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Sample records for therapy advance-d trial

  1. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  2. Chelation therapy after the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy: results of a unique trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Maria D.; Escolar, Esteban; Lamas, Gervasio A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review EDTA chelation therapy has been in off-label use for the treatment of atherosclerosis. We review the results of the first large-scale randomized trial of this treatment. Recent findings The trial to assess chelation therapy was a $30 million National Institutes of Health-funded study of the safety and efficacy of EDTA-based chelation infusions in 1708 post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients. The trial to assess chelation therapy demonstrated a significant (P = 0.035) 18% reduction in a combined primary endpoint of death, MI, stroke, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for angina. In diabetic patients the benefit was more extreme, with a 41% relative reduction in risk (P = 0.0002) and a 43% reduction in total mortality (P = 0.011). Safety data were favorable. A reduction of oxidative stress by chelation of toxic metals has been proposed as a possible mechanism of action. Summary Recent research suggests that EDTA chelation may be a well-tolerated and effective treatment for post-MI patients. Future replication and mechanistic studies are important prior to implementation in all post-MI patients. PMID:25023079

  3. Core journals that publish clinical trials of physical therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Moseley, Anne M; Sherrington, Catherine; Maher, Christopher G; Herbert, Robert D; Elkins, Mark R

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify core journals in physical therapy by identifying those that publish the most randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions, provide the highest-quality reports of randomized controlled trials, and have the highest journal impact factors. This study was an audit of a bibliographic database. All trials indexed in the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) were analyzed. Journals that had published at least 80 trials were selected. The journals were ranked in 4 ways: number of trials published; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal, regardless of publication year; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal from 2000 to 2009; and 2008 journal impact factor. The top 5 core journals in physical therapy, ranked by the total number of trials published, were Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Rehabilitation, Spine, British Medical Journal (BMJ), and Chest. When the mean total PEDro score was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Stroke, Spine, and Clinical Rehabilitation. When the mean total PEDro score of the trials published from 2000 to 2009 was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, and Pain. The most highly ranked physical therapy-specific journals were Physical Therapy (ranked eighth on the basis of the number of trials published) and Journal of Physiotherapy (ranked first on the basis of the quality of trials). Finally, when the 2008 impact factor was used for ranking, the top 5 journals were JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, and Thorax. There were no significant relationships among the rankings on the basis of trial quality, number of trials, or journal impact factor. Physical therapists who are trying to keep up-to-date by reading the best

  4. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide to 2017: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Samantha L; Amaya, Anais K; Alexander, Ian E; Edelstein, Michael; Abedi, Mohammad R

    2018-03-25

    To date, almost 2600 gene therapy clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. Our database brings together global information on gene therapy clinical activity from trial databases, official agency sources, published literature, conference presentations and posters kindly provided to us by individual investigators or trial sponsors. This review presents our analysis of clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. As of our November 2017 update, we have entries on 2597 trials undertaken in 38 countries. We have analysed the geographical distribution of trials, the disease indications (or other reasons) for trials, the proportions to which different vector types are used, and the genes that have been transferred. Details of the analyses presented, and our searchable database are available via The Journal of Gene Medicine Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website at: http://www.wiley.co.uk/genmed/clinical. We also provide an overview of the progress being made in gene therapy clinical trials around the world, and discuss key trends since the previous review, namely the use of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for the treatment of cancer and advancements in genome editing technologies, which have the potential to transform the field moving forward. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Heering, A.; Lubbe, N. van der; Vel, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy program compared with an exercise therapy program in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial of 109 hip OA patients was carried out in the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of

  6. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials.

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    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may prove helpful when assessing the

  7. Building for Biology: A Gene Therapy Trial Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Taylor-Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we examine the construction of the infrastructure for a Phase II gene therapy trial for Cystic Fibrosis (CF. Tracing the development of the material technologies and physical spaces used in the trial, we show how the trial infrastructure took form at the uncertain intersection of scientific norms, built environments, regulatory negotiations, patienthood, and the biologies of both disease and therapy. We define infrastructures as material and immaterial (including symbols and affect composites that serve a selective distributive purpose and facilitate projects of making and doing. There is a politics to this distributive action, which is itself twofold, because whilst infrastructures enable and delimit the movement of matter, they also mediate the very activity for which they provide the grounds. An infrastructural focus allows us to show how purposeful connections are made in a context of epistemic and regulatory uncertainty. The gene therapy researchers were working in a context of multiple uncertainties, regarding not only how to do gene therapy, but also how to anticipate and enact ambiguous regulatory requirements in a context of limited resources (technical, spatial, and financial. At the same time, the trial infrastructure had to accommodate Cystic Fibrosis biology by bridging the gap between pathology and therapy. The consortium’s approach to treating CF required that they address concerns about contamination and safety while finding a way of getting a modified gene product into the lungs of the trial participants.

  8. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy

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    FitzGerald, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Fitzgerald@umassmed.edu [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Knopp, Michael V. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Ohio, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core St. Louis, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Rosen, Mark A. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine–Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Shankar, Lalitha K. [National Cancer Institute, Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Laurie, Fran [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Moni, Janaki [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Coleman, C. Norman; Deye, James A.; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  9. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J.; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Followill, David S.; Galvin, James; Knopp, Michael V.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Rosen, Mark A.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Shankar, Lalitha K.; Laurie, Fran; Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Moni, Janaki; Coleman, C. Norman; Deye, James A.; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  10. Art Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Melissa; Decker, Kathleen P.; Kruk, Kerry; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2016-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine if art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was more effective for reducing symptoms of combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than CPT alone. Veterans (N = 11) were randomized to receive either individual CPT, or individual CPT in conjunction with individual…

  11. Reinventing clinical trials: a review of innovative biomarker trial designs in cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ja-An; He, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Recently, new clinical trial designs involving biomarkers have been studied and proposed in cancer clinical research, in the hope of incorporating the rapid growing basic research into clinical practices. Journal articles related to various biomarkers and their role in cancer clinical trial, articles and books about statistical issues in trial design, and regulatory website, documents, and guidance for submission of targeted cancer therapies. The drug development process involves four phases. The confirmatory Phase III is essential in regulatory approval of a special treatment. Regulatory agency has restrictions on confirmatory trials 'using adaptive designs'. No rule of thumb to pick the most appropriate design for biomarker-related trials. Statistical issues to solve in new designs. Regulatory acceptance of the 'newly proposed trial designs'. Biomarker-related trial designs that can resolve the statistical issues and satisfy the regulatory requirement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Clinical trials for stem cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomax Geoff

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, clinical trials with stem cells have taken the emerging field in many new directions. While numerous teams continue to refine and expand the role of bone marrow and cord blood stem cells for their vanguard uses in blood and immune disorders, many others are looking to expand the uses of the various types of stem cells found in bone marrow and cord blood, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, to uses beyond those that could be corrected by replacing cells in their own lineage. Early results from these trials have produced mixed results often showing minor or transitory improvements that may be attributed to extracellular factors. More research teams are accelerating the use of other types of adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells for diseases where beneficial outcome could result from either in-lineage cell replacement or extracellular factors. At the same time, the first three trials using cells derived from pluripotent cells have begun.

  13. Trial of radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia

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    Takegawa, Y; Fujiwara, K; Oe, J; Nagase, M; Akiyama, H [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1978-08-01

    Nine patients were treated by the combination therapy of external irradiation and hyperthermia, 5 patients with metastatic lesions; two breast cancer, one lung cancer, one malignant melanoma, one vulva cancer, 1 patient with recurrent lesion of skin cancer and 3 patients with bladder cancer. All patients were treated by heating locally (42/sup 0/C, 30 min) followed by external irradiation with 4,000 - 5,000 rad over 4 to 5 weeks. No local recurrence was found in 4 of 9 patients.

  14. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called "ubiquitin-proteasome system" (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients.

  15. Childhood asthma clusters and response to therapy in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Timothy S; Lemanske, Robert F; Mauger, David T; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Sorkness, Christine A; Szefler, Stanley J; Gangnon, Ronald E; Page, C David; Jackson, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Childhood asthma clusters, or subclasses, have been developed by computational methods without evaluation of clinical utility. To replicate and determine whether childhood asthma clusters previously identified computationally in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) are associated with treatment responses in Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network clinical trials. A cluster assignment model was determined by using SARP participant data. A total of 611 participants 6 to 18 years old from 3 CARE trials were assigned to SARP pediatric clusters. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by cluster in each trial. CARE participants were assigned to SARP clusters with high accuracy. Baseline characteristics were similar between SARP and CARE children of the same cluster. Treatment response in CARE trials was generally similar across clusters. However, with the caveat of a smaller sample size, children in the early-onset/severe-lung function cluster had best response with fluticasone/salmeterol (64% vs 23% 2.5× fluticasone and 13% fluticasone/montelukast in the Best ADd-on Therapy Giving Effective Responses trial; P = .011) and children in the early-onset/comorbidity cluster had the least clinical efficacy to treatments (eg, -0.076% change in FEV1 in the Characterizing Response to Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist and Inhaled Corticosteroid trial). In this study, we replicated SARP pediatric asthma clusters by using a separate, large clinical trials network. Early-onset/severe-lung function and early-onset/comorbidity clusters were associated with differential and limited response to therapy, respectively. Further prospective study of therapeutic response by cluster could provide new insights into childhood asthma treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials with misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, T.H.; Stetz, J.; Phillips, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progressive clinical trials of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole, in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Presentation is made of all the schemas of the recently completed and currently active RTOG Phase II and Phase III studies. Detailed information is provided on the clinical toxicity of the Phase II trials, specifically regarding neurotoxicity. With limitations in drug total dose, a variety of dose schedules have proven to be tolerable, with a moderate incidence of nausea and vomiting and mild peripheral neuropathy or central neuropathy. No other organ toxicity has been seen, specifically no liver, renal or bone marrow toxicities. An additional Phase III malignant glioma trial in the Brain Tumor Study Group is described

  17. Clinical trial registration in physical therapy journals: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; Veluswamy, Sundar Kumar; Rao, Pratiksha Tilak; Maiya, Arun G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trial registration has become an important part of editorial policies of various biomedical journals, including a few physical therapy journals. However, the extent to which editorial boards enforce the need for trial registration varies across journals. The purpose of this study was to identify editorial policies and reporting of trial registration details in MEDLINE-indexed English-language physical therapy journals. This study was carried out using a cross-sectional design. Editorial policies on trial registration of MEDLINE-indexed member journals of the International Society of Physiotherapy Journal Editors (ISPJE) (Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, Journal of Hand Therapy, Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Journal of Physiotherapy [formerly Australian Journal of Physiotherapy], Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Manual Therapy, Physical Therapy, Physical Therapy in Sport, Physiotherapy, Physiotherapy Research International, Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, and Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia) were reviewed in April 2013. Full texts of reports of clinical trials published in these journals between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012, were independently assessed for information on trial registration. Among the 13 journals, 8 recommended trial registration, and 6 emphasized prospective trial registration. As of April 2013, 4,618 articles were published between January 2008 and December 2012, of which 9% (417) were clinical trials and 29% (121/417) of these reported trial registration details. A positive trend in reporting of trial registration was observed from 2008 to 2012. The study was limited to MEDLINE-indexed ISPJE member journals. Editorial policies on trial registration of physical therapy journals and a rising trend toward reporting of trial registration details indicate a positive momentum toward trial registration. Physical therapy journal editors need to show

  18. Art Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Melissa; Decker, Kathleen P.; Kruk, Kerry; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2018-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine if art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was more effective for reducing symptoms of combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than CPT alone. Veterans (N = 11) were randomized to receive either individual CPT, or individual CPT in conjunction with individual art therapy. PTSD Checklist–Military Version and Beck Depression Inventory–II scores improved with treatment in both groups with no significant difference in improvement between the experimental and control groups. Art therapy in conjunction with CPT was found to improve trauma processing and veterans considered it to be an important part of their treatment as it provided healthy distancing, enhanced trauma recall, and increased access to emotions. PMID:29332989

  19. Yohimbine Enhancement of Exposure Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.A.J.; Rosenfield, D.; Davis, M.L.; Julian, K.; Handelsman, P.R.; Otto, M.W.; Tuerk, P.; Shiekh, M.; Rosenfield, B.; Hofmann, S.G.; Powers, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preclinical and clinical trials suggest that yohimbine may augment extinction learning without significant side effects. However, previous clinical trials have only examined adults with specific phobias. Yohimbine has not yet been investigated in the augmentation of exposure therapy for

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy and Cognitive Therapy for Test Anxiety: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lily A.; Forman, Evan M.; Herbert, James D.; Hoffman, Kimberly L.; Yuen, Erica K.; Goetter, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Many university students suffer from test anxiety that is severe enough to impair performance. Given mixed efficacy results of previous cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) trials and a theoretically driven rationale, an acceptance-based behavior therapy (ABBT) approach was compared to traditional CBT (i.e., Beckian cognitive therapy; CT) for the…

  1. Randomized trial of behavior therapy for adults with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Sabine; Peterson, Alan L; Piacentini, John; Woods, Douglas W; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sukhodolsky, Denis G; Chang, Susanna; Liu, Haibei; Dziura, James; Walkup, John T; Scahill, Lawrence

    2012-08-01

    Tics in Tourette syndrome begin in childhood, peak in early adolescence, and often decrease by early adulthood. However, some adult patients continue to have impairing tics. Medications for tics are often effective but can cause adverse effects. Behavior therapy may offer an alternative but has not been examined in a large-scale controlled trial in adults. To test the efficacy of a comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics in adults with Tourette syndrome of at least moderate severity. A randomized controlled trial with posttreatment evaluations at 3 and 6 months for positive responders. Three outpatient research clinics. Patients (N = 122; 78 males; age range, 16-69 years) with Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorder were recruited between December 27, 2005, and May 21, 2009. Patients received 8 sessions of comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics or 8 sessions of supportive treatment for 10 weeks. Patients with a positive response were given 3 monthly booster sessions. Total tic score on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale rated by a clinician masked to treatment assignment. Behavior therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean (SD) decrease on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (24.0 [6.47] to 17.8 [7.32]) from baseline to end point compared with the control treatment (21.8 [6.59] to 19.3 [7.40]) (P Tourette syndrome. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00231985.

  2. A randomized clinical trial of alpha(1)-antitrypsin augmentation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, A; Dijkman, J H; Madsen, F; Stoel, B; Hutchison, D C; Ulrik, C S; Skovgaard, L T; Kok-Jensen, A; Rudolphus, A; Seersholm, N; Vrooman, H A; Reiber, J H; Hansen, N C; Heckscher, T; Viskum, K; Stolk, J

    1999-11-01

    We have investigated whether restoration of the balance between neutrophil elastase and its inhibitor, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, can prevent the progression of pulmonary emphysema in patients with alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency. Twenty-six Danish and 30 Dutch ex-smokers with alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency of PI*ZZ phenotype and moderate emphysema (FEV(1) between 30% and 80% of predicted) participated in a double-blind trial of alpha(1)-antitrypsin augmentation therapy. The patients were randomized to either alpha(1)-antitrypsin (250 mg/kg) or albumin (625 mg/kg) infusions at 4-wk intervals for at least 3 yr. Self-administered spirometry performed every morning and evening at home showed no significant difference in decline of FEV(1) between treatment and placebo. Each year, the degree of emphysema was quantified by the 15th percentile point of the lung density histogram derived from computed tomography (CT). The loss of lung tissue measured by CT (mean +/- SEM) was 2.6 +/- 0.41 g/L/yr for placebo as compared with 1.5 +/- 0.41 g/L/yr for alpha(1)-antitrypsin infusion (p = 0.07). Power analysis showed that this protective effect would be significant in a similar trial with 130 patients. This is in contrast to calculations based on annual decline of FEV(1) showing that 550 patients would be needed to show a 50% reduction of annual decline. We conclude that lung density measurements by CT may facilitate future randomized clinical trials of investigational drugs for a disease in which little progress in therapy has been made in the past 30 yr.

  3. Melodic intonation therapy in chronic aphasia: Evidence from a pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. van der Meulen (Ineke); W.M.E. van de Sandt-Koenderman (Mieke); Heijenbrok, M.H. (Majanka H.); E.G. Visch-Brink (Evy); Ribber, G.M. (Gerard M.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMelodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) is a language production therapy for severely nonfluent aphasic patients using melodic intoning and rhythm to restore language. Although many studies have reported its beneficial effects on language production, randomized controlled trials (RCT) examining

  4. Core domain and outcome measurement sets for shoulder pain trials are needed: Systematic review of physical therapy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Page (Matthew J.); J.E. McKenzie (Joanne E.); S.E. Green (Sally E.); D.E. Beaton (Dorcas E.); N.B. Jain (Nitin B.); M. Lenza (Mario); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); S. Surace (Stephen); J. Deitch (Jessica); R. Buchbinder (Rachelle)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To explore the outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in published randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions for shoulder pain (rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, or nonspecific shoulder pain). Study Design and Setting We included

  5. Quality control of radiation therapy in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.; Lustig, R.; Grundy, G.

    1983-01-01

    The RTOG is a group of participating institutions which has a major interest in furthering clinical radiation oncology. They have formulated protocols for clinical investigation in which radiation therapy is the major modality of treatment. In addition, other modalities, such as chemotherapy, radiation sensitizers, and hyperthermia, are used in combined approach to cancer. Quality control in all aspects of patient management is necessary to insure quality data. These areas include evaluation of pathology, physics, and dosimetry, and clinical patient data. Quality control is both time consuming and expensive. However, by dividing these tasks into various levels and time frames, by using computerized data-control mechanisms, and by employing appropriate levels of ancillary personnel expertise, quality control can improve compliance and decrease the cost of investigational trials

  6. Comment on: "Cell Therapy for Heart Disease: Trial Sequential Analyses of Two Cochrane Reviews"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellini, Greta; Nielsen, Emil Eik; Gluud, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Trial Sequential Analysis is a frequentist method to help researchers control the risks of random errors in meta-analyses (1). Fisher and colleagues used Trial Sequential Analysis on cell therapy for heart diseases (2). The present article discusses the usefulness of Trial Sequential Analysis and...

  7. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...] Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy... Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), gene and cellular therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders...

  8. Randomized clinical trial of antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H C; Kim, M J; Lee, B H

    2017-12-01

    Uncomplicated appendicitis may resolve spontaneously or require treatment with antibiotics or appendicectomy. The aim of this randomized trial was to compare the outcome of a non-antibiotic management strategy with that of antibiotic therapy in uncomplicated appendicitis. Patients presenting to a university teaching hospital with CT-verified uncomplicated simple appendicitis (appendiceal diameter no larger than 11 mm and without any signs of perforation) were randomized to management with a no-antibiotic regimen with supportive care (intravenous fluids, analgesia and antipyretics as necessary) or a 4-day course of antibiotics with supportive care. The primary endpoint was rate of total treatment failure, defined as initial treatment failure within 1 month and recurrence of appendicitis during the follow-up period. Some 245 patients were randomized within the trial, and followed up for a median of 19 months. The duration of hospital stay was shorter (mean 3·1 versus 3·7 days; P antibiotics. There was no difference in total treatment failure rate between the groups: 29 of 124 (23·4 per cent) in the no-antibiotic group and 25 of 121 (20·7 per cent) in the antibiotic group (P = 0·609). Eighteen patients (9 in each group) had initial treatment failure, 15 of whom underwent appendicectomy and three received additional antibiotics. Thirty-six patients (20 in the no-antibiotic group, 16 in the antibiotic group) experienced recurrence, of whom 30 underwent appendicectomy and six received further antibiotics. Treatment failure rates in patients presenting with CT-confirmed uncomplicated appendicitis appeared similar among those receiving supportive care with either a no-antibiotic regimen or a 4-day course of antibiotics. Registration number: KCT0000124 ( http://cris.nih.go.kr). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Pediatric selective mutism therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Maria; Gimigliano, Francesca; Barillari, Maria R; Precenzano, Francesco; Ruberto, Maria; Sepe, Joseph; Barillari, Umberto; Gimigliano, Raffaele; Militerni, Roberto; Messina, Giovanni; Carotenuto, Marco

    2017-10-01

    Selective mutism (SM) is a rare disease in children coded by DSM-5 as an anxiety disorder. Despite the disabling nature of the disease, there is still no specific treatment. The aims of this study were to verify the efficacy of six-month standard psychomotor treatment and the positive changes in lifestyle, in a population of children affected by SM. Randomized controlled trial registered in the European Clinical Trials Registry (EuDract 2015-001161-36). University third level Centre (Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry Clinic). Study population was composed by 67 children in group A (psychomotricity treatment) (35 M, mean age 7.84±1.15) and 71 children in group B (behavioral and educational counseling) (37 M, mean age 7.75±1.36). Psychomotor treatment was administered by trained child therapists in residential settings three times per week. Each child was treated for the whole period by the same therapist and all the therapists shared the same protocol. The standard psychomotor session length is of 45 minutes. At T0 and after 6 months (T1) of treatments, patients underwent a behavioral and SM severity assessment. To verify the effects of the psychomotor management, the Child Behavior Checklist questionnaire (CBCL) and Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ) were administered to the parents. After 6 months of psychomotor treatment SM children showed a significant reduction among CBCL scores such as in social relations, anxious/depressed, social problems and total problems (Pselective mutism, even if further studies are needed. The present study identifies in psychomotricity a safe and efficacy therapy for pediatric selective mutism.

  10. Clinical trial to compare tinnitus masking and tinnitus retraining therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, J A; Schechter, M A; Zaugg, T L; Griest, S; Jastreboff, P J; Vernon, J A; Kaelin, C; Meikle, M B; Lyons, K S; Stewart, B J

    2006-12-01

    Both tinnitus masking (TM) and tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) can be effective therapies for amelioration of tinnitus. TM may be more effective for patients in the short term, but with continued treatment TRT may produce the greatest effects. Although TM and TRT have been used for many years, research has not documented definitively the efficacy of these methods. The present study was a controlled clinical trial to prospectively evaluate the clinical efficacy of these two methods for US military veterans with severe tinnitus. Over 800 veterans were screened to ensure that enrolled patients had tinnitus of sufficient severity to justify 18 months of individualized treatment. Qualifying patients (n=123) were placed quasi-randomly (alternating placement) into treatment with either TM or TRT. Treatment was administered at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Outcomes of treatment were evaluated primarily using three self-administered tinnitus questionnaires (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire, Tinnitus Severity Index). Findings are presented from the three written questionnaires with respect to three categories of patients: describing tinnitus as a 'moderate,' 'big,' and 'very big' problem at baseline. Based on effect sizes, both groups showed considerable improvement overall. In general, TM effects remained fairly constant over time while TRT effects improved incrementally. For the patients with a 'moderate' and 'big' problem, TM provided the greatest benefit at 3 and 6 months; benefit to these TRT patients was slightly greater at 12 months, and much greater at 18 months. For patients with a 'very big' problem, TM provided the greatest benefit at 3 months. For these latter patients, results were about the same between groups at 6 months, and improvement for TRT was much greater at 12 months, with further gains at 18 months.

  11. Congestive Heart Failure Cardiopoietic Regenerative Therapy (CHART-1) trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartunek, Jozef; Davison, Beth; Sherman, Warren; Povsic, Thomas; Henry, Timothy D; Gersh, Bernard; Metra, Marco; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Hajjar, Roger; Behfar, Atta; Homsy, Christian; Cotter, Gad; Wijns, William; Tendera, Michal; Terzic, Andre

    2016-02-01

    Cardiopoiesis is a conditioning programme that aims to upgrade the cardioregenerative aptitude of patient-derived stem cells through lineage specification. Cardiopoietic stem cells tested initially for feasibility and safety exhibited signs of clinical benefit in patients with ischaemic heart failure (HF) warranting definitive evaluation. Accordingly, CHART-1 is designed as a large randomized, sham-controlled multicentre study aimed to validate cardiopoietic stem cell therapy. Patients (n = 240) with chronic HF secondary to ischaemic heart disease, reduced LVEF (Heart Failure Questionnaire score, 6 min walk test, LV end-systolic volume, and LVEF at 9 months. The secondary efficacy endpoint is the time to cardiovascular death or worsening HF at 12 months. Safety endpoints include mortality, readmissions, aborted sudden deaths, and serious adverse events at 12 and 24 months. The CHART-1 clinical trial is powered to examine the therapeutic impact of lineage-directed stem cells as a strategy to achieve cardiac regeneration in HF populations. On completion, CHART-1 will offer a definitive evaluation of the efficacy and safety of cardiopoietic stem cells in the treatment of chronic ischaemic HF. NCT01768702. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  12. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendler, Rabbi Moshe D.; Loike, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The transition of new biotechnologies into clinical trials is a critical step in approving a new drug or therapy in health care. Ethically recruiting appropriate volunteers for these clinical trials can be a challenging task for both the pharmaceutical companies and the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy. The halachic perspective encourages individuals to volunteer for such clinical trials under the ethical principles of beneficence and social responsibility, when animal studies have shown that health risks are minimal. PMID:26241230

  13. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbi Moshe D. Tendler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transition of new biotechnologies into clinical trials is a critical step in approving a new drug or therapy in health care. Ethically recruiting appropriate volunteers for these clinical trials can be a challenging task for both the pharmaceutical companies and the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy. The halachic perspective encourages individuals to volunteer for such clinical trials under the ethical principles of beneficence and social responsibility, when animal studies have shown that health risks are minimal.

  14. Exercise therapy, manual therapy, or both, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a factorial randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter G David

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological, non-surgical interventions are recommended as the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis (OA of the hip and knee. There is evidence that exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and improving function in patients with knee OA, some evidence that exercise therapy is effective for hip OA, and early indications that manual therapy may be efficacious for hip and knee OA. There is little evidence as to which approach is more effective, if benefits endure, or if providing these therapies is cost-effective for the management of this disorder. The MOA Trial (Management of OsteoArthritis aims to test the effectiveness of two physiotherapy interventions for improving disability and pain in adults with hip or knee OA in New Zealand. Specifically, our primary objectives are to investigate whether: 1. Exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy improves disability at 12 months; 2. Manual physiotherapy versus no manual therapy improves disability at 12 months; 3. Providing physiotherapy programmes in addition to usual care is more cost-effective than usual care alone in the management of osteoarthritis at 24 months. Methods This is a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial. We plan to recruit 224 participants with hip or knee OA. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either: (a a supervised multi-modal exercise therapy programme; (b an individualised manual therapy programme; (c both exercise therapy and manual therapy; or, (d no trial physiotherapy. All participants will continue to receive usual medical care. The outcome assessors, orthopaedic surgeons, general medical practitioners, and statistician will be blind to group allocation until the statistical analysis is completed. The trial is funded by Health Research Council of New Zealand Project Grants (Project numbers 07/199, 07/200. Discussion The MOA Trial will be the first to investigate the effectiveness and cost

  15. Results of two randomised clinical trials of neutron therapy in rectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Arnott, S.J.; Jack, W.J.L.; Orr, J.A.; Kerr, G.R.; Williams, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two clinical trials of neutron therapy were instituted to compare fast neutron therapy with megavoltage therapy in inoperable adenocarcinoma of the rectum and in postoperative recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum and to evaluate local tumour control, radiation morbidity and survival rates. In both rectal trials, complete local regression and persistent local control of tumour were similar in each treatment group. Survival was poor and so there is little long-term experience of tumour control and morbidity. The possibility that the relatively poor penetration of the neutron beam had an adverse effect on the results of neutron therapy should be considered. (Auth.)

  16. Trimodality therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma: Results from an EORTC phase II multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); P. Baas (Paul); R.M. Gaafar (Rabab); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F. Van De Pol (Francien); B. Hasane (B.); H.M. Klomp (Houke); A.M. Abdelrahman (A.); J. Welche (J.); J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC; protocol 08031) phase II trial investigated the feasibility of trimodality therapy consisting of induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and post-operative radiotherapy in patients with malignant

  17. Randomized Trial of Asprin as Adjuvant Therapy for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0268 TITLE: Randomized Trial of Asprin as Adjuvant Therapy for Node-Positive Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Eric Winer CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02215 REPORT DATE: OCTOBER 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: ANNUAL PREPARED FOR...CONTRACT NUMBER Randomized Trial of Asprin as Adjuvant Therapy for Node- Positive Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  18. Randomized Controlled Trials in Music Therapy: Guidelines for Design and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) plays a powerful role in today's healthcare industry. At the same time, it is important that multiple types of evidence contribute to music therapy's knowledge base and that the dialogue of clinical effectiveness in music therapy is not dominated by the biomedical hierarchical model of evidence-based practice. Whether or not one agrees with the hierarchical model of evidence in the current healthcare climate, RCTs can contribute important knowledge to our field. Therefore, it is important that music therapists are prepared to design trials that meet current methodological standards and, equally important, are able to respond appropriately to those design aspects that may not be feasible in music therapy research. To provide practical guidelines to music therapy researchers for the design and implementation of RCTs as well as to enable music therapists to be well-informed consumers of RCT evidence. This article reviews key design aspects of RCTs and discusses how to best implement these standards in music therapy trials. A systematic presentation of basic randomization methods, allocation concealment strategies, issues related to blinding in music therapy trials and strategies for implementation, the use of treatment manuals, types of control groups, outcome selection, and sample size computation is provided. Despite the challenges of meeting all key design demands typical of an RCT, it is possible to design rigorous music therapy RCTs that accurately estimate music therapy treatment benefits.

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial of Problem-Solving Therapy for Minor Depression in Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, Zvi D.; McGinty, Jean; Tierney, Lynda; Jordan, Cindy; Burton, Jean; Misener, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Data are presented from a pilot research program initiated to develop, refine, and test the outcomes of problem-solving therapy that targets the needs of older adults with minor depression in home care settings. Method: A pilot randomized clinical trial compares the impact of problem-solving therapy for home care to treatment as usual…

  20. Occupational therapy for elderly : evidence mapping of randomised controlled trials from 2004-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voigt-Radloff, S; Ruf, G.; Vogel, A.; van Nes, F.; Hüll, M.

    OBJECTIVE: Previous systematic reviews on occupational therapy for elderly included studies until 2003. The present evidence mapping summarizes recent evidence for the efficacy of occupational therapy with older persons based on randomised controlled trials from 2004-2012. METHOD: An electronic

  1. Comparative effectiveness of Tai Chi versus physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis. Objective: To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy f...

  2. TU-G-BRB-00: Clinical Trials in Proton and Particle Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  3. Oversight and Management of a Cell Therapy Clinical Trial Network: Experience and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Moyé, Lemuel A.; Sayre, Shelly L.; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C.; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A.; Skarlatos, Sonia I.

    2011-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This arti...

  4. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy as a Treatment for Chronic Tinnitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    McKenna, L.; Marks, E. M.; Hallsworth, C. A.; Schaette, R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is experienced by up to 15% of the population and can lead to significant disability and distress. There is rarely a medical or surgical target and psychological therapies are recommended. We investigated whether mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) could offer an effective new therapy for tinnitus. METHODS: This single-site randomized controlled trial compared MBCT to intensive relaxation training (RT) for chronic, distressing tinnitus in adults. Both treatments in...

  5. Trial Characteristics as Contextual Factors when Evaluating Targeted Therapies in Patients with Psoriatic Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Christine; Jørgensen, Tanja S; Skougaard, Marie

    2018-01-01

    (PsA) and psoriasis (8 biologics and apremilast). The effect of targeted therapies was analyzed in the two psoriatic conditions combined by using drug retention as common outcome, and separately by using ACR20 for PsA and PASI75 for psoriasis. We explored potential effect modification of trial...... characteristics in stratified and meta-regression analyses. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated and compared among the trial eligibility criteria via the Ratio of Odds Ratios (ROR). RESULTS: Forty-eight PsA and psoriasis trials (51 comparisons, 17,737 patients) were eligible. Overall retention was OR 2.16 (1.70 to 2.......75) with higher odds for PsA trials compared with psoriasis trials (ROR = 2.55 [1.64 to 3.97]). The eligibility criteria "targeted therapy history", "minimum required disease duration", "required negative rheumatoid factor", and "required CASPAR criteria" were of importance for achieving ACR20 in PsA...

