WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapy alcohol smoking

  1. Smoking Cessation in Recovering Alcoholics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bracing: What Works?Mind/Body Connection: How Your Emotions Affect Your HealthLow-purine DietHealthy Ways to Gain Weight If You’re Underweight Home Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Self-care Smoking Cessation in Recovering Alcoholics Smoking ...

  2. Stuttering, alcohol consumption and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan, Milly; McAllister, Jan; Skinner, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Limited research has been published regarding the association between stuttering and substance use. An earlier study provided no evidence for such an association, but the authors called for further research to be conducted using a community sample. The present study used data from a community sample to investigate whether an association between stuttering and alcohol consumption or regular smoking exists in late adolescence and adulthood. Regression analyses were carried out on data from a birth cohort study, the National Child Development Study (NCDS), whose initial cohort included 18,558 participants who have since been followed up until age 55. In the analyses, the main predictor variable was parent-reported stuttering at age 16. Parental socio-economic group, cohort member's sex and childhood behavioural problems were also included. The outcome variables related to alcohol consumption and smoking habits at ages 16, 23, 33, 41, 46, 50 and 55. No significant association was found between stuttering and alcohol consumption or stuttering and smoking at any of the ages. It was speculated that the absence of significant associations might be due to avoidance of social situations on the part of many of the participants who stutter, or adoption of alternative coping strategies. Because of the association between anxiety and substance use, individuals who stutter and are anxious might be found to drink or smoke excessively, but as a group, people who stutter are not more likely than those who do not to have high levels of consumption of alcohol or nicotine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alcohol consumption and smoking status: the role of smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberger, Debra J; Grant, Kathleen

    2004-03-01

    Cigarette smoking is common among persons with alcohol dependence or abuse with as many as 80% of persons who are alcohol dependent also being smokers. Not only is smoking common in persons with heavy alcohol consumption, but also nicotine dependence appears more severe in smokers with a history of alcohol dependence. This combined exposure to both tobacco smoke and alcohol results in major health consequences including additive risks for some diseases such as head and neck cancers. Although modest alcohol consumption has some positive health benefits, smoking typically negates these benefits. The cellular mechanisms impacted by combined smoking and alcohol exposure are poorly understood, but molecular epidemiology approaches are providing insights regarding the importance of effects on oxidant/antioxidant pathways and on metabolic pathways involving the cytochrome P450 system. Given the prevalence of smoking in the alcohol dependent population, smoking cessation in this group has the potential for tremendous impact. In recent years, smoking cessation approaches have been initiated in this population, but much work remains in order to define the optimal smoking cessation strategies for persons in alcohol treatment programs.

  4. A review of technology-assisted self-help and minimal contact therapies for drug and alcohol abuse and smoking addiction: is human contact necessary for therapeutic efficacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G; Szkodny, Lauren E; Llera, Sandra J; Przeworski, Amy

    2011-02-01

    Technology-based self-help and minimal contact therapies have been proposed as effective and low-cost interventions for addictive disorders, such as nicotine, alcohol, and drug abuse and addiction. The present article reviews the literature published before 2010 on computerized treatments for drug and alcohol abuse and dependence and smoking addiction. Treatment studies are examined by disorder as well as amount of therapist contact, ranging from self-administered therapy and predominantly self-help interventions to minimal contact therapy where the therapist is actively involved in treatment but to a lesser degree than traditional therapy and predominantly therapist-administered treatments involving regular contact with a therapist for a typical number of sessions. In the treatment of substance use and abuse it is concluded that self-administered and predominantly self-help computer-based cognitive and behavioral interventions are efficacious, but some therapist contact is important for greater and more sustained reductions in addictive behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Medical therapy for smoking cessation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable morbidity and premature death. Physicians are in the unique position to promote smoking cessation and to support patients in quitting smoking is a key task for every single health care provider. Counselling smoking cessation is clearly shown to be both efficient and cost-effective in terms of years of live saved. Nicotine is highly addictive and to achieve long-term abstinence pharmacotherapy is frequently inevitable. Nicotine replacement therapy is efficacious and doubles the odds of permanently abstain from smoking. Further, strong evidence supports the use of buproprion, an atypical antidepressive agent, for quit smoking. Varenicline is the first medication specifically developed for smoking cessation. Varenicline is a partial agonist and antagonist at the nicotinic receptor that reduces craving, withdrawal symptoms and the reinforcing effect of smoking. This review summarises the current clinical data on the pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation and provides practical advice for daily clinical practice.

  6. Update on smoking cessation therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Glynn, Deirdre A

    2009-04-01

    As a reflection of an exponential increase in smoking rates throughout the world during the last century, the economic and human burden of mortality and morbidity related to smoking is now clearly defined. Smoking cessation is associated with health benefits for people of all ages. In this paper we provide a comprehensive review of current licensed pharmacological smoking cessation agents including efficacy and safety profiles, with comparisons of individual therapies available. Furthermore, we offer a prospective on the need for further testing of other agents including novel avenues of therapy.

  7. Smoking cessation therapy with varenicline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma M Mohanasundaram

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Uma M Mohanasundaram, Rajinder Chitkara, Ganesh KrishnaDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USAAbstract: Smoking cessation is the only available intervention proven to halt progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The authors discuss the current existing treatment modalities and the role of a newly approved agent, varenicline, in promotion of smoking cessation. Varenicline is a novel agent that is a centrally acting partial nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist. It has both agonistic and antagonistic properties that together are believed to account for reduction of craving and withdrawal as well as blocking the rewarding effects of smoking. Its targeted mechanism of action, better efficacy and tolerability makes varenicline a useful therapeutic option for smoking cessation. In this article, we discuss presently available options for smoking cessation and review the literature on efficacy of varenicline.Keywords: smoking cessation, varenicline, nicotine, receptors, therapy, COPD

  8. Cigarette smoking, passive smoking, alcohol consumption, and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Moore, David R; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; McCormack, Abby; Fortnum, Heather; Munro, Kevin J

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this large population-based cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between smoking, passive smoking, alcohol consumption, and hearing loss. The study sample was a subset of the UK Biobank Resource, 164,770 adults aged between 40 and 69 years who completed a speech-in-noise hearing test (the Digit Triplet Test). Hearing loss was defined as speech recognition in noise in the better ear poorer than 2 standard deviations below the mean with reference to young normally hearing listeners. In multiple logistic regression controlling for potential confounders, current smokers were more likely to have a hearing loss than non-smokers (odds ratio (OR) 1.15, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.21). Among non-smokers, those who reported passive exposure to tobacco smoke were more likely to have a hearing loss (OR 1.28, 95 %CI 1.21-1.35). For both smoking and passive smoking, there was evidence of a dose-response effect. Those who consume alcohol were less likely to have a hearing loss than lifetime teetotalers. The association was similar across three levels of consumption by volume of alcohol (lightest 25 %, OR 0.61, 95 %CI 0.57-0.65; middle 50 % OR 0.62, 95 %CI 0.58-0.66; heaviest 25 % OR 0.65, 95 %CI 0.61-0.70). The results suggest that lifestyle factors may moderate the risk of hearing loss. Alcohol consumption was associated with a protective effect. Quitting or reducing smoking and avoiding passive exposure to tobacco smoke may also help prevent or moderate age-related hearing loss.

  9. Therapeutic Adherence in Smoking Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Salvador Manzano

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic adherence is a complex and multidimensional concept. The percentage of adherence to treatments involving a change in lifestyle, such as quitting smoking, is lower than in other disorders, a fact which has relevant clinical, psychological and economic consequences. This paper aims to review the associated factors with adherence to therapy in smoking treatment. Strategies to enhance therapeutic adherence involve the adequate choice of treatment, to know the smoker´s characteristics, breaking down organizational barriers in health system and the training of health professionals in communication skills with patients.

  10. Smoking and alcohol cessation intervention in relation to radical cystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Susanne Vahr; Thomsen, Thordis; Kaldan, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite smoking and risky alcohol drinking being modifiable risk factors for cancer as well as postoperative complications, perioperative cessation counselling is often ignored. Little is known about how cancer patients experience smoking and alcohol interventions in relation to surgery....... The study also provides knowledge about the intervention in the STOP-OP study and will help guide the design of future smoking and alcohol cessation studies aimed at cancer patients undergoing surgery....

  11. Alcohol, smoking and benign hepato-biliary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Novovic, Srdan

    2017-01-01

    through effects on bile cholesterol metabolism, the enterohepatic circulation, and gallbladder function. The impact of smoking on gallstone formation seems minor. Both alcohol intake and smoking do not alter the clinical course of gallstone disease carriers. Cholecystectomy is the preferred treatment...... for symptomatic gallstone disease. Studies about the impact of alcohol and smoking on the post-cholecystectomy state are few and future studies should be performed. Pancreatitis is associated with both excessive alcohol intake and smoking in observational studies. Interpretation of associations with pancreatitis...... is hampered by an incomplete understanding of underlying mechanisms and by the co-existence of excessive alcohol intake and smoking. Smoking cessation and alcohol abstinence is recommended in the treatment of pancreatitis, but higher-level evidence is needed....

  12. Impact of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoke on renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    differences in degree of exposure to cigarette smoke and alcohol consumption will alter serum magnesium (Mg), Cobalt. (Co) and ... subjects using combined oral contraceptive, consuming alcohol and exposed to cigarette smoke may be at greater risks of diseases linked with ..... Food & Drug Interaction. Precept. Press ...

  13. Cigarette smoking, snuff use and alcohol drinking: the associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine patterns of tobacco chewing, smoking and alcohol drinking in a sample of young males. Method: The subjects answered a questionnaire concerning tobacco smoking habits, snuffing habits, consumption of alcohol and subjective evaluation of periodontal health and oral mucosa. The subjects with ...

  14. Impact of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoke on renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: Drugs and life style choices such as alcohol consumption and smoking are capable of independently altering levels of essential trace elements as well as tissue or organ function. The purpose of the study is to determine how differences in degree of exposure to cigarette smoke and alcohol consumption will alter ...

  15. Health status of hostel dwellers: Part VI. Tobacco smoking, alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Smoking, alcohol consumption and diet were among the criteria selected to screen health status among the residents of the urban migrant council-built hostels of Langa, Nyanga and. Guguletu outside Cape Town. Smoking patterns fell within the range found elsewhere. Problems associated with alcohol consumption were ...

  16. Differential Effects of Alcoholic Beverages and Cigarette Smoke on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. ABSTRACT: Cigarette smoking ... This study was designed to provide information on humoral immune responses in Nigerians that smoke cigarettes, consume alcohol or combine cigarette smoking ..... O.G. (2003). Basic Immunology for students of Medicine and Biology.

  17. Unhealthy behaviors during pregnancy : who continues to smoke and consume alcohol, and is treatment of anxiety and depressive symptoms effective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigated continued smoking and alcohol consumption during pregnancy, and treatment of anxiety and depressive symptoms during pregnancy using cognitive behavioral therapy. Data from a large prospective population-based cohort study and a randomized controlled trial were used.

  18. Alcohol, coffee, fish, smoking and disease progression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'hooghe, M. B.; Haentjens, P.; Nagels, G.; De Keyser, J.

    Background: Certain lifestyle factors might influence disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives: To investigate the consumption of alcoholic beverages, caffeinated drinks, fish and cigarette smoking in relation to disability progression in relapsing onset and progressive onset MS.

  19. Differential Effects of Alcoholic Beverages and Cigarette Smoke on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption are among social practices of some Nigerian youths. These practices have adverse health consequences but the basis of which is yet to be elucidated. This study was designed to provide information on humoral immune responses in Nigerians that smoke cigarettes, consume ...

  20. Physical activity, alcohol use, smoking and dietary profiles of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overweight and obesity among students as a specific sub-group, is an area of concern. Lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking, drinking of alcoholic beverages and poor dietary habits are inextricably linked to overweight and obesity. Little is known about trends in smoking, drinking, dietary habits and physical activity ...

  1. Factors Related to Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Use among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Vilhjalmsson, Runar

    1991-01-01

    Examined predictors of cigarette smoking and alcohol use in nationwide sample of 1,200 Icelandic adolescents. Found that use of tobacco and alcohol was related to sex, residence, hours of paid work, physical activities, social network, educational performance and beliefs, and psychological distress. Concludes that existing theoretical perspectives…

  2. Alcohol use, drunkenness and tobacco smoking in rural western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, T Q; Oeltmann, J E; Odhiambo, F O; Beynon, C; Pevzner, E; Cain, K P; Laserson, K F; Phillips-Howard, P A

    2013-04-01

    To describe the prevalence of smoking and alcohol use and abuse in an impoverished rural region of western Kenya. Picked from a population-based longitudinal database of demographic and health census data, 72 292 adults (≥18 years) were asked to self-report their recent (within the past 30 days) and lifetime use of tobacco and alcohol and frequency of recent 'drunkenness'. Overall prevalence of ever smoking was 11.2% (11.0-11.5) and of ever drinking, 20.7% (20.4-21.0). The prevalence of current smoking was 6.3% (6.1-6.5); 5.7% (5.5-5.9) smoked daily. 7.3% (7.1-7.5) reported drinking alcohol within the past 30 days. Of these, 60.3% (58.9-61.6) reported being drunk on half or more of all drinking occasions. The percentage of current smokers rose with the number of drinking days in a month (P alcohol use increased with decreasing socio-economic status and amongst women in the oldest age group (P alcohol use are prevalent in this rural region of Kenya. Abuse of alcohol is common and likely influenced by the availability of cheap, home-manufactured alcohol. Appropriate evidence-based policies to reduce alcohol and tobacco use should be widely implemented and complemented by public health efforts to increase awareness of their harmful effects. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. In-utero exposure to smoking, alcohol, coffee, and tea and risk of strabismus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Tobias; Boyd, Heather A; Poulsen, Gry

    2010-01-01

    and 2003. Maternal smoking was associated with a significantly elevated risk of strabismus in the child, increasing with number of cigarettes smoked per day ( or =10 cigarettes/day: RR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.57, 2.30). Nicotine replacement therapy was not associated with strabismus risk (RR = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.......92, 1.61). Light maternal alcohol consumption was inversely associated with strabismus risk, whereas maternal coffee and tea drinking were not associated with strabismus risk. In conclusion, smoking during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of strabismus in the offspring. Conversely, light...

  4. Age of onset of smoking among alcohol dependent men attending substance abuse treatment after a domestic violence arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Caroline J; Weinberger, Andrea H; George, Tony P

    2007-10-01

    This study examined differences between alcohol dependent offenders of intimate partner violence (IPV) with early initiation of cigarette smoking versus alcohol dependent offenders of IPV with later initiation of cigarette smoking. Seventy-eight alcohol dependent men who were arrested for domestic and referred to substance abuse treatment were randomly assigned to manual-guided behavioral therapies (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Twelve Step Facilitation). Sixty-two clients reported smoking cigarettes (85%) while 52 reported smoking cigarettes (71%) on a daily basis. Early initiation of smoking was defined as smoking cigarettes before the age of 16 years of age, while later initiation of smoking was defined as smoking cigarettes from 16.5 years and older. Regarding baseline characteristics, participants assigned to the early initiation of smoking condition had significantly more domestic violence arrests and significantly higher anger expression scores at baseline compared to the late smoking initiation group. Despite more severity of substance abuse, legal and violence characteristics at the baseline assessment in the early initiation group, both smoking initiation groups responded equally as well across 12 weeks of manualized behavioral treatments. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Aggression among male alcohol-dependent inpatients who smoke cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatcioglu, Omer; Erim, Rahsan

    2009-12-01

    The authors aimed to explore the relation between nicotine dependence and the severity of aggression among Turkish male alcohol-dependent inpatients who smoked cigarettes, as well as the effect of aggression in these groups. Participants were 126 male alcohol-dependent inpatients who were given the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Substance Use Disorder Module (A. Corapcioglu, O. Aydemir, & M. Yildiz, 1999; M. B. First, R. L. Spitzer, & J. B. W. Williams, 1997), the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (K. O. Fagerstrom, 1978), and the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS; S. C. Yudofsky, J. M. Silver, W. Jackson, J. Endicott, & D. Williams, 1986). The authors found differences between male alcohol-dependent inpatients with nicotine dependence (n = 94) and those with nondependence (n = 32) in OAS subtypes. The authors' findings showed that smoking cigarettes-an addiction frequently observed with alcoholism-was positively correlated with aggressive behaviors. The authors suggest that smoking cigarettes may cause aggression or aggression may cause smoking. Observing and evaluating how aggression and smoking cigarettes are associated with alcohol dependence may help relapse prevention and improve effectiveness of treatment interventions in alcoholism.

  6. Evidence of genotoxicity in lymphocytes of non-smoking alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santovito, Alfredo; Cervella, Piero; Delpero, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a significant public health issue. Epidemiological studies conducted on different populations consistently showed that consumption of alcoholic beverages is associated with cytogenetic damages and higher risk for several types of cancer. However, the interpretation of many cytogenetic studies resulted complicated because some confounding factors, such as smoking habit, are not always taken into account. In the present study, the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), chromosome aberrations (CAs) and micronuclei (MNs) in cultured human lymphocytes was assessed on 15 alcoholic and 15 non-alcoholic control male subjects. Moreover, considering the implication of the Glutathione S-transferases gene polymorphisms in the genetic susceptibility to alcoholic liver diseases, we considered an important issue to evaluate the relationship between these gene polymorphisms and the cytogenetic damage. In our sample we exclusively considered individuals that did not smoke nor consume drugs for a period of at least 2 years prior to the analysis. Statistically significant differences were found between alcoholics and controls in the frequency of SCEs/cell (P = 0.001), RI value (P = 0.001), CAs (P = 0.002) and CAB (P = 0.002). Vice versa, no significant differences were found between alcoholics and controls in terms of MNs frequency and CBPI value. In both samples, no statistically significant association was found between the analysed GSTs gene polymorphisms and the frequencies of MNs, SCEs and CAs. Finally, among alcoholics we found a positive correlation between SCEs and CAs frequencies and the duration of alcohol abuse.

  7. Differences in dietary intake with smoking, alcohol, and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, C; Negri, E; Franceschi, S; Parazzini, F; Decarli, A

    1992-01-01

    Differences in the frequency of consumption of 30 selected foods and in the estimated intake of total calories and selected nutrients in relation to alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking, and education were described using information obtained from 1,774 controls of a case-control study of digestive tract cancers conducted in northern Italy. Heavy alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, and lower level of education were associated with a diet poorer in several aspects, including lower consumption of fresh fruit and green vegetables and higher intake of specific indicator foods, such as sausages and canned meat. For instance, the mean number of portions of fresh fruit per week was 10.5 among male nondrinkers vs. 9.0 among heavy drinkers, 10.4 among male nonsmokers vs. 8.1 among heavy smokers, and 8.8 in less educated individuals vs. 10.7 among those more educated. Consequently, intake of beta-carotene, ascorbic acid, and calcium tended to be inversely related to alcohol and tobacco and directly related to education. Most associations were stronger in males, for whom alcohol consumption was also more common in less educated individuals. Calorie intake was directly related to alcohol consumption, largely reflecting calories provided by alcohol itself. However, alcohol drinking was also directly related to fat consumption. In both sexes, there was a strong positive correlation between cigarette smoking and coffee drinking. These results provide quantitative documentation that alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking, and education, three of the major determinants of cancer risks, were also correlates of dietary patterns and, hence, may exert an important confounding or modifying effect on the diet and cancer relationship.

  8. Inpatient smoking cessation therapy: truth or dare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Gabriela; Schroeder, Yvonne; Schoberberger, Rudolf

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to answer the question to which extent even very heavy nicotine-dependent smokers can benefit from a 3-week inpatient smoking cessation program. A particular focus lies on analyzing the positive effects, which go above and beyond normally anticipated health benefits. This is a descriptive study observing 270 patients over a 1-year period consisting of recruitment, therapy, and two post-therapy follow-up visits at 6-month interval. Gender differences, changes in body weight, and factors relating to addiction and the nicotine withdrawal process are analyzed. In comparing successful participants-post-therapy nonsmokers-with less successful ones, our analysis identifies benefits and advantages an inpatient smoking cessation therapy can bring to even the heaviest smokers. At the 12-month post-therapy follow-up visit, 42.6% of participants were identified as nonsmokers. A total of 34.0% of participants took up smoking again. No data is available on the remaining participants. Nonsmokers experienced significant reduction in nicotine craving and withdrawal symptoms. In terms of body weight, increases were found in both, men and women, nonsmokers and smokers. Successful quitters fail to report of an unbearable strong desire to smoke. Such unfounded fear should be communicated. Weight gain remains an undesired side effect. Hence, it is crucial to diagnose individuals more prone to weight gain and offer coping strategies thus reducing the risk of developing obesity. Nevertheless, the outcome of the study should be an encouragement to also heavy smokers and empower them to undertake smoking cessation.

  9. [Smoking cessation therapy in thoracic oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, A-M; Amrioui, F; Gounant, V; Wislez, M; Bouvier, F; Cadranel, J

    2013-10-01

    In France, the number of tobacco-related deaths is estimated at 73,000 per year, including 44,000 from cancer and more than 20,000 from lung cancer (LC). Smoking cessation is the most effective measure to reduce the epidemic of LC, but it is also important in the management of patients with LC regardless on stage. In localized cancers, continuing to smoke is associated with decreased survival by increasing the risk of recurrence and of developing a second cancer. During the perioperative period, smoking cessation reduces infectious complications and length of hospitalization. At all stages of the cancer, smoking cessation improves dyspnoea and appetite, and reduces fatigue, leading to improved quality of life. Tobacco addiction causes a strong physical, psychological and behavioral dependence, explaining the high rate of recurrence at 1year of approximately 80%. Nicotine replacement therapy is indicated in cases of physical addiction to nicotine. Cognitive behavioral therapy helps the smoker to get rid of the smoking habit and is important in preventing relapse. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in cigarette smoking and coffee drinking after alcohol detoxification in alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, H J; Laureaux, C; Tilikete, S; Barrucand, D

    1999-03-01

    To assess the changes in cigarette smoking and coffee drinking after alcohol detoxification in alcoholics. Evaluation at admission and an average 16 days following discharge. Alcohol detoxification inpatient programme. Seventy-three alcohol dependent (DSM-III-R) inpatients. Average number of cigarettes and of cups of coffee per day; urine cotinine level. Smokers were classified as moderate on the basis of consuming fewer than 30 cigarettes per day at the time of admission; heavy smokers were those who smoked 30 cigarettes per day or more. As a group, the smokers (N = 58) did not significantly change their cigarette consumption and there was no change in urine cotinine level. Heavy smokers (N = 34), however, significantly decreased their cigarette consumption, but urine cotinine was unchanged. Moderate smokers (N = 24) significantly increased their cigarette consumption but urine cotinine was not significantly changed. All patients--non-smokers, moderate and heavy smokers--significantly increased their coffee intake. The results suggest that heavy smokers may react to alcohol cues and thus reduce smoking activity when sober. Moderate smokers may increase their smoking rate to cope with alcohol abstinence. These changes appear only to reflect a behavioural adjustment, without modification of patients' nicotine-seeking. Alcoholics may increase their coffee intake to cope with alcohol abstinence.

  11. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and incidence of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, S C; Wolk, A; Bäck, M

    2017-10-01

    Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are modifiable lifestyle factors with important impact on public health. It is unclear whether these factors influence the risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). To investigate the associations of alcohol consumption and smoking, including smoking intensity and time since cessation, with AVS incidence in two prospective cohorts. This analysis was based on data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, comprising 69 365 adults without cardiovascular disease at baseline. Participants were followed for AVS incidence and death by linkage to the Swedish National Patient and Causes of Death Registers. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression. Over a mean follow-up of 15.3 years, 1249 cases of AVS (494 in women and 755 in men) were recorded. Compared with never drinkers of alcohol (lifelong abstainers), the risk of AVS was significantly lower in current light drinkers (1-6 drinks per week [1 drink = 12 g alcohol]; multivariable HR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.68-0.99). The risk of AVS increased with increasing smoking intensity. Compared with never smokers, the HR was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.16-1.85) in current smokers of ≥30 pack-years. Former smokers who had quit smoking 10 or more years previously had similar risk for AVS as never smokers. This study suggests that current light alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of AVS, and indicates that the association between smoking and AVS risk is reversible. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  12. Are alcohol intake and smoking associated with mycosis fungoides?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suárez-Varela, M.M.M.; Olsen, J.; Kærlev, L.

    2001-01-01

    cases of MF and 2899 controls. Wine intake had no protective effect; on the contrary the consumption of more than 24 g of alcohol per day was associated with a high risk of MF (odds ratio (OR)=3.02, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.34-6.79), after adjusting for centre, country, age, sex and education....... There was a dose-dependent increase in the risk of MF with increased smoking habits, albeit the observed trend was not statistically significant. A combined exposure to high tobacco and alcohol use yielded a significantly increased risk factor for MF (P=0.0073). Alcohol intake was associated with MF....

  13. The effect of chronic alcohol intoxication and smoking on the activity of oral peroxidase The effect of chronic alcohol intoxication and smoking on the activity of oral peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleon Waszkiewicz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase is the most important antioxidant enzyme in saliva. Through peroxidation of thiocyanate in
    the presence of H2O2, peroxidase catalyses the formation of bacteriocidic compounds such as hypothiocyanate.
    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic alcohol intoxication and smoking on the activity
    of oral peroxidase (OPO. A total of 37 volunteers participated in the study. This cohort consisted of 17 male
    alcohol-dependent smoking patients after chronic alcohol intoxication (AS group, alcohol + smoking (mean
    age: 42 years; range: 26–55 (100–700 g/day of alcohol; 10–20 cigarettes/day and 20 control male social drinkers
    (CNS group, control non-smokers with no history of alcohol abuse or smoking (mean age: 42 years; range:
    30–53. Salivary peroxidase activity was measured by the colorimetric method. The differences between groups
    were evaluated using the Mann–Whitney U test. There was significantly higher activity of OPO (p = 0.00001
    and significantly lower salivary flow (SF (p = 0.007 in alcohol-dependent smokers after chronic alcohol intoxication
    compared to the control group. OPO activity significantly correlated with the number of days of alcohol
    intoxication, but not with smoking. Gingival index (GI was significantly higher in smoking alcohol-dependent
    persons than in the control group, and correlated with OPO activity. The sensitivity of the OPO test was 70% in
    smoking alcoholics, while specificity was 95%. The increased activity of OPO suggests chronic oxidative stress is
    more likely due to ethanol action than to smoking. Smoking alcohol-dependent persons have a worse periodontal
    status than controls. OPO activity as a marker of chronic alcohol abuse may help in the diagnosis of alcoholism.Peroxidase is the most important antioxidant enzyme in saliva. Through peroxidation of thiocyanate in
    the presence of H2O2, peroxidase

  14. Cigarette smoking initiation during college predicts future alcohol involvement: A matched-samples study

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, MG; Doran, NM; Edland, SD; Amanda Schweizer, C; Wall, TL

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the relationship between cigarette smoking initiation and subsequent alcohol involvement. To address this question, the present study compared alcohol use between students who initiated smoking during college and a matched sample of never-smoking students. We hypothesized greater increases in alcohol involvement among smoking initiators, mediated by exposure to cigarette use situations. Method: Included in the present study were 104 Chinese American and Korean...

  15. Group behaviour therapy programmes for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Lindsay F; Carroll, Allison J; Lancaster, Tim

    2017-03-31

    Group therapy offers individuals the opportunity to learn behavioural techniques for smoking cessation, and to provide each other with mutual support. To determine the effect of group-delivered behavioural interventions in achieving long-term smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register, using the terms 'behavior therapy', 'cognitive therapy', 'psychotherapy' or 'group therapy', in May 2016. Randomized trials that compared group therapy with self-help, individual counselling, another intervention or no intervention (including usual care or a waiting-list control). We also considered trials that compared more than one group programme. We included those trials with a minimum of two group meetings, and follow-up of smoking status at least six months after the start of the programme. We excluded trials in which group therapy was provided to both active therapy and placebo arms of trials of pharmacotherapies, unless they had a factorial design. Two review authors extracted data in duplicate on the participants, the interventions provided to the groups and the controls, including programme length, intensity and main components, the outcome measures, method of randomization, and completeness of follow-up. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up in participants smoking at baseline. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial, and biochemically-validated rates where available. We analysed participants lost to follow-up as continuing smokers. We expressed effects as a risk ratio for cessation. Where possible, we performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect (Mantel-Haenszel) model. We assessed the quality of evidence within each study and comparison, using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool and GRADE criteria. Sixty-six trials met our inclusion criteria for one or more of the comparisons in the review. Thirteen trials compared a group programme with a self

  16. The short- and long-run effects of smoking cessation on alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukert, Benjamin

    2017-12-01

    This paper examines the short- and long-term effects of quitting smoking on alcohol consumption using the Lung Health Study, a randomized smoking cessation program. The paper estimates the relationship between smoking and alcohol consumption using several self-reported and objective smoking measures, while also implementing a two-stage least squares estimation strategy that utilizes the randomized smoking cessation program assignment as an instrument for smoking. The analysis leads to three salient findings. First, self-reported and clinically verified smoking measures provide mixed evidence on the short-term impact of quitting smoking on alcohol consumption. Second, the long-term impact of smoking on alcohol consumption, measured with the historic 5 years smoking behavior, suggests that those with the highest average cigarette consumption and those with the longest smoking history see the largest increase in alcohol consumption. Specifically, abstaining from smoking or reducing the average cigarette consumption to the mean level lowers alcohol consumption by roughly 25% per week. As a result, these findings present comprehensive evidence that smoking and drinking are complements in the long-term and that the public health and finance benefits in smoking cessations treatments are undervalued.

  17. Building the basis for primary prevention : Factors related to cigarette smoking and alcohol use among adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Kristjánsson, Álfgeir Logi

    2010-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking and alcohol use influence morbidity and premature death all over the world. Studies have shown that most life-time smokers and adult heavy drinkers began their use during their adolescent years and between 80-90% of them before the age of 18. Thus, early onset of smoking and alcohol use increases the risk of later dependence. Alcohol use and cigarette smoking among adolescents are also strongly correlated behaviors. Adolescents who initiate sm...

  18. Geospatial analysis on the distributions of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sze Hang; Jha, Prabhat; Gupta, Prakash C; Kumar, Rajesh; Dikshit, Rajesh; Sinha, Dhirendra

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco smoking and binge alcohol drinking are two of the leading risk factors for premature mortality worldwide. In India, studies have examined the geographic distributions of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking only at the state-level; sub-state variations and the spatial association between the two consumptions are poorly understood. We used data from the Special Fertility and Mortality Survey conducted in 1998 to examine the geographic distributions of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking at the district and postal code levels. We used kriging interpolation to generate smoking and drinking distributions at the postal code level. We also examined spatial autocorrelations and identified spatial clusters of high and low prevalence of smoking and drinking. Finally, we used bivariate analyses to examine the spatial correlations between smoking and drinking, and between cigarette and bidi smoking. There was a high prevalence of any smoking in the central and northeastern states, and a high prevalence of any drinking in Himachal Pradesh, Arunachal Pradesh, and eastern Madhya Pradesh. Spatial clusters of early smoking (started smoking before age 20) were identified in the central states. Cigarette and bidi smoking showed distinctly different geographic patterns, with high levels of cigarette smoking in the northeastern states and high levels of bidi smoking in the central states. The geographic pattern of bidi smoking was similar to early smoking. Cigarette smoking was spatially associated with any drinking. Smoking prevalences in 1998 were correlated with prevalences in 2004 at the district level and 2010 at the state level. These results along with earlier evidence on the complementarities between tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking suggest that local public health action on smoking might also help to reduce alcohol consumption, and vice versa. Surveys that properly represent tobacco and alcohol consumptions at the district level are recommended.

  19. Geospatial analysis on the distributions of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Hang Fu

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoking and binge alcohol drinking are two of the leading risk factors for premature mortality worldwide. In India, studies have examined the geographic distributions of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking only at the state-level; sub-state variations and the spatial association between the two consumptions are poorly understood.We used data from the Special Fertility and Mortality Survey conducted in 1998 to examine the geographic distributions of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking at the district and postal code levels. We used kriging interpolation to generate smoking and drinking distributions at the postal code level. We also examined spatial autocorrelations and identified spatial clusters of high and low prevalence of smoking and drinking. Finally, we used bivariate analyses to examine the spatial correlations between smoking and drinking, and between cigarette and bidi smoking.There was a high prevalence of any smoking in the central and northeastern states, and a high prevalence of any drinking in Himachal Pradesh, Arunachal Pradesh, and eastern Madhya Pradesh. Spatial clusters of early smoking (started smoking before age 20 were identified in the central states. Cigarette and bidi smoking showed distinctly different geographic patterns, with high levels of cigarette smoking in the northeastern states and high levels of bidi smoking in the central states. The geographic pattern of bidi smoking was similar to early smoking. Cigarette smoking was spatially associated with any drinking. Smoking prevalences in 1998 were correlated with prevalences in 2004 at the district level and 2010 at the state level.These results along with earlier evidence on the complementarities between tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking suggest that local public health action on smoking might also help to reduce alcohol consumption, and vice versa. Surveys that properly represent tobacco and alcohol consumptions at the district level are recommended.

  20. Smoke, alcohol and drug addiction and male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Andrea; Di Dato, Carla; de Angelis, Cristina; Menafra, Davide; Pozza, Carlotta; Pivonello, Rosario; Isidori, Andrea; Gianfrilli, Daniele

    2018-01-15

    In recent decades, the decline in human fertility has become increasingly more worrying: while therapeutic interventions might help, they are vexing for the couple and often burdened with high failure rates and costs. Prevention is the most successful approach to fertility disorders in males and females alike. We performed a literature review on three of the most common unhealthy habits - tobacco, alcohol and drug addiction - and their reported effects on male fertility. Tobacco smoking is remarkably common in most first-world countries; despite a progressive decline in the US, recent reports suggest a prevalence of more than 30% in subjects of reproductive age - a disturbing perspective, given the well-known ill-effects on reproductive and sexual function as well as general health. Alcohol consumption is often considered socially acceptable, but its negative effects on gonadal function have been consistently reported in the last 30 years. Several studies have reported a variety of negative effects on male fertility following drug abuse - a worrying phenomenon, as illicit drug consumption is on the rise, most notably in younger subjects. While evidence in these regards is still far from solid, mostly as a result of several confounding factors, it is safe to assume that cessation of tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and recreational drug addiction might represent the best course of action for any couple trying to achieve pregnancy.

  1. [Smoking and alcohol use among Chilean teenagers aged 10 to 14 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Jorge; Olivares, Esterbina; Rojas-Barahona, Cristian A; Rengifo, Manuel José; Labbé, Nicolás; Lepe, Leticia; Silva, Magdalena; Yáñez, Cynthia; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2016-04-01

    Smoking and alcohol use are risky behaviors that can start early in life. To determine the lifetime prevalence of tobacco and alcohol use in adolescents aged 10 to 14 years and related factors. A survey about smoking and alcohol use was answered by 1,392 teenagers aged 10 to 14 years (46% women) from seven schools in a small city near Santiago. Personal, family, and school factors were evaluated through self-report scales. Smoking and alcohol use, as dichotomous dependent variables, were defined as having consumed any of these substances throughout life. Prevalence was calculated as percentages with 95% confidence intervals. Association analyses were conducted using multivariable logistic regression models. Six and eleven percent of participants reported having smoked and used alcohol in their life, respectively. Smoking was associated with age, having behavioral problems, mothers’ smoking, perceiving that parents had drug problems, and not living with both parents. Alcohol use was mainly associated with age, having behavioral problems, perceiving that other students consumed drugs, alcohol use by both parents, and perceiving a lack of family support. Tobacco and alcohol use is highly prevalent in adolescents aged 10-14 years. There were common risk factors for smoking and alcohol use such as age and having behavioral problems, while other factors were more specific such as mothers’ smoking, or parental alcohol use.

  2. Neighborhood, Family, and Peer Factors Associated with Early Adolescent Smoking and Alcohol Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, Christopher; Kosterman, Rick; Catalano, Richard F; Guttmannova, Katarina; Hawkins, J David

    2018-02-01

    There is broad agreement that neighborhood contexts are important for adolescent development, but there is less consensus about their association with adolescent smoking and alcohol use. Few studies have examined associations between neighborhood socioeconomic contexts and smoking and alcohol use while also accounting for differences in family and peer risk factors for substance use. Data drawn from the Seattle Social Development Project (N = 808), a gender-balanced (female = 49%), multiethnic, theory-driven longitudinal study originating in Seattle, WA, were used to estimate trajectories of smoking and alcohol use from 5th to 9th grade. Time-varying measures of neighborhood socioeconomic, family, and peer factors were associated with smoking and alcohol use at each wave after accounting for average growth in smoking and alcohol use over time and demographic differences. Results indicated that living in more socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods, lower family income, lower family general functioning, more permissive family smoking environments, and affiliation with deviant peers were independently associated with increased smoking. Lower family functioning, more permissive family alcohol use environments, and deviant peers were independently associated with increased alcohol use. The effect of neighborhood disadvantage on smoking was mediated by family income and deviant peers while the effect of neighborhood disadvantage on alcohol use was mediated by deviant peers alone. Family functioning and family substance use did not mediate associations between neighborhood disadvantage and smoking or alcohol use. The results highlight the importance of neighborhood, family, and peer factors in early adolescent smoking and alcohol use. Future studies should examine the unique association of neighborhood disadvantage with adolescent smoking net of family socioeconomics, functioning, and substance use, as well as peer affiliations. Better understanding of the

  3. Nondaily smoking and alcohol use, hazardous drinking, and alcohol diagnoses among young adults: findings from the NESARC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Emily L R; Desai, Rani A; McKee, Sherry A

    2008-12-01

    Nondaily smoking and heavy alcohol use are prevalent behaviors among young adults, with nondaily smoking occurring primarily in the context of alcohol use. Although the relationship between drinking and daily smoking has been well characterized in young adults, few epidemiological investigations have investigated the association between nondaily smoking and drinking behavior. We examined Wave 1 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC; Grant et al., 2003b; n = 43,093). Young adults (aged 18 to 25 years; n = 5,838) were stratified on current smoking behavior (daily, nondaily, and nonsmokers in the past 12 months) and differences in weekly quantity of alcohol use, frequency of alcohol use, frequency of binge drinking behavior, rates of NIAAA-defined hazardous drinking, and rates of DSM-IV alcohol diagnoses were investigated. College student status was examined. Twenty-five percent were current smokers and 7% were smoking on a nondaily basis. Seventy-one percent were current drinkers, 39% reported binge drinking at least once a month, 41% met criteria for hazardous drinking, and 18% had alcohol use disorders. Across all measures of alcohol use, there was a significant effect of smoking status, with daily smokers having greater alcohol use patterns, compared with nondaily smokers, with nonsmokers consuming the least. Nondaily smokers were more likely to report any binge drinking in the past 12 months. However, daily smokers were more likely to report daily binge drinking. With regard to hazardous drinking and alcohol use disorders, nondaily smoking conferred the greatest risk, followed by daily smoking with nonsmoking as the reference group. Multinomial logistic regression demonstrated that the odds of being a hazardous drinker were 16 times greater (95% CI 9.46-26.48) in a nondaily smoker compared with a nonsmoker, whereas the odds for a daily smoker were increased by 7-fold (95% CI 5.54-9.36). A similar pattern of results was

  4. Behavioral couples therapy for smoking cessation: A pilot randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChance, Heather; Cioe, Patricia A; Tooley, Erin; Colby, Suzanne M; O'Farrell, Timothy J; Kahler, Christopher W

    2015-09-01

    Behavioral couples therapy (BCT) has been found to improve long-term abstinence rates in alcohol- and substance-dependent populations but has not been tested for smoking cessation. This pilot study examined the feasibility and acceptability of BCT for smoking-discordant couples. Forty-nine smokers (smoking >10 cigarettes/day) with nonsmoking partners were randomized to receive a couples social support (BCT-S) intervention or an individually delivered, standard smoking cessation treatment (ST). The couples were married or had been cohabiting for at least 1 year, with partners who had never smoked or had not used tobacco in 1 year. Both treatments included 7 weekly sessions and 8 weeks of nicotine replacement therapy. Participants were followed for 6 months posttreatment. The Partner Interaction Questionnaire was used to measure perceived smoking-specific partner support. Participants were 67% male and 88% White. Biochemically verified cessation rates were 40.9%, 50%, and 45% in BCT-S and 59.1%, 50%, and 55% in ST at end of treatment, after 3 month, and after 6 months, respectively, and did not differ significantly between treatment conditions at any time point. Perceived smoking-specific partner support at posttreatment did not significantly differ between treatment groups. Results of this pilot study do not provide support for the efficacy of BCT in smoking-discordant couples. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. STOP smoking and alcohol drinking before OPeration for bladder cancer (the STOP-OP study), perioperative smoking and alcohol cessation intervention in relation to radical cystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Susanne Vahr; Thomsen, Thordis; Thind, Peter

    2017-01-01

    and alcohol cessation, length of hospital stay, health-related quality of life and return to work or habitual level of activity up to 12 months postoperatively. Methods/design: The study is a multi-institutional randomised clinical trial involving 110 patients with a risky alcohol intake and daily smoking who...... meetings and at follow-up. Discussion: Herein, we report the design of the STOP-OP study, objectives and accrual up-date. This study will provide new knowledge about how to prevent smoking and alcohol-related postoperative complications at the time of bladder cancer surgery. Till now 77 patients have been......Background: To evaluate the effect of a smoking-, alcohol- or combined-cessation intervention starting shortly before surgery and lasting 6 weeks on overall complications after radical cystectomy. Secondary objectives are to examine the effect on types and grades of complications, smoking cessation...

  6. Cigarette smoking initiation during college predicts future alcohol involvement: a matched-samples study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Mark G; Doran, Neal M; Edland, Steven D; Schweizer, C Amanda; Wall, Tamaral L

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the relationship between cigarette smoking initiation and subsequent alcohol involvement. To address this question, the present study compared alcohol use between students who initiated smoking during college and a matched sample of never-smoking students. We hypothesized greater increases in alcohol involvement among smoking initiators, mediated by exposure to cigarette use situations. Included in the present study were 104 Chinese American and Korean American undergraduates who at baseline (freshman year) reported never having smoked a cigarette. Subjects were drawn from 433 participants in a naturalistic longitudinal study of tobacco use who were assessed annually each year in college. Cigarette smoking status was assessed annually as part of a structured interview. Initiators and never-smokers were matched on gender, ethnicity, baseline alcohol use, parental smoking status, and behavioral undercontrol. As predicted, participants who initiated smoking during college reported significantly greater increases in the number of past-30-day total drinks consumed (p alcohol consumption over and above the effect of exposure. Students who initiate smoking during college appear at risk for increased alcohol involvement. Part of this risk is explained by environmental contextual factors, specifically exposure to situations involving other smokers that also may result in greater exposure to alcohol use.

  7. Combined effects of smoking and alcohol on metabolic syndrome : The LifeLines cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Sandra N; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vonk, Judith M; Boezen, Hendrika; Dullaart, Robin P F; Muller Kobold, Anna; Feskens, Edith J M; van Beek, André P; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is influenced by environmental factors such as smoking and alcohol consumption. We determined the combined effects of smoking and alcohol on MetS and its individual components. METHODS: 64,046 participants aged 18-80 years from the LifeLines

  8. Relations of Alcohol Consumption with Smoking Cessation Milestones and Tobacco Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jessica W.; Fucito, Lisa M.; Piasecki, Thomas M.; Piper, Megan E.; Schlam, Tanya R.; Berg, Kristin M.; Baker, Timothy B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol consumption is associated with smoking cessation failure in both community and clinical research. However, little is known about the relation between alcohol consumption and smoking cessation milestones (i.e., achieving initial abstinence, avoiding lapses and relapse). Our objective in this research was to examine the relations…

  9. Continued smoking and continued alcohol consumption during early pregnancy distinctively associated with personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, Chantal; Burger, Huibert; Verbeek, Tjitte; Bockting, Claudi L H; Ormel, Johan

    Pregnancy is a unique period to quit smoking and alcohol consumption and although motivated, not all women succeed at this. We investigated the associations of personality with continued smoking and continued alcohol consumption during early pregnancy. In addition, we studied whether antenatal

  10. Comined effects of smoking and alcohol on metabolic syndrome: the lifelines cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, S.N.; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vonk, J.M.; Boezen, H.M.; Dullaart, R.P.F.; Muller Kobold, A.C.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Beek, van A.P.; Klauw, van der M.M.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction - The development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is influenced by environmental factors such as smoking and alcohol consumption. We determined the combined effects of smoking and alcohol on MetS and its individual components. Methods - 64,046 participants aged 18–80 years from the

  11. Influence of smoking and alcohol consumption on admissions and duration of hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla A; Rasmussen, Søren; Grønbaek, Morten

    2010-01-01

    consumption, smoking and patterns of hospitalization, defined as admission and duration of hospitalization. METHODS: The study was based on 12 698 men and women, aged 20 years or more, enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. We related smoking and alcohol to hospital admission from any cause, smoking......BACKGROUND: Previous studies have linked smoking and alcohol consumption to a considerable disease burden and large healthcare expenditures. However, findings from studies based on individual level data are sparse and inconclusive. Our objective was to assess the association between alcohol......- and alcohol-related diseases and duration of hospitalization in a two-part random effects model. RESULTS: Smoking status was strongly associated with admission and duration of hospitalization. For smoking-related admissions, odds ratios (OR) of 2.77 (95% CI 2.13-3.59) in men and 6.30 (95% CI 4...

  12. Co-occurring patterns of smoking and alcohol consumption among Korean adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ick-Joong; Chun, Jongserl

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to assess the transition probabilities between smoking and alcohol consumption trajectories for ages 13-17 using data from the Korea Youth Panel Survey (KYPS). Four smoking trajectories were identified-noninitiator, late-onsetter, experimenter, and escalator. Similarly, four alcohol consumption trajectories were identified-noninitiator, late-onsetter, experimenter, and chronic user. Those in the chronic group of alcohol consumption were most likely to be smokers. Those who fell into a particular group for use of one substance were most likely to fall into the corresponding group for use of the other substance. Implications for smoking and alcohol prevention are discussed.

  13. Respiratory immunohistochemical study in rats exposed to cigarette smoke and alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani,Karla Luciana; Cataneo,Daniele Cristina; Domingues,Maria Aparecida Custódio; Hasimoto,Erica Nishida; Evaristo,Thaiane Cristine; Cataneo,Antônio José Maria

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of exposure to cigarette and alcohol on immunohistochemical disorders caused by these attacks to respiratory system of rats.METHODS:Sixty male Wistar rats in four groups: control, cigarette smoke, alcohol and cigarette smoke + alcohol during 260 days. Immunohistochemistry was performed by researching survivin and protein P53 expressions and apoptotic index in parenchymal lung and trachea using TUNEL technique.RESULTS: There was body growth impairment in all...

  14. Smoking Cessation through Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Bal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Smoking is one of the most common addictions with devastating biopsychosocial consequences. Both medical treatment and pschotherapy are utilized in smoking cessation. Acceptance and commitment therapy holds the notion that smoking cessation rates are determined not so much by the negative affect and withdrawal symptoms per se, but by the avoidant and inflexible responding style. Acceptance and commitment therapy, through targeting the avoidance of internal stimuli and concomitant inflexible responding pattern, has yielded successful results.This article presents application of acceptance and commitment therapy step by step to a chronic smoker who quitted smoking at the end of therapy sessions. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 841-846

  15. Reciprocal Effects of Alcohol and Nicotine in Smoking Cessation Treatment Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisha, Nadra E.; Carmody, Timothy P.; Humfleet, Gary; Delucchi, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Smoking and alcohol use are highly related; as such the present study investigated whether alcohol use is associated with failure in tobacco cessation attempts. We first examined the self-reported drinking behavior and smoking over the course of a year at a basic level. Next, we addressed two hypotheses to characterize this relationship at a deeper level: (H1) Alcohol use would be lower for those who attempted to quit smoking (quit for one or more days) during the year compared to those who never quit, and (H2) for those who relapsed to smoking after a quit increases in alcohol consumption would be positively associated with increases in smoking. Method Subjects were participants in two smoking cessation programs. One group of participants (N = 139) were part of a smoking cessation study in alcohol dependent smokers in early recovery and the other participants (N = 163) were drawn from a smoking cessation study for HIV positive smokers. H1 was tested using t-tests. For H2, a time series analysis examined relationships between smoking and alcohol use within person over a one year period. For D1 and for H4, the analyses utilized bivariate time series procedures. Timeline follow-back data allowed for detailed daily reports of both tobacco and alcohol use. Results In the overall sample, there was no difference in alcohol use between those who stopped smoking and those who never stopped. However, when broken up by study, a difference was found in the alcohol dependent sample such that mean drinks were higher for those who stopped compared to those who never stopped smoking (H1). The results indicated a high number of positive significant cross-correlations between tobacco and alcohol use such that one substance predicted current, as well as past and future use of the alternate substance. Same-day cross-correlations were the most common, and dissipated with time (H2). Conclusions This analysis provided insights into the proximal influence of one substance on

  16. Individualized Behavior Therapy for Alcoholics - Republished Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Mark B; Sobell, Linda C

    2016-11-01

    A behavior therapy for alcoholism was designed based on the rationale that alcoholic drinking is a discriminated, operant response. Treatment emphasized determining setting events for each subject's drinking and training equally effective alternative responses to those situations. Seventy male, hospitalized, Gamma alcoholics were assigned to a treatment goal of either nondrinking (N=30) or controlled drinking (N=40). Subjects of each group were then randomly assigned to either an experimental group receiving 17 behavioral treatment sessions or a control group receiving only conventional treatment. Treatment of experimental groups differed only in drinking behaviors allowed during sessions and electric shock avoidance schedules. Nondrinker experimental subjects shaped to abstinence, while controlled drinker experimental subjects practiced appropriate drinking behaviors with little shaping, a result attributed to instructions. Follow-up measuring drinking and other behaviors found that experimental subjects functioned significantly better after discharge than control subjects, regardless of treatment goal. Successful experimental subjects could apply treatment principles to setting events not considered during treatment, suggesting the occurrence of rule learning. Results are discussed as evidence that some "alcoholics" can acquire and maintain controlled drinking behaviors. Traditional treatment of alcoholics may be handicapped by unvalidated beliefs concerning the nature of the disorder. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Changing the Culture of Alcohol Abuse on Campus: Lessons Learned from Secondhand Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is the single greatest public health hazard on American college and university campuses, but the culture of abusive alcohol consumption continues to be highly resistant to change. The author argues that secondhand smoke campaigns can be used as models to change the culture of alcohol abuse on campus. He proposes the implementation of…

  18. Smoking cessation after 12 months with multi-component therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, Antònia; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose Maria; Marquilles, Emili; Rubio, Lídia; Fu, Marcela; Fernández, Esteve

    2015-03-01

    Smoking is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. One of the priorities of public health programmes is the reduction of its prevalence, which would involve millions of people quitting smoking, but cessation programs often have modest results, especially within certain population groups. The aim of this study was to analyze the variables determining the success of a multicomponent therapy programme for smoking cessation. We conducted the study in the Smoking Addiction Unit at the Hospital of Manresa, with 314 patients (91.4% of whom had medium or high-level dependency). We observed that higher educational level, not living with a smoker, following a multimodal programme or smoking cessation with psychological therapy, and pharmacological treatment are relevant factors for quitting smoking. Abstinence rates are not associated with other factors, such as sex, age, smoking behaviour characteristics or psychiatric history. The combination of pharmacological and psychological treatment increased success rates in multicomponent therapy. Psychological therapy only also obtained positive results, though somewhat more modest.

  19. Income differences in life expectancy: the changing contribution of harmful consumption of alcohol and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, Pekka; Mäkelä, Pia; Peltonen, Riina; Myrskylä, Mikko

    2014-03-01

    Social differences in mortality have increased in high-income countries, but the causes of these changes remain unclear. We quantify the contribution of alcohol and smoking to trends in income differences in life expectancy from 1988 through 2007 in Finland. An 11% sample from the population registration data of Finns 25 years and older was linked with an 80% oversample of death records. Alcohol-attributable mortality was based on underlying and contributory causes of death on individual death certificates and smoking-attributable mortality on an indirect method that used lung cancer mortality as an indicator for the impact of smoking on mortality. Alcohol- and smoking-attributable deaths reduced life expectancy by about 4.5 years among men. Alcohol-attributable mortality increased and smoking-attributable mortality decreased over the period 1988-2007, leaving the joint contribution stable. Among women, the contribution of these risk factors to life expectancy over the same period increased from 0.7 to 1.2 years. In 2003-2007, life expectancy differentials between the lowest and highest income quintile were 11.4 years (men) and 6.3 years (women). In the absence of alcohol and smoking, these differences would have been 60% less for men and 36% less for women. Life expectancy differentials increased rapidly over the study period; without alcohol and smoking, the increase would have been 69% less among men and 85% less among women. Alcohol and smoking have a major influence on income differences in mortality and, with the exception of smoking among men, their contribution is increasing. Without alcohol and smoking, there would have been little change in life expectancy differentials.

  20. Alcohol-Focused Behavioral Couple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrady, Barbara S; Wilson, Adam D; Muñoz, Rosa E; Fink, Brandi C; Fokas, Kathryn; Borders, Adrienne

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy (ABCT) has emerged over the last 30 years as a highly efficacious treatment for those with alcohol use disorders. This review highlights the historical and conceptual underpinnings of ABCT, as well as the specific treatment elements and structure. Proposed active ingredients, moderators, and mediators of treatment outcome are discussed. Efficacy is evaluated for reductions in identified patient drinking, improved relationship functioning, and reductions in intimate partner violence. Adaptations of ABCT for substances other than alcohol are described. Other adaptations, including brief interventions, interventions addressing PTSD and TBI along with alcohol use, and interventions deliverable via technology platforms are described. Additional cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness findings supporting the economic value of ABCT are noted. Future directions for research in this area include possible adaptations for female identified patients, nontraditional couples, LGBT partners and dyads involving nonintimate partner relationships. The development of more flexible models and enhanced dissemination strategies may improve clinical uptake and utility as well as increasing the feasibility of this treatment for integrated healthcare settings. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  1. Brain volumes and neuropsychological performance are related to current smoking and alcoholism history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhar, Riya B; Sawyer, Kayle S; Gravitz, Zoe; Ruiz, Susan Mosher; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    Background Dual dependence on alcohol and nicotine is common, with many reports suggesting that more than 80% of alcoholics also smoke cigarettes. Even after cessation of alcohol consumption, many recovering alcoholics continue to smoke. In this exploratory study, we examined how current smoking and a history of alcoholism interacted in relation to brain volumes and neuropsychological performance. Methods Participants were 14 abstinent long-term alcoholics (seven current smokers and seven nonsmokers), and 13 nonalcoholics (six current smokers and seven nonsmokers). The groups were equivalent in age, gender, education, and intelligence quotient. Two multiecho magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (MP-RAGE) scans were collected for all participants using a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a 32 channel head coil. Brain volumes for each gray and white matter region of interest were derived using FreeSurfer. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological tests measuring intelligence quotient, memory, executive functions, personality variables, and affect. Results Compared to nonsmoking nonalcoholics, alcoholics who smoke (the comorbid group) had volumetric abnormalities in: pre- and para-central frontal cortical areas and rostral middle frontal white matter; parahippocampal and temporal pole regions; the amygdala; the pallidum; the ventral diencephalic region; and the lateral ventricle. The comorbid group performed worse than nonsmoking nonalcoholics on tests of executive functioning and on visually-based memory tests. History of alcoholism was associated with higher neuroticism scores among smokers, and current smoking was associated with higher sensation seeking scores and lower extraversion scores among nonalcoholics. Conclusion Results from this exploratory study support and extend prior reports showing that alcoholism and smoking, alone and in combination, are associated with structural brain abnormalities and poorer

  2. Effects of smoking in patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Laura; Xhaferi, Brunilda; Chiostri, Marco; Pieragnoli, Paolo; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Ricceri, Ilaria; Biria, Mazda; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjay; Valleggi, Alessandro; Emdin, Michele; Michelotti, Federica; Mascioli, Giosuè; Pandozi, Angela; Santini, Massimo; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-04-01

    Smoking is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in cardiac patients. However, data on the prognostic impact of smoking in heart failure (HF) patients on cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) are absent. We investigated the effects of smoking on all-cause mortality and on a composite endpoint (all-cause death/appropriate device therapy), appropriate and inappropriate device therapy, in 649 patients with HF who underwent CRT-D between January 2003 and October 2011 in 6 Centers (4 in Italy and 2 in USA). 68 patients were current smokers, 396 previous-smokers (patients who had smoked in the past but who had quit before the CRT-D implant), and 185 had never smoked. The risk of each endpoint by smoking status was evaluated with both Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional-hazard analysis. After adjusting for age, left ventricular ejection fraction, QRS width and ischemic etiology, both current and previous smoking were independent predictors of all-cause death [HR = 5.07 (95 % CI 2.68-9.58), p therapy compared to never smokers [HR = 21.74 (4.53-104.25), p = 0.005]. Our study indicates that in patients with HF who received a CRT-D device, current and previous smoking increase the event rate per person-time of death and of appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapy more than other known negative prognostic factors such as age, left ventricular dysfunction, prolonged QRS duration and ischemic etiology.

  3. Smoking and Breast Cancer Recurrence after Breast Conservation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Bishop

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prior studies have shown earlier recurrence and decreased survival in patients with head and neck cancer who smoked while undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether smoking status at the time of partial mastectomy and radiation therapy for breast cancer affected recurrence or survival. Method. A single institution retrospective chart review was performed to correlate smoking status with patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and outcomes for patients undergoing partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. Results. There were 624 patients who underwent breast conservation surgery between 2002 and 2010 for whom smoking history and follow-up data were available. Smoking status was associated with race, patient age, and tumor stage, but not with grade, histology, or receptor status. African American women were more likely to be current smokers (22% versus 7%, P<0.001. With a mean follow-up of 45 months, recurrence was significantly higher in current smokers compared to former or never smokers (P=0.039. In a multivariate model adjusted for race and tumor stage, recurrence among current smokers was 6.7 times that of never smokers (CI 2.0–22.4. Conclusions. Although the numbers are small, this study suggests that smoking may negatively influence recurrence rates after partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. A larger study is needed to confirm these observations.

  4. Smoke-free policy and alcohol use among undergraduate college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Karen M; Rayens, Mary Kay; Hahn, Ellen J; Adkins, Sarah M; Staten, Ruth R

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess attitudes and behaviors related to smoke-free policy among undergraduate student alcohol drinkers on a campus in a community with smoke-free bars. This was a secondary data analysis of a study in which participants completed mailed surveys assessing demographic characteristics, attitudes and behaviors related to alcohol and tobacco use and smoke-free policy (n = 337). Opinion and behavior items were summarized descriptively; associations were examined using Kruskal Wallis tests and chi-square tests of association. Logistic regression tested for predictors of importance of smoke-free policy. Respondents were predominantly female and Caucasian; mean age 20.3 years. One fourth were current smokers. Seventy-nine percent said the community smoke-free law had no effect on frequency of visiting bars. Eighty-seven percent said smoke-free policy in campus buildings was "somewhat" or "very important." Predictors of perceived importance of smoke-free policy included gender and smoking status. Most smokers in this sample did not experience a change in their motivation to quit smoking or in number of cigarettes smoked daily. Implementation of a community smoke-free law did not reduce the likelihood of visiting bars. Women and nonsmokers were more likely to rate smoke-free campus policy as very important. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Alcohol consumption, smoking and development of visible age-related signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Anne L; Mølbak, Marie-Louise; Schnor, Peter

    2017-01-01

    and earlobe crease, but not xanthelasmata. CONCLUSIONS: High alcohol consumption and smoking predict development of visible age-related signs. This is the first prospective study to show that heavy alcohol use and smoking are associated with generally looking older than one's actual age.......BACKGROUND: Visible age-related signs indicate biological age, as individuals that appear old for their age are more likely to be at poor health, compared with people that appear their actual age. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alcohol and smoking are associated with four visible...... age-related signs (arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, earlobe crease and male pattern baldness). METHODS: We used information from 11 613 individuals in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1976-2003). Alcohol intake, smoking habits and other lifestyle factors were assessed prospectively and visible age...

  6. Do cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption associate with cannabis use and problem gambling among Spanish adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez Varela, M Del Carmen; Becoña, Elisardo

    2015-03-01

    This article examined the relationship between cigarette smoking or alcohol consumption and cannabis use and problem gambling among a random and representative sample of 1447 Spanish adolescents (797 males and 650 females with an average of 12.8 years). An ad-hoc questionnaire was used to assess cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption (beer, wine and spirits) and cannabis use. Gambling was assessed with the South Oaks Gambling Screen Revised for Adolescents (SOGS-RA). Results indicated a positive and significant association between cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption and the two aforementioned variables. A larger percentage of cigarette smokers and drinkers was found among those participants who had consumed cannabis before or scored significantly in problem gambling. Additionally, multiple regression analysis confirmed that both cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption (beer and wine) were the most determinant variables for cannabis use and problem gambling.

  7. Relationship between impulsive sensation seeking traits, smoking, alcohol and caffeine intake, and Parkinson's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evans, A H; Lawrence, A D; Potts, J; MacGregor, L; Katzenschlager, R; Shaw, K; Zijlmans, J; Lees, A J

    ...), the Geriatric Depression Scale, and the Trait Anxiety Inventory. Data were collected on past and current cigarette smoking, and participants also completed food frequency questionnaires to estimate current caffeine and alcohol intake...

  8. The Influence of Alcohol Consumption, Cigarette Smoking, and Physical Activity on Leukocyte Telomere Length

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Latifovic, Lidija; Peacock, Sarah D; Massey, Thomas E; King, Will D

    2016-01-01

    ...): alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 477 healthy volunteers ages 20 to 50 years who completed a questionnaire and provided a fasting blood sample...

  9. A prospective cohort study on overweight, smoking, alcohol consumption, and risk of Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steevens, J.; Schouten, L.J.; Driessen, A.L.C.; Huysentruyt, C.J.R.; Keulemans, Y.C.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    Background: Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Besides gastroesophageal reflux, possible risk factors for BE include overweight, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption. Our objective was to study these associations by using prospective data. Methods: The

  10. Preconception care: caffeine, smoking, alcohol, drugs and other environmental chemical/radiation exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lassi, Zohra S; Imam, Ayesha M; Dean, Sohni V; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-01-01

    .... Alcohol, smoking, caffeine use and other similar lifestyle factors, have now become an integral part of the daily life of most men and women, who use/misuse one or more of these harmful substances...

  11. Prevalence and correlates of cigarette smoking among Chinese schizophrenia inpatients receiving antipsychotic mono-therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-Min; Chen, Hong-Hui; Li, Fu; Deng, Fang; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Hai-Chen; Qi, Li-Guo; Guo, Jin-Hong; Liu, Tie-Bang

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence rate of cigarette smoking and its socio-demographic and clinical correlates in Chinese schizophrenia inpatients receiving antipsychotic mono-therapy. This study was a cross-sectional, two-site, hospital-based survey. Four hundred and twenty-nine schizophrenia patients (male/female: 66.9% vs. 33.1%) were consecutively recruited from psychosis inpatient wards of two large specialty psychiatric hospitals in mainland China. Patients were assessed using a cigarette smoking questionnaire, the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale, the Simpson Angus Scale, the Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale, and the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale. Socio-demographic and other clinical data were also collected. We calculated the prevalence of current smoking in our sample as well as its indirectly standardized prevalence ratio (ISPR) using data from the 2010 Global Adult Tobacco Survey in China. The prevalence rate of current smoking was 40.6% in our sample, and 57.5% in males and 6.3% in females. The ISPRs of all patients, men and women were 1.11(95%CI: 0.95 ∼ 1.29), 1.07(95%CI = 0.91 ∼ 1.24) and 4.64(95% CI = 2.12 ∼ 8.82), respectively. The overall and male-specific prevalence of current smoking did not differ significantly between patients and the general population. In multiple logistic regression analysis, male sex, older age, poor marital status, alcohol use, use of first-generation antipsychotics, longer duration of illness, more frequent hospitalizations, and more severe negative symptoms were independently associated with current smoking. Male Chinese inpatients with schizophrenia who received a mono-therapy of antipsychotics were not more likely to smoke than the general population. Cigarette smoking is more common in schizophrenia patients with more severe illness.

