died of sepsis aggravated by coinfection with a fungal infection. Retrospectively, a PCR assay revealed continued systemic reactivation of VZV, EBV and CMV. Acute encephalomyelitis may be associated with VZV EBV and CMV reactivation during abatacept therapy. Clinicians must be aware of the possibility of acute encephalomyelitis associated with herpes virus reactivation during abatacept therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Oncology's Trojan Horse: Using Viruses to Battle Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavani, Heena J; Wick, Jeannette Y

    2016-12-01

    In 2016, the American health care system was faced with more than 1.6 million new cases of cancer, and individuals older than 65 years of age will be affected disproportionately. Many older individuals are poor candidates for traditional treatments (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation) because of actual or potential treatment-related adverse events. Researchers continuously look for novel therapeutic strategies, and an exciting new one is on the horizon: virotherapy. Viruses' ability to infect and kill human cells makes them promising cancer treatments. The greatest success has been seen in acute lymphocytic leukemia. To date, four genetically engineered oncolytic viruses have been approved globally by several countries' health regulatory agencies, but several challenges remain. Only one, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec), is available in the United States. Treatment-naive patients tend to respond better than patients receiving T-Vec as second-line therapy. Other good candidates for T-Vec include elderly patients who do not tolerate checkpoint inhibitors (the leading immunotherapy in advanced melanoma). Researchers continue to look for ways to increase oncolytic viruses' clinical potency. Once they do, these agents will become effective cancer therapy. GM-CSF = Genetically modified colony-stimulating factor, HIV = Human immunodeficiency virus, HSV-1 = Herpes simplex virus, OV = Oncolytic virus.

  6. [Genetic therapy in oncology: ethical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, L M; Fazio, V M

    2001-01-01

    The more advanced oncologic therapies are directing toward new frontiers, on account of the remarkable undesirable effects of chemio- and radio-therapies. This new therapeutic experiences are of type biological (vaccines), or genic (substitution again genes with shutters meaning-tumoral). This therapies involve, to be effected, some ethical shrewdnesses: choice of the patient, the engineering modality of the genes, the transfer of the genes in cells of the exclusively somatic line, the elimination of the pathogenic risk of the vector virus, the obligatory use of sterile rooms, the attention to the administration of the drug, a legal issue of the judgment of notoriety.

  7. Hepatitis viruses overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis is major cause of morbidity or mortality worldwide, particularly in the developing world. The major causes of infective hepatitis are hepatitis viruses. A, B, C, D or E. In the acute phase, there are no clinical features that can reliably differentiate between these viruses. Infection may be asymptomatic or can present as.

  8. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... collaboration with experts and other health agencies. Zika Strategic Response Framework العربية 中文 français русский español Highlight Zika virus disease Zika podcast series History of Zika: digital timeline Zika virus Q&A Mosquito-borne diseases ...

  9. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  10. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fever. Sexual transmission of Zika virus is also possible. Other modes of transmission such as blood transfusion are being investigated. Diagnosis Infection with Zika virus may be suspected based on symptoms and recent history of travel (e.g. residence in or travel ...

  11. Blue Tongue Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anupama

    thromboses and necrosis of infected tissues (Erasmus,. 1975) (Figure 1). In sheep, the onset of the disease is .... the skin to the local lymph nodes (Hemati et al., 2009), the sites of initial virus replication (MacLachlan, 2004). .... effects and provide protection against challenge with virulent virus of the same serotype. Animals ...

  12. Viruses in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Ellen

    2011-09-21

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself.

  13. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  14. Tobacco ringspot virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), and its vector, the dagger nematodes (Xiphinema americanum and related species) are widely distributed throughout the world. Cucumber, melon, and watermelon are particularly affected by TRSV. Symptoms can vary with plant age, the strain of the virus, and environment...

  15. Hepatitis E Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in the developing world. It is a waterborne virus that can cause epidemics in the face of overcrowding and poor sanitation. Although the hepatitis illness is usually self-limiting, it has a high mortality in pregnant women and can become a ...

  16. Strategy as a Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obed Madsen, Søren

    This article is based on virus theory (Røvik, 2007, 2011), and proposes to develop a framework that defines technology as a virus that penetrates the organism of an organization. The framework develops a new vocabulary, which can help in analyzing technologies and their negative effects on actors...... and organizations. In this paper, the virus theory is used to analyze a strategy process in an organization as an example of a technology. It shows how the strategy over time creates a memory loss, where the managers who are exposed to the virus forget their critique of the new strategy concept. The article also...... shows how resistant can be understood as being immune to a virus, since the strategy concepts bears resemblance to a former strategy concept. The article also argues that there should be more focus on the negative impacts of management tool and especially how organizations and managers are dealing...

  17. [EBOLA HEMORRHAGIC FEVER: DIAGNOSTICS, ETIOTROPIC AND PATHOGENETIC THERAPY, PREVENTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, K V; Zakharenko, S M; Kovalenko, A N; Semenov, A V; Fisun, A Ya

    2015-01-01

    The data on diagnostics, etiotropic and pathogenetic therapy, prevention of Ebola hemorrhagic fever are presented including diagnostic algorithms for different clinical situations. Fundamentals of pathogenetic therapy are described. Various groups of medications used for antiviral therapy of conditions caused by Ebola virus are characterized. Experimental drugs at different stages of clinical studies are considered along with candidate vaccines being developed for the prevention of the disease.

  18. Preclinical Development of New Therapy for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Baodong; Brooks, Elizabeth D.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) consists of more than 10 discrete conditions for which the biochemical and genetic bases have been determined, and new therapies have been under development for several of these conditions. Gene therapy research has generated proof-of-concept for GSD types I (von Gierke disease) and II (Pompe disease). Key features of these gene therapy strategies include the choice of vector and regulatory cassette, and recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing t...

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 diversity has an impact on vaccine efficacy and drug resistance. It is important to know the circulating genetic variants and associated drug-resistance mutations in the context of scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nigeria. The objective of this study was to ...

  20. Alteration in pancreatic islet function in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind the defects in insulin production and secretion associated with antihuman immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapy and the development of HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) are discussed in this article. Data suggesting insulin resistance on the beta cell...