  6. Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy vs No Therapy in Mild to Moderate Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Carl E; Patel, Smitaa; Ives, Natalie; Rick, Caroline E; Dowling, Francis; Woolley, Rebecca; Wheatley, Keith; Walker, Marion F; Sackley, Catherine M

    2016-03-01

    It is unclear whether physiotherapy and occupational therapy are clinically effective and cost-effective in Parkinson disease (PD). To perform a large pragmatic randomized clinical trial to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy and occupational therapy in PD. The PD REHAB Trial was a multicenter, open-label, parallel group, controlled efficacy trial. A total of 762 patients with mild to moderate PD were recruited from 38 sites across the United Kingdom. Recruitment took place between October 2009 and June 2012, with 15 months of follow-up. Participants with limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) were randomized to physiotherapy and occupational therapy or no therapy. The primary outcome was the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale score at 3 months after randomization. Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life (assessed by Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 and EuroQol-5D); adverse events; and caregiver quality of life. Outcomes were assessed before trial entry and then 3, 9, and 15 months after randomization. Of the 762 patients included in the study (mean [SD] age, 70 [9.1] years), 381 received physiotherapy and occupational therapy and 381 received no therapy. At 3 months, there was no difference between groups in NEADL total score (difference, 0.5 points; 95% CI, -0.7 to 1.7; P = .41) or Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 summary index (0.007 points; 95% CI, -1.5 to 1.5; P = .99). The EuroQol-5D quotient was of borderline significance in favor of therapy (-0.03; 95% CI, -0.07 to -0.002; P = .04). The median therapist contact time was 4 visits of 58 minutes over 8 weeks. Repeated-measures analysis showed no difference in NEADL total score, but Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 summary index (diverging 1.6 points per annum; 95% CI, 0.47 to 2.62; P = .005) and EuroQol-5D score (0.02; 95% CI, 0.00007 to 0.03; P = .04) showed small differences in favor of therapy. There was no difference in

  7. Guided Web-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Perfectionism: Results From Two Different Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, Alexander; Shafran, Roz; Wade, Tracey D; Kothari, Radha; Egan, Sarah J; Ekberg, Linda; Wiss, Maria; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard

    2018-04-26

    Perfectionism can become a debilitating condition that may negatively affect functioning in multiple areas, including mental health. Prior research has indicated that internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy can be beneficial, but few studies have included follow-up data. The objective of this study was to explore the outcomes at follow-up of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy with guided self-help, delivered as 2 separate randomized controlled trials conducted in Sweden and the United Kingdom. In total, 120 participants randomly assigned to internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy were included in both intention-to-treat and completer analyses: 78 in the Swedish trial and 62 in the UK trial. The primary outcome measure was the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Concern over Mistakes subscale (FMPS CM). Secondary outcome measures varied between the trials and consisted of the Clinical Perfectionism Questionnaire (CPQ; both trials), the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9; Swedish trial), the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7; Swedish trial), and the 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21; UK trial). Follow-up occurred after 6 months for the UK trial and after 12 months for the Swedish trial. Analysis of covariance revealed a significant difference between pretreatment and follow-up in both studies. Intention-to-treat within-group Cohen d effect sizes were 1.21 (Swedish trial; 95% CI 0.86-1.54) and 1.24 (UK trial; 95% CI 0.85-1.62) for the FMPS CM. Furthermore, 29 (59%; Swedish trial) and 15 (43%; UK trial) of the participants met the criteria for recovery on the FMPS CM. Improvements were also significant for the CPQ, with effect sizes of 1.32 (Swedish trial; 95% CI 0.97-1.66) and 1.49 (UK trial; 95% CI 1.09-1.88); the PHQ-9, effect size 0.60 (95% CI 0.28-0.92); the GAD-7, effect size 0.67 (95% CI 0.34-0.99); and the DASS-21, effect size 0.50 (95% CI 0.13-0.85). The results are promising for the use of

  8. Randomized trial of group musi therapy with Chinese prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Gold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    decreased significantly at mid-test and post-test; self-esteem improved significantly at mid-test (TSBI) and at post-test (TSBI, RSI). Improvements were greater in younger participants (STAI-Trait, RSI) and/or those with a lower level of education (STAI-State, STAI-Trait). Group music therapy seems...... to be effective in improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem and was shown to be most beneficial for prisoners of a younger age or with lower education level.......This study investigated the effects of group music therapy on improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in Chinese prisoners. Two hundred male prisoners were randomly assigned to music therapy (n = 100) or standard care (n = 100). The music therapy had 20 sessions of group therapy compared...

  9. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy vs. cognitive behaviour therapy for depression: study protocol for a randomised controlled superiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvenegaard, Morten; Watkins, Ed R; Poulsen, Stig; Rosenberg, Nicole K; Gondan, Matthias; Grafton, Ben; Austin, Stephen F; Howard, Henriette; Moeller, Stine B

    2015-08-11

    Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment for depression. However, one third of the patients do not respond satisfactorily, and relapse rates of around 30 % within the first post-treatment year were reported in a recent meta-analysis. In total, 30-50 % of remitted patients present with residual symptoms by the end of treatment. A common residual symptom is rumination, a process of recurrent negative thinking and dwelling on negative affect. Rumination has been demonstrated as a major factor in vulnerability to depression, predicting the onset, severity, and duration of future depression. Rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment targeting rumination. Because rumination plays a major role in the initiation and maintenance of depression, targeting rumination with rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy may be more effective in treating depression and reducing relapse than standard cognitive behavioural therapy. This study is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled superiority trial comparing the effectiveness of group-based rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy with the effectiveness of group-based cognitive behavioural therapy for treatment of depression. One hundred twenty-eight patients with depression will be recruited from and given treatment in an outpatient service at a psychiatric hospital in Denmark. Our primary outcome will be severity of depressive symptoms (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) at completion of treatment. Secondary outcomes will be level of rumination, worry, anxiety, quality of life, behavioural activation, experimental measures of cognitive flexibility, and emotional attentional bias. A 6-month follow-up is planned and will include the primary outcome measure and assessment of relapse. The clinical outcome of this trial may guide clinicians to decide on the merits of including rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy in the treatment of depression in

  10. Experiences of a long-term randomized controlled prevention trial in a maiden environment: Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahu Mati

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventive drugs require long-term trials to show their effectiveness or harms and often a lot of changes occur during post-marketing studies. The purpose of this article is to describe the research process in a long-term randomized controlled trial and discuss the impact and consequences of changes in the research environment. Methods The Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial (EPHT, originally planned to continue for five years, was planned in co-operation with the Women's International Study of Long-Duration Oestrogen after Menopause (WISDOM in the UK. In addition to health outcomes, EPHT was specifically designed to study the impact of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT on health services utilization. Results After EPHT recruited in 1999–2001 the Women's Health Initiative (WHI in the USA decided to stop the estrogen-progestin trial after a mean of 5.2 years in July 2002 because of increased risk of breast cancer and later in 2004 the estrogen-only trial because HT increased the risk of stroke, decreased the risk of hip fracture, and did not affect coronary heart disease incidence. WISDOM was halted in autumn 2002. These decisions had a major influence on EPHT. Conclusion Changes in Estonian society challenged EPHT to find a balance between the needs of achieving responses to the trial aims with a limited budget and simultaneously maintaining the safety of trial participants. Flexibility was the main key for success. Rapid changes are not limited only to transiting societies but are true also in developed countries and the risk must be included in planning all long-term trials. The role of ethical and data monitoring committees in situations with emerging new data from other studies needs specification. Longer funding for preventive trials and more flexibility in budgeting are mandatory. Who should prove the effectiveness of an (old drug for a new preventive indication? In preventive drug trials companies may

  11. Clinical trial experience using erythropoietin during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavey, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Oncologists have several reasons for trying to maintain or increase hemoglobin levels in their patients during therapy. Relief of the symptoms of anemia, including fatigue and dyspnea, are traditional, well-accepted indications. A newer rationale is to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy in controlling tumors. A laboratory animal study found that administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) increased intratumoral median oxygen levels and diminished the proportion of measurements in the very low ( [de

  12. Cellular Therapies Clinical Research Roadmap: lessons learned on how to move a cellular therapy into a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, Stacy; Tappitake, Darah; Armant, Myriam; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Derecho, Ivy; Draxler, Rebecca; Wood, Deborah; Centanni, John M

    2015-04-01

    A clinical research roadmap has been developed as a resource for researchers to identify critical areas and potential pitfalls when transitioning a cellular therapy product from the research laboratory, by means of an Investigational New Drug (IND) application, into early-phase clinical trials. The roadmap describes four key areas: basic and preclinical research, resource development, translational research and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and IND assembly and submission. Basic and preclinical research identifies a new therapeutic concept and demonstrates its potential value with the use of a model of the relevant disease. During resource development, the appropriate specialists and the required expertise to bring this product into the clinic are identified (eg, researchers, regulatory specialists, GMP manufacturing staff, clinicians and clinical trials staff, etc). Additionally, the funds required to achieve this goal (or a plan to procure them) are identified. In the next phase, the plan to translate the research product into a clinical-grade therapeutic is developed. Finally regulatory approval to start the trial must be obtained. In the United States, this is done by filing an IND application with the Food and Drug Administration. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-funded Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies program has facilitated the transition of a variety of cellular therapy products from the laboratory into Phase1/2 trials. The five Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies facilities have assisted investigators by performing translational studies and GMP manufacturing to ensure that cellular products met release specifications and were manufactured safely, reproducibly and at the appropriate scale. The roadmap resulting from this experience is the focus of this article. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A prospective randomized controlled multicenter trial comparing antibiotic therapy with appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paajanen, Hannu; Grönroos, Juha M; Rautio, Tero; Nordström, Pia; Aarnio, Markku; Rantanen, Tuomo; Hurme, Saija; Dean, Kirsti; Jartti, Airi; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Sand, Juhani; Salminen, Paulina

    2013-02-08

    Although the standard treatment of acute appendicitis (AA) consists of an early appendectomy, there has recently been both an interest and an increase in the use of antibiotic therapy as the primary treatment for uncomplicated AA. However, the use of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of uncomplicated AA is still controversial. The APPAC trial is a randomized prospective controlled, open label, non-inferiority multicenter trial designed to compare antibiotic therapy (ertapenem) with emergency appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated AA. The primary endpoint of the study is the success of the randomized treatment. In the antibiotic treatment arm successful treatment is defined as being discharged from the hospital without the need for surgical intervention and no recurrent appendicitis during a minimum follow-up of one-year (treatment efficacy). Treatment efficacy in the operative treatment arm is defined as successful appendectomy evaluated to be 100%. Secondary endpoints are post-intervention complications, overall morbidity and mortality, the length of hospital stay and sick leave, treatment costs and pain scores (VAS, visual analoque scale). A maximum of 610 adult patients (aged 18-60 years) with a CT scan confirmed uncomplicated AA will be enrolled from six hospitals and randomized by a closed envelope method in a 1:1 ratio either to undergo emergency appendectomy or to receive ertapenem (1 g per day) for three days continued by oral levofloxacin (500 mg per day) plus metronidazole (1.5 g per day) for seven days. Follow-up by a telephone interview will be at 1 week, 2 months and 1, 3, 5 and 10 years; the primary and secondary endpoints of the trial will be evaluated at each time point. The APPAC trial aims to provide level I evidence to support the hypothesis that approximately 75-85% of patients with uncomplicated AA can be treated with effective antibiotic therapy avoiding unnecessary appendectomies and the related operative morbidity, also resulting

  14. Cupping therapy versus acupuncture for pain-related conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and trial sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-Jing; Cao, Hui-Juan; Li, Xin-Lin; Yang, Xiao-Ying; Lai, Bao-Yong; Yang, Guo-Yang; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Both cupping therapy and acupuncture have been used in China for a long time, and their target indications are pain-related conditions. There is no systematic review comparing the effectiveness of these two therapies. To compare the beneficial effectiveness and safety between cupping therapy and acupuncture for pain-related conditions to provide evidence for clinical practice. Protocol of this review was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42016050986). We conducted literature search from six electronic databases until 31st March 2017. We included randomized trials comparing cupping therapy with acupuncture on pain-related conditions. Methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated by risk of bias tool. Mean difference, risk ratio, risk difference and their 95% confidence interval were used to report the estimate effect of the pooled results through meta-analysis or the results from each individual study. Trial sequential analysis (TSA) was applied to adjust random errors and calculate the sample size. Twenty-three randomized trials with 2845 participants were included covering 12 pain-related conditions. All included studies were of poor methodological quality. Three meta-analyses were conducted, which showed similar clinical beneficial effects of cupping therapy and acupuncture for the rate of symptom improvement in cervical spondylosis (RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.26; n = 646), lateral femoral cutaneous neuritis (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.22; n = 102) and scapulohumeral periarthritis (RR 1.31, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.51; n = 208). Results from other outcomes (such as visual analogue and numerical rating scale) in each study also showed no statistical significant difference between these two therapies for all included pain-related conditions. The results of TSA for cervical spondylosis demonstrated that the current available data have not reached a powerful conclusion. No serious adverse events related to cupping therapy or acupuncture was found in included

  15. Acute migraine therapy: recent evidence from randomized comparative trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mett, A.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.

    2008-01-01

    (1) A wide array of data regarding acute migraine treatment are available, but few trials strictly adhere to International Headache Society guidelines for patient inclusion criteria. (2) Triptans appear to have similar efficacy profiles, but among newer triptans, almotriptan offers improved...

  16. Antipyretic therapy in critically ill patients with established sepsis: a trial sequential analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongheng Zhang

    Full Text Available antipyretic therapy for patients with sepsis has long been debated. The present study aimed to explore the beneficial effect of antipyretic therapy for ICU patients with sepsis.systematic review and trial sequential analysis of randomized controlled trials.Pubmed, Scopus, EBSCO and EMBASE were searched from inception to August 5, 2014.Mortality was dichotomized as binary outcome variable and odds ratio (OR was chosen to be the summary statistic. Pooled OR was calculated by using DerSimonian and Laird method. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed by using the statistic I2. Trial sequential analysis was performed to account for the small number of trials and patients.A total of 6 randomized controlled trials including 819 patients were included into final analysis. Overall, there was no beneficial effect of antipyretic therapy on mortality risk in patients with established sepsis (OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.50-2.05. The required information size (IS was 2582 and our analysis has not yet reached half of the IS. The Z-curve did not cross the O'Brien-Fleming α-spending boundary or reach the futility, indicating that the non-significant result was probably due to lack of statistical power.our study fails to identify any beneficial effect of antipyretic therapy on ICU patients with established diagnosis of sepsis. Due to limited number of total participants, more studies are needed to make a conclusive and reliable analysis.

  17. Regulation of Clinical Trials with Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Matthias; Anliker, Brigitte; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schuele, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, clinical trials for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products are regulated at the national level, in contrast to the situation for a Marketing Authorisation Application, in which a centralised procedure is foreseen for these medicinal products. Although based on a common understanding regarding the regulatory requirement to be fulfilled before conduct of a clinical trial with an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product, the procedures and partly the scientific requirements for approval of a clinical trial application differ between the European Union Member States. This chapter will thus give an overview about the path to be followed for a clinical trial application and the subsequent approval process for an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product in Germany and will describe the role of the stakeholders that are involved. In addition, important aspects of manufacturing, quality control and non-clinical testing of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the clinical development phase are discussed. Finally, current and future approaches for harmonisation of clinical trial authorisation between European Union Member States are summarised.

  18. Initiation of a phase-I trial of neutron capture therapy at the MIT research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.; Yam, Chun-Shan

    1995-01-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the New England Medical Center (NEMC), and Boston University Medical Center (BUMC) initiated a phase-1 trial of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on September 6, 1994, at the 5-MW(thermal) MIT research reactor (MITR). A novel form of experimental cancer therapy, BNCT is being developed for certain types of highly malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma and melanoma. The results of the phase-1 trials on patients with tumors in the legs or feet are described

  19. Trial Watch: Immunotherapy plus radiation therapy for oncological indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchelli, Erika; Bloy, Norma; Aranda, Fernando; Buqué, Aitziber; Cremer, Isabelle; Demaria, Sandra; Eggermont, Alexander; Formenti, Silvia Chiara; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Malignant cells succumbing to some forms of radiation therapy are particularly immunogenic and hence can initiate a therapeutically relevant adaptive immune response. This reflects the intrinsic antigenicity of malignant cells (which often synthesize a high number of potentially reactive neo-antigens) coupled with the ability of radiation therapy to boost the adjuvanticity of cell death as it stimulates the release of endogenous adjuvants from dying cells. Thus, radiation therapy has been intensively investigated for its capacity to improve the therapeutic profile of several anticancer immunotherapies, including (but not limited to) checkpoint blockers, anticancer vaccines, oncolytic viruses, Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, cytokines, and several small molecules with immunostimulatory effects. Here, we summarize recent preclinical and clinical advances in this field of investigation.

  20. Innovating cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs in an era of successful standard of care therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole

    2017-11-01

    Evolving cystic fibrosis 'standards of care' have influenced recent cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs for new therapies; care additions/improvements will require innovative trial designs to maximize feasibility and efficacy detection. Three cystic fibrosis therapeutic areas (pulmonary exacerbations, Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections, and reduced cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] protein function) differ with respect to the duration for which recognized 'standards of care' have been available. However, developers of new therapies in all the three areas are affected by similar challenges: standards of care have become so strongly entrenched that traditional placebo-controlled studies in cystic fibrosis populations likely to benefit from newer therapies have become less and less feasible. Today, patients/clinicians are more likely to entertain participation in active-comparator trial designs, that have substantial challenges of their own. Foremost among these are the selection of 'valid' active comparator(s), estimation of a comparator's current clinical efficacy (required for testing noninferiority hypotheses), and effective blinding of commercially available comparators. Recent and future cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs will have to creatively address this collateral result of successful past development of effective cystic fibrosis therapies: patients and clinicians are much less likely to accept simple, placebo-controlled studies to evaluate future therapies.

  1. NHLBI's program for VAD therapy for moderately advanced heart failure: the REVIVE-IT pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J Timothy; Mann, Douglas L

    2010-11-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are used to bridge heart failure patients to transplantation, to allow their own hearts to recover, or as permanent ("destination") therapy. To date, the use of VADs has been limited to late-stage heart failure patients because of the associated device risks. In 2008, a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) working group met to evaluate the treatment of heart failure using VADs and to advise the institute on how therapy for heart failure may be best advanced by clinical trials involving the devices. Recognizing the improvements in VAD technology and in patient care and selection over the past decade, the working group recommended that a trial be performed to assess the use of chronic VAD therapy in patients who are less ill than those currently eligible for destination therapy. The hypothesis proposed for the trial is that VAD therapy may improve both survival and quality of life in moderately advanced heart failure patients who are neither inotrope-dependent nor exercise-intolerant and have not yet developed serious consequences such as malnourishment, end-organ damage, and immobility. Based on the group's recommendations, NHLBI issued an RFP in 2009 for the REVIVE-IT Pilot Trail, which will serve to test the hypothesis and inform the pivotal trial. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    spectrum disorders , and assessing the efficacy of this approach in comparison to an active Enriched Supportive Therapy (EST) intervention . Major...This project is focused on conducting the first randomized-controlled trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) in 54 verbal adults with autism ...of the neuroplastic effects of CET on brain function in support of cognitive enhancement in adult autism . Analyses of treatment effects to date

  3. The efficacy of maggot debridement therapy - a review of comparative clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, K.; Jemec, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    in a variety of ulcers. However, comparative clinical trials and in particular randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of MDT are sparse. A systematic search in the literature showed three randomized clinical trials and five non randomized studies evaluating the efficacy of sterile Lucilia......, including hydrocolloid, hydrogel and saline moistened gauze. However, the design of the studies was suboptimal, with important differences in the use of other therapies, such as compression, that may influence both debridement and healing between the compared groups, as well as inappropriately short follow...

  4. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials using music therapy for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrázová, Marcela; Celec, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Music therapy is a promising approach widening the potential applications of psychotherapy. Music influences both, psychologic and physiologic parameters, and children are especially responsive to this form of therapy. Many aspects of its action mechanisms remain to be elucidated, underscoring the need for evidence-based medicine (EBM) for clinical use of music therapy. This review seeks to highlight some of the issues of music therapy research and to initiate a discussion about the need for international multicenter cooperation to bring scientifically sound evidence of the benefits of music therapy in pediatric patients. Scientific bibliographic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials on use of music therapy for children. Identified articles were evaluated according to criteria for scientific quality. Twenty-eight studies were identified. Most of the trials were biased by the number of participants, and some trials showed the need to improve design of control groups. Indeed, the novelty of this area of study has produced a large number of different studies (with variability in diagnoses, interventions, control groups, duration, and/or outcome parameters), and there is a need for a more homogeneous and systematic approach. Available studies highlight the need to address reproducibility issues. This analysis identifies the need for a subsequent series of clinical studies on the efficacy of music in the pediatric population, with more focus on eligibility criteria with respect to EBM and reproducibility.

  5. Recruitment of Participants to a Clinical Trial of Botanical Therapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Harris E.; McVary, Kevin T.; Meleth, Sreelatha; Stavris, Karen; Downey, Joe; Kusek, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The timely recruitment of study participants is a critical component of successful trials. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common nonmalignant urologic condition among older men, is characterized by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Successful recruitment methods for a trial of medical therapy for BPH, Medical Therapy of Prostate Symptoms (MTOPS), were mass mailing and advertising. The Complementary and Alternative Medicines Trial for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) was designed to evaluate a botanical therapy, saw palmetto, for the treatment of BPH. The objective of this study was to evaluate recruitment strategies for CAMUS and to contrast the baseline characteristics of CAMUS participants with those recruited to a similar trial using conventional medical therapy. Design CAMUS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effects of saw palmetto given at escalating doses over an 18-month period on relief from LUTS. Subjects The target enrollment goal was 350 men with LUTS from 11 clinical centers over a 12-month period. The recruitment techniques used and participants contacted, screened, and randomized through each technique were obtained from the clinical centers. Baseline characteristics of the CAMUS participants were compared with participants in the MTOPS trial who met the CAMUS eligibility criteria for LUTS. Results The target enrollment goal was achieved in 11 months. The overall monthly recruitment rate per site was 3.7 and ranged from 2.4 to 8.0. The most successful recruitment methods were mass mailing and advertising, which accounted for 39% and 35% of the study participants, respectively. In comparison to MTOPS participants, CAMUS participants were younger, more highly educated, more diverse, and had less severe urinary symptoms. Conclusions Successful recruitment methods for CAMUS were similar to those in MTOPS. The use of botanical therapy attracted a less symptomatic and more educated

  6. Recruitment of participants to a clinical trial of botanical therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeannette Y; Foster, Harris E; McVary, Kevin T; Meleth, Sreelatha; Stavris, Karen; Downey, Joe; Kusek, John W

    2011-05-01

    The timely recruitment of study participants is a critical component of successful trials. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common nonmalignant urologic condition among older men, is characterized by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Successful recruitment methods for a trial of medical therapy for BPH, Medical Therapy of Prostate Symptoms (MTOPS), were mass mailing and advertising. The Complementary and Alternative Medicines Trial for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) was designed to evaluate a botanical therapy, saw palmetto, for the treatment of BPH. The objective of this study was to evaluate recruitment strategies for CAMUS and to contrast the baseline characteristics of CAMUS participants with those recruited to a similar trial using conventional medical therapy. CAMUS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effects of saw palmetto given at escalating doses over an 18-month period on relief from LUTS. The target enrollment goal was 350 men with LUTS from 11 clinical centers over a 12-month period. The recruitment techniques used and participants contacted, screened, and randomized through each technique were obtained from the clinical centers. Baseline characteristics of the CAMUS participants were compared with participants in the MTOPS trial who met the CAMUS eligibility criteria for LUTS. The target enrollment goal was achieved in 11 months. The overall monthly recruitment rate per site was 3.7 and ranged from 2.4 to 8.0. The most successful recruitment methods were mass mailing and advertising, which accounted for 39% and 35% of the study participants, respectively. In comparison to MTOPS participants, CAMUS participants were younger, more highly educated, more diverse, and had less severe urinary symptoms. Successful recruitment methods for CAMUS were similar to those in MTOPS. The use of botanical therapy attracted a less symptomatic and more educated study population.

  7. Systemic therapy for vulval Erosive Lichen Planus (the 'hELP' trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Rosalind C; Murphy, Ruth; Bratton, Daniel J; Sydes, Matthew R; Wilkes, Sally; Nankervis, Helen; Dowey, Shelley; Thomas, Kim S

    2016-01-04

    Erosive lichen planus affecting the vulva (ELPV) is a relatively rare, chronic condition causing painful raw areas in the vulvovaginal region. Symptoms are pain and burning, which impact upon daily living. There is paucity of evidence regarding therapy. A 2012 Cochrane systematic review found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in this field. Topically administered corticosteroids are the accepted first-line therapy: however, there is uncertainty as to which second-line treatments to use. Several systemic agents have been clinically noted to show promise for ELPV refractory to topically administered corticosteroids but there is no RCT evidence to support these. The 'hELP' study is a RCT with an internal pilot phase designed to provide high-quality evidence. The objective is to test whether systemic therapy in addition to standard topical therapy is a beneficial second-line treatment for ELPV. Adjunctive systemic therapies used are hydroxychloroquine, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Topical therapy plus a short course of prednisolone given orally is considered the comparator intervention. The trial is a four-armed, open-label, pragmatic RCT which uses a blinded independent clinical assessor. To provide 80 % power for each comparison, 96 participants are required in total. The pilot phase aims to recruit 40 participants. The primary clinical outcome is the proportion of patients achieving treatment success at 6 months. 'Success' is defined by a composite measure of Patient Global Assessment score of 0 or 1 on a 4-point scale plus improvement from baseline on clinical photographs scored by a clinician blinded to treatment allocation. Secondary clinical outcomes include 6-month assessment of: (1) Reduction in pain/soreness; (2) Global assessment of disease; (3) Response at other affected mucosal sites; (4) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores; (5) Sexual function; (6) Health-related quality of life using 'Short Form 36' and 'Skindex

  8. Establishing Evidence-Based Indications for Proton Therapy: An Overview of Current Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mark V., E-mail: mmishra@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aggarwal, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Knight, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute at Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To review and assess ongoing proton beam therapy (PBT) clinical trials and to identify major gaps. Methods and Materials: Active PBT clinical trials were identified from (clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Platform Registry. Data on clinical trial disease site, age group, projected patient enrollment, expected start and end dates, study type, and funding source were extracted. Results: A total of 122 active PBT clinical trials were identified, with target enrollment of >42,000 patients worldwide. Ninety-six trials (79%), with a median planned sample size of 68, were classified as interventional studies. Observational studies accounted for 21% of trials but 71% (n=29,852) of planned patient enrollment. The most common PBT clinical trials focus on gastrointestinal tract tumors (21%, n=26), tumors of the central nervous system (15%, n=18), and prostate cancer (12%, n=15). Five active studies (lung, esophagus, head and neck, prostate, breast) will randomize patients between protons and photons, and 3 will randomize patients between protons and carbon ion therapy. Conclusions: The PBT clinical trial portfolio is expanding rapidly. Although the majority of ongoing studies are interventional, the majority of patients will be accrued to observational studies. Future efforts should focus on strategies to encourage optimal patient enrollment and retention, with an emphasis on randomized, controlled trials, which will require support from third-party payers. Results of ongoing PBT studies should be evaluated in terms of comparative effectiveness, as well as incremental effectiveness and value offered by PBT in comparison with conventional radiation modalities.

  9. Brief Strategic Family Therapy versus Treatment as Usual: Results of a Multisite Randomized Trial for Substance Using Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Rohrbaugh, Michael; Shoham, Varda; Bachrach, Ken; Miller, Michael; Burlew, Kathleen A.; Hodgkins, Candy; Carrion, Ibis; Vandermark, Nancy; Schindler, Eric; Werstlein, Robert; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT; an evidence-based family therapy) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) as provided in community-based adolescent outpatient drug abuse programs. Method: A randomized effectiveness trial in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network compared BSFT to…

  10. Effect of Metoprolol Versus Carvedilol on Outcomes in MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin H; Ruwald, Anne-Christine H; Jøns, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to compare the effects of metoprolol and carvedilol in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study.......This study sought to compare the effects of metoprolol and carvedilol in the MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) study....

  11. The effect of hormone replacement therapy on serum homocysteine levels in perimenopausal women : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, AE; Bak, AAA; Lindemans, J; Planellas, J; Bennink, HJTC; Hofman, A; Grobbee, DE; Witteman, JCM

    2001-01-01

    Serum homocysteine levels may be lowered by hormone replacement therapy, but randomized controlled trial data are scarce. We performed a single center randomized placebo-controlled trial to assess the 6 months effect of hormone replacement therapy compared with placebo on fasting serum homocysteine

  12. Statin therapy and clinical outcomes in myocardial infarction patients complicated by acute heart failure : insights from the EPHESUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; Rossignol, Patrick; Murin, Jan; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Lamiral, Zohra; Krum, Henry; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    Several clinical trials have shown that in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), statin therapy improves cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, but in these trials patients with acute heart failure (HF) were excluded or only a few were included. In patients with chronic HF, statin therapy does not

  13. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-01-01

    Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical therapy, particularly active exercise therapy (PT) in patients with non-specific neck pain. Patients neck pain, aged between 18-70 years, were included in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect and functioning (Neck Disability Index), the secondary outcome was pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale for Pain). Outcomes were measured at 3, 7, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. Multilevel analyses (intention-to-treat) were the primary analyses for overall between-group differences. Additional to the primary and secondary outcomes the number of treatment sessions of the MTU group and PT group was analyzed. Data were collected from September 2008 to February 2011. A total of 181 patients were included. Multilevel analyses showed no statistically significant overall differences at one year between the MTU and PT groups on any of the primary and secondary outcomes. The MTU group showed significantly lower treatment sessions compared to the PT group (respectively 3.1 vs. 5.9 after 7 weeks; 6.1 vs. 10.0 after 52 weeks). Patients with neck pain improved in both groups without statistical significantly or clinically relevant differences between the MTU and PT groups during one-year follow-up. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843.

  14. Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Rosalie H.; Bourdon, Celine; Potani, Isabel; Mhango, Brian; van den Brink, Deborah A.; Mponda, John S.; Kobold, Anneke C. Muller; Bandsma, Robert H.; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Voskuijl, Wieger P.

    Objective: To assess the benefits of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition. Study design: We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in 90 children aged 6-60 months with complicated severe acute malnutrition at the Queen Elizabeth

  15. Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Rosalie H.; Bourdon, Céline; Potani, Isabel; Mhango, Brian; van den Brink, Deborah A.; Mponda, John S.; Muller Kobold, Anneke C.; Bandsma, Robert H.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael; Voskuijl, Wieger P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the benefits of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition. Study design We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in 90 children aged 6-60 months with complicated severe acute malnutrition at the Queen Elizabeth Central

  16. Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese ADHD Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Ng, Gene S. H.; Choi, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Chinese children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or ADHD features. Methods: This study adopted a randomized controlled trial design without blinding. Participants were randomized into either the intervention group (n = 32) and…

  17. The Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese Families: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Sin, Tammy C. S.; Choi, Siu-yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Hong Kong Chinese families, using randomized controlled trial design. Methods: The participants included 111 Hong Kong Chinese parents with children aged 2--7 years old, who were randomized into the intervention group (n = 54) and control group (n…

  18. Effect of metformin on plasma metabolite profile in the Copenhagen Insulin and Metformin Therapy (CIMT) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safai, N; Suvitaival, T; A, Ali

    2018-01-01

    of the Copenhagen Insulin and Metformin Therapy (CMIT) trial, a multicentre study from May 2008 to December 2012, was carried out. We used a non-target method to analyse 87 plasma metabolites in participants with Type 2 diabetes (n = 370) who were randomized in a 1 : 1 ratio to 18 months of metformin or placebo...

  19. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Intermittent Explosive Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Michael S.; Noblett, Kurtis L.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Coccaro, Emil F.

    2008-01-01

    No randomized clinical trials have evaluated the efficacy of psychotherapy for intermittent explosive disorder (IED). In the present study, the authors tested the efficacy of 12-week group and individual cognitive-behavioral therapies (adapted from J. L. Deffenbacher & M. McKay, 2000) by comparing them with a wait-list control in a randomized…

  20. Brief Behavioral Activation and Problem-Solving Therapy for Depressed Breast Cancer Patients: Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopko, Derek R.; Armento, Maria E. A.; Robertson, Sarah M. C.; Ryba, Marlena M.; Carvalho, John P.; Colman, Lindsey K.; Mullane, Christen; Gawrysiak, Michael; Bell, John L.; McNulty, James K.; Lejuez, Carl W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Major depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial impairment. Although some research has explored the utility of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients, only 2 small trials have investigated the potential benefits of behavior therapy among patients with…

  1. Mobile Phone-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia : A Randomized Waitlist Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, C.H.G.; Lancee, J.; Griffioen-Both, F.; Spruit, S.; Fitrianie, S.; Neerincx, M.A.; Beun, R.J.; Brinkman, W.-P.