  12. Relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection: cross sectional study.

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, H; Rothenbacher, D; Bode, G.; Adler, G.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation of smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption to active Helicobacter pylori infection. DESIGN: Cross sectional study of patients attending a general practitioner. Active H pylori infection was measured by the 15C-urea breath test and detailed quantitative information on smoking and on alcohol and coffee consumption was obtained by a standardised self administered questionnaire. SETTING: One general practice in Germany. SUBJECTS: 447 patients aged 15-79 who ha...

  13. Geospatial Analysis on the Distributions of Tobacco Smoking and Alcohol Drinking in India

    OpenAIRE

    Sze Hang Fu; Prabhat Jha; Gupta, Prakash C; Rajesh Kumar; Rajesh Dikshit; Dhirendra Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoking and binge alcohol drinking are two of the leading risk factors for premature mortality worldwide. In India, studies have examined the geographic distributions of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking only at the state-level; sub-state variations and the spatial association between the two consumptions are poorly understood. Methodology We used data from the Special Fertility and Mortality Survey conducted in 1998 to examine the geographic distributions of tobacco smo...

  14. The Synergistic Impact of Excessive Alcohol Drinking and Cigarette Smoking upon Prospective Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Anna-Marie; Heffernan, Tom; Hamilton, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The independent use of excessive amounts of alcohol or persistent cigarette smoking have been found to have a deleterious impact upon Prospective Memory (PM: remembering future intentions and activities), although to date, the effect of their concurrent use upon PM is yet to be explored. The present study investigated the impact of the concurrent use of drinking excessive amounts of alcohol and smoking cigarettes (a “Polydrug” group) in comparison to the combined effect of the single use of t...

  15. Associations between amount of smoking and alcohol intake and risk of colorectal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Jung, Hwanseok; Yun, Kyung Eun; Ryu, Seungho; Chang, Yoosoo; Park, Dong Il; Choi, Kyuyong

    2016-04-01

    Although smoking and alcohol has been linked to an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm (CRN), large-scale studies to identify dose-dependent relationship between amount of smoking and alcohol consumption and risk of CRN are rare. We aimed to investigate the risk for CRN according to the amount of smoking and alcohol intake in a large sample of Korean adults. A cross-sectional study was performed on 31,714 examinees aged ≥30 years undergoing their first colonoscopy as part of routine preventive health care between 2010 and 2011. Never smokers were compared with six groups of smokers according to smoking amount, and individuals with alcohol intake of ≤ 6.25 g ethanol per day were compared with three groups according to alcohol amount. In adjusted models, the risk of overall CRN increased with increasing amount of smoking (P for trend smoking amount (≤2.50, 2.51-5.60, 5.61-9.00, 9.01-13.00, 13.01-19.50, and ≥19.51 pack-years) were 1.02, 1.19, 1.35, 1.53, 1.63, and 2.03, respectively. In addition, the risk of both non-advanced and advanced CRN increased with increasing amount of smoking (both P for trend smoking in a dose-response manner, whereas it was not associated with the amount of alcohol consumption. Our study suggests that smoking amount as well as smoking status should be considered for CRN risk stratification. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. [Cluster analysis of smoking, alcohol drinking and other health risk behaviors in undergraduate students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuai-jun; Yu, Xiao-ming; Zhang, Xin; An, Wei-wei; Guo, Li-na; Wang, Jia

    2013-06-18

    To investigate the status of smoking and alcohol drinking behaviors in undergraduate students, and explore the relationship between smoking and alcohol drinking and other health risk behaviors. A total of 7 979 students from 44 universities or colleges across China were sampled with multiple-stage stratified sampling method. A cross-sectional investigation on smoking, alcohol drinking and other health risk behaviors was conducted, and SPSS 13.0 was used to statistically analyze the data. The prevalence of current smoking and alcohol drinking behaviors was 19.6% and 42.2%, respectively. There was significant difference in different genders (male 34.1% vs. female 6.1%), geographical regions (East China 15.7% vs. Mid-China 19.0% vs. West China 29.8%), types of university (key university 17.9% vs. vocational college 21.2%) and majors (arts 15.4% vs. science and engineering 21.5%) in undergraduate students who currently smoked (Pstudents who currently drank (Psmoking and alcohol drinking students was higher than that of the control group. The smoking and alcohol drinking status was not optimistic in undergraduate students in China, which is highly related to other health risk behaviors. Comprehensive prevention and intervention programs should be developed according to different demographic distributions.

  17. Effects of coffee, smoking, and alcohol on liver function tests: a comprehensive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun Sun; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Hwang, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyun Young; Ahn, So Yeon; Lee, Jaebong; Lee, Sang Hyub; Park, Young Soo; Hwang, Jin Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Wook; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2012-10-18

    Liver function tests (LFTs) can be affected by many factors and the proposed effects of coffee on LFT require a comprehensive evaluation. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether drinking coffee, smoking, or drinking alcohol have independent effects on LFTs in Korean health-check examinees. We used the responses of 500 health-check examinees, who had participated in a self-administered questionnaire survey about coffee, alcohol drinking, and smoking habits. Coffee consumption was closely related to male gender, high body mass index (BMI), alcohol drinking, and smoking. On univariable and multivariable analyses, drinking coffee lowered serum levels of total protein, albumin, and aspartate aminotransferases (AST). On multivariable analyses, smoking raised serum γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) level and decreased serum protein and albumin levels, while alcohol drinking raised GGT level after adjustment for age, gender, regular medication, BMI, coffee and alcohol drinking amounts, and smoking. Coffee consumption, smoking, and alcohol drinking affect the individual components of LFT in different ways, and the above 3 habits each have an impact on LFTs. Therefore, their effects on LFTs should be carefully interpreted, and further study on the mechanism of the effects is warranted.

  18. Effects of coffee, smoking, and alcohol on liver function tests: a comprehensive cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Eun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver function tests (LFTs can be affected by many factors and the proposed effects of coffee on LFT require a comprehensive evaluation. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether drinking coffee, smoking, or drinking alcohol have independent effects on LFTs in Korean health-check examinees. Methods We used the responses of 500 health-check examinees, who had participated in a self-administered questionnaire survey about coffee, alcohol drinking, and smoking habits. Results Coffee consumption was closely related to male gender, high body mass index (BMI, alcohol drinking, and smoking. On univariable and multivariable analyses, drinking coffee lowered serum levels of total protein, albumin, and aspartate aminotransferases (AST. On multivariable analyses, smoking raised serum γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT level and decreased serum protein and albumin levels, while alcohol drinking raised GGT level after adjustment for age, gender, regular medication, BMI, coffee and alcohol drinking amounts, and smoking. Conclusions Coffee consumption, smoking, and alcohol drinking affect the individual components of LFT in different ways, and the above 3 habits each have an impact on LFTs. Therefore, their effects on LFTs should be carefully interpreted, and further study on the mechanism of the effects is warranted.

  19. Effects of smoking and smoking cessation on healing after mechanical periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, S G; Zambon, J; Machtei, E E; Schifferle, R; Andreana, S; Genco, R J; Cummins, D; Harrap, G

    1997-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of cigarette smoking on 143 patients' clinical and microbiological responses to mechanical therapy. Treatment included four to six sessions of subgingival scaling and root planing and instruction in oral hygiene. Results indicate that current smokers have less healing and reduction in subgingival Bacteroides forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis after treatment compared to former and nonsmokers, suggesting that smoking impairs periodontal healing. As the healing and microbial response of former smokers is comparable to that of nonsmokers, smoking cessation may restore the normal periodontal healing response.

  20. Smoking-Related Behaviors and Effectiveness of Smoking Cessation Therapy Among Prisoners and Prison Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Onur; Turan, Pakize Ayse

    2016-04-01

    Smoking is a serious problem in prisons. This work aimed to assess smoking-related behaviors and the effectiveness of tobacco cessation therapy in prison. This study includes four visits to a prison in Bolvadin-Afyon, Turkey. Pharmacologic options for tobacco cessation were offered to the participants who wanted to quit smoking. One hundred seventy-nine subjects (109 prisoners and 70 prison staff) with 68.7% current smokers were included. There was an increase of cigarette smoking in 41.8% (the most common reason was stress) and decrease in 18.7% (the most common reason was health problems) of the participants after incarceration. Fifty-nine participants accepted the offered tobacco cessation treatment. Only 2 participants started their planned medications, but they could not quit smoking. The most common reason for failed attempts to quit was the high prices of cessation therapies. Factors like stress and being in prison may provoke smoking. A smoking ban does not seem to be a total solution for preventing tobacco use in prisons. Tobacco cessation programs may be a better option. Cost-free cessation medications may increase quitting rates among prisoners and prison staff. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  1. Polygenic risk scores for smoking: predictors for alcohol and cannabis use?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.M.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Willemsen, G.; Neale, M.C.; Furberg, H.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: A strong correlation exists between smoking and the use of alcohol and cannabis. This paper uses polygenic risk scores to explore the possibility of overlapping genetic factors. Those scores reflect a combined effect of selected risk alleles for smoking. Methods: Summary-level

  2. The relationship between alcohol use and cigarette smoking in a sample of undergraduate college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Mark B; Wang, Rong; Shillington, Audrey M; Clapp, John D; Lange, James E

    2007-03-01

    During the decade of the 1990s, smoking prevalence increased nearly 30% in the college student population. Although most college students initiate smoking before the age of 18, recent evidence suggests a sizable minority of undergraduates report starting smoking while in college. This study examined the concurrent use of alcohol and tobacco as well as the relationship between alcohol use and smoking initiation among a sample of undergraduate students attending a large public university in the southwestern United States. We defined three categories of smoking status for this study: never smokers (n=777), experimenters (n=158), and smokers (n=178). Both experimenters and smokers reported consuming significantly more drinks per occasion in the past 28 days and more drinks on one occasion in the past 2 weeks compared to never smokers; however, there was no significant difference between experimenters and smokers on either of these measures of consumption. The results of two multinomial logistic regression models showed that measures of alcohol consumption and drinking frequency were significantly associated with being an experimenter or smoker after controlling for demographic and other drug use covariates. Results of a logistic regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between past year drinking frequency and smoking initiation among respondents who reported that they were not smoking at all 12 months prior to their survey participation. The influence of alcohol consumption on smoking initiation among college students is discussed.

  3. The Relationship of Smoking Status to Alcohol Use, Problems, and Health Behaviors in College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Amie L.; Smith, Shelby K.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in drinking, consequences, and perceptions were examined between alcohol-using college students by smoking status (current, past, and lifetime nonsmoker). Entering freshmen (N = 558: 45% male, 72% Caucasian, age M = 18) completed a questionnaire assessing smoking, drinking and current health perceptions. Results indicated current…

  4. Association of smoking and alcohol drinking with dementia risk among elderly men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiming; Zhou, Rui; Zhong, Tingting; Li, Rui; Tan, Jun; Zhou, Huadong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies relating smoking and alcohol drinking with the incidence of dementia have been inconsistent. We assessed whether smoking and alcohol drinking was associated with the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) after seven years of follow-up. We prospectively analysed the incidence of dementia from 2004 to 2011 among 2959 elderly men, according to their smoking and alcohol drinking status. six neighbourhoods from three districts mentioned in Chongqing city. A total of 3170 men were followed up annually for 7 years. Cox proportional hazards models were established to evaluate the association between smoking, alcohol drinking and the risk of dementia. The incidences of AD and VaD were higher respectively in current smoking than never smoking, daily drinking than never drinking over 7 years of follow-up (page and other potential confounders, current smoking was associated with increased risk of AD (HR= 2.14, 95% CI 1.20-4.46) and VaD (HR= 3.28, 95% CI 1.14-4.52), meanwhile, daily drinking was related to increased risk of AD (HR= 2.25, 95% CI 1.43-3.97) and VaD (HR= 3.42, 95% CI 1.18-4.51). In addition, co-smoking and drinking were related to with a significantly higher risk of AD and VaD than non-smoking and drinking (HR= 3.03, 95% CI 1.65-4.19) and VaD (HR= 3.96, 95% CI 1.64-4.71). Moreover, co-smoking and drinking had higher risk of AD and VaD compared with current smoking and daily drinking. Current smoking and daily drinking were found to be significantly associated with dementia in elderly men.

  5. Influence of tobacco smoke exposure on pharmacokinetics of ethyl alcohol in alcohol preferring and non-preferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, Ewa; Kulza, Maksymilian; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Gomółka, Ewa; Jawień, Wojciech; Teżyk, Artur; Napierała, Marta

    2015-10-01

    A vast majority of people who abuse alcohol are also defined as "heavy smokers". Tobacco smokes induces CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2A6 isoenzymes, but on the other hand, ethanol activates CYP2E1, which can be important during combined, chronic use of both of them. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of tobacco smoke xenobiotics on ethanol pharmacokinetics and the level of its metabolites in alcohol preferring and non-preferring rats. Ethanol, acetaldehyde, methanol, n-propanol and n-butanol were determined in whole blood by means of gas chromatography. Cotinine in serum was determined by LC-MS/MS. A non-compartmental analysis (cotinine, acetaldehyde) and Widmark equation (ethanol) were used for pharmacokinetic parameters calculation. Ethanol levels were lower in animals exposed to tobacco smoke compared to rats receiving this xenobiotic, without a prior exposure to tobacco smoke. Lower values of the studied pharmacokinetic parameters were observed in the alcohol preferring males compared to the non-alcohol preferring rats. Both n-propanol and n-butanol had higher values of the pharmacokinetic parameters analyzed in the animals exposed to tobacco smoke and ethanol compared to those, which ethanol was administered only once. An increase in maximum concentration and the area under concentration-time curve for ethanol after its administration to rats preferring alcohol and exposed to tobacco smoke are accompanied by a decrease in the volume of distribution. The changes in the volume of distribution may be caused by an increase in the first-pass effect, in the intestinal tract and/or in the liver. The acetaldehyde elimination rate constant was significantly higher in alcohol-preferring animals. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  6. Alcohol and smoking affect risk of uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyoshi Nagata

    Full Text Available Colonic diverticula are located predominantly on the right side in Asia and on the left side in Europe and the United States. Factors associated with uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis and its distribution pattern have been unknown. Our aims are to investigate the prevalence and risk factors for uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study in adults who underwent colonoscopy. Alcohol, alcohol related flushing, smoking, medications, and comorbidities were assessed by interview on the colonoscopy day. Alcohol consumption was categorized as nondrinker, light (1-180 g/week, moderate (181-360 g/week, and heavy (≥361 g/week. Smoking index was defined as the number of cigarettes per day multiplied by the number of smoking years and categorized as nonsmoker, <400, 400-799, and ≥800. A total of 2,164 consecutive patients were enrolled. Overall, 542 patients (25.1% had uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis located on the right side (50%, bilaterally (29%, and on the left side (21%. Univariate analysis revealed age, male, smoking index, alcohol consumption, aspirin use, anticoagulants use, corticosteroid use, hypertension, and atherosclerotic disease as factors significantly associated with diverticulosis. Alcohol related flushing was not associated with the disease. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age (P<0.01, increasing alcohol consumption (P<0.01 and smoking (P<0.01, and atherosclerotic disease (P<0.01 as significantly associated factors. Alcohol and smoking were associated with right-sided and bilateral diverticula. In conclusion, one in four Japanese adults have colonic diverticulosis (50% right-sided. Age, alcohol consumption, and smoking were found to be significant risk factors for uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis, particularly right-sided and bilateral.

  7. Alcohol reduction in the first trimester is unrelated to smoking, patient or pregnancy characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen A. Schmidt

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Women reported reducing their alcohol consumption during pregnancy, including those screening positive for pre-pregnancy problem drinking. First trimester alcohol reduction cannot be accounted for by smoking, patient or pregnancy characteristics; public health initiatives, psychological factors and hormonal mechanisms may be implicated.

  8. Negative affect, stress, and smoking in college students: unique associations independent of alcohol and marijuana use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magid, Viktoriya; Colder, Craig R; Stroud, Laura R; Nichter, Mimi; Nichter, Mark

    2009-11-01

    Stress and negative affect (NA) figure prominently in theoretical models of smoking initiation, maintenance and relapse, yet few studies have examined these associations among college students. Further complicating examination of these associations, smoking often occurs in the context of other substance use (e.g., alcohol, marijuana) in college populations. Thus, it remains unclear whether stress and NA are associated with cigarette use among college students, and if so, whether these associations are evident after controlling for effects of other substance use. The goals of this study were: a) to examine whether several aspects of stress (objective events, subjective experiences) and NA (sad mood, general emotional distress) were associated with cigarette smoking among college students and b) whether associations remained after accounting for alcohol and marijuana use. A large sample of college freshmen (N=633) followed longitudinally over 35 weeks via internet assessments. Results of hierarchical linear modeling demonstrated that measures of subjective stress and NA were positively related to cigarette use, whereas measures of objective stressful events were negatively related to cigarette use. When alcohol and marijuana use were added to the models, associations between smoking and stress/NA were diminished. Associations between NA and smoking remained significant; however, associations between subjective stress/stressful events and smoking were no longer significant. This is the first study to comprehensively examine links between subjective and objective measures of stress and smoking behavior among college students while also considering the influence of other substance use. Negative affect was the most robust correlate of smoking among college students. Subjective and objective stress do not appear to be strongly associated with college smoking above and beyond alcohol and marijuana use. Stress may not be an important etiological factor for relatively low

  9. Is alcohol mixed with energy drinks consumption associated with susceptibility to smoking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagba, Sunday; Sharaf, Mesbah F

    2014-04-01

    This paper examines whether adolescent students in Canada who have never smoked but who drink alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) are more susceptible to smoking than those who do not consume AmED. A nationally representative sample of 15,875 never-smoking students in grades 9 to 12 from the 2010-2011 Canadian Youth Smoking Survey is used. The association between AmED and susceptibility to smoking is examined using a logistic regression. About 28% of the never-smoking adolescents in grades 9 to 12 are susceptible to smoking, and 13% report using AmED. Results of the adjusted logistic regression analysis show a statistically significant positive association between consuming AmED and susceptibility to smoking. Never-smoking students who reported using AmED are more susceptible to smoking when compared with those who have not consumed AmED (OR=1.89; 95% CI=1.71-2.10). Similar results are obtained when the analysis is stratified by gender. The consumption of AmED is associated with higher odds of smoking susceptibility among Canadian adolescents. AmED use could be a potential marker for smoking susceptibility among never-smoking adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reinforcement of Smoking and Drinking: Tobacco Marketing Strategies Linked With Alcohol in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated tobacco companies’ knowledge about concurrent use of tobacco and alcohol, their marketing strategies linking cigarettes with alcohol, and the benefits tobacco companies sought from these marketing activities. Methods. We performed systematic searches on previously secret tobacco industry documents, and we summarized the themes and contexts of relevant search results. Results. Tobacco company research confirmed the association between tobacco use and alcohol use. Tobacco companies explored promotional strategies linking cigarettes and alcohol, such as jointly sponsoring special events with alcohol companies to lower the cost of sponsorships, increase consumer appeal, reinforce brand identity, and generate increased cigarette sales. They also pursued promotions that tied cigarette sales to alcohol purchases, and cigarette promotional events frequently featured alcohol discounts or encouraged alcohol use. Conclusions. Tobacco companies’ numerous marketing strategies linking cigarettes with alcohol may have reinforced the use of both substances. Because using tobacco and alcohol together makes it harder to quit smoking, policies prohibiting tobacco sales and promotion in establishments where alcohol is served and sold might mitigate this effect. Smoking cessation programs should address the effect that alcohol consumption has on tobacco use. PMID:21852637

  11. Alcohol use, smoking and their co-occurrence during pregnancy among Canadian women, 2003 to 2011/12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Shannon; Probst, Charlotte; Quere, Mathilde; Rehm, Jürgen; Popova, Svetlana

    2015-11-01

    The co-occurrence of alcohol use and smoking during pregnancy has been shown to have a negative synergistic effect on fetal and perinatal risks. The objectives were to: 1) obtain an estimate of the prevalence of smoking during pregnancy in Canada by province and territory from 2003 to 2011/12; 2) determine if the prevalence of smoking during pregnancy has increased or decreased over time; 3) investigate whether smoking status is differentially associated with alcohol use during pregnancy; and 4) examine the risk factors predictive of alcohol use only, smoking only, and the co-occurrence of alcohol use and smoking during pregnancy. Secondary data analysis was conducted using five cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS; 2003, 2005, 2007/08, 2009/10 and 2011/12). The prevalence of smoking during pregnancy, and 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated by province and territory and by year. The likelihood ratio test was used to determine if the prevalence of smoking during pregnancy has increased or decreased over time. The relationship between smoking status and alcohol use during pregnancy was explored using a quasi-Poisson regression model. A multinomial logistic regression model was utilized to determine which factors were predictive of alcohol use only, smoking only, and the co-occurrence of alcohol use and smoking during pregnancy. In Canada, between 2003 and 2011/12, the weighted pooled prevalence of smoking during pregnancy was 14.3% (95% CI: 13.6%-15.0%). Women who smoked daily during pregnancy, occasionally during pregnancy, or had a lifetime history of smoking (but did not smoke while pregnant) were 2.54 (95% CI: 2.11-3.06, P woman consumed alcohol while pregnant. Ascertaining smoking status among pregnant women and women of childbearing age could be a useful screening method for identifying those at-risk of consuming alcohol during pregnancy, and vice versa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Respiratory immunohistochemical study in rats exposed to cigarette smoke and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Karla Luciana; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custódio; Hasimoto, Erica Nishida; Evaristo, Thaiane Cristine; Cataneo, Antônio José Maria

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of exposure to cigarette and alcohol on immunohistochemical disorders caused by these attacks to respiratory system of rats. Sixty male Wistar rats in four groups: control, cigarette smoke, alcohol and cigarette smoke + alcohol during 260 days. Immunohistochemistry was performed by researching survivin and protein P53 expressions and apoptotic index in parenchymal lung and trachea using TUNEL technique. There was body growth impairment in all experimental groups. Both smoker groups animals had higher trachea survivin expression and bronchial higher apoptotic index. The trachea apoptotic index was also higher in the cigarette smoke group as well as in the alveoli in the cigarette smoke + alcohol group. The three experimental groups showed negative immunoexpression for P53. this model resulted in immunohistochemical changes caused mainly by exposure to cigarette smoke. There was a synergistic action between alcohol and tobacco in the growth impairment in animals as well as in the cellular apoptotic index. The positive immunoexpression for tracheal survivin in animals from both groups exposed to tobacco smoke and associated with a negative P53 immunoexpression suggests that despite the aggression, carcinogenesis has not happened yet. In addition, the bronchial higher apoptotic index in smokers may be responsible for emphysema.

  13. The relationship between alcohol consumption and past-year smoking initiation in a sample of undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Mark B; McCabe, Cameron; Lange, James E; Clapp, John D; Shillington, Audrey M

    2010-07-01

    Although most young people begin smoking before the age of 18, the results of a growing number of recent studies have shown a sizable minority of college students initiate smoking while in college. Moreover, the use of alcohol by college students has been linked to smoking initiation in some studies in the literature. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between past-year drinking frequency and past-year smoking initiation among a sample of college students. A total of 1,523 undergraduate students attending a large urban university in the southwestern United States were invited to participate in an Internet study examining college student lifestyles and behaviors. The results of a logistic regression analysis indicated a significant association between past-year alcohol consumption and the likelihood of past-year smoking initiation after controlling for respondent race, the past-year use of marijuana, illicit drug use, and prescription drug use. These results suggest alcohol consumption may serve as an influence on smoking initiation among some college students. These results provide additional support to a growing literature linking alcohol use to smoking initiation in college student populations. Additional research is needed to determine the mechanisms that explain this relationship.

  14. Alcohol and smoking affect risk of uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Shimbo, Takuro; Kishida, Yoshihiro; Sekine, Katsunori; Tanaka, Shohei; Aoki, Tomonori; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Junichi; Yanase, Mikio; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Mizokami, Masashi; Uemura, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Colonic diverticula are located predominantly on the right side in Asia and on the left side in Europe and the United States. Factors associated with uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis and its distribution pattern have been unknown. Our aims are to investigate the prevalence and risk factors for uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study in adults who underwent colonoscopy. Alcohol, alcohol related flushing, smoking, medications, and comorbidities were assessed by interview on the colonoscopy day. Alcohol consumption was categorized as nondrinker, light (1-180 g/week), moderate (181-360 g/week), and heavy (≥361 g/week). Smoking index was defined as the number of cigarettes per day multiplied by the number of smoking years and categorized as nonsmoker, diverticulosis located on the right side (50%), bilaterally (29%), and on the left side (21%). Univariate analysis revealed age, male, smoking index, alcohol consumption, aspirin use, anticoagulants use, corticosteroid use, hypertension, and atherosclerotic disease as factors significantly associated with diverticulosis. Alcohol related flushing was not associated with the disease. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age (Pdiverticulosis (50% right-sided). Age, alcohol consumption, and smoking were found to be significant risk factors for uncomplicated colonic diverticulosis, particularly right-sided and bilateral.

  15. Self-concept and social comparison and their relation with smoking and alcohol consumption in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Aysel; Koçoğlu, Gülay

    2015-11-13

    Some attitudes that possess certain risks such as smoking and alcohol consumption rate are increasing among the adolescent age group. For this reason it is very important to shape the attitudes of adolescents during their growth period. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of social comparison and self-concept of adolescents' relation with smoking and alcohol consumption. Study was conducted as a prospective study in nine high schools which are located in city of Bursa, Turkey. Nine hundred and fifty-three (n=953) students were included. Data were gathered using a questionnaire form especially developed by researchers for this study according to relevant literature. For social comparison and self-concept evaluation Piers-Harris Self Concept Scale and Social Comparison Scale of Gilbert were used. The mean age was 15.74±1.27 and 411 of cases (43.1%) were male. It was determined that smoking and alcohol consumption increased as the age of adolescents' age increases. Rate of smoking and alcohol consumption was significantly higher in males compared to females. The mean self-concept scale score of the cases who smoke (52.30±11.01) were found to be lower than the non-smokers (56.07±10.13). The mean social comparison scale score of smoking adolescents' (70.25±23.99) was higher than the non-smokers (69.43±25.47). The social comparison scale scores were found to be higher in adolescents who consume alcohol and smoke tobacco. In contrast to this result self-concept scale scores were low. As a conclusion this study reveals that attitudes such as smoking and alcohol consumption are mostly influenced by self-concept of the adolescents and family attitudes towards adolescents.

  16. Effects of smoking and alcohol consumption on lipid profile in male adults in northwest rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X X; Zhao, Y; Huang, L X; Xu, H X; Liu, X Y; Yang, J J; Zhang, P J; Zhang, Y H

    2018-02-16

    To determine the individual and combined influences of smoking and alcohol consumption on lipid profile in male adults in northwest rural China. Cross-sectional study. In total, 4614 subjects were enrolled in the cross-sectional study, performed between 2008 and 2012. The present study examined males aged ≥18 years from northwest rural China (n = 707). Data on current smoking and drinking status were collected. Logistic regression was used to estimate the individual and combined influences of smoking and alcohol consumption on lipid profile. Age, ethnic group, educational background, smoking (or alcohol consumption), waist circumference, body mass index, blood pressure and fasting blood glucose were adjusted as confounders. Total cholesterol (TC)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio, triglycerides (TG)/HDL-C ratio, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)/HDL-C ratio and visceral adiposity index (VAI) were significantly higher in smokers than in non-smokers, whereas HDL-C was lower in smokers. TG/HDL-C ratio, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, TG, lipid accumulation product and VAI were significantly higher in drinkers than non-drinkers. After adjustment for confounders, significant relationships were observed between smoking status and any dyslipidemia, low HDL-C and high VAI (odds ratios [ORs]: 2.53 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 1.25-5.15], 6.13 [95% CI: 2.84-13.25] and 4.39 [95% CI: 2.02-9.54], respectively). The OR for any dyslipidaemia was 1.94 (95% CI: 1.09-3.48) for subjects who smoke and drank alcohol compared with subjects who did not smoke or drink alcohol. Abnormalities in lipid profile are correlated with smoking and alcohol consumption, which calls for intervention strategies to prevent dyslipidaemia and control risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cigarette smoking exacerbates chronic alcohol-induced brain damage: a preliminary metabolite imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durazzo, Timothy C; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Banys, Peter; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2004-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is common among alcohol-dependent individuals. Nevertheless, previous research has typically not accounted for the potential independent or compounding effects of cigarette smoking on alcohol-induced brain injury and neurocognition. Twenty-four 1-week-abstinent recovering alcoholics (RAs; 14 smokers and 10 nonsmokers) in treatment and 26 light-drinking controls (7 smokers and 19 nonsmokers) were compared on measures of common brain metabolites in gray matter and white matter of the major lobes, basal ganglia, midbrain, and cerebellar vermis, obtained via multislice short-echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Smoking and nonsmoking RAs were also contrasted on measures of neurocognitive functioning, as well as laboratory markers of drinking severity and nutritional status. Chronic alcohol dependence, independent of smoking, was associated with lower concentrations of frontal N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and frontal choline-containing compounds, as well as lower parietal and thalamic choline. Smoking RAs had lower NAA concentrations in frontal white matter and midbrain and lower midbrain choline than nonsmoking RAs. A four-group analysis of covariance also demonstrated that chronic cigarette smoking was associated with lower midbrain NAA and choline and with lower vermian choline. In smoking RAs, heavier drinking was associated with heavier smoking, which correlated with numerous subcortical metabolite abnormalities. The 1-week-abstinent smoking and nonsmoking RAs did not differ significantly on a brief neurocognitive battery. In smoking RAs, lower cerebellar vermis NAA was associated with poorer visuomotor scanning speed and incidental learning, and in nonsmoking RAs lower vermis NAA was related to poorer visuospatial learning and memory. These human in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging findings indicate that chronic cigarette smoking exacerbates chronic alcohol-induced neuronal injury and cell membrane damage in

  18. Smoking Intervention: A Combination Therapy Approach to Cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Penny Neathery

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Start SMART smoking cessation program which combines nicotine withdrawal therapy with behavior modification. The Start SMART program provides seven, intensive one-hour group sessions that are shown to be a most effective intervention with a specific population--motivated, yet highly dependent smokers. (GLR)

  19. Pharmacological and biochemical interventions of cigarette smoke, alcohol, and sexual mating frequency on idiopathic rat model of Parkinson's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ambhore, Ns; Antony, S; Mali, Jk; Kanhed, Am; Bhalerao, Ar; Bhojraj, S

    2012-01-01

    ...) concentration, antioxidant enzymes, and mitochondrial activity decreased after treatment with cigarette smoke, alcohol, and frequent sexual mating when compared to the values in the control group...

  20. Active and passive smoking, and alcohol drinking and breast cancer risk in chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chang-Ming; Ding, Jian-Hua; Li, Su-Ping; Liu, Yan-Ting; Qian, Yun; Chang, Jun; Tang, Jin-Hai; Tajima, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the relation between smoking, alcohol drinking and risk of breast cancer in Chinese women, we conducted a case-control study with 669 cases and 682 population-based controls in Jiangsu Province of China. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit detailed information. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The results revealed that smoking, whether active or passive through the husband, was related to increased risk of breast cancer. The ORs (adjusted for age, menopausal status, educational levels, occupation, body mass index and income) were 3.55 (95%CI: 1.27-9.91) for active smoking and 1.47 (95%CI: 1.18-1.84) for passive smoking from husbands, respectively. A significant positive relationship was observed between breast cancer risk and the degree of husbands' smoking. There were significant increase trend in ORs with the daily smoked number of cigarettes of husbands, the passive smoking years from husbands and the pack-years of husbands' smoking (trend test: p=0.00003, 0.00013 and 0.0001, respectively). Alcohol consumption was also found to be a risk factor. The findings of this study in particular suggest that husbands' smoking increases risk of breast cancer in Chinese women.

  1. Smoking and alcohol cessation intervention in relation to radical cystectomy: a qualitative study of cancer patients' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Susanne Vahr; Thomsen, Thordis; Kaldan, Gudrun; Lydom, Line Noes; Tønnesen, Hanne

    2017-11-25

    Despite smoking and risky alcohol drinking being modifiable risk factors for cancer as well as postoperative complications, perioperative cessation counselling is often ignored. Little is known about how cancer patients experience smoking and alcohol interventions in relation to surgery. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore how bladder cancer patients experience a perioperative smoking and alcohol cessation intervention in relation to radical cystectomy. A qualitative study was conducted in two urology out-patient clinics. We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with 11 purposively sampled persons who had received the smoking and alcohol cessation intervention. The analysis followed the steps contained in the thematic network analysis. Two global themes emerged: "smoking and alcohol cessation was experienced as an integral part of bladder cancer surgery" and "returning to everyday life was a barrier for continued smoking cessation/alcohol reduction". Participants described that during hospitalization their focus shifted to the operation and they did not experience craving to smoke or drink alcohol. Concurrent with improved well-being or experiencing stressful situations, the risk of relapse increased when returning to everyday life. The smoking and alcohol cessation intervention was well received by the participants. Cancer surgery served as a kind of refuge and was a useful cue for motivating patients to quit smoking and to reconsider the consequences of risky drinking. These results adds to the sparse evidence of what supports smoking and alcohol cessation in relation to bladder cancer patients undergoing major surgery and point to the need to educate healthcare professionals in offering smoking and alcohol cessation interventions in hospitals. The study also provides knowledge about the intervention in the STOP-OP study and will help guide the design of future smoking and alcohol cessation studies aimed at cancer patients undergoing surgery.

  2. Alcohol consumption, smoking and development of visible age-related signs: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, Anne L; Mølbak, Marie-Louise; Schnor, Peter; Grønbæk, Morten; Tolstrup, Janne S

    2017-12-01

    Visible age-related signs indicate biological age, as individuals that appear old for their age are more likely to be at poor health, compared with people that appear their actual age. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alcohol and smoking are associated with four visible age-related signs (arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, earlobe crease and male pattern baldness). We used information from 11 613 individuals in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1976-2003). Alcohol intake, smoking habits and other lifestyle factors were assessed prospectively and visible age-related signs were inspected during subsequent examinations. The risk of developing arcus corneae, earlobe crease and xanthelasmata increased stepwise with increased smoking as measured by pack-years. For alcohol consumption, a high intake was associated with the risk of developing arcus corneae and earlobe crease, but not xanthelasmata. High alcohol consumption and smoking predict development of visible age-related signs. This is the first prospective study to show that heavy alcohol use and smoking are associated with generally looking older than one's actual age. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Brain volumes and neuropsychological performance are related to current smoking and alcoholism history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luhar RB

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Riya B Luhar,1,2 Kayle S Sawyer,1,2 Zoe Gravitz,1,2 Susan Mosher Ruiz,1,2 Marlene Oscar-Berman1–3 1US Department of Veterans Affairs, Boston Healthcare System, 2Boston University School of Medicine, 3Athinoula A Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Background: Dual dependence on alcohol and nicotine is common, with many reports suggesting that more than 80% of alcoholics also smoke cigarettes. Even after cessation of alcohol consumption, many recovering alcoholics continue to smoke. In this exploratory study, we examined how current smoking and a history of alcoholism interacted in relation to brain volumes and neuropsychological performance. Methods: Participants were 14 abstinent long-term alcoholics (seven current smokers and seven nonsmokers, and 13 nonalcoholics (six current smokers and seven nonsmokers. The groups were equivalent in age, gender, education, and intelligence quotient. Two multiecho magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (MP-RAGE scans were collected for all participants using a 3T magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a 32 channel head coil. Brain volumes for each gray and white matter region of interest were derived using FreeSurfer. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological tests measuring intelligence quotient, memory, executive functions, personality variables, and affect. Results: Compared to nonsmoking nonalcoholics, alcoholics who smoke (the comorbid group had volumetric abnormalities in: pre- and para-central frontal cortical areas and rostral middle frontal white matter; parahippocampal and temporal pole regions; the amygdala; the pallidum; the ventral diencephalic region; and the lateral ventricle. The comorbid group performed worse than nonsmoking nonalcoholics on tests of executive functioning and on visually-based memory tests. History of alcoholism was associated with higher neuroticism scores among smokers, and current

  4. Reducing alcohol consumption to minimize weight gain and facilitate smoking cessation among military beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Mark B; Peterson, Alan L; Sobell, Linda Carter; Brundige, Antoinette; Hunter, Christopher M; Hunter, Christine M; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Hrysko-Mullen, Ann S; Isler, William C

    2017-12-01

    Smoking cessation-related weight gain can have significant negative health and career consequences for military personnel. Alcohol reduction combined with smoking cessation may decrease weight gain and relapse. A randomized clinical trial of military beneficiaries compared a standard smoking cessation (i.e., brief informational) intervention (N=159), with a brief motivational smoking cessation intervention that emphasized reduced drinking to lessen caloric intake and minimize weight gain (N=158). Participants who received the motivational intervention were significantly more likely to quit smoking at the 3-month follow-up (p=0.02), but the differences were not maintained at 6 (p=0.18) or 12months (p=0.16). Neither weight change nor alcohol reduction distinguished the 2 groups. Smoking cessation rates at 12months (motivational group=32.91%, informational group=25.79%) were comparable to previous studies, but successful cessation was not mediated by reduced drinking. Alcohol reduction combined with smoking cessation did not result in decreased weight gain or improved outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Alcoholics in interactional group therapy: an outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, I D; Bloch, S; Bond, G; Zimmerman, E; Qualls, B

    1978-04-01

    Three interactional therapy groups of alcoholic patients (N = 20) were formed, and treatment outcome after eight months and again after 12 months of therapy was compared with the outcome of 17 neurotic patients in comparable therapy. Outcome assessment was obtained from three sources: patient, therapist, and independent judge, using both nomothetic and ideographic measures. The results indicated that although more alcoholic than neurotic patients terminated therapy within the first six sessions, a higher percentage of alcoholic patients remained in therapy for 12 months. At the end of 12 months, both samples had improved along a wide variety of variables, and there were no significant differences between the alcoholic and neurotic population in degree of improvement.

  6. Alcohol and smoking behavior in chronic pain patients: the role of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Ola; Grønbaek, Morten; Peuckmann, Vera

    2008-01-01

    The primary aim of this epidemiological study was to investigate associations between chronic non-cancer pain with or without opioid treatment and the alcohol and smoking behavior. The secondary aims were to investigate self-reported quality of life, sleeping problems, oral health and the use...... individuals. We found, that individuals suffering from chronic pain were less likely to drink alcohol. In opioid users alcohol consumption was further reduced. Cigarette smoking was significantly increased in individuals suffering from chronic pain and in opioid users smoking was further increased. Poor oral...... of different health care providers. The Danish health survey of 2005 was based on a region-stratified random sample of 10.916 individuals. Data were collected via personal interviews and self-administrated questionnaires. Respondents suffering from chronic pain were identified through the question 'Do you have...

  7. [Effects of smoking and alcohol consumptionon reproductive and metabolic indicators in young men in western siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchuk, L V; Popova, A V; Erkovich, A A; Voroshilova, N A; Osadchuk, A V

    2017-09-01

    Smoking and alcohol consumption remain widespread throughout the world, including Russia. Recently, due to the increase in male infertility and subfertility, special attention has been paid to the effects of smoking and alcohol on the reproductive health of young men. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of smoking and moderate alcohol consumption on spermatogenesis, reproductive hormone levels and metabolic status in young men living in Western Siberia (Novosibirsk). One hundred thirty-three volunteers (mean age 21.1+/-0.3 years) were tested for the sperm concentration, the proportion of mobile and morphologically normal spermatozoa in the ejaculate, blood serum levels of follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones, prolactin, testosterone, estradiol, inhibin B, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose and uric acid. and conclusions The studied lifestyle factors were found to have no effects on spermatogenesis. Smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day and a moderate frequency of alcohol consumption (up to 1 time per week) was associated with higher blood serum testosterone levels and engaging in more frequent sexual contacts compared to non-smoking and non-drinking men. Drinking alcohol more than once a week and smoking more than 8 cigarettes per day was associated, along with the increase in testosterone levels and the frequency of sexual contacts, with lower levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and higher serum triglyceride levels. Thus, in young men, frequent drinking and smoking can alter the hormonal and metabolic balance, which, as the duration of the exposure and the strength of the factors increase, will increase the risk of reproductive disorders.

  8. The effect of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical activity on the risk of dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Moulisová, Karolína

    2017-01-01

    Title: The effect of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical activity on the risk of dementia Objectives: The main aim was to estimate influence of selected factors on the development of dementia. Methods: Bachelor thesis is designed as a cross-sectional study. Data for analysis was obtained from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Results: Data from 6,339 females and 7,226 males older than 60 years was analyzed. Smoking and problem with alcohol drinking were the ...

  9. Combined effects of smoking and alcohol on metabolic syndrome: the LifeLines cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagter, Sandra N; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vonk, Judith M; Boezen, H Marike; Boezen, H Marieke; Dullaart, Robin P F; Kobold, Anneke C Muller; Feskens, Edith J M; van Beek, André P; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R

    2014-01-01

    The development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is influenced by environmental factors such as smoking and alcohol consumption. We determined the combined effects of smoking and alcohol on MetS and its individual components. 64,046 participants aged 18-80 years from the LifeLines Cohort study were categorized into three body mass index (BMI) classes (BMIConsumption of ≤1 drink/day indicated a trend towards lower triglyceride levels (non-significant). Concurrent use alcohol (>1 drink/day) and tobacco showed higher triglycerides levels. Up to 2 drinks/day was associated with a smaller waist circumference in overweight and obese individuals. Consumption of >2 drinks/day increased blood pressure, with the strongest associations found for heavy smokers. The overall metabolic profile of wine drinkers was better than that of non-drinkers or drinkers of beer or spirits/mixed drinks. Light alcohol consumption may moderate the negative associations of smoking with MetS. Our results suggest that the lifestyle advice that emphasizes smoking cessation and the restriction of alcohol consumption to a maximum of 1 drink/day, is a good approach to reduce the prevalence of MetS.

  10. Stressful events and continued smoking and continued alcohol consumption during mid-pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Beijers

    Full Text Available AIM: to examine whether the severity of different categories of stressful events is associated with continued smoking and alcohol consumption during mid-pregnancy. Also, we explored the explanation of these associations by anxiety and depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Finally, we studied whether the severity of stressful events was associated with the amount of cigarettes and alcohol used by continued users. METHOD: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using data from a population-based prospective cohort study. Pregnant women were recruited via midwifery practices throughout The Netherlands. We analyzed women who continued smoking (n = 113 or quit (n = 290, and women who continued alcohol consumption (n = 124 or quit (n = 1403 during pregnancy. Smoking, alcohol consumption, and perceived severity of stressful events were measured at 19 weeks of gestation. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale were filled out at 14 weeks of gestation. Odds ratios were calculated as association measures and indicated the relative increase for the odds of continuation of smoking and alcohol consumption for the maximum severity score compared to the minimum score. FINDINGS: Severity of the following stressful event categories was associated with continued alcohol consumption: 'conflict with loved ones' (OR = 10.4, p<0.01, 'crime related' (OR= 35.7, p<0.05, 'pregnancy-specific' (OR = 13.4, p<0.05, and the total including all events (OR = 17.2, p<0.05. Adjustment for potential confounders (age, parity and educational level did not notably change the estimates. There was no association of anxiety and depressive symptoms with continued smoking or alcohol consumption. No associations emerged for continued smoking and severity of stressful events. The amount of cigarettes and alcohol consumption among continued users was not associated with severity of stressful events. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings may be relevant for health

  11. Plasma alcohol, smoking, hormone concentrations and self-reported aggression. A study in a social-drinking situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, L E; Robertson, L S; Tuchfeld, B

    1975-05-01

    Plasma alcohol concentrations and the number of cigarettes smoked by men during social-drinking situations were significantly related to change in testosterone levels. Age, height, plasma alcohol and smoking were related to self-reports of prior assault and verbal aggression. Agression was not related to testosterone concentration.

  12. Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking pattern among brothel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Background: Alcohol and tobacco use are known risk factors for non communicable diseases especially among women. Brothel based ... Objective: To assess the pattern of alcohol and tobacco use among female sex workers in two selected local government areas in .... behavior and the prevention of sexually transmitted.

  13. Adjustment for tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption by simultaneous analysis of several types of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldorsen, Tor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Kjærheim, Kristina; Grimsrud, Tom K

    2017-02-01

    Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are risk factors for several types of cancer and may act as confounders in aetiological studies. Large register-based cohorts often lack data on tobacco and alcohol. We present a method for computing estimates of cancer risk adjusted for tobacco and alcohol without exposure information. We propose the use of confirmatory factor analysis models for simultaneous analysis of several cancer sites related to tobacco and alcohol. In the analyses, the unobserved pattern of smoking habits and alcohol drinking is considered latent common factors. The models allow for different effects on each cancer site, and also for appropriate latent site-specific factors for subgroup variation. Results may be used to compute expected numbers of cancer from reference rates, adjusted for tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. This method was applied to results from a large, published study of work-related cancer based on census data (1970) and 21 years of cancer incidence data from the national cancer registry. The results from our analysis were in accordance with recognised risks in selected occupational groups. The estimated relative effects from tobacco and alcohol on cancer risk were largely in line with results from Nordic reports. For lung cancer, adjustment for tobacco implied relative changes in SIR between a decrease from 1.16 to 0.72 (Fishermen), and an increase from 0.47 to 0.95 (Forestry workers). We consider the method useful for achieving less confounded estimates of cancer risk in large cohort studies with no available information on smoking and alcohol consumption.

  14. Efficacy of a technology-based, integrated smoking cessation and alcohol intervention for smoking cessation in adolescents: Results of a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Severin; Paz Castro, Raquel; Kowatsch, Tobias; Filler, Andreas; Schaub, Michael P

    2017-11-01

    To test the efficacy of a technology-based integrated smoking cessation and alcohol intervention versus a smoking cessation only intervention in adolescents. This was a two-arm, parallel-group, cluster-randomised controlled trial with assessments at baseline and six months follow-up. Subjects in both groups received tailored mobile phone text messages to support smoking cessation for 3months, and the option of registering for a program incorporating strategies for smoking cessation centred around a self-defined quit date. Subjects in the integrated intervention group also received tailored feedback regarding their consumption of alcohol and, for binge drinkers, tailored mobile phone text messages encouraging them to maintain their drinking within low-risk limits over a 3-month period. Primary outcome measures were the 7-day point prevalence of smoking abstinence and change in cigarette consumption. In 360 Swiss vocational and upper secondary school classes, 2127 students who smoked tobacco regularly and owned a mobile phone were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 1471 (69.2%) participated and 6-month follow-up data were obtained for 1116 (75.9%). No significant group differences were observed for any of the primary or secondary outcomes. Moderator analyses revealed beneficial intervention effects concerning 7-day smoking abstinence in participants with higher versus lower alcohol consumption. Overall, the integrated smoking cessation and alcohol intervention exhibited no advantages over a smoking cessation only intervention, but it might be more effective for the subgroup of adolescent smokers with higher alcohol consumption. Providing a combined smoking cessation and alcohol intervention might be recommended for adolescent smokers with higher-level alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of nickel sensitization and contact sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    There is evidence that stimulants such as alcohol and tobacco have an effect on the immune system, but little is known about how these lifestyle factors affect the prevalence of contact sensitization. This study investigated whether smoking and alcohol consumption were associated with contact...... sensitization and nickel sensitization. A random sample of adults (n=3460) from the general population of Copenhagen was invited to participate in a general health examination including patch-testing. Alcohol consumption was not associated with nickel sensitization, whereas a significant trend (p...

  16. Integrating alcohol response feedback in a brief intervention for young adult heavy drinkers who smoke: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridberg, Daniel J; Cao, Dingcai; King, Andrea C

    2015-10-01

    More effective approaches are needed to enhance drinking and other health behavior (e.g., smoking) outcomes of alcohol brief intervention (BI). Young adult heavy drinkers often engage in other health risk behaviors and show sensitivity to alcohol's stimulating and rewarding effects, which predicts future alcohol-related problems. However, standard alcohol BIs do not address these issues. The current pilot study tested the utility of including feedback on alcohol response phenotype to improve BI outcomes among young adult heavy drinkers who smoke (HDS). Thirty-three young adult (M±SD age=23.8±2.1 years) HDS (8.7±4.3 binge episodes/month; 23.6±6.3 smoking days/month) were randomly assigned to standard alcohol BI (BI-S; n=11), standard alcohol BI with personalized alcohol response feedback (BI-ARF; n=10), or a health behavior attention control BI (AC; n=11). Alcohol responses (stimulation, sedation, reward, and smoking urge) for the BI-ARF were recorded during a separate alcohol challenge session (.8g/kg). Outcomes were past-month drinking and smoking behavior assessed at 1- and 6-months post-intervention. At 6-month follow-up, the BI-ARF produced significant reductions in binge drinking, alcohol-smoking co-use, drinking quantity and frequency, and smoking frequency, but not maximum drinks per occasion, relative to baseline. Overall, the BI-ARF produced larger reductions in drinking/smoking behaviors at follow-up than did the BI-S or AC. Including personalized feedback on alcohol response phenotype may improve BI outcomes for young adult HDS. Additional research is warranted to enhance and refine this approach in a broader sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prediagnostic smoking history, alcohol consumption, and colorectal cancer survival: the Seattle Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Baron, John; Newcomb, Polly A

    2011-11-01

    Smoking and alcohol consumption are associated with an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, it is unclear whether these exposures are associated with survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis. Men and women diagnosed with incident colorectal cancer between 1998 and 2007 in 13 counties in western Washington State were identified by using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry. Information on smoking history and alcohol consumption was collected by telephone interview. Follow-up for mortality was completed through linkage to the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations among smoking, alcohol consumption, and mortality after colorectal cancer diagnosis. Stratified analyses were conducted by sex, age at diagnosis (cancer (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.72-1.61) or those diagnosed before age 50 years (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.67-1.48). Alcohol consumption was not associated with disease-specific or all-cause mortality, regardless of patient or tumor characteristics. In addition to an association with disease risk, smoking is associated with increased mortality after colorectal cancer diagnosis. This association is especially pronounced for colorectal cancer with high microsatellite instability. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  18. Peer impact on smoking, alcohol consumption, drug use and sports activities in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geckova, A; van Dijk, JP

    2001-01-01

    The impact of peer behavior on smoking, alcohol consumption drug use and sports pursuits by pals was followed on a sample of 2616 Slovak adolescents (including 1370 boys, mean age 15 years) within the project Health Inequalities in Adolescents. The data were collected in the form of questionnaires.

  19. Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, Alcohol Consumption and Cigarette Smoking among East Asian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R.; Chin, Ming-Kai; Lee, Chung Gun; Kim, Nayoung; Huang, Sen-Fang; Chen, Chee Keong; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Wong, Patricia; Chia, Michael; Park, Bock-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify levels of moderate-intensity physical activity (MPA) and vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA) in a representative sample of college students in six East Asian economies and examine their relationship with weight, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: College students…

  20. Maternal smoking and alcohol consumption during pregnancy as risk factors for sudden infant death.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell-Naughton, M

    2012-04-01

    A population based case control study was conducted to examine alcohol consumption and maternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of SIDS in an Irish population. Each SIDS case (n = 287) was compared with control infants (n = 832) matched for date and place of birth for infants born from 1994 to 2001. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate differences between Cases and Controls establishing Odds Ratio\\'s (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI). Mothers who smoked were 3 times more likely to have a SIDS Case, and a dose response effect was apparent, with mothers smoking 1-10 cigarettes\\/day OR 2.93 (CI 1.50-5.71), and those smoking > 10 cigarettes\\/day OR 4.36 (CI 2.50-7.61). More Case mothers consumed alcohol during pregnancy than Control mothers and, within drinkers, the amount of alcohol consumed was also greater (p < 0.05). A dose response with frequency of drinking was apparent. The adjusted odds ratio for those consuming alcohol in all three trimesters was 3.59 (CI:1.40-9.20). Both of these risk factors are modifiable and need to be incorporated into antenatal education from a SIDS point of view.

  1. Mental Health Correlates of Post Disaster Increases in Alcohol and Cigarette Smoking: A Vietnamese Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Juliana D.; McCauley, Jenna L.; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Richardson, Lisa; Kilpatrick, Dean; Tran, Trinh L.; Trung, Lam T.; Tam, Nguyen T.; Tuan, Tran; Buoi, La Thi; Ha, Tran Thu; Thach, Tran D.; Acierno, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Previous research in US populations has found associations between disaster-related variables, psychological variables, and post-disaster increases in smoking and alcohol use. To date, no research has examined this association in an international population of disaster exposed individuals. Data used in this study were drawn from a larger study…

  2. Precocious Initiation into Smoking, Alcohol Use, and Gambling among Children with Conduct Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temcheff, Caroline E; Déry, Michèle; St-Pierre, Renée A; Laventure, Myriam; Lemelin, Jean-Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent participation in risky and addictive behaviours, such as smoking, substance use, and gambling has the potential to lead to many serious problems. The presence of conduct problems (CPs) and early initiation into risky and addictive behaviours have been independently shown to be associated with adolescent and young adult smoking, drinking, and gambling. Nevertheless, the relation between early initiation into risky and addictive behaviours and CPs remains to be explored among pre-adolescents. Our study aims to examine the prospective relation between CPs in early primary school and pre-adolescent initiation into smoking, alcohol use, and gambling. Our study used data from participants in an ongoing prospective, longitudinal study at the Université de Sherbrooke to examine cigarette, alcohol, and gambling initiation among primary school-aged boys and girls with CPs. Children were recruited between the ages of 6 and 9 years from several low socioeconomic status public schools in diverse geographical regions of Quebec. Initiation into cigarettes, alcohol, and gambling was measured 1 year later. Children with CPs were found to be at greater risk for early initiation into smoking, alcohol, and gambling. These effects remained even once other known risk factors, such as poor parental supervision and child effortful control, were controlled for. These results suggest that CPs present in early elementary school can predict early initiation in to potentially addictive behaviours among boys and girls. Implications for targeted preventive intervention are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Combined effects of smoking and alcohol on metabolic syndrome: the LifeLines cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra N Slagter

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The development of metabolic syndrome (MetS is influenced by environmental factors such as smoking and alcohol consumption. We determined the combined effects of smoking and alcohol on MetS and its individual components. METHODS: 64,046 participants aged 18-80 years from the LifeLines Cohort study were categorized into three body mass index (BMI classes (BMI1 drink/day and tobacco showed higher triglycerides levels. Up to 2 drinks/day was associated with a smaller waist circumference in overweight and obese individuals. Consumption of >2 drinks/day increased blood pressure, with the strongest associations found for heavy smokers. The overall metabolic profile of wine drinkers was better than that of non-drinkers or drinkers of beer or spirits/mixed drinks. CONCLUSION: Light alcohol consumption may moderate the negative associations of smoking with MetS. Our results suggest that the lifestyle advice that emphasizes smoking cessation and the restriction of alcohol consumption to a maximum of 1 drink/day, is a good approach to reduce the prevalence of MetS.

  4. The Effects of Maternal Alcohol Consumption and Cigarette Smoking during Pregnancy on Acoustic Cry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, J. Kevin; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Measured the neurobehavioral integrity of Irish infants and maternal alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. Subjects were 127 primiparous mothers. Results demonstrated significant cry effects on infants of heavily drinking mothers, supporting the conclusion that newborn infants show functional disturbances in the nervous system resulting from…

  5. Alcohol and smoking as risk factors in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamini, G; Bassi, C; Falconi, M; Sartori, N; Salvia, R; Rigo, L; Castagnini, A; Di Francesco, V; Frulloni, L; Bovo, P; Vaona, B; Angelini, G; Vantini, I; Cavallini, G; Pederzoli, P

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare alcohol and smoking as risk factors in the development of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We considered only male subjects: (1) 630 patients with chronic pancreatitis who developed 12 pancreatic and 47 extrapancreatic cancers; (2) 69 patients with histologically well documented pancreatic cancer and no clinical history of chronic pancreatitis; and (3) 700 random controls taken from the Verona polling list and submitted to a complete medical check-up. Chronic pancreatitis subjects drink more than control subjects and more than subjects with pancreatic cancer without chronic pancreatitis (Ppancreatitis is significantly higher than that in the control group [odds ratio (OR) 17.3; 95% CI 12.6-23.8; Ppancreatic carcinomas but with no history of chronic pancreatitis (OR 5.3; 95% CI 3.0-9.4; Prisk of chronic pancreatitis correlates both with alcohol intake and with cigarette smoking with a trend indicating that the risk increases with increased alcohol intake and cigarette consumption; (2) alcohol and smoking are statistically independent risk factors for chronic pancreatitis; and (3) the risk of pancreatic cancer correlates positively with cigarette smoking but not with drinking.

  6. Influence of smoking, alcohol consumption, drug usage, and lack of physical activity on health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gecková, A.; Pudelsky, M.; Tuinstra, J.; van Dijk, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of project "lnequality in health In adolescents", the influence of smoking, alcohol consumption, drug usage, lack of physical activity. and their cumulative influence on health was Investigated in the sample of Slovak adolescents (n = 2616, including 1370 boys, average age 15

  7. Stressful events and continued smoking and continued alcohol consumption during mid-pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, Chantal; Ormel, Johan; Meijer, Judith L; Verbeek, Tjitte; Bockting, Claudi L H; Burger, Huibert

    2014-01-01

    Aim: to examine whether the severity of different categories of stressful events is associated with continued smoking and alcohol consumption during mid-pregnancy. Also, we explored the explanation of these associations by anxiety and depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Finally, we studied whether

  8. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and endometrial cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loerbroks, A.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and endometrial cancer. Methods: In 1986, the Netherlands Cohort Study was initiated. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other cancer risk factors was completed by 62,573 women. Follow-up for

  9. In-utero exposure to smoking, alcohol, coffee, and tea and risk of strabismus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Tobias; Boyd, Heather A; Poulsen, Gry

    2010-01-01

    In a prospective, population-based cohort study, the authors investigated the effect of in-utero exposure to maternal smoking and consumption of alcohol, coffee, and tea on the risk of strabismus. They reviewed medical records for children in the Danish National Birth Cohort identified through...... national registers as possibly having strabismus. Relative risk estimates were adjusted for year of birth, social class, maternal smoking, maternal age at birth, and maternal coffee and tea consumption. The authors identified 1,321 cases of strabismus in a cohort of 96,842 Danish children born between 1996.......92, 1.61). Light maternal alcohol consumption was inversely associated with strabismus risk, whereas maternal coffee and tea drinking were not associated with strabismus risk. In conclusion, smoking during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of strabismus in the offspring. Conversely, light...

  10. Smoking and alcohol intervention before surgery: evidence for best practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H; Nielsen, P R; Lauritzen, J B

    2009-01-01

    Smoking and hazardous drinking are common and important risk factors for an increased rate of complications after surgery. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms include organic dysfunctions that can recover with abstinence. Abstinence starting 3-8 weeks before surgery will significantly re...

  11. Matching Alcoholics to Coping Skills or Interactional Therapies: Posttreatment Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadden, Ronald M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Randomly assigned 96 persons from inpatient alcoholism treatment program to aftercare group treatment consisting of either coping skills training or interactional therapy. Found that coping skills training was more effective for subjects higher in sociopathy or psychopathology; interactional therapy was more effective for subjects lower in…

  12. The Effect of Nutritional Therapy on Rehabilitation of Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Ruth M.

    In this study, nutrition therapy was found to be an important variable in the successful treatment of alcoholism. Traditional treatment methods, such as psychological and institutional approaches, social and group therapy, and chemotherapy, are noted. Research on nutritional needs of individuals has led to an orthomolecular concept which holds…

  13. Telomere Shortening Unrelated to Smoking, Body Weight, Physical Activity, and Alcohol Intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischer, Maren; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies have associated short telomere length with smoking, body weight, physical activity, and possibly alcohol intake; however, whether these associations are due to confounding is unknown. We tested these hypotheses in 4,576 individuals from the general population cross......-year inter-observational tobacco consumption, body weight, physical activity, or alcohol intake. Prospectively during a further 10 years follow-up after the second examination, quartiles of telomere length change did not associate with risk of all-cause mortality, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary...... disease, diabetes mellitus, ischemic cerebrovascular disease, or ischemic heart disease. In conclusion, smoking, increased body weight, and physical inactivity were associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally, but not with telomere length change during 10 years observation, and alcohol intake...

  14. Associations of smoking and alcohol consumption with impaired β-cell function in Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Zhou, Yulin; Xu, Baihui; Sun, Jichao; Wang, Tiange; Lu, Jieli; Lai, Shenghan; Bi, Yufang; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang

    2016-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with impaired β-cell function in Chinese men, particularly the interaction of smoking and alcohol consumption on impaired insulin secretion. A population-based cross-sectional study was performed in 3957 Chinese men aged ≥40 years. The homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β) was calculated, and impaired β-cell function was defined as less than the lowest quartile HOMA-βcut-off point. The prevalence of impaired β-cell function in current smokers and heavy drinkers (≥200 g/week) was significantly higher than in non-smokers and non-drinkers, respectively. Compared with non-smoking, current smoking had an exacerbating relationship with impaired β-cell function (odds ratio [OR] 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.47-2.15; P function and former smoking (P = 0.21), although low and heavy drinking were associated with an increased risk of impaired β-cell function (OR 1.40 [95% CI 1.07-1.81] and 2.14 [95% CI 1.77-2.58], respectively) compared with non-drinking. The combination of current smoking and heavy drinking was associated with the highest risk of impaired β-cell function (OR 3.16; 95% CI 2.43-4.12; P function. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption were significantly and independently associated with impaired β-cell function in Chinese men. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity in man: influence of gender, age, alcohol consumption and smoking in a caucasian population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Billinger, M. H.; Bode, C.

    2002-01-01

    potentially confounding factors (alcohol consumption, smoking, drug intake) on its activity in a Caucasian population. METHODS: ADH activity was assessed in endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens from 111 Caucasian subjects aged 20-80 years, of whom 51 were females. RESULTS: Highest ADH activity was measured......-80 years. In men aged 20-40 years, consumption of larger quantities of alcohol (>0.8 g/kg body weight/day) was associated with reduced ADH activity. H(2)-Receptor antagonist treatment also decreased gastric ADH activity. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that ADH activity in human gastric mucosa...... is negatively associated with consumption of larger quantities of alcohol. The question of whether ADH activity is higher in males or females can only be answered with respect to age. The gastric ADH activity in young men is distinctly higher compared to young women, but the opposite holds true in middle...

  16. What is the association of smoking and alcohol use with the increase in social inequality in mortality in Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Mette Bjerrum; Diderichsen, Finn; Grønbæk, Morten

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to estimate the impact of smoking and alcohol use on the increase in social inequality in mortality in Denmark in the period 1985-2009. DESIGN: A nationwide register-based study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: The whole Danish population aged 30 years or more....... In women the increase was mainly caused by smoking. CONCLUSIONS: The main explanation for the increase in social inequality in mortality since the mid-1980s is smoking and alcohol use. A significant reduction in the social inequality in mortality can only happen if the prevention of smoking and alcohol use...... in the period 1985-2009. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome is mortality rates in relation to educational attainments calculated with and without deaths related to smoking and alcohol use. An absolute measure of inequality in mortality is applied along with a result on the direct...

  17. Impact of Alcohol Use and Bar Attendance on Smoking and Quit Attempts Among Young Adult Bar Patrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined cigarette smoking and quit attempts in the context of alcohol use and bar attendance among young adult bar patrons with different smoking patterns. Methods. We used randomized time location sampling to collect data among adult bar patrons aged 21 to 26 years in San Diego, California (n = 1235; response rate = 73%). We used multinomial and multivariate logistic regression models to analyze the association between smoking and quit attempts and both drinking and binge drinking among occasional, regular, very light, and heavier smokers, controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education. Results. Young adult bar patrons reported high rates of smoking and co-use of cigarettes and alcohol. Binge drinking predicted smoking status, especially occasional and very light smoking. All types of smokers reported alcohol use, and bar attendance made it harder to quit. Alcohol use was negatively associated with quit attempts for very light smokers, but positively associated with quitting among heavier smokers. Conclusions. Smoking and co-use of cigarettes and alcohol are common among young adult bar patrons, but there are important differences by smoking patterns. Tobacco interventions for young adults should prioritize bars and address alcohol use. PMID:23488485

  18. Effects of intimate partner violence, PTSD, and alcohol use on cigarette smoking in a nationally representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Julianne C; Hakes, Jahn K; McClure, Erin A; Snead, Alexandra L; Back, Sudie E

    2016-06-01

    Separate literatures indicate that intimate partner violence (IPV), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and alcohol use are independently associated with increased risk for cigarette smoking. No previous studies have examined the co-occurrence of these problems on smoking quantity and potential gender-specific relationships. This study will address this gap in the literature. Data from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) were examined. Variables were assessed during the past year. Individuals (N = 25,604) who reported being married, dating, or involved in a romantic relationship were included. Among men, PTSD and alcohol use were associated with more cigarettes smoked per day. Among women, PTSD, alcohol use, and IPV victimization were associated with more cigarettes smoked per day. Women who experienced IPV victimization smoked approximately three additional cigarettes per day. IPV victimization, PTSD, and alcohol use were associated with cigarettes smoked among women, while IPV experiences were not associated with smoking risk among men. These findings represent an important contribution to the existing literature in that it elucidates the compounding relationship between a common and complex comorbidity and cigarette smoking. Findings indicate a critical need to implement routine smoking screening and intervention in venues where intimate partner violence is commonly encountered, such as advocacy and substance use treatment settings. (Am J Addict 2016;25:283-290). © 2016 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  19. A prospective study of the association between smoking and later alcohol drinking in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majken K; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Andersen, Anne T

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To address the possible prospective association between smoking habits and risk of later heavy drinking in the adult population. DESIGN: Pooled population-based long-term cohort studies with repeated assessments of smoking and alcohol habits. SETTING: Copenhagen, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS...... consumption at first examination predicted an increased risk of becoming a heavy and excessive drinker in a dose-dependent manner. Men who smoked more than 25 g of tobacco per day had adjusted odds ratios of 2.12 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.44-3.11) and 3.95 (95% CI: 1.93-8.95) for becoming heavy...... and excessive drinkers, compared to participants who had never smoked. Equivalent estimates among women were 1.76 (95% CI: 1.02-3.04) and 2.21 (95% CI: 1.00-4.58), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that tobacco use is associated quantitatively with later risk of heavier drinking....

  20. Lifestyle in Curacao - Smoking, alcohol consumption, eating habits and exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grol, MEC; Halabi, YT; Gerstenbluth, [No Value; Alberts, JF; ONiel, J

    The Curacao Health Study was carried out among a randomized sample (n = 2248, response rate = 85%) of the adult non-institutionalized population in order to assess aspects of lifestyle that may pose health risks. Factors examined were tobacco and alcohol use, eating habits and exercise behaviour.

  1. Alcohol consumption as a predictor of reactivity to smoking and stress cues presented in the natural environment of smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Rachel L; Saladin, Michael E; McClure, Erin A; Squeglia, Lindsay M; Carpenter, Matthew J; Tiffany, Stephen T; Baker, Nathaniel L; Gray, Kevin M

    2017-02-01

    The high prevalence of co-occurring alcohol and tobacco use underscores the importance of understanding the influence of alcohol consumption on risk factors for smoking and relapse. Alcohol has been shown to impact reactivity to smoking and stress-related cues, both of which are common antecedents to smoking and smoking relapse. The objective of the current study is to examine associations between alcohol use, cigarette craving, and stress reactivity following exposure to smoking and stress cues delivered in participants' daily lives. Using cue-reactivity ecological momentary assessment (CREMA), adult smokers (n = 138) reported cigarette craving, stress, and past hour alcohol use on a mobile device four times per day for 2 weeks, resulting in a range of 4493-5983 data points per analysis. Questions were followed by exposure to pictorial neutral, stressful, or smoking cues delivered via the mobile device. Craving and affect were re-assessed following cue exposure. Results showed that recent (past hour) alcohol use was significantly associated with increases in the following: (a) tonic (non-cue-elicited) cigarette craving, (b) stress cue-elicited cigarette craving, and (c) stress cue-elicited stress reactivity, in the context of high-baseline stress. There was no significant association between alcohol use and smoking cue-elicited craving. Alcohol use may increase risk for smoking and relapse to smoking by increasing cigarette craving and, in certain contexts, stress following stress cue exposure. Though alcohol is known for its anxiolytic properties, under some conditions, it may increase reactivity to stress cues.

  2. Neighborhood environment perceptions and the likelihood of smoking and alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitnarin, Nattinee; Heinrich, Katie M; Haddock, Christopher K; Hughey, Joseph; Berkel, LaVerne; Poston, Walker S C

    2015-01-14

    Neighborhood characteristics are important correlates for a variety of health outcomes. Among several health risk behaviors, smoking and alcohol use have significant consequences. Perceptions of neighborhood problems are associated with depressive symptoms, lower physical activity, and lower quality of life. However, it is unclear which perceived aspects of neighborhoods might be related to smoking and drinking. We examined whether perceived neighborhood characteristics were associated with smoking and drinking patterns using data from US metropolitan Midwestern area adults. Participants completed surveys including sociodemographic characteristics, neighborhood perceptions, behavioral and psychological health. For men, negative perceptions of neighborhood infrastructures were significant predictors for smoking and binge drinking. Among women, no perceived environmental factors were associated with smoking or drinking. However, education was a significant negative predictor for smoking. As age increased, the likelihood of using cigarettes, heavy and binge drinking in women decreased significantly. Depression was a positive predictor for smoking and heavy drinking in men and women, respectively. These findings indicate that the perceived neighborhood infrastructure was predictive of health behaviors among men, even after adjusting for key confounders. Closer attention may need to be paid to the role of neighborhood environmental characteristics along with individual-level characteristics in influencing unhealthy behaviors.

  3. Transition to a smoke-free culture within mental health and drug and alcohol services: A survey of key stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Marewa; Fraser, Trish; Bullen, Chris; Wallace-Bell, Mark; McRobbie, Hayden; Hadwen, Georgy

    2014-04-01

    Tobacco smoking is common among people with mental illnesses, and they carry a higher burden of smoking-related illnesses. Despite this, smoke-free policies and systems for supporting cessation have proved difficult to introduce in mental health and drug and alcohol services (MHDAS). This paper examines the barriers to becoming smoke free within New Zealand services. Key informants, including staff, smoke-free coordinators, and cessation specialists were interviewed. Of the 142 invited informants 61 agreed (42%) to participate in a telephone interview, and 56 provided useable data. Organizations had a permissive or transitioning smoking culture, or were smoke free, defined by smoke-free environments, smoke-free-promoting attitudes and behaviours of management and staff, and cessation support. Most organizations were on a continuum between permissive and transitional cultures. Only eight services had a fully smoke-free culture. MHDAS face many challenges in the transition to a smoke-free culture. They are not helped by exemptions in smoke-free policies for mental health services, staff smoking, negative staff attitudes to becoming smoke free, poor knowledge of nicotine dependence, smoking-related harm and comorbidities, and poor knowledge and skills regarding cessation-support options. Health inequalities will continue across both service and socioeconomic divides without a concerted effort to address smoking. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Smoking, alcohol use, socioeconomic background and oral health among young Finnish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Tarja; Päkkilä, Jari; Karjalainen, Kaisa; Kämppi, Antti; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Patinen, Pertti; Tjäderhane, Leo; Anttonen, Vuokko

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of smoking and alcohol use in association with dental caries experience and signs of periodontal disease in a Finnish male group born in the early 1990s. The impacts of health behaviour and socioeconomic factors were included in the analyses. Oral health of 8539 conscripts was screened in a cross-sectional study (DT, DMFT and CPI). They also answered a questionnaire covering their habits of smoking and alcohol use as well as other behaviours and background factors. The bleeding on probing index (BOP) was available on 6529 conscripts. Cross-tabulation together with a chi-squared test and generalized linear mixed models were used in the analyses. A mosaic figure was used to illustrate associations of smoking frequency, use of dental services and toothache. Majority (80.9%) in the study group consumed alcohol at least once a month, and 39.4% were daily smokers. Smoking was statistically significantly associated with high caries experience and high bleeding values of gums. Consumption of alcohol was not associated with dental caries and periodontal disease. The high BOP value had the strongest association with infrequent tooth brushing and smoking. The participant's own education level was the main protective factor of oral health. The smokers used dental services more frequently compared to the non-smokers mostly for acute care. Young men's health behaviour, especially of those with low education, does not promote oral health, which may indicate need for extensive healthcare services in the future. Health promotion should not be neglected. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Epidemiology and potential mechanisms of tobacco smoking and heavy alcohol consumption in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duell, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoking represents an important known cause of ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Recent data from pooled analyses in consortia involving multiple case-control and cohort studies suggest that heavy (but not moderate or light) alcohol consumption also may increase pancreatic cancer risk. Animal and human evidence indicate that tobacco carcinogens and metabolites may act in concert and have both genetic and epigenetic effects at early and later stages in pancreatic tumorigenesis. One of the more important tobacco-related carcinogens, NNK, probably acts via multiple pathways. Heavy alcohol consumption may increase pancreatic cancer risk by potentiating the effects of other risk factors such as tobacco smoking, poor nutrition, and inflammatory pathways related to chronic pancreatitis, but also may have independent genetic and epigenetic effects. Animal and human studies of tobacco- and alcohol-related pancreatic carcinogenesis suggest multi-modal, overlapping mechanistic pathways. Tobacco smoking and heavy alcohol consumption are preventable exposures, and their avoidance would substantially decrease the burden of pancreatic cancer worldwide. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Smoking, alcohol and drug use in youth and adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Sydney; Hirsch, Lauren; Pringsheim, Tamara

    2017-05-01

    Previous research suggests a relationship between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and smoking, alcohol and illicit drug use, however most studies have focused on adolescents or young adults, or clinically ascertained samples. To analyse population-based data on the relationship between ADHD and at-risk health behaviours in adolescents and adults. Data were derived from a Statistics Canada population-based health survey. The association between the diagnosis of ADHD and smoking, alcohol use, and illicit drug use was examined. Individuals with ADHD started smoking at a younger age. They consumed more alcoholic drinks on drinking days, and women with ADHD were more likely to engage in binge drinking. Women over the age of 25 and men with ADHD were more likely to meet alcohol-dependence lifetime criteria. People with ADHD were at a greater risk of drug misuse and dependence. People with ADHD are more likely to partake in at-risk behaviours. None. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license.

  7. Preconception markers of dual risk for alcohol and smoking exposed pregnancy: tools for primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Karen S; Hettema, Jennifer E; Cropsey, Karen L; Jackson, Justin P

    2011-11-01

    Effective preconception primary prevention strategies are needed for women who are at dual risk for alcohol and smoking exposed pregnancies. The current study seeks to identify risk factors that can be used to target intervention strategies at women who are at dual risk. During a 2-year period from January 2007 through December 2009, 109 women at dual risk for alcohol exposed pregnancy (AEP) and smoking exposed pregnancy (SEP) and 108 women at risk only for AEP were recruited from central Virginia cities. All participants completed a battery of instruments, including assessments of sexual, smoking, and alcohol history and current behavior in each area. Several factors differentiated women at dual risk for SEP/AEP vs. AEP alone, including lower educational level and employment, higher frequency of sexual intercourse, less use of contraception, and higher frequency of alcohol use and mental disorders. Several measurable factors differentiate SEP/AEP women, and these factors could be used to efficiently target primary prevention. The increased severity of women at dual risk of SEP/AEP on a variety of factors demonstrates the importance of preconception prevention efforts for these women.

  8. Effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of nickel sensitization and contact sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Menné, Torkil; Nielsen, Niels H; Linneberg, Allan

    2010-01-01

    There is evidence that stimulants such as alcohol and tobacco have an effect on the immune system, but little is known about how these lifestyle factors affect the prevalence of contact sensitization. This study investigated whether smoking and alcohol consumption were associated with contact sensitization and nickel sensitization. A random sample of adults (n=3460) from the general population of Copenhagen was invited to participate in a general health examination including patch-testing. Alcohol consumption was not associated with nickel sensitization, whereas a significant trend (p<0.05) was identified between smoking status and nickel sensitization in an adjusted model; i.e. nickel sensitization was higher among both previous smokers (odds ratio (OR) = 1.19; confidence interval (CI) = 0.81-1.76), current light smokers (OR=1.50; CI=0.94-2.37) and current heavy smokers (OR=1.56; CI = 0.87-2.80) compared with never smokers. This study confirmed that smoking is associated with nickel sensitization, but rejected an association with alcohol consumption.

  9. Are changes in financial strain associated with changes in alcohol use and smoking among older adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Benjamin A; Agahi, Neda; Krause, Neal

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to assess whether changes in levels of financial strain are associated with changes in alcohol use and smoking among older adults. Multilevel analyses were conducted using longitudinal data from a randomly selected national sample of older adults (N = 2,352; 60% female). The data were collected in six waves during the period of 1992-2006. We estimated associations between within-person changes in levels of financial strain and the odds of engaging in heavy drinking and smoking, while also testing for the moderating effects of gender, education, and age. A direct association was observed between changes in levels of financial strain and the odds of heavy drinking, particularly among elderly men (odds ratio [OR] = 1.31) and those with low levels of education (OR = 1.27). A direct association between changes in levels of financial strain and the odds of smoking was also evident, particularly among the young-old (i.e., age 65 at baseline; OR = 1.44). Exposure to financial strain places some groups of older adults at increased risk for unhealthy drinking and smoking. If the current global financial crisis leads to increases in experiences of financial strain among older adults, alcohol and smoking problems can also be expected to increase in this population.

  10. Restricted environmental stimulation therapy of smoking: a parametric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedfeld, P; Baker-Brown, G

    1987-01-01

    Restricted environmental stimulation therapy (REST) has been shown in several studies to be an effective technique in smoking intervention. The most common procedure has been 24 hours in a dark, silent chamber; in several cases, messages designed to facilitate smoking cessation have been presented every few hours over an intercom. This study parametrically varied 12 versus 24 hour chamber REST sessions and four message presentation schedules (massed, distributed, or self-demand presentation of five messages, and a no message condition). A ninth group of volunteer subjects spent five one hour sessions in a flotation REST tank. In this condition, no message was presented during the first session; one message was given during each of the next three sessions; and two messages were given in the last session. Previous findings of therapeutic efficacy were confirmed for chamber REST, with 3- and 12-month follow-ups showing means of 51% and 35% reduction, and 34% and 21% abstinence, respectively. The 24-hour distributed message group, representing the modal technique, showed a mean reduction rate of 51% and an abstinence rate of 36% one year after treatment. There were no significant differences as a function of the two main factors nor the interaction. Most chamber REST groups showed significant smoking reductions on both follow-ups. Flotation REST led to a significant decrease three months after the treatment, but not at one year. The data have theoretical as well as practical implications for future uses of REST.

  11. STOP smoking and alcohol drinking before OPeration for bladder cancer (the STOP-OP study), perioperative smoking and alcohol cessation intervention in relation to radical cystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Susanne Vahr; Thomsen, Thordis; Thind, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effect of a smoking-, alcohol- or combined-cessation intervention starting shortly before surgery and lasting 6 weeks on overall complications after radical cystectomy. Secondary objectives are to examine the effect on types and grades of complications, smoking cessation...... and alcohol cessation, length of hospital stay, health-related quality of life and return to work or habitual level of activity up to 12 months postoperatively. METHODS/DESIGN: The study is a multi-institutional randomised clinical trial involving 110 patients with a risky alcohol intake and daily smoking who...... meetings and at follow-up. DISCUSSION: Herein, we report the design of the STOP-OP study, objectives and accrual up-date. This study will provide new knowledge about how to prevent smoking and alcohol-related postoperative complications at the time of bladder cancer surgery. Till now 77 patients have been...

  12. [Withdrawal therapy of patients with alcoholism and nicotine dependence with carcinomas in the area of the head and neck. Luxury or necessity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammer, R; Neiderdellmann, H; Friesenecker, J; Fleischmann, H; Herrmann, J; Kreft, M

    1998-03-01

    Alcohol and nicotine abuse play a major role in the etiology of oral squamous cell carcinomas. In the present study, we investigated the number of patients with oral/oropharyngeal carcinomas who regularly consume alcohol and nicotine and what type of specific treatment should be prescribed for the addiction. A total of 105 patients (90 men, 15 women) with oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas were studied based on catamnestic data as well as a special questionnaire designed to assess drinking and smoking habits (40 g alcohol/day for men and 20 g alcohol/day for women was taken as the standard measure for those considered at risk for alcoholism). For smokers, the number of packs smoked per year was determined and compared to clinical data (i.e., tumor size, location) and laboratory data (gamma-GT). Particular attention was given to the addiction behavior before and after tumor therapy (recorded at least 1 year after successful tumor treatment). At the time of diagnosis, 83.1% regularly drank alcohol (71.9% reported drinking over 40 g/ 20 g of alcohol per day). Another 17.9% stopped drinking after therapy. Of the alcoholics 59.8% had been exposed to a daily consumption level above the threshold amount for more than 20 years. Some 70% of the patients reported that they exclusively drank beer. Tobacco consumption came from cigarette smoking 92.7% and 89.7% reported that they smoked before therapy--after therapy only 37.8% smoked. Carcinomas of the floor of the mouth indicated a prevalence toward alcohol and nicotine abuse. Of the patients with a T3 and T4 carcinoma 84% had daily alcohol consumption levels over the threshold value stated above. None of the 105 patients underwent specific alcohol treatment therapy. In light of the high prevalence of carcinomas of the oral cavity in patients with alcohol and nicotine addiction, mandatory withdrawal therapy should be offered in the form of postoperative treatment to prevent recurrence or the development of second

  13. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and risk of subtypes of oesophageal and gastric cancer: A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steevens, J.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking may be differentially associated with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). However, because this was based on retrospective

  14. The acute effects of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on video-lottery terminal gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Sean P; Collins, Pam; Stewart, Sherry H

    2015-03-01

    Gamblers often use alcohol and/or tobacco when they gamble but little is known about the extent to which drinking or smoking affects gambling behavior. This study examined the acute effects of alcohol and nicotine-containing tobacco administration on the subjective and behavioral responses to video-lottery terminal (VLT) gambling in 16 regular video-lottery terminal players (11 male) who were also regular consumers of alcohol and tobacco. During four double-blind, counterbalanced sessions, participants assessed the subjective effects of nicotine-containing tobacco or denicotinized tobacco following the administration of a moderately intoxicating dose of alcohol or a placebo beverage. They were then given $40 and provided with an opportunity to gamble using an authentic VLT. Alcohol administration was associated with increased ratings of several subjective descriptors including "intoxicated", "high", "want alcohol", "crave cigarette", and "want to gamble" but did not affect subsequent gambling behavior. In contrast, relative to denicotinized tobacco, the administration of nicotine containing tobacco was associated with increased average wagers, but did not significantly alter subjective state. Findings suggest that both alcohol and nicotine-containing tobacco may acutely increase the propensity to gamble using VLTs, but they may do so through separate processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The association of perioperative dexamethasone, smoking and alcohol abuse with wound complications after laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Rikke M; Wetterslev, Jørn; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A number of perioperative risk factors may suppress the immune system and contribute to the development of post-operative complications. The association between surgical site infection (SSI) and other wound-related complications resulting from immunosuppression through either perioper......BACKGROUND: A number of perioperative risk factors may suppress the immune system and contribute to the development of post-operative complications. The association between surgical site infection (SSI) and other wound-related complications resulting from immunosuppression through either......, smoking status and alcohol abuse with the primary outcome, being a composite of SSI, anastomotic leak, wound dehiscence, burst abdomen and 30-day mortality. RESULTS: The primary outcome occurred in 21% of patients receiving dexamethasone versus 28% of patients not receiving dexamethasone...... was not significantly associated with SSI or other wound-related complications. Conversely, smoking and alcohol abuse were both significant predictors of the primary outcome consisting of wound-related complications and mortality....

  16. Communication of alcohol and smoking lifestyle advice to the gastroenterological patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Andrew D; Khasawneh, Mais; Allen, Patrick B; Addley, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    Effective communication between healthcare staff and patients is central to development of the patient-professional relationship. Many barriers influence this communication, often resulting in patients' lack of understanding and retention of information, particularly affecting advice regarding lifestyle habits, such as alcohol consumption and smoking. Alcohol and smoking misuse are potentially modifiable risk factors known to adversely affect a variety of gastroenterological conditions and improvements in communication with patients regarding this is an important management component. This review discusses the clinical impact of these factors and how healthcare professionals can improve communication. We discuss how enhancing verbal communication skills through medical training leads to greater outcomes in patient satisfaction and adherence to treatment and advice. In addition, with the rapid digitalisation of society, platforms such as social media and smartphone applications may be considered as adjuncts to traditional forms of communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship of Smokefree Laws and Alcohol Use with Light and Intermittent Smoking and Quit Attempts among US Adults and Alcohol Users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Jiang

    Full Text Available Light and intermittent smoking (LITS has become increasingly common. Alcohol drinkers are more likely to smoke. We examined the association of smokefree law and bar law coverage and alcohol use with current smoking, LITS, and smoking quit attempts among US adults and alcohol drinkers.Cross-sectional analyses among a population-based sample of US adults (n = 27,731 using restricted data from 2009 National Health Interview Survey and 2009 American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation United States Tobacco Control Database. Multivariate logistic regression models examined the relationship of smokefree law coverage and drinking frequency (1 with current smoking among all adults; (2 with 4 LITS patterns among current smokers; and (3 with smoking quit attempts among 6 smoking subgroups. Same multivariate analyses were conducted but substituted smokefree bar law coverage for smokefree law coverage to investigate the association between smokefree bar laws and the outcomes. Finally we ran the above analyses among alcohol drinkers (n = 16,961 to examine the relationship of smokefree law (and bar law coverage and binge drinking with the outcomes. All models controlled for demographics and average cigarette price per pack. The interactions of smokefree law (and bar law coverage and drinking status was examined.Stronger smokefree law (and bar law coverage was associated with lower odds of current smoking among all adults and among drinkers, and had the same effect across all drinking and binge drinking subgroups. Increased drinking frequency and binge drinking were related to higher odds of current smoking. Smokefree law (and bar law coverage and drinking status were not associated with any LITS measures or smoking quit attempts.Stronger smokefree laws and bar laws are associated with lower smoking rates across all drinking subgroups, which provides further support for these policies. More strict tobacco control measures might help reduce cigarette consumption and

  18. Smoking and alcohol drinking during pregnancy as the risk factors for poor child neurodevelopment – A review of epidemiological studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Jurewicz; Wojciech Hanke

    2015-01-01

    Maternal active and passive smoking and low or moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy, taking into account the level of exposure and developmental or behavioral outcomes, are recognized as a significant issue from both a clinical and a public health perspective. The article aims at evaluating the impact of prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke constituents and low or moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy on children neurodevelopment by reviewing the most recently published literature. R...

  19. Witnessing a violent death and smoking, alcohol consumption, and marijuana use among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabayo, Roman; Molnar, Beth E; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2014-04-01

    Witnessing violence has been linked to maladaptive coping behaviors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and marijuana use. However, more research is required to identify mechanisms in which witnessing violence leads to these behaviors. The objectives of this investigation were to examine the association between witnessing a violent death and smoking, alcohol consumption, and marijuana use among adolescents, to identify whether exhibiting depressive symptoms was a mediator within this relationship, and to determine if those who had adult support in school were less likely to engage in risky health behaviors. Data were collected from a sample of 1,878 urban students, from 18 public high schools participating in the 2008 Boston Youth Survey. In 2012, we used multilevel log-binomial regression models and propensity score matching to estimate the association between witnessing a violent death and smoking, alcohol consumption, and marijuana use. Analyses indicated that girls who witnessed a violent death were more likely to use marijuana (relative risk (RR) = 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02, 1.17), and tended towards a higher likelihood to smoke (RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.13) and consume alcohol (RR = 1.07, 95% CI = 0.97, 1.18). Among boys, those who witnessed a violent death were significantly more likely to smoke (RR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.29), consume alcohol (RR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.17, 1.45) and use marijuana (RR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.21, 1.46). When exhibiting depressive symptoms was included, estimates were not attenuated. However, among girls who witnessed a violent death, having an adult at school for support was protective against alcohol consumption. When we used propensity score matching, findings were consistent with the main analyses among boys only. This study adds insight into how witnessing violence can lead to adoption of adverse health behaviors.

  20. Opium use, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shakeri, Ramin; Kamangar, Farin; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Tabrizi, Reza; Zamani, Farhad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Nikfam, Sepideh; Nikmanesh, Arash; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ostovaneh, Mohammad Reza; Islami, Farhad; Poustchi, Hossein; Boffetta, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Although several studies have suggested opium as a risk factor for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, larynx, lung, and bladder, no previous study has examined the association of opium with pancreatic cancer. We aimed to study the association between opium use and risk of pancreatic cancer in Iran, using a case-control design. We also studied the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with pancreatic cancer, for which little information was avai...

  1. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption are enemy of male fertility? A patho-radiological correlation study

    OpenAIRE

    Tina Rai; Garjesh Singh Rai

    2016-01-01

    Background: About 15% of the sexually active population is suffering from infertility in India, and in 50% of cases, male partner is involved, either as a primary cause or in combination a problem in the female partner. Modern life style changes like cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption are emerging out to cause a detrimental effect on male fertility due to adverse effects on semen volume, sperm morphology, total count and motility. The aim of the study was to study the effects of cigare...

  2. Lifestyle Factors and Metabolic Syndrome among Workers: The Role of Interactions between Smoking and Alcohol to Nutrition and Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jui-Hua; Li, Ren-Hau; Huang, Shu-Ling; Sia, Hon-Ke; Chen, Yu-Ling; Tang, Feng-Cheng

    2015-12-16

    This study aimed to investigate (1) relations of smoking and alcohol to metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, with nutrition and exercise controlled; and (2) interactions between smoking/alcohol and nutrition/exercise on MetS. This cross-sectional study enrolled 4025 workers. Self-reported lifestyles, anthropometric values, blood pressure (BP), and biochemical determinations were obtained. Among males, smoking significantly increased the risk of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), high triglyceride, abdominal obesity (AO), and MetS. Additionally, smoking showed significant interaction effects with nutrition on high BP, AO, and MetS; after further analysis, nutrition did not decrease above-mentioned risks for smokers. However, there was no significant interaction of smoking with exercise on any metabolic parameter. Alcohol increased the risk of AO, but decreased low HDL-C. It also showed an interaction effect with exercise on AO; after further analysis, exercise decreased AO risk for drinkers. Among females, alcohol significantly decreased the risk of high fasting blood glucose, but did not show significant interaction with nutrition/exercise on any metabolic parameter. In conclusion, in males, smoking retained significant associations with MetS and its components, even considering benefits of nutrition; exercise kept predominance on lipid parameters regardless of smoking status. Alcohol showed inconsistencies on metabolic parameters for both genders.

  3. Lifestyle Factors and Metabolic Syndrome among Workers: The Role of Interactions between Smoking and Alcohol to Nutrition and Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Hua Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate (1 relations of smoking and alcohol to metabolic syndrome (MetS and its components, with nutrition and exercise controlled; and (2 interactions between smoking/alcohol and nutrition/exercise on MetS. This cross-sectional study enrolled 4025 workers. Self-reported lifestyles, anthropometric values, blood pressure (BP, and biochemical determinations were obtained. Among males, smoking significantly increased the risk of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, high triglyceride, abdominal obesity (AO, and MetS. Additionally, smoking showed significant interaction effects with nutrition on high BP, AO, and MetS; after further analysis, nutrition did not decrease above-mentioned risks for smokers. However, there was no significant interaction of smoking with exercise on any metabolic parameter. Alcohol increased the risk of AO, but decreased low HDL-C. It also showed an interaction effect with exercise on AO; after further analysis, exercise decreased AO risk for drinkers. Among females, alcohol significantly decreased the risk of high fasting blood glucose, but did not show significant interaction with nutrition/exercise on any metabolic parameter. In conclusion, in males, smoking retained significant associations with MetS and its components, even considering benefits of nutrition; exercise kept predominance on lipid parameters regardless of smoking status. Alcohol showed inconsistencies on metabolic parameters for both genders.

  4. A cohort study of smoking, alcohol consumption, and dietary factors for pancreatic cancer (United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W; McLaughlin, J K; Gridley, G; Bjelke, E; Schuman, L M; Silverman, D T; Wacholder, S; Co-Chien, H T; Blot, W J; Fraumeni, J F

    1993-09-01

    Risk factors for pancreatic cancer were evaluated in a cohort study of 17,633 White men in the United States who responded to a mailed questionnaire in 1966 and were followed-up through 1986 for mortality. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption were found to be important risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Risks increased significantly with number of cigarettes smoked, reaching fourfold for smokers of 25 or more cigarettes per day relative to nonsmokers. Alcohol intake also was related significantly to risk, with consumers of 10 or more drinks per month having three times the risk of nondrinkers, but dose-response trends among drinkers were not smooth. Coffee consumption was unrelated to risk. Dietary analyses revealed a rising rate of pancreatic cancer mortality with increasing consumption of meat after adjustment for other risk factors. Men in the highest quartile of meat intake had about three times the risk of those in the lowest quartile. No consistent association, however, was observed for consumption of fruits, vegetables, or grains. This study confirms cigarette smoking as an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and provides evidence that elevated intake of alcohol and meat may increase the risk of this fatal malignancy.

  5. Smoking, low formal level of education, alcohol consumption, and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, U; Jacobsson, L T H; Nilsson, J Å; Wirfält, E; Turesson, C

    2013-01-01

    Suggested predictors of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include environmental exposure, such as smoking. Our purpose was to investigate potential predictors of RA in a nested case-control study based on a prospective cohort. Between 1991 and 1996, 30,447 persons were included in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS). Individuals who developed RA after inclusion up to 31 December 2004 were identified by linking the database to different registers. Four controls were selected for every case. Data on lifestyle factors were collected in the MDCS. We identified 172 incident cases of RA [36 men/136 women, mean age at diagnosis 63 years, 69% rheumatoid factor (RF) positive, median time from inclusion to diagnosis 5 (range 1-13) years]. In bivariate analyses, baseline smoking [odds ratio (OR) 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.31-3.12] and a low level of formal education (i.e. ≤ 8 years; OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.18-4.93 vs. University degree) predicted subsequent development of RA. Infrequent baseline alcohol consumption was a predictor of RA (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.91-6.30) compared to recent use (within the past month), and individuals with moderate baseline alcohol consumption (3.5-15.2 g/day vs. education. Smoking and a low level of formal education were found to be independent predictors of RA. Moderate alcohol consumption may also be associated with a reduced risk.

  6. Opium use, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, Ramin; Kamangar, Farin; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Tabrizi, Reza; Zamani, Farhad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Nikfam, Sepideh; Nikmanesh, Arash; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ostovaneh, Mohammad Reza; Islami, Farhad; Poustchi, Hossein; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2016-07-01

    Although several studies have suggested opium as a risk factor for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, larynx, lung, and bladder, no previous study has examined the association of opium with pancreatic cancer. We aimed to study the association between opium use and risk of pancreatic cancer in Iran, using a case-control design. We also studied the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with pancreatic cancer, for which little information was available from this population. Cases and controls were selected from patients who were referred to 4 endoscopic ultrasound centers in Tehran, Iran. We recruited 316 histopathologically (all adenocarcinoma) and 41 clinically diagnosed incident cases of pancreatic cancer, as well as 328 controls from those with a normal pancreas in enodosonography from January 2011 to January 2015. We used logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). After adjustment for potential confounders, opium use (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.06-3.43) and alcohol consumption (OR 4.16; 95% CI 1.86-9.31) were significantly associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find an association between ever tobacco smoking and pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.62-1.39). In our study, opium use and alcohol consumption were associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas cigarette smoking was not.

  7. Patterns of Smoking and Unhealthy Alcohol Use Following Sexual Trauma Among U.S. Service Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Amber D; Rivera, Anna C; Powell, Teresa M; Williams, Emily C; Peterson, Arthur V; Littman, Alyson J; Maynard, Charles; Street, Amy E; Bricker, Jonathan B; Boyko, Edward J

    2017-10-01

    In the first known longitudinal study of the topic, we examined whether experiencing sexual assault or sexual harassment while in the military was associated with increased risk for subsequent unhealthy alcohol use and smoking among U.S. service members in the Millennium Cohort Study (2001-2012). Adjusted complementary log-log models were fit to estimate the relative risk of (a) smoking relapse among former smokers (men: n = 4,610; women: n = 1,453); (b) initiation of unhealthy alcohol use (problem drinking and/or drinking over recommended limits) among those with no known history of unhealthy alcohol use (men: n = 8,459; women: n = 4,816); and (c) relapse among those previously reporting unhealthy alcohol use (men: n = 3,487; women: n = 1,318). Men who reported experiencing sexual assault while in the military had sixfold higher risk for smoking relapse: relative risk (RR) = 6.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) [2.34, 18.73], than men who did not. Women who reported experiencing sexual assault while in the military had almost twice the risk for alcohol relapse: RR = 1.73; 95% CI [1.06, 2.83]. There were no other significant associations. These findings suggest that men and women may respond differently following sexual trauma, and support future concerted policy efforts by military leadership to prevent, detect, and intervene on sexual assault. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Cognitive remediation therapy during treatment for alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Claudia I; Kemmler, Georg; Kurz, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive impairments in individuals with alcohol dependence may interfere with the progress of treatment and contribute to the progression of the disease. This study aimed to determine whether cognitive remediation (CR) therapy applied during treatment for alcohol dependence improves cognitive functioning in alcohol-dependent inpatients. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether the benefits of CR generalize to noncognitive clinically meaningful outcomes at the end of inpatient treatment. Forty-one alcohol-dependent patients entering inpatient treatment for alcohol dependence were randomly assigned to receive conventional treatment (n = 21) or an additional 12 sessions of computer-assisted CR focusing on cognitive enhancement in attention/executive function and memory domains (n = 20). Assessments of cognitive abilities in these domains as well as of psychological well-being and alcohol craving were conducted at baseline (at the beginning of inpatient treatment) and after CR (at the end of treatment). Results indicated that, relative to patients completing conventional treatment, those who received supplemental CR showed significant improvement in attention/executive function and memory domains, particularly in attention (alertness, divided attention), working memory, and delayed memory (recall). In addition, patients receiving CR during alcohol-dependence treatment showed significantly greater improvements in psychological well-being (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised) and in the compulsion aspect of craving (Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale-German version). CR during inpatient treatment for alcohol dependence is effective in improving cognitive impairments in alcohol-dependent patients. The benefits generalize to noncognitive outcomes, demonstrating that CR may be an efficacious adjunctive intervention for the treatment of alcohol dependence.

  9. Relationships Between Alcohol Consumption, Smoking Status and Food Habits in Greek Adolescents. Vascular Implications for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Sousana K; Hassapidou, Maria N; Katsiki, Niki; Fachantidis, Panagiotis; Fachantidou, Anna I; Daskalou, Efstratia; Deligiannis, Asterios P

    2017-01-01

    Addictive behaviours in adolescents such as alcohol consumption and smoking are rapidly increasing worldwide. No previous study has examined smoking status and alcohol consumption in adolescents of Northern Greece in relation to their food habits. Therefore, we assessed the smoking status and alcohol consumption, as well the food habits, of this population. Adolescents (495 boys and 508 girls) aged 15±1 years old and 15±2 years old respectively, completed questionnaires regarding smoking, alcohol and food habits. Tobacco use and alcohol consumption were reported by 9.2% and 48.1% of them, respectively. Of those that drank alcohol, 13.9% were also smokers. Older adolescents were more likely to consume foods high in fat and sugar, low in vitamins and minerals as well as foods, considered by them to be less healthy and prepared in a less healthy way. Moreover, smoker adolescents were less likely to choose foods considered to be healthy and prepared in a healthy way, whereas they were more likely to choose foods high in fat content. Both smoking and alcohol consumption may affect cardiovascular risk and the vasculature. Poor lifestyle (and risk of vascular events) can start at an early age. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. 78 FR 277 - Food and Drug Administration Actions Related to Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Smoking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... Therapies and Smoking-Cessation Products; Report to Congress on Innovative Products and Treatments for... replacement therapies (NRTs), and input on a report to Congress examining the regulation and development of... marketed for smoking cessation. Section 918(b) requires that the Secretary of HHS, after consultation with...

  11. Neuromodulation Therapies for Alcohol Addiction: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Celeste A; Mammis, Antonios

    2018-02-01

    The goal of this review is to explore alternative neurological therapies in the treatment of alcohol use disorder; including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation (DBS), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and the off-label use of the GABA B receptor agonist baclofen. A comprehensive literature search was conducted through EBSCOhost regarding the neurological therapies in the treatment of alcoholism discussed in this paper. To date, few studies have been conducted on the subject, sample sizes are consistently small, and long-term abstinence appears a common problem. tDCS has shown to temporarily reduce alcohol cravings but with a high number of long-term relapses, 50-70%. DBS and TMS, similarly, fail to overcome high relapse rates. In one DBS study, for example, only two of five patients achieved prolonged abstinence. ECT seems to avoid such problems, but only a single case study exists to date. As such, no solid conclusions can be made regarding its success in alcohol addiction treatment. Baclofen, however, implicated in studies with comparatively larger patient samples and higher efficacy rates, presents with great promise, particularly in patients with more severe forms of AUD. In one of the largest observational studies to date (100 subjects) 92% of patients reported craving suppression and long-term relapse rates were low. The side-effects of oral baclofen (i.e., somnolence, insomnia, dizziness, paresthesia, etc.) though, pose a principle limitation to its administration in alcohol addiction. Based on current information in the literature, the authors advocate that, following more extensive research on oral baclofen and its indications in the treatment of alcohol addiction, intrathecal administration be the next logical therapeutic option to be explored. In particular, those patients with severe AUD, requiring high doses of the medication, may benefit, as it eliminates the systemic side effects

  12. Clustering of smoking, alcohol drinking and cannabis use in adolescents in a rapidly developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiolero Arnaud

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking, alcohol drinking and cannabis use ("risk behaviors" are often initiated at a young age but few epidemiological studies have assessed their joined prevalence in children in developing countries. This study aims at examining the joint prevalence of these behaviors in adolescents in the Seychelles, a rapidly developing country in the Indian Ocean. Methods Cross-sectional survey in a representative sample of secondary school students using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire (Global Youth Tobacco Survey. The questionnaire was completed by 1,321 (92% of 1,442 eligible students aged 11 to 17 years. Main variables of interest included smoking cigarettes on ≥1 day in the past 30 days; drinking any alcohol beverage on ≥1 day in the past 30 days and using cannabis at least once in the past 12 months. Results In boys and girls, respectively, prevalence (95% CI was 30% (26–34/21% (18–25 for smoking, 49% (45–54/48% (43–52 for drinking, and 17% (15–20/8% (6–10 for cannabis use. The prevalence of all these behaviors increased with age. Smokers were two times more likely than non-smokers to drink and nine times more likely to use cannabis. Drinkers were three times more likely than non-drinkers to smoke or to use cannabis. Comparison of observed versus expected frequencies of combination categories demonstrated clustering of these risk behaviors in students (P Conclusion Smoking, drinking and cannabis use were common and clustered among adolescents of a rapidly developing country. These findings stress the need for early and integrated prevention programs.

  13. Cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking in a representative sample of English school pupils: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger-Johnson, Gareth; Bell, Steven; Britton, Annie; Cable, Noriko; Conner, Mark; O'Connor, Daryl B; Shickle, Darren; Shelton, Nicola; Bewick, Bridgette M

    2013-05-01

    The aim of our study was to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking, in a representative sample of English pupils. Data from 13,635 school pupils in the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE) on usage of cigarettes from 2004 (typical age 14) to 2006 (age 16) and alcohol from 2004 to 2007 (age 17), analyzed with latent growth curve models. The weighted percentage of pupils drinking alcohol increased from 26% at age 14 to 71% by age 17, smoking from 12% to 27% by age 16. Pupils with lower socio-economic status were more likely to smoke but less likely to drink alcohol regularly. Both behaviors were positively correlated at age 14, adjusted for several confounding factors. The rate of increase over time was also positively correlated. Cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking are already correlated by age 14, are socio-economically patterned, and 'move together' during adolescence. Future studies and interventions should be targeted at a younger age range, to identify early smoking and potentially hazardous alcohol drinking patterns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Smoking, alcohol, coffee, and tea intake and incidence of cancer of the exocrine pancreas: the Iowa Women's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnack, L J; Anderson, K E; Zheng, W; Folsom, A R; Sellers, T A; Kushi, L H

    1997-12-01

    To assess the relationship of smoking and coffee, tea, and alcohol intake to the risk of cancer of the exocrine pancreas, analyses were performed using data from a prospective cohort study of 33,976 postmenopausal Iowa women who responded to a mailed questionnaire in 1986 and were followed through 1994 for cancer incidence and total mortality. At baseline, information on cigarette smoking, consumption of tea, coffee, and alcoholic beverages, and other dietary and lifestyle factors was obtained. Age-adjusted relative risks of pancreatic cancer (n = 66 cases) showed a dose-response association with smoking. Those with fewer than 20 pack-years and those with 20 or more pack-years of smoking exposure were 1.14 (95% confidence interval, 0.53-2.45) and 1.92 (95% confidence interval, 1.12-2.30) times more likely, respectively, to develop pancreatic cancer than were nonsmokers. Current smokers were twice as likely as were nonsmokers to develop pancreatic cancer. Relative risks of pancreatic cancer increased with the amount of alcohol consumed (Ptrend = 0.11) after adjustment for age, smoking status, and pack-years of smoking. Relative risks of pancreatic cancer according to alcoholic beverage intake were as strong among never-smokers as they were in the total cohort. After the data were adjusted for age, smoking status, and pack-years of smoking, there was a statistically significant 2-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.08-4.30) elevated risk of pancreatic cancer for those who drank > 17.5 cups of coffee per week, compared to those who consumed cancer incidence. In summary, these findings provide evidence of an association of both alcoholic beverage and coffee consumption with pancreatic cancer incidence that is independent of age and cigarette smoking.

  15. Use of aids for smoking cessation and alcohol reduction: A population survey of adults in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Beard

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important for policy planning to chart the methods smokers and high-risk drinkers use to help them change their behaviour. This study assessed prevalence of use, and characteristics of users, of support for smoking cessation and alcohol reduction in England. Methods Data were used from the Smoking and Alcohol Toolkit Studies, which involve monthly face-to-face computer-assisted interviews of adults aged 16+ in England. We included data collected between June 2014 and July 2015 on 1600 smokers who had made at least one quit attempt and 911 high-risk drinkers (defined as scores >8+ on the full AUDIT or 5+ on questions 1–3 of the AUDIT-C who had made an attempt to cut down in the past 12 months. Participants provided information on their socio-demographic characteristics and use of aids during their most recent quit attempt including pharmacotherapy, face-to-face counselling, telephone support, self-help materials (digital and printed, and complementary medicine. Results A total of 60.3% of smokers used aids in the past year, compared with just 14.9% of high-risk drinkers. Use of pharmacotherapy was high among smokers and very low among drinkers (56.0%versus1.2%. Use of other aids was low for both behaviours: face-to-face counselling (2.6%versus4.8%, self-help materials (1.4%versus4.1% and complementary medicine (1.0%versus0.5%. Use of aids was more common among smokers aged 25–54 compared with 16–24 year olds (25–34,ORadj1.49,p = 0.012; 35–44,ORadj1.93,p 10 relative to 20,ORadj4.23,p = 0.001, and less common among ethnic minorities (ORadj0.69,p = 0.026. For alcohol reduction, use of aids was higher among ethnic minority groups (ORadj2.41;p = 0.015, and those of social-grade D/E relative to AB (ORadj2.29,p = 0.012&ORadj3.13,p < 0.001. Conclusion In England, the use of pharmacotherapy is prevalent for smoking cessation but not alcohol reduction. Other aids are used at a low rate, with

  16. Association of asthma symptoms with cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption in Korean adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Oksoo; Kim, Bo Hye

    2013-03-01

    The association of asthma symptoms with cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption in Korean adolescents was investigated in this study using the data of Korean Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Associated risk factors for experiencing asthma symptoms were explored in 3432 adolescents. In the symptomatic group, 21.7% were current smokers, compared to 10.9% in the asymptomatic group. Current smokers in the symptomatic group also smoked more cigarettes than those in the asymptomatic group. In the symptomatic group, 27.4% were current drinkers, compared to 17.9% in the asymptomatic group. Current drinkers in the symptomatic group were more likely to drink alcohol and to have experienced severe intoxication than those in the asymptomatic group. Participants who had been diagnosed within one year (odds ratio = 5.19, 95% confidence interval = 4.17-6.44) and those who had smoked over 20 days during the past 30 days (odds ratio = 1.77, 95% confidence interval = 1.26-2.49) were more likely to experience asthma symptoms. Healthcare providers should identify the risk behaviors of adolescents with asthma and counsel them and their parents simultaneously. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. The relationships between eating habits, smoking and alcohol consumption, and body mass index among baby boomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Anthony; Wang, Wei C; Hunter, Wendy

    2012-02-01

    The study was to examine the eating habits of baby boomers and to investigate the relationship of these and other lifestyle habits on their reported body mass indices (BMI). A questionnaire was administered by mail to a random sample of people aged 40 years and above, drawn from the Electoral Rolls in Victoria, Australia. Part of the questionnaire contained questions about the respondents' eating habits, smoking status and alcohol use, as well as self reported heights and weights and demographic characteristics. Eight hundred and forty-four people (out of 1470) returned usable questionnaires. Statistically significant differences were found between the eating habits of men and women. Generally, more women snacked on high energy dense foods (e.g., confectionery). More men took larger mouthfuls than women. The eating habits of women appeared to be more formal than men's. Four constructs named: unconstrained eating, traditional eating style, gulping, and chocolate and junk food were derived from the eating behaviour literature. Structural equation modelling showed that eating behaviour was associated with BMI along with current smoking, ex-smoking status, alcohol consumption, and demographics. Eating habits and other lifestyle behaviours appear to be associated with BMI though in different pathways for men and women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Validity and Reliability of the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburcio Sainz, Marcela; Rosete-Mohedano, Ma Guadalupe; Natera Rey, Guillermina; Martínez Vélez, Nora Angélica; Carreño García, Silvia; Pérez Cisneros, Daniel

    2016-03-02

    The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), has been used successfully in many countries, but there are few studies of its validity and reliability for the Mexican population. The objective of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the self-administered ASSIST test in university students in Mexico. This was an ex post facto non-experimental study with 1,176 undergraduate students, the majority women (70.1%) aged 18-23 years (89.5%) and single (87.5%). To estimate concurrent validity, factor analysis and tests of reliability and correlation were carried out between the subscale for alcohol and AUDIT, those for tobacco and the Fagerström Test, and those for marijuana and DAST-20. Adequate reliability coefficients were obtained for ASSIST subscales for tobacco (alpha = 0.83), alcohol (alpha = 0.76), and marijuana (alpha = 0.73). Significant correlations were found only with the AUDIT (r = 0.71) and the alcohol subscale. The best balance of sensitivity and specificity of the alcohol subscale (83.8% and 80%, respectively) and the largest area under the ROC curve (81.9%) was found with a cutoff score of 8. The self-administered version of ASSIST is a valid screening instrument to identify at-risk cases due to substance use in this population.

  19. [A group therapy model in the rehabilitation fo alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittadini, G; Giorgi, I

    1998-01-01

    At present group psychotherapy is one of the most important resources in the treatment of alcoholism. Among the various theoretical orientations present in this setting, the systemic approach has always favoured interventions designed to improve interpersonal relationships. More recently, the concepts of constructivism and "narrative" therapy have laid greater emphasis upon the relational and linguistic aspect of any individual problem. Starting from these premises, a systemic-constructivistic therapy group was created for persons with problems associated with alcohol, as part of an inpatient rehabilitation programme. Given the novelty of this initiative and the particular context, several solutions were adopted that may represent a proposal for the extension of the method. The characteristics and ways in which this particular group might evolve are discussed under four headings: 1) the characteristics of the group, 2) techniques for guiding the group, 3) the role and problems facing the therapist, and 4) the recurrent problems in the life of the group.

  20. Smoking and alcohol drinking during pregnancy as the risk factors for poor child neurodevelopment - A review of epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polańska, Kinga; Jurewicz, Joanna; Hanke, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Maternal active and passive smoking and low or moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy, taking into account the level of exposure and developmental or behavioral outcomes, are recognized as a significant issue from both a clinical and a public health perspective. The article aims at evaluating the impact of prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke constituents and low or moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy on children neurodevelopment by reviewing the most recently published literature. Relevant studies were identified by searching the Pubmed, Medline and Ebsco literature databases. This review is restricted to 29 human studies published in English in peer reviewed journals since 2006. The studies published recently continued to show some relationship between tobacco smoke exposure, from active and passive maternal smoking during pregnancy, and children's psychomotor development independent of other variables, but this relationship is not straightforward. The association is mostly consistent for measures of academic achievements and behavioral problems which require further attention. The results of the studies on low or moderate exposure to alcohol are not fully conclusive, but some of them suggest that consumption of alcohol during pregnancy may adversely affect children's intelligence quotient (IQ), mental health, memory and verbal or visual performance. As the reviewed studies indicate, maternal lifestyle during pregnancy like alcohol drinking or smoking may affect children neurodevelopment. All effort should be taken to eliminate such exposure to ensure appropriate children's development. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  1. Smoking and alcohol drinking during pregnancy as the risk factors for poor child neurodevelopment – A review of epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Jurewicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Maternal active and passive smoking and low or moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy, taking into account the level of exposure and developmental or behavioral outcomes, are recognized as a significant issue from both a clinical and a public health perspective. The article aims at evaluating the impact of prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke constituents and low or moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy on children neurodevelopment by reviewing the most recently published literature. Relevant studies were identified by searching the Pubmed, Medline and Ebsco literature databases. This review is restricted to 29 human studies published in English in peer reviewed journals since 2006. The studies published recently continued to show some relationship between tobacco smoke exposure, from active and passive maternal smoking during pregnancy, and children’s psychomotor development independent of other variables, but this relationship is not straightforward. The association is mostly consistent for measures of academic achievements and behavioral problems which require further attention. The results of the studies on low or moderate exposure to alcohol are not fully conclusive, but some of them suggest that consumption of alcohol during pregnancy may adversely affect children’s intelligence quotient (IQ, mental health, memory and verbal or visual performance. As the reviewed studies indicate, maternal lifestyle during pregnancy like alcohol drinking or smoking may affect children neurodevelopment. All effort should be taken to eliminate such exposure to ensure appropriate children’s development.

  2. Pfeiffer-like Syndrome With Holoprosencephaly: A Newborn With Maternal Smoking and Alcohol Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pen-Hua Su

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a female infant with Pfeiffer-like syndrome and holoprosencephaly. She had a cloverleaf skull, ocular proptosis, broad thumbs and halluces, and variable accompanying anomalies compatible with Pfeiffer syndrome. She also displayed microcephaly, short palpebral fissures, and a smooth philtrum, which are clinical signs consistent with fetal alcohol syndrome. She suffered from multiple congenital anomalies and died at 41 days of age. Cardio-pulmonary failure, brain abnormalities, prematurity, and multiple complications contributed to her death. The patient displayed normal chromosomal numbers and type. DNA analysis did not reveal fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR genes FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 or TWIST gene mutations. We review the previous reports of Pfeiffer syndrome and holoprosencephaly and describe our infant patient with Pfeiffer-like syndrome, holoprosencephaly, and heavy in utero maternal alcohol and smoking exposures.

  3. Preconception care: caffeine, smoking, alcohol, drugs and other environmental chemical/radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Zohra S; Imam, Ayesha M; Dean, Sohni V; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-09-26

    As providing health education, optimizing nutrition, and managing risk factors can be effective for ensuring a healthy outcome for women and her yet un-conceived baby, external influences play a significant role as well. Alcohol, smoking, caffeine use and other similar lifestyle factors, have now become an integral part of the daily life of most men and women, who use/misuse one or more of these harmful substances regularly despite knowledge of their detrimental effects. The adverse health outcomes of these voluntary and involuntary exposures are of even greater concern in women of child bearing age where the exposure has the potential of inflicting harm to two generations. This paper is examining the available literature for the possible effects of caffeine consumption, smoking, alcohol or exposure to chemicals may have on the maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH). A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence was conducted to ascertain the possible impact of preconception usage of caffeine, tobacco, alcohol and other illicit drugs; and exposure to environmental chemicals and radiant on MNCH outcomes. A comprehensive strategy was used to search electronic reference libraries, and both observational and clinical controlled trials were included. Cross-referencing and a separate search strategy for each preconception risk and intervention ensured wider study capture. Heavy maternal preconception caffeine intake of >300 mg/d significantly increase the risk of a subsequent fetal loss by 31% (95% CI: 8-58%). On the other hand, preconception alcohol consumption leads to non-significant 30% increase in spontaneous abortion (RR 1.30; 95% CI: 0.85-1.97). Preconception counselling can lead to a significant decrease in the consumption of alcohol during the first trimester (OR 1.79; 95% CI: 1.08-2.97). Periconception smoking, on the other hand, was found to be associated with an almost 3 times increased risk of congenital heart defects (OR 2.80; 95% CI 1

  4. Alcohol abuse and cigarette smoking are associated with global DNA hypermethylation: results from the German Investigation on Neurobiology in Alcoholism (GINA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmler, Alexander; Heese, Peter; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Muschler, Marc; Heberlein, Annemarie; Bigler, Laurent; Prost, Jean-Christophe; Frieling, Helge; Kornhuber, Johannes; Banger, Markus; Bleich, Stefan; Hillemacher, Thomas; Linnebank, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that smoking and alcoholism may be associated with altered DNA methylation and that alcohol consumption might induce changes in DNA methylation by altering homocysteine metabolism. In this monocenter study, we included 363 consecutive patients referred for hospitalization for alcohol detoxification treatment. Blood samples were obtained on treatment days 1, 3, and 7 for measurement of global DNA methylation in leukocytes by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Genomic DNA was used for genotyping the following seven genetic variants of homocysteine metabolism: cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) c.844_855ins68, dihydrofolate-reductase (DHFR) c.594 + 59del19bp, methylenetetrahydrofolate-reductase (MTHFR) c.677C > T and c.1298A > C, methyltetrahydrofolate-transferase (MTR) c.2756A > G, reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) c.80G > A, and transcobalamin 2 c.776C > G. Multivariate linear regression showed a positive correlation of global DNA methylation with alcohol consumption and smoking on day 1 of hospitalization. DNA methylation was not correlated with homocysteine or vitamin plasma levels, nor with the tested genetic variants of homocysteine metabolism. This suggests a direct effect of alcohol consumption and smoking on DNA methylation, which is not mediated by effects of alcohol on homocysteine metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Facilitating Smoking Cessation and Preventing Relapse in Primary Care: Minimizing Weight Gain by Reducing Alcohol Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    serving fat-free pretzels  6 saltine crackers  3 squares of a regular graham cracker  3 vanilla wafers  10 animal crackers  1 oatmeal or... Acupuncture (4) ___ Support Group (9) ___ Nicotine Patch (14) 9. Since you first started smoking cigarettes regularly, how many... Acupuncture (5) ___ Nicotine nasal spray (9) ___ Gradual reduction (1) ___ Counseling/therapy (6) ___ Support Group (10) ___ Self-help books (2

  6. Effects of cigarette smoking and family history of alcoholism on sweet taste perception and food cravings in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino, Marta Yanina; Mennella, Julie A

    2007-11-01

    Despite popular beliefs that smoking affects the sensitivity and liking of sweet-tasting foods and beverages, few psychophysical studies have examined this phenomenon and none have taken into account the individual's family history of alcoholism (FH+), a predictor of heightened sweet preferences. A within- and between-subjects study was conducted to determine the effect of both cigarette smoking and an acute exposure to nicotine on sweet taste sensitivity and preferences in women. Two groups were studied on 2 days separated by 1 week: women who were current smokers (n = 27, 18 were FH+) and those who never smoked in their lifetime (n = 22, 9 were FH+). Current smokers smoked nicotine-containing cigarettes during 1 test session and nicotine-free cigarettes during the other. The procedures were identical during both test sessions for the group of never smokers, with the exception that they did not smoke. Two-alternative staircase methods and forced-choice tracking procedures were used to assess sucrose thresholds and preferences, respectively, during both test session. Standardized questionnaires were administered to assess food cravings as well as smoking and alcohol usage and dependence. The Family Interview for Genetic Studies was used to detect alcoholism according to the DSM III criteria for family members up to second-degree relatives. Acute exposure to nicotine did not affect sucrose detection thresholds or preferences, but smokers had significantly higher sucrose detection thresholds than never smokers. The greater the smoking dose in pack-years, the lower the sucrose sensitivity. Regardless of smoking status, women who were FH+ preferred significantly higher sucrose concentrations and craved sweets more often than women who were not. Both smoking and having a family history of alcoholism had differential effects on sweet taste. Smoking was associated with decreased sweet taste sensitivity whereas having a family history of alcoholism was associated with

  7. Cue-Provoked Craving and Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Smoking Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Andrew J.; Shiffman, Saul; Sayette, Michael A.; Paty, Jean A.; Gwaltney, Chad J.; Balabanis, Mark H.

    2004-01-01

    Cue exposure paradigms have been used to examine reactivity to smoking cues. However, it is not known whether cue-provoked craving is associated with smoking cessation outcomes or whether cue reactivity can be attenuated by nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in clinical samples. Cue-provoked craving ratings and reaction time responses were…

  8. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Promote Smoking Cessation among African American Smokers: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Monica S.; de Ybarra, Denise Rodriguez; Baker, Elizabeth A.; Reis, Isildinha M.; Carey, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The health consequences of tobacco smoking disproportionately affect African Americans, but research on whether efficacious interventions can be generalized to this population is limited. This study examined the efficacy of group-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation among African Americans. Method: Participants…

  9. Effects of Smoking on Pegylated Interferon alpha 2a and First Generation Protease Inhibitor-based Antiviral Therapy in Naïve Patients Infected with Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Tim; Hueppe, Dietrich; Mauss, Stefan; Buggisch, Peter; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, Heike; Grimm, Daniel; Galle, Peter R; Alshuth, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Smoking has multiple effects on factors influencing hepatitis C and antiviral therapy, including lipid metabolism, fibrosis, platelet count and adherence aspects. The aim of this analysis was to determine the impact of smoking on hepatitis C virus antiviral therapy. Data of two cohorts of an observational multicenter study including therapy-naïve patients infected with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) treated with dual antiviral therapy (n=7,796) with pegylated interferon alpha 2a in combination with ribavirin, or triple antiviral therapy (n=1,122) containing telaprevir or boceprevir, were analysed. In the univariate matched pair analysis of dual antiviral therapy patients (n=584), smoking was significantly associated with lower sustained viral response rates (p=0.026, OR 0.69 CI: 0.50 - 0.96). The effect of smoking on sustained viral response remained significant (p=0.028, OR 0.67 CI: 0.47 - 0.96) in the multivariate analysis when adjusting for all other baseline parameters with a significant association in the univariate analysis, i.e. diabetes, fibrosis, body mass index, transaminases and baseline viral load. Under protease inhibitors the influence of smoking on virological response did not arise. Smoking has a negative impact on antiviral therapy in naïve patients infected with HCV genotype 1 independently of age, gender, history of drug use or alcoholic liver disease. The effects of smoking might be overcome by the new antiviral agents.

  10. What is the association of smoking and alcohol use with the increase in social inequality in mortality in Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Mette Bjerrum; Diderichsen, Finn; Grønbæk, Morten

    2015-01-01

    in the period 1985-2009. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome is mortality rates in relation to educational attainments calculated with and without deaths related to smoking and alcohol use. An absolute measure of inequality in mortality is applied along with a result on the direct......OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper is to estimate the impact of smoking and alcohol use on the increase in social inequality in mortality in Denmark in the period 1985-2009. DESIGN: A nationwide register-based study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: The whole Danish population aged 30 years or more...... contribution from smoking and alcohol use on the absolute difference in mortality rates. The secondary outcome is life expectancy in relation to educational attainments. RESULTS: Since 1985, Danish overall mortality rates have decreased. Alongside the improvement in mortality, the absolute difference...

  11. Risk reduction before surgery. The role of the primary care provider in preoperative smoking and alcohol cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Hanne; Faurschou, Pernille; Ralov, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Daily smokers and hazardous drinkers are high-risk patients, developing 2-4 times more complications after surgery. Preoperative smoking and alcohol cessation for four to eight weeks prior to surgery halves this complication rate. The patients' preoperative contact with the surgical departments m...... might be too brief for the hospital to initiate these programmes. Therefore, it was relevant to evaluate a new clinical practice which combined the general practitioner's (GP) referral to surgery with a referral to a smoking and alcohol intervention in the surgical pathway.......Daily smokers and hazardous drinkers are high-risk patients, developing 2-4 times more complications after surgery. Preoperative smoking and alcohol cessation for four to eight weeks prior to surgery halves this complication rate. The patients' preoperative contact with the surgical departments...

  12. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INTERNET ADDICTION AND ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION IS INFLUENCED BY THE SMOKING STATUS IN MALE ONLINE VIDEO GAMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Müller

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mounting evidence suggests a putative link between overuse of digital media and easily accessible drugs such as alcohol and nicotine. Method: We assessed Internet addiction tendencies in a sample of N=1,362 male players of online first-person-shooter-video games. We used Young’s 20-item Internet addiction test (IAT. We also asked participants about their smoking status and alcohol consumption. Results: No significant differences were observed on the IAT between smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers. However, in line with the majority of the literature, the results yielded support for a link between Internet addiction and alcohol consumption. Of importance, this correlation was influenced by the current smoking status. This relationship was especially pronounced for the group of ex-smokers. Conclusions: It is possible that after quitting smoking, drinking habits and online activities may be used to compensate for nicotine abstinence.