    Background: This study is one of the first randomized controlled trials investigating cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered by a fully automated mobile phone app. Such an app can potentially increase the accessibility of insomnia treatment for the 10% of people who have

  2. Mobile Phone-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia : A Randomized Waitlist Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, C.H.G.; Lancee, J; Griffioen-Both, Fiemke; Spruit, Sandor; Fitrianie, S.; Neerincx, M.A.; Beun, RJ; Brinkman, W.P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study is one of the first randomized controlled trials investigating cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered by a fully automated mobile phone app. Such an app can potentially increase the accessibility of insomnia treatment for the 10% of people who have

  3. Baseline characteristics in the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Marc A; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Chen, Chao-Yin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anemia augments the already high rates of fatal and major nonfatal cardiovascular and renal events in individuals with type 2 diabetes. In 2004, we initiated the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT). This report presents the baseline characteristics and t...

  4. Moving from Efficacy to Effectiveness in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis: A Randomized Clinical Practice Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M.; Ziegler, Michael; Mehl, Stephanie; Kesting, Marie-Luise; Lullmann, Eva; Westermann, Stefan; Rief, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized controlled trials have attested the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing psychotic symptoms. Now, studies are needed to investigate its effectiveness in routine clinical practice settings. Method: Eighty patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who were seeking outpatient treatment were randomized…

  5. Cognitive behavior therapy for pediatric functional abdominal pain: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veek, Shelley M. C.; Derkx, Bert H. F.; Benninga, Marc A.; Boer, Frits; de Haan, Else

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of a 6-session protocolized cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) compared with 6 visits to a pediatrician (intensive medical care; IMC) for the treatment of pediatric functional abdominal pain (FAP). One hundred four children aged 7 to 18

  6. Using Mock Trials to Teach Students Forensic Core Competencies in Marriage and Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John K.; Linville, Deanna; Todahl, Jeff; Metcalfe, Joe

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a description of a university-based project that used mock trials to train both practicum-level marriage and family therapy and law students in forensic work, and a qualitative investigation of student experiences with the training. The content of the training focused on American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy…

  7. A randomized trial evaluating a block-replacement regimen during radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Grupe, Peter; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Eur J Clin Invest 2010 ABSTRACT: Background  Lack of consensus regarding the antithyroid drug regimen in relation to radioiodine ((131) I) therapy of hyperthyroidism prompted this randomized trial comparing two strategies. Design  Patients with Graves' disease (GD, n = 51) or toxic nodular goitre...

  8. Gaze-Contingent Music Reward Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarov, Amit; Pine, Daniel S; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2017-07-01

    Patients with social anxiety disorder exhibit increased attentional dwelling on social threats, providing a viable target for therapeutics. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of a novel gaze-contingent music reward therapy for social anxiety disorder designed to reduce attention dwelling on threats. Forty patients with social anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to eight sessions of either gaze-contingent music reward therapy, designed to divert patients' gaze toward neutral stimuli rather than threat stimuli, or to a control condition. Clinician and self-report measures of social anxiety were acquired pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Dwell time on socially threatening faces was assessed during the training sessions and at pre- and posttreatment. Gaze-contingent music reward therapy yielded greater reductions of symptoms of social anxiety disorder than the control condition on both clinician-rated and self-reported measures. Therapeutic effects were maintained at follow-up. Gaze-contingent music reward therapy, but not the control condition, also reduced dwell time on threat, which partially mediated clinical effects. Finally, gaze-contingent music reward therapy, but not the control condition, also altered dwell time on socially threatening faces not used in training, reflecting near-transfer training generalization. This is the first randomized controlled trial to examine a gaze-contingent intervention in social anxiety disorder. The results demonstrate target engagement and clinical effects. This study sets the stage for larger randomized controlled trials and testing in other emotional disorders.

  9. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as continuation treatment to sustain response after electroconvulsive therapy in depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Merkl, Angela; Wilbertz, Gregor; Quante, Arnim; Regen, Francesca; Bührsch, Nicole; van Hall, Franziska; Kischkel, Eva; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Anghelescu, Ion; Heuser, Isabella; Kathmann, Norbert; Bajbouj, Malek

    2014-08-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective acute antidepressant intervention, sustained response rates are low. It has never been systematically assessed whether psychotherapy, continuation ECT, or antidepressant medication is the most efficacious intervention to maintain initial treatment response. In a prospective, randomized clinical trial, 90 inpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were treated with right unilateral ultra-brief acute ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy responders received 6 months guideline-based antidepressant medication (MED) and were randomly assigned to add-on therapy with cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBT-arm), add-on therapy with ultra-brief pulse continuation electroconvulsive therapy (ECT-arm), or no add-on therapy (MED-arm). After the 6 months of continuation treatment, patients were followed-up for another 6 months. The primary outcome parameter was the proportion of patients who remained well after 12 months. Of 90 MDD patients starting the acute phase, 70% responded and 47% remitted to acute ECT. After 6 months of continuation treatment, significant differences were observed in the three treatment arms with sustained response rates of 77% in the CBT-arm, 40% in the ECT-arm, and 44% in the MED-arm. After 12 months, these differences remained stable with sustained response rates of 65% in the CBT-arm, 28% in the ECT-arm, and 33% in the MED-arm. These results suggest that ultra-brief pulse ECT as a continuation treatment correlates with low sustained response rates. However, the main finding implicates cognitive-behavioral group therapy in combination with antidepressants might be an effective continuation treatment to sustain response after successful ECT in MDD patients. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  11. Development of a manualized protocol of massage therapy for clinical trials in osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ather

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trial design of manual therapies may be especially challenging as techniques are often individualized and practitioner-dependent. This paper describes our methods in creating a standardized Swedish massage protocol tailored to subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee while respectful of the individualized nature of massage therapy, as well as implementation of this protocol in two randomized clinical trials. Methods The manualization process involved a collaborative process between methodologic and clinical experts, with the explicit goals of creating a reproducible semi-structured protocol for massage therapy, while allowing some latitude for therapists’ clinical judgment and maintaining consistency with a prior pilot study. Results The manualized protocol addressed identical specified body regions with distinct 30- and 60-min protocols, using standard Swedish strokes. Each protocol specifies the time allocated to each body region. The manualized 30- and 60-min protocols were implemented in a dual-site 24-week randomized dose-finding trial in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, and is currently being implemented in a three-site 52-week efficacy trial of manualized Swedish massage therapy. In the dose-finding study, therapists adhered to the protocols and significant treatment effects were demonstrated. Conclusions The massage protocol was manualized, using standard techniques, and made flexible for individual practitioner and subject needs. The protocol has been applied in two randomized clinical trials. This manualized Swedish massage protocol has real-world utility and can be readily utilized both in the research and clinical settings. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970008 (18 August 2009

  12. Creative art therapy to enhance rehabilitation for stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkasuwan, Ratcharin; Voraakhom, Kotchakorn; Pisolayabutra, Prim; Maneechai, Pichai; Boonin, Jiraporn; Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai

    2016-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of creative art therapy plus conventional physical therapy, compared with physical therapy only, in increasing cognitive ability, physical functions, psychological status and quality of life of stroke patients. Randomized controlled trial with blinded assessor. An in-patient setting PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and eighteen stroke patients aged ⩾50 years who could communicate verbally. All participants received conventional physical therapy five days per week. An intervention group received additional creative art therapy, twice a week for four weeks, in a rehabilitation ward. Cognitive function, anxiety and depression, physical performance and quality of life were measured with the Abbreviated Mental Test, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the modified Barthel Index scale and the pictorial Thai Quality of Life questionnaire, respectively. Mean differences for the intervention group were significantly greater than the control group for depression (-4.5, 95% CI -6.5, -2.5, part therapy and most reported improved concentration (68.5%), emotion (79.6%), self-confidence (72.2%) and motivation (74.1%). Creative art therapy combined with conventional physical therapy can significantly decrease depression, improve physical functions and increase quality of life compared with physical therapy alone. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Plus Bright Light Therapy for Adolescent Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Gardner, Greg; Paine, Sarah; Starkey, Karina; Menne, Annemarie; Slater, Amy; Wright, Helen; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Weaver, Edward; Trenowden, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy (CBT plus BLT) for adolescents diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Design: Randomized controlled trial of CBT plus BLT vs. waitlist (WL) control with comparisons at pre- and post-treatment. There was 6-month follow-up for the CBT plus BLT group only. Setting: Flinders University Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic, Adelaide, South Australia. Patients: 49 adolescents (mean age 14.6 ± 1.0 y, 53% males) diagnosed with DSPD; mean chronicity 4 y 8 months; 16% not attending school. Eighteen percent of adolescents dropped out of the study (CBT plus BLT: N = 23 vs WL: N = 17). Interventions: CBT plus BLT consisted of 6 individual sessions, including morning bright light therapy to advance adolescents' circadian rhythms, and cognitive restructuring and sleep education to target associated insomnia and sleep hygiene. Measurements and Results: DSPD diagnosis was performed via a clinical interview and 7-day sleep diary. Measurements at each time-point included online sleep diaries and scales measuring sleepiness, fatigue, and depression symptoms. Compared to WL, moderate-to-large improvements (d = 0.65-1.24) were found at post-treatment for CBT plus BLT adolescents, including reduced sleep latency, earlier sleep onset and rise times, total sleep time (school nights), wake after sleep onset, sleepiness, and fatigue. At 6-month follow-up (N = 15), small-to-large improvements (d = 0.24-1.53) continued for CBT plus BLT adolescents, with effects found for all measures. Significantly fewer adolescents receiving CBT plus BLT met DPSD criteria at post-treatment (WL = 82% vs. CBT plus BLT = 13%, P sleep and daytime impairments in the immediate and long-term. Studies evaluating the treatment effectiveness of each treatment component are needed. Clinical Trial Information: Australia – New Zealand Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12610001041044. Citation: Gradisar M; Dohnt H; Gardner G; Paine S; Starkey

  14. Incretin-based therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian patients: Analysis of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melva Louisa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To review the effi cacy and safety data on incretin-based therapies currently available (exenatide, liraglutide, sitagliptin, vildagliptin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian population.Methods We conducted Medline search of all relevant randomized clinical trials of incretin-based therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian populations. Data pertinent to the efficacy and safety of GLP-1 mimetics and DPP-4 inhibitors were extracted and used.Results We found 14 randomized controlled trials of incretin based-therapy which included 3567 type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian population (Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Indian. It was shown that incretin-based therapies improved HbA1c at higher extent (up to -1.42% in exenatide 10 mcg bid, -1.85% for liraglutide 0.9 mg qd, -1.4% for sitagliptin 100 mg and -1.4% for vildagliptin 50 mg bid compared to the effects observed in studies with Caucasian population, with comparable safety profile.Conclusion The efficacy of incretin-based therapies in Asian patients improved glycemic parameters in a higher magnitude on some glycemic parameters compared with those in Caucasian population. These results indicate that incretin-based therapies may be more effective in Asian population than in Caucasian. (Med J Indones 2010; 19: 205-12Key words: exenatide, incretin, liraglutide, sitagliptin, type-2 diabetes, vildagliptin

  15. Indirect vs Direct Voice Therapy for Children With Vocal Nodules: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnick, Christopher; Ballif, Catherine; De Guzman, Vanessa; Sataloff, Robert; Campisi, Paolo; Kerschner, Joseph; Shembel, Adrianna; Reda, Domenic; Shi, Helen; Sheryka Zacny, Elinore; Bunting, Glenn

    2018-02-01

    Benign vocal fold nodules affect 12% to 22% of the pediatric population, and 95% of otolaryngologists recommend voice therapy as treatment. However, no randomized clinical trials that we are aware of have shown its benefits. To determine the impact of voice therapy in children with vocal fold nodules according to pretherapy and posttherapy scores on the Pediatric Voice-Related Quality of Life (PVRQOL) survey; secondary objectives included changes in phonatory parameters. For this multicenter randomized clinical trial, 114 children ages 6 to 10 years with vocal fold nodules, PVRQOL scores less than 87.5, and dysphonia for longer than 12 weeks were recruited from outpatient voice and speech clinics. This age range was identified because these patients have not experienced pubertal changes of the larynx, tolerate stroboscopy, and cooperate with voice therapy. Participants were blinded to treatment arm. Participants received either indirect or direct therapy for 8 to 12 weeks. Indirect therapy focused on education and discussion of voice principles, while direct treatment used the stimulus, response, antecedent paradigm. The primary outcome measure was PVRQOL score change before and after treatment. Secondary phonatory measures were also compared. Overall, 114 children were recruited for study (mean [SD] age, 8 [1.4] years; 83 males [73%]); with 57 randomized to receive either indirect or direct therapy. Both direct and indirect therapy approaches showed significant differences in PVRQOL scores pretherapy to posttherapy. The mean increase in PVRQOL score for direct therapy was 19.2, and 14.7 for indirect therapy (difference, 4.5; 95.3% CI, -10.8 to 19.8). Of 44 participants in the direct therapy group, 27 (61%) achieved a clinically meaningful PVRQOL improvement, compared with 26 of 49 (53%) for indirect therapy (difference, 8%; 95% CI, -12 to 28). Post hoc stratification showed robust effects in the direct therapy group for older children (Cohen d = 0.50) and the

  16. Trial watch – inhibiting PARP enzymes for anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistigu, Antonella; Manic, Gwenola; Obrist, Florine; Vitale, Ilio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are a members of family of enzymes that catalyze poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and/or mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation (MARylation), two post-translational protein modifications involved in crucial cellular processes including (but not limited to) the DNA damage response (DDR). PARP1, the most abundant family member, is a nuclear protein that is activated upon sensing distinct types of DNA damage and contributes to their resolution by PARylating multiple DDR players. Recent evidence suggests that, along with DDR, activated PARP1 mediates a series of prosurvival and proapoptotic processes aimed at preserving genomic stability. Despite this potential oncosuppressive role, upregulation and/or overactivation of PARP1 or other PARP enzymes has been reported in a variety of human neoplasms. Over the last few decades, several pharmacologic inhibitors of PARP1 and PARP2 have been assessed in preclinical and clinical studies showing potent antineoplastic activity, particularly against homologous recombination (HR)-deficient ovarian and breast cancers. In this Trial Watch, we describe the impact of PARP enzymes and PARylation in cancer, discuss the mechanism of cancer cell killing by PARP1 inactivation, and summarize the results of recent clinical studies aimed at evaluating the safety and therapeutic profile of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308587

  17. Trial Watch: Toll-like receptor agonists for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have long been known for their ability to initiate innate immune responses upon exposure to conserved microbial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA. More recently, this family of pattern recognition receptors has been attributed a critical role in the elicitation of anticancer immune responses, raising interest in the development of immunochemotherapeutic regimens based on natural or synthetic TLR agonists. In spite of such an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation, only three TLR agonists are currently licensed by FDA for use in cancer patients: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that operates as a mixed TLR2/TLR4 agonist; monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a derivative of Salmonella minnesota that functions as a potent agonist of TLR4; and imiquimod, a synthetic imidazoquinoline that activates TLR7. One year ago, in the August and September issues of OncoImmunology , we described the main biological features of TLRs and discussed the progress of clinical studies evaluating the safety and therapeutic potential of TLR agonists in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of research, focusing on preclinical studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the antineoplastic activity of TLR agonists.

  18. Virtual reality exposure therapy for social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Page L; Price, Matthew; Edwards, Shannan M; Obasaju, Mayowa A; Schmertz, Stefan K; Zimand, Elana; Calamaras, Martha R

    2013-10-01

    This is the first randomized trial comparing virtual reality exposure therapy to in vivo exposure for social anxiety disorder. Participants with a principal diagnosis of social anxiety disorder who identified public speaking as their primary fear (N = 97) were recruited from the community, resulting in an ethnically diverse sample (M age = 39 years) of mostly women (62%). Participants were randomly assigned to and completed 8 sessions of manualized virtual reality exposure therapy, exposure group therapy, or wait list. Standardized self-report measures were collected at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 12-month follow-up, and process measures were collected during treatment. A standardized speech task was delivered at pre- and posttreatment, and diagnostic status was reassessed at 3-month follow-up. Analysis of covariance showed that, relative to wait list, people completing either active treatment significantly improved on all but one measure (length of speech for exposure group therapy and self-reported fear of negative evaluation for virtual reality exposure therapy). At 12-month follow-up, people showed significant improvement from pretreatment on all measures. There were no differences between the active treatments on any process or outcome measure at any time, nor differences on achieving partial or full remission. Virtual reality exposure therapy is effective for treating social fears, and improvement is maintained for 1 year. Virtual reality exposure therapy is equally effective as exposure group therapy; further research with a larger sample is needed, however, to better control and statistically test differences between the treatments.

  19. The role of radiation therapy in pediatric oncology as assessed by cooperative clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angio, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Major advances have been made in pediatric oncology, and many are due to the advent of the cooperative clinical trial. This important research tool was originally developed for the testing of various therapeutic strategies for the management of children with acute leukemia. Such trials were eminently successful, as the consistently better long-term survival rates for children with this hitherto uniformly lethal disease can attest. The method soon found favor for the investigation of patients with so-called solid tumors. These trails were originally concerned with the elucidation of the value of various chemotherapeutic agents. Radiation therapists soon became involved, however, and this discipline became more heavily represented in study design and data analyses. Much radiation therapy information has been gained, some through prospective, randomized clinical investigations and some through retrospective reviews of roentgen therapy as it was employed in protocols accenting other aspects of care. Voluminous, important radiation therapy data have been deduced through the latter retrospective kinds of analyses, but this review will be confined largely to the published results of prospective, randomized cooperative clinical trials where radiation therapy was a governing variable. Certain investigations of historical interest will also be cited together with other results that established important principles even though not so rigorous in design

  20. Cell therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy: from animal models to clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. del Corsso

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy can be the end-stage form and common denominator of several cardiac disorders of known cause, such as hypertensive, ischemic, diabetic and Chagasic diseases. However, some individuals have clinical findings, such as an increase in ventricular chamber size and impaired contractility (classical manifestations of dilated cardiomyopathy even in the absence of a diagnosed primary disease. In these patients, dilated cardiomyopathy is classified as idiopathic since its etiology is obscure. Nevertheless, regardless of all of the advances in medical, pharmacological and surgical procedures, the fate of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (of idiopathic or of any other known cause is linked to arrhythmic episodes, severe congestive heart failure and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In this review, we will summarize present data on the use of cell therapies in animal models of dilated cardiomyopathies and will discuss the few clinical trials that have been published so far involving patients affected by this disease. The animal models discussed here include those in which the cardiomyopathy is produced by genetic manipulation and those in which disease is induced by chemical or infectious agents. The specific model used clearly creates restrictions to translation of the proposed cell therapy to clinical practice, insofar as most of the clinical trials performed to date with cell therapy have used autologous cells. Thus, translation of genetic models of dilated cardiomyopathy may have to wait until the use of allogeneic cells becomes more widespread in clinical trials of cell therapies for cardiac diseases.

  1. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME therapy following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stokes Emma

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744

  2. Radiation Therapy Intensification for Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamoah, Kosj [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To systematically review the outcomes of randomized trials testing radiation therapy (RT) intensification, including both dose escalation and/or the use of altered fractionation, as a strategy to improve disease control for a number of malignancies. Methods and Materials: We performed a literature search to identify randomized trials testing RT intensification for cancers of the central nervous system, head and neck, breast, lung, esophagus, rectum, and prostate. Findings were described qualitatively. Where adequate data were available, pooled estimates for the effect of RT intensification on local control (LC) or overall survival (OS) were obtained using the inverse variance method. Results: In primary central nervous system tumors, esophageal cancer, and rectal cancer, randomized trials have not demonstrated that RT intensification improves clinical outcomes. In breast cancer and prostate cancer, dose escalation has been shown to improve LC or biochemical disease control but not OS. Radiation therapy intensification may improve LC and OS in head and neck and lung cancers, but these benefits have generally been limited to studies that did not incorporate concurrent chemotherapy. Conclusions: In randomized trials, the benefits of RT intensification have largely been restricted to trials in which concurrent chemotherapy was not used. Novel strategies to optimize the incorporation of RT in the multimodality treatment of solid tumors should be explored.

  3. Global Harmonization of Quality Assurance Naming Conventions in Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melidis, Christos, E-mail: christos.melidis@eortc.be [European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer–Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG), Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance (RTQA), Brussels (Belgium); Bosch, Walther R. [Washington University, representing Advanced Technology Consortium, Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Dosimetry Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Zubizarreta, Eduardo [Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ulin, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Representing Quality Assurance Review Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Ishikura, Satoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Representing Japan Clinical Oncology Group, RTQA, Tokyo (Japan); Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Representing Radiological Physics Center, RTQA, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Representing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTQA, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, representing TransTasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Besuijen, Deidre [North West Cancer Centre, Representing TROG Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Clark, Clark H. [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke' s Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey and National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, representing Radiation Therapy Trials Quality Assurance (RTTQA) (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth; Aird, Edwin [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood, Middlesex representing RTTQA (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To review the various radiation therapy quality assurance (RTQA) procedures used by the Global Clinical Trials RTQA Harmonization Group (GHG) steering committee members and present the harmonized RTQA naming conventions by amalgamating procedures with similar objectives. Methods and Materials: A survey of the GHG steering committee members' RTQA procedures, their goals, and naming conventions was conducted. The RTQA procedures were classified as baseline, preaccrual, and prospective/retrospective data capture and analysis. After all the procedures were accumulated and described, extensive discussions took place to come to harmonized RTQA procedures and names. Results: The RTQA procedures implemented within a trial by the GHG steering committee members vary in quantity, timing, name, and compliance criteria. The procedures of each member are based on perceived chances of noncompliance, so that the quality of radiation therapy planning and treatment does not negatively influence the trial measured outcomes. A comparison of these procedures demonstrated similarities among the goals of the various methods, but the naming given to each differed. After thorough discussions, the GHG steering committee members amalgamated the 27 RTQA procedures to 10 harmonized ones with corresponding names: facility questionnaire, beam output audit, benchmark case, dummy run, complex treatment dosimetry check, virtual phantom, individual case review, review of patients' treatment records, and protocol compliance and dosimetry site visit. Conclusions: Harmonized RTQA harmonized naming conventions, which can be used in all future clinical trials involving radiation therapy, have been established. Harmonized procedures will facilitate future intergroup trial collaboration and help to ensure comparable RTQA between international trials, which enables meta-analyses and reduces RTQA workload for intergroup studies.

  4. Therapeutic responses in systematic targeted alpha therapy trial for melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, C.; Rizvi, S.M.A.; Song, E.Y.; Graham, P.; Kearsley, J.H.; Goldsmith, H.; Bosserhoff, A.; Morgenstern, A.; Apostolidis, C.; Reisfeld, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The therapeutic response of melanoma patients after systemic alpha therapy has been investigated in an open-labeled Phase 1 dose escalation study to establish the effective dose of alpha-immunoconjugate 2l3 Bi-cDTPA-9.2.27 mAb (AIC). The tools used to investigate the effects were physical examination; the images of the tumours, pathology comparisons over 12 weeks; CT comparisons and changes in tumour marker over 8 weeks. The physical examination indicated varied tumour responses. One patient showed complete response at 12 weeks post-TAT, with 20 of 21 tumours completely regressing, the last reduced by 80%. The tumour beds were biopsied for staining; S l OO was negative and no viable cells were observed. Most patients showed stable disease at 2 weeks. In one patient the CT comparison of 8 weeks with baseline showed marked reduction in three lung lesions. At least 4/21 patients showed partial response at 4 to 8 weeks and the same number showed stable disease. The disease progressed in 7 patients. The tumour marker melanoma inhibitory activity protein (MIA) showed reductions over 8 weeks, and was consistent with observations in most patients. Complete and partial responses were observed in systemic TAT for stage IV melanoma, but there was no dose-response relationship

  5. Outcomes of clinical trial: tinnitus masking versus tinnitus retraining therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, James A; Schechter, Martin A; Zaugg, Tara L; Griest, Susan; Jastreboff, Pawel J; Vernon, Jack A; Kaelin, Christine; Meikle, Mary B; Lyons, Karen S; Stewart, Barbara J

    2006-02-01

    A controlled clinical study was conducted to evaluate prospectively the clinical efficacy of tinnitus masking (TM) and tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) in military veterans having clinically significant tinnitus. Qualifying patients were placed into the two groups in an alternating manner (to avoid selection bias), and treatment was administered at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Outcomes of treatment were evaluated using three self-administered tinnitus questionnaires (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire, Tinnitus Severity Index) and the verbally administered TRT interview forms. Findings are presented from the three written questionnaires, and from two of the interview questions (percentage time aware of, and annoyed by, tinnitus). Outcomes were analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis, using a multilevel modeling approach. Of the 123 patients enrolled, 118 were included in the analysis. Both groups showed significant declines (improvements) on these measures, with the TRT decline being significantly greater than for TM. The greater declines in TRT compared to TM occurred most strongly in patients who began treatment with a "very big" tinnitus problem. When patients began treatment with a "moderate" tinnitus problem, the benefits of TRT compared to TM were more modest.

  6. Oversight and management of a cell therapy clinical trial network: experience and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyé, Lemuel A; Sayre, Shelly L; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2011-09-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This article describes the Network's challenges as it initiated three protocols in a polarized cultural atmosphere at a time when oversight bodies were positioning themselves for the tightest vigilance of promising new therapies. Effective strategies involving ongoing education, open communication, and relationship building with the oversight community are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Music Therapy in Patients with Huntington's Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen-Rufi, Monique C H; Vink, Annemieke C; Wolterbeek, Ron; Achterberg, Wilco P; Roos, Raymund A C

    2017-01-01

    Music therapy may have beneficial effects on improving communication and expressive skills in patients with Huntington's disease (HD). Most studies are, however, small observational studies and methodologically limited. Therefore we conducted a multi-center randomized controlled trial. To determine the efficacy of music therapy in comparison with recreational therapy in improving quality of life of patients with advanced Huntington's disease by means of improving communication. Sixty-three HD-patients with a Total Functional Capacity (TFC) score of ≤7, admitted to four long-term care facilities in The Netherlands, were randomized to receive either group music therapy or group recreational therapy in 16 weekly sessions. They were assessed at baseline, after 8, 16 and 28 weeks using the Behaviour Observation Scale for Huntington (BOSH) and the Problem Behaviour Assessment-short version (PBA-s). A linear mixed model with repeated measures was used to compare the scores between the two groups. Group music therapy offered once weekly for 16 weeks to patients with Huntington's disease had no additional beneficial effect on communication or behavior compared to group recreational therapy. This was the first study to assess the effect of group music therapy on HD patients in the advanced stages of the disease. The beneficial effects of music therapy, recorded in many, mainly qualitative case reports and studies, could not be confirmed with the design (i.e. group therapy vs individual therapy) and outcome measures that have been used in the present study. A comprehensive process-evaluation alongside the present effect evaluation is therefore performed.

  8. Comparing systemic therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Christina; Hilzinger, Rebecca; Koch, Theresa; Mander, Johannes; Sander, Anja; Bents, Hinrich; Schweitzer, Jochen

    2016-03-31

    Social anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent anxiety disorders in the general population. The efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorders is well demonstrated. However, only three studies point to the efficacy of systemic therapy (ST) in anxiety disorders, and only two of them especially focus on social anxiety disorders. These ST studies either do not use a good comparator but minimal supportive therapy, they do not use a multi-person ST but a combined therapy, or they do not especially focus on social anxiety disorders but mood and anxiety disorders in general. Though ST was approved as evidence based in Germany for a variety of disorders in 2008, evidence did not include anxiety disorders. This is the first pilot study that will investigate multi-person ST, integrating a broad range of systemic methods, specifically for social anxiety disorders and that will compare ST to the "gold standard" CBT. This article describes the rationale and protocol of a prospective, open, interventive, balanced, bi-centric, pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT). A total of 32 patients with a primary SCID diagnosis of social anxiety disorder will be randomized to either CBT or ST. Both treatments will be manualized. The primary outcome will include social anxiety symptoms at the end of therapy. Therapy will be restricted to no more than 26 hours (primary endpoint). Secondary outcomes will include psychological, social systems and interpersonal functioning, symptom adjustment, and caregiver burden, in addition to change measures, therapist variables and treatment adherence. At the secondary endpoints, 9 and 12 months after the beginning of therapy, we will again assess all outcomes. The study is expected to pilot test a RCT which will be the first to directly compare CBT and multi-person ST, integrating a broad range of systemic methods, for social anxiety disorders, and it will provide empirical evidence for the calculation of the number of

  9. Preparations for the next generation of clinical trials with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newhauser, W.D.; Smith, A.R.; Fitzek, M.; Ibbott, G.; Munzenrider, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: As proton radiation therapy centers become more widely available, we anticipate an increase in clinical proton therapy research, e.g. clinical trials to compare the efficacy of proton therapy with that of conformal photon therapy. In this presentation, we explore some of the quality assurance (QA) work that will be necessary to support multi-institution clinical trials to include facilities in Europe, Asia and the United States. Specifically, we shall concentrate on three areas pertaining to practical clinical proton dosimetry for which clear, concise, and coherent guidance is needed. First, the existing proton therapy dosimetry protocols (e.g. ICRU Report 59, IAEA TRS-398) provide general methods that are well suited for adoption in proton therapy. Many additional techniques are required in order to implement dosimetry in a contemporary proton clinic. For example, special situations arise for small fields including those for radiosurgery and ocular treatments, and for rotational therapy. Fortunately, this additional information is emerging from various proton therapy centers. For example, Vatnitsky et al. described the dosimetry of small beams, Newhauser et al. described absolute proton dosimetry techniques for radiosurgery and for ocular beams. Newhauser et al. also reported on a general formalism and practical methods for dosimetry measurements in a rotational proton gantry. Our aim is to discuss some specific needs for the standardization of these tasks, which will be essential in achieving adequate uniformity in multi-institution clinical trials. Second, we will discuss means to standardize of writing the physics QA portion of protocols for multi-institution clinical trials, through which a statistically significant number of patient outcomes may be obtained more rapidly. Surprisingly, only two multi-institution proton clinical trials have been undertaken (a skull base sarcoma trial and a prostate cancer trial, both shared between MGH and Loma Linda

  10. Primary ICD-therapy in patients with advanced heart failure: selection strategies and future trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Zugck, Christian; Nelles, Manfred; Schellberg, Dieter; Remppis, Andrew; Katus, Hugo

    2008-09-01

    For allocation of primary ICD-therapy, a possible lower limit of inclusion criteria--defining overly advanced heart failure--is less well investigated. Also, a multi-variable approach to stratification beyond ejection fraction (LVEF) appears warranted. We examined whether adding a selection limit of peak VO(2) trials based on real-life data for this high risk cohort. In our prospective clinical registry 1,926 patients with systolic CHF were recruited consecutively since 1994. Of these patients, 292 met the selection criteria described above. The mean age was 57.6 +/- 9.5 years, 83% were male, 37% had ischemic cardiomyopathy and 28% received primary ICD-therapy. All cause mortality was considered as end point. Median follow-up was 45 (18-86) months. ICD was not a significant predictor of outcome either for the entire population, or grouped according to aetiology of CHF. Still, 3-year mortality was 15% (ICD-patients) Vs. 28% (non-ICD-patients); P = 0.05; under combination medical therapy. Inversely, in ICD-patients medical combination therapy conveyed a significant survival benefit (P < 0.001). Consequently, the number-needed-to-treat was eight under combination therapy and the size estimate amounts to 300 patients for a prospective trial in this cohort. A cut-off of LVEF therapy. Our results indicate the need for a specific randomized trial in this cohort. The according mortality data and a size estimate are provided.