  13. Effect of Alcohol and Tobacco Smoke on Long-Term Memory and Cell Proliferation in the Hippocampus of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rosane; Schneider, Ricardo; Quinteros, Dayane; Santos, Carolina Ferreira; Bandiera, Solange; Thiesen, Flavia Valadão; Coitinho, Adriana Simon; Fernandes, Marilda da Cruz; Wieczorek, Marina Godinho

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol is frequently used in combination with tobacco and few studies explore interactions between these two drugs of abuse. Here, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol administration and concomitant exposure to tobacco smoke on long-term memory and on cell proliferation in the hippocampus of rats. Forty male Wistar rats were assigned to four groups and treated with alcohol (2g/kg by gavage) and/or exposed to tobacco smoke (from six cigarettes, by inhalation) twice a day (at 9:00 AM and 2:00 PM) for 30 days. Long-term memory was evaluated in the inhibitory avoidance test and hippocampal cell proliferation was analyzed for bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that alcohol, tobacco smoke, or their combination improved the long-term memory evaluated by the memory index in rats. Moreover, alcohol and tobacco coadministration decreased bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells by 60% when compared to the control group, while alcohol treatment decreased labeled cells by 40%. The tobacco group showed a nonsignificant 26% decrease in labeled cells compared to the control group. Chronic alcohol and tobacco coadministration improves the long-term memory in rats in the inhibitory avoidance test. However, coadministration decreases the cell proliferation in the hippocampus of rats, suggesting a deleterious effect by the combined use of these drugs of abuse. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Cigarette smoking among intimate partner violence perpetrators and victims: findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Cory A; Pilver, Corey E; Weinberger, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking and intimate partner violence (IPV) are preventable, major public health issues that result in severe physical and psychological consequences. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the consistency and strength of the association between these highly variable behaviors using a nationally representative sample. Self-reported IPV perpetration, victimization, and smoking data were collected from 25,515 adults (54% female) through the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Multinomial logistic regression models were constructed to determine the relationships among smoking status (current daily, intermittent, former, and never smoker) and IPV (minor and sever victimization as well as perpetration). Results indicated a robust relationship between IPV and smoking among both victims and perpetrators. The odds for current daily and intermittent smoking were significantly elevated among those who reported both minor and severe IPV relative to their non-violent counterparts. Mood and anxiety disorders were significant comorbid conditions in the interpretation of the relationship between severe IPV and smoking. The current study provides strong evidence for a robust relationship between IPV and smoking across current smoking patterns, IPV severity levels, and IPV experience patterns. Findings emphasize the need to better understand the mechanisms by which smoking and IPV are associated and how this interdependence may impact approaches to treatment. Specifically, research is required to assess the efficacy of integrated smoking cessation and IPV treatment or recovery programs over more traditional, exclusive approaches. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  15. The effect of maternal prenatal smoking and alcohol consumption on the placenta-to-birth weight ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N; Tikellis, G; Sun, C; Pezic, A; Wang, L; Wells, J C K; Cochrane, J; Ponsonby, A-L; Dwyer, T

    2014-07-01

    Maternal influence on fetal growth is mediated through the placenta and this influence may have an implication for the offspring's long-term health. The placenta-to-birth weight ratio has been regarded as an indicator of placental function. However, few studies have examined the effect of maternal lifestyle exposures on the placenta-to-birth weight ratio. This study aims to examine the associations of maternal prenatal smoking and alcohol consumption with the placenta-to-birth weight ratio. Data for 7945 term singletons, gestation≥37 weeks, were selected from the Tasmanian Infant Health Survey; a 1988-1995 Australian cohort study. Placenta and birth weight were extracted from birth notification records. Maternal smoking during pregnancy was strongly associated with a 6.77 g/kg higher (95% CI 4.83-8.71) placenta-to-birth weight ratio when compared to non-smoking mothers. Maternal prenatal smoking was associated with lower placental (β = -15.37 g; 95% CI -23.43 to -7.31) and birth weights (β = -205.49 g; 95% CI -232.91 to -178.08). Mothers who consumed alcohol during pregnancy had a lower placenta-to-birth weight ratio (β = -2.07 g/kg; 95% CI -4.01 to -0.12) than mothers who did not consume alcohol. The associations of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy with placental and birth weight did not reach statistical significance. Maternal prenatal smoking and alcohol consumption may influence fetal growth by either directly or indirectly altering the function of the placenta. The alteration of the in utero environment induced by smoking and alcohol consumption appears to affect placental and fetal growth in differing ways. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of metabolic indicators, smoking, alcohol and socioeconomic position on mortality after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Signe Benzon; Kroman, Niels; Ibfelt, Else Helene; Christensen, Jane; Tjønneland, Anne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2015-05-01

    Factors differently distributed among social groups like obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, smoking, and alcohol intake predict survival after breast cancer diagnosis and therefore might mediate part of the observed social inequality in survival. We conducted a cohort study among 1250 postmenopausal breast cancer patients identified among 29 875 women in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study. Participants completed questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were made at enrollment. Information on survival, socioeconomic position, and comorbidity was obtained by linkage to national Danish registries. Clinical information was obtained from the nationwide Danish Breast Cancer Database. Selected information was obtained from hospital records at time of diagnosis. All analyses were based on Cox proportional hazard models, using death from all causes as outcome. Median follow-up was 9.6 years [interquartile range (IQR), 2.2-17.0 years]. The hazard ratio (HR) for death from all causes increased with lower education (p for trend, 0.01). Adjustment for disease-related prognostic factors, comorbidity and metabolic indicators measured as BMI, waist circumference and diabetes, and smoking and alcohol affected but did not explain the social gradient. The findings indicate that these factors explain some but not all the social inequality in survival after breast cancer and that improvement of lifestyle to some extent would improve survival among women with low socioeconomic position.

  17. Interactive Effects of Chronic Cigarette Smoking and Age on Brain Volumes in Controls and Alcohol Dependent Individuals in Early Abstinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mon, Anderson; Pennington, David; Abé, Christoph; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic alcohol use disorders (AUD) have been shown to interact with normal age-related volume loss to exacerbate brain atrophy with increasing age. However, chronic cigarette smoking, a highly comorbid condition in AUD, and its influence on age-related brain atrophy has not been evaluated. We performed 1.5T quantitative MRI in non-smoking controls (nsCON; n=54), smoking light drinking controls (sCON, n=34), and 1-week-abstinent, treatment-seeking non-smoking alcohol dependent individuals (nsALC, n=35) and smoking ALC (sALC, n=43), to evaluate the independent and interactive effects of alcohol dependence and chronic smoking on regional cortical and subcortical brain volumes, emphasizing the brain reward/executive oversight system (BREOS),. nsCON and sALC showed greater age-related volume losses than nsALC in the dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC), total cortical BREOS, superior parietal lobule and putamen. nsALC and sALC demonstrated smaller volumes than nsCON in most cortical ROIs. sCON had smaller volumes than nsCON in the DPFC, insula, inferior parietal lobule, temporal pole/parahippocampal region and all global cortical measures. nsALC and sALC had smaller volumes than sCON in the DPFC, superior temporal gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, precuneus and all global cortical measures. Volume differences between nsALC and sALC were observed only in the putamen. Alcohol consumption measures were not related to volumes in any ROI for ALC; smoking severity measures were related to corpus callosum volume in sCON and sALC. The findings indicate that consideration of smoking status is necessary for a better understanding of the factors contributing to regional brain atrophy in AUD. PMID:22943795

  18. Risk reduction before surgery. The role of the primary care provider in preoperative smoking and alcohol cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Hanne; Faurschou, Pernille; Ralov, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Daily smokers and hazardous drinkers are high-risk patients, developing 2-4 times more complications after surgery. Preoperative smoking and alcohol cessation for four to eight weeks prior to surgery halves this complication rate. The patients' preoperative contact with the surgical departments...... might be too brief for the hospital to initiate these programmes. Therefore, it was relevant to evaluate a new clinical practice which combined the general practitioner's (GP) referral to surgery with a referral to a smoking and alcohol intervention in the surgical pathway....

  19. A Prospective Study of Alcohol Consumption and Smoking and the Risk of Major Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Lisa L; Singh, Prashant; Boylan, Matthew R; Piawah, Sorbarikor; Cao, Yin; Chan, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Data regarding smoking and alcohol consumption and risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) are sparse and conflicting. We assessed the risk of major GIB associated with smoking and alcohol consumption in a large, prospective cohort. We prospectively studied 48,000 men in the Health Professional follow-up Study (HPFS) who were aged 40-75 years at baseline in 1986. We identified men with major GIB requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion via biennial questionnaires and chart review. We documented 305 episodes of major GIB during 26 years of follow-up. Men who consumed >30 g/day of alcohol had a multivariable relative risk (RR) of 1.43 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88-2.35; P for trend 0.006) for major GIB when compared with nondrinkers. Alcohol consumption appeared to be primarily related to upper GIB (multivariable RR for >30 g/day vs. nondrinkers was 1.35; 95% CI, 0.66-2.77; P for trend 0.02). Men who consumed ≥ 5 drinks/week vs. risk of GIB associated with NSAIDs/aspirin use increased with greater alcohol consumption (multivariable RR 1.37; 95% CI, 0.85-2.19 for 1-14g/day of alcohol, RR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.07-2.88 for ≥ 15g/day compared to nondrinkers). Smoking was not significantly associated with GIB. Alcohol consumption, but not smoking, was associated with an increased risk of major GIB. Associations were most notable for upper GIB associated with liquor intake. Alcohol appeared to potentiate the risk of NSAID-associated GIB.

  20. A Prospective Study of Alcohol Consumption and Smoking and the Risk of Major Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa L Strate

    Full Text Available Data regarding smoking and alcohol consumption and risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB are sparse and conflicting. We assessed the risk of major GIB associated with smoking and alcohol consumption in a large, prospective cohort.We prospectively studied 48,000 men in the Health Professional follow-up Study (HPFS who were aged 40-75 years at baseline in 1986. We identified men with major GIB requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion via biennial questionnaires and chart review.We documented 305 episodes of major GIB during 26 years of follow-up. Men who consumed >30 g/day of alcohol had a multivariable relative risk (RR of 1.43 (95% confidence interval (CI, 0.88-2.35; P for trend 0.006 for major GIB when compared with nondrinkers. Alcohol consumption appeared to be primarily related to upper GIB (multivariable RR for >30 g/day vs. nondrinkers was 1.35; 95% CI, 0.66-2.77; P for trend 0.02. Men who consumed ≥ 5 drinks/week vs. < 1 drink/month of liquor had a multivariable RR of 1.72 (95% CI, 1.26-2.35, P for trend <0.001. Wine and beer were not significantly associated with major GIB. The risk of GIB associated with NSAIDs/aspirin use increased with greater alcohol consumption (multivariable RR 1.37; 95% CI, 0.85-2.19 for 1-14g/day of alcohol, RR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.07-2.88 for ≥ 15g/day compared to nondrinkers. Smoking was not significantly associated with GIB.Alcohol consumption, but not smoking, was associated with an increased risk of major GIB. Associations were most notable for upper GIB associated with liquor intake. Alcohol appeared to potentiate the risk of NSAID-associated GIB.

  1. Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Consumption and Overweight in Multiple Sclerosis: Disability Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Ballesteros, Wayra Citlali; Monterrubio-Flores, Eric Alejandro; de Jesús Flores-Rivera, José; Corona-Vázquez, Teresa; Hernández-Girón, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The rate at which disability progresses in multiple sclerosis (MS), and its severity, have been associated with modifiable lifestyle habits. To investigate the risk of disability progression in MS patients according to tobacco and alcohol consumption and to the presence of overweight. This was a follow-up of MS cases from a concluded case-control study (National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Mexico 2010-2013). The evolution in EDSS (Expanded Disability Scale Score) units was followed through a medical record review. Kaplan Meier statistics and multivariate Cox regression analysis were performed. Of 181 cases, 63.5% were women and 82.5% had relapsing remitting MS. Study duration was 19.95 ± 15.24 months. The disease progressed faster in daily smokers than in non-smokers (p = 0.0168). In overweight patients, disability progressed faster than in normal weight patients (p = 0.0249). Ex-consumers of alcohol had lower risk of progression than current consumers (HR = 0.33 CI 95% = 0.14-0.83, p = 0.019) and both daily and ex-smokers presented higher risk of progression than non-smokers (HR = 2.32 CI 95% = 1.14-4.72, p = 0.020 and HR = 3.56, CI 95% = 1.21-10.46, p = 0.021). Stratifying by gender, the effects of smoking and overweight were only found in men. Smoking is associated with rapid disability progression in MS. Our results suggest that cessation of tobacco and alcohol consumption could be clinically beneficial. Although there is association between overweight and disability progression in men, a further exploration of gender differences is necessary to corroborate this finding. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk: a case-control study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamini, R; Polesel, J; Gallus, S; Dal Maso, L; Zucchetto, A; Negri, E; Bosetti, C; Lucenteforte, E; Boz, G; Franceschi, S; Serraino, D; La Vecchia, C

    2010-01-01

    In Italy, pancreatic cancer accounts for approximately 5% of cancer-related deaths. Tobacco smoking is the major established risk factor for this cancer, whereas the role of alcohol consumption is open to debate. Between 1991 and 2008, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study on pancreatic cancer in northern Italy. Cases were 326 patients (median age 63 years) with incident pancreatic cancer admitted to major general hospitals. Controls were 652 patients (median age 63 years) with acute non-neoplastic conditions admitted to the same hospital network of cases. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Pancreatic cancer was associated to current smoking (OR=1.68; 95% CI: 1.13-2.48), and the risk rose with increasing number of cigarettes/day (OR=2.04; 95% CI: 1.14-3.66 for > or = 20 cigarettes/day). No association emerged for former smokers (OR=0.98; 95% CI: 0.66-1.45). Alcohol consumption was associated to increased pancreatic cancer risk, but ORs were significant only among heavy drinkers (ORs: 2.03 and 3.42 for 21-34 and > or = 35 drinks/week, respectively). Pancreatic cancer risk was 4.3-fold higher in heavy smokers (> or = 20 cigarettes/day) and heavy drinkers (> or = 21 drinks/week) in comparison with never smokers who drunk alcohol drinking are two independent risk factors for pancreatic cancer which may be responsible for approximately one third of these cancers in our population. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Differences between Alcoholic Couples Accepting and Rejecting an Offer of Outpatient Marital Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Timothy J.; And Others

    Several theorists have advocated marital therapy in treatment programs for alcoholics. Given the promise of marital therapy for alcoholics, it is important to develop successful techniques for recruitment. One approach toward improving recruitment is to identify the characteristics of couples who are likely to accept or reject marital therapy.…

  4. Assessing Treatment Integrity in Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kevin A; Crotwell, Shirley M; Muñoz, Rosa E; Gius, Becky K; McCrady, Barbara S; Ladd, Benjamin O; Epstein, Elizabeth E

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy (ABCT) is an efficacious treatment for alcohol use disorders. Coding treatment integrity can shed light on the active ingredients of ABCT, but there are no published studies of treatment integrity instruments for ABCT. The present study describes the development and initial reliability of the Treatment Integrity Rating System - Couples Version (C-TIRS) for ABCT. The C-TIRS was used to rate 284 first- and mid-treatment ABCT sessions of 188 couples in four randomized clinical trials. Average inter-rater reliability for distinguishing ratings between C-TIRS items was fair-to-good for quantity items (intraclass correlation [ICC] = 0.64) and poor-to-fair for quality items (ICC = 0.41). Five C-TIRS subscales were defined a priori to measure treatment components involving cognitive-behavioral therapy, spouse involvement, couple therapy, common therapeutic factors, and overall adherence to the treatment protocol and had adequate internal reliability (α = 0.74-0.89). Inter-rater reliability was fair to good on seven of ten scales but poor on three scales (ICC range = 0.17-0.72). The C-TIRS was designed to provide information about quantity and quality of the delivery of ABCT components; however, further refinement of the C-TIRS is warranted before it should be used in frontline practice. Clinical implications and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  5. Association of Smoking, Alcohol Use, and Betel Quid Chewing with Epigenetic Aberrations in Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Hong Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous environmental factors such as diet, alcohol use, stress, and environmental chemicals are known to elicit epigenetic changes, leading to increased rates of cancers and other diseases. The incidence of head and neck cancer, one of the most common cancers in Taiwanese males, is increasing: oral cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma are ranked fourth and tenth respectively, among the top ten cancers in this group, and a major cause of cancer-related deaths in Taiwanese males. Previous studies have identified smoking, alcohol use, and betel quid chewing as the three major causes of head and neck cancers; these three social habits are commonly observed in Taiwanese males, resulting in an increasing morbidity rate of head and neck cancers in this population. In this literature review, we discuss the association between specific components of betel quid, alcohol, and tobacco, and the occurrence of head and neck cancers, lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancers, and urethral cancer. We focus on regulatory mechanisms at the epigenetic level and their oncogenic effects. The review further discusses the application of FDA-approved epigenetic drugs as therapeutic strategies against cancer.

  6. Association of Smoking, Alcohol Use, and Betel Quid Chewing with Epigenetic Aberrations in Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Hsia, Shih-Min; Shih, Yin-Hwa; Shieh, Tzong-Ming

    2017-06-06

    Numerous environmental factors such as diet, alcohol use, stress, and environmental chemicals are known to elicit epigenetic changes, leading to increased rates of cancers and other diseases. The incidence of head and neck cancer, one of the most common cancers in Taiwanese males, is increasing: oral cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma are ranked fourth and tenth respectively, among the top ten cancers in this group, and a major cause of cancer-related deaths in Taiwanese males. Previous studies have identified smoking, alcohol use, and betel quid chewing as the three major causes of head and neck cancers; these three social habits are commonly observed in Taiwanese males, resulting in an increasing morbidity rate of head and neck cancers in this population. In this literature review, we discuss the association between specific components of betel quid, alcohol, and tobacco, and the occurrence of head and neck cancers, lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancers, and urethral cancer. We focus on regulatory mechanisms at the epigenetic level and their oncogenic effects. The review further discusses the application of FDA-approved epigenetic drugs as therapeutic strategies against cancer.

  7. Tea consumption and its interactions with tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking on oral cancer in southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F; He, B-C; Yan, L-J; Liu, F-P; Huang, J-F; Hu, Z-J; Lin, Z; Zheng, X-Y; Lin, L-S; Zhang, Z-F; Cai, L

    2017-04-01

    Epidemiological results on the association between tea consumption and oral cancer remain controversial. We aimed to evaluate the exact relationship between tea consumption and oral cancer in Chinese population. A large-scale case-control study was conducted on 586 oral cancer patients and 1024 controls frequency-matched by age and gender. Epidemiological data were collected through face-to-face interviews with a structure questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression model was used to assess the effect of tea consumption on oral cancer stratified by smoking, alcohol drinking and demographics. Quantity of tea consumed (ml/day) was categorized into five subgroups based on quartiles and then its interactions was evaluated with tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking at each subgroup. Tea consumption showed an inverse association with oral cancer for non-smokers or non-alcohol drinkers (the odds ratios (ORs) were 0.610 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.425-0.876) and 0.686 (95% CI: 0.503-0.934), respectively). For smokers or alcohol drinkers, decreased risk was only observed in those who consumed >800 ml/day. Furthermore, oolong tea consumption was associated with decreased risk of oral cancer in smokers or alcohol drinkers but not in non-smokers or non-alcohol drinkers. Tea consumption combined with smoking or/and alcohol drinking had a greater risk than tea consumption alone, but the risk was roughly reduced from zero to Q4 (>800 ml/day). Additionally, when stratified by demographics, the protective effect of tea was especially evident in females, urban residents, normal body mass index population (18.5-23.9), farmers, office workers and those aged consumption protects against oral cancer in non-smokers or non-alcohol drinkers, but this effect may be obscured in smokers or alcohol drinkers. Additionally, demographics may modify the association between tea consumption and oral cancer.

  8. Smoking history, nicotine dependence, and changes in craving and mood during short-term smoking abstinence in alcohol dependent vs. control smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Jaimee L; Mingione, Carolyn; Blom, Thomas J; Anthenelli, Robert M

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this study was to compare lifetime cigarette smoking, severity of nicotine dependence, and subjective effects of short-term tobacco abstinence in abstinent alcohol dependent (AD) and control smokers. AD (n=119) and control (n=55) ever-smokers were compared on tobacco use history and nicotine dependence. Negative affect and craving to smoke were examined in a subsample of currently smoking AD (N=34) and control (N=19) participants during a 6-h period of tobacco abstinence using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges-Brief (QSU-B). Although AD smokers did not differ from controls on heaviness of smoking, they were more likely to meet lifetime criteria for nicotine dependence. AD smokers also reported more withdrawal symptoms and were more likely to endorse withdrawal-related depressed mood during past smoking reduction or abstinence periods. During short-term abstinence, AD smokers were more likely to report high craving to smoke for negative affect relief within the first 150 min of tobacco abstinence, but did not differ from controls on overall craving to smoke or withdrawal-related negative affect on the POMS. Results support previous findings that AD smokers have a greater prevalence of nicotine dependence and more severe nicotine withdrawal, with a greater propensity toward withdrawal-related depressed mood. These results, along with our novel finding that greater craving to smoke in abstaining smokers with AD is specific to negative affect-related craving, suggest that negative reinforcement may be a particularly salient factor in the maintenance of tobacco use among individuals with AD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Smoke, alcohol consumption and illicit drug use in an Italian population of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Marco; De Luca, Carmen; Mappa, Ilenia; Quattrocchi, Tomasella; Angelo, Licameli; Cesari, Elena

    2011-11-01

    High-risk behaviours are associated with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Exposure to drugs, infection or radiation is a cause of concern for pregnant women, who contact Teratology Information Services (TIS) to have a counseling but with an accurate medical history is possible to detect additional behavioural risk factors that can significantly interfere with pregnancy outcome. The aim of this study is to describe risk behaviours in a population of Italian women calling our TIS and to identify related maternal factors. Between December 2008 and January 2010 we collected data from 503 pregnant women calling our TIS (Telefono Rosso, Rome). We investigated about smoke, alcohol and abuse substances addiction and we also collected demographic data. Of the 503 women consenting to participate 34% were found to have an additional risk marker during the current pregnancy. Within this group were 22.7% (n=119) who reported smoking, the 17.7% (n=89) admitted to drink and 2 women (0.4%) used illicit drugs. In 13.7% of cases (n=69) reason for calling represented an exposure to teratogenic agents. Unmarried status and previous induced abortion represent a risk factor for all high-risk behaviours. Lower education (p<0.001) and use of neurological drugs (p<0.001) are related with cigarette consumption. A lower parity was a risk factor for alcohol assumption (p=0.04). Women with high-risk behaviours tend to be exposed to more than a risk factor. Teratogen Information Services are an important system to identify women with pregnancy risk markers. These services should have the ability to provide risk reduction information to women who smoke cigarettes or with alcohol or drug use. In addition to the phone based information these women may benefit from referral back to their physician for assessment and management of substance use/abuse during pregnancy. Substance abuse risks are often underestimated by pregnant women. Single mothers or women with an history of

  10. Investigation of aggravating psychosocial factors on health and predictability of smoking and alcohol use in post adolescent students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effrosyni Barmpagianni

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study is to explore those factors which affect the health of students in postadolescent age, focusing on smoking and alcohol use, especially in regard to ways of predicting adoption of this behavior and its frequency to detect future users of tobacco and alcohol use but also high-risk groups, i.e. those people who are led to abuses. On the basis of the research part is the Theory of Planned Behaviour, the axes of which are to be investigated. Specifically, the factors evaluated, except for population parameters, behavioral attitudes, i.e. attitudes towards the behavior of tobacco use and alcohol regulations subjective perceptions and perceptions of control, perceived behavioral control and self-efficacy. Intention is explored to continue or start using tobacco and alcohol in the future and evaluate the behavior. The sample consisted of 138 students of postadolescent age, 18-25 years of both sexes, all of the University of Peloponnese and the Technological Educational Institute of Kalamata, Department of Sparta, Greece. The results of a series of statistical analysis, via SPSS 21.0 statistical program revealed the predictive power of perceived behavioral control and subjective norms to the intention of interpreting 64% of the variance of the latter, of the attitudes toward alcohol in relation to intention that interpret 69% of the variance, of the normative beliefs toward smoking with 69% range of interpretation to the dependent variable, of the perceived behavioral control of smoking with 72% and of the attitudes toward smoking with 77% of interpretation. The results demonstrate the significance and application in universities and technological educational institutes appropriate primary preventive interventions for students nonusers of tobacco and alcohol and appropriate programs of secondary and tertiary prevention in heavy users of tobacco and alcohol use and high-risk individual.

  11. Prevalence of cigarette smoking and associated factors in a large sample of HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung Phuong Thi; Tran, Bach Xuan; Hwang, Lu Y; Markham, Christine M; Swartz, Michael D; Phan, Huong Thu Thi; Nong, Vuong Minh; Nguyen, Cuong Tat; Nguyen, Anh Hue; Latkin, Carl A; Vidrine, Damon J

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking presents a salient risk for HIV-positive populations. This study is among the first to examine smoking prevalence, nicotine dependence, and associated factors in a large sample of HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Vietnam. A cross-sectional study of 1133 HIV-positive people was conducted from January to September 2013 at 8 ART clinics in Hanoi (the capital) and Nam Dinh (a rural area). Smoking history and nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence-FTND) were assessed by participant self-report. Logistic regression and Tobit linear regression were performed to identify factors significantly associated with smoking outcomes. Prevalence of current, former, and never smokers in the sample was 36.1%, 9.5%, and 54.4%, respectively. The current smoking proportion was higher in males (59.7%) than females (2.6%). The mean FTND score was 3.6 (SD = 2.1). Males were more likely to currently smoke than females (OR = 23.4, 95% CI = 11.6-47.3). Individuals with problem drinking (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1-2.9) and ever drug use (OR = 3.7, 95%CI = 2.5-5.7) were more likely to be current smokers. Older age and currently feeling pain were associated with lower nicotine dependence. Conversely, receiving care in Nam Dinh, greater alcohol consumption, ever drug use, and a longer smoking duration were associated with greater nicotine dependence. Given the high prevalence of smoking among HIV-positive patients, smoking screening and cessation support should be offered at ART clinics in Vietnam. Risk factors (i.e., substance use) linked with smoking behavior should be considered in prevention programs.

  12. Behavioural aspects of smoking (both passive and active) and alcohol consumption on the risk of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attard, R.; Dingli, P.; Cassar, K.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Farrugia, R.; Bezzina Wettinger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption and of passive and active smoking on the risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Methods: Data on 429 cases with MI and 434 controls was obtained through an interviewer-led questionnaire as part of the Maltese Acute Myocardial Infarction

  13. Behavioral Effects of Pre- and Postnatal Exposure to Smoking, Alcohol, and Caffeine in 5-Month-Old Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowler, Jeffrey K.; Jacobson, Sandra W.

    This study examined the behavioral effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure to smoking, alcohol, and caffeinated beverages on 5-month-old infants. The sample consisted of 179 Caucasian infants and their mothers. All mothers were 19 years of age or older and had at least a tenth-grade education. Mental and motor portions of the Bayley Scales of…

  14. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and the risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maasland, D.H.E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kremer, S.H.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schouten, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prospective data on alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes, i.e. oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), are limited. We investigated these associations within the second largest prospective study

  15. Alcohol, smoking and illicit drug use in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon van Weelden

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate alcohol, smoking and/or illicit drug use, and history of bullying in adolescent childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus and healthy controls. Methods 174 adolescents with pediatric rheumatic diseases were selected. All of the 34 childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 35 healthy controls participated in this study. A cross-sectional study included demographic/anthropometric data and puberty markers assessments; structured questionnaire and CRAFFT screening interview. Results McNemar tests indicated an excellent test–retest reliability of the structured questionnaire (p = 1.0. The median current age was similar between childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and controls [15 (12–18 vs. 15 (12–18 years, p = 0.563]. The median of menarche age was significantly higher in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to controls [12 (10–15 vs. 11.5 (9–15 years, p = 0.041], particularly in those that lupus had occurred before first menstruation [13 (12–15 vs. 11.5(9–15 years, p = 0.007]. The other puberty marker and sexual function parameters were similar in both groups (p > 0.05. Alcohol use was similar in both childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and controls (38% vs. 46%, p = 0.628. A trend of lower frequency of CRAFFT score ≥2 (high risk for substance abuse/dependence was evidenced in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to controls (0% vs. 15%, p = 0.053. Bullying was reported similarly for the two groups (43% vs. 44%, p = 0.950. Further analysis in lupus patients regarding alcohol/smoking/illicit drug use showed no differences in demographic data, puberty markers, history of bullying, sexual function, contraceptive use, disease activity/damage scores, clinical/laboratorial features and treatments (p > 0.05. Conclusion This study showed high frequencies of early alcohol use in lupus adolescents and

  16. Cigarette smoking is associated with high HIV viral load among adults presenting for antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Pollack

    Full Text Available High HIV viral load (VL >100,000 cp/ml is associated with increased HIV transmission risk, faster progression to AIDS, and reduced response to some antiretroviral regimens. To better understand factors associated with high VL, we examined characteristics of patients presenting for treatment in Hanoi, Vietnam. We examined baseline data from the Viral Load Monitoring in Vietnam Study, a randomized controlled trial of routine VL monitoring in a population starting antiretroviral therapy (ART at a clinic in Hanoi. Patients with prior treatment failure or ART resistance were excluded. Characteristics examined included demographics, clinical and laboratory data, and substance use. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Out of 636 patients, 62.7% were male, 72.9% were ≥30 years old, and 28.3% had a history of drug injection. Median CD4 was 132 cells/mm3, and 34.9% were clinical stage IV. Active cigarette smoking was reported by 36.3% with 14.0% smoking >10 cigarettes per day. Alcohol consumption was reported by 20.1% with 6.1% having ≥5 drinks per event. Overall 53.0% had a VL >100,000 cp/ml. Male gender, low body weight, low CD4 count, prior TB, and cigarette smoking were associated with high VL. Those who smoked 1-10 cigarettes per day were more likely to have high VL (aOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.15-3.45, while the smaller number of patients who smoked >10 cigarettes per day had a non-significant trend toward higher VL (aOR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.75-2.66. Alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with high VL. Tobacco use is increasingly recognized as a contributor to premature morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In our study, cigarette smoking in the last 30 days was associated with a 1.5 to 2-fold higher odds of having an HIV VL >100,000 cp/ml among patients presenting for ART. These findings provide further evidence of the negative effects of

  17. Cigarette smoking is associated with high HIV viral load among adults presenting for antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Todd M; Duong, Hao T; Pham, Thuy T; Do, Cuong D; Colby, Donn

    2017-01-01

    High HIV viral load (VL >100,000 cp/ml) is associated with increased HIV transmission risk, faster progression to AIDS, and reduced response to some antiretroviral regimens. To better understand factors associated with high VL, we examined characteristics of patients presenting for treatment in Hanoi, Vietnam. We examined baseline data from the Viral Load Monitoring in Vietnam Study, a randomized controlled trial of routine VL monitoring in a population starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a clinic in Hanoi. Patients with prior treatment failure or ART resistance were excluded. Characteristics examined included demographics, clinical and laboratory data, and substance use. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Out of 636 patients, 62.7% were male, 72.9% were ≥30 years old, and 28.3% had a history of drug injection. Median CD4 was 132 cells/mm3, and 34.9% were clinical stage IV. Active cigarette smoking was reported by 36.3% with 14.0% smoking >10 cigarettes per day. Alcohol consumption was reported by 20.1% with 6.1% having ≥5 drinks per event. Overall 53.0% had a VL >100,000 cp/ml. Male gender, low body weight, low CD4 count, prior TB, and cigarette smoking were associated with high VL. Those who smoked 1-10 cigarettes per day were more likely to have high VL (aOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.15-3.45), while the smaller number of patients who smoked >10 cigarettes per day had a non-significant trend toward higher VL (aOR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.75-2.66). Alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with high VL. Tobacco use is increasingly recognized as a contributor to premature morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In our study, cigarette smoking in the last 30 days was associated with a 1.5 to 2-fold higher odds of having an HIV VL >100,000 cp/ml among patients presenting for ART. These findings provide further evidence of the negative effects of tobacco use among

  18. Health-Related Quality of Life With Regard to Smoking, Consumption of Alcohol, and Sports Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamvirdi, Rezvan; Hosseinzadeh Asl, Navidreza; Colakoglu, Filiz Fatma

    2016-07-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important determinant in a person's life. In this study aimed at physical education students, alcohol consumption and smoking as risk factors and sports as a healthy factor could affect HRQoL. This study was an analytical cross-sectional study. For our purpose, the subjects (n = 519) were asked to answer the SF-36 questionnaire (short form health survey for HRQOL). To analyze the data, two-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), the independent-samples t-test, and Pearson correlation coefficient were conducted. In this study, the P sports students despite the fact that they regularly engage in sports programs that could positively affect their HRQOL.

  19. Analysis of factors that determine weight gain during smoking cessation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Maki; Wada, Hiromichi; Ura, Shuichi; Yamakage, Hajime; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Shimatsu, Akira; Koyama, Hiroshi; Kono, Koichi; Takahashi, Yuko; Hasegawa, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smokers are generally known to gain weight after quitting smoking, and such weight gain is thought to contribute to the worsening of glucose tolerance. While smoking cessation therapy such as nicotine replacement is useful to minimize post-cessation weight gain, substantial gain occurs even during the therapy. The purpose of the present study was to identify factors associated with weight gain during smoking cessation therapy. We evaluated 186 patients(132 males and 54 females)who visited our outpatient clinic for smoking cessation, and successfully achieved smoking abstinence. We performed gender-adjusted regression analysis for the rate of BMI increase from the beginning of cessation to 3 months after initiation. Furthermore, we performed multivariate analysis to investigate factors that determine the BMI increase after smoking cessation. The mean BMI significantly (ptherapy. There was no significant difference in the extent of BMI increase between nicotine patch and varenicline therapy groups. Factors significantly correlated with the %BMI increase at 3 months after the start of therapy were triglyceride (p = 0.0006, βa = 0.260), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p = 0.0386, βa = -0.168), daily cigarette consumption (p = 0.0385, βa = 0.154), and the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) score (p = 0.0060, βa = 0.203). Stepwise multivariate analysis demonstrated that triglyceride and the FTND score were the factors determining the post-cessation BMI increase and that the FTND score was the strongest one. The present study demonstrated that smokers with a high FTND score are more likely to gain weight during smoking cessation therapy. Thus, smokers with a high nicotine dependency may require intervention against weight gain in the cessation clinic.

  20. [Family and peer factors related to alcohol abuse and smoking by 15-year-old youth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Jakub; Małkowska-Szkutnik, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the period of adolescence is to experiment with e.g. alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking. Both family relations and relations with peer groups can be referred to undertaking this kind of behavior by adolescents. The aim of this study was an attempt to assess relationships between joint family and peer-group relations and the frequency of binge drinking and tobacco smoking by 15-year-olds. The study was conducted in 2010/2011 within the framework of the international HBSC study (Health Behaviour in School-aged Children) on a group of 1551 people aged 15 years (49.1% boys). It was carried out in schools. Items from the HBSC questionnaire were used to assess the frequency of undertaking risky behaviors. To assess the quality of relations within the family, questions from the FDM II scale (Family Dynamics Measure II) were used, whereas an abbreviated version of the IPPA (Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment) scale was used to assess the quality of peer relations. Three patterns of relations with family and peers were identified by the use of the cluster analysis methods (k-means method). In the group of girls the differences in the proportions in clusters reflecting the patterns of relations with the family and peers were greater than in boys. 15-year olds who had good relations with peers and poor relations with their family got drunk and smoked tobacco more often than adolescents in other clusters. The frequency of undertaking risk behavior by adolescents is associated with perceptions of social relations. Good family relations, as a protective factor, may partially reduce the negative impact of the peer group on undertaking risk behavior by adolescents. There is a need for further research to answer the question about the trends in the correspondence between the quality of family and peer relations and undertaking risk behaviors.

  1. Smoking, alcohol use, dietary factors and risk of small intestinal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A H; Yu, M C; Mack, T M

    1997-03-04

    To investigate the role of tobacco and alcohol use and dietary factors in the etiology of small intestinal adenocarcinoma, we analyzed data from a large population-based case-control study of multi-site cancers conducted in Los Angeles County between 1975 and 1984. The present analysis included interview information on 36 small intestinal adenocarcinoma patients and 998 population controls. After adjusting for age and ethnicity, men who smoked more than 100 cigarettes during their lifetimes were at a non-significantly 3-fold increased risk for small intestinal adenocarcinoma; this association was substantially weaker in women. In men and women combined, a significant 3-fold increased risk in heavy drinkers (80+ g ethanol/day) relative to more moderate drinkers and non-drinkers was observed. Although frequent (>6 times vs. less than 2 times of intake a week) intake of foods rich in heterocyclic aromatic amines (based on the combined intake of fried bacon and ham, barbecued and/or smoked meat and smoked fish) was associated with a significant 4.5-fold increased risk of small intestinal adenocarcinoma in men; this association was not present in women. Based on 2 questions that provided a crude assessment of sugar intake, risk of small intestinal adenocarcinoma in men and women appeared to be associated with adding sugar regularly in coffee or tea and daily intake of non-diet carbonated soft drinks. When we computed total sugar intake from tea, coffee and non-diet carbonated soft drinks, there was a consistent and significant trend of increasing sugar intake and risk of small intestinal adenocarcinomas. Compared with the lowest intake level a day (25 g) were associated with ORs of 2.5 and 3.8, respectively.

  2. Family Therapy and Children of Alcoholics Implications for Continuing Education and Certification in Substance Abuse Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Tony D.; Rueckert, Quentin H.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians involved in family therapy are increasingly concerned with the impact of parental alcoholism on individual development and family functioning. With more than 20 million adults raised within an alcoholic family, and with widespread problems associated with parental alcoholism, clinicians providing family treatment have a potentially…

  3. Significant differe nces in demographic, clinical, and pathological features in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption among 1,633 head and neck cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ajub Moyses

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: As a lifestyle-related disease, social and cultural disparities may influence the features of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in different geographic regions. We describe demographic, clinical, and pathological aspects of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck according to the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of patients in a Brazilian cohort. METHODS: We prospectively analyzed the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of 1,633 patients enrolled in five São Paulo hospitals that participated in the Brazilian Head and Neck Genome Project - Gencapo. RESULTS: The patients who smoked and drank were younger, and those who smoked were leaner than the other patients, regardless of alcohol consumption. The non-smokers/non-drinkers were typically elderly white females who had more differentiated oral cavity cancers and fewer first-degree relatives who smoked. The patients who drank presented significantly more frequent nodal metastasis, and those who smoked presented less-differentiated tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck demonstrated demographic, clinical, and pathological features that were markedly different according to their smoking and drinking habits. A subset of elderly females who had oral cavity cancer and had never smoked or consumed alcohol was notable. Alcohol consumption seemed to be related to nodal metastasis, whereas smoking correlated with the degree of differentiation.

  4. Association of arsenic exposure with smoking, alcohol, and caffeine consumption: data from NHANES 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ram B

    2015-03-01

    Association of arsenic exposure with smoking, alcohol, and caffeine consumption was investigated. Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years 2005-2010 were used for this investigation. Urinary levels of total arsenic (UAS) and dimethylarsonic acid (UDMA) were evaluated for children aged 6-12 years and adolescents and adults aged ≥ 12 years. Urinary levels of arsenobetaine (UAB) were evaluated for adolescents and adults only. Regression models were fitted for log transformed values of UAB, UAS, and UDMA. For the models for children, however, gender, race/ethnicity, SES, and fish/shell fish consumption during the last 30 days were the only independent variables that were included in the models. Nonsmokers were found to have higher levels of UAS and UDMA than smokers. Elevated levels of UAB, UAS, and UDMA were associated with higher amounts of daily alcohol consumption. The associations were in the opposite direction for daily caffeine consumption. Females were found to have statistically significantly lower adjusted levels of UDMA than males for those aged ≥ 12 years. Irrespective of age, those with unclassified race/ethnicity had the highest levels of UAB, UAS, and UDMA and non-Hispanic whites had the lowest levels. Adolescents had the higher levels of UAB, UAS, and UDMA than adults. Higher SES was associated with higher levels of UAB, UAS, and UDMA among adolescents and adults. Irrespective of age, fish consumption was associated with higher levels of UAB, UAS, and UDMA. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. [Television and Internet as sources of women knowledge of tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and energy drinks impact on health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycharz-Dudziak, Małgorzata; Nakonieczna-Rudnicka, Marta; Bachanek, Teresa; Kobyłecka, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Accessibility of the Internet allows obtaining information on different areas of life, including the impact of smoking, alcohol consumption and energy drinks on health. Environmental exposure to tobacco smoke and active smoking are a serious risk for women's health, especially for women in reproductive age and children at any time in their lives. Alcohol is a risk factor for the development of general diseases, and consumed by pregnant women has a toxic effect on the body of women and a child in the prenatal period. Due to the increased consumption of energy drinks containing among others nervous system stimulants and carbohydrates, their consumption should be a conscious choice of the consumers. Knowledge of the health risks resulting from the lifestyle can be a decisive factor for the implementation of health behaviour. The aim of the study was to determine the sources from which men and women acquire information concerning the effects of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and energy drinks on health. The respondents interest in the above mentioned subjects was also evaluated. The survey study was carried out in a group of 160 persons (114 women and 46 men), aged 19-60 years, randomly selected from the patients presenting to the Department of Conservative Dentistry with Endodontics of the Medical University of Lublin. An author's questionnaire was prepared for this research. The data were analyzed statistically with the use of Pearson's X2 test. Statistically significant test values were those with penergy drinks for 61.40 % of women and 47.83% men. Differences between sex of the respondents and indicated source of information were not statistically significant. Obtaining information from television programmes on the impact of smoking on health reported 70.18% of women and 63.04% of men, about alcohol consumption - 66.67% women and 58.70% men respectively. There was no statistically significant correlation between sex of the respondents and obtaining

  6. Pharmacogenetic study of seven polymorphisms in three nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in smoking-cessation therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintarelli, Giulia; Galvan, Antonella; Pozzi, Paolo; Noci, Sara; Pasetti, Giovanna; Sala, Francesca; Pastorino, Ugo; Boffi, Roberto; Colombo, Francesca

    2017-12-01

    Smoking-cessation therapy reduces the risk of smoking-related diseases, but is successful only in a fraction of smokers. There is growing evidence that genetic variations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits influence the risk of nicotine dependence and the ability to quit smoking. To investigate the role of polymorphisms in nAChR genes on smoking quantity and the outcome of smoking-cessation therapies, we carried out an association study on 337 smokers who underwent pharmacotherapy with varenicline, bupropion, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) alone, or NRT plus bupropion. Smoking habit and abstention were assessed from the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) and the exhaled CO (eCO), at baseline and up to 12 months. We genotyped seven polymorphisms in genes encoding the nAChR subunits CHRNA4, CHRNA5, and CHRNB2. At baseline, both CPD and eCO were associated with polymorphisms in the CHRNA5 locus (rs503464, rs55853698, rs55781567 and rs16969968; P < 0.01). rs503464, a variant in the 5'-UTR of CHRNA5, was also associated with short-, mid- and long-term responses to therapy (P = 0.011, P = 0.0043, P = 0.020, respectively), although after correction for multiple testing only the association at the mid-term assessment remained significant (FDR = 0.03). These data support the role of individual genetic makeup in the ability to quit smoking.

  7. Comparison of Family Therapy Outcome with Alcohol-Abusing, Runaway Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L

    2009-01-01

    Treatment evaluation for alcohol problem, runaway adolescents and their families is rare. This study recruited primary alcohol problem adolescents (N = 119) and their primary caretakers from two runaway shelters and assigned them to (a) home-based ecologically based family therapy (EBFT), (b) office-based functional family therapy (FFT), or (c)…

  8. [Selected biochemical parameters of oxidative stress as a result of exposure to tobacco smoke in animals addicted to ethyl alcohol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Anna; Kulza, Maksymilian; Seńczuk-Przybyłowska, Monika; Cimino, Francesco; Saija, Antonella; Ignatowicz, Ewa; Chuchracki, Marek; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Kramer, Lucyna; Florek, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Smoking cigarettes and alcohol addiction are serious problems in health hazard and life of society. Tobacco smoke leads to many kinds of cancer formation and scientific research indicates, that heart-vascular disease and lung cancer are the most common diseases caused by tobacco smoke. While talking about ethanol, it is responsible for liver, pancreas, mucous membrane damage and leads to central and circular nervous disorder. Scientific research indicates, that many smokers drink alcohol and vice versa. Unfortunately in that case the risk of many diseases increases. Both of these stimulants leads to enlarged production of reactive oxygen species, which is connected with unbalance between pro and antioxidant processes in human organism. Free radicals in normal conditions plays positive role but with tobacco smoke and alcohol connection may lead to serious changes in human organism. They damage organs, it comes to protein structure, nucleic acid and fat violation, which in consequence leads to immunity decrease and many pathological changes. Reactive oxygen species also plays role in pathogenesis of many diseases: diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis and Down syndrome. ROS may also increase the risk of pancreas, lung, larynx and urinary bladder cancer formation. Human organism defends oneself from harmful influence of reactive oxygen species owing to enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems presence-Non-enzymatic antioxidants: glutathione, carotene, bilirubin, tocopherol, uric acid and ions metals temporary complex belong to non-enzymatic systems. To enzymatic ones belong: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase. The aim of the study was tobacco smoke and ethyl alcohol influence evaluation in rats addicted to these substances on activity of chosen enzymes responsible for organism defense against toxic compounds action. To this study 63 white, Wistar tribe rats at the age of 3,5 months were used - males addicted to ethyl alcohol. They

  9. Sporadic Retinoblastoma and Parental Smoking and Alcohol Consumption before and after Conception: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Azary

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma is the most frequent tumor of the eye in children and very little is known about the etiology of non-familial (sporadic retinoblastoma. In this study we examined whether parental tobacco smoking or alcohol consumption (pre- or post-conception contribute to the two phenotypes (bilateral or unilateral of sporadic retinoblastoma.Two large multicenter case-control studies identified 488 cases through eye referral centers in the United States and Canada or through the Children's Oncology Group. Controls (n = 424 were selected from among friends and relatives of cases and matched by age. Risk factor information was obtained via telephone interview. We employed multivariable logistic regression to estimate the effects of parental tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on retinoblastoma.Maternal smoking before and during pregnancy contributed to unilateral retinoblastoma risk in the child: year before pregnancy conditional Odds Ratio (OR, 8.9; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.5-51, and unconditional OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.7; month before or during pregnancy, conditional OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 0.5-20.8, and unconditional OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.0. No association was found for maternal or paternal alcohol consumption.The results of this study indicate that maternal active smoking during pregnancy may be a risk factor for sporadic retinoblastoma. Our study supports a role for tobacco exposures in embryonal tumors.

  10. Sporadic Retinoblastoma and Parental Smoking and Alcohol Consumption before and after Conception: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azary, Saeedeh; Ganguly, Arupa; Bunin, Greta R; Lombardi, Christina; Park, Andrew S; Ritz, Beate; Heck, Julia E

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most frequent tumor of the eye in children and very little is known about the etiology of non-familial (sporadic) retinoblastoma. In this study we examined whether parental tobacco smoking or alcohol consumption (pre- or post-conception) contribute to the two phenotypes (bilateral or unilateral) of sporadic retinoblastoma. Two large multicenter case-control studies identified 488 cases through eye referral centers in the United States and Canada or through the Children's Oncology Group. Controls (n = 424) were selected from among friends and relatives of cases and matched by age. Risk factor information was obtained via telephone interview. We employed multivariable logistic regression to estimate the effects of parental tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on retinoblastoma. Maternal smoking before and during pregnancy contributed to unilateral retinoblastoma risk in the child: year before pregnancy conditional Odds Ratio (OR), 8.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-51, and unconditional OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.7; month before or during pregnancy, conditional OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 0.5-20.8, and unconditional OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.0. No association was found for maternal or paternal alcohol consumption. The results of this study indicate that maternal active smoking during pregnancy may be a risk factor for sporadic retinoblastoma. Our study supports a role for tobacco exposures in embryonal tumors.

  11. Smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use among adolescents with psychiatric disorders compared with a population based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangerud, Wenche Langfjord; Bjerkeset, Ottar; Holmen, Turid Lingaas; Lydersen, Stian; Indredavik, Marit Sæbø

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated frequencies of smoking, alcohol use, and illicit drug use by diagnostic category in 566 adolescent psychiatric patients, comparing this sample with 8173 adolescents from the general population in Norway who completed the Young-HUNT 3 survey. Frequencies of current alcohol use were high in both samples but were lower among psychiatric patients. Compared with adolescents in the general population, adolescents in the clinical sample had a higher prevalence of current smoking and over four times higher odds of having tried illicit drugs. In the clinical sample, those with mood disorders reported the highest frequencies of smoking, alcohol use, and illicit drug use, whereas those with autism spectrum disorders reported the lowest frequencies. Our results show an increased prevalence of risky health behaviors among adolescents with psychiatric disorders compared with the general population. The awareness of disorder-specific patterns of smoking and substance use may guide preventive measures. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Tobacco Addiction and Smoking Status in Heroin Addicts under Methadone vs. Buprenorphine Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Casari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims of the present investigation were: (i to assess the prevalence of current smokers and relative smoking status among a large number of heroin addicts attending opioid-substitution therapy prevalence; (ii to evaluate the relationship between the type (methadone, buprenorphine and dosage of opioid substitution therapy and nicotine dependence. Three hundred and five (305 heroin addicts under opioid-substitution therapy were recruited at five Addiction Units. All participants completed a questionnaire assessing sociodemographic information, type and dose of opioid-substitution therapy, smoking history and status, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND, and the Zung Self-Rating Depression scale (SDS. 298 subjects, out of 305 (97.2% were smokers, with an average of 20.5 cigarette/day and a median FTND of 6. Our data confirmed the high prevalence of smokers among heroin addicts, the highest described in the literature to date among heroin addicts under substitution therapies, without any significant difference between methadone vs. buprenorphine therapy groups. There was no correlation between dose of methadone or buprenorphine and average number of cigarettes/day. Patients in substance abuse treatment very frequently smoke cigarettes and often die of tobacco-related diseases. Substance abuse treatment programs too often ignore tobacco use. We hope that these findings will help to incorporate smoking cessation in substance abuse treatments.

  13. Modification of Smoking Behavior Through Self-Administered Punishment of Imagined Behavior: A New Approach to Aversion Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berecz, John

    1972-01-01

    This study investigated the therapeutic feasibility of self-administered punishment of imagined behavior. With heavy-smoking males, the imagined-smoking treatment was the only highly effective therapy. It was significantly more effective than the placebo or actual-smoking treatments, and it replicated. (Author)

  14. Different Markers of Alcohol Consumption, Smoking and Body Mass Index in Relation to Risk of Pancreatic Cancer. A Prospective Cohort Study within the Malmö Preventive Project.

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Dorthe; Borgström, Anders; Lindkvist, Björn; Manjer, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim: The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer is not clear. This study investigates different prediagnostic measurements of alcohol consumption, a laboratory marker (gamma-glutamyltransferase; gamma-GT), and a score measuring alcohol addiction (Mm-MAST), in relation to the risk of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the study investigated whether smoking and alcohol consumption interact with each other, or if the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with these ...

  15. Tobacco-stained fingers: a clue for smoking-related disease or harmful alcohol use? A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Gregor; Pasche, Sephora; Rothen, Nicole; Charmoy, Alexia; Delhumeau-Cartier, Cécile; Genné, Daniel

    2013-11-07

    Tobacco stain on fingers is frequent. However, there is scarce description of this clinical sign. We aimed to explore tobacco stain on fingers as a marker of tobacco-related disease independent of cumulative tobacco exposure, and to find behavioural and environmental characteristics associated with those stains. Case-control study. A Swiss community hospital of 180 beds. 49 adults presenting tobacco-tars staining on fingers were matched to 49 control smokers by age, gender, height and pack-year (PY). Documented smoking-related carcinoma, ischaemic heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, stroke and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), also determined by lung function, were compared between groups. Association between harmful alcohol use, mental disorders or unemployment and tar-staining was adjusted for smoking behaviour through conditional logistic regression. Overall cigarette-related disease was high in the case group (84%), and symptomatic peripheral arterial disease was more frequent compared to controls (OR 3.5, CI 95% 1.1 to 14.6). Smoking-related carcinoma, ischaemic heart disease, stroke and COPD were not statistically different for control smokers. Harmful alcohol use was strongly associated with stains and this association persists after adjustment for smoking unfiltered cigarettes, smoking more than one pack of cigarettes in a day and age at smoking onset (adjusted OR 4.6, CI 95% 1.2 to 17.2). Mental disorders and unemployment were not statistically significant. Patients with tobacco-tar-stained fingers frequently have cigarette-related disease, however statistically not more than control smokers matched for PY, except for symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. This study suggests a link between stained fingers and addictive behaviour or concomitant high alcohol consumption.

  16. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and the risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Goldbohm, R Alexandra Sandra; Schouten, Leo J

    2014-03-14

    Prospective data on alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes, i.e. oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), are limited. We investigated these associations within the second largest prospective study on this topic so far, the Netherlands Cohort Study. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors in 1986. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 395 HNC (110 OCC, 83 OHPC, and 199 LC) cases and 4288 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. For total HNC, the multivariable adjusted incidence rate ratio (RR) was 2.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.85-4.06) for those drinking ≥30 g ethanol/day compared with abstainers; in subtypes, RRs were 6.39 for OCC, 3.52 for OHPC, and 1.54 for LC. Compared with never cigarette smokers, current cigarette smokers had a RR of 4.49 (95%CI 3.11-6.48) for HNC overall, and 2.11 for OCC, 8.53 for OHPC, and 8.07 for LC. A significant, positive, multiplicative interaction between categories of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking was found for HNC overall (P interaction 0.03). Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking were independently associated with risk of HNC overall, with a positive, multiplicative interaction. The strength of these associations differed among HNC-subtypes: OCC was most strongly associated with alcohol consumption but most weakly with cigarette smoking, whereas LC was not statistically significantly associated with alcohol consumption.

  17. Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many of the same problems as smokers do. E-cigarettes often look like cigarettes, but they work differently. They are battery-operated smoking devices. Not much is known about the health risks of using them. Quitting smoking can reduce your ...

  18. Substitution therapy for alcoholism: time for a reappraisal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Jonathan; Nutt, David J

    2012-02-01

    A number of compounds already in use as medications for various indications substitute for ethanol at clinically relevant brain pathways, in particular, at gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. Nevertheless, although substitute medications have been recognized for heroin and tobacco dependence, patients with alcohol dependence are rarely offered an analogous approach. Benzodiazepines may have paradoxical effects, and abuse and dependence are known. Baclofen (GABA(B) agonist) has not been associated with dependence or misuse and has been effective in several trials in preventing relapse, although research is required to establish the optimal dosing regimen. GABA-ergic anticonvulsants, helpful in treating withdrawal, have yet to emerge as effective in relapse prevention. Clomethiazole and sodium oxybate, the latter having been shown to be effective in relapse prevention, have incurred a reputation for dependence and abuse. However, data have emerged showing that the risk of abuse of sodium oxybate is lower than many clinicians had foreseen. For a condition where existing therapies are only effective in a proportion of patients, and which has high morbidity and mortality, the time now seems right for reappraising the use of substitute prescribing for alcohol dependence.

  19. Using the alcohol, smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) to determine substance abuse prevalence in the RI trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ralph; Baird, Janette; He, Jun Kit; Adams, Charles; Mello, Michael

    2014-02-03

    Level I trauma centers are required to provide screening and brief interventions for alcohol abuse. The World Health Organization (WHO) Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) is a validated screening measure for all substances of abuse. This study is the first to use the ASSIST to screen a trauma population. A cross-sectional screening study using the ASSIST was conducted which included all patients admitted to the trauma service at Rhode Island Hospital during July and August 2012 who met inclusion criteria. The ASSIST categorized 25% of participants as needing a brief intervention for alcohol and an additional 6.3% as needing more intensive treatment. At least a brief intervention was indicated for at least one other substance besides alcohol in 37% of participants. The ability of the ASSIST to identify misuse of multiple substances makes it a good candidate for the screening measure used by trauma centers.

  20. Smoking cessation in workplace settings: quit rates and determinants in a group behaviour therapy programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausherr, Yann; Quinto, Carlos; Grize, Leticia; Schindler, Christian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2017-09-25

    To capitalise on the opportunities that the smoking ban legislation in Switzerland offers for the prevention of tobacco-related diseases, a smoking cessation programme in a workplace setting was developed and implemented in companies across the language and cultural regions of Switzerland. Our goal was to identify factors associated with relapse into smoking that may be overcome during training sessions or that should be considered for the optimisation of future interventions. Between 2006 and 2012, 1287 smokers aged 16 to 68 years voluntarily attended smoking cessation training at their workplace. The intervention was based on a cognitive behavioural group therapy combined with individual proactive telephone counselling. The evaluation consisted of three anonymised questionnaires (pre- and postintervention, and 12-month follow-up). In this prospective cohort study, we investigated the association of smoking quit rates with training and participant characteristics, including withdrawal symptoms, by use of multilevel logistic regression analysis with a random intercept for training courses. The self-reported abstinence rate was 72.4% at the end of the training, and 18.6% 1 year later. The risk of relapse during the training was positively associated with the number of years and daily cigarettes smoked, and negatively with increased appetite, sleeping troubles and satisfaction with learned techniques. Failed abstinence within the first year was associated with younger age, higher numbers of daily smoked cigarettes and unsuccessful recent quit attempts. Our evaluation suggests that younger and more addicted smokers attending smoking cessation trainings may need additional support to achieve long lasting abstinence rates. Offering smoking cessation training in a workplace setting can achieve reasonable long-term quit rates, but a subset of employees needs additional support at the group or personal level. Group behaviour therapy could be an effective method to achieve

  1. GPX1 Pro(198)Leu polymorphism, erythrocyte GPX activity, interaction with alcohol consumption and smoking, and risk of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Dalgaard; Krath, Britta N.; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    and information on lifestyle factors was obtained from questionnaires filled in at enrolment in 1993–1997. GPX1 Pro198Leu, hOGG1 Ser326Cys and erythrocyte GPX enzyme activity were not associated with risk of colorectal cancer. We observed a higher risk associated with alcohol consumption and smoking among......198Leu genotype, gender, smoking intensity, and intake of fruits and vegetables. Our results indicate that lifestyle-related oxidative stress may be a risk factor for colorectal cancer among subjects with a lowered defence....

  2. Smoking and alcohol drinking in relation to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: A population-based case-control study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaorong; Chen, Xingdong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Yuan, Ziyu; Nie, Shuping; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2017-12-08

    Previous results regarding the associations between esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) risk and smoking/alcohol drinking in high-risk areas are inconsistent. We performed a large population-based case-control study from 2010 to 2013 in a high-incidence area of China, and enrolled 1353 ESCC cases and 1961 controls. Data regarding smoking and alcohol drinking were collected via face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. Odd ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models. After adjusting for alcohol drinking and other potential confounders, male heavy smokers (i.e., those who started smoked more than 20 cigarettes per day or 40 pack-years, or started smoking early), showed a moderately increased risk for ESCC; however, current smoking was not associated with an increased risk. Alcohol drinking among males significantly increased the risk for ESCC (OR = 2.20, 95%CI:1.79~2.70). We observed increasing excess ESCC risks with decreasing age at behavior initiation as well as with increasing duration and intensity of alcohol intake, which were particularly evident among current smokers. In contrast, neither smoking nor alcohol drinking was not associated with ESCC risk among females. In conclusion, alcohol drinking shows a monotonic dose-response relationship with ESCC risk among men, and this relationship is particularly evident among smokers.

  3. Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and risk of oral cavity cancer by subsite: results of a French population-based case-control study, the ICARE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoï, Loredana; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Cyr, Diane; Papadopoulos, Alexandra; Guida, Florence; Schmaus, Annie; Cénée, Sylvie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Carton, Matthieu; Lapôtre-Ledoux, Bénédicte; Delafosse, Patricia; Stücker, Isabelle; Luce, Danièle

    2013-05-01

    The objective was to examine the role of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking in the incidence of oral cavity cancer by subsite in France, a high-incidence area. We analysed detailed data on lifelong tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking from 772 oral cavity cancer cases and 3555 controls included in a population-based case-control study, the ICARE study. Tobacco smoking increased the risk of oral cavity cancer even for the smaller quantities and durations, whereas alcohol drinking increased this risk only in heavy drinkers who were also ever smokers. The combined effect of smoking and drinking was greater than multiplicative. The floor of the mouth was the subsite that was the most affected by the harmful effects of tobacco and alcohol, whereas the gums were less susceptible. The risk associated with tobacco and alcohol consumption did not differ between intraoral cavity and subsites usually included in the oropharynx (soft palate and base of the tongue). Population-attributable risks for oral cavity cancer were 78.6% for tobacco smoking, 7.3% for alcohol drinking and 80.7% for tobacco and/or alcohol consumption. These results indicate that regular oral check-ups should be targeted at smokers and heavy drinkers, and that prevention efforts should be focused on smoking cessation.

  4. Genetic variation of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene is associated with alcohol use disorders identification test scores and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchankova, Petra; Nilsson, Staffan; von der Pahlen, Bettina; Santtila, Pekka; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Johansson, Ada; Jern, Patrick; Engel, Jörgen A; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2016-03-01

    The multifaceted gut-brain peptide ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR-1a) are implicated in mechanisms regulating not only the energy balance but also the reward circuitry. In our pre-clinical models, we have shown that ghrelin increases whereas GHSR-1a antagonists decrease alcohol consumption and the motivation to consume alcohol in rodents. Moreover, ghrelin signaling is required for the rewarding properties of addictive drugs including alcohol and nicotine in rodents. Given the hereditary component underlying addictive behaviors and disorders, we sought to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the pre-proghrelin gene (GHRL) and GHSR-1a gene (GHSR) are associated with alcohol use, measured by the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) and smoking. Two SNPs located in GHRL, rs4684677 (Gln90Leu) and rs696217 (Leu72Met), and one in GHSR, rs2948694, were genotyped in a subset (n = 4161) of a Finnish population-based cohort, the Genetics of Sexuality and Aggression project. The effect of these SNPs on AUDIT scores and smoking was investigated using linear and logistic regressions, respectively. We found that the minor allele of the rs2948694 SNP was nominally associated with higher AUDIT scores (P = 0.0204, recessive model) and smoking (P = 0.0002, dominant model). Furthermore, post hoc analyses showed that this risk allele was also associated with increased likelihood of having high level of alcohol problems as determined by AUDIT scores ≥ 16 (P = 0.0043, recessive model). These convergent findings lend further support for the hypothesized involvement of ghrelin signaling in addictive disorders. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking in combination: A predictor of contralateral breast cancer risk in the WECARE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Julia A; Fan, Jing; Malone, Kathleen E; John, Esther M; Lynch, Charles F; Langballe, Rikke; Bernstein, Leslie; Shore, Roy E; Brooks, Jennifer D; Reiner, Anne S; Woods, Meghan; Liang, Xiaolin; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2017-09-01

    Alcohol drinking and, to a lesser extent, cigarette smoking are risk factors for a first primary breast cancer. Information on these behaviours at diagnosis may contribute to risk prediction of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and they are potentially modifiable. The WECARE Study is a large population-based case-control study of women with breast cancer where cases (N = 1,521) had asynchronous CBC and controls (N = 2,212), matched on survival time and other factors, had unilateral breast cancer (UBC). Using multivariable conditional logistic regression to estimate rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), we examined the risk of CBC in relation to drinking and smoking history at and following first diagnosis. We adjusted for treatment, disease characteristics and other factors. There was some evidence for an association between CBC risk and current drinking or current smoking at the time of first breast cancer diagnosis, but the increased risk occurred primarily among women exposed to both (RR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.24-2.11). CBC risk was also elevated in women who both smoked and drank alcohol after diagnosis (RR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.18-1.99). In the subset of women with detailed information on amount consumed, smoking an average of ≥10 cigarettes per day following diagnosis was also associated with increased CBC risk (RR = 1.50, 95% CI 1.08-2.08; p-trend = 0.03). Among women with a diagnosis of breast cancer, information on current drinking and smoking could contribute to the prediction of CBC risk. Women who both drink and smoke may represent a group who merit targeted lifestyle intervention to modify their risk of CBC. © 2017 UICC.