  11. Manual Therapy With Cryotherapy Versus Manual Therapy With Kinesio Taping for Males With Lumbar Discopathy: A Pilot Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizis, Pawel; Kobza, Wojciech

    2017-06-23

    Context • Numerous modalities of therapeutic interventions exist for lumbar discopathy. Manual therapy is one option, although its effectiveness remains controversial. The addition of cryotherapy to manual therapy may enhance the health benefits in patients with lumbar discopathy.  Objective • The study intended to evaluate the efficacy of manual therapy combined with cryotherapy vs manual therapy combined with Kinesio taping for males with lumbar discopathy. Design • The research team designed a pilot randomized trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. Setting • The study occurred in the Physiotherapy Outpatient Department of the Regional Hospital (Zywiec, Poland). Participants • The participants were 40 males with lumbar discopathy, aged 30-75 y, who were patients in the department at the hospital. Intervention • The participants were randomly assigned to an intervention group that received Kaltenborn-Evjenth orthopedic manual therapy (KEOMT) combined with cryotherapy, the KEOMT-C group (n = 20), or to a control group that received KEOMT combined with Kinesio taping, the KEOMT-K group (n = 20). The participants in both groups received 10 treatments, 2 per wk for 5 wk. Outcome Measures • The primary outcome was measured using a visual analog scale and the Laitinen scale pain ratings. The secondary outcome measured the quality of life using the short form-36 questionnaire. The participants completed the tests at baseline and postintervention. Results • After the treatments, the intervention group had significantly lower scores than the control group for pain as well as significantly higher scores for quality of life. Conclusions • Patients achieved better health benefits from manual therapy when it was combined with cryotherapy.

  12. Inpatient Massage Therapy Versus Music Therapy Versus Usual Care: A Mixed-methods Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseen, Eric J; Cornelio-Flores, Oscar; Lemaster, Chelsey; Hernandez, Maria; Fong, Calvin; Resnick, Kirsten; Wardle, Jon; Hanser, Suzanne; Saper, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the feasibility of providing massage or music therapy to medical inpatients at urban safety-net hospitals or the impact these treatments may have on patient experience. To determine the feasibility of providing massage and music therapy to medical inpatients and to assess the impact of these interventions on patient experience. Single-center 3-arm feasibility randomized controlled trial. Urban academic safety-net hospital. Adult inpatients on the Family Medicine ward. Massage therapy consisted of a standardized protocol adapted from a previous perioperative study. Music therapy involved a preference assessment, personalized compact disc, music-facilitated coping, singing/playing music, and/or songwriting. Credentialed therapists provided the interventions. Patient experience was measured with the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) within 7 days of discharge. We compared the proportion of patients in each study arm reporting "top box" scores for the following a priori HCAHPS domains: pain management, recommendation of hospital, and overall hospital rating. Responses to additional open-ended postdischarge questions were transcribed, coded independently, and analyzed for common themes. From July to December 2014, 90 medical inpatients were enrolled; postdischarge data were collected on 68 (76%) medical inpatients. Participants were 70% females, 43% non-Hispanic black, and 23% Hispanic. No differences between groups were observed on HCAHPS. The qualitative analysis found that massage and music therapy were associated with improved overall hospital experience, pain management, and connectedness to the massage or music therapist. Providing music and massage therapy in an urban safety-net inpatient setting was feasible. There was no quantitative impact on HCAHPS. Qualitative findings suggest benefits related to an improved hospital experience, pain management, and connectedness to the massage or music therapist.

  13. Inpatient Massage Therapy Versus Music Therapy Versus Usual Care: A Mixed-methods Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelio-Flores, Oscar; Lemaster, Chelsey; Hernandez, Maria; Fong, Calvin; Resnick, Kirsten; Wardle, Jon; Hanser, Suzanne; Saper, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background Little is known about the feasibility of providing massage or music therapy to medical inpatients at urban safety-net hospitals or the impact these treatments may have on patient experience. Objective To determine the feasibility of providing massage and music therapy to medical inpatients and to assess the impact of these interventions on patient experience. Design Single-center 3-arm feasibility randomized controlled trial. Setting Urban academic safety-net hospital. Patients Adult inpatients on the Family Medicine ward. Interventions Massage therapy consisted of a standardized protocol adapted from a previous perioperative study. Music therapy involved a preference assessment, personalized compact disc, music-facilitated coping, singing/playing music, and/or songwriting. Credentialed therapists provided the interventions. Measurements Patient experience was measured with the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) within 7 days of discharge. We compared the proportion of patients in each study arm reporting “top box” scores for the following a priori HCAHPS domains: pain management, recommendation of hospital, and overall hospital rating. Responses to additional open-ended postdischarge questions were transcribed, coded independently, and analyzed for common themes. Results From July to December 2014, 90 medical inpatients were enrolled; postdischarge data were collected on 68 (76%) medical inpatients. Participants were 70% females, 43% non-Hispanic black, and 23% Hispanic. No differences between groups were observed on HCAHPS. The qualitative analysis found that massage and music therapy were associated with improved overall hospital experience, pain management, and connectedness to the massage or music therapist. Conclusions Providing music and massage therapy in an urban safety-net inpatient setting was feasible. There was no quantitative impact on HCAHPS. Qualitative findings suggest benefits related to an

  14. Effects of an aquatic therapy approach (Halliwick-Therapy) on functional mobility in subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Florian; Krakow, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of an aquatic physiotherapy method (Halliwick-Therapy) upon mobility in the post-acute phase of stroke rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Hospital for neurological rehabilitation. Adult patients after first-ever stroke in post-acute inpatient rehabilitation at least two weeks after the onset of stroke (n = 30). In the Halliwick-Therapy group (n = 14) the treatment over a period of two weeks included 45 minutes of aquatic therapy three times per week and a conventional physiotherapeutic treatment twice a week. Subjects in the control group (n = 16) received conventional physiotherapeutic treatment over a period of two weeks five times per week. The primary outcome variable was postural stability (Berg Balance Scale). Secondary outcome variables were functional reach, functional gait ability and basic functional mobility. Compared to the control group, significantly more subjects in the Halliwick-Therapy group (83.3% versus 46.7%) attained significant improvement of the Berg Balance Scale (P stroke patients in post-acute rehabilitation and has positive effects upon some aspects of mobility.

  15. Upper limb robot-assisted therapy in cerebral palsy: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliaux, Maxime; Renders, Anne; Dispa, Delphine; Holvoet, Dominique; Sapin, Julien; Dehez, Bruno; Detrembleur, Christine; Lejeune, Thierry M; Stoquart, Gaëtan

    2015-02-01

    Several pilot studies have evoked interest in robot-assisted therapy (RAT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). To assess the effectiveness of RAT in children with CP through a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Sixteen children with CP were randomized into 2 groups. Eight children performed 5 conventional therapy sessions per week over 8 weeks (control group). Eight children completed 3 conventional therapy sessions and 2 robot-assisted sessions per week over 8 weeks (robotic group). For both groups, each therapy session lasted 45 minutes. Throughout each RAT session, the patient attempted to reach several targets consecutively with the REAPlan. The REAPlan is a distal effector robot that allows for displacements of the upper limb in the horizontal plane. A blinded assessment was performed before and after the intervention with respect to the International Classification of Functioning framework: body structure and function (upper limb kinematics, Box and Block test, Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test, strength, and spasticity), activities (Abilhand-Kids, Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory), and participation (Life Habits). During each RAT session, patients performed 744 movements on average with the REAPlan. Among the variables assessed, the smoothness of movement (P robotic group than in the control group. This single-blind randomized controlled trial provides the first evidence that RAT is effective in children with CP. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects of this therapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Olsalazine is contraindicated during pelvic radiation therapy: results of a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martenson, James A.; Hyland, Glenn; Moertel, Charles G.; Mailliard, James A.; O'Fallon, Judith R.; Collins, Roger T.; Morton, Roscoe F.; Tewfik, Hamed H.; Moore, Randy L.; Frank, Albert R.; Urias, Rodolfo E.; Deming, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A randomized clinical trial from Great Britain suggested a possible beneficial effect of acetylsalicylate in the prevention of radiation-induced bowel toxicity. Olsalazine is an orally administered drug designed to deliver 5-aminosalicylate to the large bowel with minimal systemic absorption. A randomized clinical trial was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of olsalazine in preventing acute diarrhea in patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy were randomized, in double-blind fashion, to olsalazine 250 mg, two capsules twice daily, or an identical appearing placebo, two capsules twice daily. Patients were then evaluated weekly during radiation therapy for the primary study endpoint, diarrhea, as well as rectal bleeding, abdominal cramping, and tenesmus. Results: The study was closed early, after entry of 58 evaluable patients, when a preliminary analysis showed excessive diarrhea in patients randomized to olsalazine. The incidence and severity of diarrhea were worse in patients randomized to olsalazine (p 0.0036). Sixty percent of the patients randomized to olsalazine experienced Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea compared to only 14% randomized to placebo. There was also a trend toward higher incidence and greater severity of abdominal cramping in patients who were randomized to olsalazine (p = 0.084). Conclusion: Administration of olsalazine during pelvic radiation therapy resulted in an increased incidence and severity of diarrhea. Olsalazine is contraindicated in patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy

  17. From Molecular Biology to Clinical Trials: Toward Personalized Colorectal Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Sabina; Zwenger, Ariel O; Croce, María V; Abba, Martín C; Lacunza, Ezequiel

    2016-06-01

    During the past years, molecular studies through high-throughput technologies have led to the confirmation of critical alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) and the discovery of some new ones, including mutations, DNA methylations, and structural chromosomal changes. These genomic alterations might act in concert to dysregulate specific signaling pathways that normally exert their functions on critical cell phenotypes, including the regulation of cellular metabolism, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Targeted therapy against key components of altered signaling pathways has allowed an improvement in CRC treatment. However, a significant percentage of patients with CRC and metastatic CRC will not benefit from these targeted therapies and will be restricted to systemic chemotherapy. Mechanisms of resistance have been associated with specific gene alterations. To fully understand the nature and significance of the genetic and epigenetic defects in CRC that might favor a tumor evading a given therapy, much work remains. Therefore, a dynamic link between basic molecular research and preclinical studies, which ultimately constitute the prelude to standardized therapies, is very important to provide better and more effective treatments against CRC. We present an updated revision of the main molecular features of CRC and their associated therapies currently under study in clinical trials. Moreover, we performed an unsupervised classification of CRC clinical trials with the aim of obtaining an overview of the future perspectives of preclinical studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A randomized trial of emotion-focused therapy for couples in a training clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, W H; Burleson, B R; Clark, T E; Rodriguez, C P; Hobbs, B V

    2000-01-01

    Forty married couples participated in a randomized trial comparing 8 weekly sessions of emotion-focused therapy (EFT) for couples to a group of couples who were placed on an 8-week waiting list. A composite marital satisfaction score was created from scores on the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Positive Feelings Questionnaire, and Personal Assessment of Intimacy in Relationships scale. Controlling for pretest scores, participants in the treatment group had significantly higher levels of marital satisfaction after 8 weeks than wait-list participants. Supplementary analyses identified variables associated with gains in therapy and with dropping out of the study.

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, Hugo; Gustafsson, Tore; Lunden, Charlotte; Henrikson, Oskar; Fattahi, Kidjan; Johnsson, Erik; Westin, Vendela Zetterqvist; Carlbring, Per; Maki-Torkko, Elina; Kaldo, Viktor; Andersson, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were…

  20. Therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: single blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Jesper; Andersson, Erik; Mataix-Cols, David; Lichtenstein, Linn; Alström, Katarina; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Rück, Christian

    2016-02-02

    To evaluate the efficacy of therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET) compared with online supportive therapy. A 12 week single blind parallel group randomised controlled trial. Academic medical centre. 94 self referred adult outpatients with a diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder and a modified Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (BDD-YBOCS) score of ≥ 20. Concurrent psychotropic drug treatment was permitted if the dose had been stable for at least two months before enrolment and remained unchanged during the trial. Participants received either BDD-NET (n=47) or supportive therapy (n=47) delivered via the internet for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the BDD-YBOCS score after treatment and follow-up (three and six months from baseline) as evaluated by a masked assessor. Responder status was defined as a ≥ 30% reduction in symptoms on the scale. Secondary outcomes were measures of depression (MADRS-S), global functioning (GAF), clinical global improvement (CGI-I), and quality of life (EQ5D). The six month follow-up time and all outcomes other than BDD-YBOCS and MADRS-S at 3 months were not pre-specified in the registration at clinicaltrials.gov because of an administrative error but were included in the original trial protocol approved by the regional ethics committee before the start of the trial. BDD-NET was superior to supportive therapy and was associated with significant improvements in severity of symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-YBOCS group difference -7.1 points, 95% confidence interval -9.8 to -4.4), depression (MADRS-S group difference -4.5 points, -7.5 to -1.4), and other secondary measures. At follow-up, 56% of those receiving BDD-NET were classed as responders, compared with 13% receiving supportive therapy. The number needed to treat was 2.34 (1.71 to 4.35). Self reported satisfaction was high. CBT can be delivered safely via the internet to patients with body

  1. Most Trial Eligibility Criteria and Patient Baseline Characteristics Do Not Modify Treatment Effect in Trials Using Targeted Therapies for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anton Wulf; Tarp, Simon; Furst, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if variations in trial eligibility criteria and patient baseline characteristics could be considered effect modifiers of the treatment response when testing targeted therapies (biological agents and targeted synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs....... Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated from the response rates and compared among the trial eligibility criteria/patient baseline characteristics of interest. Comparisons are presented as the Ratio of Odds Ratios (ROR). RESULTS: Sixty-two trials (19,923 RA patients) were included in the primary analyses...... using ACR20 response. Overall, targeted therapies constituted an effective treatment (OR 3.96 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.41 to 4.60). The majority of the trial eligibility criteria and patient baseline characteristics did not modify treatment effect. The added benefit of targeted therapies was lower...

  2. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials on curative and health enhancement effects of forest therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamioka H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hiroharu Kamioka,1 Kiichiro Tsutani,2 Yoshiteru Mutoh,3 Takuya Honda,4 Nobuyoshi Shiozawa,5 Shinpei Okada,6 Sang-Jun Park,6 Jun Kitayuguchi,7 Masamitsu Kamada,8 Hiroyasu Okuizumi,9 Shuichi Handa91Faculty of Regional Environment Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo, 2Department of Drug Policy and Management, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 3Todai Policy Alternatives Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 4Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, 5Food Labeling Division, Consumer Affairs Agency, Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, Tokyo, 6Physical Education and Medicine Research Foundation, Nagano, 7Physical Education and Medicine Research Center Unnan, Shimane, 8Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Shimane University School of Medicine, Shimane, 9Mimaki Onsen (Spa Clinic, Tomi City, Nagano, JapanObjective: To summarize the evidence for curative and health enhancement effects through forest therapy and to assess the quality of studies based on a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs.Study design: A systematic review based on RCTs.Methods: Studies were eligible if they were RCTs. Studies included one treatment group in which forest therapy was applied. The following databases – from 1990 to November 9, 2010 – were searched: MEDLINE via PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Ichushi-Web. All Cochrane databases and Campbell Systematic Reviews were also searched up to November 9, 2010.Results: Two trials met all inclusion criteria. No specific diseases were evaluated, and both studies reported significant effectiveness in one or more outcomes for health enhancement. However, the results of evaluations with the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials 2010 and CLEAR NPT (A Checklist to Evaluate a Report of a Nonpharmacological Trial checklists generally showed a remarkable lack of description in the studies. Furthermore, there was a

  3. CHAMP: Cognitive behaviour therapy for health anxiety in medical patients, a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal health anxiety, also called hypochondriasis, has been successfully treated by cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT in patients recruited from primary care, but only one pilot trial has been carried out among those attending secondary medical clinics where health anxiety is likely to be more common and have a greater impact on services. The CHAMP study extends this work to examine both the clinical and cost effectiveness of CBT in this population. Method/Design The study is a randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms and equal randomization of 466 eligible patients (assuming a 20% drop-out to an active treatment group of 5-10 sessions of cognitive behaviour therapy and to a control group. The aim at baseline, after completion of all assessments but before randomization, was to give a standard simple explanation of the nature of health anxiety for all participants. Subsequently the control group was to receive whatever care might usually be available in the clinics, which is normally a combination of clinical assessment, appropriate tests and reassurance. Those allocated to the active treatment group were planned to receive between 5 and 10 sessions of an adapted form of cognitive behaviour therapy based on the Salkovskis/Warwick model, in which a set of treatment strategies are chosen aimed at helping patients understand the factors that drive and maintain health anxiety. The therapy was planned to be given by graduate research workers, nurses or other health professionals trained for this intervention whom would also have their competence assessed independently during the course of treatment. The primary outcome is reduction in health anxiety symptoms after one year and the main secondary outcome is the cost of care after two years. Discussion This represents the first trial of adapted cognitive behaviour therapy in health anxiety that is large enough to test not only the clinical benefits of treatment but also

  4. Recruitment to Online Therapies for Depression: Pilot Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Ray B; Goldsmith, Lesley; Hewson, Paul; Williams, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Background Raising awareness of online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) could benefit many people with depression, but we do not know how purchasing online advertising compares to placing free links from relevant local websites in increasing uptake. Objective To pilot a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing purchase of Google AdWords with placing free website links in raising awareness of online CBT resources for depression in order to better understand research design issues....

  5. The implementation and evaluation of cognitive milieu therapy for dual diagnosis inpatients: A pragmatic clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jørn; Oestrich, Irene; Austin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    milieu therapy (CMT) among a group of dual diagnosis inpatients. CMT is an integrated treatment for both mental illness and substance abuse based on cognitive behavioral principles and carried out within a supportive inpatient environment. A convenience sample of dual diagnosis inpatients (N = 136......Dual diagnosis is chronic psychiatric condition involving serious mental illness and substance abuse. Experts recommend the integration of treatment for concurrent substance abuse and serious psychiatric problems. The following pragmatic trial examined the implementation and outcomes of cognitive...

  6. Massage therapy decreases pain and perceived fatigue after long-distance Ironman triathlon: a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Guilherme S Nunes; Paula Urio Bender; Fábio Sprada de Menezes; Igor Yamashitafuji; Valentine Zimermann Vargas; Bruna Wageck

    2016-01-01

    Question: Can massage therapy reduce pain and perceived fatigue in the quadriceps of athletes after a long-distance triathlon race (Ironman)? Design: Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded outcome assessors. Participants: Seventy-four triathlon athletes who completed an entire Ironman triathlon race and whose main complaint was pain in the anterior portion of the thigh. Intervention: The experimental group received massage to the quadri...

  7. Group art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia: a randomised controlled trial (MATISSE).

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, MJ; Killaspy, H; Barnes, TR; Barrett, B; Byford, S; Clayton, K; Dinsmore, J; Floyd, S; Hoadley, A; Johnson, T; Kalaitzaki, E; King, M; Leurent, B; Maratos, A; O'Neill, FA

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of referral to group art therapy plus standard care, compared with referral to an activity group plus standard care and standard care alone, among people with schizophrenia. DESIGN A three-arm, parallel group, single-blind, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Participants were randomised via an independent and remote telephone randomisation service using permuted blocks, stratified by study centre. SETTING Study partic...

  8. HElmet therapy Assessment in infants with Deformed Skulls (HEADS: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Wijk Renske M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In The Netherlands, helmet therapy is a commonly used treatment in infants with skull deformation (deformational plagiocephaly or deformational brachycephaly. However, evidence of the effectiveness of this treatment remains lacking. The HEADS study (HElmet therapy Assessment in Deformed Skulls aims to determine the effects and costs of helmet therapy compared to no helmet therapy in infants with moderate to severe skull deformation. Methods/design Pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT nested in a cohort study. The cohort study included infants with a positional preference and/or skull deformation at two to four months (first assessment. At 5 months of age, all children were assessed again and infants meeting the criteria for helmet therapy were asked to participate in the RCT. Participants were randomly allocated to either helmet therapy or no helmet therapy. Parents of eligible infants that do not agree with enrolment in the RCT were invited to stay enrolled for follow up in a non-randomisedrandomised controlled trial (nRCT; they were then free to make the decision to start helmet therapy or not. Follow-up assessments took place at 8, 12 and 24 months of age. The main outcome will be head shape at 24 months that is measured using plagiocephalometry. Secondary outcomes will be satisfaction of parents and professionals with the appearance of the child, parental concerns about the future, anxiety level and satisfaction with the treatment, motor development and quality of life of the infant. Finally, compliance and costs will also be determined. Discussion HEADS will be the first study presenting data from an RCT on the effectiveness of helmet therapy. Outcomes will be important for affected children and their parents, health care professionals and future treatment policies. Our findings are likely to influence the reimbursement policies of health insurance companies. Besides these health outcomes, we will be able to

  9. Optimizing Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance in Clinical Trials: A TROG 08.03 RAVES Substudy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trada, Yuvnik, E-mail: yuvnik@gmail.com [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Royal North Shore Hospital, St Lenoards, New South Wales (Australia); Paneghel, Andrea [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Pearse, Maria [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Sidhom, Mark [Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Tang, Colin [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Wiltshire, Kirsty; Haworth, Annette [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Fraser-Browne, Carol [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Martin, Jarad [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To explore site- and clinician-level factors associated with protocol violations requiring real-time-review (RTR) resubmission in a multicenter clinical trial to help tailor future quality assurance (QA) protocols. Methods and Materials: RAVES (Radiation Therapy–Adjuvant vs Early Salvage) (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 08.03) is a randomized trial comparing adjuvant with early salvage radiation therapy in men with positive surgical margins or pT3 disease after prostatectomy. Quality assurance in RAVES required each clinician and site to submit a credentialing dummy run (DR) and for each patient's radiation therapy plan to undergo external RTR before treatment. Prospectively defined major violations from trial protocol required remedy and resubmission. Site and clinician factors associated with RTR resubmission were examined using hierarchical modeling. Results: Data were collected from 171 consecutive patients, treated by 46 clinicians at 32 hospitals. There were 47 RTR resubmissions (27%) due to 65 major violations. The relative rate of resubmission decreased by 29% per year as the study progressed (odds ratio OR. 0.71, P=.02). The majority of resubmissions were due to contouring violations (39 of 65) and dosimetric violations (22 of 65). For each additional patient accrued, significant decreases in RTR resubmission were seen at both clinician level (OR 0.75, P=.02) and site level (OR 0.72, P=.01). The rate of resubmission due to dosimetric violations was only 1.6% after the first 5 patients. Use of IMRT was associated with lower rates of resubmission compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (OR 0.38, P=.05). Conclusion: Several low- and high-risk factors that may assist with tailoring future clinical trial QA were identified. Because the real-time resubmission rate was largely independent of the credentialing exercise, some form of RTR QA is recommended. The greatest benefit from QA was derived early in trial activation

  10. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Internet Therapy, Group Therapy and A Waiting List Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Eduard J; Bögels, Susan M; Oort, Frans J; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) in adolescents. A randomized controlled trial of CBTI in group therapy (GT), guided internet therapy (IT), and a waiting list (WL), with assessments at baseline, directly after treatment (post-test), and at 2 months follow-up. Diagnostic interviews were held at the laboratory of the Research Institute of Child Development and Education at the University of Amsterdam. Treatment for GT occurred at the mental health care center UvAMinds in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. One hundred sixteen adolescents (mean age = 15.6 y, SD = 1.6 y, 25% males) meeting DSM-IV criteria for insomnia, were randomized to IT, GT, or WL. CBTI of 6 weekly sessions, consisted of psychoeducation, sleep hygiene, restriction of time in bed, stimulus control, cognitive therapy, and relaxation techniques. GT was conducted in groups of 6 to 8 adolescents, guided by 2 trained sleep therapists. IT was applied through an online guided self-help website with programmed instructions and written feedback from a trained sleep therapist. Sleep was measured with actigraphy and sleep logs for 7 consecutive days. Symptoms of insomnia and chronic sleep reduction were measured with questionnaires. Results showed that adolescents in both IT and GT, compared to WL, improved significantly on sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, and total sleep time at post-test, and improvements were maintained at follow-up. Most of these improvements were found in both objective and subjective measures. Furthermore, insomnia complaints and symptoms of chronic sleep reduction also decreased significantly in both treatment conditions compared to WL. Effect sizes for improvements ranged from medium to large. A greater proportion of participants from the treatment conditions showed high end-state functioning and clinically significant improvement after treatment and at follow-up compared to WL. This study is the first randomized

  11. Sociodemographic analysis of patients in radiation therapy oncology group clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, Robert M.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Porter, Arthur T.; Roach, M.; Streeter, Oscar; Cox, James D.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the degree to which the sociodemographic characteristics of patients enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trails are representative of the general population. Methods and Materials: Sociodemographic data were collected on 4016 patients entered in 33 open RTOG studies between July 1991 and June 1994. The data analyzed included educational attainment, age, gender, and race. For comparison, we obtained similar data from the U.S. Department of Census. We also compared our RTOG data with Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for patients who received radiation therapy, to determine how RTOG patients compared with cancer patients in general, and with patients with cancers at sites typically treated with radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the sociodemographic characteristics of patients entered in RTOG trials were similar to those of the Census data. We found that, in every age group of African-American men and at nearly every level of educational attainment, the proportion of RTOG trial participants mirrored the proportion in the census data. Significant differences were noted only in the youngest category of African-American men, where the RTOG accrues more in the lower educational categories and fewer with college experience. For African-American women, we found a similar pattern in every age group and at each level of educational attainment. As with men, RTOG trials accrued a considerably larger proportion of younger, less educated African-American women than the census reported. Using SEER for comparison, the RTOG enrolled proportionately more African-American men to trials all cancer sites combined, and for prostate and head and neck cancer. In head and neck trials, the RTOG enrolled nearly twice as many African-American men than would be predicted by SEER data. In lung cancer trials, RTOG underrepresented African-American men significantly; however, there was no difference for brain cancer trials. There were

  12. Spa therapy and balneotherapy for treating low back pain: meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittler, M H; Karagülle, M Z; Karagülle, M; Ernst, E

    2006-07-01

    Low back pain is a major public health concern and complementary treatments are frequently used for this condition. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the evidence for or against the effectiveness of spa therapy and balneotherapy for treating low back pain. Systematic searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed Cochrane Central, the UK National Research Register and ClincalTrials.gov (all until July 2005). Hand searches were performed and experts contacted. Methodological quality was assessed using a standard scale. Five randomized clinical trials met all inclusion criteria. Quantitative data synthesis was performed. The data for spa therapy, assessed on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS), suggest significant beneficial effects compared with waiting list control groups (weighted mean difference 26.6 mm, 95% confidence interval 20.4-32.8, n=442) for patients with chronic low back pain. For balneotherapy the data, assessed on a 100 mm VAS, also suggest beneficial effects compared with control groups (weighted mean difference 18.8 mm, 95% confidence interval 10.3-27.3, n=138). Even though the data are scarce, there is encouraging evidence suggesting that spa therapy and balneotherapy may be effective for treating patients with low back pain. These data are not compelling but warrant rigorous large-scale trials.

  13. Brief psychosocial therapy for the treatment of agitation in Alzheimer disease (the CALM-AD trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Clive; Brown, Richard; Fossey, Jane; Douglas, Simon; Bradley, Paul; Hancock, Judith; James, Ian A; Juszczak, Edmund; Bentham, Peter; Burns, Alistair; Lindesay, James; Jacoby, Robin; O'Brien, John; Bullock, Roger; Johnson, Tony; Holmes, Clive; Howard, Robert

    2009-09-01

    Good practice guidelines state that a psychological intervention should usually precede pharmacotherapy, but there are no data evaluating the feasibility of psychological interventions used in this way. At the first stage of a randomized blinded placebo-controlled trial, 318 patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) with clinically significant agitated behavior were treated in an open design with a psychological intervention (brief psychosocial therapy [BPST]) for 4 weeks, preceding randomization to pharmacotherapy. The therapy involved social interaction, personalized music, or removal of environmental triggers. Overall, 318 patients with AD completed BPST with an improvement of 5.6 points on the total Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI; mean [SD], 63.3 [16.0] to 57.7 [18.4], t = 4.8, df = 317, p 95% of patients. More detailed evaluation of outcome was completed for the 198 patients with AD from these centers, who experienced a mean improvement of 6.6 points on the total CMAI (mean [SD], 62.2 [14.3] to 55.6 [15.8], t = 6.5, df = 197, p < 0.0001). Overall, 43% of participants achieved a 30% improvement in their level of agitation. The specific attributable benefits of BPST cannot be determined from an open trial. However, the BPST therapy was feasible and was successfully delivered according to an operationalized manual. The encouraging outcome indicates the need for a randomized controlled trial of BPST.

  14. [Bibliometrics study on indications of acupuncture therapy based on foreign acupuncture clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Tong, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Ying-Kai; Rong, Pei-Jing; Wang, Hong-Cai

    2012-10-01

    In the present paper, the authors make a bibliometrics study on clinical indications of acupuncture therapy based on the published foreign articles about acupuncture clinical trials collected from PubMed database and Excerpta Medica database (EMbase). In 1996, 64 acupuncture indications were declared by WHO in Milan conference. But in recent 15 years, clinical trials have been conducted extensively in the foreign countries. Till now, 77 new indications for acupuncture therapy have been found in the foreign journals. The authors recommended that 29 indications (knee osteoarthritis, critique age problems, muscular fasciae ache, anxiety, etc.) should be added to the first class, 4 indications (irritable bowel syndrome, malposition, backache, simple obesity) should be upgraded from the second class to the first class, and the other 3 indications (childbirth pain, male and female barren) should be upgraded from the third class to the first class due to their application frequency in clinical trials. Increase of clinical indications reflects extensive application of acupuncture therapy and may help providing a better service for people's health.

  15. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy in advanced biliary tract carcinoma: a pooled analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Florian; Schmid, Roland M

    2014-01-01

    In biliary tract cancer, gemcitabine platinum (GP) doublet palliative chemotherapy is the current standard treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze recent trials, even those small and nonrandomized, and identify superior new regimens. Trials published in English between January 2000 and January 2014 were analyzed, as well as ASCO abstracts from 2010 to 2013. In total, 161 trials comprising 6,337 patients were analyzed. The pooled results of standard therapy GP (no fluoropyrimidine, F, or other drug) were as follows: the median response rate (RR), tumor control rate (TCR), time to tumor progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 25.9 and 63.5%, and 5.3 and 9.5 months, respectively. GFP triplets as well as G-based chemotherapy plus targeted therapy were significantly superior to GP concerning tumor control (TCR, TTP) and OS, with no difference in RR. Triplet combinations of GFP as well as G-based chemotherapy with (predominantly EGFR) targeted therapy are most effective concerning tumor control and survival.