  6. Effect of metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 genotype on N-acetylaspartate levels and neurocognition in non-smoking, active alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (GRM3 gene on brain N-acetylaspartate (NAA concentrations and executive function (EF skills in non-smoking, active alcoholics, and evaluated associations between these variables. Methods SNPs (rs6465084, rs1468412, and rs2299225 in GRM3 were genotyped in 49 male, non-smoking, alcohol-dependent patients and 45 healthy control subjects using ligase detection reactions. NAA/creatine (Cr ratios in left prefrontal gray matter (GM and white matter (WM, left parietal GM, left parietal WM, and cerebellar vermis regions were measured by Proton 1 H Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. EF was measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST. Results Compared to controls, alcoholics had lower NAA/Cr ratios in prefrontal GM and WM regions and performed more poorly on all EF tests (P P P P P P  Conclusions Our results provide evidence that glutamate system dysfunction may play a role in the prefrontal functional abnormalities seen in alcohol dependence. It is possible that certain GRM3 SNP genotypes (the A/A genotype of rs6465084 and the T allele of rs1468412 may further lower NAA/Cr levels and EF skills in addition to the effect of alcohol.

  7. Pilot Cases of Combined Cognitive Processing Therapy and Smoking Cessation for Smokers With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedert, Eric A; Resick, Patricia A; McFall, Miles E; Dennis, Paul A; Olsen, Maren; Beckham, Jean C

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and smoking are often comorbid, and both problems are in need of improved access to evidence-based treatment. The combined approach could address two high-priority problems and increase patient access to both treatments, but research is needed to determine whether this is feasible and has promise for addressing both PTSD and smoking. We collected data from 15 test cases that received a treatment combining two evidence-based treatments: cognitive processing therapy-cognitive version (CPT-C) for PTSD and integrated care for smoking cessation (ICSC). We explored two combined treatment protocols including a brief (six-session) CPT-C with five follow-up in-person sessions focused on smoking cessation (n=9) and a full 12-session CPT-C protocol with ICSC (n=6). The combined interventions were feasible and acceptable to patients with PTSD making a quit attempt. Initial positive benefits of the combined treatments were observed. The six-session dose of CPT-C and smoking cessation resulted in 6-month bioverified smoking abstinence in two of nine participants, with clinically meaningful PTSD symptom reduction in three of nine participants. In the second cohort (full CPT-C and smoking treatment), both smoking and PTSD symptoms were improved, with three of six participants abstinent from smoking and four of six participants reporting clinically meaningful reduction in PTSD symptoms. Results suggested that individuals with PTSD who smoke are willing to engage in concurrent treatment of these problems and that combined treatment is feasible. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Youthful Smoking: Patterns and Relationships to Alcohol and Other Drug Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, John W.; Barnes, Grace M.

    1987-01-01

    Examined smoking patterns in 27,335 junior and senior high school students. Found smoking was more prevalent among girls than boys, and among whites more than members of minority groups. Marijuana use was the best single predictor of whether a student smoked or not. Heavy drinking was the best predictor of quantity smoked among smokers. (Author/KS)

  9. Smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and family history and the risks of acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina pectoris: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, A.H.; Boer, J.M.A.; Schouten, L.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Verschuren, M.W.W.; Gorgels, A.P.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies investigated the association between smoking, alcohol consumption, or physical activity and the risk of unstable angina pectoris (UAP), while the strength of these associations may differ compared to other coronary diseases such as acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

  10. The role of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption in the differentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma for the males in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Heavy and long-term smoking and drinking habit might pronouncedly increase the risk of triggering OSCC. Tobacco and alcohol consumption seems to play a role in the differentiation characteristics of the tumor.

  11. Impact of a smoking and alcohol intervention programme on lung and breast cancer incidence in Denmark: An example of dynamic modelling with Prevent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerjomataram, Isabelle; de Vries, Esther; Engholm, Gerda

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Among the known risk factors, smoking is clearly related to the incidence of lung cancer and alcohol consumption is to breast cancer. In this manuscript we modelled the potential benefits of reductions in smoking or alcohol prevalence for the burden of these cancers. METHOD: We used...... Prevent v.3.01 to assess the changes in incidence as a result of risk factor changes. Incidence of lung and breast cancer until 2050 was predicted under two scenarios: ideal (total elimination of smoking and reduction of alcohol intake to maximum 1units/d for women) and optimistic (decreasing prevalence...... of risk factors because of a 10% increase in cigarette and alcohol beverage price, repeated every 5years). Danish data from the household surveys, cancer registration and Eurostat were used. RESULTS: Up to 49% less new lung cancer cases can be expected in 2050 if smoking were to be completely eliminated...

  12. Maternal Gestational Smoking, Diabetes, Alcohol Drinking, Pre-Pregnancy Obesity and the Risk of Cryptorchidism: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies: e0119006

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin Zhang; Xing-Huan Wang; Xin-Min Zheng; Tong-Zu Liu; Wei-Bin Zhang; Hang Zheng; Mi-Feng Chen

    2015-01-01

      Background Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity are thought to increase the risk of cryptorchidism in newborn males, but the evidence is inconsistent...

  13. Social capital in relation to alcohol consumption, smoking, and illicit drug use among adolescents: a cross-sectional study in Sweden

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Åslund, Cecilia; Nilsson, Kent W

    2013-01-01

    Social capital has lately received much attention in public health research. However, few studies have examined the influence of social capital on alcohol consumption, smoking and drug use which have strong influence on public health...

  14. Caffeine drinking, cigarette smoking, and dopaminergic replacement therapy dose in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-López, Carmen; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Corona, Teresa

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effect of smoking and caffeine intake in the dosage of dopaminergic replacement therapy. Patients were recruited from the movement disorders clinic of the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City. An interviewer-administered structured questionnaire was given to all subjects regarding their smoking and caffeine drinking habits. Dopaminergic replacement therapy information was collected and levodopa, dopamine agonists, and levodopa equivalent daily doses were calculated. 146 Parkinson's disease patients (50 % female) were included. All patients were on antiparkinsonian treatment, with a mean levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD) of 550.2 ± 408. Patients were stratified according to smoking and caffeine drinking status. 104 (71.2 %) of the patients were "never smokers", 33 (22.6 %) were "former smokers" and 9 (6.2 %) were "current smokers". 40 (27.4 %) patients reported no history of caffeine intake, 36 (24.7 %) were former consumers and 70 (47.9 %) were current caffeine drinkers. No association between LEDD and smoking or caffeine intake was found. A weak positive correlation (r = 0.22, p < 0.04) was found between the daily dose of pramipexole and the daily intake of caffeine. LEDD, levodopa daily dose and dopamine agonist daily dose were not related to smoking or caffeine intake status. We found a weak correlation between caffeine daily intake and pramipexole dose. Further prospective exploration is needed to address the interaction of concomitant A2A antagonism induced by caffeine intake and dopaminergic replacement therapy.

  15. Effect of smoking cessation on non-surgical periodontal therapy: Results after 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francisca Rosa, Ecinele; Corraini, Priscila; Inoue, Gislene

    2014-01-01

    extended, resulting in 116 eligible among the 286 screened subjects. They received NSPT and concurrent smoking cessation interventions. Periodontal maintenance was performed every three months. A calibrated examined, blinded to smoking status, performed full-mouth periodontal examination in six sites per......AIM: The aim of this 24-month prospective study was to assess the effect of smoking cessation on non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) in adult subjects with chronic periodontitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Relative to a previous 12-month follow-up study, recruitment and follow-up period were...... tooth at baseline, 3, 12 and 24 months of follow-up. Expired air carbon monoxide concentration measurements and interviews were performed to gather demographic and behavioral information. RESULTS: From the 116 enrolled subjects, 61 remained up to 24 months of follow-up. Of these, 18 quit smoking (Q), 32...

  16. Outpatient Long-term Intensive Therapy for Alcoholics (OLITA): a successful biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, Henning; Stawicki, Sabina; Hoehe, Margret R.; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a frequent, chronic, relapsing, and incurable disease with enormous societal costs. Thus, alcoholism therapy and research into its outcome are of major importance for public health. The present article will: (i) give a brief overview of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment outcomes of alcohol dependence; (ii) introduce the basic principles of outpatient long-term therapy of alcohol-dependent patients; and (iii) discuss in detail process-outcome research on Outpatient Long-term intensive Therapy for Alcoholics (OLITA). This successful biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of alcoholisms shows a 9-year abstinence rate of over 50%, a re-employment rate of 60%, and a dramatic recovery from comorbid depression, anxiety disorders, and physical sequelae. The outcome data are empirically based on treatment processes that have proven high predictive validity and give concrete information about where to focus the therapeutic efforts. Thus, process-outcome research on OLITA can serve for the development of new therapeutic guidelines on adapting individual relapse prevention strategies. PMID:18286800

  17. Maternal Gestational Smoking, Diabetes, Alcohol Drinking, Pre-Pregnancy Obesity and the Risk of Cryptorchidism: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Zhang; Xing-Huan Wang; Xin-Min Zheng; Tong-Zu Liu; Wei-Bin Zhang; Hang Zheng; Mi-Feng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity are thought to increase the risk of cryptorchidism in newborn males, but the evidence is inconsistent. Method We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on the association between maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism. Articles were retrieved by searching PubMed and ScienceDirect, and the meta-analysis wa...

  18. Estrogen receptor activation by tobacco smoke condensate in hormonal therapy-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Toshifumi; Shinagawa, Yuri; Asari, Yosuke; Suzuki, Kanae; Takanobu, Junko; Gohno, Tatsuyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between tobacco smoke and breast cancer incidence has been studied for many years, but the effect of smoking on hormonal therapy has not been previously reported. We investigated the effect of smoking on hormonal therapy by performing in vitro experiments. We first prepared tobacco smoke condensate (TSC) and examined its effect on estrogen receptor (ER) activity. The ER activity was analyzed using MCF-7-E10 cells into which the estrogen-responsive element (ERE)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene had been stably introduced (GFP assay) and performing an ERE-luciferase assay. TSC significantly activated ERs, and upregulated its endogenous target genes. This activation was inhibited by fulvestrant but more weakly by tamoxifen. These results suggest that the activation mechanism may be different from that for estrogen. Furthermore, using E10 estrogen depletion-resistant cells (EDR cells) established as a hormonal therapy-resistant model showing estrogen-independent ER activity, ER activation and induction of ER target genes were significantly higher following TSC treatment than by estradiol (E2). These responses were much higher than those of the parental E10 cells. In addition, the phosphorylation status of signaling factors (ERK1/2, Akt) and ER in the E10-EDR cells treated with TSC increased. The gene expression profile induced by estrogenic effects of TSC was characterized by microarray analysis. The findings suggested that TSC activates ER by both ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Although TSC constituents will be metabolized in vivo, breast cancer tissues might be exposed for a long period along with hormonal therapy. Tobacco smoke may have a possibility to interfere with hormonal therapy for breast cancer, which may have important implications for the management of therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. To what degree is the association between educational inequality and laryngeal cancer explained by smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Irene; Kroll, Lars Eric; Dietz, Andreas; Becher, Heiko; Ramroth, Heribert

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the extent to which the association between socioeconomic status and laryngeal cancer among males is mediated by smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational exposure. We used Karlson et al's decomposition method for logit models, which returns the percentage of change in odds ratios (OR) due to confounding. This population-based, case-control study on laryngeal cancer was conducted in Germany in 1998-2000 and included 208 male cases and 702 controls. Information on occupational history, smoking, alcohol consumption, and education was collected through face-to-face interviews. Jobs coded according to ISCO-68 were linked to a recently developed job-classification index covering physical and psychosocial dimensions. A sub-index focused on jobs involving potentially carcinogenic agents (CAI) for the upper-aero digestive tract. When adjusted for smoking and alcohol consumption, higher OR were found for lower education. This OR decreased after further adjustment using the overall job index [2.9, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.4-6.2], similar to the OR using the sub-index CAI (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.8). Applying the Karlson et al method, 25.4% (95% CI 22.6-28.2%) of the reduction in these OR was due to occupational exposure (CAI), while smoking and alcohol consumption contributed to around 26.1% (95% CI 23.2-28.9%) and 2.7% (95% CI 1.7-3.8%), respectively. Occupational aspects, in particular the exposure to carcinogenic agents, explain a large portion of the association between low educational level and laryngeal cancer risk among males. Occupational effects are now easier to quantify using this recently developed and easily applicable index.

  20. Smoking and alcohol and subsequent risk of myelodysplastic syndromes in Japan: the Japan Public Health Centre-based Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugai, Tomotaka; Matsuo, Keitaro; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-09-01

    Smoking and alcohol are important modifiable risk factors for human cancers. However, few epidemiological studies have investigated their association with the risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here, we investigated the association of smoking and alcohol consumption and the risk of MDS in a large-scale population-based cohort study in Japan. We included 95 510 Japanese subjects (45 451 men and 50 059 women; age 40-69 years at baseline) and identified 70 MDS cases (50 men and 20 women) during 18·3 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using a Cox regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Smoking was marginally associated with an increased risk of MDS among men, with a HR for current smokers relative to never smokers of 2·11 (95% CI: 0·91-4·89). In contrast, alcohol consumption was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in the risk of MDS among men (nondrinkers: reference, occasional drinkers: HR = 0·48, 0·16-1·41; 0-299 g/week: HR = 0·37, 0·19-0·73; ≥300 g/week: HR = 0·49, 0·22-1·08, P for trend = 0·010). This study showed that alcohol has a significant protective effect on the risk of MDS. In addition, this study might indicate that smoking increases the risk of MDS among Japanese population, as it does in Western populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and the risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Maasland, D.H.E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kremer, S.H.A.; Goldbohm, R A; Schouten, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prospective data on alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes, i.e. oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), are limited. We investigated these associations within the second largest prospective study on this topic so far, the Netherlands Cohort Study. Methods: 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors in 1986. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 395 HNC (1...

  2. Alcohol use disorder with and without stimulant use: brain morphometry and its associations with cigarette smoking, cognition, and inhibitory control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Pennington

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effects of polysubstance use and cigarette smoking on brain morphometry. This study examined neocortical brain morphometric differences between abstinent polysubstance dependent and alcohol-only dependent treatment seekers (ALC as well as light drinking controls (CON, the associations of cigarette smoking in these polysubstance users (PSU, and morphometric relationships to cognition and inhibitory control.All participants completed extensive neuropsychological assessments and 4 Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging. PSU and ALC were abstinent for one month at the time of study. Parcellated morphological data (volume, surface area, thickness were obtained with FreeSurfer methodology for the following bilateral components: dorso-prefrontal cortex (DPFC, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, and insula. Regional group differences were examined and structural data correlated with domains of cognition and inhibitory control.PSU had significantly smaller left OFC volume and surface area and trends to smaller right DPFC volume and surface area compared to CON; PSU did not differ significantly from ALC on these measures. PSU, however, had significantly thinner right ACC than ALC. Smoking PSU had significantly larger right OFC surface area than non-smoking PSU. No significant relationships between morphometry and quantity/frequency of substance use, alcohol use, or age of onset of heavy drinking were observed. PSU exhibited distinct relationships between brain structure and processing speed, cognitive efficiency, working memory and inhibitory control that were not observed in ALC or CON.Polysubstance users have unique morphometric abnormalities and structure-function relationships when compared to individuals dependent only on alcohol and light drinking controls. Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with structural brain irregularities in polysubstance users. Further elucidation of these distinctive

  3. Alcohol use disorder with and without stimulant use: brain morphometry and its associations with cigarette smoking, cognition, and inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, David L; Durazzo, Timothy C; Schmidt, Thomas P; Abé, Christoph; Mon, Anderson; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of polysubstance use and cigarette smoking on brain morphometry. This study examined neocortical brain morphometric differences between abstinent polysubstance dependent and alcohol-only dependent treatment seekers (ALC) as well as light drinking controls (CON), the associations of cigarette smoking in these polysubstance users (PSU), and morphometric relationships to cognition and inhibitory control. All participants completed extensive neuropsychological assessments and 4 Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging. PSU and ALC were abstinent for one month at the time of study. Parcellated morphological data (volume, surface area, thickness) were obtained with FreeSurfer methodology for the following bilateral components: dorso-prefrontal cortex (DPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and insula. Regional group differences were examined and structural data correlated with domains of cognition and inhibitory control. PSU had significantly smaller left OFC volume and surface area and trends to smaller right DPFC volume and surface area compared to CON; PSU did not differ significantly from ALC on these measures. PSU, however, had significantly thinner right ACC than ALC. Smoking PSU had significantly larger right OFC surface area than non-smoking PSU. No significant relationships between morphometry and quantity/frequency of substance use, alcohol use, or age of onset of heavy drinking were observed. PSU exhibited distinct relationships between brain structure and processing speed, cognitive efficiency, working memory and inhibitory control that were not observed in ALC or CON. Polysubstance users have unique morphometric abnormalities and structure-function relationships when compared to individuals dependent only on alcohol and light drinking controls. Chronic cigarette smoking is associated with structural brain irregularities in polysubstance users. Further elucidation of these distinctive

  4. Hookah tobacco smoking in a large urban sample of adult cigarette smokers: Links with alcohol and poly-tobacco use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Amy M; Ehlke, Sarah J; Cobb, Caroline O; Soule, Eric K

    2017-05-01

    Hookah tobacco smoking (HTS) has been increasing, particularly among young adults and has similar health effects compared to cigarette smoking. The link between HTS and poly-tobacco use is well documented, but fewer show an association between HTS and alcohol use. It is essential to identify factors that increase the risk for or addictiveness and consequences of HTS, given its growing prevalence. This study examined whether the association between HTS and poly-tobacco use differed as a function of age and alcohol consumption within in a sample of 1223 adult cigarette smokers. Approximately 20% of participants reported HTS. Compared to non-users, hookah users were more likely to be male, highly educated, and to report drug and alcohol use, binge drinking, and poly-tobacco use but were less likely to be heavy smokers (≥10 cigarettes per day). Regression analyses predicting number of tobacco products used (excluding cigarettes and HTS) indicated a three-way interaction of HTS, frequency of alcohol use, and age such that the association between HTS and number of tobacco products used was strongest for younger respondents who consumed alcohol more frequently. As observed in previous studies, alcohol is an important risk factor in the relationship between HTS and poly-tobacco use, particularly among younger cigarette smokers. The links between alcohol, HTS, and poly-tobacco use should be considered when developing HTS education and prevention materials directed toward younger cigarette smokers. Findings provide information relevant to FDA's interest in the addiction potential of HTS and its link to poly-tobacco use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Socio-demographic characteristics associated with cigarettes smoking, drug abuse and alcohol drinking among male medical university students in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Farzad; Karami Matin, Behzad; Ahmadpanah, Mohammad; Ataee, Mari; Ahmadi Jouybari, Touraj; Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Mirzaei Alavijeh, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is one of the most complicated social problems. Understanding socio-demographic characteristics of those who abuse substances could help deal with this problem more efficiently. The main objective of this study was to determine socio-demographic characteristics associated with alcohol drinking, cigarettes smoking and drug abuse among a sample of male medical university students in Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 among 425 male medical college students randomly selected with the proportional to size among different faculties in Isfahan and Kermanshah medical universities in Iran. A self-report written questionnaire was applied to collect data. Data were analyzed by the SPSS-20. Mean age of the respondents was 19.9 yr (ranging from 18 to 22 yr). About 19.4%, 3.9%, and 10.1% of the respondents had history of cigarette smoking, drug use, and alcohol drinking during the past three months, respectively. Logistic regression showed that mother's educational level, living place, economic status, and parents' divorce were the most influential predictive factors on substance abuse. Considering the high prevalence of substance abuse (especially smoking and alcohol drinking), it seems essential to design educational interventions to prevent substance abuse, paying attention to predictive factors mentioned above, among college students.

  6. Effects of alcohol drinking and smoking on pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mortality: A retrospective cohort study consisting of 1783 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuisheng; Wang, Chengfeng; Huang, Huang; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Ma, Jie; Yuan, Wei; Sun, Yuemin; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Haibo; Zhao, Yajie; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Yawei; Chen, Yingtai

    2017-08-29

    The effects of alcohol drinking and smoking on pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) mortality are contradictory. Individuals who were diagnosed as PDAC and hospitalized at the China National Cancer Center between January 1999 and January 2016 were identified and included in the study. Ultimately, 1783 consecutive patients were included in the study. Patients were categorized as never, ex-drinkers/smokers or current drinkers/smokers. Hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause mortality and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Compared with never drinkers, the HRs were 1.25 for ever drinkers, 1.24 for current drinkers, and 1.33 for ex-drinkers (trend P = 0.031). Heavy drinking and smoking period of 30 or more years were positive prognostic factors for PDAC. For different smoking and alcohol drinking status, only subjects who are both current smokers and current drinkers (HR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.03-2.05) were associated with reduced survival after PDAC compared to those who were never smokers and never drinkers. Patients who are alcohol drinkers and long-term smokers before diagnosis have a significantly higher risk of PDAC mortality. Compared to those who neither smoker nor drink, only patients who both smokers and drinkers were associated with reduced survival from PDAC.

  7. The salivary β-HEX A% index as an excellent marker of periodontitis in smoking alcohol-dependent persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Zalewska, Anna; Konarzewska, Beata; Szulc, Agata; Wojtulewska-Supron, Aleksandra; Kępka, Alina; Knaś, Małgorzata; Ładny, Jerzy Robert; Milewski, Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Severe periodontitis leading to tooth loss is found in 5-15% of most populations worldwide. The applicability of salivary β -hexosaminidase (β-HEX A%, percentage of β-HEX A isoenzyme to total β-HEX) and β-HEX B% (β-HEX B/β-HEX) indexes was investigated as a possible marker of periodontitis. Thirty three alcohol-dependent smokers (AS) and 32 healthy controls (C) were enrolled in the study. The activity of β-HEX was measured spectrophotometrically. β-HEX A% was significantly higher and β-HEX B% was lower in AS than in C group. We found a significant correlation between β-HEX A% and gingival index (GI) and an inverse correlation between β-HEX A% and salivary flow (SF), in all groups. Salivary β-HEX A% index in smoking alcoholics at 0.23 had excellent sensitivity (96%) and specificity (91%); the AUC for β-HEX A% was high (0.937). There were no correlations between amount/duration-time of alcohol drinking/smoking and β-HEX A% or β-HEX B%. We found significant correlations between the time period of denture wearing and GI, papilla bleeding index (PBI), and decayed missing filled teeth index (DMFT) and between GI and the amount of smoked cigarettes per day. Bad periodontal state was most likely due to the nicotine dependence. Salivary β-HEX A% is a promising excellent marker for the diagnosis of periodontitis.

  8. Lifestyle intervention in general practice for physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet in elderly: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrdoljak, Davorka; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Puljak, Livia; Lalić, Dragica Ivezić; Kranjčević, Ksenija; Vučak, Jasna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of programmed and intensified intervention on lifestyle changes, including physical activity, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and diet, in patients aged ≥ 65 with the usual care of general practitioners (GP). In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, 738 patients aged ≥ 65 were randomly assigned to receive intensified intervention (N = 371) or usual care (N = 367) of a GP for lifestyle changes, with 18-month follow-up. The main outcome measures were physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet. The study was conducted in 59 general practices in Croatia between May 2008 and May 2010. The patients' mean age was 72.3 ± 5.2 years. Significant diet correction was achieved after 18-month follow-up in the intervention group, comparing to controls. More patients followed strictly Mediterranean diet and consumed healthy foods more frequently. There was no significant difference between the groups in physical activity, tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption or diet after the intervention. In conclusion, an 18-month intensified GP's intervention had limited effect on lifestyle habits. GP intervention managed to change dietary habits in elderly population, which is encouraging since elderly population is very resistant regarding lifestyle habit changes. Clinical trial registration number. ISRCTN31857696. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Alcohol use disorders and antiretroviral therapy among prisoners in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Michael; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Vázquez, Mariana; Altice, Frederick L

    2013-01-01

    While Argentina has significantly improved access to HIV care and antiretroviral therapy (ART) for both the general population and prisoners, the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among HIV-infected prisoners and their relationship to accessing ART in Argentina is currently unknown. This study aims to characterize the substance abuse patterns of HIV-infected prisoners in Argentina and to assess the independent correlates of receipt of pre-incarceration ART. An anonymous, cross-sectional survey of 100 HIV-infected federal prisoners was conducted in the Buenos Aires municipality from July-December 2010. AUDs were assessed using the AUDIT scale. A majority (63 per cent) of participants met criteria for AUDs, 45 per cent of subjects were diagnosed with HIV in prison and one-quarter had initiated ART during the current incarceration. In addition, over one-third (35 per cent) of participants did not receive ART during the pre-incarceration period despite receiving it upon incarceration. This correlated significantly with the presence of having an AUD (AOR 0.20, 95 per cent CI 0.06-0.74, p = 0.016). AUDs are prevalent among HIV-infected prisoners in Argentina and are significantly related to negative secondary HIV prevention and treatment outcomes. While Argentina has provided an exemplary model of HIV-related health care reform within its prisons, future efforts to provide screening and treatment for AUDs are needed to improve the health of the nation’s incarcerated population. This paper is the first to describe pre-incarceration drug and alcohol use disorders and issues related to access to ART among prisoners in Argentina.

  10. Efficacy of an Internet and SMS-based integrated smoking cessation and alcohol intervention for smoking cessation in young people: study protocol of a two-arm cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Severin; Castro, Raquel Paz; Filler, Andreas; Kowatsch, Tobias; Fleisch, Elgar; Schaub, Michael P

    2014-11-05

    Tobacco smoking prevalence continues to be high, particularly among adolescents and young adults with lower educational levels, and is therefore a serious public health problem. Tobacco smoking and problem drinking often co-occur and relapses after successful smoking cessation are often associated with alcohol use. This study aims at testing the efficacy of an integrated smoking cessation and alcohol intervention by comparing it to a smoking cessation only intervention for young people, delivered via the Internet and mobile phone. A two-arm cluster-randomised controlled trial with one follow-up assessment after 6 months will be conducted. Participants in the integrated intervention group will: (1) receive individually tailored web-based feedback on their drinking behaviour based on age and gender norms, (2) receive individually tailored mobile phone text messages to promote drinking within low-risk limits over a 3-month period, (3) receive individually tailored mobile phone text messages to support smoking cessation for 3 months, and (4) be offered the option of registering for a more intensive program that provides strategies for smoking cessation centred around a self-defined quit date. Participants in the smoking cessation only intervention group will only receive components (3) and (4). Study participants will be 1350 students who smoke tobacco daily/occasionally, from vocational schools in Switzerland. Main outcome criteria are 7-day point prevalence smoking abstinence and cigarette consumption assessed at the 6-month follow up. This is the first study testing a fully automated intervention for smoking cessation that simultaneously addresses alcohol use and interrelations between tobacco and alcohol use. The integrated intervention can be easily implemented in various settings and could be used with large groups of young people in a cost-effective way. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN02427446 (date of registration: 08th September, 2014).

  11. Alcohol use, antiretroviral therapy adherence, and preferences regarding an alcohol-focused adherence intervention in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekwaletswe CT

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Connie T Kekwaletswe,1 Neo K Morojele1,21Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South AfricaBackground: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the association between alcohol and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and the perceived appropriateness and acceptability of elements of an adherence counseling program with a focus on alcohol-related ART nonadherence among a sample of ART recipients in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinics in Tshwane, South Africa.Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with purposive sampling. The sample comprised 304 male and female ART recipients at two President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief-supported HIV clinics. Using an interview schedule, we assessed patients' alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, other drug use, level of adherence to ART, and reasons for missing ART doses (AIDS Clinical Trials Group adherence instrument. Additionally, patients’ views were solicited on: the likely effectiveness of potential facilitators; the preferred quantity, duration, format, and setting of the sessions; the usefulness of having family members/friends attend sessions along with the patient; and potential skill sets to be imparted.Results: About half of the male drinkers’ and three quarters of the female drinkers’ Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores were suggestive of hazardous or harmful drinking. Average self-reported ART adherence was 89.7%. There was a significant association between level of alcohol use and degree of ART adherence. Overall, participants perceived two clinic-based sessions, each of one hour’s duration, in a group format, and facilitated by a peer or adherence counselor, as most appropriate and acceptable. Participants also had a favorable attitude towards family and friends accompanying them to the sessions. They also favored an

  12. [Alcohol consumption, smoking and drug abuse among teenagers - a prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gislason, T; Yngvadottir, A; Benediktsdottir, B

    1994-12-01

    Many of the social and health problems of teenagers today are related to the use of intoxicating drugs. In 1990 the use of Lions Quest began in primary schools in Iceland. With Lions Quest the young are taught life skills in order to be helped to live a healthy life without tobacco, alcohol or other intoxicating drugs. The aim of this study, therefore, was to try to determine what factors influence teenage use of intoxicants and whether the attitudes and drug consumption of those teenagers who had participated in Lions Quest were any different from those who had not. The research is a continuation of a comparative study where students were administered questionnaires to ascertain their attitudes toward life and toward the use of intoxicating substances. In 1989 the survey covered 566 students 12-13 years of age and three years later in 1992 reached 500 of the former respondents when they were 15-16 years old. "The schools were chosen such that the study reflected the attitudes of students both in sparsely and in densely settled areas. The study showed that of the 15-16 year olds 18.6% smoked daily, 44.4% had felt the effects of alcohol four times or more, and 5% had a history of repeated drug abuse (cannabis, sniffing solvents, etc.) The use of various intoxicating substances is strongly correlated, a fact that supports the hypothesis that attitudes toward life and conditions that lead to the use of one type of drug also support the use of other drugs. Those teenagers who used drugs had a great deal in common as regards attitudes toward life and the pattern of family relations. They were not as close to their families as were teenagers who did not use drugs, were seldom home in the evening and had few interests in common with their parents. The parents were more often divorced, smoking in the home was more common and alcohol consumption had more frequently caused family problems. These teenagers were more easily influenced, were more dependent on their friends, had

  13. Risk of second primary cancer associated with pre-diagnostic smoking, alcohol, and obesity in women with keratinocyte carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Min; Li, Tricia; Wu, Shaowei; Li, Wen-Qing; Qureshi, Abrar A; Stampfer, Meir; Cho, Eunyoung

    2017-04-01

    Keratinocyte carcinoma (KC), which includes basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous-cell cancer (SCC), has been associated with an increased risk of second primary cancers (SPCs), although the reason for this increase is unknown. We assessed the effects of smoking, alcohol, and obesity prior to the diagnosis of KC on the development of SPCs, as these are well-established risk factors for multiple cancers and may also contribute to the increased risk of SPCs among those with KC. A total of 15,628 women with self-reported KC were identified in the Nurses' Health Study. Incident SPCs were assessed throughout the follow-up until June 2012. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of SPC associated with pre-diagnostic smoking, alcohol and body mass index (BMI). We also compared these risk estimates to those for first cancers in all cohort participants. During 193,695 person-years of follow-up, we recorded 2839 SPC cases. Compared with never smokers, current smokers had a significantly elevated risk for SPC overall and specifically for lung, colorectal, and bladder cancers. We also found a positive association between higher BMI and risk for SPC overall as well as for endometrial and bladder SPCs. Women with KC who consumed alcohol ≥30g/day had a marginally higher risk of SPC compared to non-drinkers. The associations between incident SPC risk among KC cases and smoking, alcohol, and obesity appeared similar to the associations between these risk factors and the incident first primary cancers in the whole cohort. Only in the heavy smoking (≥25 cigarettes/day) category was the HR for SPC after KC (2.34; 95% CI 1.98-2.76) slightly higher than that for the first cancer in the overall cohort (HR 1.86; 95% CI 1.75-1.98, Pheterogeneity=0.01). In conclusion, pre-diagnostic smoking, alcohol and obesity prior to KC diagnosis were associated with risk of SPCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The association of alcohol consumption and smoking with quality of life, disability and disease activity in an international sample of people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Tracey J; Hadgkiss, Emily J; Jelinek, George A; Pereira, Naresh G; Marck, Claudia H; van der Meer, Dania M

    2014-01-15

    Modifiable lifestyle factors represent important targets for preventive intervention in multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to explore the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with major MS morbidity outcomes. We surveyed a large, international sample of people with MS recruited via Web 2.0 platforms about type of MS, relapse rates, disability, disease activity, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), alcohol use and smoking. Of 2469 respondents with confirmed MS, 11.7% were current and 40.3% former smokers. Most (61.5%) consumed less than 15 g alcohol weekly; few (0.8%) drank large amounts. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with increased HRQOL; and after controlling for age and gender, was associated with lower odds of significant disability (41% decrease). After controlling for age, gender and alcohol use, smokers had an increased likelihood of major mobility requirements by 90% compared to never smokers. There was no association between alcohol or smoking and relapse rate or disease activity after controlling for age and gender, however among former smokers, a longer duration of smoking cessation was associated with reduced disease activity. Smokers had significantly lower HRQOL than never smokers and former smokers; heavier smoking was associated with greater decreases in HRQOL. This cross-sectional study supports previous research showing a link between morbidity indicators in MS and alcohol use and smoking. While people with MS should be advised of the potential risks of smoking, any risks and benefits of alcohol consumption require validation using a prospective cohort of people with MS. © 2013.

  15. Effects of state cigarette excise taxes and smoke-free air policies on state per capita alcohol consumption in the U.S., 1980–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Melissa J.; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A.; Plunk, Andrew D.; Bierut, Laura J.; Grucza, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing state cigarette excise taxes and strengthening smoke-free air laws are known to reduce smoking prevalence. Some studies suggest that such policies may also reduce alcohol use, but results for cigarette taxes have been mixed and associations with smoke-free air policies have been limited to some demographic subgroups. To shed further light on the potential secondary effects of tobacco control policy, we examined whether increases in cigarette taxes and strengthening of smoke-free air laws were associated with reductions of per capita alcohol consumption and whether any reductions were specific to certain beverage types. Methods State per capita alcohol consumption from 1980–2009 was modeled as a function of state price per pack of cigarettes and smoke-free air policy scores while controlling for secular trends and salient state covariates. Both policy measures also accounted for local policies. Total alcohol, beer, wine, and spirits consumption per capita were modeled separately. For each type of beverage, we used a nested models approach to determine whether the two policies together were associated with reduced consumption. Results For total alcohol consumption, and for beer or spirits (but not wine), one or both tobacco policies were associated with reductions in consumption. A one percent increase in cigarette price per pack was associated with a 0.083% decrease in per capita total alcohol consumption (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.0002% to 0.166%, p=.0495), and a one point increase in SFA policy score, measured on a 6-point scale, was associated with a 1.1% decrease in per capita total alcohol consumption (95% CI 0.4% to 1.7%, p=.001; pconsumption). Conclusions The public health benefits of increasing cigarette taxes and smoke-free policies may go beyond the reduction of smoking and extend to alcohol consumption, specifically beer and spirits. PMID:25257814

  16. Effect of smoking on the response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassrawin, N A

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the influence of smoking on the response of nonsurical periodontal treatment, at prospective study was carried out on 65 smokers and 68 nonsmoker controls. Both groups were examined periodontally for plaque, bleeding and loss of attachment, before and after a course of treatment with oral hygiene instructions, scaling, root planning periodontal and polishing. Before treatment, mean bleeding index score was significantly higher in smokers than nonsmokers but scores were similar after treatment. Plaque index scores were similar in both groups before and after treatment. Loss of attachment score was significantly higher in smokers before treatment and remained higher after treatment. Smokers showed more signs of periodontal disease, and treatment did not reverse this fully.

  17. Effectiveness of smoking cessation therapies: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimoulas Popey

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking remains the leading preventable cause of premature deaths. Several pharmacological interventions now exist to aid smokers in cessation. These include Nicotine Replacement Therapy [NRT], bupropion, and varenicline. We aimed to assess their relative efficacy in smoking cessation by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods We searched 10 electronic medical databases (inception to Sept. 2006 and bibliographies of published reviews. We selected randomized controlled trials [RCTs] evaluating interventions for smoking cessation at 1 year, through chemical confirmation. Our primary endpoint was smoking cessation at 1 year. Secondary endpoints included short-term smoking cessation (~3 months and adverse events. We conducted random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression. We compared treatment effects across interventions using head-to-head trials and when these did not exist, we calculated indirect comparisons. Results We identified 70 trials of NRT versus control at 1 year, Odds Ratio [OR] 1.71, 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.55–1.88, P = Varenicline was superior to placebo at 1 year (4 RCTs, OR 2.96, 95% CI, 2.12–4.12, P = Conclusion NRT, bupropion and varenicline all provide therapeutic effects in assisting with smoking cessation. Direct and indirect comparisons identify a hierarchy of effectiveness.

  18. Effect of smoking cessation on non-surgical periodontal therapy: results after 24 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ecinele Francisca; Corraini, Priscila; Inoue, Gislene; Gomes, Elaine Fueta; Guglielmetti, Mariana Rocha; Sanda, Sheila Regina; Lotufo, João Paulo Becker; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this 24-month prospective study was to assess the effect of smoking cessation on non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) in adult subjects with chronic periodontitis. Relative to a previous 12-month follow-up study, recruitment and follow-up period were extended, resulting in 116 eligible among the 286 screened subjects. They received NSPT and concurrent smoking cessation interventions. Periodontal maintenance was performed every 3 months. A calibrated examiner, blinded to smoking status, performed full-mouth periodontal examination in six sites per tooth at baseline, 3, 12 and 24 months of follow-up. Expired air carbon monoxide concentration measurements and interviews were performed to gather demographic and behavioural information. From the 116 enrolled subjects, 61 remained up to 24 months of follow-up. Of these, 18 quit smoking (Q), 32 continued smoking (NQ) and 11 oscillated (O) at 24 months of follow-up. Thereby, Q showed significantly higher mean CAL gain in diseased sites and higher reduction in the proportion of sites with CAL ≥ 3 mm, when compared to NQ. In addition, Q presented significantly higher mean probing depth reduction relative to NQ(p ≤ 0.05). Smoking cessation promoted additional benefits on NSPT in chronic periodontitis subjects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Validation of smoking-related virtual environments for cue exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Pericot-Valverde, Irene; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Ferrer-García, Marta; Secades-Villa, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Craving is considered one of the main factors responsible for relapse after smoking cessation. Cue exposure therapy (CET) consists of controlled and repeated exposure to drug-related stimuli in order to extinguish associated responses. The main objective of this study was to assess the validity of 7 virtual reality environments for producing craving in smokers that can be used within the CET paradigm. Forty-six smokers and 44 never-smokers were exposed to 7 complex virtual environments with smoking-related cues that reproduce typical situations in which people smoke, and to a neutral virtual environment without smoking cues. Self-reported subjective craving and psychophysiological measures were recorded during the exposure. All virtual environments with smoking-related cues were able to generate subjective craving in smokers, while no increase was observed for the neutral environment. The most sensitive psychophysiological variable to craving increases was heart rate. The findings provide evidence of the utility of virtual reality for simulating real situations capable of eliciting craving. We also discuss how CET for smoking cessation can be improved through these virtual tools. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CHRNA4 rs1044396 is associated with smoking cessation in varenicline therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Rocha Santos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The large individual variability in response to drugs for smoking cessation suggests that specific treatments can be more effective in particular subgroups of smokers. In the context of personalized medicine, the main aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the CHRNA4 and CHRNB2 polymorphisms are associated with response to smoking cessation therapies in patients from a smoker assistance program. This cohort study enrolled 483 smoking patients who received behavioral counseling and drug treatment (varenicline, bupropion and/or nicotine replacement therapy. Smoking cessation success was considered for patients who completed 6 months of continuous abstinence. Fagerström test for nicotine dependence (FTND and Issa situational smoking scores were analyzed for nicotine dependence. The CHRNA4 (rs1044396 and rs2236196 and CHRNB2 (rs2072660 and rs2072661 polymorphisms were genotyped by high resolution melting analysis.Patients with rs1044396 CC genotype had lower success rate in treatment with varenicline (29.5% compared with carriers of CT or TT genotypes (50.9% (p=0.007, n=167. The CT or TT genotypes were associated with higher odds ratio for success (OR=1.67, 95%CI=1.10-2.53, p=0.02, in a multivariate model. We did not observe significant differences in the FTND and Issa scores according to the studied polymorphisms. In conclusion, the CHRNA4 rs1044396 is associated with smoking cessation in individuals on varenicline therapy. We suggest that this polymorphism influences the varenicline response, but replications of this finding are needed.

  1. Esophageal cancer risk by type of alcohol drinking and smoking: a case-control study in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porta Miquel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking on esophageal cancer (EC has never been explored in Spain where black tobacco and wine consumptions are quite prevalent. We estimated the independent effect of different alcoholic beverages and type of tobacco smoking on the risk of EC and its main histological cell type (squamous cell carcinoma in a hospital-based case-control study in a Mediterranean area of Spain. Methods We only included incident cases with histologically confirmed EC (n = 202. Controls were frequency-matched to cases by age, sex and province (n = 455. Information on risk factors was elicited by trained interviewers using structured questionnaires. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Results Alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking were strong and independent risk factors for esophageal cancer. Alcohol was a potent risk factor with a clear dose-response relationship, particularly for esophageal squamous-cell cancer. Compared to never-drinkers, the risk for heaviest drinkers (≥ 75 g/day of pure ethanol was 7.65 (95%CI, 3.16–18.49; and compared with never-smokers, the risk for heaviest smokers (≥ 30 cigarettes/day was 5.07 (95%CI, 2.06–12.47. A low consumption of only wine and/or beer (1–24 g/d did not increase the risk whereas a strong positive trend was observed for all types of alcoholic beverages that included any combination of hard liquors with beer and/or wine (p-trend Conclusion Our study shows that the risk of EC, and particularly the squamous cell type, is strongly associated with alcohol drinking. The consumption of any combination of hard liquors seems to be harmful whereas a low consumption of only wine may not. This may relates to the presence of certain antioxidant compounds found in wine but practically lacking in liquors. Tobacco smoking is also a clear risk factor, black more than blond.

  2. Tobacco smoking policies in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services, agreement between staff awareness and the written policy document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Eliza; Bonevski, Billie; Tzelepis, Flora; Shakeshaft, Anthony; Guillaumier, Ashleigh; Dunlop, Adrian; McCrabb, Sam; Palazzi, Kerrin

    2017-01-17

    Comprehensive smoke-free policy in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting provides an opportunity to reduce tobacco related harms among clients and staff. This study aimed to examine within AOD services: staff awareness of their service's smoking policy compared to the written policy document and staff and service factors associated with accurate awareness of a total ban and perceived enforcement of a total ban. An audit of written tobacco smoking policy documents and an online cross-sectional survey of staff from 31 Australian AOD services. In addition, a contact at each service was interviewed to gather service-related data. Overall, 506 staff participated in the survey (response rate: 57%). Nearly half (46%) perceived their service had a total ban with 54% indicating that this policy was always enforced. Over one-third (37%) reported a partial ban with 48% indicating that this policy was always enforced. The audit of written policies revealed that 19 (61%) services had total bans, 11 (36%) had partial bans and 1 (3%) did not have a written smoking policy. Agreement between staff policy awareness and their service's written policy was moderate (Kappa 0.48) for a total ban and fair (Kappa 0.38) for a partial ban. Age (1 year increase) of staff was associated with higher odds of correctly identifying a total ban at their service. Tobacco smoking within Australian AOD services is mostly regulated by a written policy document. Staff policy awareness was modest and perceived policy enforcement was poor.

  3. CYP2B6 rs2279343 polymorphism is associated with smoking cessation success in bupropion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaz, Paulo Roberto Xavier; Santos, Juliana Rocha; Issa, Jaqueline Scholz; Abe, Tânia Ogawa; Gaya, Patrícia Viviane; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Santos, Paulo Caleb Júnior Lima

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that polymorphisms in the CYP2B6 gene (which encodes an isoenzyme that metabolizes bupropion) and in the ANKK1 gene (which is located in the ANKK1/DRD2 gene cluster) might influence response to therapy. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the CYP2B6 and ANKK1 polymorphisms are associated with the response to smoking cessation therapies in patients from a smoking cessation assistance program. The cohort study enrolled 478 smokers who received behavioral counseling and drug therapy (bupropion, nicotine replacement therapy, and/or varenicline). Smoking cessation success was considered for patients who completed 6 months of continuous abstinence. Fagerström test for nicotine dependence (FTND) and Issa situational smoking scores were analyzed for nicotine dependence (ND). The ANKK1 rs1800497, CYP2B6*4 (rs2279343), CYP2B6*5 (rs3211371), and CYP2B6*9 (rs3745274) polymorphisms were genotyped by high resolution melting analysis or by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Patients with CYP2B6 rs2279343 wild-type AA genotype had higher success rate (48.0 %) compared with patients carrying AG or GG genotypes (CYP2B6*4 variant) (35.5 %) on bupropion therapy. The AA genotype was associated with higher OR for success during bupropion therapy (OR = 1.92, 95 % CI = 1.08-3.42, p = 0.03) in a multivariate model. We did not observe significant differences in the FTND and Issa scores according to the studied polymorphisms. We showed that patients with CYP2B6*4 (rs2279343) variant had lower success rate with bupropion. Likely, the CYP2B6*4 variant, which leads to a rapid predicted metabolic phenotype for the isoenzyme, influences the pharmacological activity of bupropion. Our finding suggests that CYP2B6*4 may be an important genetic marker for individualized bupropion pharmacotherapy.

  4. Comparison of cotinine levels in pregnant women while smoking and when using nicotine replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Katharine A; Lewis, Sarah; Coleman, Tim; Vaz, Luis R; Cooper, Sue

    2014-06-01

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) helps smokers quit smoking, but trials indicate that there is no evidence that it is effective during pregnancy. As metabolism increases during pregnancy, NRT may deliver insufficient nicotine to alleviate withdrawal symptoms. There is mixed evidence as to what levels of cotinine are reached from nicotine exposure during pregnancy while using NRT compared with smoking. We analyzed data on 33 pregnant participants from the NRT arm of a randomized control trial who had stopped smoking and were still using 15 mg/16 hr nicotine patches 1 month after quitting. Salivary cotinine levels when smoking at baseline were compared with levels on NRT at 1 month using the Wilcoxon test. Cotinine levels were a median of 98.5 ng/ml while smoking and 62.8 ng/ml while using NRT and remaining abstinent (p = .045). Participants with the highest cotinine measurements when smoking also tended to have the steepest reduction in cotinine levels while using NRT. This was most noticeable among participants with baseline cotinine levels more than 150 ng/ml (n = 9) who had a greater reduction in median cotinine levels (median difference -134.8 ng /ml [95% CI = -144.5 to -125.9]) than those with a baseline cotinine level under 150 ng/ml (n = 24; median difference -27.9 ng/ml [95% CI = -49.35 to -1.75]). In a pragmatic trial that replicated clinical practice, cotinine levels generated using NRT during pregnancy were lower than levels achieved from smoking. Although the sample size of this study was small, our findings are significant and are consistent with the hypothesis that NRT patches deliver an inadequate dose of nicotine to aid smoking cessation during pregnancy.

  5. Behavioral couples therapy (BCT) for alcohol and drug use disorders: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, M.B.; Vedel, E.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Narrative reviews conclude that behavioral couples therapy (BCT) produces better outcomes than individual-based treatment for alcoholism and drug abuse problems (e.g., [Epstein, E. E., & McCrady, B. S. (1998). Behavioral couples treatment of alcohol and drug use disorders: Current status and

  6. The role of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption in the differentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma for the males in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhua; Xu, Ji; Wang, Lijuan; Liu, Chao; Wang, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world and two-thirds of the OSCC occur in developing countries. Male and female have different smoking and drinking habit. However, there is little gender-specific risk study between OSCC and the habit of drinking and smoking in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of smoking and alcohol consumption in the differentiation grade of OSCC for the male in China. Review cases of male patients who suffered from OSCC tylectomy and were pathologically confirmed the diagnosis of OSCC. Data from 210 cases, related to patient, smoking, and alcohol drinking, were collected and analyzed using multivariate conditional logistic regression models. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption were strongly associated with differentiation of oral cancer (P = 0.013 and 0.005, respectively). The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for smoker were 1.45 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.145-4.19). The ORs for drinkers were 0.56 (95% CI = 0.19-1.58). The risk of the two habits in the development of oral cancer appeared to be significant increase. Increased risk of low oral cancer differentiation was associated with increased amount of alcohol consumed. Heavy and long-term smoking and drinking habit might pronouncedly increase the risk of triggering OSCC. Tobacco and alcohol consumption seems to play a role in the differentiation characteristics of the tumor.

  7. Smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Lampert, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Every year on May 31 is World No Tobacco Day (WNTD). The current issue of GBE kompakt deals with the prevalence and development of tobacco use in Germany. Data of the telephone survey "German Health Update" 2009 (GEDA) show a decrease in smoking for the last years but only for the younger age groups.

  8. Prevalence of smoking, alcohol and substance use among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in Denmark compared with the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders G; Dalsgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    is likely to reduce this risk. Aims: To test whether adolescents with ADHD in pharmacological treatment have a higher prevalence of smoking and use of alcohol and drugs than a matched control group from the general population. The study will also analyse associations between smoking, alcohol and drug use...... compared with 7% of controls used illicit drugs within last month (P = 0.260). Conclusion: No significant group differences were found in the prevalence of ever having smoked cigarettes, drinking alcohol or using illicit drugs between adolescents with ADHD and controls. Contrary to expectations, subjects......Background: Studies have shown that adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have an increased risk of alcohol and substance abuse in adulthood. An unequivocal reason for this association has not yet been identified but it has been shown that pharmacological treatment...

  9. [Assessment of surveys of adolescents about smoking and the use of alcohol and cannabis in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalbí, Joan R; Suelves, Josep M; Saltó, Esteve; Cabezas, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring health-related behaviors in adolescence requires instruments capable of providing valid data The objective of this paper is to review and assess existing information sources on smoking and alcohol and cannabis use by age and sex among adolescents in Spain. A search was carried out for studies with repeated observations over time, and their methods and characteristics reviewed. For each study, the number of surveys, their frequency and their sample size are assessed, as well as the instrument used, the available indicators, and the availability, accessibility and comparability of the information. Five sources of information providing data over extended periods of time with accessible data are identified: the National survey on drug use in secondary-school children (Encuesta estatal sobre uso de drogas en estudiantes de secundaria; ESTUDES); the Health behavior in school-aged children study (ECERSHBSC); the Monitoring system for risk factors associated with non-transmissible diseases in young people (Sistema de Vigilancia de Factores de Riesgo Asociados a Enfermedades No Transmisibles dirigido a poblacion juvenil; SIVFRENT-J); the Study of risk factors in secondary school children (Estudio de factores de riesgo en estudiantes de secundaria; FRESC); and the Monitoring study of health behaviors in adolescents (Estudio de monitorizacion de las conductas de salud de los adolescents; EMCSAT). Two of the surveys cover the whole of Spain, one is regional, and two are city-specific. All use solid methods and representative sampling techniques. In some, changes have occurred that make comparison of the evolution of some indicators difficult. Report accessibility is variable; comparability is limited for some surveys. Some provide almost no stratified data. There are valuable sources of data, but all have shortcomings. Changing the measurement instrument in a survey for comparison with others raises dilemmas as to the internal comparability of series.

  10. What is the association of smoking and alcohol use with the increase in social inequality in mortality in Denmark? A nationwide register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Mette Bjerrum; Diderichsen, Finn; Grønbæk, Morten; Juel, Knud

    2015-05-11

    The aim of this paper is to estimate the impact of smoking and alcohol use on the increase in social inequality in mortality in Denmark in the period 1985-2009. A nationwide register-based study. Denmark. The whole Danish population aged 30 years or more in the period 1985-2009. The primary outcome is mortality rates in relation to educational attainments calculated with and without deaths related to smoking and alcohol use. An absolute measure of inequality in mortality is applied along with a result on the direct contribution from smoking and alcohol use on the absolute difference in mortality rates. The secondary outcome is life expectancy in relation to educational attainments. Since 1985, Danish overall mortality rates have decreased. Alongside the improvement in mortality, the absolute difference in the mortality rate (per 100,000 persons) between the lowest and the highest educated quartile grew from 465 to 611 among men and from 250 to 386 among women. Smoking and alcohol use have caused 75% of the increase among men and 97% of the increase among women. Among men the increase was mainly caused by alcohol. In women the increase was mainly caused by smoking. The main explanation for the increase in social inequality in mortality since the mid-1980s is smoking and alcohol use. A significant reduction in the social inequality in mortality can only happen if the prevention of smoking and alcohol use are targeted to the lower educated part of the Danish population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Comparison of brief interventions in primary care on smoking and excessive alcohol consumption: a population survey in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jamie; West, Robert; Angus, Colin; Beard, Emma; Brennan, Alan; Drummond, Colin; Hickman, Matthew; Holmes, John; Kaner, Eileen; Michie, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Brief interventions have a modest but meaningful effect on promoting smoking cessation and reducing excessive alcohol consumption. Guidelines recommend offering such advice opportunistically and regularly but incentives vary between the two behaviours. To use representative data from the perspective of patients to compare the prevalence and characteristics of people who smoke or drink excessively and who receive a brief intervention. Data was from a representative sample of 15,252 adults from household surveys in England. Recall of brief interventions on smoking and alcohol use, sociodemographic information, and smoking and alcohol consumption patterns were assessed among smokers and those who drink excessively (AUDIT score of ≥8), who visited their GP surgery in the previous year. Of 1775 smokers, 50.4% recalled receiving brief advice on smoking in the previous year. Smokers receiving advice compared with those who did not were more likely to be older (odds ratio [OR] 17-year increments 1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.06 to 1.34), female (OR 1.35, 95% CI =1.10 to 1.65), have a disability (OR 1.44, 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.88), have made more quit attempts in the previous year (compared with no attempts: one attempt, OR 1.65, 95% CI = 1.32 to 2.08; ≥2 attempts, OR 2.02, 95% CI =1.49 to 2.74), and have greater nicotine dependence (OR 1.17, 95% CI =1.05 to 1.31) but were less likely to have no post-16 qualifications (OR 0.81, 95% CI = 0.66 to 1.00). Of 1110 people drinking excessively, 6.5% recalled receiving advice in their GP surgery on their alcohol consumption in the previous year. Those receiving advice compared with those who did not had higher AUDIT scores (OR 1.17, 95% CI =1.12 to 1.23) and were less likely to be female (OR 0.44, 95% CI = 0.23 to 0.87). Whereas approximately half of smokers in England visiting their GP in the past year report having received advice on cessation, consumption. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  12. [Smoking and alcohol drinking among medical students at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, María Inés; Santander, Jaime; Hitschfeld, Mario Javier; Labbé, Marcela; Zamora, Viviana

    2009-03-01

    Tobacco and alcohol consumption are public health problems, generally starting in adolescence. Medical students are not an exception. To determine the characteristics of tobacco and alcohol use among medical students at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and their association with gender, career level and mental health. A questionnaire to evaluate substance use was applied along with Goldberg Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), as a mental health risk predictor, to all medical students in November 2005. The survey was completed by 569 of 775 students (74%). Current smokers were 23- 7%, with the lowest figure, 13-5% in sixth year, and the highest, 40.5% in seventh year (p <0.01). Thirty one percent of students with an score of five and over in the GHQ-12 were smokers, compared to 19% among those with a lower score. Daily smokers were 40%o of the current smokers. Seventy four percent of students consumed alcohol during the last month. No association with sex or GHQ-12 was observed. The lowest alcohol consumption rate was observed in second year, and the highest in sixth year (66%o and 89-2%o, respectively, p <0.01). Fifty three percent of men and 26%o of women drank three or more drinks in any given day (p <0.01). Sixty three percent of men and 81% of women never drank more than five drinks in one day, during the last month (p <0.01). Our medical students smoke less than Chilean youth but more than medical students of countries such as the USA. They drink less than Anglo-Saxon medical students but more than Chilean youth. Male consumption is greater than that of women. Smoking and alcohol drinking are mutually associated.

  13. Genome-Wide Interaction Analyses between Genetic Variants and Alcohol Consumption and Smoking for Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many genetic susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer (CRC. However, variants in these loci explain only a small proportion of familial aggregation, and there are likely additional variants that are associated with CRC susceptibility. Genome-wide studies of gene-environment interactions may identify variants that are not detected in GWAS of marginal gene effects. To study this, we conducted a genome-wide analysis for interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO. Interactions were tested using logistic regression. We identified interaction between CRC risk and alcohol consumption and variants in the 9q22.32/HIATL1 (Pinteraction = 1.76×10-8; permuted p-value 3.51x10-8 region. Compared to non-/occasional drinking light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer among individuals with rs9409565 CT genotype (OR, 0.82 [95% CI, 0.74-0.91]; P = 2.1×10-4 and TT genotypes (OR,0.62 [95% CI, 0.51-0.75]; P = 1.3×10-6 but not associated among those with the CC genotype (p = 0.059. No genome-wide statistically significant interactions were observed for smoking. If replicated our suggestive finding of a genome-wide significant interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption might contribute to understanding colorectal cancer etiology and identifying subpopulations with differential susceptibility to the effect of alcohol on CRC risk.

  14. Association between burnout syndrome, harmful use of alcohol and smoking in nursing in the ICU of a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Larissa Santi; Nitsche, Maria José Trevizani; Godoy, Ilda de

    2018-01-01

    The article aims to determine the presence of burnout syndrome among professionals in the field of Nursing in the Intensive Care Unit in a university hospital and a possible association with consumption of alcohol and tobacco. Participants were 160 nursing professionals from 04 intensive care unit of a university hospital in the period from March 2013 to February 2014. We used a structured questionnaire, plus the smoking history, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, Fagerström Dependence Questionnaire and the measurement of carbon monoxide. We used Fisher's chi-square or Fisher exact test. Syndrome was found in 34 professionals, most of them female, married and young adults. 18 professionals reported being smokers. 6,4% of Nursing Assistants, 50% Practical Nurses and Nurses 71,4% drank moderate; 5,4% Nursing Assistant and 14,3% Nurses scored default risk drinking and only 01 Practical Nurses had possible alcohol dependence. There was a positive association of the syndrome with smoking in 01 ICU. Final considerations: Hospital Intensive Care services need assistance from the managers of services for the purpose of caring for the health of their caregivers.

  15. The long-term effect of a population-based life-style intervention on smoking and alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Sophie; Toft, Ulla Marie Nørgaard; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    ; participants at high risk of ischaemic heart disease-according to pre-specified criteria-were also offered group-based counselling. MEASUREMENTS: Self-reported point abstinence from smoking as well as changes in the average alcohol consumption per week and binge drinking in the past week from baseline to 10...... = -0.08 days with binge drinking in the last week, 95% CI = -0.16 to -0.01, P = 0.028) than in the control group. There were no detectable long-term intervention effects on the average alcohol consumption per week. CONCLUSIONS: A population-based multi-factorial life-style intervention of 5 years......AIMS: To examine whether improvements in smoking and alcohol consumption throughout the 5-year course of a population-based multi-factorial life-style intervention were sustained 5 years after its discontinuation. DESIGN: Population-based randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Suburbs of Copenhagen...

  16. Correlates of use of electronic cigarettes versus nicotine replacement therapy for help with smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Little, Melissa A; Fagan, Pebbles; Kawamoto, Crissy T; Herzog, Thaddeus A

    2014-12-01

    Electronic- or e-cigarettes are nicotine-delivery devices commonly used by smokers to quit or reduce smoking. At present, not much is known about the characteristics of smokers who specifically try e-cigarettes to quit smoking compared to the nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Determining the characteristics of smokers who are likely to choose e-cigarettes as cessation aids would help develop strategies to impart valid information about e-cigarettes to such smokers as facts regarding the safety and utility of e-cigarettes emerge. This study is based on 834 daily smokers [mean age=45.8 (standard deviation=13)] from Hawaii. Demographic, smoking- and cessation-related variables were examined as correlates of ever use of e-cigarette only or any FDA-approved NRT product only or both as cessation aids. Results indicated that younger smokers, non-White smokers, and smokers reporting higher income, lower nicotine dependence, shorter smoking history, and higher lifetime quit attempts were more likely to have tried e-cigarettes but not NRT products for help with smoking cessation. Smokers who are attracted to use e-cigarettes but not FDA-approved NRT products may differ from smokers who are likely to have used NRT products but not e-cigarettes in terms of demographic (e.g., age, ethnicity) and smoking- or cessation-related characteristics (e.g., nicotine dependence, quit attempts). Given the lack of knowledge regarding the health effects of e-cigarettes and their efficacy as cessation aids, future research needs to continue characterizing smokers who are likely to use e-cigarettes for smoking cessation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A mechanistic test of nicotine replacement therapy sampling for smoking cessation induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, Jessica L; Heckman, Bryan W; Mathew, Amanda R; Carpenter, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Studies that explore the mechanisms of treatment effect are needed in the area of smoking cessation induction, the primary goal of which is to promote the occurrence of a quit attempt among individuals who report little interest in smoking cessation. This study tested the mediational effect of 5 psychological variables (motivation to quit, abstinence self-efficacy, knowledge of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), and both positive and negative attitudes toward NRT) on the relationship between NRT sampling and smoking outcomes. Adults who reported low levels of intention to quit in the next month (n = 593) were recruited for a nationwide randomized clinical trial of NRT sampling. Participants provided self-report data via telephone interview on multiple occasions, with the final follow-up at 6 months. Motivation to quit, and to a lesser degree, abstinence self-efficacy at the end of the 6-week intervention best accounted for the effect of NRT sampling as a promoter of quit attempts, smoking reduction, and 7-day point prevalence abstinence. Providing smokers with free NRT samples, in addition to encouraging them to engage in temporary abstinence, results in meaningful change in motivation and self-efficacy, which in turn influence smoking outcomes. Cessation induction interventions should aim to increase motivation to quit and abstinence self-efficacy, above and beyond any efforts to increase knowledge or prompt attitudinal shifts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Effects of state cigarette excise taxes and smoke-free air policies on state per capita alcohol consumption in the United States, 1980 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Melissa J; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Plunk, Andrew D; Bierut, Laura J; Grucza, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    Increasing state cigarette excise taxes and strengthening smoke-free air (SFA) laws are known to reduce smoking prevalence. Some studies suggest that such policies may also reduce alcohol use, but results for cigarette taxes have been mixed, and associations with smoke-free air policies have been limited to some demographic subgroups. To shed further light on the potential secondary effects of tobacco control policy, we examined whether increases in cigarette taxes and strengthening of SFA laws were associated with reductions of per capita alcohol consumption and whether any reductions were specific to certain beverage types. State per capita alcohol consumption from 1980 to 2009 was modeled as a function of state price per pack of cigarettes and SFA policy scores while controlling for secular trends and salient state covariates. Both policy measures also accounted for local policies. Total alcohol, beer, wine, and spirits consumption per capita were modeled separately. For each type of beverage, we used a nested models approach to determine whether the 2 policies together were associated with reduced consumption. For total alcohol consumption, and for beer or spirits (but not wine), one or both tobacco policies were associated with reductions in consumption. A 1% increase in cigarette price per pack was associated with a 0.083% decrease in per capita total alcohol consumption (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.0002 to 0.166, p = 0.0495), and a 1-point increase in SFA policy score, measured on a 6-point scale, was associated with a 1.1% decrease in per capita total alcohol consumption (95% CI 0.4 to 1.7, p = 0.001; p consumption). The public health benefits of increasing cigarette taxes and smoke-free policies may go beyond the reduction of smoking and extend to alcohol consumption, specifically beer and spirits. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  19. Neutrophil superoxide-anion generating capacity in chronic smoking: effect of long-term alpha-tocopherol therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tits, van L.; Waart, de F.; Hak-Lemmers, H.L.M.; Graaf, de J.; Demacker, P.N.; Stalenhoef, A.F.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether long-term alpha-tocopherol therapy in chronic smoking affects superoxide generating capacity of neutrophils ex vivo. To this purpose, we randomly assigned 128 male chronic smokers (37 21 pack years of smoking) to treatment with placebo (n = 64) or alpha-tocopherol (400 IU

  20. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to buy or use alcohol. By setting the drinking age at 21, they hope older people will be ... stop without help. A person who starts drinking alcohol at a young age is more likely to develop alcoholism. Alcoholism is ...