  16. Design and Methodology of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Gervasio A.; Goertz, Christine; Boineau, Robin; Mark, Daniel B.; Rozema, Theodore; Nahin, Richard L.; Drisko, Jeanne A.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2011-01-01

    The Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) is an NIH-sponsored, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial clinical trial testing the benefits and risks of 40 infusions of a multi-component Na2EDTA-chelation solution compared with placebo, and of an oral, high-dose multivitamin and mineral supplement. TACT has randomized and will follow 1708 patients for an average of approximately 4 years. The primary endpoint is a composite of all cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, and hospitalization for angina. A 900 patient substudy will examine quality of life outcomes. The trial is designed to have >85% power to detect a 25% relative reduction in the primary endpoint for each treatment factor. Enrollment began in September 2003 and completed in October 2010. PMID:22172430

  17. Protocol for the saMS trial (supportive adjustment for multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy to supportive listening for adjustment to multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrone Paul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an incurable, chronic, potentially progressive and unpredictable disease of the central nervous system. The disease produces a range of unpleasant and debilitating symptoms, which can have a profound impact including disrupting activities of daily living, employment, income, relationships, social and leisure activities, and life goals. Adjusting to the illness is therefore particularly challenging. This trial tests the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural intervention compared to Supportive Listening to assist adjustment in the early stages of MS. Methods/Design This is a two arm randomized multi-centre parallel group controlled trial. 122 consenting participants who meet eligibility criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Supportive Listening. Eight one hour sessions of therapy (delivered over a period of 10 weeks will be delivered by general nurses trained in both treatments. Self-report questionnaire data will be collected at baseline (0 weeks, mid-therapy (week 5 of therapy, post-therapy (15 weeks and at six months (26 weeks and twelve months (52 weeks follow-up. Primary outcomes are distress and MS-related social and role impairment at twelve month follow-up. Analysis will also consider predictors and mechanisms of change during therapy. In-depth interviews to examine participants' experiences of the interventions will be conducted with a purposively sampled sub-set of the trial participants. An economic analysis will also take place. Discussion This trial is distinctive in its aims in that it aids adjustment to MS in a broad sense. It is not a treatment specifically for depression. Use of nurses as therapists makes the interventions potentially viable in terms of being rolled out in the NHS. The trial benefits from incorporating patient input in the development and evaluation stages. The trial will provide important information about the

  18. Multicentre quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans: a precursor to clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M. J.; Bailey, M. J.; Forstner, D.; Metcalfe, P. E

    2007-01-01

    Full text: A multicentre planning study comparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for the treatment of a head and neck cancer has been carried out. Three Australian radiotherapy centres, each with a different planning system, were supplied a fully contoured CT dataset and requested to generate an IMRT plan in accordance with the requirements of an IMRT-based radiation therapy oncology group clinical trial. Plan analysis was carried out using software developed specifically for reviewing multicentre clinical trial data. Two out of the three plans failed to meet the prescription requirements with one misinterpreting the prescription and the third failed to meet one of the constraints. Only one plan achieved all of the dose objectives for the critical structures and normal tissues. Although each centre used very similar planning parameters and beam arrangements the resulting plans were quite different. The subjective interpretation and application of the prescription and planning objectives emphasize one of the many difficulties in carrying out multicentre IMRT planning studies. The treatment prescription protocol in a clinical trial must be both lucid and unequivocally stated to avoid misinterpretation. Australian radiotherapy centres must show that they can produce a quality IMRT plan and that they can adhere to protocols for IMRT planning before using it in a clinical trial

  19. Results of a multicenter randomized controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness of schema therapy for personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bamelis, L.L.M.; Evers, S.M.A.A.; Spinhoven, P.; Arntz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the effectiveness of 50 sessions of schema therapy with clarification-oriented psychotherapy and with treatment as usual among patients with cluster C, paranoid, histrionic, or narcissistic personality disorder. Method: A multicenter randomized controlled trial, with

  20. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables....

  1. Music-supported therapy in the rehabilitation of subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Duarte, Esther; Ramos-Escobar, Neus; Sierpowska, Joanna; Rueda, Nohora; Redón, Susana; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Pedro, Jordi; Särkämö, Teppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2018-04-01

    The effect of music-supported therapy (MST) as a tool to restore hemiparesis of the upper extremity after a stroke has not been appropriately contrasted with conventional therapy. The aim of this trial was to test the effectiveness of adding MST to a standard rehabilitation program in subacute stroke patients. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in which patients were randomized to MST or conventional therapy in addition to the rehabilitation program. The intensity and duration of the interventions were equated in both groups. Before and after 4 weeks of treatment, motor and cognitive functions, mood, and quality of life (QoL) of participants were evaluated. A follow-up at 3 months was conducted to examine the retention of motor gains. Both groups significantly improved their motor function, and no differences between groups were found. The only difference between groups was observed in the language domain for QoL. Importantly, an association was encountered between the capacity to experience pleasure from music activities and the motor improvement in the MST group. MST as an add-on treatment showed no superiority to conventional therapies for motor recovery. Importantly, patient's intrinsic motivation to engage in musical activities was associated with better motor improvement. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. A randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for individuals at clinical high risk of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, Jean; Epstein, Irvin; Liu, Lu; French, Paul; Boydell, Katherine M; Zipursky, Robert B

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in early detection during the prodromal phase of a psychotic disorder. To date a few treatment studies have been published with some promising results for both pharmacological treatments, using second generation antipsychotics, and psychological interventions, mainly cognitive behavioral therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine first if cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was more effective in reducing the rates of conversion compared to a supportive therapy and secondly whether those who received CBT had improved symptoms compared to those who received supportive therapy. Fifty-one individuals at clinical high risk of developing psychosis were randomized to CBT or a supportive therapy for up to 6 months. The sample was assessed at 6, 12 and 18 months post baseline on attenuated positive symptoms, negative symptoms, depression, anxiety and social functioning. Conversions to psychosis only occurred in the group who received supportive therapy although the difference was not significant. Both groups improved in attenuated positive symptoms, depression and anxiety and neither improved in social functioning and negative symptoms. There were no differences between the two treatment groups. However, the improvement in attenuated positive symptoms was more rapid for the CBT group. There are limitations of this trial and potential explanations for the lack of differences. However, both the results of this study and the possible explanations have significant implications for early detection and intervention in the pre-psychotic phase and for designing future treatments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Individual music therapy for agitation in dementia: an exploratory randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette O; Stige, Brynjulf; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild; Gold, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Agitation in nursing home residents with dementia leads to increase in psychotropic medication, decrease in quality of life, and to patient distress and caregiver burden. Music therapy has previously been found effective in treatment of agitation in dementia care but studies have been methodologically insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of individual music therapy on agitation in persons with moderate/severe dementia living in nursing homes, and to explore its effect on psychotropic medication and quality of life. In a crossover trial, 42 participants with dementia were randomized to a sequence of six weeks of individual music therapy and six weeks of standard care. Outcome measures included agitation, quality of life and medication. Agitation disruptiveness increased during standard care and decreased during music therapy. The difference at -6.77 (95% CI (confidence interval): -12.71, -0.83) was significant (p = 0.027), with a medium effect size (0.50). The prescription of psychotropic medication increased significantly more often during standard care than during music therapy (p = 0.02). This study shows that six weeks of music therapy reduces agitation disruptiveness and prevents medication increases in people with dementia. The positive trends in relation to agitation frequency and quality of life call for further research with a larger sample.

  4. Effects of music therapy on intravitreal injections: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuejing; Seth, Rajeev K; Rao, Veena S; Huang, John J; Adelman, Ron A

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the effects of music therapy on anxiety, perceived pain, and satisfaction in patients undergoing intravitreal injections in the outpatient setting. This is a randomized clinical trial. Seventy-three patients were recruited from the retina clinic at 1 institution and randomized into a music therapy (n=37) or control (n=36) group. Prior to injection, patients completed the state portion of the Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S). The music therapy group listened to classical music through computer speakers while waiting for and during the injection. The control group underwent the injection in the same setting without music. Afterward, all patients completed another STAI-S and a satisfaction and pain questionnaire. The main outcome measures were objective anxiety derived from STAI-S scores and subjective pain and anxiety from the post procedure questionnaire. The music therapy group had a greater decrease in anxiety than the control group (P=0.0480). Overall, 73% of all patients requested music for future injections (P=0.0001). The music therapy group (84%) requested music in future injections more frequently than the control group (61%) (P=0.0377). Both groups reported similar levels of pain (P=0.5879). Classical music before and during intravitreal injections decreases anxiety in patients without decreasing pain. Most patients desire to have music during future injections. Music therapy is a low-cost, easy, safe intervention that reduces anxiety during intravitreal injections in the outpatient setting.

  5. Individual music therapy for agitation in dementia: an exploratory randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stige, Brynjulf; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild; Gold, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Agitation in nursing home residents with dementia leads to increase in psychotropic medication, decrease in quality of life, and to patient distress and caregiver burden. Music therapy has previously been found effective in treatment of agitation in dementia care but studies have been methodologically insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of individual music therapy on agitation in persons with moderate/severe dementia living in nursing homes, and to explore its effect on psychotropic medication and quality of life. Method: In a crossover trial, 42 participants with dementia were randomized to a sequence of six weeks of individual music therapy and six weeks of standard care. Outcome measures included agitation, quality of life and medication. Results: Agitation disruptiveness increased during standard care and decreased during music therapy. The difference at −6.77 (95% CI (confidence interval): −12.71, −0.83) was significant (p = 0.027), with a medium effect size (0.50). The prescription of psychotropic medication increased significantly more often during standard care than during music therapy (p = 0.02). Conclusion: This study shows that six weeks of music therapy reduces agitation disruptiveness and prevents medication increases in people with dementia. The positive trends in relation to agitation frequency and quality of life call for further research with a larger sample. PMID:23621805

  6. Static magnetic therapy does not decrease pain or opioid requirements: a randomized double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Carr, Daniel B; Sarquis, Tony; Miranda, Nelcy; Garcia, Ricardo J; Zarate, Camilo

    2007-02-01

    A growing multibillion dollar industry markets magnetic necklaces, bracelets, bands, insoles, back braces, mattresses, etc., for pain relief, although there is little evidence for their efficacy. We sought to evaluate the effect of magnetic therapy on pain intensity and opioid requirements in patients with postoperative pain. We designed a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. One-hundred-sixty-five patients older than 12 yr of age were randomized to magnetic (n = 81) or sham therapy (n = 84) upon reporting moderate-to-severe pain in the postanesthesia care unit. Devices were placed over the surgical incision and left in place for 2 h. Patients rated their pain intensity on a 0-10 scale every 10 min and received incremental doses of morphine until pain intensity was Magnetic therapy lacks efficacy in controlling acute postoperative pain intensity levels or opioid requirements and should not be recommended for pain relief in this setting.

  7. Trauma management therapy with virtual-reality augmented exposure therapy for combat-related PTSD: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidel, Deborah C; Frueh, B Christopher; Neer, Sandra M; Bowers, Clint A; Trachik, Benjamin; Uhde, Thomas W; Grubaugh, Anouk

    2017-08-23

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) realistically incorporates traumatic cues into exposure therapy and holds promise in the treatment of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In a randomized controlled trial of 92 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans and active duty military personnel with combat-related PTSD, we compared the efficacy of Trauma Management Therapy (TMT; VRET plus a group treatment for anger, depression, and social isolation) to VRET plus a psychoeducation control condition. Efficacy was evaluated at mid- and post-treatment, and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Consistent with our hypothesis, VRET resulted in significant decreases on the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale and the PTSD Checklist-Military version for both groups. Also consistent with our hypothesis, significant decreases in social isolation occurred only for those participants who received the TMT group component. There were significant decreases for depression and anger for both groups, although these occurred after VRET and before group treatment. All treatment gains were maintained six-months later. Although not part of the original hypotheses, sleep was not improved by either intervention and remained problematic. The results support the use of VRET as an efficacious treatment for combat-related PTSD, but suggest that VRET alone does not result in optimal treatment outcomes across domains associated with PTSD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Group therapy task training versus individual task training during inpatient stroke rehabilitation: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Caroline Ie; Outermans, Jacqueline; Ludwig, Ricarda; Brendel, Christiane; Kwakkel, Gert; Hummelsheim, Horst

    2016-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of intensive daily applied progressive group therapy task training with equally dosed individual progressive task training on self-reported mobility for patients with moderate to severe stroke during inpatient rehabilitation. Randomized controlled clinical trial. In-patient rehabilitation center. A total of 73 subacute patients with stroke who were not able to walk without physical assistance at randomisation. Patients were allocated to group therapy task training (GT) or individual task training (IT). Both interventions were intended to improve walking competency and comprised 30 sessions of 90 minutes over six weeks. Primary outcome was the mobility domain of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS-3.0). Secondary outcomes were the other domains of SIS-3.0, standing balance, gait speed, walking distance, stair climbing, fatigue, anxiety and depression. No adverse events were reported in either arm of the trial. There were no significant differences between groups for the SIS mobility domain at the end of the intervention (Z= -0.26, P = 0.79). No significant differences between groups were found in gait speed improvements (GT:0.38 ±0.23; IT:0.26±0.35), any other gait related parameters, or in non-physical outcomes such as depression and fatigue. Inpatient group therapy task training for patients with moderate to severe stroke is safe and equally effective as a dose-matched individual task training therapy. Group therapy task training may be delivered as an alternative to individual therapy or as valuable adjunct to increase time spent in gait-related activities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-hui Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although some studies evaluated the effectiveness of massage therapy for fibromyalgia (FM, the role of massage therapy in the management of FM remained controversial. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence of massage therapy for patients with FM. METHODS: Electronic databases (up to June 2013 were searched to identify relevant studies. The main outcome measures were pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and appraised risk of bias. The risk of bias of eligible studies was assessed based on Cochrane tools. Standardised mean difference (SMD and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated by more conservative random-effects model. And heterogeneity was assessed based on the I(2 statistic. RESULTS: Nine randomized controlled trials involving 404 patients met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analyses showed that massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks significantly improved pain (SMD, 0.62; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.20; p = 0.03, anxiety (SMD, 0.44; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.78; p = 0.01, and depression (SMD, 0.49; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.84; p = 0.005 in patients with FM, but not on sleep disturbance (SMD, 0.19; 95% CI -0.38 to 0.75; p = 0.52. CONCLUSION: Massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks had beneficial immediate effects on improving pain, anxiety, and depression in patients with FM. Massage therapy should be one of the viable complementary and alternative treatments for FM. However, given fewer eligible studies in subgroup meta-analyses and no evidence on follow-up effects, large-scale randomized controlled trials with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings.

  10. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-hui; Wang, Feng-yun; Feng, Chun-qing; Yang, Xia-feng; Sun, Yi-hua

    2014-01-01

    Although some studies evaluated the effectiveness of massage therapy for fibromyalgia (FM), the role of massage therapy in the management of FM remained controversial. The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence of massage therapy for patients with FM. Electronic databases (up to June 2013) were searched to identify relevant studies. The main outcome measures were pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and appraised risk of bias. The risk of bias of eligible studies was assessed based on Cochrane tools. Standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by more conservative random-effects model. And heterogeneity was assessed based on the I(2) statistic. Nine randomized controlled trials involving 404 patients met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analyses showed that massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks significantly improved pain (SMD, 0.62; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.20; p = 0.03), anxiety (SMD, 0.44; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.78; p = 0.01), and depression (SMD, 0.49; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.84; p = 0.005) in patients with FM, but not on sleep disturbance (SMD, 0.19; 95% CI -0.38 to 0.75; p = 0.52). Massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks had beneficial immediate effects on improving pain, anxiety, and depression in patients with FM. Massage therapy should be one of the viable complementary and alternative treatments for FM. However, given fewer eligible studies in subgroup meta-analyses and no evidence on follow-up effects, large-scale randomized controlled trials with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings.

  11. The TOPSHOCK study: effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, Henk; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L

    2011-10-11

    Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The TOPSHOCK study is the first randomised controlled trial that

  12. An adaptive randomized trial of dialectical behavior therapy and cognitive behavior therapy for binge-eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, E Y; Cacioppo, J; Fettich, K; Gallop, R; McCloskey, M S; Olino, T; Zeffiro, T A

    2017-03-01

    Early weak treatment response is one of the few trans-diagnostic, treatment-agnostic predictors of poor outcome following a full treatment course. We sought to improve the outcome of clients with weak initial response to guided self-help cognitive behavior therapy (GSH). One hundred and nine women with binge-eating disorder (BED) or bulimia nervosa (BN) (DSM-IV-TR) received 4 weeks of GSH. Based on their response, they were grouped into: (1) early strong responders who continued GSH (cGSH), and early weak responders randomized to (2) dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), or (3) individual and additional group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT+). Baseline objective binge-eating-day (OBD) frequency was similar between DBT, CBT+ and cGSH. During treatment, OBD frequency reduction was significantly slower in DBT and CBT+ relative to cGSH. Relative to cGSH, OBD frequency was significantly greater at the end of DBT (d = 0.27) and CBT+ (d = 0.31) although these effects were small and within-treatment effects from baseline were large (d = 1.41, 0.95, 1.11, respectively). OBD improvements significantly diminished in all groups during 12 months follow-up but were significantly better sustained in DBT relative to cGSH (d = -0.43). At 6- and 12-month follow-up assessments, DBT, CBT and cGSH did not differ in OBD. Early weak response to GSH may be overcome by additional intensive treatment. Evidence was insufficient to support superiority of either DBT or CBT+ for early weak responders relative to early strong responders in cGSH; both were helpful. Future studies using adaptive designs are needed to assess the use of early response to efficiently deliver care to large heterogeneous client groups.

  13. Metabolic control after years of completing a clinical trial on sensor-augmented pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Carmen; Giménez, Marga; Orois, Aida; Conget, Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    Sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy has been shown to be effective and safe for improving metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in a number of trials. Our objective was to assess glycemic control in a group of T1DM patients on insulin pump or SAP therapy after years of participating in the SWITCH (Sensing With Insulin pump Therapy To Control HbA1c) trial and their return to routine medical monitoring. A retrospective, observational study of 20 patients who participated in the SWITCH trial at our hospital from 2008 to 2010. HbA1c values were compared at the start, during (at the end of the periods with/without SAP use - Sensor On/Sensor Off period respectively - of the cross-over design), and 3 years after study completion. HbA1c values of patients who continued SAP therapy (n=6) or only used insulin pump (n=14) were also compared. Twenty patients with T1DM (44.4±9.3 years, 60% women, baseline HbA1c level 8.43±0.55%) were enrolled into the SWITCH study). Three years after study completion, HbA1c level was 7.79±0.77 in patients on pump alone, with no significant change from the value at the end of the Off period of the study (7.85±0.57%; p=0.961). As compared to the end of the On period, HbA1c worsened less in patients who remained on SAP than in those on pump alone (0.18±0.42 vs. 0.55±0.71%; p=0.171), despite the fact that levels were similar at study start (8.41±0.60 vs. 8.47±0.45; p=0.831) and at the end of the On period (7.24±0.48 vs. 7.38±0.61; p=0.566). Frequency of CGM use in patients who continued SAP therapy was high (61.2% of the time in the last 3 months). Our study suggests that the additional benefit of SAP therapy achieved in a clinical trial may persist in the long term in routine clinical care of patients with T1DM. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Does Quality of Radiation Therapy Predict Outcomes of Multicenter Cooperative Group Trials? A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, Alysa, E-mail: alysa.fairchild@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Straube, William [Advanced Technology Consortium, Imaged-Guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); Followill, David [Radiological Physics Center, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Central review of radiation therapy (RT) delivery within multicenter clinical trials was initiated in the early 1970s in the United States. Early quality assurance publications often focused on metrics related to process, logistics, and timing. Our objective was to review the available evidence supporting correlation of RT quality with clinical outcomes within cooperative group trials. A MEDLINE search was performed to identify multicenter studies that described central subjective assessment of RT protocol compliance (quality). Data abstracted included method of central review, definition of deviations, and clinical outcomes. Seventeen multicenter studies (1980-2012) were identified, plus one Patterns of Care Study. Disease sites were hematologic, head and neck, lung, breast, and pancreas. Between 0 and 97% of treatment plans received an overall grade of acceptable. In 7 trials, failure rates were significantly higher after inadequate versus adequate RT. Five of 9 and 2 of 5 trials reported significantly worse overall and progression-free survival after poor-quality RT, respectively. One reported a significant correlation, and 2 reported nonsignificant trends toward increased toxicity with noncompliant RT. Although more data are required, protocol-compliant RT may decrease failure rates and increase overall survival and likely contributes to the ability of collected data to answer the central trial question.

  15. Does Quality of Radiation Therapy Predict Outcomes of Multicenter Cooperative Group Trials? A Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, Alysa; Straube, William; Laurie, Fran; Followill, David

    2013-01-01

    Central review of radiation therapy (RT) delivery within multicenter clinical trials was initiated in the early 1970s in the United States. Early quality assurance publications often focused on metrics related to process, logistics, and timing. Our objective was to review the available evidence supporting correlation of RT quality with clinical outcomes within cooperative group trials. A MEDLINE search was performed to identify multicenter studies that described central subjective assessment of RT protocol compliance (quality). Data abstracted included method of central review, definition of deviations, and clinical outcomes. Seventeen multicenter studies (1980-2012) were identified, plus one Patterns of Care Study. Disease sites were hematologic, head and neck, lung, breast, and pancreas. Between 0 and 97% of treatment plans received an overall grade of acceptable. In 7 trials, failure rates were significantly higher after inadequate versus adequate RT. Five of 9 and 2 of 5 trials reported significantly worse overall and progression-free survival after poor-quality RT, respectively. One reported a significant correlation, and 2 reported nonsignificant trends toward increased toxicity with noncompliant RT. Although more data are required, protocol-compliant RT may decrease failure rates and increase overall survival and likely contributes to the ability of collected data to answer the central trial question

  16. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for somatization and symptom syndromes: a critical review of controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, K; Swindle, R

    2000-01-01

    Few treatments for somatization have been proven effective. In the past decade, however, clinical trials of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) have been promising. Our aim was to critically review and synthesize the evidence from these trials. A search of the Medline database from 1966 through July 1999 was conducted to identify controlled trials designed to evaluate the efficacy of CBT in patients with somatization or symptom syndromes. A total of 31 controlled trials (29 randomized and 2 nonrandomized) were identified. Twenty-five studies targeted a specific syndrome (e.g. chronic fatigue, irritable bowel, pain) while 6 focused on more general somatization or hypochondriasis. Primary outcome assessment included physical symptoms, psychological distress and functional status in 28, 26 and 19 studies, respectively. Physical symptoms appeared the most responsive: CBT-treated patients improved more than control subjects in 71% of the studies and showed possibly greater improvement (i.e., a trend) in another 11% of the studies. A definite or possible advantage of CBT for reducing psychological distress was demonstrated in only 38 and 8% of studies, and for improving functional status in 47 and 26%. Group therapy and interventions as brief as 5 sessions proved efficacious. Benefits were sustained for up to 12 months. CBT can be an effective treatment for patients with somatization or symptom syndromes. Benefits can occur whether or not psychological distress is ameliorated. Since chronic symptoms are exceptionally common and most studies were conducted in referral populations, the optimal sequencing of CBT in treating primary care patients and the identification of those most likely to accept and respond to therapy should be further evaluated. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Is laser acupuncture an effective complementary therapy for obesity management? A systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Nazli; Khodamoradi, Kajal; Larijani, Bagher; Ayati, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-12-01

    Complementary therapies may increase the success rate of weight loss via a calorie-restricted diet. Acupuncture is a popular complementary therapy for obesity management. To our knowledge, no studies have summarised the effects of laser acupuncture (LA) on obesity. To evaluate the efficacy of LA, in particular with respect to its impact on anthropometric features and appetite in obese adults, by conducting a systematic review of previous clinical trials. We searched PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar electronic databases for papers published through October 2016. All clinical trials in English containing either anthropometric indices or appetite parameters were included. Two reviewers independently examined studies based on a predefined form for data extraction and the Jadad scale for quality assessment in order to minimise bias throughout the evaluation. After screening the papers, seven clinical trials met the criteria and were included in the systematic review. Positive effects of LA therapy were seen in body weight (n=3), body mass index (n=5), waist circumference (n=4), hip circumference (n=3), waist to hip ratio (n=4) and % fat mass (n=3). Appetite parameters were reported in one study, which showed that LA can reduce appetite and increase the sensation of feeling full. Although some studies have indicated beneficial effects for LA on obesity, the lack of evidence with high methodological quality made it impossible to reach a definitive conclusion about the efficacy of LA for obesity management. Further high-quality, randomised, sham-controlled clinical trials with a larger sample size are needed to shed light on the efficacy of LA for obesity management and weight maintenance. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Massage therapy decreases pain and perceived fatigue after long-distance Ironman triathlon: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S Nunes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Question: Can massage therapy reduce pain and perceived fatigue in the quadriceps of athletes after a long-distance triathlon race (Ironman? Design: Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded outcome assessors. Participants: Seventy-four triathlon athletes who completed an entire Ironman triathlon race and whose main complaint was pain in the anterior portion of the thigh. Intervention: The experimental group received massage to the quadriceps, which was aimed at recovery after competition, and the control group rested in sitting. Outcome measures: The outcomes were pain and perceived fatigue, which were reported using a visual analogue scale, and pressure pain threshold at three points over the quadriceps muscle, which was assessed using digital pressure algometry. Results: The experimental group had significantly lower scores than the control group on the visual analogue scale for pain (MD –7 mm, 95% CI –13 to –1 and for perceived fatigue (MD –15 mm, 95% CI –21 to –9. There were no significant between-group differences for the pressure pain threshold at any of the assessment points. Conclusion: Massage therapy was more effective than no intervention on the post-race recovery from pain and perceived fatigue in long-distance triathlon athletes. Trial registration: Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials, RBR-4n2sxr. [Nunes GS, Bender PU, de Menezes FS, Yamashitafuji I, Vargas VZ, Wageck B (2016 Massage therapy decreases pain and perceived fatigue after long-distance Ironman triathlon: a randomised trial. Journal of Physiotherapy 62: 83–87

  19. Effects of psychological therapies in randomized trials and practice-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkham, Michael; Stiles, William B; Connell, Janice; Twigg, Elspeth; Leach, Chris; Lucock, Mike; Mellor-Clark, John; Bower, Peter; King, Michael; Shapiro, David A; Hardy, Gillian E; Greenberg, Leslie; Angus, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Randomized trials of the effects of psychological therapies seek internal validity via homogeneous samples and standardized treatment protocols. In contrast, practice-based studies aim for clinical realism and external validity via heterogeneous samples of clients treated under routine practice conditions. We compared indices of treatment effects in these two types of studies. Using published transformation formulas, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores from five randomized trials of depression (N = 477 clients) were transformed into Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) scores and compared with CORE-OM data collected in four practice-based studies (N = 4,196 clients). Conversely, the practice-based studies' CORE-OM scores were transformed into BDI scores and compared with randomized trial data. Randomized trials showed a modest advantage over practice-based studies in amount of pre-post improvement. This difference was compressed or exaggerated depending on the direction of the transformation but averaged about 12%. There was a similarly sized advantage to randomized trials in rates of reliable and clinically significant improvement (RCSI). The largest difference was yielded by comparisons of effect sizes which suggested an advantage more than twice as large, reflecting narrower pre-treatment distributions in the randomized trials. Outcomes of completed treatments for depression in randomized trials appeared to be modestly greater than those in routine care settings. The size of the difference may be distorted depending on the method for calculating degree of change. Transforming BDI scores into CORE-OM scores and vice versa may be a preferable alternative to effect sizes for comparisons of studies using these measures.

  20. Artemisinin versus Nonartemisinin Combination Therapy for Uncomplicated Malaria: Randomized Clinical Trials from Four Sites in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeka, Adoke; Banek, Kristin; Bakyaita, Nathan; Staedke, Sarah G; Kamya, Moses R; Talisuna, Ambrose; Kironde, Fred; Nsobya, Samuel L; Kilian, Albert; Slater, Madeline; Reingold, Arthur; Rosenthal, Philip J; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Dorsey, Grant

    2005-01-01

    Background Drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum poses a major threat to malaria control. Combination antimalarial therapy including artemisinins has been advocated recently to improve efficacy and limit the spread of resistance, but artemisinins are expensive and relatively untested in highly endemic areas. We compared artemisinin-based and other combination therapies in four districts in Uganda with varying transmission intensity. Methods and Findings We enrolled 2,160 patients aged 6 mo or greater with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Patients were randomized to receive chloroquine (CQ) + sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP); amodiaquine (AQ) + SP; or AQ + artesunate (AS). Primary endpoints were the 28-d risks of parasitological failure either unadjusted or adjusted by genotyping to distinguish recrudescence from new infections. A total of 2,081 patients completed follow-up, of which 1,749 (84%) were under the age of 5 y. The risk of recrudescence after treatment with CQ + SP was high, ranging from 22% to 46% at the four sites. This risk was significantly lower (p AQ + SP or AQ + AS (7%–18% and 4%–12%, respectively). Compared to AQ + SP, AQ + AS was associated with a lower risk of recrudescence but a higher risk of new infection. The overall risk of repeat therapy due to any recurrent infection (recrudescence or new infection) was similar at two sites and significantly higher for AQ + AS at the two highest transmission sites (risk differences = 15% and 16%, pAQ + AS was the most efficacious regimen for preventing recrudescence, but this benefit was outweighed by an increased risk of new infection. Considering all recurrent infections, the efficacy of AQ + SP was at least as efficacious at all sites and superior to AQ + AS at the highest transmission sites. The high endemicity of malaria in Africa may impact on the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy. The registration number for this trial is ISRCTN67520427 (http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/trial

  1. Feasibility of a Trial on Improvisational Music Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Bieleninik, Łucja; Gold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    To conduct generalizable, rigorously designed, adequately powered trials investigating music therapy and other complex interventions, it is essential that study procedures are feasible and acceptable for participants. To date, only limited evidence on feasibility of trial designs and strategies to facilitate study implementation is available in the music therapy literature. Using data from a subsample of a multi-center RCT on improvisational music therapy (IMT) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), this study aims to evaluate feasibility of study procedures, evaluate safety, document concomitant treatment, and report consistency of individuals' trends over time in chosen outcome measures. Children with ASD aged between 4 years, 0 months, and 6 years, 11 months, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: one (low intensity) vs. three weekly IMT sessions (high intensity) for five months vs. standard care. Feasibility was evaluated by examining recruitment, implementation of study conditions, assessment procedures, blinding, and retention; we also evaluated safety, concomitant treatment, and consistency of changes in standardized scales completed by blinded assessors and parents before and 5 months after randomization. Within this subsample (n = 15), recruitment rates, session attendance in the high-intensity condition, and consistency between outcome measures were lower than expected. Session attendance in the low-intensity and control conditions, treatment fidelity, measurement completion, blinding, retention, and safety met a priori thresholds for feasibility. By discussing strategies to improve recruitment and to minimize potential burden on study participants, referrers, and researchers, this study helps build knowledge about designing and implementing trials successfully. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The effects of ear acupressure, massage therapy and no therapy on symptoms of dementia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan; González López-Arza, María Victoria; Varela-Donoso, Enrique; Montanero-Fernández, Jesús; González Sánchez, Blanca; Garrido-Ardila, Elisa María

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of ear acupressure and massage vs. control in the improvement of pain, anxiety and depression in persons diagnosed with dementia. A pilot randomized controlled trial. Residential homes in Extremadura (Spain). A total of 120 elders with dementia institutionalized in residential homes. The participants were randomly allocated, in three groups. Control group - they continued with their routine activities; ear acupressure intervention group - they received ear acupressure treatment (pressure was applied to acupressure points on the ear); and massage therapy intervention group - they received relaxing massage therapy. The variables pain, anxiety and depression were assessed with the Doloplus2, Cornell and Campbell scales. The study was carried out during five months; three months of experimental treatment and two months with no treatment. The assessments were done at baseline, each month during the treatment and at one and two months of follow-up. In the statistical analysis the three groups were compared with each other. A total of 111 participants completed the study. Their aged ranged from 67 to 91 years old and 86 of them (77.4%) were women. The ear acupressure intervention group showed better improvements than the massage therapy intervention group in relation to pain and depression during the treatment period and at one month of follow-up. The best improvement in pain was achieved in the last (3rd) month of ear acupressure treatment (p  massage therapy showed better results than the control group in relation to pain, anxiety and depression. However, ear acupressure achieved more improvements. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Tilt Table Therapies for Patients with Severe Disorders of Consciousness: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewer, Carmen; Luther, Marianne; Koenig, Eberhard; Müller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    One major aim of the neurological rehabilitation of patients with severe disorders of consciousness (DOC) is to enhance patients' arousal and ability to communicate. Mobilization into a standing position by means of a tilt table has been shown to improve their arousal and awareness. However, due to the frequent occurrence of syncopes on a tilt table, it is easier to accomplish verticalization using a tilt table with an integrated stepping device. The objective of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a tilt table therapy with or without an integrated stepping device on the level of consciousness. A total of 50 participants in vegetative or minimally conscious states 4 weeks to 6 month after injury were treated with verticalization during this randomized controlled trial. Interventions involved ten 1-hour sessions of the specific treatment over a 3-week period. Blinded assessors made measurements before and after the intervention period, as well as after a 3-week follow-up period. The coma recovery scale-revised (CRS-R) showed an improvement by a median of 2 points for the group receiving tilt table with integrated stepping (Erigo). The rate of recovery of the group receiving the conventional tilt table therapy significantly increased by 5 points during treatment and by an additional 2 points during the 3-week follow-up period. Changes in spasticity did not significantly differ between the two intervention groups. Compared to the conventional tilt table, the tilt table with integrated stepping device failed to have any additional benefit for DOC patients. Verticalization itself seems to be beneficial though and should be administered to patients in DOC in early rehabilitation. Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials Ltd (www.controlled-trials.com), identifier number ISRCTN72853718.