  1. The Salivary β-HEX A% Index as an Excellent Marker of Periodontitis in Smoking Alcohol-Dependent Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleon Waszkiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Severe periodontitis leading to tooth loss is found in 5–15% of most populations worldwide. Aim. The applicability of salivary β-hexosaminidase (β-HEX A%, percentage of β-HEX A isoenzyme to total β-HEX and β-HEX B% (β-HEX B/β-HEX indexes was investigated as a possible marker of periodontitis. Methods. Thirty three alcohol-dependent smokers (AS and 32 healthy controls (C were enrolled in the study. The activity of β-HEX was measured spectrophotometrically. Results. β-HEX A% was significantly higher and β-HEX B% was lower in AS than in C group. We found a significant correlation between β-HEX A% and gingival index (GI and an inverse correlation between β-HEX A% and salivary flow (SF, in all groups. Salivary β-HEX A% index in smoking alcoholics at 0.23 had excellent sensitivity (96% and specificity (91%; the AUC for β-HEX A% was high (0.937. There were no correlations between amount/duration-time of alcohol drinking/smoking and β-HEX A% or β-HEX B%. We found significant correlations between the time period of denture wearing and GI, papilla bleeding index (PBI, and decayed missing filled teeth index (DMFT and between GI and the amount of smoked cigarettes per day. Conclusion. Bad periodontal state was most likely due to the nicotine dependence. Salivary β-HEX A% is a promising excellent marker for the diagnosis of periodontitis.

  2. Social capital in relation to alcohol consumption, smoking, and illicit drug use among adolescents: a cross-sectional study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åslund, Cecilia; Nilsson, Kent W

    2013-05-20

    Social capital has lately received much attention in public health research. However, few studies have examined the influence of social capital on alcohol consumption, smoking and drug use which have strong influence on public health. The present cross-sectional study investigated whether two measures of social capital were related to substance use in a large population of Swedish adolescents. A total of 7757 13-18 year old students (participation rate: 78.2%) anonymously completed the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland 2008 which included questions on sociodemographic background, neighbourhood social capital, general social trust, alcohol consumption, smoking, and illicit drug use. Individuals within the group with low neighbourhood social capital had an approximately 60% increased odds of high alcohol consumption, more than three times increased odds of smoking and more than double the odds of having used illicit drugs compared with individuals with high neighbourhood social capital. Individuals within the group with low general social trust had approximately 50% increased odds of high alcohol consumption and double the odds of smoking and having used illicit drugs compared with individuals with high general social trust. However, social capital at the contextual level showed very weak effects on alcohol consumption, smoking, and illicit drug use. Social capital may be an important factor in the future development of prevention programs concerning adolescent substance use. However, further replications of the results as well as identifications of direction of causality are needed.

  3. Baseline adjustment and change revisited: effect of smoking on change in periodontal status following periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preus, Hans R; Sandvik, Leiv; Gjermo, Per; Baelum, Vibeke

    2014-04-01

    Smokers have frequently been reported to have more severe periodontitis, to respond less favorably to periodontal therapy, and to show elevated rate of recurrence compared with non-smokers. The aims of this study was to compare the results of baseline-adjusted and -unadjusted analyses when assessing the effect of smoking on change in periodontal status following therapy and to discuss the methodological issues involved. This is a secondary analysis of data from 180 periodontitis patients enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical intervention trial. Information on smoking habits was elicited from the participants before, and 12 months after, therapy. The clinical parameters analyzed were probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level, using both simple analysis of change (SAC) and analysis of covariance (ancova), adjusting for age, gender, and treatment group. The current smokers presented with more severe periodontitis at baseline than did former and never smokers. Results of the SAC indicated that the current smokers benefitted more from treatment than did former or never smokers, whereas the results of the baseline-adjusted ancova indicated no such differences. Both sets of results are likely to be biased with respect to valid conclusions regarding the 'causal' effect of smoking. Possible sources of bias are discussed. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  4. [THE INTERDEPENDENCE BETWEEN SMOKING, ALCOHOL, TOOTH PATHOLOGY AND PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI AMONG ETHNIC GROUPS IN KYRGYZSTAN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhumabaev, M N; Dzhumanova, R G; Sabirov, I S

    2015-01-01

    The main aim was to study the ethnic and social characteristics of the prevalence of certain risk factors among Kyrgyz ethnic population infected with Helicobacter pylori without clinical signs of the disease of upper gastrointestinal tract. The study involved 116 healthy individuals (57 and 49 Kyrgyz, Russian) who were tested on H. pylori infection, taking into account risk factors such as smoking, alcohol consumption, low or serious teeth damage. The identified H.pylori infection was independent from ethnic affiliation. Significant relation between absence or high damage of the teeth and H. pylori contamination was revealed in surveyed Kyrgyz group.

  5. Marital Therapy and Spouse Involvement in the Treatment of Depression, Agoraphobia, and Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Neil S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examines literature on marital therapy and spouse involvement as treatments for major psychopathology, focusing on depression, agoraphobia, and alcoholism. For each disorder, examines relation between marital dynamics and disorder and discusses empirical efforts to evaluate impact of marital therapy or spouse involvement on disorder. Summarizes…

  6. Alcohol use disorders and current pharmacological therapies: the role of GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing; Olsen, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are defined as alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence, which create large problems both for society and for the drinkers themselves. To date, no therapeutic can effectively solve these problems. Understanding the underlying mechanisms leading to AUD is critically important for developing effective and safe pharmacological therapies. Benzodiazepines (BZs) are used to reduce the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome. However, frequent use of BZs causes cross-tolerance, dependence, and cross-addiction to alcohol. The FDA-approved naltrexone and acamprosate have shown mixed results in clinical trials. Naltrexone is effective to treat alcohol dependence (decreased length and frequency of drinking bouts), but its severe side effects, including withdrawal symptoms, are difficult to overcome. Acamprosate showed efficacy for treating alcohol dependence in European trials, but two large US trials have failed to confirm the efficacy. Another FDA-approved medication, disulfiram, does not diminish craving, and it causes a peripheral neuropathy. Kudzu is the only natural medication mentioned by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, but its mechanisms of action are not yet established. It has been recently shown that dihydromyricetin, a flavonoid purified from Hovenia, has unique effects on GABAA receptors and blocks ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in alcoholic animal models. In this article, we review the role of GABAA receptors in the treatment of AUD and currently available and potentially novel pharmacological agents. PMID:25066321

  7. Alcohol use disorders and current pharmacological therapies: the role of GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jing; Olsen, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are defined as alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence, which create large problems both for society and for the drinkers themselves. To date, no therapeutic can effectively solve these problems. Understanding the underlying mechanisms leading to AUD is critically important for developing effective and safe pharmacological therapies. Benzodiazepines (BZs) are used to reduce the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome. However, frequent use of BZs causes cross-tolerance, dependence, and cross-addiction to alcohol. The FDA-approved naltrexone and acamprosate have shown mixed results in clinical trials. Naltrexone is effective to treat alcohol dependence (decreased length and frequency of drinking bouts), but its severe side effects, including withdrawal symptoms, are difficult to overcome. Acamprosate showed efficacy for treating alcohol dependence in European trials, but two large US trials have failed to confirm the efficacy. Another FDA-approved medication, disulfiram, does not diminish craving, and it causes a peripheral neuropathy. Kudzu is the only natural medication mentioned by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, but its mechanisms of action are not yet established. It has been recently shown that dihydromyricetin, a flavonoid purified from Hovenia, has unique effects on GABAA receptors and blocks ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in alcoholic animal models. In this article, we review the role of GABAA receptors in the treatment of AUD and currently available and potentially novel pharmacological agents.

  8. Smoking was associated with poor response to intravenous steroids therapy in Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lijing; Ye, Lei; Zhu, Wei; Shen, Liyun; Huang, Fengjiao; Jiao, Qin; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shu; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that smoking is closely related to the occurrence, severity and response to orbital radiation in Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). The aim of this study was to investigate whether smoking impacts the response to intravenous 4.5 g methylprednisolone therapy in patients with active moderate-to-severe GO. Ninety-two individuals with active moderate-to-severe GO who were treated with cumulative doses of 4.5 g intravenous methylprednisolone within 3 months were recruited. The patients were grouped as never smokers, active smokers (including smokers and quit smokers) and passive smokers. We observed significantly greater response rate in never smokers compared with active smokers (73.9% vs 29.0%, p=0.001). After adjusting the confounding factors such as age, sex, body mass index, clinical activity score, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody and the duration of GO, smoking was independently associated with poor intravenous glucocorticoid (GC) response (OR 12.40, 95% CI 1.20 to 128.14, p=0.035). We also found the response rate was significantly higher in never smokers than in quit smokers (73.9% vs 16.7%, p=0.001), while no statistical significance between current smokers and quit smokers (36.8% vs 16.7%, p=0.228). There was a trend of poor response for passive smokers compared with never smokers (64.7% vs 72.2%, p=0.583). Smoking, even past smoking, was an independent risk factor associated with impaired response to intravenous corticosteroids in patients with GO. Smokers with GO should be given optimised treatment strategy such as higher dose of GC or combined radiation therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Estimating the public economic consequences of introducing varenicline smoking cessation therapy in South Korea using a fiscal analytic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Mark P; Baker, Christine L; Kotsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2018-02-13

    Smoking gives rise to many cross-sectorial public costs and benefits for government. Costs arise from increased healthcare spending and work-related social benefits, while smoking itself provides significant revenue for government from tobacco taxes. To better understand the public economic impact of smoking and smoking cessation therapies, this study developed a government perspective framework for assessing smoking-attributable morbidity and mortality and associated public costs. This framework includes changes in lifetime tax revenue and health costs, as well as changes in tobacco tax revenue, from fewer smokers. A modified generational accounting framework was developed to assess relationships between smoking-attributable morbidity and mortality and public economic consequences of smoking, including lifetime tax revenue gains/losses, government social transfers, and health spending. Based on the current prevalence of smoking in South Korean males, a cohort model was developed for smokers, former-smokers, and never-smokers. The model simulated the lifetime discounted fiscal transfers for different age cohorts in 5 year age bands, and the return on investment (ROI) from smoking cessation therapy. Former smokers are estimated to generate higher lifetime earnings and direct tax revenues and lower lifetime healthcare costs due to the reduction of smoking-attributable mortality and morbidity compared to smokers, even after accounting for reduced tobacco taxes paid. Based on the costs of public investments in varenicline, this study estimated a ROI from 1.4-1.7, depending on treatment age, with higher ROI in younger cohorts, with an average ROI of 1.6 for those aged less than 65. This analysis suggests that reductions in smoking can generate positive public economic benefits for government, even after accounting for lost tobacco tax revenues. The results described here are likely applicable to countries having similar underlying smoking prevalence, comparable taxation

  10. Genetic Sensitivity to Peer Behaviors: "5HTTLPR", Smoking, and Alcohol Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, Jonathan; Shanahan, Michael; Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Smolen, Andrew; Haberstick, Brett; Boardman, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region ("5HTTLPR"), a gene associated with environmental sensitivity, moderates the association between smoking and drinking patterns at adolescents' schools and their corresponding risk for smoking and drinking themselves. Drawing on the school-based design of the National…

  11. "Get drunk. Smoke weed. Have fun.": A Content Analysis of Tweets About Marijuana and Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Melissa J; Grucza, Richard A; Bierut, Laura J; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A

    2017-05-01

    To explore the sentiment and themes of Twitter chatter that mentions both alcohol and marijuana. Cross-sectional analysis of tweets mentioning both alcohol and marijuana during 1 month was performed. The study setting was Twitter. Tweets sent from February 4 to March 5, 2014, were studied. A random sample (n = 5000) of tweets that mentioned alcohol and marijuana were qualitatively coded as normalizing both substances, preferring one substance over the other, or discouraging both substances. Other common themes were identified. More than half (54%) of the tweets normalized marijuana and alcohol (without preferring one substance over the other), and 24% preferred marijuana over alcohol. Only 2% expressed a preference for alcohol over marijuana, 7% discouraged the use of both substances, and the sentiment was unknown for 13% of the tweets. Common themes among tweets that normalized both substances included using the substances with friends (17%) and mentioning substance use in the context of sex or romance (14%). Common themes among tweets that preferred marijuana over alcohol were the beliefs that marijuana is safer than alcohol (46%) and preferences for effects of marijuana over alcohol (40%). Tweets normalizing polysubstance use or encouraging marijuana use over alcohol use are common. Both online and offline prevention efforts are needed to increase awareness of the risks associated with polysubstance use and marijuana use.

  12. Review of outcome research on marital and family therapy in treatment for alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Timothy J; Clements, Kahni

    2012-01-01

    This review of controlled studies of marital and family therapy (MFT) in alcoholism treatment updates the earlier review by O'Farrell and Fals-Stewart (2003). We conclude that, when the alcoholic is unwilling to seek help, MFT is effective in helping the family cope better and motivating alcoholics to enter treatment. Specifically, both Al-Anon facilitation and referral and spouse coping skills training (based on new findings) help family members cope better, and CRAFT promotes treatment entry and was successfully transported to a community clinic in a new study. Once the alcoholic enters treatment, MFT, particularly behavioral couples therapy (BCT), is clearly more effective than individual treatment at increasing abstinence and improving relationship functioning. New BCT studies showed efficacy with women alcoholics and with gay and lesbian alcoholics, and BCT was successfully transported to a community clinic, a brief BCT version was tested, and BCT was adapted for family members other than spouses. Future studies should evaluate the following: MFT with couples where both members have a current alcohol problem and with minority patients, mechanisms of change, transportability of evidence-based MFT approaches to clinical practice settings, and replication of MFT outcomes of reduced partner violence and improved child functioning. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  13. A Descriptive Study of the Prevalence and Typology of Alcohol-Related Posts in an Online Social Network for Smoking Cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Amy M; Zhao, Kang; Cha, Sarah; Wang, Xi; Amato, Michael S; Pearson, Jennifer L; Papandonatos, George D; Graham, Amanda L

    2017-09-01

    Alcohol use and problem drinking are associated with smoking relapse and poor smoking-cessation success. User-generated content in online social networks for smoking cessation provides an opportunity to understand the challenges and treatment needs of smokers. This study used machine-learning text classification to identify the prevalence, sentiment, and social network correlates of alcohol-related content in the social network of a large online smoking-cessation program, BecomeAnEX.org. Data were analyzed from 814,258 posts (January 2012 to May 2015). Posts containing alcohol keywords were coded via supervised machine-learning text classification for information about the user's personal experience with drinking, whether the user self-identified as a problem drinker or indicated problem drinking, and negative sentiment about drinking in the context of a quit attempt (i.e., alcohol should be avoided during a quit attempt). Less than 1% of posts were related to alcohol, contributed by 13% of users. Roughly a third of alcohol posts described a personal experience with drinking; very few (3%) indicated "problem drinking." The majority (70%) of alcohol posts did not express negative sentiment about drinking alcohol during a quit attempt. Users who did express negative sentiment about drinking were more centrally located within the network compared with those who did not. Discussion of alcohol was rare, and most posts did not signal the need to quit or abstain from drinking during a quit attempt. Featuring expert information or highlighting discussions that are consistent with treatment guidelines may be important steps to ensure smokers are educated about drinking risks.

  14. Genetic variation (CHRNA5), medication (combination nicotine replacement therapy vs. varenicline), and smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Shiun; Baker, Timothy B; Jorenby, Douglas; Piper, Megan; Saccone, Nancy; Johnson, Eric; Breslau, Naomi; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Carney, Robert M; Bierut, Laura J

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the efficacy of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy can vary across patients based on their genotypes. This study tests whether the coding variant rs16969968 in the CHRNA5 nicotinic receptor gene predicts the effects of combination nicotine replacement therapy (cNRT) and varenicline on treatment outcomes. In two randomized smoking cessation trials comparing cNRT vs. placebo, and varenicline vs. placebo, we used logistic regression to model associations between CHRNA5 rs16969968 and abstinence at end of treatment. For abstinence at end of treatment, there was an interaction between cNRT and rs16969968 (X(2)=8.15, df=2, omnibus-p=0.017 for the interaction); individuals with the high-risk AA genotype were more likely to benefit from cNRT. In contrast, varenicline increased abstinence, but its effect did not vary with CHRNA5. However, the genetic effects differed between the placebo control groups across two trials (wald=3.94, df=1, p=0.047), this non-replication can alter the interpretation of pharmacogenetic findings. Results from two complementary smoking cessation trials demonstrate inconsistent genetic results in the placebo arms. This evidence highlights the need to compare the most effective pharmacotherapies with the same placebo control to establish pharmacogenetic evidence to aid decisions on medication choice for patients trying to quit smoking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The National Incidence and Resource Utilization of Burn Injuries Sustained While Smoking on Home Oxygen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimacopoulos, Evangelia M; Liao, Junlin; Heard, Jason P; Kluesner, Karen M; Wilson, Jeffrey; Wibbenmeyer, Lucy A

    2016-01-01

    Considerable risk of burn injury exists for those patients on home oxygen therapy (HOT) who continue to smoke. In this study, the authors sought to establish the national incidence of burns incurred while smoking on HOT and to determine the resource utilization and sequelae of these injuries. A retrospective review of the American Burn Association's National Burn Repository was conducted to identify patients burned while on HOT during the years 2002 to 2011. Duplicate entries, as well as records of follow-up visits and readmissions, were removed. Univariate analysis was used to compare the differences between patients sustaining burn injuries related to HOT and patients with other mechanisms of injury. Multivariate analysis provided odds ratios for mortality controlling for all significant variables. The frequency of burns sustained on HOT significantly increased during the 10-year period reviewed and were associated with increased comorbidities and certain complications. Compared with non-HOT injuries, HOT injuries had higher incidence of inhalation injury and mortality. Inhalation injury was the strongest predictor of mortality in HOT burn injuries. The likelihood of poor prognosis was even more pronounced in patients who required intubation. Smoking was responsible for 83% of the HOT burn injuries described here. Therefore, smoking cessation counseling and treatment should be mandatory in all patients prescribed HOT.

  16. Randomized, controlled pilot trial of a smartphone app for smoking cessation using acceptance and commitment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Jonathan B; Mull, Kristin E; Kientz, Julie A; Vilardaga, Roger; Mercer, Laina D; Akioka, Katrina J; Heffner, Jaimee L

    2014-10-01

    There is a dual need for (1) innovative theory-based smartphone applications for smoking cessation and (2) controlled trials to evaluate their efficacy. Accordingly, this study tested the feasibility, acceptability, preliminary efficacy, and mechanism of behavioral change of an innovative smartphone-delivered acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) application for smoking cessation vs. an application following US Clinical Practice Guidelines. Adult participants were recruited nationally into the double-blind randomized controlled pilot trial (n=196) that compared smartphone-delivered ACT for smoking cessation application (SmartQuit) with the National Cancer Institute's application for smoking cessation (QuitGuide). We recruited 196 participants in two months. SmartQuit participants opened their application an average of 37.2 times, as compared to 15.2 times for QuitGuide participants (pacceptance of cravings at baseline (n=88), the quit rates were 15% in SmartQuit vs. 8% in QuitGuide (OR=2.9; 95% CI=0.6-20.7). ACT is feasible to deliver by smartphone application and shows higher engagement and promising quit rates compared to an application that follows US Clinical Practice Guidelines. As results were limited by the pilot design (e.g., small sample), a full-scale efficacy trial is now needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Independent and supra-additive effects of alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and metabolic syndrome on the elevation of serum liver enzyme levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Young Park

    Full Text Available We investigated the independent and combined effects of alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and metabolic syndrome on abnormal liver function, i.e., the elevation of serum liver enzyme levels. Participants of a Korean population-based prospective cohort aged ≥30 years without liver disease, diabetes, or cardiovascular diseases were included. Information on alcohol consumption, smoking status, and metabolic syndrome, defined as per the criteria of the Adult Treatment Panel III, were applied to evaluate their impact on serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and metabolic syndrome were the significant individual factors that elevated serum liver enzyme levels. Supra-additive effects of metabolic syndrome and either alcohol consumption or cigarette smoking were also identified. The combination of heavy drinking (≥24 g/day and metabolic syndrome conferred an effect that was higher than the sum of the two individual effects (Synergic Index (SI: AST, 2.37 [1.20-4.67]; GGT, 1.91 [1.17-3.13]. Only GGT level (odds ratio 6.04 [3.68-9.94], SI 2.33 [1.24-4.41] was significantly elevated when the effect of moderate drinking (20 pack years, 1.80 for ≥24 g/day and ≤20 pack years, 2.03 for ≥24 g/day and >20 pack years, while only the combined effect of drinking ≥24 g/day and smoking >20 pack years elevated the AST level (SI 4.55 [3.12-6.61]. The combined effect of cigarette smoking and metabolic syndrome was not supra-additive. To prevent fatty liver disease and other related diseases, a multifactorial prevention strategy that includes limited alcohol consumption, smoking cessation and rectification of adverse metabolic profiles is required.

  18. The independent effects of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and serum aspartate aminotransferase on the alanine aminotransferase ratio in korean men for the risk for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Heejin; Kim, Sangwon; Jee, Sun Ha

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the interactions among alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) / alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratios on esophageal cancer. Alcohol and the risk of incidence and death from esophageal cancer were examined in a 14-year prospective cohort study of 782,632 Korean men, 30 to 93 years of age, who received health insurance from the National Health Insurance Corporation and had a medical evaluation from 1992 to 1995. Smoking, alcohol intake, and AST/ALT ratios were associated with the increased risk of esophageal cancer in a dose-dependent manner independent of each other. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of incidence [Hazard ratio (HR) = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.8 to 2.5] and mortality (HR = 2.5, 2.0 to 3.1). Combined HR of incidence for alcohol consumption (> 25 g/day) and smoking was 4.5 (3.8-5.5); for alcohol (> 25 g/day) and the AST/ALT ratio (>or= 2.0), it was 5.8 (4.6-7.2); for smoking and the AST/ALT ratio (>or= 2.0), it was 6.3 (5.1-7.5). Similar results were seen for mortality from esophageal cancer. Subjects who drank >or= 25 g/day with an AST/ALT ratio >or= 2 had a higher risk of esophageal cancer incidence (HR = 6.5, 4.8 to 8.7) compared with those who drank >or= 25 g/day with an AST/ALT ratio smoking, and the AST/ALT ratio are independently associated with increased risk of esophageal cancer but did not interact synergistically. The combination of the AST/ALT ratio with a questionnaire for alcohol consumption may increase the effectiveness for determining the risk of esophageal cancer.

  19. Validation of the French version of the alcohol, smoking and substance involvement screening test (ASSIST in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Riaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use disorders seem to be an under considered health problem amongst the elderly. The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST, was developed by the World Health Organization to detect substance use disorders. The present study evaluates the psychometric properties of the French version of ASSIST in a sample of elderly people attending geriatric outpatient facilities (primary care or psychiatric facilities. Methods One hundred persons older than 65 years were recruited from clients attending a geriatric policlinic day care centre and from geriatric psychiatric facilities. Measures included ASSIST, Addiction Severity Index (ASI, Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI-Plus, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT, Revised Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire-Smoking (RTQ and MiniMental State(MMS. Results Concurrent validity was established with significant correlations between ASSIST scores, scores from ASI, AUDIT, RTQ, and significantly higher ASSIST scores for patients with a MINI-Plus diagnosis of abuse or dependence. The ASSIST questionnaire was found to have high internal consistency for the total substance involvement along with specific substance involvement as assessed by Cronbach’s α, ranging from 0.66, to 0.89 . Conclusions The findings demonstrate that ASSIST is a valid screening test for identifying substance use disorders in elderly.

  20. Stress, social support and health-related behavior: a study of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, A; Wardle, J; Pollard, T M; Canaan, L; Davies, G J

    1996-08-01

    The effects of academic examination stress on health behavior was assessed in university students. It was hypothesized that the anticipation of examinations would lead to increases in cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, and to decreases in physical activity, and that effects would be particularly salient in students with low social supports. One hundred eighty students were divided into exam-stress (51 women, 64 men) and control (49 women, 16 men) groups, and were assessed at baseline and then within 2 weeks of exams, or an equivalent point for the control group. Perceived stress, emotional well-being and health behaviors were assessed by questionnaire and interview. The exam-stress group reported significant increases in perceived stress and emotional distress between baseline and exam sessions, but responses were not affected by social support availability. The controls showed no systematic changes in health behaviors. In the exam-stress group, smoking increased by an average of 54.7% between sessions in women with few social supports, but remained stable in men. There was a decrease in alcohol consumption of 17.5% in students with high social support between sessions, while those with low social supports showed an average increase of 18.5%. Physical activity decreased between baseline and exam sessions in the exam-stress group, but was not affected by social support. The results are discussed in relation to the effects of naturally occurring episodic stress on health behaviors, and the role of social support in moderating responses.

  1. [Patterns of drinking alcohol tobacco smoking among 6th year students of the faculty of medicine in Białstok].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielska, Dorota; Kurpas, Donata; Ołtarzewska, Alicja; Piotrowska-Depta, Maria; Gomółka, Ewa; Wojtal, Mariola; Florek, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and tobacco are legal, easily available addictive substances. There are no universal criteria of safe alcohol consumption but some scientific studies have allowed for determination of consumption levels helpful in evaluation of the pattern of drinking and evoking readiness to limit the amount of consumed alcohol. The aim of the work was to evaluate and compare the knowledge of 6th year students of the Faculty of Medicine of the Medical University of Biatystok in the academic years 2011/12 and 2012/13 concerning the effects of alcohol abuse, as well as to determine their drinking patterns and tobacco smoking structure. The study material was collected by means of anonymous voluntary surveys carried out before classes concerning the issues of addictions within the framework of family medicine subject block. 356 students took part in the study: 226 (63.5%) women and 130 (36.5%) men (pdrinking day (rS=-0.15, p=0.03) as well as between a low level of knowledge and hazardous drinking (rS=-0.13, p=0.03). Among the respondents, 18,58% women and 14,63% men smoked cigarettes regularly. Those who are 6th year students in the academic year 2012/13 usually had started smoking within the first three years of study at the Medical University and drank greater amounts of alcohol on a typical drinking day than students surveyed in the 2011/12 year. A correlation was found between tobacco smoking and a greater frequency of getting drunk occasionally (rS=-0.18, p=0.002) among students of both years. Insufficient knowledge on the effects of alcohol abuse and smoking coexist with a higher risk of drinking alcohol.

  2. Impact of alcohol habits and smoking on the risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation in hypertensive patients with ECG left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Reims, Henrik M; Gjesdal, Knut

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) is increased by uncontrolled hypertension, and antihypertensive treatment reduces new-onset AF. However, it is unclear whether alcohol intake and smoking influence the risk of new-onset AF during antihypertensive treatment.......The incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) is increased by uncontrolled hypertension, and antihypertensive treatment reduces new-onset AF. However, it is unclear whether alcohol intake and smoking influence the risk of new-onset AF during antihypertensive treatment....

  3. The effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of self-reported hand eczema: a cross-sectional population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T

    2010-01-01

    . It has been debated whether life-style factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are associated with hand eczema. OBJECTIVES: The current study aimed to investigate whether self-reported hand eczema was associated with smoking and alcohol consumption in the general population. METHODS...... were analysed with logistic regression analyses and associations were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: The prevalence of hand eczema was higher among previous smokers (OR = 1.13; CI = 0.90-1.40), current light smokers (OR = 1.51; CI = 1.14-2.02) and current...

  4. Support for smoke-free policy, and awareness of tobacco health effects and use of smoking cessation therapy in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Lewis, Sarah; McNeill, Ann; Gilmore, Anna; Britton, John

    2011-07-18

    Preventing an epidemic increase in smoking prevalence is a major challenge for developing countries. Ghana, has maintained a low smoking prevalence despite the presence of cigarette manufacturing for many decades. Some of this success may have been contributed by cultural factors and attitudes. We have studied public awareness of health risks, attitudes to smoke-free policy, tobacco advertising/promotion and other factors in a Ghanaian population sample. We used two-stage cluster randomized sampling to study household members aged 14 and over in a representative household sample in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. 6258 people, 88% of those eligible, took part in the study. Knowledge of health risks of smoking and passive smoking was high; radio was the main source of such information. Most people work and/or spend time in places where smoking is permitted. There was very strong support (97%) for comprehensive smoke-free legislation, particularly among Christians and Muslims. Despite the advertising ban, a third of respondents (35%), particularly in urban areas, had noticed advertising of tobacco or tobacco products, on the radio (72%) and television (28%). Among smokers, 76% had attempted to quit in the last 6 months, with the main sources of advice being friends and spouses. Use of nicotine replacement therapy was very rare. Low levels of health awareness were seen in females compared with males (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR); 0.51, 95% CI 0.39-0.69, p smoke-free policy are high in Ghana. Exposure to tobacco advertising or promotion is limited and most smokers have tried to quit. Whether these findings are cause or effect of current low smoking prevalence is uncertain.

  5. Support for smoke-free policy, and awareness of tobacco health effects and use of smoking cessation therapy in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeill Ann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventing an epidemic increase in smoking prevalence is a major challenge for developing countries. Ghana, has maintained a low smoking prevalence despite the presence of cigarette manufacturing for many decades. Some of this success may have been contributed by cultural factors and attitudes. We have studied public awareness of health risks, attitudes to smoke-free policy, tobacco advertising/promotion and other factors in a Ghanaian population sample. Methods We used two-stage cluster randomized sampling to study household members aged 14 and over in a representative household sample in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. Results 6258 people, 88% of those eligible, took part in the study. Knowledge of health risks of smoking and passive smoking was high; radio was the main source of such information. Most people work and/or spend time in places where smoking is permitted. There was very strong support (97% for comprehensive smoke-free legislation, particularly among Christians and Muslims. Despite the advertising ban, a third of respondents (35%, particularly in urban areas, had noticed advertising of tobacco or tobacco products, on the radio (72% and television (28%. Among smokers, 76% had attempted to quit in the last 6 months, with the main sources of advice being friends and spouses. Use of nicotine replacement therapy was very rare. Low levels of health awareness were seen in females compared with males (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR; 0.51, 95% CI 0.39-0.69, p Conclusion Awareness of health risks and support for smoke-free policy are high in Ghana. Exposure to tobacco advertising or promotion is limited and most smokers have tried to quit. Whether these findings are cause or effect of current low smoking prevalence is uncertain.

  6. [Alcohol withdrawal syndrome and delirium tremens. Diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilker, T

    1999-08-19

    The alcohol withdrawal syndrome can be classified into three degrees of severity on the basis of the symptomatology, autonomic withdrawal, predelirium and delirium tremens. In American literature the severity of withdrawal is recorded using the CIWA-A scale (Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment--Alcohol). The pathophysiological causes lie in an imbalance between the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters after giving up alcohol. This results in predomination by the excitatory system. Therapeutic intervention is possible here. Clomethiazole has effective sedative actions, stabilises the autonomic nervous system, and is an anticonvulsant. It is the drug of choice for autonomic withdrawal and predelirium. The benzodlazepines have a similar effect, but cannot be controlled so accurately. Carbamazepine can prevent withdrawal convulsions and progression of delirium. Clonidine acts on autonomic withdrawal and, together with neuroleptics and benzodiazepines, is easy to use parenterally for delirium tremens, while parenteral clomethiazole harbours dangers.

  7. Association between nicotine replacement therapy use in pregnancy and smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brose, Leonie S; McEwen, Andy; West, Robert

    2013-10-01

    There is an urgent need to find better ways of helping pregnant smokers to stop. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have not detected an effect of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) for smoking cessation in pregnancy. This may be because of inadequate dosing because of faster nicotine metabolism in this group. In England, many pregnant smokers use single form and combination NRT (patch plus a faster acting form). This correlational study examined whether the latter is associated with higher quit rates. Routinely collected data from 3880 pregnant smokers attempting to stop in one of 44 Stop Smoking Services in England. The outcome measure was 4-week quit rates, verified by expired-air carbon monoxide levelsmoking cessation during pregnancy. While this conclusion is based on correlational data, it lends support to continuing this treatment option pending confirmation by an RCT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Individual cognitive-behavioral therapy and behavioral couples therapy in alcohol use disorder: A comparative evaluation in community-based addiction treatment centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vedel, E.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Schippers, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Alcohol abuse serves as a chronic stressor between partners and has a deleterious effect on relationship functioning. Behavioral Couples Therapy (BCT) for alcohol dependence, studied as an adjunct to individual outpatient counseling, has shown to be effective in decreasing alcohol

  9. Smoking Status and Body Composition, Exercise, Dietary Intake, and Alcohol/Caffeine Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    cholesterol , cigarette smoking, and body weight. Acta Medica Scandinavica, 200, 470-485. Hodgdon, J.A., Beckett, M.B. (1984a). Prediction of percent body...Cigarette smoking, exercise, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol . Atherosclerosis, 52, 73-83. Stamford, B.A., Matter, S., Fell, R.D...milk, cream, cheeses, ice cream) 6. eat low-fat dairy products (e.g., low-fat milk or cottage cheere, yogurt ) 7. eat (or cook with) butter, lard, or

  10. The association of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking with body mass index: a cross-sectional, population-based study among Chinese adult male twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao Liao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a multifactorial abnormality which has an underlying genetic control but requires environmental influences to trigger. Numerous epidemiological studies have examined the roles of physical inactivity and dietary factors in obesity development. Interactions between obesity-related genes and these lifestyles have also been confirmed. However, less attention has been paid to these complex relationship between cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and obesity. The purpose of this study was to assess whether cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking were associated with body mass index (BMI, and whether these lifestyle factors modified the genetic variance of BMI. Methods Subjects were twins recruited through the Chinese National Twin Registry, aged 18 to 79 years, and the sample comprised 6121 complete male twin pairs. Information on height, weight, cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking status were assessed with self-report questionnaires. The associations of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking with BMI were evaluated by linear regression models. Further, structure equation models were conducted to estimate whether cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking status modified the degree of genetic variance of BMI. Results After adjustment for a variety of socio-demographic and lifestyle factors, former smokers had higher BMI (β = 0.475; 95 % CI, 0.196 to 0.754 whereas moderate to heavy smokers had lower BMI (β = −0.115; 95 % CI, −0.223 to −0.007 when compared with nonsmokers. BMI decreased with increased cigarette pack-years (β = −0.008; 95 % CI, −0.013 to −0.003. These effects still existed substantially in within-MZ twin pair analyses. By contrast, current alcohol drinking had no significant influence on BMI when additionally controlled for shared factors in within-pair analyses. Genetic modification by alcohol drinking was statistically significant for BMI (β = −0.137; 95 % CI, −0

  11. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  12. REVIEW OF OUTCOME RESEARCH ON MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF ALCOHOLISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Farrell, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    This review of controlled studies of marital and family therapy (MFT) in alcoholism treatment updates our earlier review (XXXXXXX). We conclude that, when the alcoholic is unwilling to seek help, MFT is effective in helping the family cope better and motivating alcoholics to enter treatment. Specifically, both Al-Anon facilitation and referral and spouse coping skills training (based on new findings) help family members cope better; and Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) promotes treatment entry and was successfully transported to a community clinic in a new study. Once the alcoholic enters treatment, MFT, particularly behavioral couples therapy (BCT), is clearly more effective than individual treatment at increasing abstinence and improving relationship functioning. New BCT studies showed efficacy with women alcoholics and with gay and lesbian alcoholics; and BCT was successfully transported to a community clinic, a brief BCT version was tested, and BCT was adapted for family members other than spouses. Future studies should evaluate: MFT with couples where both members have a current alcohol problem and with minority patients, mechanisms of change, transportability of evidence-based MFT approaches to clinical practice settings, and replication of MFT outcomes of reduced partner violence and improved child functioning. PMID:22283384

  13. Behavioural therapy for smoking cessation: The effectiveness of different intervention types for disadvantaged and affluent smokers☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, Rosemary; Murray, Susan; Brose, Leonie S.; McEwen, Andy; Bee, Jo Leonardi; Dobbie, Fiona; Bauld, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Background Disadvantaged smokers are less likely to be successful when trying to stop smoking than more affluent smokers. In the UK, NHS Stop Smoking Services (SSS) provide a range of pharmacotherapy and behavioural support, delivered by advisors with a range of backgrounds. Whether the types of support provided and who provides it influence differences in quit rates amongst low SES smokers compared with high SES smokers has not previously been examined. Methods 202,084 records of smokers in England who attended a NHS Stop Smoking Service between July 2010 and June 2011 were acquired. Smokers were followed-up by services at four weeks post quit date. Multilevel logistic regression models of CO validated quits were employed. Disadvantage was explored through the National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) and by eligibility for free prescriptions, an indicator of low income amongst adults aged between 19 and 59 in England. Results Affluent smokers were more likely to quit than disadvantaged smokers (OR 1.38 (1.35 to 1.42) for clients who paid for prescriptions compared to those eligible for free prescriptions). 80% of service clients received one-to-one counselling but open group forms of behavioural therapy were more successful (main effect OR 1.26 (1.12 to 1.41)) except amongst some of the most disadvantaged clients (long-term unemployed and prisoners). Closed groups were little deployed and they were not significantly more successful than one-to-one behavioural therapy after controls. Who delivered treatment did make a difference for some clients, with all but the most affluent less likely to be successful if they had been treated by a nurse compared with other types of advisers, including smoking cessation specialists (main effect OR 0.73 (0.65 to 0.83)). Conclusion This study provides further evidence that disadvantaged smokers find quitting more difficult even when they have attended a smoking cessation programme. The findings suggest that open

  14. Behavioural therapy for smoking cessation: the effectiveness of different intervention types for disadvantaged and affluent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, Rosemary; Murray, Susan; Brose, Leonie S; McEwen, Andy; Bee, Jo Leonardi; Dobbie, Fiona; Bauld, Linda

    2013-11-01

    Disadvantaged smokers are less likely to be successful when trying to stop smoking than more affluent smokers. In the UK, NHS Stop Smoking Services (SSS) provide a range of pharmacotherapy and behavioural support, delivered by advisors with a range of backgrounds. Whether the types of support provided and who provides it influence differences in quit rates amongst low SES smokers compared with high SES smokers has not previously been examined. 202,084 records of smokers in England who attended a NHS Stop Smoking Service between July 2010 and June 2011 were acquired. Smokers were followed-up by services at four weeks post quit date. Multilevel logistic regression models of CO validated quits were employed. Disadvantage was explored through the National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) and by eligibility for free prescriptions, an indicator of low income amongst adults aged between 19 and 59 in England. Affluent smokers were more likely to quit than disadvantaged smokers (OR 1.38 (1.35 to 1.42) for clients who paid for prescriptions compared to those eligible for free prescriptions). 80% of service clients received one-to-one counselling but open group forms of behavioural therapy were more successful (main effect OR 1.26 (1.12 to 1.41)) except amongst some of the most disadvantaged clients (long-term unemployed and prisoners). Closed groups were little deployed and they were not significantly more successful than one-to-one behavioural therapy after controls. Who delivered treatment did make a difference for some clients, with all but the most affluent less likely to be successful if they had been treated by a nurse compared with other types of advisers, including smoking cessation specialists (main effect OR 0.73 (0.65 to 0.83)). This study provides further evidence that disadvantaged smokers find quitting more difficult even when they have attended a smoking cessation programme. The findings suggest that open groups should be promoted, although

  15. Predictors of participation in a telephone-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for smoking cessation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Yim Wah; Lee, Paul H; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2015-12-23

    Little is known about factors that influence participation in smoking cessation trials among Chinese populations. The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics of individuals who chose to participate and those who chose not to participate in a proactive telephone-based acceptance and commitment therapy program for smoking cessation within a Chinese sample, and to identify predictors of program participation. Understanding the factors that predict participation in smoking cessation trials may allow researchers and healthcare professionals to target their recruitment efforts to increase the enrollment of smokers in smoking cessation programs. Participants were proactively recruited from six primary healthcare centers. Current cigarette smokers were screened for eligibility and then invited to complete a baseline questionnaire for the trial. The differences in characteristics between participants and non-participants as well as factors predictive of participation were analyzed using Chi-square tests and logistics regression. A total of 30,784 clinic attendees were approached. From these, 3,890 (12.6%) smokers were screened and identified. Of the 3,890 smokers, 420 (10.8%) were eligible to participate and completed the baseline questionnaires. The analysis showed that participants (n = 142) and non-participants (n = 278) differed significantly in terms of demographics, smoking-related, and psychological variables. The following characteristics were found to predict program participation: those with a relatively high level of dependence on nicotine (OR = 3.75; 95% CI = 1.25-11.23), those in the contemplation (OR = 7.86; 95% CI = 2.90-21.30) or preparation (OR = 24.81; 95% CI = 8.93-68.96) stages of change, and those who had abstained for one month or less in a previous attempt at quitting (OR = 3.77; 95% CI = 1.68-8.47). The study shed light on the factors predictive of participation in a counseling-based smoking cessation program among a Chinese population

  16. Smoking, consumption of alcohol and sedentary life style in population grouping and their relationships with lipemic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salas Martins Ignez

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The study, part of the project "Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, lipemic disorders, hypertension, obesity and diabetis mellitus in a population of the metropolitan area of the southeastern region of Brazil", had the following objectives: a the characterization and distribution among typical human socio-economic groupings, of the prevalence of some particular habits which constitute aspects of life-style-the use of tobacco, the use of alcohol and sedentary activity; b the establishment of the interrelation between the above-mentioned habits and some lipemic disorders. The prevalence of the habits cited behaved in the following manner: the use of tobacco predominated among men, distributed uniformly throughout the social strata; among the women the average percentage of smokers was 18,9%, a significant difference occurring among the highest socio-economic class, where the average was of 40.2%. The sedentary style of life presented high prevalence, among both men and women with exception of the women of the highest socio-economic level and of the skilled working class. The use of alcohol, as one would expect, is a habit basically practised by the men, without any statistically significant differences between classes. For the purpose of establishing associations between these risk fictors and lipemic conditions four situations were chosen, of the following characteristics: 1- total cholesterol > or = 220 mg/dl and triglycerides > or = 150 mg/dl; 2- HDL cholesterol or = 150 mg/dl; 3- HDL cholesterol or = 150 mg/dl, and the following independent variables: age, use of tobacco and the interactions between obesity and smoking, age and sedentary lifestyle, sex and obesity (R2=22%; the standardized B coefficient showed that the variables with the greatest weight in the forecasting of the variation in the levels of cholesterol were smoking and the interaction between obesity and smoking. The hypercholesterolemia accompanied by triglycerides levels

  17. The Combination of Alcohol and Cigarette Smoke Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cell Death in Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugea, Aurelia; Gerloff, Andreas; Su, Hsin-Yuan; Xu, Zhihong; Go, Ariel; Hu, Cheng; French, Samuel W; Wilson, Jeremy S; Apte, Minoti V; Waldron, Richard T; Pandol, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Smoking, an independent risk factor for pancreatitis, accelerates the development of alcoholic pancreatitis. Alcohol feeding of mice induces up-regulation of spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1s), which regulates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response and promotes cell survival upon ER stress. We examined whether smoking affects the adaptive mechanisms induced by alcohol and accelerates disorders of the ER in pancreatic acinar cells. We studied the combined effects of ethanol (EtOH) and cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on ER stress and cell death responses in mouse and human primary acini and the acinar cell line AR42J. Cells were incubated with EtOH (50 mmol/L), CSE (20-40 μg/mL), or both (CSE+EtOH), and analyzed by immunoblotting, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and cell death assays. Some cells were incubated with MKC-3946, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus signaling 1 (ERN1, also called IRE1) that blocks XBP1s formation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed isocaloric amounts of an EtOH-containing (Lieber-DeCarli) or control diet for 11 weeks and exposed to cigarette smoke or room air in an exposure chamber for 2 hours each day. During the last 3 weeks, a subset of rats received intravenous injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 3 mg/kg per week) to induce pancreatitis or saline (control). Pancreatic tissues were collected and analyzed by histology and immunostaining techniques. In AR42J and primary acini, CSE+EtOH induced cell death (necrosis and apoptosis), but neither agent alone had this effect. Cell death was associated with a significant decrease in expression of XBP1s. CSE+EtOH, but neither agent alone, slightly decreased adenosine triphosphate levels in AR42J cells, but induced oxidative stress and sustained activation (phosphorylation) of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 3 (EIF2AK3, also called PERK) and increased protein levels of DNA damage inducible transcript 3 (DDIT

  18. Alcohol and associated characteristics among older persons living with human immunodeficiency virus on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emily C; Bradley, Katharine A; Balderson, Benjamin H; McClure, Jennifer B; Grothaus, Lou; McCoy, Katryna; Rittmueller, Stacey E; Catz, Sheryl L

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use, and particularly unhealthy alcohol use, is associated with poor human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related outcomes among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Despite a rapidly growing proportion of PLWH ≥50 years, alcohol use and its associated characteristics are underdescribed in this population. The authors describe alcohol use, severity, and associated characteristics using data from a sample of PLWH ≥50 years who participated in a trial of a telephone-based intervention to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Participants were recruited from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) service organizations in 9 states and included PLWH ≥50 years who were prescribed ART, reported suboptimal adherence at screening (missing >1.5 days of medication or taking medications 2 hours early or late on >3 days in the 30 days prior to screening), and consented to participate. The AUDIT-C (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption) alcohol screen, sociodemographic characteristics, substance use, and mental health comorbidity were assessed at baseline. AUDIT-C scores were categorized into nondrinking, low-level drinking, and mild-moderate unhealthy, and severe unhealthy drinking (0, 1-3, 4-6, and 7-12, respectively). Analyses described and compared characteristics across drinking status (any/none) and across AUDIT-C categories among drinkers. Among 447 participants, 57% reported drinking in the past year (35%, 15%, and 7% reported low-level drinking, mild-moderate unhealthy drinking, and severe unhealthy drinking, respectively). Any drinking was most common among men and those who were lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT), married/partnered, had received past-year alcohol treatment, and never used injection drugs (P values all older PLWH with suboptimal ART adherence, a majority reported past-year alcohol use and 22% screened positive for unhealthy alcohol use. Any and unhealthy alcohol use were associated with demographics

  19. The effects of alcoholism and smoking on advanced cancer patients admitted to an acute supportive/palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Adile, Claudio; Ferrera, Patrizia; Casuccio, Alessandra

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the characteristics and symptom burden of advanced cancer patients with alcoholism problems and smoking, who were referred to an acute palliative/supportive care unit (ASPCU) of a comprehensive cancer center. Patients' characteristics, indications for admission, kind of admission, awareness of prognosis, and anticancer treatments were recorded. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) was used to assess physical and psychological symptoms, and the CAGE questionnaire for the diagnosis of alcoholism. Patients were also divided in three groups: persistent smokers (PS), former smokers (FS), and non-smokers (NS). The Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS) was used to assess the cognitive status of patients. Analgesic drugs and their doses at admission and discharge were recorded, as well opioid escalation index during hospital stay. Three hundred fourteen consecutive cancer patients were surveyed. Forty-seven (14.9%), 143 (45.5%), and 124 (39.5%) subjects were PS-patients, FS-patients, and NS-patients, respectively. Sixteen patients were CAGE-positive. Females were more frequently NS, while males were more frequently FS (p = 0.0005). Statistical differences were also observed in disease awareness among the categories of smoking (p = 0.048). No statistical differences were found in ESAS items, except for drowsiness at T0 in NS-patients. Differences were found in OME and OEI, although the large variability of data did not determined a statistical difference. Higher values of nausea (at T0, p = 0.0005), dyspnea (at T0 and TX, p = 0.08 and 0.023, respectively), and well-being (at TX p = 0.003) were reported in CAGE-positive patients. No correlation was found between CAGE-positive patients and smokers. Although smoking and alcoholism have obvious implications in advanced cancer patients, data remain controversial, as present data did provide limited data to confirm risk factors for advanced cancer patients

  20. Lack of association of the serotonin transporter gene promoter region polymorphism, 5-HTTLPR, including rs25531 with cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Bagger, Yu; Tanko, Laszlo B

    2009-01-01

    and previous consumption of cigarettes and alcohol were obtained using a questionnaire. Genotypes were classified according to allele size, that is, S and L with 14 and 16 repeat units, respectively, and on a functional basis by amalgamation of the L(G) and S alleles. Data were subjected to regression analyses....... These analyses revealed P values for associations between 5-HTTLPR genotype and alcohol and cigarette consumption in the range from 0.15 to 0.92. On adjustment for age and educational level, significance for the associations of 5-HTTLPR with the smoking and alcohol consumption measures was not reached. We...

  1. Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    Full Text Available Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity are thought to increase the risk of cryptorchidism in newborn males, but the evidence is inconsistent.We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on the association between maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism. Articles were retrieved by searching PubMed and ScienceDirect, and the meta-analysis was conducted using Stata/SE 12.0 software. Sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate the influence of confounding variables.We selected 32 articles, including 12 case-control, five nested case-control, and 15 cohort studies. The meta-analysis showed that maternal smoking (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23 or diabetes (OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.00-1.46 during pregnancy were associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism. Overall, the association between maternal alcohol drinking (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.87-1.07, pre-pregnancy body mass index (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95-1.09 and risk of cryptorchidism were not statistically significant. Additional analysis showed reduced risk (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.82-0.96 of cryptorchidism with moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy. No dose-response relationship was observed for increments in body mass index in the risk of cryptorchidism. Sensitivity analysis revealed an unstable result for the association between maternal diabetes, alcohol drinking and cryptorchidism. Moderate heterogeneity was detected in studies of the effect of maternal alcohol drinking and diabetes. No publication bias was detected.Maternal gestational smoking, but not maternal pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity, was associated with increased cryptorchidism risk in the offspring. Moderate alcohol drinking may reduce the risk of cryptorchidism while gestational diabetes may be a risk factor, but further studies are needed to verify this.

  2. Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing-Huan; Zheng, Xin-Min; Liu, Tong-Zu; Zhang, Wei-Bin; Zheng, Hang; Chen, Mi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity are thought to increase the risk of cryptorchidism in newborn males, but the evidence is inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on the association between maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism. Articles were retrieved by searching PubMed and ScienceDirect, and the meta-analysis was conducted using Stata/SE 12.0 software. Sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate the influence of confounding variables. We selected 32 articles, including 12 case-control, five nested case-control, and 15 cohort studies. The meta-analysis showed that maternal smoking (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.11-1.23) or diabetes (OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.00-1.46) during pregnancy were associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism. Overall, the association between maternal alcohol drinking (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.87-1.07), pre-pregnancy body mass index (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95-1.09) and risk of cryptorchidism were not statistically significant. Additional analysis showed reduced risk (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.82-0.96) of cryptorchidism with moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy. No dose-response relationship was observed for increments in body mass index in the risk of cryptorchidism. Sensitivity analysis revealed an unstable result for the association between maternal diabetes, alcohol drinking and cryptorchidism. Moderate heterogeneity was detected in studies of the effect of maternal alcohol drinking and diabetes. No publication bias was detected. Maternal gestational smoking, but not maternal pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity, was associated with increased cryptorchidism risk in the offspring. Moderate alcohol drinking may reduce the risk of cryptorchidism while gestational diabetes may be a risk factor, but further studies are needed to verify this.

  3. Randomized trial of telephone-delivered acceptance and commitment therapy versus cognitive behavioral therapy for smoking cessation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Jonathan B; Bush, Terry; Zbikowski, Susan M; Mercer, Laina D; Heffner, Jaimee L

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a pilot randomized trial of telephone-delivered acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) versus cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation. Participants were 121 uninsured South Carolina State Quitline callers who were adult smokers (at least 10 cigarettes/day) and who wanted to quit within the next 30 days. Participants were randomized to 5 sessions of either ACT or CBT telephone counseling and were offered 2 weeks of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). ACT participants completed more calls than CBT participants (M = 3.25 in ACT vs. 2.23 in CBT; p = .001). Regarding satisfaction, 100% of ACT participants reported their treatment was useful for quitting smoking (vs. 87% for CBT; p = .03), and 97% of ACT participants would recommend their treatment to a friend (vs. 83% for CBT; p = .06). On the primary outcome of intent-to-treat 30-day point prevalence abstinence at 6 months postrandomization, the quit rates were 31% in ACT versus 22% in CBT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7-3.4). Among participants depressed at baseline (n = 47), the quit rates were 33% in ACT versus 13% in CBT (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0-1.6). Consistent with ACT's theory, among participants scoring low on acceptance of cravings at baseline (n = 57), the quit rates were 37% in ACT versus 10% in CBT (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.3-22.0). ACT is feasible to deliver by phone, is highly acceptable to quitline callers, and shows highly promising quit rates compared with standard CBT quitline counseling. As results were limited by the pilot design (e.g., small sample), a full-scale efficacy trial is now needed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Randomized Trial of Telephone-Delivered Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Versus Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Smoking Cessation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Terry; Zbikowski, Susan M.; Mercer, Laina D.; Heffner, Jaimee L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a pilot randomized trial of telephone-delivered acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) versus cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation. Method: Participants were 121 uninsured South Carolina State Quitline callers who were adult smokers (at least 10 cigarettes/day) and who wanted to quit within the next 30 days. Participants were randomized to 5 sessions of either ACT or CBT telephone counseling and were offered 2 weeks of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Results: ACT participants completed more calls than CBT participants (M = 3.25 in ACT vs. 2.23 in CBT; p = .001). Regarding satisfaction, 100% of ACT participants reported their treatment was useful for quitting smoking (vs. 87% for CBT; p = .03), and 97% of ACT participants would recommend their treatment to a friend (vs. 83% for CBT; p = .06). On the primary outcome of intent-to-treat 30-day point prevalence abstinence at 6 months postrandomization, the quit rates were 31% in ACT versus 22% in CBT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7–3.4). Among participants depressed at baseline (n = 47), the quit rates were 33% in ACT versus 13% in CBT (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0–1.6). Consistent with ACT’s theory, among participants scoring low on acceptance of cravings at baseline (n = 57), the quit rates were 37% in ACT versus 10% in CBT (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.3–22.0). Conclusions: ACT is feasible to deliver by phone, is highly acceptable to quitline callers, and shows highly promising quit rates compared with standard CBT quitline counseling. As results were limited by the pilot design (e.g., small sample), a full-scale efficacy trial is now needed. PMID:24935757

  5. Measured Effect of Sexual Activities, Alcohol Consumption, Smoking and Aggression on Health Risk of Students in Rural Communities in Ikenne, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeokoli, Rita; Ofole, Ndidi M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the joint and relative contribution of sexual activities, alcohol consumption, smoking and aggression to the prediction of health risk of students in rural communities in Ogun State. Descriptive research design of correlational type was adopted. Multi-stage sampling Technique was used to draw 300 respondents from an…

  6. Partner’s and own education : does who you live with matter for self-assessed health, smoking and excessive alcohol consumption?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monden, Christiaan W.S.; Lenthe, Frank van; Graaf, Nan Dirk De; Kraaykamp, Gerbert

    2003-01-01

    This study analyses the importance of partner status and partner’s education, adjusted for own education, on selfassessed health, smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. The relationship between socio-economic factors and health-related outcomes is traditionally studied from an individual

  7. An Epidemiological Study of ADHD Symptoms among Young Persons and the Relationship with Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Consumption and Illicit Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjonsson, Gisli H.; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Young, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the relationship between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and cigarette smoking, alcohol use and illicit drug use. Method: The participants were 10,987 pupils in the final three years of their compulsory education in Iceland (ages 14-16 years). The participants completed questionnaires in…

  8. [High risk groups in health behavior defined by clustering of smoking, alcohol, and exercise habits: National Heath and Nutrition Examination Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kiwon; Sung, Joohon; Kim, Chang Yup

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the clustering of selected lifestyle factors (cigarette smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, lack of physical exercise) and identified the population characteristics associated with increasing lifestyle risks. Data on lifestyle risk factors, sociodemographic characteristics, and history of chronic diseases were obtained from 7,694 individuals >/=20 years of age who participated in the 2005 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Clustering of lifestyle risks involved the observed prevalence of multiple risks and those expected from marginal exposure prevalence of the three selected risk factors. Prevalence odds ratio was adopted as a measurement of clustering. Multiple correspondence analysis, Kendall tau correlation, Man-Whitney analysis, and ordinal logistic regression analysis were conducted to identify variables increasing lifestyle risks. In both men and women, increased lifestyle risks were associated with clustering of: (1) cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, and (2) smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and lack of physical exercise. Patterns of clustering for physical exercise were different from those for cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption. The increased unhealthy clustering was found among men 20-64 years of age with mild or moderate stress, and among women 35-49 years of age who were never-married, with mild stress, and increased body mass index (>30 kg/m(2)). Addressing a lack of physical exercise considering individual characteristics including gender, age, employment activity, and stress levels should be a focus of health promotion efforts.

  9. Lack of association between DRD2 Taq1A gene polymorphism and smoking cessation therapy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Duck; Shin, Wan Gyoon

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have reported that genetic factors are significantly associated with smoking behavior, but the influence of the smoking behavior-related genes on smoking cessation treatment is still not clear. We analyzed the smoking cessation outcomes among previously reported studies involving participants who underwent smoking cessation therapy by comparing the following DRD2 Taq1A gene polymorphism using meta-analysis. In total, nine studies including 2,851 participants were assessed and the A1 allele carriers and A2 homozygotes were compared with respect to smoking cessation outcomes by meta-analysis. No significant association was observed for the main analysis (OR = 0.900; 95% CI, 0.751 - 1.078). In subgroup analysis, three studies were assessed by comparing participants with the A1/A1, A1/A2, and A2/A2 genotypes. A significant association between the DRD2 Taq1A polymorphism andsmoking cessation therapy was observed between the A1/A1 and A1/A2 genotypes (OR = 2.967; 95% CI 1.737 - 5.068) and between the A1/A2 and A2/A2 genotypes (OR = 0.547; 95% CI 0.392 - 0.762), but not between the A1/A1 and A2/A2 genotypes (OR = 1.269; 95% CI 0.746 - 2.157). This study is the first meta-analysis to evaluate and quantitatively integrate the association between the DRD2 Taq1A polymorphism and smoking cessation therapy. A significant relationship between DRD2 Taq1A polymorphism and smoking cessation therapy was not observed.

  10. Combination rapid-acting nicotine mouth spray and nicotine patch therapy in smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Brent O; Adamson, Simon J; Crane, Julian

    2014-10-01

    Improved smoking cessation rates are urgently required if New Zealand is to reach its target of a smokefree nation by 2025, during which some 600,000 smokers will need to quit. Nicotine replacement therapy remains a core part of the pharmacological approach to smoking cessation. Oral nicotine solutions with rapid onset have recently become available. We have examined the effect of a nicotine spray and a nicotine patch on smoking cessation for 12 months. We enrolled potential participants-smokers wanting to quit aged 18-70 years, who smoked ≥9 cigarettes per day-with Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence score ≥3 in a double-blind trial in 3 trial sites. Smokers were randomized to a nicotine or placebo spray for 6 months, and all received nicotine patches daily for 5 months. They were followed at regular intervals for 12 months. A total of 1,423 subjects were randomized to nicotine oral spray (1mg of nicotine free base per spray) plus nicotine patch or a placebo spray and nicotine patch. The nicotine mouth spray plus nicotine patch showed significant improvements in prolonged abstinence for all measures to 6 months (7 consecutive days at each visit for 6 months: 15.5% vs. 10.6%; p = .006) for the combination versus placebo and nicotine patch. Thereafter, the differences were not significant. The addition of a nicotine mouth spray to a nicotine replacement patch in a population of smokers receiving a low level of behavioral support improved early quitting, but the effects were not sustained. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy smoking cessation treatment for smokers with depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Helen A; Heffner, Jaimee L; Mercer, Laina; Wyszynski, Christopher M; Vilardaga, Roger; Bricker, Jonathan B

    2015-01-01

    Smokers with depressive symptoms have more difficulty quitting smoking than the general population of smokers. The present study examines a web-based treatment using acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for smokers with depressive symptoms. The study aimed to determine participant receptivity to the intervention and its effects on smoking cessation, acceptance of internal cues, and depressive symptoms. Smokers who had positive screening results for depressive symptoms at baseline (n = 94) were selected from a randomized controlled trial (N = 222) comparing web-based ACT for smoking cessation (WebQuit.org) with Smokefree.gov. Forty-five participants (48%) completed the three-month follow-up. Compared to Smokefree.gov, WebQuit participants spent significantly more time on site (p =.001) and had higher acceptance of physical cravings (p =.033). While not significant, WebQuit participants were more engaged and satisfied with their program and were more accepting of internal cues overall. There was preliminary evidence that WebQuit participants had higher quit rates (20% versus 12%) and lower depressive symptoms at follow-up (45% versus 56%) than those in Smokefree.gov. This was the first study of web-based ACT for smoking cessation among smokers with depressive symptoms, with promising evidence of receptivity, efficacy, impact on a theory-based change process, and possible secondary effects on depression. A fully powered trial of the ACT WebQuit.org intervention specifically for depressed smokers is needed. This was part of a clinical trial registered as NCT#01166334 at www.clinicaltrials.gov .

  12. Bidirectional relationship between time preference and adolescent smoking and alcohol use: Evidence from longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Young Kyung; Shin, Eunhae

    2017-07-01

    Scholarly interest in time preference as a potential predictor of risky health behaviors in adolescents has increased in recent years. However, most of the existing literature is limited due to the exclusive reliance on cross-sectional data, precluding the possibility of establishing the direction of causality. Using longitudinal data from the Korea Youth Panel Survey (2003-7), which followed up a nationally representative sample of 3449 adolescents aged 14years for five years, this study examines a bidirectional relationship between time preference and smoking and drinking behaviors among adolescents. We used discrete time hazard models of smoking and drinking initiation as a function of time preference measured at the baseline and fixed-effects ordered logit model of time preference, respectively. Our measure of time preference was derived from the survey question on a hypothetical choice between immediate enjoyment today and likely higher scores on an exam tomorrow. The overall results provide evidence on the bidirectional relationship; that is, higher time discounting (i.e., greater relative preference for present utility over future utility) results in an increased risk of engaging in smoking and drinking, and conversely, adopting such behaviors leads to a higher discount rate. The bidirectional relationship may function as a mechanism for adolescents to engage in increased smoking and drinking or additional negative health behaviors via gateway effects, strengthening the case for preventing the initiation of risky health behaviors among adolescents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Does educational level influence the effects of smoking, alcohol, physical activity, and obesity on mortality? A prospective population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Christina; Højbjerre, Lise; Riegels, Mette

    2004-01-01

    strata. Further, subjects who were either very lean or obese had increased risks of death compared with those of normal weight at all educational levels in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: The difference in distribution of the main known risk factors may be part of the explanation for the differences......OBJECTIVES: This study aims at examining whether the relation between established risk factors and mortality differs with socioeconomic status as measured by level of education. METHODS: A population-based sample of 14,399 women and 16,236 men aged 20-93 years from Copenhagen was stratified...... into three educational levels measured as basic schooling, and the effect of smoking habits, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and body mass index, respectively, on mortality was assessed. RESULTS: Those with the lowest level of education were most frequently heavy smokers, heavy drinkers, physically...

  14. Trends in leisure time physical activity, smoking, body mass index and alcohol consumption in Danish adults with and without diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, Stig; Johnsen, Nina Føns; Snorgaard, Ole

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: In recent decades there has been an increased focus on non-pharmacological treatment of diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in leisure time physical activity (PA), smoking, body mass index (BMI), and alcohol consumption reported in 2000, 2005 and 2010 by Danish subjects......-sectional analyses from 2000, 2005 and 2010. RESULTS: In participants with diabetes, leisure time PA levels increased from 2000 to 2010: The percentage of those that were physically active increased from 53.5% to 78.2% (p... in participants with diabetes compared to participants without diabetes throughout the study. CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of physically active Danish participants older than 45 years with diabetes increased from 2000 to 2010, and the most beneficial trends in life style were observed among the women. These trends...

  15. Validation of survey information on smoking and alcohol consumption against import statistics, Greenland 1993–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bjerregaard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Questionnaires are widely used to obtain information on health-related behaviour, and they are more often than not the only method that can be used to assess the distribution of behaviour in subgroups of the population. No validation studies of reported consumption of tobacco or alcohol have been published from circumpolar indigenous communities. Objective. The purpose of the study is to compare information on the consumption of tobacco and alcohol obtained from 3 population surveys in Greenland with import statistics. Design. Estimates of consumption of cigarettes and alcohol using several different survey instruments in cross-sectional population studies from 1993–1994, 1999–2001 and 2005–2010 were compared with import statistics from the same years. Results. For cigarettes, survey results accounted for virtually the total import. Alcohol consumption was significantly under-reported with reporting completeness ranging from 40% to 51% for different estimates of habitual weekly consumption in the 3 study periods. Including an estimate of binge drinking increased the estimated total consumption to 78% of the import. Conclusion. Compared with import statistics, questionnaire-based population surveys capture the consumption of cigarettes well in Greenland. Consumption of alcohol is under-reported, but asking about binge episodes in addition to the usual intake considerably increased the reported intake in this population and made it more in agreement with import statistics. It is unknown to what extent these findings at the population level can be inferred to population subgroups.

  16. A randomized controlled study of exposure therapy as aftercare for alcohol use disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellentin, Angelina Isabella; Nielsen, Bent; Nielsen, Anette Søgaard

    2016-01-01

    Background It is well documented that individuals with Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) respond well during evidence-based psychological treatment, but also that a large proportion relapses when discharged from treatment and confronted with alcohol in real life. Cue Exposure Treatment (CET) focuses...... on exposing individuals to alcohol cues in order to reduce cravings as well as the likelihood of relapse. The aims of the study are: 1) to investigate whether CET aftercare delivered via a smartphone or in group sessions increases the effect of Cognitive Behavioural Treatment in groups of alcohol dependent...... individuals; 2) to investigate whether CET as a smartphone application is as or more effective than CET group therapy, and 3) to investigate whether CET as a smartphone application is more cost-effective than CET group aftercare and Aftercare as Usual. Design and methods The study will be implemented...

  17. Prevalence of smoking, alcohol and substance use among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in Denmark compared with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Anders G; Dalsgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have an increased risk of alcohol and substance abuse in adulthood. An unequivocal reason for this association has not yet been identified but it has been shown that pharmacological treatment is likely to reduce this risk. To test whether adolescents with ADHD in pharmacological treatment have a higher prevalence of smoking and use of alcohol and drugs than a matched control group from the general population. The study will also analyse associations between smoking, alcohol and drug use and comorbid psychiatric symptoms. The sample in this case-control study comprised 219 adolescents aged 13-18 years, including a case group of 117 adolescents with ADHD and a control group of 102 adolescents without ADHD. Participating subjects completed a questionnaire about their use of cigarettes, drugs and alcohol and the self-report version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). 21% of ADHD probands vs. 16% controls were daily smokers (P = 0.326). Among alcohol users, 52% of ADHD probands vs. 70% controls confirmed monthly alcohol intake (P = 0.014); 4% of cases compared with 7% of controls used illicit drugs within last month (P = 0.260). No significant group differences were found in the prevalence of ever having smoked cigarettes, drinking alcohol or using illicit drugs between adolescents with ADHD and controls. Contrary to expectations, subjects in the control group had a more regular and heavier use of alcohol. However, ADHD patients had a heavier use of cigarettes than controls.

  18. A growing fire hazard concern in communities: home oxygen therapy and continued smoking habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Catherine J; Markkanen, Pia K; Fantasia, Linda M; Gore, Rebecca J; Sama, Susan R; Quinn, Margaret M

    2015-02-01

    The Safe Home Care Project investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively a range of occupational safety and health hazards, as well as injury and illness prevention practices, among home care aides in Massachusetts. This article reports on a hazard identified by aides during the study's initial focus groups: smoking by home care clients on long-term oxygen therapy. Following the qualitative phase we conducted a cross-sectional survey among 1,249 aides and found that medical oxygen was present in 9 percent of aide visits (314 of aides' 3,484 recent client visits) and that 25 percent of clients on oxygen therapy were described as smokers. Based on our findings, the Board of Health in a local town conducted a pilot study to address fire hazards related to medical oxygen. Medical oxygen combined with smoking or other sources of ignition is a serious fire and explosion hazard that threatens not only workers who visit homes but also communities. © 2015 SAGE Publications.

  19. Alcohol Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Enhancing Effectiveness by Incorporating Spirituality and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective modality for the treatment of alcoholism. Given widespread interest in incorporating spirituality into professional treatment, this article orients practitioners to spiritually modified CBT, an approach that may enhance outcomes with some spiritually motivated clients. More specifically, by…

  20. Matching Alcoholics to Coping Skills or Interactional Therapies: Two-Year Follow-Up Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Ned L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Assigned 96 inpatients in alcoholism treatment to aftercare group treatment with either coping skills training or interactional therapy. Survival analyses using two-year outcome data provided evidence for durability of matching interaction effects. Individuals scoring high on sociopathy or global psychopathology had better outcomes in coping…

  1. Behavioral Marital Therapy for Male Alcoholics: Clinical Procedures from a Treatment Outcome Study in Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Timothy J.; Cutter, Henry S. G.

    1984-01-01

    Compares behavioral with interactional couples group therapy for male alcoholics (N=36). Behavioral methods included rehearsal and weekly homework assignments, such as contracting, shared recreation, caring behaviors, communication skills, and negotiation. Both methods were effective, but preliminary results showed communication skills training…

  2. Predictors of Relapse in a Bupropion Trial for Smoking Cessation in Recently-Abstinent Alcoholics: Preliminary Results Using an Aggregate Genetic Risk Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. McGeary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Rates of smoking in the US population have decreased overall, but rates in some groups, including alcoholic smokers, remain high. Many newly sober alcoholics are concerned about their smoking and some attempt to quit. However, quit rates in this population are low. Prior studies suggest risk for relapse in this population may be genetically influenced and that genetic factors may moderate response to treatment. Methods In this exploratory study, we had two specific aims: (1 to investigate associations between genetic risk and outcome; (2 to investigate whether genetic risk moderates the efficacy of a medication intervention. Data are from a subsample of 90 participants from a clinical trial of smoking cessation treatment for smokers with between 2 and 12 months of alcohol abstinence. Subjects were randomly assigned to bupropion or placebo. All subjects received counseling and nicotine patches. To examine the possibility that bupropion may have been efficacious in participants with a specific genetic profile (ie, a pharmacogenetic approach, an aggregate genetic risk score was created by combining risk genotypes previously identified in bupropion treatment studies. Results Although medication efficacy was not moderated by the aggregate genetic risk score, there was an interaction between nicotine dependence and genetic risk in predicting smoking abstinence rates at the end of treatment (10 weeks. Conclusions Results suggest an aggregate genetic risk score approach may have utility in treatment trials of alcoholics who smoke. Additionally, these findings suggest a strategy for understanding and interpreting conflicting results for single genetic markers examined as moderators of smoking cessation treatment.

  3. DNA global hypomethylation in squamous cell head and neck cancer associated with smoking, alcohol consumption and stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian M; Mydlarz, Wojciech K; Mithani, Suhail K; Califano, Joseph A

    2007-10-15

    Epigenetic changes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Prior efforts have primarily examined regional promoter hypermethylation as a silencer of tumor suppressor gene expression. To analyze the global state of methylation in the HNSCC genome, we utilize pyrosequencing of repetitive elements (LINEs) to compare the state of global methylation in HNSCC to normal aerodigestive mucosa. 137 samples (119 HNSCC tumors and 18 normal mucosal tissues) were digested to extract DNA and subjected to bisulfite treatment. Treated DNA was amplified using PCR primers for the repetitive LINEs sequence and produced a heterogeneous sample of products, from many genomic loci. These products were pyrosequenced to quantitatively evaluate their global genomic methylation status. HNSCC specimens showed global hypomethylation, with a mean level of genomic methylation of 46.8% methylated with a standard deviation of 9.0. Conversely, the normal upper airway mucosa had a global methylation level of 54.0 and a standard deviation of 4.6 (Mann-Whitney p value < 0.001). The tumor specimens also showed an increasing degree of hypomethylation associated with advanced tumor stage (ANOVA p-value of 0.003). About 67% of HNSCC's are globally hypomethylated when evaluated against the minimum level of methylation in the normal mucosal specimens. Degree of global hypomethylation was associated with smoking history, alcohol use and stage in univariate analysis (p-value 0.02), however, only HNSCC diagnosis remained significant on multivariate analysis. Despite the presence of regional promoter hypermethylation, HNSCC demonstrates global genomic hypomethylation. The effects of stage, alcohol use and smoking on global hypomethylation were not independently significant. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Prediction of Smoking, Alcohol, Drugs, and Psychoactive Drugs Abuse Based on Emotional Dysregulation and Child Abuse Experience in People with Borderline Personality Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M GannadiFarnood

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research was an attempt to predict the tendency of people having borderline personality traits to smoking, drinking alcohol, and taking psychoactive drugs based on emotional dysregulation and child abuse. Method: This study employed a correlation method which is categorized in descriptive category. A sample including 600 male and female bachelor students of Tabriz University was selected by cluster sampling. Then, high risk behaviors scale, Emotional dysregulation Scale, Child abuse scale, and borderline personality scale (STB were distributed among this group. Findings: Stepwise multiple regression analysis suggested that emotional dysregulation and child abuse significantly predicted varying degrees of smoking, drug, and alcohol usage. Conclusion: The research findings suggest the basic role of initial biological vulnerability in terms of emotional regulation (dysregulation and invalidating family environment (child abuse in the prediction of catching the disorder of borderline personality traits and producing high riskbehaviorssuch as alcohol drink and drug usage.

  5. Alcohol consumption and smoking and their associations with socio-demographic characteristics, dietary patterns, and perceived academic stress in Puerto Rican college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Anaisa M; Cruz, Sonia Y; Ríos, Josué L; Pagán, Ideliz; Fabián, Carla; Betancourt, Jesmari; Rivera-Soto, Winna T; González, Michael J; Palacios, Cristina

    2013-06-01

    College students often use different strategies, such as consuming alcohol and smoking, to cope with stress. We examined the associations between self-perceived academic stress, alcohol consumption, smoking, and dietary patterns in graduate students. A representative stratified sample of 275 students from each school of the Medical Science Campus of the University of Puerto Rico (UPR-MSC) completed a 48-item questionnaire that solicited the following: socio-demographic data, estimates of self-perceived stress, estimates of the frequency of alcohol consumption and the type(s) of alcohol consumed, details regarding smoking habits, and information associated with diet (i.e., dietary patterns). Fisher's exact test and the Chi2 test were used to assess the associations between the different study variables. Only 3% were considered smokers (defined as > 1 cigarettes per day), with the greatest number of smokers among those aged 21-30 y (pacademic load/stress or with dietary pattern. Most smokers reported that their main reason for using cigarettes was to cope with stress. About 70% of the students were considered drinkers (defined as > 0 drink/day), with a higher proportion found among women (63.5%), among those aged 21-30 years (90.6%), and among those with a low or moderate household income (pacademic stress, with a greater proportion of drinkers reporting experiencing moderate levels of academic stress (pacademic load (p>0.05). Most subjects classified as drinkers reported that alcohol consumption was not (in their experience) an effective strategy for the management of stress (81%). Alcohol consumption was only associated with academic stress. No associations were found between smoking habits and academic stress/load and dietary patterns.

  6. Smoking and Passive Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell V. Luepker, MD, MS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the literature on associations between cardiovascular diseases and tobacco use, including recent trends in smoking behaviors and clinical approaches for cessation of smoking. Methods: A literature review of recent scientific findings for smoking and cardiovascular diseases and recommendations for obtaining cessation. Results: Tobacco smoking is causally related to cardiovascular disease, with nearly a half million deaths annually attributed to cigarette smoking in the United States. The human, economic, medical, and indirect costs are enormous. Secondhand smoke as inhaled from the environment also plays an important role in the genesis of cardiovascular diseases. A recent trend in the use of e-cigarettes is noted particularly among youth. For children, prevention is the best strategy. For adult smokers, behavioral treatments, self-help approaches, and pharmacologic therapies are readily available. Clinicians can have a significant impact on patients’ smoking habits. Adding to individual strategies, regulatory community and public health approaches provide the potential for eliminating the use of tobacco. Conclusion: Tobacco smoke causes cardiovascular morbidity and death. Clinicians can play a role in preventing smoking and promoting cessation.

  7. The Perceptions and Habits of Alcohol Consumption and Smoking Among Canadian Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Sidd; Ismail, Zahinoor; Jarvis, Scott; Payne, Eric; Keetbaas, Shayne; Payne, Rob; Rothenburg, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors aim to quantify the extent, and to assess student perception, of alcohol and tobacco use among medical students at the University of Calgary, and the relationship of these attitudes to problem drinking (according to the CAGE questionnaire). Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to first-, second-, and third-year medical…

  8. Validation of survey information on smoking and alcohol consumption against import statistics, Greenland 1993-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Becker, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Questionnaires are widely used to obtain information on health-related behaviour, and they are more often than not the only method that can be used to assess the distribution of behaviour in subgroups of the population. No validation studies of reported consumption of tobacco or alcohol have been...

  9. Effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of nickel sensitization and contact sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    sensitization and nickel sensitization. A random sample of adults (n=3460) from the general population of Copenhagen was invited to participate in a general health examination including patch-testing. Alcohol consumption was not associated with nickel sensitization, whereas a significant trend (p...

  10. Coffee, alcohol, smoking, physical activity and QT interval duration: results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyi Zhang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in the electrocardiographic QT interval duration have been associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. However, there is substantial uncertainty about the effect of modifiable factors such as coffee intake, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity on QT interval duration.We studied 7795 men and women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES III, 1988-1994. Baseline QT interval was measured from the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram. Coffee and tea intake, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activities over the past month, and lifetime smoking habits were determined using validated questionnaires during the home interview.In the fully adjusted model, the average differences in QT interval comparing participants drinking ≥6 cups/day to those who did not drink any were -1.2 ms (95% CI -4.4 to 2.0 for coffee, and -2.0 ms (-11.2 to 7.3 for tea, respectively. The average differences in QT interval duration comparing current to never smokers was 1.2 ms (-0.6 to 2.9 while the average difference in QT interval duration comparing participants drinking ≥7 drinks/week to non-drinkers was 1.8 ms (-0.5 to 4.0. The age, race/ethnicity, and RR-interval adjusted differences in average QT interval duration comparing men with binge drinking episodes to non-drinkers or drinkers without binge drinking were 2.8 ms (0.4 to 5.3 and 4.0 ms (1.6 to 6.4, respectively. The corresponding differences in women were 1.1 (-2.9 to 5.2 and 1.7 ms (-2.3 to 5.7. Finally, the average differences in QT interval comparing the highest vs. the lowest categories of total physical activity was -0.8 ms (-3.0 to 1.4.Binge drinking was associated with longer QT interval in men but not in women. QT interval duration was not associated with other modifiable factors including coffee and tea intake, smoking, and physical activity.

  11. [Effectiveness of forgiveness therapy on resilience, self-esteem, and spirituality of wives of alcoholics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Lee, Mihyoung

    2014-06-01

    In this study the effects of forgiveness therapy on the resilience, self-esteem, and spirituality of wives of men suffering from alcohol abuse was examined. The study design was a quasi-experimental design. Forgiveness therapy was conducted once a week for 12 weeks. Data were obtained from March 2012 to December 2013. Participants were chosen from women in two Alcohol Counseling Centers. Of the 29 participants, 16 were assigned to the experimental group and 13 to the control group. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, χ(2)-test, and repeated measure ANOVA. There were statistically significantly differences for resilience, self-esteem, and spirituality between the experimental and control groups. Forgiveness therapy improved the resilience, self-esteem, and spirituality in the experimental group compared to the control group (pself-esteem. This study results show that forgiveness therapy is effective in improving resilience, self-esteem, and spirituality in wives of men suffering from alcohol abuse. Therefore, forgiveness therapy can be considered a useful nursing intervention to promote improvements in emotional stability and provide pain relief for these wives.

  12. Investigating the synergistic interaction of diabetes, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, and hypercholesterolemia on the risk of pancreatic cancer: a case-control study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Sferrazza, Antonella; Gualano, Maria Rosaria; de Waure, Chiara; Clemente, Gennaro; De Rose, Agostino Maria; Nicolotti, Nicola; Nuzzo, Gennaro; Siliquini, Roberta; Boccia, Antonio; Ricciardi, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present research are to investigate the possible predictors of pancreatic cancer, in particular smoking status, alcohol consumption, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus, in patients with histologically confirmed pancreatic carcinoma and to examine the synergism between risk factors. A case-control study (80 patients and 392 controls) was conducted at the Teaching Hospital "Agostino Gemelli" in Rome. A conditional logistic regression was used for the statistical analysis and results were presented as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We also investigated the possible interactions between risk factors and calculated the synergism index (SI). The multivariate analysis revealed that hypercholesterolemia and alcohol consumption resulted in important risk factors for pancreatic cancer even after the adjustment for all variables (OR: 5.05, 95% CI: 2.94-8.66; OR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.30-3.89, resp.). Interestingly, important synergistic interactions between risk factors were found, especially between ever smoking status and alcohol consumptions (SI = 17.61) as well as alcohol consumption and diabetes (SI = 17.77). In conclusion, the study confirms that hypercholesterolemia and alcohol consumption represent significant and independent risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Moreover, there is evidence of synergistic interaction between diabetes and lifestyle factors (drinking alcohol and eating fatty foods).

  13. Investigating the Synergistic Interaction of Diabetes, Tobacco Smoking, Alcohol Consumption, and Hypercholesterolemia on the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Case-Control Study in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe La Torre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present research are to investigate the possible predictors of pancreatic cancer, in particular smoking status, alcohol consumption, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus, in patients with histologically confirmed pancreatic carcinoma and to examine the synergism between risk factors. A case-control study (80 patients and 392 controls was conducted at the Teaching Hospital “Agostino Gemelli” in Rome. A conditional logistic regression was used for the statistical analysis and results were presented as odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. We also investigated the possible interactions between risk factors and calculated the synergism index (SI. The multivariate analysis revealed that hypercholesterolemia and alcohol consumption resulted in important risk factors for pancreatic cancer even after the adjustment for all variables (OR: 5.05, 95% CI: 2.94–8.66; OR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.30–3.89, resp.. Interestingly, important synergistic interactions between risk factors were found, especially between ever smoking status and alcohol consumptions (SI = 17.61 as well as alcohol consumption and diabetes (SI = 17.77. In conclusion, the study confirms that hypercholesterolemia and alcohol consumption represent significant and independent risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Moreover, there is evidence of synergistic interaction between diabetes and lifestyle factors (drinking alcohol and eating fatty foods.

  14. Associations between night work and BMI, alcohol, smoking, caffeine and exercise--a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchvold, Hogne Vikanes; Pallesen, Ståle; Øyane, Nicolas M F; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2015-11-12

    Shift work is associated with negative health effects. Increased prevalence of several cardiovascular risk factors among shift workers/night workers compared with day workers have been shown resulting in increased risk of cardiovascular events among shift workers and night workers. Previous studies have taken a dichotomous approach to the comparison between day and night workers. The present study uses a continuous approach and provides such a new perspective to the negative effects of night work load as a possible risk factor for undesirable health effects. This cross sectional study (The SUrvey of Shift work, Sleep and Health (SUSSH)) uses data collected from December 2008 to March 2009. The study population consists of Norwegian nurses. The study collected information about demographic and lifestyle factors: Body Mass Index (BMI), smoking habits, alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption and exercise habits. The lifestyle parameters were evaluated using multiple hierarchical regression and binary logistic regression. Number of night shifts worked last year (NNL) was used as operationalization of night work load. Adjustment for possible confounders were made. Obesity was defined as BMI > 30. Alcohol Consumption was evaluated using the short form of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption (AUDIT-C). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 22. We had data from 2059 nurses. NNL was significantly and positively associated with BMI, both when evaluated against BMI as a continuous parameter (Beta = .055, p worked per week (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI = 1.01-1.05). We found a positive significant association between night work load and BMI. This suggests that workers with a heavy night work load might need special attention and frequent health checks due to higher risk of undesirable health effects.

  15. Association of Visceral Fat Area, Smoking, and Alcohol Consumption with Reflux Esophagitis and Barrett's Esophagus in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntaro Matsuzaki

    Full Text Available Central obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of visceral fat area and other lifestyle factors with reflux esophagitis or Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.Individuals who received thorough medical examinations including the measurement of visceral fat area by abdominal computed tomography were enrolled. Factors associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, the severity of reflux esophagitis, or the presence of Barrett's esophagus were determined using multivariable logistic regression models.A total of 2608 individuals were eligible for the analyses. Visceral fat area was associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis both in men (odds ratio, 1.21 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.01 to 1.46 and women (odds ratio, 2.31 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.57 to 3.40. Current smoking and serum levels of triglyceride were also associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis in men. However, significant association between visceral fat area and the severity of reflux esophagitis or the presence of Barrett's esophagus was not shown. In men, excessive alcohol consumption on a drinking day, but not the frequency of alcohol drinking, was associated with both the severity of reflux esophagitis (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confident interval, 1.03 to 4.41 and the presence of Barrett's esophagus (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confident interval, 1.14 to 2.56.Visceral fat area was independently associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, but not with the presence of Barrett's esophagus. On the other hand, quantity of alcohol consumption could play a role in the development of severe reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.

  16. [Relapse prevention program consisting of coping skills training, cue exposure treatment, and letter therapy for Japanese alcoholic men who relapsed after standard cognitive-behavioral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Akira; Matsushita, Sachio; Toyama, Tomomi; Nakayama, Hideki; Takimura, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Mitsuru; Yoneda, Junichi; Maesato, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Takeshi; Higuchi, Susumu; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-04-01

    Coping skills training (CST) and cue exposure treatment (CET) have yielded favorable outcomes when used to treat alcoholics. We conducted 6-week inpatient programs that consisted of 9 CST group sessions (n = 117) during 2005-2009 and 9 CST group sessions plus 4 CET group sessions (n = 49) during 2009-2011 and subsequent 1-year letter therapy for Japanese alcoholic men who had relapsed and been readmitted after standard cognitive-behavioral inpatient therapy. When patients received a letter containing encouraging words every 2 weeks, they were asked to reread their CST and CET records and to respond to the letter by marking drinking days on a calendar and naming the skills on a list of the 9 CST themes and CET that were useful for maintaining abstinence during that 2-week period. The estimated percentages of achievement of 30 or fewer drinking days during the one year of letter therapy were 36.1 - 45.8%. 'Non-smoking', '2nd admission', and 'After age-limit job retirement' were significant factors in achieving good outcomes. The 'usefulness' responses for 'Increasing pleasant activities', 'CET', 'Anger management', ' Managing negative thinking', 'Problem solving', and ' Seemingly irrelevant decisions' as percentages of overall responses to the letters were significantly higher, in order of decreasing percentages, in the achiever group than in the non-achiever group, but the differences between the groups in ' Managing urges to drink', ' Drink refusal skills', ' Planning for emergencies', and ' Receiving criticism about drinking' were not significant. The odds ratios for achievement of 30 or fewer drinking days during the 1-year period increased significantly by 1.15 -1.31 fold per 10% increment in the 'usefulness' ratio for 'Increasing pleasant activities'. The difference in percentage achievement between the group treated by CST alone and the group treated by CST plus CET was not significant. In conclusion, some coping skills were more useful for relapse prevention

  17. Effects of Assault Type on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Coexisting Depression and Alcohol Misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie A. Bailey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although assault exposure is common in mental health and substance misusing populations, screening for assaults in treatment settings is frequently overlooked. This secondary analysis explored the effects of past sexual (SA and physical (PA assault on depression, alcohol misuse, global functioning and attrition in the Depression and Alcohol Integrated and Single focussed Intervention (DAISI project, whose participants (N = 278 received cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT for their depression and/or alcohol misuse. Of the 278 DAISI participants, 220 consented to screening for past assault (either by a stranger or non-stranger at baseline. Depression, alcohol, and global functioning assessments were administered at baseline and 3, 12, 24, and 36 months post baseline. A between-group analysis was used to assess differences between SA and No SA, and PA and No PA groupings, on adjusted mean treatment outcomes across all assessment periods. SA and PA participants had similar mean symptom reductions compared to No SA and No PA participants except for lower depression and global functioning change scores at the 12-month follow-up. People with coexisting depression and alcohol misuse reporting SA or PA can respond well to CBT for depression and alcohol misuse. However, follow-up is recommended in order to monitor fluctuations in outcomes.

  18. No evidence for genome-wide interactions on plasma fibrinogen by smoking, alcohol consumption and body mass index: results from meta-analyses of 80,607 subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Baumert

    Full Text Available Plasma fibrinogen is an acute phase protein playing an important role in the blood coagulation cascade having strong associations with smoking, alcohol consumption and body mass index (BMI. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified a variety of gene regions associated with elevated plasma fibrinogen concentrations. However, little is yet known about how associations between environmental factors and fibrinogen might be modified by genetic variation. Therefore, we conducted large-scale meta-analyses of genome-wide interaction studies to identify possible interactions of genetic variants and smoking status, alcohol consumption or BMI on fibrinogen concentration. The present study included 80,607 subjects of European ancestry from 22 studies. Genome-wide interaction analyses were performed separately in each study for about 2.6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs across the 22 autosomal chromosomes. For each SNP and risk factor, we performed a linear regression under an additive genetic model including an interaction term between SNP and risk factor. Interaction estimates were meta-analysed using a fixed-effects model. No genome-wide significant interaction with smoking status, alcohol consumption or BMI was observed in the meta-analyses. The most suggestive interaction was found for smoking and rs10519203, located in the LOC123688 region on chromosome 15, with a p value of 6.2 × 10(-8. This large genome-wide interaction study including 80,607 participants found no strong evidence of interaction between genetic variants and smoking status, alcohol consumption or BMI on fibrinogen concentrations. Further studies are needed to yield deeper insight in the interplay between environmental factors and gene variants on the regulation of fibrinogen concentrations.

  19. Association of alcohol intake and smoking with malignant lymphoma risk in Japanese: a hospital-based case-control study at Aichi Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Junya; Matsuo, Keitaro; Kawase, Takakazu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Seto, Masao; Morishima, Yasuo; Tajima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Hideo

    2009-09-01

    Given the lower incidence and differences in distribution of malignant lymphoma in Asian than western populations, the association of alcohol intake and smoking with malignant lymphoma risk in Asian populations merits investigation. Here, we conducted a sex- and age-matched case-control study of a Japanese population using two data sets, the first and second versions of the Hospital-based Epidemiological Research Program at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (HERPACC-I and HERPACC-II, respectively), in 452 and 330 cases of histologically diagnosed malignant lymphoma and 2,260 and 1,650 noncancer controls, respectively. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using a conditional logistic regression model that incorporated smoking exposure and alcohol intake. Compared with nondrinking, consumption of >or=50 g/d by frequent drinkers was associated with significantly decreased risk in both data sets [OR (95% CI), 0.70 (0.53-0.93) for HERPACC-I and 0.40 (0.23-0.68) for HERPACC-II]. Given similar findings among groups, we used pooled data sets in subsequent analyses. For any alcohol intake versus nondrinking, point estimates of OR were less than unity for all four malignant lymphoma subtypes. In contrast, pack-years of smoking were associated with increased malignant lymphoma risk: relative to the reference (0-4 pack-years), OR (95% CI) were 1.32 (1.02-1.71), 1.39 (1.07-1.80), and 1.48 (1.12-1.95) for 5 to 19, 20 to 39, and >or=40 pack-years, respectively. This association with smoking was less apparent for all subtypes, except Hodgkin's lymphoma. In conclusion, we found that alcohol had an inverse association with malignant lymphoma risk across all malignant lymphoma subtypes in our Japanese subjects. Smoking appeared to be positively associated with malignant lymphoma risk, but this finding may vary by subtype.

  20. Gene network analysis shows immune-signaling and ERK1/2 as novel genetic markers for multiple addiction phenotypes: alcohol, smoking and opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C; Yuan, Christine; Wang, Jian; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Shete, Sanjay

    2015-06-05

    Addictions to alcohol and tobacco, known risk factors for cancer, are complex heritable disorders. Addictive behaviors have a bidirectional relationship with pain. We hypothesize that the associations between alcohol, smoking, and opioid addiction observed in cancer patients have a genetic basis. Therefore, using bioinformatics tools, we explored the underlying genetic basis and identified new candidate genes and common biological pathways for smoking, alcohol, and opioid addiction. Literature search showed 56 genes associated with alcohol, smoking and opioid addiction. Using Core Analysis function in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, we found that ERK1/2 was strongly interconnected across all three addiction networks. Genes involved in immune signaling pathways were shown across all three networks. Connect function from IPA My Pathway toolbox showed that DRD2 is the gene common to both the list of genetic variations associated with all three addiction phenotypes and the components of the brain neuronal signaling network involved in substance addiction. The top canonical pathways associated with the 56 genes were: 1) calcium signaling, 2) GPCR signaling, 3) cAMP-mediated signaling, 4) GABA receptor signaling, and 5) G-alpha i signaling. Cancer patients are often prescribed opioids for cancer pain thus increasing their risk for opioid abuse and addiction. Our findings provide candidate genes and biological pathways underlying addiction phenotypes, which may be future targets for treatment of addiction. Further study of the variations of the candidate genes could allow physicians to make more informed decisions when treating cancer pain with opioid analgesics.

  1. Suitability of a Group Behavioural Therapy Module for Workplace Smoking Cessation Programs in Malaysia: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarof, Muhammad Faizal; Ali, Adliah Mhd; Amit, Noh; Bakry, Mohd Makmor; Taha, Nur Akmar

    2016-01-01

    In Malaysia, data on components suitability the established smoking cessation module is limited. This exploratory study aimed to evaluate the suitability of the components developed in the module for group behavioural therapy in workplace smoking cessation programs. Twenty staff were identified but only eight individuals were selected according to the study criteria during the recruitment period in May 2014. Focus group discussion was conducted to identify themes relevant to the behavioural issues among smokers. Thematic analysis yielded seven major themes which were reasons for regular smoking, reasons for quitting, comprehending smoking characteristics, quit attempt experiences, support and encouragement, learning new skills and behaviour, and preparing for lapse/relapse or difficult situations. As a result, the developed module was found to be relevant and suitable for use based on these themes.

  2. The Effect of Computer Usage in Internet Café on Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Use among Chinese Adolescents and Youth: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Delva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We used longitudinal data to investigate the relationship between computer use in internet cafés and smoking/drinking behavior among Chinese adolescents and young adults. Data are from two waves of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (2004 and 2006. Fixed effects models were used to examine if changes in internet café use were associated with changes in cigarette smoking and drinking of alcohol. Male café users spent on average 17.3 hours in front of the computer/week. This was associated with an increase in the probability of being a current smoker by 13.3% and with smoking 1.7 more cigarettes. Female café users spent on average 11 hours on the computer/week. This was associated with an increase in the probability of drinking wine and/or liquor by 14.74% and was not associated with smoking. Internet cafés are an important venue by which adolescent and young adults in China are exposed to smoking and drinking. Multi-component interventions are needed ranging from policies regulating cigarette and alcohol availability in these venues to anti-tobacco campaigns aimed at the general population but also at individuals who frequent these establishments.

  3. Effect of Smoking Reduction Therapy on Smoking Cessation for Smokers without an Intention to Quit: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Effective strategies are needed to encourage smoking cessation for smokers without an intention to quit. We systematically reviewed the literature to investigate whether smoking reduction therapy can increase the long-term cessation rates of smokers without an intention to quit. Methods: PubMed, Embase, and CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs on the effect of smoking reduction therapy on long-term smoking cessation in smokers without an intention to quit. The primary outcome was the cessation rate at the longest follow-up period. A random effects model was used to calculate pooled relative risks (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: Fourteen trials with a total of 7981 smokers were included. The pooled analysis suggested that reduction support plus medication significantly increased the long-term cessation of smokers without an intention to quit compared to reduction support plus placebo (RR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.44–2.7; I2, 52% or no intervention (RR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.41–2.64; I2, 46%. In a subgroup of smokers who received varenicline or nicotine replacement therapy (NRT, the differences were also statistically significant. This suggests the safety of using NRT. The percentage of smokers with serious adverse events who discontinued because of these events in the non-NRT group was slightly significantly different than in the control group. Insufficient evidence is available to test the efficacy of reduction behavioural support in promoting long-term cessation among this population. Conclusions: The present meta-analysis indicated the efficacy of NRT- and varenicline-assisted reduction to achieve complete cessation among smokers without an intention to quit. Further evidence is needed to assess the efficacy and safety of reduction behavioural support and bupropion.

  4. Effect of Smoking Reduction Therapy on Smoking Cessation for Smokers without an Intention to Quit: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Sun, Samio; He, Yao; Zeng, Jing

    2015-08-25

    Effective strategies are needed to encourage smoking cessation for smokers without an intention to quit. We systematically reviewed the literature to investigate whether smoking reduction therapy can increase the long-term cessation rates of smokers without an intention to quit. PubMed, Embase, and CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effect of smoking reduction therapy on long-term smoking cessation in smokers without an intention to quit. The primary outcome was the cessation rate at the longest follow-up period. A random effects model was used to calculate pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Fourteen trials with a total of 7981 smokers were included. The pooled analysis suggested that reduction support plus medication significantly increased the long-term cessation of smokers without an intention to quit compared to reduction support plus placebo (RR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.44-2.7; I(2), 52%) or no intervention (RR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.41-2.64; I(2), 46%). In a subgroup of smokers who received varenicline or nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), the differences were also statistically significant. This suggests the safety of using NRT. The percentage of smokers with serious adverse events who discontinued because of these events in the non-NRT group was slightly significantly different than in the control group. Insufficient evidence is available to test the efficacy of reduction behavioural support in promoting long-term cessation among this population. The present meta-analysis indicated the efficacy of NRT- and varenicline-assisted reduction to achieve complete cessation among smokers without an intention to quit. Further evidence is needed to assess the efficacy and safety of reduction behavioural support and bupropion.

  5. Associations of Cigarette Smoking and Polymorphisms in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase with Neurocognition in Alcohol Dependent Individuals during Early Abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy eDurazzo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic cigarette smoking and polymorphisms in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT are associated with neurocognition in normal controls and those with various neuropsychiatric conditions. The influence of these polymorphisms on neurocognition in alcohol dependence is unclear. The goal of this report was to investigate the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in BDNF Val66Met and COMT Val158Met with neurocognition in a treatment-seeking alcohol dependent cohort and determine if neurocognitive differences between non-smokers and smokers previously observed in this cohort persist when controlled for these functional SNPs. Genotyping was conducted on 70 primarily male treatment-seeking alcohol dependent participants (ALC who completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery after 33 ± 9 days of monitored abstinence. Smoking ALC performed significantly worse than non-smoking ALC on the domains of auditory-verbal and visuospatial learning and memory, cognitive efficiency, general intelligence, processing speed and global neurocognition. In smoking ALC, greater number of years of smoking over lifetime was related to poorer performance on multiple domains. COMT Met homozygotes were superior to Val homozygotes on measures of executive skills and showed trends for higher general intelligence and visuospatial skills, while COMT Val/Met heterozygotes showed significantly better general intelligence than Val homozygotes. COMT Val homozygotes performed better than heterozygotes on auditory-verbal memory. BDNF genotype was not related to any neurocognitive domain. The findings are consistent with studies in normal controls and neuropsychiatric cohorts that observed COMT Met carriers showed better performance on measures of executive skills and general intelligence. Overall, the findings support to the expanding clinical movement to make smoking cessation programs available at the inception of

  6. Heavy alcohol drinking downregulates ALDH2 gene expression but heavy smoking up-regulates SOD2 gene expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Jin; Lee, Hyung Min; Kim, Jin Hwan; Park, Ii Seok; Rho, Young Soo

    2017-08-25

    This study aims to determine the relationship between expression levels of ALDH2 and SOD2 genes and clinical parameters such as alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking, primary site of HNSCC, and human papilloma virus (HPV) state. Gene expression data were obtained from gene expression omnibus (GEO accession number: GSE65858). Clinical data (N = 270) including survival result, gender, age, TNM stage, primary site of HNSCC, HPV status, alcohol drinking, and tobacco smoking habit were analyzed according to gene expression pattern. ALDH2 gene was expressed in low levels in patients with heavy alcohol consumption. It was expressed in high (p = 0.01) levels in patients with no or light alcohol consumption. ALDH2 gene was also expressed in low levels in patients with oral cavity cancers or hypopharynx cancers. However, ALDH2 gene was expressed in high (p = 0.03) levels in patients with oropharyngeal cancers or laryngeal cancers. HPV-positive patients were found to have high (p = 0.02) expression levels of ALDH2. SOD2 gene was expressed in high (p = 0.005) levels in patients who had greater mean pack-year of tobacco smoking. Based on log rank test, the group of patients with high expression of ALDH2 showed better (p = 0.002) clinical results than those with low expression of ALDH2. Difference of survival results between ALDH2 high-expressed group and ALDH2 low-expressed group was validated in another cohort (GSE39368, N = 138). Heavy alcohol drinking downregulates ALDH2 gene expression level. Heavy smoking up-regulates SOD2 gene expression level in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The group of patients with low expression levels of ALDH2 showed significantly poorer survival results compared to those with high expression levels of ALDH2.

  7. The effect of smoking on inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in gingival crevicular fluid and subgingival microbiota following periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaes, D F; Mustafa, M; Mohamed, H G; Lie, S A; Leknes, K N

    2017-08-01

    Periodontal health is mediated by suppressing microorganisms inducing a local inflammatory host response. Smoking may impair this process. This study compares gingival crevicular fluid levels of inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in heavy smokers and non-smokers following active and supportive periodontal therapy in patients with chronic periodontitis. Gingival crevicular fluid and subgingival plaque were collected from the deepest periodontal pocket in 50 patients, 25 smokers and 25 non-smokers, at baseline (T0), following active (T1) and 12 mo of supportive periodontal therapy (T2). Smoking status was validated measuring serum cotinine levels. Gingival crevicular fluid levels of 27 inflammatory and two bone remodeling markers were analyzed using multiplex and singleplex micro-bed immunoassays, and subgingival plaque samples using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Amounts of markers in smokers and non-smokers were compared calculating the effect size. Expression of inflammatory and bone-remodeling markers in smokers demonstrated an overall reduced effect size at T0 and T2 (p periodontal therapy (p periodontal microbial species. Except for an upregulation of interleukin-8, smokers exhibited reduced gingival crevicular fluid levels of several inflammatory markers at baseline and following active and supportive periodontal therapy. Only inflammatory responses in non-smokers adapted to periodontal therapy. Apparently, there seems to be an immunosuppressant effect of smoking regulating the local inflammatory response and bone remodeling markers captured in gingival crevicular fluid following periodontal therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [Combined outpatient alcoholism therapy and occupational rehabilitation on welfare recipients--results of a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, M; Morhart-Klute, V; Nowak, A; Rüster, P; De Christos, S; Pechmann, L; Braunisch, N; Bauder, A; Gebler, M; Löhnert, B; Soyka, M

    2002-08-01

    This study tested the feasibility of outpatient abstinence treatment among alcohol dependent subjects on welfare. Patients had a long history of alcohol dependence and prolonged unemployment. Over a period of six months a total of 250 patients were approached by the social welfare office and asked to participate in the program. The program involved detoxification and a three month combined alcohol treatment and personal job training. Of the 250 persons approached 96 patients (about 40 %) appeared for the initial examination, 19 patients (13 %) finished detoxification and a total of 5 patients completed the program. The majority of a group of patients considered to be highly therapy resistant did not complete the program. Still it was important to demonstrate that a subgroup of patients did successfully complete this program. We consider this pilot project a successful starting point for further development of treatment approaches targeted more specifically at this group of patients.

  9. Prevention and therapy of alcohol withdrawal on intensive care units: systematic review of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungur, Lavinius A; Neuner, Bruno; John, Susanne; Wernecke, Klaus; Spies, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) occurs in 16 to 31% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients after cessation of sedation. There exist many preventive and therapeutic strategies, but no systematic review (SR) has been published on this topic so far. We aimed to perform a synopsis of all controlled trials of AWS prevention and therapy in ICU published between 1971 and 30 March 2011 following the "Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses" (PRISMA) statement. We performed a MEDLINE search with the terms "alcohol" AND "ICU" as well as "alcohol withdrawal" AND "intensive care." All publications that matched our eligibility criteria were analyzed according to our predefined criteria. We identified 6 controlled trials about AWS prevention and 8 about AWS therapy in ICUs. For AWS prevention, benzodiazepines (BZO), ethanol (EtOH), and clonidine were evaluated as single agents, and BZO, clonidine, clomethiazol and haloperidol were studied in drug combinations. All evaluated single agents and combinations were found to be effective for AWS prevention. Clomethiazol was found to be associated with a higher tracheobronchitis rate and thus disadvised for critically ill patients. For AWS therapy, BZO, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and clomethiazol were evaluated in randomized controlled trials as single agents and phenobarbital, clonidine, and haloperidol as adjuncts. All evaluated regimens were found to be effective for AWS therapy. Overall, in the ICU, BZO were found to be superior to GHB and clomethiazol regarding safety and efficacy. Furthermore, 4 cohort trials with historical control groups evaluated the effect of the implementation of a standardized protocol of BZO therapy for AWS in ICUs. All of these 4 studies found better outcome for the intervention groups. Based on the evidence of this SR, EtOH or BZO can be advised for AWS prevention on ICU patients with alcohol dependence, but EtOH is not allowed for therapy of AWS. AWS therapy should be

  10. A haplotype of polymorphisms in ASE-1, RAI and ERCC1 and the effects of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on risk of colorectal cancer: a Danish prospective case-cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke D; Sørensen, Mette; Tjønneland, Anne

    2008-01-01

    cancer, and investigated gene-environment associations between the polymorphisms and the haplotype and smoking status at enrolment, smoking duration, average smoking intensity and alcohol consumption, respectively, in relation to risk of colorectal cancer. METHODS: Associations between the three...... of colorectal cancer were found. No statistically significant interactions between the genotypes and the lifestyle exposures smoking or alcohol consumption were observed. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the ASE-1 G-21A, RAI IVS1 A4364G and ERCC1 Asn118Asn polymorphisms and the previously identified...... haplotype are not associated with risk of colorectal cancer. We found no evidence of gene-environment interaction between the three polymorphisms and the haplotype and smoking intensity and alcohol consumption, respectively, in relation to the risk of colorectal cancer. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-null...

  11. Bu-Shen-Jian-Pi-Yi-Qi Therapy Prevents Alcohol-Induced Osteoporosis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shu-Jun; Xing, Guo-Li; Hu, Nai-Wu; Xu, Wei-Ming; Wang, Yong-Qi; Dong, Qing-Ping; Jiang, Yi-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Bu-Shen-Jian-Pi-Yi-Qi therapy, which refers to reinforcing kidney, regulating qi, and invigorating spleen, is a traditional Chinese medicine, and we investigated its efficacy in treatment of alcohol-induced osteoporosis and its underlying mechanism. Forty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into alcohol-supplemented group, JIAN-GU-LING (JGL) group, calcium D3 + alfacalcidol group, and sham-treated group. Bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and bone biomechanical properties were assessed. Biochemical analyses of serum and urine specimens were detected. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the mRNA level of vitamin D receptor (VDR). There were markedly lower bone metabolic markers and biomechanical properties in alcohol-supplemented group compared with sham-treated group (all P alcohol + calcium D3 + alfacalcidol group (P alcoholic osteoporosis. The disease reversal is evidenced by increased BMD and BMC, improved biomechanical properties, elevated VDR mRNA level, enhanced response sensitivity of 1, 25(OH)2D3, and reduced S-Ca/P.

  12. [Smoking among nursing and physical therapy students of the University of the Balearic Islands: opinions on regulation of smoking in public places].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Torrente, Susana; Bennasar-Veny, Miguel; Pericàs-Beltrán, Jordi; de Pedro-Gómez, Joan E; Aguiló-Pons, Antonio; Bauzá-Amengual, María de Lluc

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, opinions and attitudes of nursing and physical therapy students at the University of the Balearic Islands toward smoking in public places and the influence of regulatory policies. We performed a cross-sectional, descriptive, observational study using a self-administered questionnaire. The survey was designed to evaluate opinions on and the degree of agreement with smoking and regulatory policies on this issue. The assessment was performed using Likert scales. The survey was offered to all students attending class in the core subject with the greatest number of enrolled students on a normal academic day between February 15 and March 15, 2006. We calculated 95% confidence intervals for proportions. The Chi square test was used to compare qualitative variables and Student's t-test was used for quantitative variables. The sample consisted of 345 students, 82.2% of whom were women. The mean age was 21.9 years. The prevalence of regular smokers was 26.1% (26.9% among women and 22.6% among men). Almost all (93.8%) of the respondents agreed that smoking should be banned in closed spaces in educational institutions and 70.9% believed that the law should be complied with at the University of the Balearic Islands, with differences between 2003 and 2006. Smoking was less prevalent in our population than in the general regional and national populations, as well as in other Spanish nursing students of the same age and gender. The prevalence of occasional smokers has fallen since 2003. Most students had a favorable view of the new Smoking Prevention Act.

  13. Interactive effects of chronic cigarette smoking and age on brain volumes in controls and alcohol-dependent individuals in early abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durazzo, Timothy C; Mon, Anderson; Pennington, David; Abé, Christoph; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) have been shown to interact with normal age-related volume loss to exacerbate brain atrophy with increasing age. However, chronic cigarette smoking, a highly co-morbid condition in AUD and its influence on age-related brain atrophy have not been evaluated. We performed 1.5 T quantitative magnetic resonance imaging in non-smoking controls [non-smoking light drinking controls (nsCONs); n = 54], smoking light drinking controls (sCONs, n = 34), and one-week abstinent, treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent (ALC) non-smokers (nsALCs, n = 35) and smokers (sALCs, n = 43), to evaluate the independent and interactive effects of alcohol dependence and chronic smoking on regional cortical and subcortical brain volumes, emphasizing the brain reward/executive oversight system (BREOS). The nsCONs and sALCs showed greater age-related volume losses than the nsALCs in the dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC), total cortical BREOS, superior parietal lobule and putamen. The nsALCs and sALCs demonstrated smaller volumes than the nsCONs in most cortical region of interests (ROIs). The sCONs had smaller volumes than the nsCONs in the DPFC, insula, inferior parietal lobule, temporal pole/parahippocampal region and all global cortical measures. The nsALCs and sALCs had smaller volumes than the sCONs in the DPFC, superior temporal gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, precuneus and all global cortical measures. Volume differences between the nsALCs and sALCs were observed only in the putamen. Alcohol consumption measures were not related to volumes in any ROI for ALC; smoking severity measures were related to corpus callosum volume in the sCONs and sALCs. The findings indicate that consideration of smoking status is necessary for a better understanding of the factors contributing to regional brain atrophy in AUD. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Remediation therapy in patients with alcohol use disorders and neurocognitive disorders: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixidor López, Lídia; Frías-Torres, Cindy; Moreno-España, José; Ortega, Lluisa; Barrio, Pablo; Gual, Antoni

    2017-07-14

    Many alcohol-dependent patients suffer from cognitive impairment of variable severity, manifested by alterations in retrograde and anterograde memory, visuospatial processing, cognitive abilities and attention, some of which are reversible. In this context, cognitive remediation therapies could significantly improve patients' performance; therefore, these are considered a valuable alternative. The aim of this study was to implement cognitive remediation therapy in patients with alcohol dependence and cognitive impairment and evaluate its viability and effectiveness. The participants were sixteen abstinent, alcohol-dependent patients (mean age of 59 years, 63% males) from the Addictive Behaviours Unit of a tertiary hospital. Over 6 months, a nurse led 1-hour weekly sessions (24 sessions in total) during which exercises for improving functional, social and cognitive performance were completed. Patients were assessed at baseline, at the end of the study and 6 months later, using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Memory Alteration Test (M@T). Their respective scores were 26.4 (SD 3.16), 29 (SD 1.67) and 27 (SD 3.1) for the MMSE and 38.7 (SD 6.81), 45.7 (SD 5.6) and 41.1 (SD 7.86) for the M@T. Changes were assessed with both Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, with mostly statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). Assistance and satisfaction were high. Therefore, the therapy was viable, widely accepted and effective.

  15. Does comorbid alcohol and substance abuse affect electroconvulsive therapy outcome in the treatment of mood disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Lori; Vaidya, Nutan

    2014-03-01

    Antidepressant medications remain the principal agents used to treat patients with mood disorders, although 30% to 40% of these patients do not improve. One of the factors associated with poor medication response is alcohol and substance abuse. Persons with mood disorders are at the greatest risk for suicide, and alcoholism is a significant additional risk factor. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is shown to be the most effective treatment for major depression especially when associated with psychosis, catatonia, and suicide intent. However, similar to most antidepressant trials, patients with depression and comorbid alcohol and substance abuse are excluded from ECT efficacy studies. Through a retrospective chart review, we compared response to ECT in patients with mood disorder and comorbid alcohol and drug abuse to those with mood disorder only. From 2004 to 2010, 80 patients with mood disorder received ECT. Fifty of these had comorbid alcohol or drug abuse. Using a 10-item psychopathology scale, we compared pre- and post-ECT symptom severity between the 2 groups. Outcome was determined by measuring a decrease in the pre-ECT and post-ECT score using Wilcoxon rank tests, with statistical significance at P = 0.05. There was no difference between the 2 groups in most demographics, ECT medication, or seizure quality. There was no difference in ECT outcome between those with comorbid alcohol abuse and those without based on percent decrease in pre- and post-ECT symptom scores (abuse: mean [SD], 0.89 [0.2] vs nonabuse: mean [SD], 0.93 [0.16]; Wilcoxon, 1332; P = 0.086). When we compared those who met the criteria for alcohol or drug dependence (19 patients) with those with no abuse, there was a trend for the dependence group to not do as well (dependence: mean [SD], 0.83 [0.25] vs nonabuse: mean [SD], 0.93 [0.16]; Wilcoxon, 405; P = 0.053). Those with combined drug and alcohol abuse (18 patients) did have a significantly worse outcome (combined: mean [SD], 0.82 [0

  16. Associations between hypo-HDL cholesterolemia and cardiometabolic risk factors in middle-aged men and women: Independence of habitual alcohol drinking, smoking and regular exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Daimon, Takashi

    Hypo-HDL cholesterolemia is a potent cardiovascular risk factor, and HDL cholesterol level is influenced by lifestyles including alcohol drinking, smoking and regular exercise. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships between hypo-HDL cholesterolemia and cardiovascular risk factors and to determine whether or not these relationships depend on the above-mentioned lifestyles. The subjects were 3456 men and 2510 women (35-60 years of age) showing low HDL cholesterol levels (age-matched control subjects showing normal HDL cholesterol levels. Each cardiometabolic risk factor was compared between the groups with and without hypo-HDL cholesterolemia. Data for hypo-HDL cholesterolemic subjects not having habits of alcohol drinking, smoking and regular exercise (men, n=333; women, n=1410) and their age-matched control subjects were also analysed. Both in men and in women of overall subjects and subjects without histories of alcohol drinking, smoking and regular exercise, odds ratios of subjects with hypo-HDL cholesterolemia vs. subjects with normo-HDL cholesterolemia for high body mass index, high waist-to-height ratio, high triglycerides, high lipid accumulation product and multiple risk factors (three or more out of obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes) were significantly higher than the reference level of 1.00. These associations in overall subjects were found when the above habits were adjusted. Hypo-HDL cholesterolemic men and women have adverse cardiovascular profiles, such as obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and multiple risk factors, independently of age, alcohol drinking, smoking and regular exercise. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between PTGS1 polymorphisms and functional outcomes in Chinese patients with stroke during aspirin therapy: Interaction with smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huan; Cai, Biyang; Sun, Lingli; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Shuyu; Cao, Liping; Guo, Hongquan; Sun, Wen; Yan, Bernard; Davis, Stephen M; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Xinfeng

    2017-05-15

    Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthase 1 (PTGS1) and smoking may play important roles in aspirin nonresponsiveness, but the effect of their interaction on stroke outcomes remains largely unknown. We examined the effects of PTGS1 polymorphisms, smoking status, and their interaction on functional outcomes in a cohort of Chinese Han patients with stroke during aspirin therapy. A total of 617 ischemic stroke patients taking aspirin were enrolled. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs1330344, rs3842788, and rs5788 in PTGS1 were determined for genotyping. Poor functional outcomes were defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 3-6 at 90-day follow-up. The influence of PTGS1 gene-smoking interaction on functional outcomes was examined. Poor functional outcomes occurred in 145 (23.5%) patients. When adjusting multiple factors by logistic regression, CC genotype of rs1330344 was associated with poor functional outcomes (risk ratio [RR]=1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-2.37). A similar connection was found in the CGC haplotype (RR=1.40; 95% CI: 1.08-1.77). Furthermore, we found a significant interaction between rs1330344 and smoking status (P interaction =0.018); the interaction effect between the PTGS1 haplotype and smoking also showed statistical significance (P interaction =0.040). In Chinese Han stroke patients with aspirin therapy, the adverse effect of PTGS1 polymorphisms on functional outcomes may be modulated by the smoking status. PTGS1 gene-smoking interaction might in part reflect the heterogeneity in the prognosis of patients treated with aspirin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Do counselor techniques predict quitting during smoking cessation treatment? A component analysis of telephone-delivered Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardaga, Roger; Heffner, Jaimee L; Mercer, Laina D; Bricker, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    No studies to date have examined the effect of counselor techniques on smoking cessation over the course of treatment. To address this gap, we examined the degree to which the use of specific Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) counseling techniques in a given session predicted smoking cessation reported at the next session. The data came from the ACT arm of a randomized controlled trial of a telephone-delivered smoking cessation intervention. Trained raters coded 139 counseling sessions across 44 participants. The openness, awareness and activation components of the ACT model were rated for each telephone counseling session. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to estimate the predictive relationship between each component during any given telephone session and smoking cessation at the following telephone session. For every 1-unit increase in counselors' use of openness and awareness techniques there were 42% and 52% decreases in the odds of smoking at the next counseling session, respectively. However, there was no significant predictive relationship between counselors' use of activation techniques and smoking cessation. Overall, results highlight the theoretical and clinical value of examining therapists' techniques as predictors of outcome during the course of treatment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Lung cancer in never-smokers. Does smoking history matter in the era of molecular diagnostics and targeted therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer in never-smokers was recognised as a distinct clinical entity around the mid-2000s because these patients tended to be Asian women and diagnosed at a younger age with a preponderance of adenocarcinoma and better survival outcome despite a more advanced stage of presentation. It was soon discovered that lung cancer in never-smokers had a higher prevalence of activating EGFR mutations and we tend to classify lung cancer by smoking status for screening purpose. With the discoveries of many actionable driver mutations such as activating EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement in adenocarcinoma of the lung we have switched to classifying non-small cell lung cancer into different individual molecular subgroups based on the presence of a dominant driver mutation. Although many actionable driver mutations are found in never-smokers with adenocarcinoma, this review will summarise that a substantial proportion of patients with these actionable driver mutations had a previous smoking history. Alternatively among the driver mutations that are associated with smoking history, a fair amount of these patients were never-smokers. Thus smoking status should not be used as a screen strategy for identifying driver mutations in clinical practice. Finally smoking history may have predictive and/or prognostic significance within individual molecular subgroups and identifying the difference according to smoking history may help optimise future targeted therapy.

  20. Republished: lung cancer in never-smokers. Does smoking history matter in the era of molecular diagnostics and targeted therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2014-04-01

    Lung cancer in never-smokers was recognised as a distinct clinical entity around the mid-2000s because these patients tended to be Asian women and diagnosed at a younger age with a preponderance of adenocarcinoma and better survival outcome despite a more advanced stage of presentation. It was soon discovered that lung cancer in never-smokers had a higher prevalence of activating EGFR mutations and we tend to classify lung cancer by smoking status for screening purpose. With the discoveries of many actionable driver mutations such as activating EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement in adenocarcinoma of the lung we have switched to classifying non-small cell lung cancer into different individual molecular subgroups based on the presence of a dominant driver mutation. Although many actionable driver mutations are found in never-smokers with adenocarcinoma, this review will summarise that a substantial proportion of patients with these actionable driver mutations had a previous smoking history. Alternatively among the driver mutations that are associated with smoking history, a fair amount of these patients were never-smokers. Thus smoking status should not be used as a screen strategy for identifying driver mutations in clinical practice. Finally smoking history may have predictive and/or prognostic significance within individual molecular subgroups and identifying the difference according to smoking history may help optimise future targeted therapy.

  1. Use of pharmacy data to evaluate smoking regulations' impact on sales of nicotine replacement therapies in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Kristina B; Mostashari, Farzad; Kerker, Bonnie D

    2005-06-01

    Recently, New York City and New York State increased cigarette excise taxes and New York City implemented a smoke-free workplace law. To assess the impact of these policies on smoking cessation in New York City, we examined over-the-counter sales of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products. Pharmacy sales data were collected in real time as part of nontraditional surveillance activities. We used Poisson generalized estimating equations to analyze the effect of smoking-related policies on pharmacy-specific weekly sales of nicotine patches and gum. We assessed effect modification by pharmacy location. We observed increases in NRT product sales during the weeks of the cigarette tax increases and the smoke-free workplace law. Pharmacies in low-income areas generally had larger and more persistent increases in response to tax increases than those in higher-income areas. Real-time monitoring of existing nontraditional surveillance data, such as pharmacy sales of NRT products, can help assess the effects of public policies on cessation attempts. Cigarette tax increases and smoke-free workplace regulations were associated with increased smoking cessation attempts in New York City, particularly in low-income areas.

  2. The effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on the prevalence of self-reported hand eczema: a cross-sectional population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Menné, T; Nielsen, N H; Johansen, J D

    2010-03-01

    Hand eczema is a prevalent disorder that leads to high health care costs as well as a decreased quality of life. Important risk factors include atopic dermatitis, contact allergy and wet work whereas the role of null mutations in the filaggrin gene complex remains to be clarified. It has been debated whether life-style factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are associated with hand eczema. The current study aimed to investigate whether self-reported hand eczema was associated with smoking and alcohol consumption in the general population. Between June 2006 and May 2008, a cross-sectional study was performed in the general population in Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark. A random sample of 7931 subjects aged 18-69 years old was invited to participate in a general health examination including a questionnaire; 3471 (44%) participated. Data were analysed with logistic regression analyses and associations were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The prevalence of hand eczema was higher among previous smokers (OR = 1.13; CI = 0.90-1.40), current light smokers (OR = 1.51; CI = 1.14-2.02) and current heavy smokers (OR = 1.38; CI = 0.99-1.92) compared with never-smokers. Tobacco smoking was positively associated with hand eczema among adults from the general population in Denmark. Apparently, current light smokers ( 15 g daily) but this needs to be reconfirmed. Alcohol consumption was not associated with hand eczema.

  3. Different markers of alcohol consumption, smoking and body mass index in relation to risk of pancreatic cancer. A prospective cohort study within the Malmö Preventive Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Dorthe; Borgström, Anders; Lindkvist, Björn; Manjer, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer is not clear. This study investigates different prediagnostic measurements of alcohol consumption, a laboratory marker (gamma-glutamyltransferase; gamma-GT), and a score measuring alcohol addiction (Mm-MAST), in relation to the risk of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the study investigated whether smoking and alcohol consumption interact with each other, or if the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with these factors is modified by obesity or weight gain. A cohort of 33,346 subjects provided prediagnostic information on the above factors. During a mean follow-up of 22.1 years, 183 cases of pancreatic cancer occurred. Cox's analysis yielded relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The highest gamma-GT quartile was associated with a high risk of pancreatic cancer (RR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.34-3.44), and this association was even stronger in subjects that reported a previous weight gain (RR = 3.61, 95% CI = 1.29-10.09). A high Mm-MAST score was also associated with pancreatic cancer (p = 0.02). Current smoking was associated with pancreatic cancer (RR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.60-3.43), and obese smokers had an even higher risk (RR = 7.45, 95% CI = 1.65-33.64). High alcohol intake is associated with subsequent risk of pancreatic cancer and this risk may be higher following weight gain. The risk associated with smoking may be even higher in obese subjects. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Factors Associated with Successful Smoking Cessation in Korean Adult Males: Findings from a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmee; Cho, Won-Kyung

    2014-11-01

    Smoking cessation rates have remained stagnant globally. This study was conducted to explore the factors associated with successful smoking cessation among South Korean adult males using nationally representative data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2007 to 2012. A comparison was made between successful quitters and those who failed to quit after attempts to stop smoking. A total of 7,839 males, aged 19-65 years, were included in this cross-sectional study. The outcome measures were the success and failure rates in smoking cessation, sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, health behaviors, perceived health status, quality of life, and mental health. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine the various factors associated with smoking cessation success. The cessation success and failure rates were 45.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Smoking cessation was related to older age, marriage, higher income, smoking larger amounts of cigarettes, use of willpower, alcohol abstinence, cancer history, better mental health, and higher levels of quality of life, after controlling for multiple variables. Second-hand smoke exposure at home and using nicotine replacement therapy were associated with a lower likelihood of smoking cessation. A smoke-free environment, use of willpower, alcohol abstinence, and better stress management are important for smoking cessation. Unlike previous studies, not using nicotine replacement therapy and higher levels of daily cigarette consumption were associated with successful smoking cessation, suggesting that motivation appears to be important to smoking cessation in Korean adult male population.

  5. Secondary Prevention of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Areas Where Smoking, Alcohol, and Betel Quid Chewing are Prevalent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Shuan Chung

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal cancer is ranked as the sixth most common cause of cancer death worldwide and has a substantial effect on public health. In contrast to adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett's esophagus in Western countries, the major disease phenotype in the Asia-Pacific region is esophageal squamous cell carcinoma which is attributed to the prevalence of smoking, alcohol, and betel quid chewing. Despite a multidisciplinary approach to treating esophageal cancer, the outcome remains poor. Moreover, field cancerization reveals that esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is closely linked with the development of head and neck cancers that further sub-optimize the treatment of patients. Therefore, preventive strategies are of paramount importance to improve the prognosis of this dismal disease. Since obstacles exist for primary prevention via risk factor elimination, the current rationale for esophageal cancer prevention is to identify high-risk groups at earlier stages of the disease, and encourage them to get a confirmatory diagnosis, prompt treatment, and intensive surveillance for secondary prevention. Novel biomarkers for identifying specific at-risk populations are under extensive investigation. Advances in image-enhanced endoscopy do not just substantially improve our ability to identify small precancerous or cancerous foci, but can also accurately predict their invasiveness. Research input from the basic sciences should be translated into preventive measures in order to decrease the disease burden of esophageal cancer.