  4. Tilt Table Therapies for Patients with Severe Disorders of Consciousness: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Krewer

    Full Text Available One major aim of the neurological rehabilitation of patients with severe disorders of consciousness (DOC is to enhance patients' arousal and ability to communicate. Mobilization into a standing position by means of a tilt table has been shown to improve their arousal and awareness. However, due to the frequent occurrence of syncopes on a tilt table, it is easier to accomplish verticalization using a tilt table with an integrated stepping device. The objective of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a tilt table therapy with or without an integrated stepping device on the level of consciousness. A total of 50 participants in vegetative or minimally conscious states 4 weeks to 6 month after injury were treated with verticalization during this randomized controlled trial. Interventions involved ten 1-hour sessions of the specific treatment over a 3-week period. Blinded assessors made measurements before and after the intervention period, as well as after a 3-week follow-up period. The coma recovery scale-revised (CRS-R showed an improvement by a median of 2 points for the group receiving tilt table with integrated stepping (Erigo. The rate of recovery of the group receiving the conventional tilt table therapy significantly increased by 5 points during treatment and by an additional 2 points during the 3-week follow-up period. Changes in spasticity did not significantly differ between the two intervention groups. Compared to the conventional tilt table, the tilt table with integrated stepping device failed to have any additional benefit for DOC patients. Verticalization itself seems to be beneficial though and should be administered to patients in DOC in early rehabilitation. Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials Ltd (www.controlled-trials.com, identifier number ISRCTN72853718.

  5. Occupational therapy discharge planning for older adults: A protocol for a randomised trial and economic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wales Kylie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decreased functional ability is common in older adults after hospitalisation. Lower levels of functional ability increase the risk of hospital readmission and nursing care facility admission. Discharge planning across the hospital and community interface is suggested to increase functional ability and decrease hospital length of stay and hospital readmission. However evidence is limited and the benefits of occupational therapists providing this service has not been investigated. This randomised trial will investigate the clinical effectiveness of a discharge planning program in reducing functional difficulties of older adults post-discharge. This trial will also examine the cost of the intervention and cost effectiveness when compared to in-hospital discharge planning. Methods/design 400 participants admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited. Participants will be 70 years of age and over, have no significant cognitive impairment and be independently mobile at discharge. This study protocol was approved by the ethics committee of Ryde Rehabilitation Human Research Ethics Committee, Western Sydney Local Health District (Westmead Campus Human Research Ethics Committee, Alfred Health Human Research ethics committee for the randomised trial and NSW Population and Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee for data linkage. Participants will provide informed written consent. Participants will be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. The intervention group will receive discharge planning therapies primarily within their home environment while the control group will receive an in-hospital consultation, both provided by trained occupational therapists. Primary outcome measures will be the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale (NEADL and the Late Life Disability Index (LLDI which will measure functional independence, and participation and limitation in daily life activities

  6. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disordered Youth: A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Child and Family Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Philip C.; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Gosch, Elizabeth; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Suveg, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial compared the relative efficacy of individual (child) cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT), family cognitive-behavioral therapy (FCBT), and a family-based education/support/attention (FESA) active control for treating anxiety disordered youth ages 7-14 years (M = 10.27). Youth (N = 161; 44% female; 85% Caucasian, 9%…

  7. One-year evaluation of the effect of physical therapy for masticatory muscle pain : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craane, B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Stappaerts, K.; De Laat, A.

    Physical therapy is widely used to decrease pain and restore function in patients suffering from masticatory muscle pain. Controlled studies on its efficacy are scarce. This study evaluated the 1-year effect of a 6-week physical therapy programme in a single blind, randomized, controlled trial.

  8. Effects of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, J C; Hansen, J L; Simonsen, S; Simonsen, E; Gluud, C

    2012-07-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetime at tremendous suffering and cost. Cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy are treatment options, but their effects have only been limitedly compared in systematic reviews. Using Cochrane systematic review methodology we compared the benefits and harm of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for major depressive disorder. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, Psychlit, PsycInfo, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2010. Continuous outcome measures were assessed by mean difference and dichotomous outcomes by odds ratio. We conducted trial sequential analysis to control for random errors. We included seven trials randomizing 741 participants. All trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis of the four trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression showed no significant difference between the two interventions [mean difference -1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.35 to 0.32]. Meta-analysis of the five trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Beck Depression Inventory showed comparable results (mean difference -1.29, 95% CI -2.73 to 0.14). Trial sequential analysis indicated that more data are needed to definitively settle the question of a differential effect. None of the included trial reported on adverse events. Randomized trials with low risk of bias and low risk of random errors are needed, although the effects of cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy do not seem to differ significantly regarding depressive symptoms. Future trials should report on adverse events.

  9. Occupational therapy for stroke patients not admitted to hospital: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M F; Gladman, J R; Lincoln, N B; Siemonsma, P; Whiteley, T

    1999-07-24

    Patients who have a stroke are not always admitted to hospital, and 22-60% remain in the community, frequently without coordinated rehabilitation. We aimed to assess the efficacy of an occupational therapy intervention for patients with stroke who were not admitted to hospital. In this single-blind randomised controlled trial, consecutive stroke patients on a UK community register in Nottingham and Derbyshire were allocated randomly to up to 5 months of occupational therapy at home or to no intervention (control group) 1 month after their stroke. The aim of the occupational therapy was to encourage independence in personal and instrumental activities of daily living. Patients were assessed on outcome measures at baseline (before randomisation) and at 6 months. The primary outcome measure was the score on the extended activities of daily living (EADL) scale at 6 months. Other outcome measures included the Barthel index, the general health questionnaire 28, the carer strain index, and the London handicap scale. All assessments were done by an independent assessor who was unaware of treatment allocation. The analysis included only data from completed questionnaires. 185 patients were included: 94 in the occupational therapy group and 91 in the control group. 22 patients were not assessed at 6 months. At follow-up, patients who had occupational therapy had significantly higher median scores than the controls on: the EADL scale (16 vs 12, pstroke who were not admitted to hospital.

  10. Ear Acupuncture Therapy for Masticatory Myofascial and Temporomandibular Pain: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ambrosio Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ear acupuncture works by reducing painful sensations with analgesic effect through microsystem therapy and has been demonstrated to be as effective as conventional therapies in the control of facial pain. This clinical trial aimed to evaluate the adjuvant action of auricular acupuncture through an observation of the evolution of temporomandibular and masticatory myofascial symptoms in two groups defined by the therapies elected: auricular acupuncture associated with occlusal splint (study and the use of the occlusal splint plate alone (control. We have selected 20 patients, who were randomly allocated into two groups of ten individuals. Symptoms were evaluated in five different moments, every seven days. We analyzed the orofacial muscle and joint palpation in order to measure the intensity of the experienced pain. Both groups showed a statistically significant decrease in muscle and joint symptoms (p<0.05. However, comparisons between the groups showed an expressive and significant reduction of symptomatology in the study group (p<0.05 already on the first week of therapy. According to the results, to the methodological criteria developed and statistical analysis applied, the conclusion is that auricular acupuncture therapy has synergistic action on conventional occlusal splint treatment. It was demonstrated to be effective in the reduction of symptoms in the short term.

  11. Topical diclofenac therapy for osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhen-Han; Zeng, Chao; Yang, Ye; Li, Yu-Sheng; Wei, Jie; Yang, Tuo; Li, Hui; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical diclofenac therapy for osteoarthritis (OA). A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted. A comprehensive literature search, covering the databases of Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE, was conducted in September 2014 to identify the randomized controlled trials which adopted the topical diclofenac therapy for OA. A total of nine papers were included in this meta-analysis. Topical diclofenac appears to be effective in both pain relief (standard mean differences (SMD) = 0.40; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 0.62; P = 0.0003) and function improvement (SMD = 0.23; 95 % CI 0.03 to 0.43; P = 0.03) when compared with the control group. The sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis showed that the result of pain intensity was stable and reliable, while the result of physical function improvement was vague. With respect to safety, topical diclofenac demonstrated a higher incidence of adverse events such as dry skin, rash, dermatitis, neck pain, and withdrawal. Topical diclofenac is effective in pain relief as a treatment of OA. It may also have a potential effect in function improvement, which needs further studies to be explored. Although, some adverse effects were observed in the application of topical diclofenac, none of them was serious.

  12. Effects of horticultural therapy on elderly' health: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hui Yu; Ho, Roger Chun-Man; Mahendran, Rathi; Ng, Kheng Siang; Tam, Wilson Wai-San; Rawtaer, Iris; Tan, Chay Hoon; Larbi, Anis; Feng, Lei; Sia, Angelia; Ng, Maxel Kian-Wee; Gan, Goh Lee; Kua, Ee Heok

    2017-08-29

    Due to a rapidly ageing population in the world, it is increasingly pertinent to promote successful ageing strategies which are cost-effective, easily accessible, and more likely to be acceptable to the elderly. Past research associates exposure to natural environments and horticultural therapy (HT) with positive psychological, social and physical health benefits. This Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) is designed to evaluate the efficacy of HT in promoting Asian elderly' mental health, cognitive functioning and physical health. 70 elderly participants aged 60 to 85 years old will be randomized to participate in either the active horticultural therapy group or be in the waitlist control. Sessions will be weekly for 12 weeks, and monthly for 3 months. Mental health will be assessed through self-reports of depressive and anxiety symptomatology, life satisfaction, social connectedness and psychological well-being, collaborated with immunological markers. Outcome measures of cognitive functioning and physical health include neuropsychological tests of cognitive function and basic health screening. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 3 months and 6 months post-intervention. This RCT comprehensively investigates the efficacy of a non-invasive intervention, HT, in enhancing mental health, cognitive functioning and physical health. The results have tremendous potential for supporting future successful ageing programs and applicability to larger populations. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02495194 . Trial registration date: July 13, 2015. Retrospectively registered.

  13. Mirror therapy in children with hemiparesis: a randomized observer-blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchez, Roselyn; Jequier Gygax, Marine; Roches, Sylvie; Fluss, Joel; Jacquier, David; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Grunt, Sebastian; Newman, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of mirror therapy in children with hemiparesis. The design was an observer-blinded parallel-group randomized controlled trial (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number 48748291). Randomization was computer-generated, 1:1 allocation to mirror therapy or comparison groups. The settings were home-based intervention and tertiary centre assessments. Participants were 90 children with hemiparesis aged 7 to 17 years. Intervention was 15 minutes per day of simultaneous arm training, 5 days a week, for 5 weeks. The mirror therapy group used a mirror; those in the comparison group looked at their paretic limb. Assessments comprised measures of upper limb strength, function (Melbourne Assessment 2), daily performance (ABILHAND-Kids), and sensory function at weeks 0 (T0 ), 5 (T1 ), and 10 (T2 ). There were no significant differences in outcomes and their progression over time between the mirror therapy and comparison groups. Post-hoc intention-to-treat analyses showed significant improvements in both groups for grasp strength (T0 -T1 +12.6%), pinch strength (T0 -T2 +9.1%), upper limb function in terms of accuracy (T0 -T2 +2.7%) and fluency (T0 -T2 +5.0%), as well as daily performance (T0 -T2 +16.6%). Per protocol analyses showed additional improvements in dexterity (T0 -T2 +4.0%). The use of the mirror illusion during therapy had no significant effect on treatment outcomes. However, 5 weeks of daily simultaneous arm training significantly improved paretic upper limb strength, function, and daily use. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Spa therapy in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a large randomised multicentre trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestier, R; Desfour, H; Tessier, J-M; Françon, A; Foote, A M; Genty, C; Rolland, C; Roques, C-F; Bosson, J-L

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether spa therapy, plus home exercises and usual medical treatment provides any benefit over exercises and usual treatment, in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Methods Large multicentre randomised prospective clinical trial of patients with knee osteoarthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria, attending French spa resorts as outpatients between June 2006 and April 2007. Zelen randomisation was used so patients were ignorant of the other group and spa personnel were not told which patients were participating. The main endpoint criteria were patient self-assessed. All patients continued usual treatments and performed daily standardised home exercises. The spa therapy group also received 18 days of spa therapy (massages, showers, mud and pool sessions). Main Endpoint The number of patients achieving minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) at 6 months, defined as ≥19.9 mm on the visual analogue pain scale and/or ≥9.1 points in a normalised Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index function score and no knee surgery. Results The intention to treat analysis included 187 controls and 195 spa therapy patients. At 6 months, 99/195 (50.8%) spa group patients had MCII and 68/187 (36.4%) controls (χ2=8.05; df=1; p=0.005). However, no improvement in quality of life (Short Form 36) or patient acceptable symptom state was observed at 6 months. Conclusion For patients with knee osteoarthritis a 3-week course of spa therapy together with home exercises and usual pharmacological treatments offers benefit after 6 months compared with exercises and usual treatment alone, and is well tolerated. Trial registration number NCT00348777. PMID:19734131

  15. Summary of major radiation fractionation and chemotherapy trials for organ preservation therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, James T; Greene, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    To review radiation fractionation and chemotherapy trials for patients undergoing organ preservation therapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Radiation therapy fractionation and chemotherapy trial results as well as historical evidence are systematically reviewed. Trial results, which involve nearly 30,000 patients, have been interpreted, compared, and presented in a structured manner to demonstrate the changing approaches in treatment over the years from the 1960s to the present. The review includes data from the split-course radiation therapy era, meta-analyses of chemotherapy and radiation therapy fractionation trials, cetuximab trials, "triple-drug trials," and modern trials of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This summary will be useful to clinicians making treatment decisions today and to investigators designing trials in the future. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative effectiveness of injection therapies in lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Thøger Persson; Bartels, Else Marie; Ellingsen, Torkell; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Fredberg, Ulrich; Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin

    2013-06-01

    Injection therapy with glucocorticoids has been used since the 1950s as a treatment strategy for lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow). Lately, several novel injection therapies have become available. To assess the comparative effectiveness and safety of injection therapies in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials comparing different injection therapies for lateral epicondylitis were included provided they contained data for change in pain intensity (primary outcome). Trials were assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Network (random effects) meta-analysis was applied to combine direct and indirect evidence within and across trial data using the final end point reported in the trials, and results for the arm-based network analyses are reported as standardized mean differences (SMDs). Seventeen trials (1381 participants; 3 [18%] at low risk of bias) assessing injection with 8 different treatments-glucocorticoid (10 trials), botulinum toxin (4 trials), autologous blood (3 trials), platelet-rich plasma (2 trials), and polidocanol, glycosaminoglycan, prolotherapy, and hyaluronic acid (1 trial each)-were included. Pooled results (SMD [95% confidence interval]) showed that beyond 8 weeks, glucocorticoid injection was no more effective than placebo (-0.04 [-0.45 to 0.35]), but only 1 trial (which did not include a placebo arm) was at low risk of bias. Although botulinum toxin showed marginal benefit (-0.50 [-0.91 to -0.08]), it caused temporary paresis of finger extension, and all trials were at high risk of bias. Both autologous blood (-1.43 [-2.15 to -0.71]) and platelet-rich plasma (-1.13 [-1.77 to -0.49]) were also statistically superior to placebo, but only 1 trial was at low risk of bias. Prolotherapy (-2.71 [-4.60 to -0.82]) and hyaluronic acid (-5.58 [-6.35 to -4.82]) were both more efficacious than placebo, whereas polidocanol (0.39 [-0.42 to 1.20]) and glycosaminoglycan (-0.32 [-1.02 to 0

  17. Clinical Trials of Immunogene Therapy for Spontaneous Tumors in Companion Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Claudio Glikin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the important progress obtained in the treatment of some pets’ malignancies, new treatments need to be developed. Being critical in cancer control and progression, the immune system’s appropriate modulation may provide effective therapeutic options. In this review we summarize the outcomes of published immunogene therapy veterinary clinical trials reported by many research centers. A variety of tumors such as canine melanoma, soft tissue sarcomas, osteosarcoma and lymphoma, feline fibrosarcoma, and equine melanoma were subjected to different treatment approaches. Both viral and mainly nonviral vectors were used to deliver gene products as cytokines, xenogeneic tumor associated antigens, specific ligands, and proapoptotic regulatory factors. In some cases autologous, allogenic, or xenogeneic transgenic cytokine producing cells were assayed. In general terms, minor or no adverse collateral effects appeared during this kind of therapies and treated patients usually displayed a better course of the disease (longer survival, delayed or suppressed recurrence or metastatic spread, and improvement of the quality of life. This suggests the utility of these methodologies as standard adjuvant treatments. The encouraging outcomes obtained in companion animals support their ready application in veterinary clinical oncology and serve as preclinical proof of concept and safety assay for future human gene therapy trials.

  18. Stem cell therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus: a review of recent clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couri Carlos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell therapy is one of the most promising treatments for the near future. It is expected that this kind of therapy can ameliorate or even reverse some diseases. With regard to type 1 diabetes, studies analyzing the therapeutic effects of stem cells in humans began in 2003 in the Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto - SP USP, Brazil, and since then other centers in different countries started to randomize patients in their clinical trials. Herein we summarize recent data about beta cell regeneration, different ways of immune intervention and what is being employed in type 1 diabetic patients with regard to stem cell repertoire to promote regeneration and/or preservation of beta cell mass. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT was a 7-year longitudinal study that demonstrated the importance of the intensive insulin therapy when compared to conventional treatment in the development of chronic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This study also demonstrated another important issue: there is a reverse relationship between C-peptide levels (endogenous indicator of insulin secretion chronic complications - that is, the higher the C-peptide levels, the lower the incidence of nephropathy, retinopathy and hypoglycemia. From such data, beta cell preservation has become an additional target in the management of T1DM 1.

  19. TU-G-BRB-05: Panel Discussion: Clinical Trials in Proton and Ion Therapy - Are We Ready?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R.

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  20. Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Therapy in Female Adolescents With Bulimia Nervosa: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefini, Annette; Salzer, Simone; Reich, Günter; Horn, Hildegard; Winkelmann, Klaus; Bents, Hinrich; Rutz, Ursula; Frost, Ulrike; von Boetticher, Antje; Ruhl, Uwe; Specht, Nicole; Kronmüller, Klaus-Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The authors compared cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) in female adolescents. In this randomized controlled trial, 81 female adolescents with BN or partial BN according to the DSM-IV received a mean of 36.6 sessions of manualized disorder-oriented PDT or CBT. Trained psychologists blinded to treatment condition administered the outcome measures at baseline, during treatment, at the end of treatment, and 12 months after treatment. The primary outcome was the rate of remission, defined as a lack of DSM-IV diagnosis for BN or partial BN at the end of therapy. Several secondary outcome measures were evaluated. The remission rates for CBT and PDT were 33.3% and 31.0%, respectively, with no significant differences between them (odds ratio [OR] = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.35-2.28, p = .82). The within-group effect sizes were h = 1.22 for CBT and h = 1.18 for PDT. Significant improvements in all secondary outcome measures were found for both CBT (d = 0.51-0.82) and PDT (d = 0.24-1.10). The improvements remained stable at the 12-month follow-up in both groups. There were small between-group effect sizes for binge eating (d = 0.23) and purging (d = 0.26) in favor of CBT and for eating concern (d = -0.35) in favor of PDT. CBT and PDT were effective in promoting recovery from BN in female adolescents. The rates of remission for both therapies were similar to those in other studies evaluating CBT. This trial identified differences with small effects in binge eating, purging, and eating concern. Clinical trial registration information-Treating Bulimia Nervosa in Female Adolescents With Either Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or Psychodynamic Therapy (PDT). http://isrctn.com/; ISRCTN14806095. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Graff, Maud J L; Hendriks, Jan C M; Veenhuizen, Yvonne; Munneke, Marten; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W

    2014-06-01

    There is insufficient evidence to support use of occupational therapy interventions for patients with Parkinson's disease. We aimed to assess the efficacy of occupational therapy in improving daily activities of patients with Parkinson's disease. We did a multicentre, assessor-masked, randomised controlled clinical trial in ten hospitals in nine Dutch regional networks of specialised health-care professionals (ParkinsonNet), with assessment at 3 months and 6 months. Patients with Parkinson's disease with self-reported difficulties in daily activities were included, along with their primary caregivers. Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to the intervention or control group by a computer-generated minimisation algorithm. The intervention consisted of 10 weeks of home-based occupational therapy according to national practice guidelines; control individuals received usual care with no occupational therapy. The primary outcome was self-perceived performance in daily activities at 3 months, assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (score 1-10). Data were analysed using linear mixed models for repeated measures (intention-to-treat principle). Assessors monitored safety by asking patients about any unusual health events during the preceding 3 months. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01336127. Between April 14, 2011, and Nov 2, 2012, 191 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=124) or the control group (n=67). 117 (94%) of 124 patients in the intervention group and 63 (94%) of 67 in the control group had a participating caregiver. At baseline, the median score on the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was 4·3 (IQR 3·5-5·0) in the intervention group and 4·4 (3·8-5·0) in the control group. At 3 months, these scores were 5·8 (5·0-6·4) and 4·6 (4·6-6·6), respectively. The adjusted mean difference in score between groups at 3 months was in favour of the intervention group (1·2; 95% CI 0·8-1·6

  2. Effectiveness of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Graff, Maud J; Borm, George F; Adang, Eddy M M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Munneke, Marten

    2013-02-02

    Occupational therapists may have an added value in the care of patients with Parkinson's disease whose daily functioning is compromised, as well as for their immediate caregivers. Evidence for this added value is inconclusive due to a lack of rigorous studies. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the (cost) effectiveness of occupational therapy in improving daily functioning of patients with Parkinson's disease. A multicenter, assessor-blinded, two-armed randomized controlled clinical trial will be conducted, with evaluations at three and six months. One hundred ninety-two home-dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease and with an occupational therapy indication will be assigned to the experimental group or to the control group (2:1). Patients and their caregivers in the experimental group will receive ten weeks of home-based occupational therapy according to recent Dutch guidelines. The intervention will be delivered by occupational therapists who have been specifically trained to treat patients according to these guidelines. Participants in the control group will not receive occupational therapy during the study period. The primary outcome for the patient is self-perceived daily functioning at three months, assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Secondary patient-related outcomes include: objective performance of daily activities, self-perceived satisfaction with performance in daily activities, participation, impact of fatigue, proactive coping skills, health-related quality of life, overall quality of life, health-related costs, and effectiveness at six months. All outcomes at the caregiver level will be secondary and will include self-perceived burden of care, objective burden of care, proactive coping skills, overall quality of life, and care-related costs. Effectiveness will be evaluated using a covariance analysis of the difference in outcome at three months. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will be conducted, as

  3. Future trials of endovascular mechanical recanalisation therapy in acute ischemic stroke patients - a position paper endorsed by ESMINT and ESNR : part II: methodology of future trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehler, Jens; Söderman, Michael; Turjman, Francis; White, Philip M; Bakke, Søren Jacob; Mangiafico, Salvatore; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Muto, Mario; Cognard, Christophe; Gralla, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Based on current data and experience, the joint working group of the European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT) and the European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR) make suggestions on trial design and conduct aimed to investigate therapeutic effects of mechanical thrombectomy (MT). We anticipate that this roadmap will facilitate the setting up and conduct of successful trials in close collaboration with our neighbouring disciplines.

  4. Future trials of endovascular mechanical recanalisation therapy in acute ischemic stroke patients - A position paper endorsed by ESMINT and ESNR. Pt. 2. Methodology of future trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiehler, Jens [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Soederman, Michael [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Turjman, Francis [Hopital neurologique, Centre de Neurosciences Cognitives, Department of Neuroradiology, Lyon (France); White, Philip M. [University of Edinburgh, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Bakke, Soeren Jacob [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Oslo (Norway); Mangiafico, Salvatore [University Hospital Careggi, Interventional Neuroradiology Unit, Florence (Italy); Kummer, Ruediger von [University of Dresden, Department of Neuroradiology, Dresden (Germany); Muto, Mario [University of Naples, Department of Neuroradiology, Naples (Italy); Cognard, Christophe [Hopital Purpan, Service de Neuroradiologie, Toulouse (France); Gralla, Jan [Inselspital Bern, Department of Neuroradiology, Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    Based on current data and experience, the joint working group of the European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT) and the European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR) make suggestions on trial design and conduct aimed to investigate therapeutic effects of mechanical thrombectomy (MT). We anticipate that this roadmap will facilitate the setting up and conduct of successful trials in close collaboration with our neighbouring disciplines. (orig.)

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of 7-Day Intensive and Standard Weekly Cognitive Therapy for PTSD and Emotion-Focused Supportive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Anke; Hackmann, Ann; Grey, Nick; Wild, Jennifer; Liness, Sheena; Albert, Idit; Deale, Alicia; Stott, Richard; Clark, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are usually delivered once or twice weekly over several months. It is unclear whether they can be successfully delivered over a shorter period of time. This clinical trial had two goals, (1) to investigate the acceptability and efficacy of a 7-day intensive version of cognitive therapy for PTSD, and (2) to investigate whether cognitive therapy has specific treatment effects by comparing intensive and standard weekly cognitive therapy with an equally credible alternative treatment. Method Patients with chronic PTSD (N=121) were randomly allocated to 7-day intensive or standard 3-month weekly cognitive therapy for PTSD, 3-month weekly emotion-focused supportive therapy, or a 14-week waitlist condition. Primary outcomes were PTSD symptoms and diagnosis as assessed by independent assessors and self-report. Secondary outcomes were disability, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Measures were taken at initial assessment, 6 weeks and 14 weeks (post-treatment/wait). For groups receiving treatment, measures were also taken at 3 weeks, and follow-ups at 27 and 40 weeks after randomization. All analyses were intent-to-treat. Results At post-treatment/wait assessment, 73%, 77%, 43%, 7% of the intensive cognitive therapy, standard cognitive therapy, supportive therapy, and waitlist groups, respectively, had recovered from PTSD. All treatments were well tolerated and were superior to waitlist on all outcome measures, with the exception of no difference between supportive therapy and waitlist on quality of life. For primary outcomes, disability and general anxiety, intensive and standard cognitive therapy were superior to supportive therapy. Intensive cognitive therapy achieved faster symptom reduction and comparable overall outcomes to standard cognitive therapy. Conclusions Cognitive therapy for PTSD delivered intensively over little more than a week is as effective as cognitive therapy delivered

  6. Is High Dose Therapy Superior to Conventional Dose Therapy as Initial Treatment for Relapsed Germ Cell Tumors? The TIGER Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren R. Feldman, Robert Huddart, Emma Hall, Jörg Beyer, Thomas Powles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic germ cell tumours (GCTs are usually cured with cisplatin based chemotherapy and standard treatment algorithms are established. However when this treatment fails and the disease relapses, standard treatment is much more uncertain. Both conventional dose therapy (CDT and high dose therapy (HDT are widely used, due to the lack of conclusive data supporting one specific approach. A recent retrospective analysis focusing on this population suggested a significant benefit for HDT. Retrospective analyses are prone to bias, and therefore while this data is provocative it is by no mean conclusive. For this reason the international community is supporting a prospective randomised trial in this area comparing CDT(TIP with sequential HDT (TICE. The planned open labelled randomised phase III study (TIGER is due to open in 2011 and will recruit 390 patients to detect a 13% difference in 2 year progression free survival (primary endpoint. It is hoped that this large study will conclusively resolve the uncertainty which currently exists.

  7. The Effect of Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Insomnia due to Methadone Maintenance Therapy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robabeh Soleimani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep disturbance is a common complaint of patients undergoing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT. There are limited studies about the effect of different treatments on insomnia due to MMT. In this study, we evaluated the effect of cognitive-behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBTI on sleep disorders in patients undergoing MMT. Methods: Twenty-two patients with insomnia due to MMT (aged 18-60 years participated in this randomized double-blind clinical trial. The intervention group received CBTI from a clinical psychologist for 8 weeks, whereas the control group received behavioral placebo therapy (BPT. The duration of individual sessions was 45 minutes, which was conducted once a week. The primary outcome was sleep disturbance assessed with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 19. Results: Eleven patients were assigned to each group. Two groups were matched according to demographic characteristics (age, marital status, education, and daily methadone doses. Although PSQI score was significantly reduced during weeks 5 and 8 after both interventions, there was a significant difference in intervention versus time interaction (P<0.02. The effects of CBTI versus placebo were significantly different (P<0.001. The time course was also significant (P<0.001. Conclusion: This study showed that CBTI is more effective than BPT in overall sleep quality. We recommend further studies, with a larger sample, on CBTI in patients undergoing MMT.

  8. Randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of pulsed signal therapy in dogs with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Meghan O; Gordon-Evans, Wanda J; Knap, Kim E; Evans, Richard B

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of pulsed signal therapy (PST) in reducing pain and increasing function in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) using a randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trial. Randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial. Adult dogs (n = 60) with moderate-to-severe clinical signs of OA. Dogs were randomized by age into 2 groups: dogs ≥ 9 years and dogs Goniometry and gait analysis were performed, and the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) questionnaire was given to the owners to fill out without supervision. Outcome measures were repeated at the end of treatment (Day 11) and 6 weeks after beginning treatment (Day 42). The PST group performed significantly better than the control group as measured by the CBPI Severity and Interference scores (P Veterinary Surgeons.

  9. Multimodal manual therapy vs. pharmacological care for management of tension type headache: A meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Jiménez, Juan A; Lozano-López, Cristina; Angulo-Díaz-Parreño, Santiago; Rodríguez-Fernández, Ángel L; De-la-Hoz-Aizpurua, Jose L; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar

    2015-12-01

    Manual therapies are generally requested by patients with tension type headache. To compare the efficacy of multimodal manual therapy vs. pharmacological care for the management of tension type headache pain by conducting a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, EBSCO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Collaboration Trials Register, PEDro and SCOPUS were searched from their inception until June 2014. All randomized controlled trials comparing any manual therapy vs. medication care for treating tension type headache adults were included. Data were extracted and methodological quality assessed independently by two reviewers. We pooled headache frequency as the main outcome and also intensity and duration. The weighted mean difference between manual therapy and pharmacological care was used to determine effect sizes. Five randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled analyses found that manual therapies were more effective than pharmacological care in reducing frequency (weighted mean difference -0.8036, 95% confidence interval -1.66 to -0.44; three trials), intensity (weighted mean difference -0.5974, 95% confidence interval -0.8875 to -0.3073; five trials) and duration (weighted mean difference -0.5558, 95% confidence interval -0.9124 to -0.1992; three trials) of the headache immediately after treatment. No differences were found at longer follow-up for headache intensity (weighted mean difference -0.3498, 95% confidence interval -1.106 to 0.407; three trials). Manual therapies were associated with moderate effectiveness at short term, but similar effectiveness at longer follow-up for reducing headache frequency, intensity and duration in tension type headache than pharmacological medical drug care. However, due to the heterogeneity of the interventions, these results should be considered with caution at this stage. © International Headache

  10. Wet cupping therapy for treatment of herpes zoster: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Zhu, Chenjun; Liu, Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Wet cupping is a traditional Chinese medicine therapy commonly used in treating herpes zoster in China, and clinical studies have shown that wet cupping may have beneficial effect on herpes zoster compared with Western medication. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on wet cupping for herpes zoster. We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library (Issue 3, 2008), China Network Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Fulltext Database VIP, and Wan Fang Database. All searches ended in February 2009. Two authors extracted data and assessed the trials' quality independently. RevMan 5.0.18 software (The Cochrane Collaboration, The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark) was used for data analysis with effect estimate presented as relative risk (RR) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Eight RCTs involving 651 patients were included, and the methodological quality of trials was generally fair in terms of randomization, blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. Meta-analyses showed wet cupping was superior to medication in the number of cured patients (RR 2.49, 95% CI 1.91 to 3.24, P cupping plus medication was significantly better than medication alone on number of cured patients (RR 1.93, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.04, P = .005) but demonstrated no difference in symptom improvement (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.08, P = .98). There were no serious adverse effects related to wet cupping therapy in the included trials. Wet cupping appears to be effective in the treatment of herpes zoster. However, further large, rigorously designed

  11. Dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents with repeated suicidal and self-harming behavior: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlum, Lars; Tørmoen, Anita J; Ramberg, Maria; Haga, Egil; Diep, Lien M; Laberg, Stine; Larsson, Bo S; Stanley, Barbara H; Miller, Alec L; Sund, Anne M; Grøholt, Berit

    2014-10-01

    We examined whether a shortened form of dialectical behavior therapy, dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents (DBT-A) is more effective than enhanced usual care (EUC) to reduce self-harm in adolescents. This was a randomized study of 77 adolescents with recent and repetitive self-harm treated at community child and adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinics who were randomly allocated to either DBT-A or EUC. Assessments of self-harm, suicidal ideation, depression, hopelessness, and symptoms of borderline personality disorder were made at baseline and after 9, 15, and 19 weeks (end of trial period), and frequency of hospitalizations and emergency department visits over the trial period were recorded. Treatment retention was generally good in both treatment conditions, and the use of emergency services was low. DBT-A was superior to EUC in reducing self-harm, suicidal ideation, and depressive symptoms. Effect sizes were large for treatment outcomes in patients who received DBT-A, whereas effect sizes were small for outcomes in patients receiving EUC. Total number of treatment contacts was found to be a partial mediator of the association between treatment and changes in the severity of suicidal ideation, whereas no mediation effects were found on the other outcomes or for total treatment time. DBT-A may be an effective intervention to reduce self-harm, suicidal ideation, and depression in adolescents with repetitive self-harming behavior. Clinical trial registration information-Treatment for Adolescents With Deliberate Self Harm; http://ClinicalTrials.gov/; NCT00675129. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhaled nitric oxide for the adjunctive therapy of severe malaria: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavery James V

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe malaria remains a major cause of global morbidity and mortality. Despite the use of potent anti-parasitic agents, the mortality rate in severe malaria remains high. Adjunctive therapies that target the underlying pathophysiology of severe malaria may further reduce morbidity and mortality. Endothelial activation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of severe malaria, of which angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2 has recently been shown to function as a key regulator. Nitric oxide (NO is a major inhibitor of Ang-2 release from endothelium and has been shown to decrease endothelial inflammation and reduce the adhesion of parasitized erythrocytes. Low-flow inhaled nitric oxide (iNO gas is a US FDA-approved treatment for hypoxic respiratory failure in neonates. Methods/Design This prospective, parallel arm, randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded clinical trial compares adjunctive continuous inhaled nitric oxide at 80 ppm to placebo (both arms receiving standard anti-malarial therapy, among Ugandan children aged 1-10 years of age with severe malaria. The primary endpoint is the longitudinal change in Ang-2, an objective and quantitative biomarker of malaria severity, which will be analysed using a mixed-effects linear model. Secondary endpoints include mortality, recovery time, parasite clearance and neurocognitive sequelae. Discussion Noteworthy aspects of this trial design include its efficient sample size supported by a computer simulation study to evaluate statistical power, meticulous attention to complex ethical issues in a cross-cultural setting, and innovative strategies for safety monitoring and blinding to treatment allocation in a resource-constrained setting in sub-Saharan Africa. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01255215

  13. Precision Medicine for Advanced Pancreas Cancer: The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantrill, Lorraine A; Nagrial, Adnan M; Watson, Clare; Johns, Amber L; Martyn-Smith, Mona; Simpson, Skye; Mead, Scott; Jones, Marc D; Samra, Jaswinder S; Gill, Anthony J; Watson, Nicole; Chin, Venessa T; Humphris, Jeremy L; Chou, Angela; Brown, Belinda; Morey, Adrienne; Pajic, Marina; Grimmond, Sean M; Chang, David K; Thomas, David; Sebastian, Lucille; Sjoquist, Katrin; Yip, Sonia; Pavlakis, Nick; Asghari, Ray; Harvey, Sandra; Grimison, Peter; Simes, John; Biankin, Andrew V

    2015-05-01

    Personalized medicine strategies using genomic profiling are particularly pertinent for pancreas cancer. The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) trial was initially designed to exploit results from genome sequencing of pancreatic cancer under the auspices of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) in Australia. Sequencing revealed small subsets of patients with aberrations in their tumor genome that could be targeted with currently available therapies. The pilot stage of the IMPaCT trial assessed the feasibility of acquiring suitable tumor specimens for molecular analysis and returning high-quality actionable genomic data within a clinically acceptable timeframe. We screened for three molecular targets: HER2 amplification; KRAS wild-type; and mutations in DNA damage repair pathways (BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM). Tumor biopsy and archived tumor samples were collected from 93 patients and 76 were screened. To date 22 candidate cases have been identified: 14 KRAS wild-type, 5 cases of HER2 amplification, 2 mutations in BRCA2, and 1 ATM mutation. Median time from consent to the return of validated results was 21.5 days. An inability to obtain a biopsy or insufficient tumor content in the available specimen were common reasons for patient exclusion from molecular analysis while deteriorating performance status prohibited a number of patients from proceeding in the study. Documenting the feasibility of acquiring and screening biospecimens for actionable molecular targets in real time will aid other groups embarking on similar trials. Key elements include the need to better prescreen patients, screen more patients, and offer more attractive clinical trial options. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Role of massage therapy on reduction of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in term and preterm neonates: a review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhawan Deep; Kabra, Nandkishor S; Balasubramanian, Haribalakrishna

    2017-09-13

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NNH) is one of the leading causes of admissions in nursery throughout the world. It affects approximately 2.4-15% of neonates during the first 2 weeks of life. To evaluate the role of massage therapy for reduction of NNH in both term and preterm neonates. The literature search was done for various randomized control trials (RCTs) by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE. This review included total of 10 RCTs (two in preterm neonates and eight in term neonates) that fulfilled inclusion criteria. In most of the trials, Field massage was given. Six out of eight trials reported reduction in bilirubin levels in term neonates. However, only one trial (out of two) reported significant reduction in bilirubin levels in preterm neonates. Both trials in preterm neonates and most of the trials in term neonates (five trials) reported increased stool frequencies. Role of massage therapy in the management of NNH is supported by the current evidence. However, due to limitations of the trials, current evidences are not sufficient to use massage therapy for the management of NNH in routine practice.

  15. Systematic reviews of randomised clinical trials examining the effects of psychotherapeutic interventions versus "no intervention" for acute major depressive disorder and a randomised trial examining the effects of "third wave" cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based treatment for acute major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian

    2014-01-01

    systematic reviews with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses using The Cochrane Collaboration methodology examining the effects of cognitive therapy and psycho-dynamic therapy for major depressive disorder. We developed a thorough treatment protocol for a randomised trial with low risks of bias...... therapy versus mentalisation-based treatment for major depressive disorder. The first systematic review included five randomised trials examining the effects of psychodynamic therapy versus "no intervention' for major depressive disorder. Altogether the five trials randomised 365 participants who in each...... this result. The second systematic review included 12 randomised trials examining the effects of cognitive therapy versus "no intervention" for major depressive disorder. Altogether a total of 669 participants were randomised. All trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that cognitive therapy...

  16. Melodic Intonation Therapy in chronic aphasia: evidence from a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Van Der Meulen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMelodic Intonation Therapy (MIT is a language production therapy for severely non-fluent aphasic patients using melodic intoning and rhythm to restore language. Although many studies have reported its beneficial effects on language production, randomized controlled trials (RCT examining the efficacy of MIT are rare. In an earlier publication, we presented the results of an RCT on MIT in subacute aphasia and found that MIT was effective on trained and untrained items. Further, we observed a clear trend in improved functional language use after MIT. Subacute aphasic patients receiving MIT improved considerably on language tasks measuring connected speech and daily life verbal communication. Here, we present the results of a pilot RCT on MIT in chronic aphasia and compare these to the results observed in subacute aphasia. We used a multicenter waiting-list randomized controlled trial design. Patients with chronic (>1 year post-stroke aphasia were randomly allocated to the experimental group (6 weeks MIT or to the control group (6 weeks no intervention followed by 6 weeks MIT. Assessments were done at baseline (T1, after 6 weeks (T2, and 6 weeks later (T3. Efficacy was evaluated at T2 using univariable linear regression analyses. Outcome measures were chosen to examine several levels of therapy success: improvement on trained items, generalization to untrained items, and generalization to verbal communication. Of 17 included patients, 10 were allocated to the experimental condition and 7 to the control condition. MIT significantly improved repetition of trained items (β=13.32, p=.02. This effect did not remain stable at follow-up assessment. In contrast to earlier studies, we found only a limited and temporary effect of MIT, without generalization to untrained material or to functional communication. The results further suggest that the effect of MIT in chronic aphasia is more restricted than its effect in earlier stages post stroke. This

  17. A randomized trial comparing bladder volume consistency during fractionated prostate radiation therapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, L.

    2014-01-10

    Organ motion is a contributory factor to the variation in location of the prostate and organs at risk during a course of fractionated prostate radiation therapy (RT). A prospective randomized controlled trial was designed with the primary endpoint to provide evidence-based bladder-filling instructions to achieve a consistent bladder volume (BV) and thus reduce the bladder-related organ motion. The secondary endpoints were to assess the incidence of acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for patients and patients’ satisfaction with the bladder-filling instructions.

  18. Walking adaptability therapy after stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Celine; Roerdink, Melvyn; van Ooijen, Marielle W; Meskers, Carel G; Janssen, Thomas W; Beek, Peter J

    2016-08-26

    Walking in everyday life requires the ability to adapt walking to the environment. This adaptability is often impaired after stroke, and this might contribute to the increased fall risk after stroke. To improve safe community ambulation, walking adaptability training might be beneficial after stroke. This study is designed to compare the effects of two interventions for improving walking speed and walking adaptability: treadmill-based C-Mill therapy (therapy with augmented reality) and the overground FALLS program (a conventional therapy program). We hypothesize that C-Mill therapy will result in better outcomes than the FALLS program, owing to its expected greater amount of walking practice. This is a single-center parallel group randomized controlled trial with pre-intervention, post-intervention, retention, and follow-up tests. Forty persons after stroke (≥3 months) with deficits in walking or balance will be included. Participants will be randomly allocated to either C-Mill therapy or the overground FALLS program for 5 weeks. Both interventions will incorporate practice of walking adaptability and will be matched in terms of frequency, duration, and therapist attention. Walking speed, as determined by the 10 Meter Walking Test, will be the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures will pertain to walking adaptability (10 Meter Walking Test with context or cognitive dual-task and Interactive Walkway assessments). Furthermore, commonly used clinical measures to determine walking ability (Timed Up-and-Go test), walking independence (Functional Ambulation Category), balance (Berg Balance Scale), and balance confidence (Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale) will be used, as well as a complementary set of walking-related assessments. The amount of walking practice (the number of steps taken per session) will be registered using the treadmill's inbuilt step counter (C-Mill therapy) and video recordings (FALLS program). This process measure will

  19. Feasibility, Safety, and Compliance in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Physical Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. McGinley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both efficacy and clinical feasibility deserve consideration in translation of research outcomes. This study evaluated the feasibility of rehabilitation programs within the context of a large randomized controlled trial of physical therapy. Ambulant participants with Parkinson's disease (PD (n=210 were randomized into three groups: (1 progressive strength training (PST; (2 movement strategy training (MST; or (3 control (“life skills”. PST and MST included fall prevention education. Feasibility was evaluated in terms of safety, retention, adherence, and compliance measures. Time to first fall during the intervention phase did not differ across groups, and adverse effects were minimal. Retention was high; only eight participants withdrew during or after the intervention phase. Strong adherence (attendance >80% did not differ between groups (P=.435. Compliance in the therapy groups was high. All three programs proved feasible, suggesting they may be safely implemented for people with PD in community-based clinical practice.

  20. A randomized, controlled trial of magnetic therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baute, Vanessa; Keskinyan, Vahakn S; Sweeney, Erica R; Bowden, Kayla D; Gordon, Allison; Hutchens, Janet; Cartwright, Michael S

    2018-03-07

    Magnet therapy has been proposed as a treatment for neurologic conditions. In this this trial we assessed the feasibility and efficacy of a magnet inserted into a wristband for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Twenty-two patients with mild to moderate CTS were randomized to wear a high-dose or low-dose "sham" magnetic wristband for 6 weeks. The primary outcome was the Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Secondary measures were nerve conduction studies (NCS), median nerve ultrasound, and compliance. Compliance for both groups was >90%. Improvements in the mean SSS, NCS, and median nerve ultrasound did not reach statistical significance. Magnet therapy via wristband is well-tolerated. Further investigations in larger populations are needed to determine efficacy. Muscle Nerve, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy as new treatment for clear cell sarcoma: Trial on different animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andoh, Tooru; Fujimoto, Takuya; Sudo, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Epstein, Alan L.; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In our previous study, the tumor disappeared under boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on subcutaneously-transplanted CCS-bearing animals. In the present study, the tumor disappeared under this therapy on model mice intramuscularly implanted with three different human CCS cells. BNCT led to the suppression of tumor-growth in each of the different model mice, suggesting its potentiality as an alternative to, or integrative option for, the treatment of CCS. - Highlights: • BNCT with the use of L-BPA was applied for three human clear cell sarcoma (CCS) cell lines. • BNCT trial was performed on a newly established intramuscularly CCS-bearing animal model. • A significant decrease of the tumor-volume was seen by single BNCT with the use of L-BPA. • A multiple BNCT application would be required for controlling the growth of any residual tumors

  2. ‘Third wave’ cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen Janus Christian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. ‘Third wave‘ cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients with major depression. Methods/ design We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder. The participants will be randomised to either ‘third wave‘ cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy. The primary outcome will be the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at cessation of treatment at 18 weeks. Secondary outcomes will be the proportion of patients with remission, Symptom Checklist 90 Revised, Beck’s Depression Inventory, and The World Health Organisation-Five Well-being Index 1999. Discussion Interventions for depression have until now shown relatively small effects. Our trial results will provide knowledge about the effects of two modern psychotherapeutic interventions. Trial registration ClinicalTrials: NCT01070134

  3. Behavior therapy for children with Tourette disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, John; Woods, Douglas W; Scahill, Lawrence; Wilhelm, Sabine; Peterson, Alan L; Chang, Susanna; Ginsburg, Golda S; Deckersbach, Thilo; Dziura, James; Levi-Pearl, Sue; Walkup, John T

    2010-05-19

    Tourette disorder is a chronic and typically impairing childhood-onset neurologic condition. Antipsychotic medications, the first-line treatments for moderate to severe tics, are often associated with adverse effects. Behavioral interventions, although promising, have not been evaluated in large-scale controlled trials. To determine the efficacy of a comprehensive behavioral intervention for reducing tic severity in children and adolescents. Randomized, observer-blind, controlled trial of 126 children recruited from December 2004 through May 2007 and aged 9 through 17 years, with impairing Tourette or chronic tic disorder as a primary diagnosis, randomly assigned to 8 sessions during 10 weeks of behavior therapy (n = 61) or a control treatment consisting of supportive therapy and education (n = 65). Responders received 3 monthly booster treatment sessions and were reassessed at 3 and 6 months following treatment. Comprehensive behavioral intervention. Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (range 0-50, score >15 indicating clinically significant tics) and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement Scale (range 1 [very much improved] to 8 [very much worse]). Behavioral intervention led to a significantly greater decrease on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (24.7 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 23.1-26.3] to 17.1 [95% CI, 15.1-19.1]) from baseline to end point compared with the control treatment (24.6 [95% CI, 23.2-26.0] to 21.1 [95% CI, 19.2-23.0]) (P tic worsening was reported by 4% of children (5/126). Treatment gains were durable, with 87% of available responders to behavior therapy exhibiting continued benefit 6 months following treatment. A comprehensive behavioral intervention, compared with supportive therapy and education, resulted in greater improvement in symptom severity among children with Tourette and chronic tic disorder. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00218777.

  4. Massage therapy for patients with metastatic cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Maria; Marcantonio, Edward R; Davis, Roger B; Walton, Tracy; Kahn, Janet R; Phillips, Russell S

    2013-07-01

    The study objectives were to determine the feasibility and effects of providing therapeutic massage at home for patients with metastatic cancer. This was a randomized controlled trial. Patients were enrolled at Oncology Clinics at a large urban academic medical center; massage therapy was provided in patients' homes. Subjects were patients with metastatic cancer. There were three interventions: massage therapy, no-touch intervention, and usual care. Primary outcomes were pain, anxiety, and alertness; secondary outcomes were quality of life and sleep. In this study, it was possible to provide interventions for all patients at home by professional massage therapists. The mean number of massage therapy sessions per patient was 2.8. A significant improvement was found in the quality of life of the patients who received massage therapy after 1-week follow-up, which was not observed in either the No Touch control or the Usual Care control groups, but the difference was not sustained at 1 month. There were trends toward improvement in pain and sleep of the patients after therapeutic massage but not in patients in the control groups. There were no serious adverse events related to the interventions. The study results showed that it is feasible to provide therapeutic massage at home for patients with advanced cancer, and to randomize patients to a no-touch intervention. Providing therapeutic massage improves the quality of life at the end of life for patients and may be associated with further beneficial effects, such as improvement in pain and sleep quality. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to substantiate these findings.

  5. Music therapy for prisoners: pilot randomised controlled trial and implications for evaluating psychosocial interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Christian; Assmus, Jörg; Hjørnevik, Kjetil; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild; Brown, Fiona Kirkwood; Hansen, Anita Lill; Waage, Leif; Stige, Brynjulf

    2014-12-01

    Mental health problems are common among prison inmates. Music therapy has been shown to reduce mental health problems. It may also be beneficial in the rehabilitation of prisoners, but rigorous outcome research is lacking. We compared group music therapy with standard care for prisoners in a pilot randomised controlled trial that started with the establishment of music therapy services in a prison near Bergen in 2008. In all, 113 prisoners agreed to participate. Anxiety (STAI-State [State-Trait Anxiety Inventory], STAI-Trait), depression (HADS-D [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale]), and social relationships (Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire [Q-LES-Q]) were assessed at baseline; every 2 weeks in the experimental group; after 1, 3, and 6 months in the control group; and at release. No restrictions were placed on the frequency, duration, or contents of music therapy. Duration of stay in the institution was short (62% stayed less than 1 month). Only a minority reached clinical cutoffs for anxiety and depression at baseline. Between-group analyses of effects were not possible. Music therapy was well accepted and attractive among the prisoners. Post hoc analysis of within-group changes suggested a reduction of state anxiety after 2 weeks of music therapy (d = 0.33, p = .025). Short sentences and low baseline levels of psychological disturbance impeded the examination of effects in this study. Recommendations for planning future studies are given, concerning the careful choice of participants, interventions and settings, comparison condition and design aspects, choice of outcomes, and integration of research approaches. Thus, the present study has important implications for future studies evaluating interventions for improving prisoners' mental health. ISRCTN22518605. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Drivers of Costs Associated with Reperfusion Therapy in Acute Stroke: The IMS III Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kit N.; Simpson, Annie N.; Mauldin, Patrick D.; Hill, Michael D; Yeatts, Sharon D.; Spilker, Judith A.; Foster, Lydia D.; Khatri, Pooja; Martin, Renee; Jauch, Edward C.; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Broderick, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The IMS III study tested the effect of IV t-PA alone as compared to IV t-PA followed by endovascular therapy and collected cost data to assess the economic implications of the two therapies. This report describes the factors affecting the costs of the initial hospitalization for acute stroke subjects from the US. Methods Prospective cost analysis of US subjects treated with IV t-PA alone or IV t-PA followed by endovascular therapy in the IMS III trial. Results compared to expected Medicare payments. Results The adjusted cost of a stroke admission in the study was $35,130 for subjects treated with endovascular therapy following IV t-PA treatment and $25,630 for subjects treated with IV t-PA alone (p<0.0001). Significant factors related to costs included treatment group, baseline NIH Stroke Scale, time from stroke onset to IV t-PA, age, stroke location, and comorbid diabetes. The mean cost for subjects who had routine use of general anesthesia as part of endovascular therapy was $46,444 as compared to $30,350 for those who did not have general anesthesia. The costs of embolectomy for IMS III subjects and patients from the NIS cohort exceeded the Medicare DRG payment in more than 75% of patients. Conclusion Minimizing the time to start of IV t-PA and decreasing the use of routine general anesthesia, may improve the cost-effectiveness of medical and endovascular therapy for acute stroke. PMID:24876261

  7. Effect of biomagnetic therapy versus physiotherapy for treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremion, Gerald; Gaillard, David; Leyvraz, Pierre-Francois; Jolles, Brigitte M

    2009-11-01

    To assess the effectiveness of pulsed signal therapy in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren II or III). A randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trial. The first 95 patients sent to the clinic with knee osteo-arthritis were selected and randomized into treatment with pulsed signal therapy or conventional physiotherapy. Assessment included recording of usual demographic data, pertinent history, baseline medication and radiographs. Clinical evaluation was made at baseline, 6 weeks and 6 months after the end of treatment by the same blinded doctor. At each follow-up time, the patient was asked to complete a visual analogue pain scale and a Lequesne score. The doctor recorded the degree of pain on motion and the ability to move the affected knee. Both treatments resulted in significant improvements in pain and physical function. A statistical difference was observed only for activities of daily living, where the physiotherapy was more efficient (pphysiotherapy. Like physiotherapy, pulsed signal therapy has improved the clinical state of treated patients but with no significant statistical difference. Pulsed signal therapy is, however, more expensive.

  8. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid drugs in Graves' disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This meta-analysis was performed to compare radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in terms of clinical outcomes, including development or worsening of ophthalmopathy, hyperthyroid cure rate, hypothyroidism, relapse rate and adverse events. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed and National Knowledge Infrastructure, China, were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in patients with Graves' disease. Results were expressed as risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and weighted mean differences with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: 17 RCTs involving 4024 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included. Results showed that radioiodine treatment has increased risk in new ophthalmopathy, development or worsening of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Whereas, compared with antithyroid drugs, radioiodine treatment seems to have a higher hyperthyroid cure rate, lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy is associated with a higher hyperthyroid cure rate and lower relapse rate compared with antithyroid drugs. However, it also increases the risk of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Advances in knowledge: Considering that antithyroid drug treatment can be associated with unsatisfactory control of hyperthyroidism, we would recommend radioiodine therapy as the treatment of choice for patients with Graves' disease. PMID:27266544

  9. A randomized trial of dialectical behavior therapy versus general psychiatric management for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMain, Shelley F; Links, Paul S; Gnam, William H; Guimond, Tim; Cardish, Robert J; Korman, Lorne; Streiner, David L

    2009-12-01

    The authors sought to evaluate the clinical efficacy of dialectical behavior therapy compared with general psychiatric management, including a combination of psychodynamically informed therapy and symptom-targeted medication management derived from specific recommendations in APA guidelines for borderline personality disorder. This was a single-blind trial in which 180 patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder who had at least two suicidal or nonsuicidal self-injurious episodes in the past 5 years were randomly assigned to receive 1 year of dialectical behavior therapy or general psychiatric management. The primary outcome measures, assessed at baseline and every 4 months over the treatment period, were frequency and severity of suicidal and nonsuicidal self-harm episodes. Both groups showed improvement on the majority of clinical outcome measures after 1 year of treatment, including significant reductions in the frequency and severity of suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injurious episodes and significant improvements in most secondary clinical outcomes. Both groups had a reduction in general health care utilization, including emergency visits and psychiatric hospital days, as well as significant improvements in borderline personality disorder symptoms, symptom distress, depression, anger, and interpersonal functioning. No significant differences across any outcomes were found between groups. These results suggest that individuals with borderline personality disorder benefited equally from dialectical behavior therapy and a well-specified treatment delivered by psychiatrists with expertise in the treatment of borderline personality disorder.

  10. Rifaximin therapy for metronidazole-unresponsive Clostridium difficile infection: a prospective pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Basu, P; Dinani, Amreen; Rayapudi, Krishna; Pacana, Tommy; Shah, Niraj James; Hampole, Hemant; Krishnaswamy, N V; Mohan, Vinod

    2010-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a recent epidemic in the United States, particularly in the hospital setting. Oral metronidazole is standard therapy for C. difficile infection, but resistance to metronidazole is becoming a clinical challenge. We evaluated the efficacy of the nonsystemic oral antibiotic rifaximin for the treatment of metronidazole-resistant C. difficile infection. Twenty-five patients with C. difficile infection were enrolled in the study. All had mild-to-moderate C. difficile infection (5-10 bowel movements a day without sepsis) unresponsive to metronidazole (i.e. stools positive for toxins A and B after oral metronidazole 500 mg three times daily [t.i.d.] for 5 days). After discontinuation of metronidazole, rifaximin 400 mg t.i.d. for 14 days was prescribed. Patients were followed for 56 days and stool was tested for C. difficile using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess the effect of treatment. A negative PCR test result was interpreted as a favorable response to rifaximin. Sixteen of 22 patients (73%) were eligible for study inclusion and completed rifaximin therapy experienced eradication of infection (stool negative for C. difficile) immediately after rifaximin therapy and 56 days post-treatment. Three patients (12%) discontinued therapy because of abdominal distention. Rifaximin was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, rifaximin may be considered for treatment of mild-to-moderate C. difficile infection that is resistant to metronidazole. Larger randomized trials are needed to confirm these positive findings.

  11. Adapting Animal-Assisted Therapy Trials to Prison-Based Animal Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Molly; Ramaswamy, Megha

    2016-09-01

    Prison-based animal programs have shown promise when it comes to increased sociability, responsibility, and levels of patience for inmates who participate in these programs. Yet there remains a dearth of scientific research that demonstrates the impact of prison-based animal programs on inmates' physical and mental health. Trials of animal-assisted therapy interventions, a form of human-animal interaction therapy most often used with populations affected by depression/anxiety, mental illness, and trauma, may provide models of how prison-based animal program research can have widespread implementation in jail and prison settings, whose populations have high rates of mental health problems. This paper reviews the components of prison-based animal programs most commonly practiced in prisons today, presents five animal-assisted therapy case studies, evaluates them based on their adaptability to prison-based animal programs, and discusses the institutional constraints that act as barriers for rigorous prison-based animal program research implementation. This paper can serve to inform the development of a research approach to animal-assisted therapy that nurses and other public health researchers can use in working with correctional populations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [PARAMOUNT trial: clinical meaning of continuous maintenance therapy in lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridelli, Cesare

    2015-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide across both sex. Patients with Advanced -NSCLC (A-NSCLC) do not have curative treatment options, so the primary endpoint of every therapeutic decision aims to prolong survival, improving or maintain a good Quality of Life (QoL). Histology could represent a positive predictive factor for patients with Non squamous NSCLC (Nsq-NSCLC) respect to pemetrexed treatment. Pemetrexed is an antifolate that inhibits primarily thymidylate synthase (TS), together with dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. Pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin is approved in the first line setting and as monotherapy in the switch or continuous maintenance of Non Squamous A-NSCLC. Maintenance therapy is a widely used therapeutic option in other solid and hematologic malignancies, but in the A-NSCLC represent an innovative approach. The rationale in this new setting of patients is based on the evidence that patients who benefit from an initial induction therapy platinum based may benefit from maintenance therapy with the third generation agent dropping the platinum drug after four to six cycles. We can define two types of maintenance therapy: continuation maintenance and switch maintenance. Major results in prolonging Overall Survival (OS) was reported with the continuation maintenance strategy as in the PARAMOUNT trial.

  13. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in euthymic bipolar disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinan, Mette Kvisten; Krane-Gartiser, Karoline; Langsrud, Knut; Sand, Trond; Kallestad, Håvard; Morken, Gunnar

    2014-01-16

    Patients with bipolar disorder experience sleep disturbance, even in euthymic phases. Changes in sleep pattern are frequent signs of a new episode of (hypo)mania or depression. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is an effective treatment for primary insomnia, but there are no published results on the effects of CBT-I in patients with bipolar disorder. In this randomized controlled trial, we wish to compare CBT-I and treatment as usual with treatment as usual alone to determine its effect in improving quality of sleep, stabilizing minor mood variations and preventing new mood episodes in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder and comorbid insomnia. Patients with euthymic bipolar I or II disorder and insomnia, as verified by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID-1) assessment, will be included. The patients enter a three-week run-in phase in which they complete a sleep diary and a mood diary, are monitored for seven consecutive days with an actigraph and on two of these nights with polysomnography in addition before randomization to an eight-week treatment trial. Treatment as usual consists of pharmacological and supportive psychosocial treatment. In this trial, CBT-I will consist of sleep restriction, psychoeducation about sleep, stabilization of the circadian rhythm, and challenging and correcting sleep state misperception, in three to eight sessions. This trial could document a new treatment for insomnia in bipolar disorder with possible effects on sleep and on stability of mood. In addition, more precise information can be obtained about the character of sleep disturbance in bipolar disorder. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01704352.

  14. The TOPSHOCK study: Effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diercks Ron L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. Methods/design The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion

  15. Clinical Trials for Disease-Modifying Therapies in Alzheimer's Disease: A Primer, Lessons Learned, and a Blueprint for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Ritter, Aaron; Zhong, Kate

    2018-03-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has no currently approved disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), and treatments to prevent, delay the onset, or slow the progression are urgently needed. A delay of 5 years if available by 2025 would decrease the total number of patients with AD by 50% in 2050. To meet the definition of DMT, an agent must produce an enduring change in the course of AD; clinical trials of DMTs have the goal of demonstrating this effect. AD drug discovery entails target identification followed by high throughput screening and lead optimization of drug-like compounds. Once an optimized agent is available and has been assessed for efficacy and toxicity in animals, it progresses through Phase I testing with healthy volunteers, Phase II learning trials to establish proof-of-mechanism and dose, and Phase III confirmatory trials to demonstrate efficacy and safety in larger populations. Phase III is followed by Food and Drug Administration review and, if appropriate, market access. Trial populations include cognitively normal at-risk participants in prevention trials, mildly impaired participants with biomarker evidence of AD in prodromal AD trials, and subjects with cognitive and functional impairment in AD dementia trials. Biomarkers are critical in trials of DMTs, assisting in participant characterization and diagnosis, target engagement and proof-of-pharmacology, demonstration of disease-modification, and monitoring side effects. Clinical trial designs include randomized, parallel group; delayed start; staggered withdrawal; and adaptive. Lessons learned from completed trials inform future trials and increase the likelihood of success.

  16. Effects of traditional cupping therapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Andreas; Bock, Silke; Lüdtke, Rainer; Rampp, Thomas; Baecker, Marcus; Bachmann, Jürgen; Langhorst, Jost; Musial, Frauke; Dobos, Gustav J

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of cupping, a traditional method of treating musculoskeletal pain, in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in an open randomized trial. n = 52 outpatients (58.5 +/- 8.0 years) with neurologically confirmed CTS were randomly assigned to either a verum (n = 26) or a control group (n = 26). Verum patients were treated with a single application of wet cupping, and control patients with a single local application of heat within the region overlying the trapezius muscle. Patients were followed up on day 7 after treatment. The primary outcome, severity of CTS symptoms (VAS), was reduced from 61.5 +/- 20.5 to 24.6 +/- 22.7 mm at day 7 in the cupping group and from 67.1 +/- 20.2 to 51.7 +/- 23.9 mm in the control group [group difference -24.5mm (95%CI -36.1; -2.9, P cupping therapy may be effective in relieving the pain and other symptoms related to CTS. The efficacy of cupping in the long-term management of CTS and related mechanisms remains to be clarified. The results of a randomized trial on the clinical effects of traditional cupping therapy in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome are presented. Cupping of segmentally related shoulder zones appears to alleviate the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  17. Hormone therapy in menopausal women with cognitive complaints: a randomized, double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, P M; Gast, M J; Vieweg, A J; Burriss, S W; Yaffe, K

    2007-09-25

    To evaluate the effects of hormone therapy (HT) on cognition and subjective quality of life (QoL) in recently postmenopausal women with cognitive complaints. Cognitive Complaints in Early Menopause Trial (COGENT) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, pilot study of 180 healthy postmenopausal women aged 45 to 55 years, randomly assigned to receive either placebo or conjugated equine estrogen 0.625 mg/medroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5 mg for 4 months. Outcome measures included memory, subjective cognition, QoL, sexuality, and sleep, which were assessed at baseline and month 4. The study was terminated before the expected final sample size of 275 due to a decrease in enrollment coinciding with the publication of findings from the Women's Health Initiative. There were no differences between groups on any cognitive or QoL measures, except for an increase in sexual interest and thoughts with HT. Modest negative effects on short- and long-term verbal memory approached significance (p or=0.45, this study suggests potential modest negative effects on verbal memory that are consistent with previous hormone therapy trials in older women.