  6. Interaction between MLL3 genetic polymorphisms, smoking, and alcohol drinking in laryngeal cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Gong, Liang; Jiang, Qichuan; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Bin

    2016-03-01

    A previous study indicated that MLL3 genetic polymorphisms were associated with human cancer. However, whether MLL3 genetic variants are associated with the risk of laryngeal cancer is not clear. This study investigated the association between MLL3 gene polymorphisms and laryngeal cancer in a Chinese population. Four polymorphisms of the MLL3 gene (rs6943984, rs4725443, rs3800836, rs6464211) were genotyped using the TaqMan method in 592 patients with larynx cancer and 602 age- and sex-matched noncancer controls. We found that rs6943984 and rs4725443 of the MLL3 gene were significantly associated with the risk of larynx cancer after Bonferroni correction. The minor allele A for rs6943984 was associated with increased larynx cancer risk (P laryngeal cancer (OR = 2.406, 95% CI: 1.820-3.180, P laryngeal cancer (OR = 0.332, 95% CI: 0.271-0.408, P laryngeal cancer. This study indicated that MLL3 genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes were associated with larynx cancer in a Chinese population. There was a mutually synergistic effect between smoking, alcohol drinking, and MLL3 gene polymorphisms for laryngeal cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Peer influences: the impact of online and offline friendship networks on adolescent smoking and alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace C; Unger, Jennifer B; Soto, Daniel; Fujimoto, Kayo; Pentz, Mary Ann; Jordan-Marsh, Maryalice; Valente, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    Online social networking sites (SNSs) have become a popular mode of communication among adolescents. However, little is known about the effects of social online activity on health behaviors. The authors examined the use of SNSs among friends and the degree to which SNS activities relate to face-to-face peer influences and adolescent risk behaviors. Longitudinal egocentric friendship network data along with adolescent social media use and risk behaviors were collected from 1,563 10th-grade students across five Southern California high schools. Measures of online and offline peer influences were computed and assessed using fixed-effects models. The frequency of adolescent SNS use and the number of their closest friends on the same SNSs were not significantly associated with risk behaviors. However, exposure to friends' online pictures of partying or drinking was significantly associated with both smoking (β = .11, p impact on adolescents' risk behaviors and significantly interacted with risk behaviors of their friends. These results provide evidence that friends' online behaviors should be considered a viable source of peer influence and that increased efforts should focus on educating adolescents on the negative effects of risky online displays. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Some Comments on the Failure of Behavior Therapy as a Technique for Modifying Cigarette Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausner, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    Data from a role playing experiment are interpreted to signify that positive reinforcements for refraining from smoking might be more successful than aversive controls in changing smoking behavior. It was proposed that cutting down by eliminating undesired cigarettes might strengthen rather than weaken smoking, since its rewards are if anything,…

  9. The Interplay of Friendship Networks and Social Networking Sites: Longitudinal Analysis of Selection and Influence Effects on Adolescent Smoking and Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Daniel; Fujimoto, Kayo; Valente, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the coevolution of adolescent friendships and peer influences with respect to their risk behaviors and social networking site use. Methods. Investigators of the Social Network Study collected longitudinal data during fall 2010 and spring 2011 from 10th-grade students in 5 Southern California high schools (n = 1434). We used meta-analyses of stochastic actor-based models to estimate changes in friendship ties and risk behaviors and the effects of Facebook and MySpace use. Results. Significant shifts in adolescent smoking and drinking occurred despite little change in overall prevalence rates. Students with higher levels of alcohol use were more likely to send and receive friendship nominations and become friends with other drinkers. They were also more likely to increase alcohol use if their friends drank more. Adolescents selected friends with similar Facebook and MySpace use habits. Exposure to friends’ risky online pictures increased smoking behaviors but had no significant effects on alcohol use. Conclusions. Our findings support a greater focus on friendship selection mechanisms in school-based alcohol use interventions. Social media platforms may help identify at-risk adolescent groups and foster positive norms about risk behaviors. PMID:24922126

  10. The interplay of friendship networks and social networking sites: longitudinal analysis of selection and influence effects on adolescent smoking and alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace C; Soto, Daniel; Fujimoto, Kayo; Valente, Thomas W

    2014-08-01

    We examined the coevolution of adolescent friendships and peer influences with respect to their risk behaviors and social networking site use. Investigators of the Social Network Study collected longitudinal data during fall 2010 and spring 2011 from 10th-grade students in 5 Southern California high schools (n = 1434). We used meta-analyses of stochastic actor-based models to estimate changes in friendship ties and risk behaviors and the effects of Facebook and MySpace use. Significant shifts in adolescent smoking and drinking occurred despite little change in overall prevalence rates. Students with higher levels of alcohol use were more likely to send and receive friendship nominations and become friends with other drinkers. They were also more likely to increase alcohol use if their friends drank more. Adolescents selected friends with similar Facebook and MySpace use habits. Exposure to friends' risky online pictures increased smoking behaviors but had no significant effects on alcohol use. Our findings support a greater focus on friendship selection mechanisms in school-based alcohol use interventions. Social media platforms may help identify at-risk adolescent groups and foster positive norms about risk behaviors.

  11. Assessment of the effectiveness of yoga therapy as an adjunct in patients with alcohol dependence syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Bhagabati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Substance use disorders, alcohol use in particular, are among the leading disorders in psychiatry in terms of prevalence. They put a lot of burden on health as well as family, society, and economic status of the patient. What more challenging is that such patients often suffer from comorbid anxiety and depression, which has the potential to perpetuate the alcohol use. Yoga is an alternative and complementary therapy which is widely practiced by people in India. However, its effectiveness in alcohol use disorders is not tested systematically. Aims and objectives: To study the effectiveness of yoga as an adjunctive therapy in patients of alcohol use disorders and to evaluate its ability to reduce comorbid depression, anxiety, and craving. Materials and methods: Hundred patients of alcohol use disorders as per the tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10 were selected and were divided into two groups each containing 50 patients. The case group received structured yoga session in addition to standard pharmacotherapy while the control group received only pharmacotherapy. Assessment of depression (Hamilton depression rating scale [HAM-D], anxiety (Hamilton anxiety rating scale [HAM-A], and craving (Obsessive-compulsive drinking scale [OCDS] was done at baseline, two weeks, and at one month. Results were compared between the two groups and statistical analysis was done. Results: Both the case and control groups were similar in HAM-D (p=0.9634, HAM-A (p=0.7744, and OCDS (p= 0.8626 scores at baseline. There was significant reduction in HAM-A score at one month (p=0.0091, and OCDS score at two weeks (p=0.0428 and one month (p<0.0001 respectively in yoga group as compared to control group. Within case group, only reduction in HAM-A (p<0.001 and p<0.01 and OCDS (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001 scores were progressively better statistically at two weeks and one month while reduction in HAM-D score

  12. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... addicted, there are some downsides to drinking: The punishment is severe. Teens who drink put themselves at ... treatment centers help a person gradually overcome the physical and psychological dependence on alcohol. previous continue What ...

  13. Alcoholism in the family context: confronting strategies of the older users of comunity therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Oliveira Ferreira Filha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholism in the family context poses significant risks to older women who become the most common victims of this problem. This is a documentary study aiming to identify the confronting strategies of alcoholism used by older women, in the family and spontaneous comments expressed at the last moment in the Community Therapy circles held at the Health Department in João Pessoa - PB, in July 2008. For this research 776 Community Therapy information sheets were checked. The findings were organized in the form of narratives and separated into analytical compiled categories. That demonstrated how the most used strategies: spirituality (33,3%, self-help groups (26,6% and strengthening of family (13,3%; and more frequent statements: courage (15.5%, hope (13.3%, faith (11.1%, trust and unity (6.6% are in line with the analytical categories, functioning as a master spring in the process of empowerment, by strengthening bonds and creating resilience, thereby allowing the family to overcome the daily dilemmas, and face the problem of alcoholism.

  14. Pharmacological management of alcohol dependence: from mono-therapy to pharmacogenetics and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Fabio; Vignoli, Teo; Grignaschi, Alice; Cibin, Mauro; Addolorato, Giovanni; Bernardi, Mauro

    2014-02-01

    Almost 10% of the world's population is affected by alcohol use disorders, and the treatment of alcohol dependence (AD) still remains a challenge. Patients with AD can differ in many traits. Three drugs (disulfiram, naltrexone, and acamprosate) have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of AD, and in some European countries sodium oxybate is also approved for this purpose. Combined pharmacological therapy has not provided such convincing results. Considering the fact that the "ideal" and effective drug for all types of alcoholic patients does not exists, the future challenge will be to identify a personalized approach. Recent data has shown that this objective can be achieved by investigating the genetic variability of the patient. Moreover, the use of replacement molecules can probably be considered an advantageous therapeutic opportunity (i.e. sodium oxybate). In addition, reduction of alcohol consumption is increasingly accepted as a viable treatment goal, and the use of nalmefene "as-needed" (a pharmacological approach similar to naltrexone, but, possibly, with lower hepatotoxicity) may help in the treatment of AD. Thus, it is important to stress that a pharmacological approach to treat AD should be preceded by the definition of patient characteristics; this may help in the choice of the most appropriate drug and it can be done more easily when more pharmacological options approved for the treatment of AD are also available. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. and ECNP.

  15. The impact of smoking tobacco and drinking alcohol on mortality risk in people of working age – Results of an 8-year study in a large urban center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to assess the effects of smoking and drinking alcohol on death rates in working-age urban inhabitants in Poland. Material and Methods: In 2001 randomly selected inhabitants of Łódź, aged 18-64 years, were included in the WHO Program Countrywide Integrated Noncommunicable Diseases Intervention (CINDI. The study sample comprised 1828 people (1002 men, 826 women. In 2009 for all participants of the 2001 study, information was obtained whether they were living or deceased, or moved out of Łódź. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for the evaluation of hazard ratios (HR. Results: The analysis revealed the increased risk of death among Łódź inhabitants of working age. An 8-year follow-up yielded the following values: for active smokers compared with people slightly addicted to nicotine, HR = 2.582 (95% CI: 1.381-4.825, p < 0.003; for people heavily addicted to nicotine, HR = 3.656 (95% CI: 1.544-8.654, p < 0.004; and for passive smokers (risk for persons staying in smoky rooms up to 5 h a day, compared to those not living in smoke-filled rooms, HR = 2.021 (95% CI: 1.111-3.672, p < 0.03. The variable that had a protective effect on the mortality risk of working-age population turned out to be a "reasonable" use of alcohol (HR = 0.411, 95% CI: 0.227-0.744, p < 0.004, compared to non-drinking alcohol at all. Conclusions: Addiction to smoking significantly increases the risk of premature death, and therefore appropriate prevention programs aimed at the reduction of smoking can contribute to closing the gap in the population health status. Med Pr 2014;65(2:251–260

  16. The long-term effect of a population-based life-style intervention on smoking and alcohol consumption. The Inter99 Study--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sophie; Toft, Ulla; Aadahl, Mette; Jørgensen, Torben; Pisinger, Charlotta

    2015-11-01

    To examine whether improvements in smoking and alcohol consumption throughout the 5-year course of a population-based multi-factorial life-style intervention were sustained 5 years after its discontinuation. Population-based randomized controlled trial. Suburbs of Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 9415 people aged 30-60 years were randomized to an intervention group (n = 6091) and an assessment-only control group (n = 3324). All participants in the intervention group received screening, risk assessment and individual life-style counselling; participants at high risk of ischaemic heart disease-according to pre-specified criteria-were also offered group-based counselling. Self-reported point abstinence from smoking as well as changes in the average alcohol consumption per week and binge drinking in the past week from baseline to 10-year follow-up were investigated using random-effects modelling. At 10-year follow up, people in the intervention group reported a higher smoking abstinence rate [odds ratio (OR) = 1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-3.33, P = 0.043] and a greater reduction in binge drinking (net change = -0.08 days with binge drinking in the last week, 95% CI = -0.16 to -0.01, P = 0.028) than in the control group. There were no detectable long-term intervention effects on the average alcohol consumption per week. A population-based multi-factorial life-style intervention of 5 years' duration in Denmark had sustained beneficial effects on smoking abstinence and binge drinking 5 years after its discontinuation. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Hypnotherapy is more effective than nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Faysal M; Zagarins, Sofija E; Pischke, Karen M; Saiyed, Shamila; Bettencourt, Ann Marie; Beal, Laura; Macys, Diane; Aurora, Sanjay; McCleary, Nancy

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation is well documented. However, due to relapse rates and side effects, hypnotherapy is gaining attention as an alternative treatment option. The aim of this one-center randomized study was to compare the efficacy of hypnotherapy alone, as well as hypnotherapy with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), to conventional NRT in patients hospitalized with a cardiac or pulmonary illness. We evaluated self-reported and biochemically verified 7-day prevalence smoking abstinence rates at 12 and 26 weeks post-hospitalization. Patients (n=164) were randomized into one of three counseling-based treatment groups: NRT for 30 days (NRT; n=41), a 90-min hypnotherapy session (H; n=39), and NRT with hypnotherapy (HNRT; n=37). Treatment groups were compared to a "self-quit" group of 35 patients who refused intervention. Hypnotherapy patients were more likely than NRT patients to be nonsmokers at 12 weeks (43.9% vs. 28.2%; p=0.14) and 26 weeks after hospitalization (36.6% vs. 18.0%; p=0.06). Smoking abstinence rates in the HNRT group were similar to the H group. There was no difference in smoking abstinence rates at 26 weeks between "self quit" and participants in any of the treatment groups. In multivariable regression analysis adjusting for diagnosis and demographic characteristics, H and HNRT were over three times more likely than NRT participants to abstain at 26-weeks post-discharge (RR=3.6; p=0.03 and RR=3.2; p=0.04, respectively). Hypnotherapy is more effective than NRT in improving smoking abstinence in patients hospitalized for a smoking-related illness, and could be an asset to post-discharge smoking cessation programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An HIV-tailored quit-smoking counselling pilot intervention targeting depressive symptoms plus Nicotine Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Louise; Wiebe, Stephanie A; Cameron, William D; Sandre, Daniella; Pipe, Andrew; Cooper, Curtis; Angel, Jonathan; Garber, Gary; Holly, Crystal; Dalgleish, Tracy L; Tasca, Giorgio A; MacPherson, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) rates among people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs) are high. Rates of cigarette smoking, a leading contributor to CVD among PHAs, are 40-70% (2-3 times higher than the general population). Furthermore, PHAs have high rates of depression (40-60%), a risk factor for smoking cessation relapse. The current pilot study examined the effectiveness of a specifically tailored 5-session smoking cessation counselling programme for PHAs, which addressed depression, in combination with Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) in a cohort of PHA smokers (n = 50). At 6-month follow-up, 28% of participants demonstrated biochemically verified abstinence from smoking. This result compares favourably to other quit-smoking intervention studies, particularly given the high percentage of HIV+ smokers with depression. At study baseline, 52% of HIV+ smokers scored above the clinical cut-off for depression on the Centre for Epidemiological Studies - Depression (CES-D) scale. HIV+ smokers with depression at study baseline demonstrated quantitatively lower depression at 6-month follow-up with a large effect size (d = 1), though it did not reach statistical significance (p = .058). Furthermore, those with depression were no more likely to relapse than those without depression (p = .33), suggesting that our counselling programme adequately addressed this significant barrier to smoking cessation among PHAs. Our pilot study indicates the importance of tailored programmes to help PHAs quit smoking, the significance of addressing depressive symptoms, and the need for tailored counselling programmes to enhance quit rates among PHAs.

  19. Telomere shortening unrelated to smoking, body weight, physical activity, and alcohol intake: 4,576 general population individuals with repeat measurements 10 years apart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weischer, Maren; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-03-01

    Cross-sectional studies have associated short telomere length with smoking, body weight, physical activity, and possibly alcohol intake; however, whether these associations are due to confounding is unknown. We tested these hypotheses in 4,576 individuals from the general population cross-sectionally, and with repeat measurement of relative telomere length 10 years apart. We also tested whether change in telomere length is associated with mortality and morbidity in the general population. Relative telomere length was measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cross-sectionally at the first examination, short telomere length was associated with increased age (P for trend across quartiles = 3 × 10(-77)), current smoking (P = 8 × 10(-3)), increased body mass index (P = 7 × 10(-14)), physical inactivity (P = 4 × 10(-17)), but not with increased alcohol intake (P = 0.10). At the second examination 10 years later, 56% of participants had lost and 44% gained telomere length with a mean loss of 193 basepairs. Change in leukocyte telomere length during 10 years was associated inversely with baseline telomere length (Pweight, physical activity, or alcohol intake. Prospectively during a further 10 years follow-up after the second examination, quartiles of telomere length change did not associate with risk of all-cause mortality, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, ischemic cerebrovascular disease, or ischemic heart disease. In conclusion, smoking, increased body weight, and physical inactivity were associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally, but not with telomere length change during 10 years observation, and alcohol intake was associated with neither. Also, change in telomere length did not associate prospectively with mortality or morbidity in the general population.

  20. Telomere shortening unrelated to smoking, body weight, physical activity, and alcohol intake: 4,576 general population individuals with repeat measurements 10 years apart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Weischer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional studies have associated short telomere length with smoking, body weight, physical activity, and possibly alcohol intake; however, whether these associations are due to confounding is unknown. We tested these hypotheses in 4,576 individuals from the general population cross-sectionally, and with repeat measurement of relative telomere length 10 years apart. We also tested whether change in telomere length is associated with mortality and morbidity in the general population. Relative telomere length was measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cross-sectionally at the first examination, short telomere length was associated with increased age (P for trend across quartiles = 3 × 10(-77, current smoking (P = 8 × 10(-3, increased body mass index (P = 7 × 10(-14, physical inactivity (P = 4 × 10(-17, but not with increased alcohol intake (P = 0.10. At the second examination 10 years later, 56% of participants had lost and 44% gained telomere length with a mean loss of 193 basepairs. Change in leukocyte telomere length during 10 years was associated inversely with baseline telomere length (P<1 × 10(-300 and age at baseline (P = 1 × 10(-27, but not with baseline or 10-year inter-observational tobacco consumption, body weight, physical activity, or alcohol intake. Prospectively during a further 10 years follow-up after the second examination, quartiles of telomere length change did not associate with risk of all-cause mortality, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, ischemic cerebrovascular disease, or ischemic heart disease. In conclusion, smoking, increased body weight, and physical inactivity were associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally, but not with telomere length change during 10 years observation, and alcohol intake was associated with neither. Also, change in telomere length did not associate prospectively with mortality or morbidity in the general population.

  1. Squamous cell carcinoma of the trachea in a non-smoking woman after radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwa, Naoki; Yamada, Kouzou; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Noda, Kazumasa [Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama (Japan); Kameda, Youichi; Maehara, Takamitsu

    2000-04-01

    Few cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the trachea have been reported in non-smoking women. We report one case which was probably due to radiation therapy. A 50-year-old non-smoking woman was referred to our hospital because wheezing and dyspnea had been aggravated for 3 months. She had received radiation therapy ({sup 60}Cobalt) after standard radical mastectomy for right breast cancer 13 years previously. Bronchoscopic findings and chest CT scan showed tracheal stenosis due to the tumor. Sleeve resection of the trachea was performed, and the tumor was histologically diagnosed as poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. We may consider this case to be radiation-induced cancer compatible with the most strict criteria of radiation induced malignancy. (author)

  2. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms and interaction with smoking and alcohol consumption in lung cancer risk: a case-control study in a Japanese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor of lung cancer development while the current epidemiological evidence is suggestive of an increased lung cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption. Dietary folate, which is present in a wide range of fresh fruits and vegetables, may be a micronutrient that has a beneficial impact on lung carcinogenesis. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) plays a crucial role in regulating folate metabolism, which affects both DNA synthesis/repair and methylation. We examined if smoking or alcohol consumption modify associations between MTHFR polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. Methods We evaluated the role of the MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131) polymorphisms in a case-control study comprised of 462 lung cancer cases and 379 controls in a Japanese population. Logistic regression was used to assess the adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results The TT genotype of the C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.42 - 3.62, P A1298C polymorphism was not associated with lung cancer risk. The minor alleles of both polymorphisms behaved in a recessive fashion. The highest risks were seen for 677TT-carriers with a history of smoking or excessive drinking (OR = 6.16, 95% CI = 3.48 - 10.9 for smoking; OR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.64 - 5.81 for drinking) compared with C-carriers without a history of smoking or excessive drinking, but no interactions were seen. The 1298CC genotype was only associated with increased risk among non-smokers (P A1298C polymorphism and drinking (P A1298C polymorphism was not associated with lung cancer risk, a significant interaction with drinking was observed. Future studies incorporating data on folate intake may undoubtedly lead to a more thorough understanding of the role of the MTHFR polymorphisms in lung cancer development. PMID:22024018

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms and interaction with smoking and alcohol consumption in lung cancer risk: a case-control study in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, Chikako; Horiuchi, Takahiko; Takayama, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2011-10-25

    Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor of lung cancer development while the current epidemiological evidence is suggestive of an increased lung cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption. Dietary folate, which is present in a wide range of fresh fruits and vegetables, may be a micronutrient that has a beneficial impact on lung carcinogenesis. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) plays a crucial role in regulating folate metabolism, which affects both DNA synthesis/repair and methylation. We examined if smoking or alcohol consumption modify associations between MTHFR polymorphisms and lung cancer risk. We evaluated the role of the MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131) polymorphisms in a case-control study comprised of 462 lung cancer cases and 379 controls in a Japanese population. Logistic regression was used to assess the adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The TT genotype of the C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.42 - 3.62, P A1298C polymorphism was not associated with lung cancer risk. The minor alleles of both polymorphisms behaved in a recessive fashion. The highest risks were seen for 677TT-carriers with a history of smoking or excessive drinking (OR = 6.16, 95% CI = 3.48 - 10.9 for smoking; OR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.64 - 5.81 for drinking) compared with C-carriers without a history of smoking or excessive drinking, but no interactions were seen. The 1298CC genotype was only associated with increased risk among non-smokers (P A1298C polymorphism and drinking (P A1298C polymorphism was not associated with lung cancer risk, a significant interaction with drinking was observed. Future studies incorporating data on folate intake may undoubtedly lead to a more thorough understanding of the role of the MTHFR polymorphisms in lung cancer development.

  4. The relationship among internal resilience, smoking, alcohol use, and depression symptoms in emerging adults transitioning out of child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Abby L; Faulkner, Breanne; Wekerle, Christine

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that child maltreatment reflects a context of risk for multiple negative outcomes. Identifying factors that protect against negative outcomes is important for the development of strengths-based approaches that emphasize resilience, particularly for youth transitioning out of the child welfare system. The current study examined the relationship between an internal resilience measure, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC; Connor & Davidson, 2003), and several external measures of resilience and behavioral outcomes (tobacco use and dependence, alcohol use and problems, and depression symptoms). In addition, two models of resilience were examined in the context of child maltreatment: a compensatory model and a risk-protection model. Ninety-three emerging adults (ages 18-25) who were making the transition out of child welfare completed self-report measures of child maltreatment, internal resilience (CD-RISC), external resilience (academic achievement, religious and community involvement, monitoring by caregivers, and presence of an adult mentor), alcohol and tobacco use, and depression symptoms. Internal resilience was significantly associated with involvement in religion and community, and monitoring by caregivers. In addition, internal resilience was negatively associated with past year smoking and nicotine dependence, and with symptoms of depression. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine the direct and interaction effects of resilience on depression symptoms in the context of child maltreatment. When internal resilience was added to the model, it made a significant contribution to depression scores over and above child maltreatment (physical, sexual, and emotional abuse; emotional neglect). In addition, there was a significant Sexual Abuse×Resilience interaction, wherein high resilience was associated with a reduction in depression scores at higher levels of sexual abuse. These findings support internal resilience

  5. Smoking cessation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    physical nicotine dependence, but also to introduce cognitive behavioural therapy to deal with his or her emotional attachment to smoking.7. Tobacco use ... interventions, the primary healthcare provider can use the 5. As (Figure 1) to help to ...

  6. Effect of prior stimulant treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder on subsequent risk for cigarette smoking and alcohol and drug use disorders in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilens, Timothy E; Adamson, Joel; Monuteaux, Michael C; Faraone, Stephen V; Schillinger, Mary; Westerberg, Diana; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    To examine the effects of early stimulant treatment on subsequent risk for cigarette smoking and substance use disorders (SUDs) in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Case-controlled, prospective, 5-year follow-up study. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. Adolescents with and without ADHD from psychiatric and pediatric sources. Blinded interviewers determined all diagnoses using structured interviews. Intervention Naturalistic treatment exposure with psychostimulants for ADHD. We modeled time to onset of SUDs and smoking as a function of stimulant treatment. We ascertained 114 subjects with ADHD (mean age at follow-up, 16.2 years) having complete medication and SUD data; 94 of the subjects were treated with stimulants. There were no differences in SUD risk factors between naturalistically treated and untreated groups other than family history of ADHD. We found no increased risks for cigarette smoking or SUDs associated with stimulant therapy. We found significant protective effects of stimulant treatment on the development of any SUD (hazard ratio [HR], 0.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.13-0.60; chi(2)(113) = 10.57, P = .001) and cigarette smoking (HR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.14-0.60; chi(2)(111) = 10.05, P = .001) that were maintained when controlling for conduct disorder. We found no effects of time to onset or duration of stimulant therapy on subsequent SUDs or cigarette smoking in subjects with ADHD. Stimulant therapy does not increase but rather reduces the risk for cigarette smoking and SUDs in adolescents with ADHD.

  7. The Neurobiological Mechanism of Chemical Aversion (Emetic) Therapy for Alcohol Use Disorder: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Ralph L.; Richards, Todd L.; Nielsen, Robert; Repass, Richard; Stahlbrandt, Henriettae; Hoffman, Hunter G.

    2017-01-01

    A recent NIH epidemiology study found the lifetime prevalence of alcohol use disorder in the United States to be 29%. Alcohol drinking behavior is strongly “learned” via pleasure center activation/reinforcement. Alcohol craving is a powerful desire to drink alcoholic beverages. Craving was added as one of the defining criteria for alcohol use disorder in DSM5, and craving reduction is becoming an increasingly important treatment goal. In the current study, patients with alcohol use disorder received 10 days of inpatient multi-modal treatments at Schick Shadel Hospital (SSH) of Seattle. The treatments included five chemical aversion conditioning sessions that associated alcohol cues (and alcohol) with nausea and emesis. All patients met DSM4 criteria for alcohol use disorder, were heavy drinkers, and reported craving alcohol pre-treatment. Craving reduction was one of the primary treatment goals. This is the first fMRI study to measure the effects of chemical aversion therapy on alcohol craving-related brain activity. Patients were recruited as subjects for the University of Washington (UW) brain scan study following SSH admission but before treatment onset. Prior to treatment, patients reported craving/desire for alcohol. After treatment (after four SSH chemical aversion treatments, again after five SSH chemical treatments, 30 and 90-days post-discharge), these same patients reported avoidance/aversion to alcohol. Most of the participants (69%) reported being still sober 12 months post-treatment. Consistent with a craving reduction mechanism of how chemical aversion therapy facilitates sobriety, results of the UW fMRI brain scans showed significant pre- to post-treatment reductions in craving-related brain activity in the occipital cortex. Additional fMRI brain scan studies are needed to further explore the neurobiological mechanism of chemical aversion therapy treatment for alcohol use disorder, and other substance use disorders for which chemical aversion

  8. At-risk and problem gambling among Finnish youth: The examination of risky alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, mental health and loneliness as gender-specific correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgren Robert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIMS - The aims were to compare past-year at-risk and problem gambling (ARPG and other at-risk behaviours (computer gaming, risky alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking by age and gender, and to explore how ARPG is associated with risky alcohol consumption, tobacco smoking, poor mental health and loneliness in males and females. DESIGN - Data from respondents aged 15-28 (n = 822 were derived from a cross-sectional random sample of population-based data (n = 4484. The data were collected in 2011-2012 by telephone interviews. The Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI, score≥2 was used to evaluate ARPG. Prevalence rates for risk behaviours were compared for within gender-specific age groups. Regression models were gender-specific. RESULTS - The proportion of at-risk and problem gamblers was higher among males than females in all age groups except among 18-21-year-olds, while frequent computer gaming was higher among males in all age groups. The odds ratio (95% CI of being a male ARPGer was 2.57 (1.40-4.74 for risky alcohol consumption; 1.95 (1.07-3.56 for tobacco smoking; 2.63 (0.96-7.26 for poor mental health; and 4.41 (1.20-16.23 for feeling lonely. Likewise, the odds ratio (95% CI of being a female ARPGer was 1.19 (0.45-3.12 for risky alcohol consumption; 4.01 (1.43-11.24 for tobacco smoking; 0.99 (0.18-5.39 for poor mental health; and 6.46 (1.42-29.34 for feeling lonely. All 95% CIs of ARPG correlates overlapped among males and females. CONCLUSIONS - Overall, past-year at-risk and problem gambling and computer gaming seem to be more common among males than females; however, for risky alcohol consumption similar gender differences were evident only for the older half of the sample. No clear gender differences were seen in correlates associated with ARPG.

  9. Smoking cessation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur K; Juneja S; Kaushal S

    2008-01-01

    Kirandeep Kaur, Shivani Juneja, Sandeep KaushalDepartment of Pharmacology, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, IndiaWith reference to the article published under the title "Pharmacologic agents for smoking cessation: A clinical review", we would like to add some information related to smoking cessation therapy among pregnant females. In that article, in the nicotine replacement therapy section, pregnancy has been considered as a contraindication...

  10. Tobacco smoking is associated with antipsychotic medication, physical aggressiveness, and alcohol use disorder in schizophrenia: results from the FACE-SZ national cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, J; Le Strat, Y; Schürhoff, F; Mazer, N; Portalier, C; Andrianarisoa, M; Aouizerate, B; Berna, F; Brunel, L; Capdevielle, D; Chereau, I; D'Amato, T; Dubreucq, J; Faget, C; Gabayet, F; Honciuc, R M; Lançon, C; Llorca, P M; Misdrahi, D; Rey, R; Roux, P; Schandrin, A; Urbach, M; Vidailhet, P; Fond, G; Dubertret, C

    2018-02-02

    Tobacco smoking is common in schizophrenia and is one of the main causes of premature mortality in this disorder. Little is known about clinical correlates and treatments associated with tobacco smoking in patients with schizophrenia. Still, a better characterization of these patients is necessary, in a personalized care approach. Aggressiveness and childhood trauma have been associated with tobacco smoking in general population, but this association has never been explored in schizophrenia. Our study examines the clinical and therapeutic characteristics of tobacco smoking in schizophrenia. 474 stabilized patients (mean age = 32.2; 75.7% male gender; smokers n = 207, 54.6%) were consecutively included in the network of the FondaMental Expert centers for Schizophrenia and assessed with valid scales. Current tobacco status was self-declared. Aggressiveness was self-reported with Buss-Perry Aggressiveness Questionnaire and Childhood Trauma with Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Ongoing treatment was reported. In univariate analysis, tobacco smoking was associated with lower education level (p aggressiveness (p smoking remained associated with physical aggressiveness (p < 0.05), current alcohol dependence (p < 0.01) and FGA use (p < 0.05). No association was observed with childhood trauma history, mood disorder, suicidal behavior, psychotic symptom, global functioning or medication adherence. Patients with tobacco use present clinical and therapeutic specificities, questioning the neurobiological links between tobacco and schizophrenia. They could represent a specific phenotype, with specific clinical and therapeutic specificities that may involve interactions between cholinergic-nicotinic system and dopaminergic system. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the potential efficacy of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) on tobacco use in schizophrenia and to develop effective strategies for tobacco cessation in this population.

  11. Randomized trial of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion and NRT plus bupropion for smoking cessation: effectiveness in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, John; West, Robert; Hajek, Peter; Wheeler, Jenny; Vangeli, Eleni; Abdi, Zeinab; O’Gara, Colin; McRobbie, Hayden; Humphrey, Kirsty; Ali, Rachel; Strang, John; Sutherland, Gay

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Bupropion was introduced for smoking cessation following a pivotal trial showing that it gave improved efficacy over the nicotine patch and also suggesting combination treatment was beneficial. We tested in clinical practice for an effectiveness difference between bupropion and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), whether the combination improves effectiveness and whether either treatment might be more beneficial for certain subgroups of smokers. Design Open-label randomized controlled trial with 6-month follow-up. Setting Four UK National Health Service (NHS) smoking cessation clinics. Participants Smokers (n = 1071) received seven weekly behavioural support sessions and were randomized to an NRT product of their choice (n = 418), bupropion (n = 409) or NRT plus bupropion (n = 244). Measures The primary outcome was self-reported cessation over 6 months, with biochemical verification at 1 and 6 months. Also measured were baseline demographics, health history, smoking characteristics and unwanted events during treatment. Findings Abstinence rates for bupropion (27.9%) and NRT (24.2%) were not significantly different (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval = 0.883–1.67), and the combination rate (24.2%) was similar to that for either treatment alone. There was some evidence that the relative effectiveness of bupropion and NRT differed according to depression (χ2 = 2.86, P = 0.091), with bupropion appearing more beneficial than NRT in those with a history of depression (29.8 versus 18.5%). Several unwanted symptoms were more common with bupropion. Conclusion There is no difference in smoking cessation effectiveness among bupropion, nicotine replacement therapy and their combination when used with behavioural support in clinical practice. There is some evidence that bupropion is more beneficial than nicotine replacement therapy for smokers with a history of depression. PMID:23859696

  12. Characterization of Exercise and Alcohol Self-Management Behaviors of Type 1 Diabetes Patients on Insulin Pump Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grando, Maria Adela; Groat, Danielle; Soni, Hiral; Boyle, Mary; Bailey, Marilyn; Thompson, Bithika; Cook, Curtiss B

    2017-03-01

    There is a lack of systematic ways to analyze how diabetes patients use their insulin pumps to self-manage blood glucose to compensate for alcohol ingestion and exercise. The objective was to analyze "real-life" insulin dosing decisions occurring in conjunction with alcohol intake and exercise among patients using insulin pumps. We recruited adult type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients on insulin pump therapy. Participants were asked to maintain their daily routines, including those related to exercising and consuming alcohol, and keep a 30-day journal on exercise performed and alcohol consumed. Thirty days of insulin pump data were downloaded. Participants' actual insulin dosing behaviors were compared against their self-reported behaviors in the setting of exercise and alcohol. Nineteen T1D patients were recruited and over 4000 interactions with the insulin pump were analyzed. The analysis exposed variability in how subjects perceived the effects of exercise/alcohol on their blood glucose, inconsistencies between self-reported and observed behaviors, and higher rates of blood glucose control behaviors for exercise versus alcohol. Compensation techniques and perceptions on how exercise and alcohol affect their blood glucose levels vary between patients. Improved individualized educational techniques that take into consideration a patient's unique life style are needed to help patients effectively apply alcohol and exercise compensation techniques.

  13. Smoking, consumption of alcohol and sedentary life style in population grouping and their relationships with lipemic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignez Salas Martins

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available The study, part of the project "Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, lipemic disorders, hypertension, obesity and diabetis mellitus in a population of the metropolitan area of the southeastern region of Brazil", had the following objectives: a the characterization and distribution among typical human socio-economic groupings, of the prevalence of some particular habits which constitute aspects of life-style-the use of tobacco, the use of alcohol and sedentary activity; b the establishment of the interrelation between the above-mentioned habits and some lipemic disorders. The prevalence of the habits cited behaved in the following manner: the use of tobacco predominated among men, distributed uniformly throughout the social strata; among the women the average percentage of smokers was 18,9%, a significant difference occurring among the highest socio-economic class, where the average was of 40.2%. The sedentary style of life presented high prevalence, among both men and women with exception of the women of the highest socio-economic level and of the skilled working class. The use of alcohol, as one would expect, is a habit basically practised by the men, without any statistically significant differences between classes. For the purpose of establishing associations between these risk fictors and lipemic conditions four situations were chosen, of the following characteristics: 1- total cholesterol > or = 220 mg/dl and triglycerides > or = 150 mg/dl; 2- HDL cholesterol or = 150 mg/dl; 3- HDL cholesterol or = 150 mg/dl, and the following independent variables: age, use of tobacco and the interactions between obesity and smoking, age and sedentary lifestyle, sex and obesity (R2=22%; the standardized B coefficient showed that the variables with the greatest weight in the forecasting of the variation in the levels of cholesterol were smoking and the interaction between obesity and smoking. The hypercholesterolemia accompanied by triglycerides levels

  14. Cigarette smoking is associated with unhealthy patterns of food consumption, physical activity, sleep impairment, and alcohol drinking in Chinese male adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Shabana; Cappelli, Christopher; Li, Yawen; Tanenbaum, Hilary; Chou, Chih-Ping; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Palmer, Paula H; Johnson, C Anderson; Xie, Bin

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent national survey, tobacco use is a critical public health issue in China, with more than two-thirds of Chinese males smoking. Findings in Western populations suggest that smoking may cluster with other health-risk behaviors. To explore these relationships in Chinese male adults, we utilized baseline data from the China Seven Cities Study (CSCS). Male adults (n = 12,122) were included. Smoking status was defined as never smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers, and current heavy smokers. Logistic regression was employed to investigate the association of cigarette smoking and patterns of food consumption, physical activity, and alcohol drinking. After controlling for age, socioeconomic status, and city residence, heavy smokers consumed significantly less vegetables, fruits, milk and other dairy products, spent significantly more time watching television, slept and exercised less, and got drunk or engaged in binge drinking more frequently compared to never, ex-, or current smokers (p adults, underscoring the need for tobacco control interventions for Chinese males.

  15. Protocol for the Smoking, Nicotine and Pregnancy (SNAP trial: double-blind, placebo-randomised, controlled trial of nicotine replacement therapy in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coughtrie Michael WH

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking in pregnancy remains a public health challenge. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is effective for smoking cessation in non-pregnant people, but because women metabolise nicotine and cotinine much faster in pregnancy, it is unclear whether this will be effective for smoking cessation in pregnancy. The NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme (HTA-funded smoking, nicotine and pregnancy (SNAP trial will investigate whether or not nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is effective, cost-effective and safe when used for smoking cessation by pregnant women. Methods/Design Over two years, in 5 trial centres, 1050 pregnant women who are between 12 and 24 weeks pregnant will be randomised as they attend hospital for ante-natal ultrasound scans. Women will receive either nicotine or placebo transdermal patches with behavioural support. The primary outcome measure is biochemically-validated, self-reported, prolonged and total abstinence from smoking between a quit date (defined before randomisation and set within two weeks of this and delivery. At six months after childbirth self-reported maternal smoking status will be ascertained and two years after childbirth, self-reported maternal smoking status and the behaviour, cognitive development and respiratory symptoms of children born in the trial will be compared in both groups. Discussion This trial is designed to ascertain whether or not standard doses of NRT (as transdermal patches are effective and safe when used for smoking cessation during pregnancy.

  16. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate reflects age better than health status, and may increase with cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking in middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Teruo; Kondo, Yasuaki; Okinaka, Toshio

    2012-04-01

    Serum dehydroepiandrosterone- sulfate (DHEAS), the most abundant adrenal steroid hormone, may predict aging status and longevity in humans. The aims of this study are to clarify the fundamental properties of serum DHEAS as a biomarker for health in middle-aged men. We investigated correlations of serum DHEAS with age or conventional health indices (body mass index, blood pressure, and 12 serum/blood tests) and associations of serum DHEAS with lifestyle factors (smoking, drinking, exercise, sleep) in 384 healthy men aged 30-49 years, randomly selected from voluntary attendees at a checkup. Serum DHEAS had an inverse and stronger correlation with age (Spearman's r=-0.320, page and BMI adjustments, serum DHEAS had a weak correlation with serum uric acid (crude Spearman's r=0.198, page better than health status evaluated by conventional health indices, and may increase with cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking in middle-aged healthy men.

  17. Predictors of Alcohol Treatment Outcome : Prognostic factors in cognitive behavioral therapy for problem drinking including Targeted Use of Naltrexone

    OpenAIRE

    Vuoristo-Myllys, Salla

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews form a basis for evidence-based treatments of alcohol use disorders. However, generalizing the research findings of randomized controlled trials to clinical practice is sometimes difficult. Little is known about how many such treatments work in real-life treatment settings or to whom the results apply. The aim of this study was to investigate how one of the evidence-based treatments for alcohol dependence, cognitive behavioral therapy (C...

  18. Family time, parental behaviour model and the initiation of smoking and alcohol use by ten-year-old children: an epidemiological study in Kaunas, Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaborskis Apolinaras

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family is considered to be the first and the most important child development and socialization bond. Nevertheless, parental behaviour model importance for the children, as well as family time for shared activity amount influence upon the child's health-related behaviour habit development has not been yet thoroughly examined. The aim of this paper is to indicate the advanced health-hazardous behaviour modelling possibilities in the families, as well as time spent for joint family activities, and to examine the importance of time spent for joint family activities for the smoking and alcohol use habit initiation among children. Methods This research was carried out in Kaunas, Lithuania, during the school year 2004–2005. The research population consisted of 369 fifth-grade schoolchildren (211 (57.2% boys and 158 (42.8% girls and 565 parents: 323 (57.2% mothers and 242 (48.2% fathers. The response rate was 80.7% for children; 96.1% and 90.6% for mothers and fathers correspondingly. Results Eating a meal together was the most frequent joint family activity, whereas visiting friends or relatives together, going for a walk, or playing sports were the most infrequent joint family activities. More than two thirds (81.5% of parents (248 (77.0% mothers and 207 (85.9% fathers (p Conclusion Joint family activity time deficit together with frequent parental examples of smoking and alcohol use underlie the development of alcohol and smoking addictions in children to some extent. The above-mentioned issues are suggested to be widely addressed in the comprehensive family health education programs.

  19. Family time, parental behaviour model and the initiation of smoking and alcohol use by ten-year-old children: an epidemiological study in Kaunas, Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmiene, Asta; Zemaitiene, Nida; Zaborskis, Apolinaras

    2006-11-23

    Family is considered to be the first and the most important child development and socialization bond. Nevertheless, parental behaviour model importance for the children, as well as family time for shared activity amount influence upon the child's health-related behaviour habit development has not been yet thoroughly examined. The aim of this paper is to indicate the advanced health-hazardous behaviour modelling possibilities in the families, as well as time spent for joint family activities, and to examine the importance of time spent for joint family activities for the smoking and alcohol use habit initiation among children. This research was carried out in Kaunas, Lithuania, during the school year 2004-2005. The research population consisted of 369 fifth-grade schoolchildren (211 (57.2%) boys and 158 (42.8%) girls) and 565 parents: 323 (57.2%) mothers and 242 (48.2%) fathers. The response rate was 80.7% for children; 96.1% and 90.6% for mothers and fathers correspondingly. Eating a meal together was the most frequent joint family activity, whereas visiting friends or relatives together, going for a walk, or playing sports were the most infrequent joint family activities. More than two thirds (81.5%) of parents (248 (77.0%) mothers and 207 (85.9%) fathers (p parental examples of smoking and alcohol use underlie the development of alcohol and smoking addictions in children to some extent. The above-mentioned issues are suggested to be widely addressed in the comprehensive family health education programs.

  20. The association of measures of the serotonin system, personality, alcohol use, and smoking with risk-taking traffic behavior in adolescents in a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luht, Kadi; Eensoo, Diva; Tooding, Liina-Mai; Harro, Jaanus

    2017-08-26

    Studies on the neurobiological basis of risk-taking behavior have most often focused on the serotonin system. The promoter region of the gene encoding the serotonin transporter contains a polymorphic site (5-HTTLPR) that is important for the transcriptional activity, and studies have demonstrated its association with brain activity and behavior. Another molecular mechanism that reflects the capacity of the central serotonin system is the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase (MAO) as measured in platelets. The purpose of the present study was to examine how measures of the serotonin system (platelet MAO activity and the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism), personality variables, alcohol use and smoking are associated with risk-taking traffic behavior in schoolchildren through late adolescence. The younger cohort of the longitudinal Estonian Children Personality Behaviour and Health Study (originally n = 583) filled in questionnaires about personality traits, smoking status, alcohol use and traffic behavior at age 15 and 18 years. From venous blood samples, platelet MAO activity was measured radioenzymatically and 5-HTTLPR was genotyped. During late adolescence, subjects with lower platelet MAO activity were more likely to belong to the high-risk traffic behavior group. Male 5-HTTLPRs'-allele carriers were more likely to belong to the high-risk traffic behavior group compared to the l'/l' homozygotes. Other variables predicting risk group were alcohol use, smoking and Maladaptive impulsivity.The results suggest that lower capacity of the serotoninergic system is associated with more risky traffic behavior during late adolescence, but possibly by different mechanisms in boys and girls.

  1. Physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption in association with incidence of type 2 diabetes among middle-aged and elderly Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Li, Honglan; Cai, Hui; Liu, Qiaolan; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Villegas, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent chronic disease worldwide. The prevalence of T2DM is increasing rapidly in China. Understanding the contribution of modifiable lifestyle factors on T2DM risk is imperative to prevent the development of T2DM in China. We examined associations between lifestyle factors including physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption with incidence of T2DM among middle-aged and elderly men in urban Shanghai. Information on socio-demographics, lifestyle habits, dietary habits, and disease history was collected via in-person interviews. Anthropometric measurements were taken. A total of 51 464 Chinese men aged 40-74 years free of T2DM, coronary heart disease (CHD), and stroke at baseline were included in the current study. Incident T2DM was identified through follow-up surveys conducted every 2-3 years. Cox proportional hazard analyses were conducted to evaluate associations between lifestyle risk factors and incidence of T2DM. We documented 1304 new cases of T2DM during 276 929 person-years of follow-up (average: 5.4 years). Physical activity was inversely associated with T2DM risk. Daily living, commuting, and total physical activity METs had inverse negative dose-response relationships with T2DM (P-trend = 0.0033, 0.0022, and associated with increased T2DM risk; HRs were 1.25 (95%CI: 1.00-1.56) for smoking more than 20 cigarettes per day and 1.28 (95%CI: 1.04-1.57) for smoking more than 40 pack-years. Physical activity and moderate alcohol intake are inversely associated with T2DM risk, whereas smoking was positively associated with T2DM risk among middle-age and elderly Chinese men. Preventive measures should be developed to focus on these modifiable lifestyle habits to reduce the upward trend of T2DM.

  2. Telomere shortening in the esophagus of Japanese alcoholics: relationships with chromoendoscopic findings, ALDH2 and ADH1B genotypes and smoking history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Aida

    Full Text Available Chromoendoscopy with Lugol iodine staining provides important information on the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. In particular, distinct iodine-unstained lesions (DIULs larger than 10 mm show a high prevalence in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia. It has also been reported that inactive ALDH2*1/*2 and less-active ADH1B*1/*1, and smoking, are risk factors for esophageal SCC. We previously examined telomere shortening in the esophageal epithelium of alcoholics, and suggested a high prevalence of chromosomal instability in such individuals. In the present study, we attempted to analyze telomere lengths in 52 DIULs with reference to both their size and multiplicity, ALDH2 and ADH1B genotypes, and smoking history. Patients with DIULs <10 mm (n = 42 had significantly longer telomeres than those with DIULs ≥10 mm (n = 10, p = 0.008. No significant differences in telomere length were recognized between the ALDH2 and ADH1B genotypes (ALDH2 active/inactive = 35/17, ADH1B active/inactive = 32/20; p = 0.563, 0.784, respectively or among four groups of patients divided according to smoking history (never-, ex-, light, and heavy smokers = 3, 6, 21, and 22 patients, respectively; p = 0.956. Patients without multiple DIULs (n = 17 had significantly longer telomeres than patients with multiple DIULs (n = 35, p = 0.040. It is suggested that alcoholism reduces telomere length in the esophagus, irrespective of genotype or smoking habit. Telomere shortening may not generate cancer directly, but may create conditions under which SCC can develop more easily, depending on subsequent exposure to carcinogens.

  3. Heavy dependent nicotine smokers--Newfound lifestyle appreciation after quitting successfully. Experiences from inpatient smoking cessation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoberberger, R; Böhm, G; Schroeder, Y

    2015-05-01

    This is an evaluation of an ongoing inpatient smoking cessation program available in Austria and aims to show to what extent even heavy nicotine dependent smokers can benefit from a three-week inpatient therapy. A particular focus lies on analyzing the benefits and changes in lifestyle and sense of well-being. 270 initially heavy nicotine dependent smokers are observed for a one year period consisting of recruitment, therapy and two post-therapy follow-up visits; post program smokers are compared to post program ex-smokers. 12 month post-therapy, 42.6% of participants are identified by carbon monoxide-verifications as ex-smokers, 34% as smokers and the remaining did not attend follow-up visits. Significant changes in lifestyle satisfaction are reported by ex-smokers compared to still smokers. Convincing heavy dependent nicotine smokers that significant changes in lifestyle satisfaction can be expected as part of a successful cessation process should lead to enough motivation for these individuals to seek such inpatient smoking cessation program. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Smoking, alcohol, and diet in relation to risk of pancreatic cancer in China: a prospective study of 0.5 million people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yuanjie; Holmes, Michael V; Guo, Yu; Yang, Ling; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Yiping; Iona, Andri; Millwood, Iona Y; Bragg, Fiona; Chen, Junshi; Li, Liming; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Chen, Zhengming

    2017-12-22

    In China, the incidence of pancreatic cancer (PC) has increased in recent decades. However, little is known about the relevance to PC risk of lifestyle and behavioral factors such as smoking, alcohol drinking, and diet. The China Kadoorie Biobank prospective study recruited 512,891 adults (210,222 men, 302,669 women) aged 30-79 (mean 52) years from 10 diverse areas during 2004-08. During ~9 years of follow-up, 688 incident cases of PC were recorded among those who had no prior history of cancer at baseline. Cox regression yielded adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for PC associated with smoking, alcohol and selected dietary factors. Overall, 74% of men were ever-regular smokers and 33% of men drank at least weekly, compared with only 3% and 2% of women, respectively. Among men, current regular smoking was associated with an adjusted HR of 1.25 (95% CI 1.08-1.44) for PC, with greater excess risk in urban than rural areas (1.46 [1.19-1.79] vs 1.04 [0.86-1.26]). Heavy, but not light to moderate, alcohol drinking (i.e. ≥420 g/week) was associated with significant excess risk (1.69 [1.21-2.37]), again more extreme in urban than rural areas (1.93 [1.29-2.87] vs 1.35 [0.74-2.48]). Overall, regular consumption of certain foodstuffs was associated with PC risk, with adjusted daily vs never/rare consumption HRs of 0.66 (0.56-0.79) for fresh fruit and 1.16 (1.01-1.33) for red meat. In China, smoking and heavy alcohol drinking were independent risk factors for PC in men. Lower fresh fruit and higher red meat consumption were also associated with higher risk of PC.ibitor treatment may be most effective on colorectal tumors expressing highest levels of calpain-2. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption in association with incidence of type 2 diabetes among middle-aged and elderly Chinese men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shi

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a prevalent chronic disease worldwide. The prevalence of T2DM is increasing rapidly in China. Understanding the contribution of modifiable lifestyle factors on T2DM risk is imperative to prevent the development of T2DM in China.We examined associations between lifestyle factors including physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption with incidence of T2DM among middle-aged and elderly men in urban Shanghai. Information on socio-demographics, lifestyle habits, dietary habits, and disease history was collected via in-person interviews. Anthropometric measurements were taken. A total of 51 464 Chinese men aged 40-74 years free of T2DM, coronary heart disease (CHD, and stroke at baseline were included in the current study. Incident T2DM was identified through follow-up surveys conducted every 2-3 years. Cox proportional hazard analyses were conducted to evaluate associations between lifestyle risk factors and incidence of T2DM.We documented 1304 new cases of T2DM during 276 929 person-years of follow-up (average: 5.4 years. Physical activity was inversely associated with T2DM risk. Daily living, commuting, and total physical activity METs had inverse negative dose-response relationships with T2DM (P-trend = 0.0033, 0.0022, and <0.0001, respectively. Regular participation in exercise or sports reduced T2DM risk (HR = 0.86, 95%CI: 0.76-0.98. Moderate alcohol intake (1-3 drinks/day was inversely related to T2DM risk (HR = 0.80, 95%CI: 0.67-0.94. Cigarette smoking, on the other hand, was associated with increased T2DM risk; HRs were 1.25 (95%CI: 1.00-1.56 for smoking more than 20 cigarettes per day and 1.28 (95%CI: 1.04-1.57 for smoking more than 40 pack-years.Physical activity and moderate alcohol intake are inversely associated with T2DM risk, whereas smoking was positively associated with T2DM risk among middle-age and elderly Chinese men. Preventive measures should be developed to focus on these modifiable

  6. Effects of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive patients in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhung T P; Tran, Bach X; Hwang, Lu Y; Markham, Christine M; Swartz, Michael D; Vidrine, Jennifer I; Phan, Huong T T; Latkin, Carl A; Vidrine, Damon J

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is increasingly recognized as an indicator for inferior adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-positive patients. Given the limited body of work on this issue, we aimed to explore the relations between cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence, and ART adherence in Vietnam. A cross-sectional study of 1050 HIV-positive people was conducted from January to September 2013 in Hanoi (the capital) and Nam Dinh (a rural city). Adherence to ART during the last 30 days was measured by the 100-point visual analog scale (VAS). Smoking history and nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence) were self-reported by participants. Multiple logistic regression was performed to examine the association of current smoking and nicotine dependence with ART nonadherence. Using the established VAS cut point of 95 to indicate adequate adherence, the prevalence of ART nonadherence was 30.9%. Approximately 35.5% of the sample reported current smoking. No association between smoking status and ART nonadherence was found. However, participants with greater nicotine dependence (OR = 1.1, 95%CI = 1.0-1.2 per unit increase) were more likely to be nonadherent. Also, individuals who were female (OR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.19-2.42), receiving ART in Nam Dinh (OR = 1.6, 95%CI = 1.1-2.4), and currently feeling anxiety (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1) had a higher likelihood of ART nonadherence. Additionally, current smokers reporting current pain (OR = 1.9, 95%CI = 1.2-3.1) were more likely to be nonadherent. Conversely, protective factors included living with a spouse/partner (OR = 0.5, 95%CI = 0.3-0.7) and having more than a high school education (OR = 0.4, 95%CI = 0.1-1.0). Given the high prevalence of suboptimal adherence and current smoking among HIV-positive patients, screening for smoking status and nicotine dependence during ART treatment may help to improve patients' adherence to medication. More efforts

  7. Diabetes, smoking, alcohol use, and family history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Hedenström, Per; Korsæth, Emilie; Valente, Roberto; Hayes, Alastair; Siuka, Darko; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz; Lindkvist, Björn; Capurso, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Risk factors for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are not well understood. The aim of this systematic review was to assess if diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcohol use, and family history of cancer are risk factors for PNETs. MEDLINE and abstracts from the European and North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Societies (ENETS and NANETS) were searched for studies published until October 2013. Eligible studies were selected according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Five studies evaluating 4 individual populations were included (study accrual period 2000-2011) into the meta-analysis, involving 827 cases (range 160-309 per study) and 2,407 controls (range 233-924 per study). All studies had a case-control design and described regional series. The pooled adjusted odds ratio was 2.74 (95% CI: 1.63-4.62; p alcohol use, 2.72 (95% CI: 1.25-5.91; p = 0.01; I(2) = 57.8%) for heavy alcohol use, and 2.16 (95% CI: 1.64-2.85; p cancer. Diabetes mellitus and first-degree family history of cancer are associated with an increased risk of sporadic PNET. There was also a trend for diagnosis of sporadic PNET associated with heavy smoking. Alcohol use may be a risk factor for PNET, but there was considerable heterogeneity in the meta-analysis. These results suggest the need for a larger, homogeneous, international study for the clarification of risk factors for the occurrence of PNET. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Do health behaviours change after colonoscopy? A prospective cohort study on diet, alcohol, physical activity and smoking among patients and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Gill; Brown, Alistair; Campbell, Anna; Campbell, Neil; Diament, Bob; Fielding, Shona; Forbat, Liz; Masson, Lindsey F; O'Carroll, Ronan; Stein, Kevin; Morrison, David S

    2014-01-14

    To describe diet, alcohol, physical activity and tobacco use prospectively, that is, before and 10 months after colonoscopy for patients and their partners. Prospective cohort study of health behaviour change in patients and partners. Comparison groups are patients receiving a normal result notification (NRN) versus patients receiving an abnormal result notification (ARN). Patients and partners (controls) are also compared. 5 Scottish hospitals. Of 5798 colonoscopy registrations, 2577 (44%) patients met the eligibility criteria of whom 565 (22%) were recruited; 460 partners were also recruited. International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Scottish Collaborative Group Food Frequency Questionnaire (includes alcohol), smoking status, sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, medical conditions, colonoscopy result, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, behaviour-specific self-efficacy scales. 57% of patients were men, with a mean age of 60.8 years (SE 0.5) and 43% were from more affluent areas. 72% (n=387) of patients received an ARN and 28% (n=149) received an NRN. Response rate of the second questionnaire was 68.9%. Overall, 27% of patients consumed physical activity and 21% were obese. At 10-month follow-up, a 5% reduction in excessive alcohol consumption and an 8% increase in low levels of physical activity were observed among patients; no significant changes occurred in partners. Baseline high alcohol consumption and low physical activity were the strongest predictors of these behaviours at follow-up. Low alcohol self-efficacy and increasing age were associated with poorer health-related behaviours at follow-up for alcohol consumption and physical activity, respectively. Colonoscopy is associated with marginal beneficial changes in some behaviours but not others. Further work is needed to explore how services can optimise increases in beneficial behaviours and mitigate increases in harmful ones. REC REF 10/S0709/24, UKCRN 9911.

  9. Lifestyle factors of smoking, BMI and alcohol on the risk of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi-Bee, J; Ellison, T; Bath-Hextall, F

    2012-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common cancer in humans and the most important risk factors are thought to be age, skin type, and exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Lifestyle factors may also play a part. To date no systematic review has been performed to collate evidence of the effects of smoking, alcohol or body mass index. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effects of smoking, alcohol and body mass index on the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer and its subtypes. Adults (18+ years old) of either sex from any ethnicitySmoking, alcohol, or body mass index (including other anthropometric measurements, such as weight, waist to hip ratio, and the percentage body fat)Non-melanoma skin cancer, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, or basal cell carcinomaComparative observational epidemiological studies SEARCH STRATEGY: We performed a comprehensive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and CAB Abstracts from inception to October 2010. We also scanned reference lists to identify further eligible studies. Data from eligible studies were extracted and quality assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale independently by two reviewers. The titles, abstracts and full text identified from the search were assessed independently by two reviewers against pre-specified inclusion/exclusion criteria. Disagreements were resolved through discussion with a third reviewer. For studies with similar exposures, a meta-analysis was performed using a random effects model and results were expressed as pooled odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity was assessed using I. Publication bias was assessed using funnel plots. Data were analysed using Review Manager. Thirty studies were included of which 22 used a case control design and the remaining used a cohort design. The overall quality of the studies was variable with a Newcastle Ottawa Scale median score of 6 out of 9 stars. No evidence of asymmetry was detected in the funnel plots

  10. Deficits in Emotion-Regulation Skills Predict Alcohol Use during and after Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Alcohol Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Matthias; Margraf, Matthias; Ebert, David; Wupperman, Peggilee; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Junghanns, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Objective: As emotion regulation is widely considered to be a primary motive in the misuse of alcohol, our aim in the study was to investigate whether deficits in adaptive emotion-regulation skills maintain alcohol dependence (AD). Method: A prospective study investigated whether emotion-regulation skills were associated with AD and whether these…

  11. Single-arm trial of the second version of an acceptance & commitment therapy smartphone application for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Jonathan B; Copeland, Wade; Mull, Kristin E; Zeng, Emily Y; Watson, Noreen L; Akioka, Katrina J; Heffner, Jaimee L

    2017-01-01

    The first randomized trial of a smartphone application (app) for adult smoking cessation (SmartQuit 1.0) revealed key features that predict cessation. These findings guided the revision of this Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT)-based application (SmartQuit 2.0), which was primarily tested to examine participant receptivity, short-term cessation and reduction, and the relationship between program completion, smoking cessation and reduction. Secondarily, outcomes were descriptively compared with the SmartQuit1.0 trial. Adult participants (78% female, 25% with high school or less education, 30% unemployed) were recruited into the single-arm pilot trial (N=99) of SmartQuit 2.0 with a two-month follow-up (85% retention). Regarding receptivity, 84% of participants were satisfied with SmartQuit 2.0 (vs. 59% for SmartQuit1.0), 73% would recommend it to a friend (vs. 48% for SmartQuit1.0), 81% found the ACT exercises useful for quitting (vs. 44% for SmartQuit1.0). At the 2-month follow-up, the quit rates were 21% for 7-day point prevalence (vs. 23% for SmartQuit1.0), 11% for 30-day point prevalence (vs. 13% for SmartQuit1.0), and 75% of participants reduced their smoking frequency (vs. 57% for SmartQuit1.0). Among program completers (24% of total sample), the quit rates were 33% for 7-day point prevalence, 28% for 30-day point prevalence, and 88% of participants reduced their smoking frequency. The revised app had high user receptivity, modest quit rates, and high smoking reduction rates. Program completion may be key to boosting the app's effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Burn injury during long-term oxygen therapy in Denmark and Sweden: the potential role of smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanash, Hanan A; Ringbaek, Thomas; Huss, Fredrik; Ekström, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) increases life expectancy in patients with COPD and severe hypoxemia. Smoking is the main cause of burn injury during LTOT. Policy regarding smoking while on LTOT varies between countries. In this study, we compare the incidence of burn injury that required contact with a health care specialist, between Sweden (a country with a strict policy regarding smoking while on LTOT) and Denmark (a country with less strict smoking policy). This was a population-based, cohort study of patients initiating LTOT due to any cause in Sweden and Denmark. Data on diagnoses, external causes, and procedures were obtained from the Swedish and Danish National Patient Registers for inpatient and outpatient care. Patients were followed from January 1, 2000, until the first of the following: LTOT withdrawal, death, or study end (December 31, 2009). The primary end point was burn injury during LTOT. A total of 23,741 patients received LTOT in Denmark and 7,754 patients in Sweden. Most patients started LTOT due to COPD, both in Sweden (74%) and in Denmark (62%). The rate of burn injury while on LTOT was higher in Denmark than in Sweden; 170 (95% confidence interval [CI], 126-225) vs 85 (95% CI, 44-148) per 100,000 person-years; rate ratio 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0-4.1). The risk remained higher after adjustment for gender, age, and diagnosis in multivariate Cox regression, hazard ratio 1.8 (95% CI, 1.0-3.5). Thirty-day mortality after burn injury was 8% in both countries. Compared to Sweden, the rate of burn injury was twice as high in Denmark where smoking is not a contraindication for prescribing LTOT.

  13. Smoking Behaviour and Mental Health Disorders—Mutual Influences and Implications for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Vicinanza

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is strongly associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Smokers are more likely than non-smokers to meet current criteria for mental health conditions, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders and psychosis. Evidence also suggest that smokers with psychiatric disorders may have more difficulty quitting, offering at least a partial explanation for why smoking rates are higher in this population. The mechanisms linking mental health conditions and cigarette smoking are complex and likely differ across each of the various disorders. The most commonly held view is that patients with mental health conditions smoke in an effort to regulate the symptoms associated with their disorder. However some recent evidence suggests that quitting smoking may actually improve mental health symptoms. This is particularly true if the tobacco cessation intervention is integrated into the context of ongoing mental health treatment. In this paper we reviewed and summarized the most relevant knowledge about the relationship between tobacco use and dependence and psychiatric disorders. We also reviewed the most effective smoking cessation strategies available for patients with psychiatric comorbidity and the impact of smoking behavior on psychiatric medication.

  14. Characterizing the Association Between Alcohol and HIV Virologic Failure in a Military Cohort on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiss, Robert G; Mesner, Octavio; Agan, Brian K; Ganesan, Anuradha; Okulicz, Jason F; Bavaro, Mary; Lalani, Tahaniyat; O'Bryan, Thomas A; Bebu, Ionut; Macalino, Grace E

    2016-03-01

    The effects of at-risk drinking on HIV infection remain controversial. We investigated the impact of self-reported alcohol consumption on surrogate markers of HIV progression among individuals initiated on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We analyzed individuals who were surveyed on alcohol use within a year of HAART initiation between 2006 and 2014. At-risk drinking was defined as consumption of at least 3 or 4 drinks/d, or 7 and 14 drinks/wk among women and men, respectively. We performed time-updated gen