  18. Cognitive Analytic Therapy for Bipolar Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mark; Kellett, Stephen; Heyland, Simon; Hall, Jo; Majid, Shazmin

    2017-01-01

    The evidence base for treatment of bipolar affective disorder (BD) demands the evaluation of new psychotherapies in order to broaden patient choice. This study reports on the feasibility, safety, helpfulness and effectiveness of cognitive analytic therapy (CAT). In a pilot randomized controlled trial, BD patients in remission were randomized to either receiving 24 sessions of CAT (n = 9) or treatment as usual (n = 9) and were assessed in terms of symptoms, functioning and service usage over time. In the CAT arm no adverse events occurred, 8/9 completed treatment, 5/8 attended all 24 sessions and 2/8 were categorized as recovered. The most common helpful event during CAT was recognition of patterns in mood variability, with helpfulness themes changing according to phase of therapy. No major differences were found when comparing the arms over time in terms of service usage or psychometric outcomes. The study suggests that conducting further research into the effectiveness of CAT in treating BD is warranted and guidance regarding future trials is provided. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Treating BD with CAT appears feasible and safe. Retaining fidelity to the reformulation, recognition and revision structure of CAT appears useful. Participants stated that across the phases of CAT, focussing on patterns of mood variability was consistently helpful. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depressed adolescents exposed to interpersonal trauma: an initial effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirk, Stephen R; Deprince, Anne P; Crisostomo, Patrice S; Labus, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    Four clinical trials have shown that a history of interpersonal trauma is associated with diminished response to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adolescent depression. An efficacious CBT protocol for adolescent depression was modified to address cognitive deficits and distortions associated with interpersonal trauma. Initial feasibility, acceptability, and treatment impact of the modified treatment (m-CBT) were evaluated in a randomized effectiveness trial conducted in community clinics. Clients were 43 referred adolescents with a depressive disorder and a history of interpersonal trauma. Adolescents either received m-CBT or usual care (UC) therapy. Results indicated that m-CBT was delivered with good fidelity by community clinicians, but that number of sessions completed was attenuated in both m-CBT and UC. Adolescents reported high levels of treatment satisfaction and acceptability for the new treatment. There were significant reductions in depressive symptoms over time, but no differences in outcomes between groups. Although the new treatment produced promising results, it did not outperform UC. Implications for treatment development are considered. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Internet-Delivered Exposure Therapy for Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman-Lagerlöf, Maria; Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik; Axelsson, Erland; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Engelbrektsson, Johanna; Hultkrantz, Sofia; Lundbäck, Karolina; Björkander, Daniel; Wicksell, Rikard K; Flink, Ida; Andersson, Erik

    2018-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common and disabling chronic pain disorder, for which existing pharmacological and psychological treatments have yet yielded insufficient effects. Previous literature has shown that exposure therapy may be an effective treatment for chronic pain. This study constitutes the first randomized controlled trial evaluating exposure therapy for FM. A total of 140 participants with diagnosed FM were randomized to a 10-week Internet-delivered exposure treatment (iExp; n=70) or a waitlist control condition (WLC; n=70). Primary outcome measure were FM symptoms and impact, and secondary outcome measures were fatigue, disability, quality of life, pain-related distress and avoidance behaviors, insomnia, depression, and anxiety. Data retention was high (100% data completion at posttreatment for primary outcome, 96% at 6-month follow-up and 94% at 12-month follow-up). Results showed that participants in the iExp group made large and superior improvements compared with WLC on FM symptoms and impact (B, -1.93; z, -10.14; P<0.001, between-group Cohen d=0.90), as well as all secondary outcomes (between-group Cohen d ranging from 0.44 to 1.38) with sustained results. We conclude that iExp seems to be an efficacious treatment for FM compared with no treatment, and the results also highlight the potential increase of accessibility by using the Internet format to deliver psychological treatments for these patients. Future trials with active control conditions are warranted.

  1. Massage therapy decreases pain and perceived fatigue after long-distance Ironman triathlon: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Guilherme S; Bender, Paula Urio; de Menezes, Fábio Sprada; Yamashitafuji, Igor; Vargas, Valentine Zimermann; Wageck, Bruna

    2016-04-01

    Can massage therapy reduce pain and perceived fatigue in the quadriceps of athletes after a long-distance triathlon race (Ironman)? Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded outcome assessors. Seventy-four triathlon athletes who completed an entire Ironman triathlon race and whose main complaint was pain in the anterior portion of the thigh. The experimental group received massage to the quadriceps, which was aimed at recovery after competition, and the control group rested in sitting. The outcomes were pain and perceived fatigue, which were reported using a visual analogue scale, and pressure pain threshold at three points over the quadriceps muscle, which was assessed using digital pressure algometry. The experimental group had significantly lower scores than the control group on the visual analogue scale for pain (MD -7 mm, 95% CI -13 to -1) and for perceived fatigue (MD -15 mm, 95% CI -21 to -9). There were no significant between-group differences for the pressure pain threshold at any of the assessment points. Massage therapy was more effective than no intervention on the post-race recovery from pain and perceived fatigue in long-distance triathlon athletes. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials, RBR-4n2sxr. Copyright © 2016 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Lisa S.; Maguen, Shira; Metzler, Thomas J.; Schmitz, Martha; McCaslin, Shannon E.; Richards, Anne; Perlis, Michael L.; Posner, Donn A.; Weiss, Brandon; Ruoff, Leslie; Varbel, Jonathan; Neylan, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Examine whether cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) improves sleep in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as nightmares, nonsleep PTSD symptoms, depression symptoms, and psychosocial functioning. Design: Randomized controlled trial with two arms: CBT-I and monitor-only waitlist control. Setting: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center. Participants: Forty-five adults (31 females: [mean age 37 y (22-59 y)] with PTSD meeting research diagnostic criteria for insomnia, randomly assigned to CBT-I (n = 29; 22 females) or monitor-only waitlist control (n = 16; nine females). Interventions: Eight-session weekly individual CBT-I delivered by a licensed clinical psychologist or a board-certified psychiatrist. Measurements and Results: Measures included continuous monitoring of sleep with diary and actigraphy; prepolysomnography and postpolysomnography and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS); and pre, mid, and post self-report questionnaires, with follow-up of CBT-I participants 6 mo later. CBT-I was superior to the waitlist control condition in all sleep diary outcomes and in polysomnography-measured total sleep time. Compared to waitlist participants, CBT-I participants reported improved subjective sleep (41% full remission versus 0%), disruptive nocturnal behaviors (based on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-Addendum), and overall work and interpersonal functioning. These effects were maintained at 6-mo follow-up. Both CBT-I and waitlist control participants reported reductions in PTSD symptoms and CAPS-measured nightmares. Conclusions: Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) improved sleep in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder, with durable gains at 6 mo. Overall psychosocial functioning improved following CBT-I. The initial evidence regarding CBT-I and nightmares is promising but further research is needed. Results suggest that a comprehensive approach to treatment of posttraumatic stress

  3. Can therapy dogs improve pain and satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Carl M; Dong, Yan; Thornhill, Thomas S; Wright, John; Ready, John; Brick, Gregory W; Dyer, George

    2015-01-01

    The use of animals to augment traditional medical therapies was reported as early as the 9th century but to our knowledge has not been studied in an orthopaedic patient population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of animal-assisted therapy using therapy dogs in the postoperative recovery of patients after THA and TKA. We asked: (1) Do therapy dogs have an effect on patients' perception of pain after total joint arthroplasty as measured by the VAS? (3) Do therapy dogs have an effect on patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay after total joint arthroplasty as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS)? A randomized controlled trial of 72 patients undergoing primary unilateral THA or TKA was conducted. Patients were randomized to a 15-minute visitation with a therapy dog before physical therapy or standard postoperative physical therapy regimens. Both groups had similar demographic characteristics. Reduction in pain was assessed using the VAS after each physical therapy session, beginning on postoperative Day 1 and continuing for three consecutive sessions. To ascertain patient satisfaction, the proportion of patients selecting top-category ratings in each subsection of the HCAHPS was compared. Patients in the treatment group had lower VAS scores after each physical therapy session with a final VAS score difference of 2.4 units (animal-assisted therapy VAS, 1.7; SD, 0.97 [95% CI, 1.4-2.0] versus control VAS, 4.1; SD, 0.97 [95% CI, 3.8-4.4], pphysical therapy session. Patients in the treatment group had a higher proportion of top-box HCAHPS scores in the following fields: nursing communication (33 of 36, 92% [95% CI, 78%-98%] versus 69%, 25 of 36 [95% CI, 52%-84%], p=0.035; risk ratio, 1.3 [95% CI of risk ratio, 1.0-1.7]; risk difference, 23% [95% CI of risk difference, 5%-40%]), pain management (34 of 36, 94% [95% CI, 81%-99%], versus 26 of 36, 72% [95% CI, 55%-86%], p=0.024; risk ratio, 1.3 [95

  4. Artemisinin versus nonartemisinin combination therapy for uncomplicated malaria: randomized clinical trials from four sites in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adoke Yeka

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum poses a major threat to malaria control. Combination antimalarial therapy including artemisinins has been advocated recently to improve efficacy and limit the spread of resistance, but artemisinins are expensive and relatively untested in highly endemic areas. We compared artemisinin-based and other combination therapies in four districts in Uganda with varying transmission intensity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We enrolled 2,160 patients aged 6 mo or greater with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Patients were randomized to receive chloroquine (CQ + sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP; amodiaquine (AQ + SP; or AQ + artesunate (AS. Primary endpoints were the 28-d risks of parasitological failure either unadjusted or adjusted by genotyping to distinguish recrudescence from new infections. A total of 2,081 patients completed follow-up, of which 1,749 (84% were under the age of 5 y. The risk of recrudescence after treatment with CQ + SP was high, ranging from 22% to 46% at the four sites. This risk was significantly lower (p < 0.01 after AQ + SP or AQ + AS (7%-18% and 4%-12%, respectively. Compared to AQ + SP, AQ + AS was associated with a lower risk of recrudescence but a higher risk of new infection. The overall risk of repeat therapy due to any recurrent infection (recrudescence or new infection was similar at two sites and significantly higher for AQ + AS at the two highest transmission sites (risk differences = 15% and 16%, p < 0.003. CONCLUSION: AQ + AS was the most efficacious regimen for preventing recrudescence, but this benefit was outweighed by an increased risk of new infection. Considering all recurrent infections, the efficacy of AQ + SP was at least as efficacious at all sites and superior to AQ + AS at the highest transmission sites. The high endemicity of malaria in Africa may impact on the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy. The registration number for this trial is ISRCTN

  5. Economic evaluation of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Hendriks, Jan C M; Graff, Maud J L; Adang, Eddy M M; Munneke, Marten; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2015-07-01

    A large randomized clinical trial (the Occupational Therapy in Parkinson's Disease [OTiP] study) recently demonstrated that home-based occupational therapy improves perceived performance in daily activities of people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the current study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this intervention. We performed an economic evaluation over a 6-month period for both arms of the OTiP study. Participants were 191 community-dwelling PD patients and 180 primary caregivers. The intervention group (n = 124 patients) received 10 weeks of home-based occupational therapy; the control group (n = 67 patients) received usual care (no occupational therapy). Costs were assessed from a societal perspective including healthcare use, absence from work, informal care, and intervention costs. Health utilities were evaluated using EuroQol-5d. We estimated cost differences and cost utility using linear mixed models and presented the net monetary benefit at different values for willingness to pay per quality-adjusted life-year gained. In our primary analysis, we excluded informal care hours because of substantial missing data for this item. The estimated mean total costs for the intervention group compared with controls were €125 lower for patients, €29 lower for caregivers, and €122 higher for patient-caregiver pairs (differences not significant). At a value of €40,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained (reported threshold for PD), the net monetary benefit of the intervention per patient was €305 (P = 0.74), per caregiver €866 (P = 0.01) and per patient-caregiver pair €845 (P = 0.24). In conclusion, occupational therapy did not significantly impact on total costs compared with usual care. Positive cost-effectiveness of the intervention was only significant for caregivers. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. [YANG's pricking-cupping therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a multi-center randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Xiru; Hu, Zhihai; Sun, Aijun; Ma, Yanwen; Chen Yingying; Zhang, Xuzhi; Liu, Meiling; Wang, Yi; Wang, Shuoshuo; Zhang, Yunjia; Li, Yijing; Shen, Weidong

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of YANG's pricking-cupping therapy for knee osteoar thritis (KOA). Methods This was a multi-center randomized parallel controlled trial. One hundred and seventy one patients with KOA were randomly allocated to a pricking-cupping group (89 cases) and a conventional acu puncture group (82 cases). Neixiyan (EX-LE 4), Dubi (ST 35) and ashi points were selected in the two groups. Patients in the pricking-cupping group were treated with YANG's pricking-cupping therapy; the seven-star needles were used to perform pricking at acupoints, then cupping was used until slight bleeding was observed. Patients in the conventional acupuncture group were treated with semi-standardized filiform needle therapy. The treatment was given for 4 weeks (from a minimum of 5 times to a maximum of 10 times). The follow-up visit was 4 weeks. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were adopted for the efficacy assessments. The pain score, stiffness score, physical function score and total score of WOMAC were all reduced after 4-week treatment and during follow-up visit in the two groups (all P0. 05), each score and total score of WOMAC in the pricking-cupping group were lower than those in the conventional acupuncture group after 4-week treatment and during follow-up visit (Pcupping group were lower than those in the conventional acupuncture group after 4-week treatment and during follow-up visit (P cupping and conventional acupuncture therapy can both significantly improve knee joint pain and function in patients with KOA, which are relatively safe. The pricking cupping therapy is superior to conventional acupuncture with the identical selection of acupoints.

  7. Handcrafted Vacuum-Assisted Device for Skin Ulcers Treatment Versus Traditional Therapy, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Israel Gonzalez; Angel, Medina Andrade Luis; Baez, Maria Valeria Jimenez; Ruiz Flores, Brenda; de Los Angeles Martinez Ferretiz, Maria; Woolf, Stephanny Vanestty; López, Israel; Sandoval-Jurado, Luis; Pat-Espadas, Fany Guadalupe; Cruz, Alan Alejandro Reyes; Delgado, Arsenio Torres

    2017-02-01

    Chronic lower limb ulcers constitute a public health problem, with important socioeconomic implications and high attention cost. This trial evaluates handcrafted vacuum-assisted therapy versus traditional treatment effectiveness for lower limbs ulcers. It was a prospective randomized clinical trial conducted over 144 patients with lower limbs ulcers. Patients were randomized into two groups of 72 patients: Experimental group were treated with debridement, cure and a handcrafted vacuum-assisted device that was changed every 72 h. Control group was treated with debridement and cure with soap every 24 h. Ulcers were evaluated every 72 h and on 10th day. The presence of systemic inflammatory response, pain, granulation tissue and viability for discharge was registered and analyzed . After exclusion of 18 patients, 126 were included, 65.1% were men with an average of 58 years. Sole region ulcer by diabetic foot was the more frequent in both groups (73%). Leukocytes count, systemic inflammatory response and pain were significantly lower in experimental group (p ulcers. This system would benefit patients favoring earlier infection control, faster granulation tissue appearance and earlier discharge. Clinical trials registered in https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ Number NCT02512159.

  8. A randomised controlled trial of time limited CBT informed psychological therapy for anxiety in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven; McGrath, Elly; Hampshire, Kay; Owen, Rebecca; Riste, Lisa; Roberts, Chris; Davies, Linda; Mayes, Debbie

    2013-02-15

    Anxiety comorbidity is common in bipolar disorder and is associated with worse treatment outcomes, greater risk of self harm, suicide and substance misuse. To date however there have been no psychological interventions specifically designed to address this problem. The primary objective of this trial is to establish the acceptability and feasibility of a new integrated intervention for anxiety in bipolar disorder designed in collaboration with individuals with personal experience of both problems. Single blind randomised controlled trials to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a time limited CBT informed psychological intervention for anxiety in bipolar disorder (AIBD) compared with treatment as usual. Participants will be recruited from across the North West of England from specialist mental health services and through primary care and self referral. The primary outcome of the study is the feasibility and acceptability of AIBD assessed by recruitment to target and retention to follow-up, as well as absence of untoward incidents associated with AIBD. We will also estimate the effect size of the impact of the intervention on anxiety and mood outcomes, as well as calculate preliminary estimates of cost-effectiveness and investigate potential mechanisms for this (stigma, self appraisal and stability of social rhythms). This is the first trial of an integrated intervention for anxiety in bipolar disorder. It is of interest to researchers involved in the development of new therapies for bipolar disorder as well as indicating the wider potential for evaluating approaches to the treatment of comorbidity in severe mental illness.

  9. Using PET for therapy monitoring in oncological clinical trials: challenges ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deroose, C.M.; Stroobants, S.; Liu, Y.; Shankar, L.K.; Bourguet, P.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging with PET has emerged as a powerful imaging tool in the clinical care of oncological patients. Assessing therapy response is a prime application of PET and so the integration of PET into multicentre trials can offer valuable scientific insights and shape future clinical practice. However, there are a number of logistic and methodological challenges that have to be dealt with. These range from availability and regulatory compliance of the PET radiopharmaceutical to availability of scan time for research purposes. Standardization of imaging and reconstruction protocols, quality control, image processing and analysis are of paramount importance. Strategies for harmonization of the final image and the quantification result are available and can be implemented within the scope of multicentre accreditation programmes. Data analysis can be performed either locally or by centralized review. Response assessment can be done visually or using more quantitative approaches, depending on the research question. Large-scale real-time centralized review can be achieved using web-based solutions. Specific challenges for the future are inclusion of PET/MRI scanners in multicentre trials and the incorporation of radiomic analyses. Inclusion of PET in multicentre trials is a necessity to guarantee the further development of PET for routine clinical care and may yield very valuable scientific insights. (orig.)

  10. Using PET for therapy monitoring in oncological clinical trials: challenges ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroose, C.M. [UZ Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); Stroobants, S. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Liu, Y. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Shankar, L.K. [National Cancer Institute, Diagnostic Imaging Branch, Cancer Imaging Program, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bourguet, P. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University of Rennes 1, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rennes (France)

    2017-08-15

    Molecular imaging with PET has emerged as a powerful imaging tool in the clinical care of oncological patients. Assessing therapy response is a prime application of PET and so the integration of PET into multicentre trials can offer valuable scientific insights and shape future clinical practice. However, there are a number of logistic and methodological challenges that have to be dealt with. These range from availability and regulatory compliance of the PET radiopharmaceutical to availability of scan time for research purposes. Standardization of imaging and reconstruction protocols, quality control, image processing and analysis are of paramount importance. Strategies for harmonization of the final image and the quantification result are available and can be implemented within the scope of multicentre accreditation programmes. Data analysis can be performed either locally or by centralized review. Response assessment can be done visually or using more quantitative approaches, depending on the research question. Large-scale real-time centralized review can be achieved using web-based solutions. Specific challenges for the future are inclusion of PET/MRI scanners in multicentre trials and the incorporation of radiomic analyses. Inclusion of PET in multicentre trials is a necessity to guarantee the further development of PET for routine clinical care and may yield very valuable scientific insights. (orig.)

  11. Pilot randomized controlled trial of dialectical behavior therapy group skills training for ADHD among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Andrew P; McMahon, Robert J; Moran, Lyndsey R; Peterson, A Paige; Dreessen, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    ADHD affects between 2% and 8% of college students and is associated with broad functional impairment. No prior randomized controlled trials with this population have been published. The present study is a pilot randomized controlled trial evaluating dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) group skills training adapted for college students with ADHD. Thirty-three undergraduates with ADHD between ages 18 and 24 were randomized to receive either DBT group skills training or skills handouts during an 8-week intervention phase. ADHD symptoms, executive functioning (EF), and related outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Participants receiving DBT group skills training showed greater treatment response rates (59-65% vs. 19-25%) and clinical recovery rates (53-59% vs. 6-13%) on ADHD symptoms and EF, and greater improvements in quality of life. DBT group skills training may be efficacious, acceptable, and feasible for treating ADHD among college students. A larger randomized trial is needed for further evaluation. © 2014 SAGE Publications.

  12. Internet delivered cognitive behavior therapy for antenatal depression: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsell, Erik; Bendix, Marie; Holländare, Fredrik; Szymanska von Schultz, Barbara; Nasiell, Josefine; Blomdahl-Wetterholm, Margareta; Eriksson, Caroline; Kvarned, Sara; Lindau van der Linden, Johanna; Söderberg, Elin; Jokinen, Jussi; Wide, Katarina; Kaldo, Viktor

    2017-10-15

    Major depression occurs in 5-10% of pregnancies and is associated with many negative effects for mother and child, yet treatment options are scarce. To our knowledge, this is the first published randomised controlled trial on Internet delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy (ICBT) for this group. To test the efficacy of a pregnancy adapted version of an existing 10-week ICBT-program for depression as well as assessing acceptability and adherence DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. Online and telephone. Self-referred pregnant women (gestational week 10-28 at intake) currently suffering from major depressive disorder. 42 pregnant women (gestational week 12-28) with major depression were randomised to either treatment as usual (TAU) provided at their antenatal clinic or to ICBT as an add-on to usual care. The primary outcome was depressive symptoms measured with the Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale-self report (MADRS-S). The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and measures of anxiety and sleep were used. Credibility, satisfaction, adherence and utilization were also assessed. The ICBT group had significantly lower levels of depressive symptoms post treatment (p treatment credibility, satisfaction, utilization, and adherence were comparable to implemented ICBT for depression. Small sample size and no long-term evaluation. Pregnancy adapted ICBT for antenatal depression is feasible, acceptable and efficacious. These results need to be replicated in larger trials to validate these promising findings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Balance chiropractic therapy for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Li, Wen-Xiong; Liu, Zhu; Liu, Li

    2016-10-22

    Cervical spondylosis is a very common disorder and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) is the most common form of spinal degenerative disease. Its clinical manifestations focus on pain and numbness of the neck and arm as well as restricted movement of the neck, which greatly affect the patient's life and work. The orthopedic of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory holds that the basic pathologic change in spinal degenerative diseases is the imbalance between the dynamic system and the static system of the cervical spine. Based on this theory, some Chinese physicians have developed a balance chiropractic therapy (BCT) to treat CSR, which has been clinically examined for more than 50 years to effectively cure CSR. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of BCT on CSR and to investigate the mechanism by which the efficacy is achieved. We propose a multicenter, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BCT for CSR. Participants aged 18 to 65 years, who are in conformity with the diagnostic criteria of CSR and whose pain score on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) is more than 4 points and less than 8 points, will be included and randomly allocated into two groups: a treatment group and a control group. Participants in the treatment group will be treated with BCT, while the control group will receive traction therapy (TT). The primary outcome is pain severity (measured with a VAS). Secondary outcomes will include cervical curvature (measured by the Borden Index), a composite of functional status (measured by the Neck Disability Index, NDI), patient health status (evaluated by the SF-36 health survey) and adverse events (AEs) as reported in the trial. If BCT can relieve neck pain without adverse effects, it may be a novel strategy for the treatment of CSR. Furthermore, the mechanism of BCT for CSR will be partially elucidated. Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02705131 . Registered on 9

  14. New therapies for chronic hepatitis C infection: a systematic review of evidence from clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L Y; Tong, C Y W; Wong, T; Wilkinson, M

    2012-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects approximately 3% of the world population. The current standard of care for treatment of HCV is a combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Approximately 10% of patients will stop treatment and 30% of patients require dose reduction because of side effects. For genotype 1 HCV-infected patients, only 40% of patients will achieve undetectable viral load 26 weeks posttreatment. The objectives of this review were to identify new treatments that are in clinical trials. These include boceprevir and telaprevir which are in routine clinical use and form part of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) 2011 guidelines as well as drugs based on observational studies, improving/modifying ribavirin or interferon-based therapies, modifying the host response and finally the use of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA).   MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched from 2008 to 2011 for treatments for hepatitis C. Furthermore, abstracts and poster presentations for the annual European Association Study of the Liver, AASLD, Digestive Disease Week and Asian Pacific Association for the study of the Liver were searched for relevant material. All four classes of DAA; NS3/NS4a serine protease inhibitors, cyclophilin inhibitors, NS5b polymerase inhibitors and NS5a inhibitors, show good success rates. Trials have been performed without ribavirin or interferon and demonstrate good antiviral activity with a decreased side effect profile. Combinations of DAA are a promising area of research with a high success rate. Clinical trials show that future HCV therapy could be personalised, achieve higher success rates with decreased adverse incidents. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy for social phobia: outcomes and moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Niles, Andrea N; Burklund, Lisa J; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B; Vilardaga, Jennifer C Plumb; Arch, Joanna J; Saxbe, Darby E; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an empirically supported treatment for social phobia. However, not all individuals respond to treatment and many who show improvement do not maintain their gains over the long-term. Thus, alternative treatments are needed. The current study (N = 87) was a 3-arm randomized clinical trial comparing CBT, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), and a wait-list control group (WL) in participants with a diagnosis of social phobia based on criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Participants completed 12 sessions of CBT or ACT or a 12-week waiting period. All participants completed assessments at baseline and posttreatment, and participants assigned to CBT and ACT also completed assessments 6 and 12 months following baseline. Assessments consisted of self-report measures, a public-speaking task, and clinician ratings. Multilevel modeling was used to examine between-group differences on outcomes measures. Both treatment groups outperformed WL, with no differences observed between CBT and ACT on self-report, independent clinician, or public-speaking outcomes. Lower self-reported psychological flexibility at baseline was associated with greater improvement by the 12-month follow-up in CBT compared with ACT. Self-reported fear of negative evaluation significantly moderated outcomes as well, with trends for both extremes to be associated with superior outcomes from CBT and inferior outcomes from ACT. Across treatment groups, higher perceived control and extraversion were associated with greater improvement, whereas comorbid depression was associated with poorer outcomes. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  16. Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy for social phobia: outcomes and moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Niles, Andrea N.; Burklund, Lisa J.; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B.; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Arch, Joanna J.; Saxbe, Darby E.; Lieberman, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an empirically supported treatment for social phobia. However, not all individuals respond to treatment and many who show improvement do not maintain their gains over the long-term. Thus, alternative treatments are needed. Method The current study (N=87) was a 3-arm randomized clinical trial comparing CBT, Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT), and a waitlist control group (WL) in participants with a DSM-IV diagnosis of social phobia. Participants completed 12 sessions of CBT or ACT or a 12-week waiting period. All participants completed assessments at baseline and post-treatment, and participants assigned to CBT and ACT also completed assessments at 6 and 12 months following baseline. Assessments consisted of self-report measures, a public speaking task, and clinician ratings. Results Multilevel modeling was used to examine between-group differences on outcomes measures. Both treatment groups outperformed WL, with no differences observed between CBT and ACT on self-report, independent clinician, or public speaking outcomes. Lower self-reported psychological flexibility at baseline was associated with greater improvement by the 12-mo follow-up in CBT compared to ACT. Self-reported fear of negative evaluation significantly moderated outcomes as well, with trends for both extremes to be associated with superior outcomes from CBT and inferior outcomes from ACT. Across treatment groups, higher perceived control, and extraversion were associated with greater improvement, whereas comorbid depression was associated with poorer outcomes. Conclusions Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:24999670

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder with Integrated Techniques from Emotion-Focused and Interpersonal Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Borkovec, Thomas D.; Fisher, Aaron J.; Boswell, James F.; Szkodny, Lauren E.; Nordberg, Samuel S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Recent models suggest that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms may be maintained by emotional processing avoidance and interpersonal problems. Method: This is the first randomized controlled trial to test directly whether cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) could be augmented with the addition of a module targeting interpersonal…

  18. Rotterdam Aphasia Therapy Study (RATS) - 3: " The efficacy of intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy in the acute stage of aphasia"; design of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Nouwens (Femke); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); M. Jong-Hagelstein (Marjolein); E.G. Visch-Brink (Evy); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); L. de Lau (Lonneke)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Aphasia is a severely disabling condition occurring in 20 to 25% of stroke patients. Most patients with aphasia due to stroke receive speech and language therapy. Methodologically sound randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of specific interventions for

  19. Music therapy in Huntington's disease: a protocol for a multi-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen-Rufi, Monique; Vink, Annemieke; Achterberg, Wilco; Roos, Raymund

    2016-07-26

    Huntington's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease with autosomal dominant inheritance, characterized by motor disturbances, cognitive decline and behavioral and psychological symptoms. Since there is no cure, all treatment is aimed at improving quality of life. Music therapy is a non-pharmacological intervention, aiming to improve the quality of life, but its use and efficacy in patients with Huntington's disease has hardly been studied. In this article, a protocol is described to study the effects of music therapy in comparison with a control intervention to improve quality of life through stimulating expressive and communicative skills. By targeting these skills we assume that the social-cognitive functioning will improve, leading to a reduction in behavioral problems, resulting in an overall improvement of the quality of life in patients with Huntington's disease. The study is designed as a multi-center single-blind randomised controlled intervention trial. Sixty patients will be randomised using centre-stratified block-permuted randomisation. Patients will be recruited from four long-term care facilities specialized in Huntington's disease-care in The Netherlands. The outcome measure to assess changes in expressive and communication skills is the Behaviour Observation Scale Huntington and changes in behavior will be assessed by the Problem Behaviour Assesment-short version and by the BOSH. Measurements take place at baseline, then 8, 16 (end of intervention) and 12 weeks after the last intervention (follow-up). This randomized controlled study will provide greater insight into the effectiveness of music therapy on activities of daily living, social-cognitive functioning and behavior problems by improving expressive and communication skills, thus leading to a better quality of life for patients with Huntington's disease. Netherlands Trial Register: NTR4904 , registration date Nov. 15, 2014.

  20. A randomized controlled trial of stretch-and-flow voice therapy for muscle tension dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Christopher R; Hamilton, Amy; Toles, Laura; Childs, Lesley; Mau, Ted

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of stretch-and-flow voice therapy on vocal function and handicap. Randomized controlled trial. Participants with primary muscle tension dysphonia were randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. Experimental participants received vocal hygiene education followed by 6 weeks of stretch-and-flow voice therapy. Control participants received vocal hygiene education only. Outcome variables consisted of a measure of vocal handicap (Voice Handicap Index [VHI]), maximum phonation time, s/z ratio, and acoustic measures. All measures were obtained at baseline prior to treatment and within 2 weeks posttreatment or at the end of the control period. The pre- to posttreatment measurement change (delta Δ) was applied to statistical analyses. A multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant group differences in pre-to-post changes on measures of VHI, maximum phonation time, and cepstral peak prominence (CPP) in connected speech and vowels (P = 0.003, 0.013, 0.025, and 0.017 respectively), with a significant reduction of VHI (Cohen's d = 1.6), increase in maximum phonation time (Cohen's d = 1.2), increase of CPP in connected speech (Cohen's d = 1.2), and increase of CPP in vowels (Cohen's d = 1.1) in the experimental group compared to the control group. This preliminary small sample randomized controlled trial found significantly greater improvement in vocal handicap, maximum phonation time, and acoustic measures of vocal function after participants received stretch-and-flow voice therapy compared to participants receiving vocal hygiene education alone. Additional research incorporating larger samples will be needed to confirm and further investigate these findings. 1b. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Cognitive effects of calligraphy therapy for older people: a randomized controlled trial in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok TCY

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Timothy CY Kwok1,2, Xue Bai1,3, Henry SR Kao4,5, Jessie CY Li1, Florence KY Ho11Jockey Club Centre for Positive Ageing; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; 3Department of Social Work and Social Administration; 4Department of Psychology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; 5Department of Psychology, Fu Jen Catholic University, TaiwanBackground: This pilot study investigated the effects of calligraphy therapy on cognitive function in older Hong Kong Chinese people with mild cognitive impairment.Methods: A single-blind, randomized controlled trial was carried out in a sample of 31 adults aged 65 years or older with mild cognitive impairment. They were randomly assigned to receive either intensive calligraphy training led by a trained research assistant for eight weeks (calligraphy group, n = 14 or no calligraphy treatment (control group, n = 17. Participants' cognitive function was assessed by the Chinese version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (CMMSE before and after calligraphy treatment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and paired samples t-tests were used to analyze the data.Results: A significant interaction effect of time and intervention was detected [F (1, 29 = 9.11, P = 0.005, η2= 0.24]. The calligraphy group was found to have a prominent increase in CMMSE global score, and scores in the cognitive areas of orientation, attention, and calculation after two months (∆M = 2.36, P < 0.01, whereas their counterparts in the control group experienced a decline in CMMSE score (∆M = -0.41, P < 0.05.Conclusion: Calligraphy therapy was effective for enhancing cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment and should be incorporated as part of routine programs in both community and residential care settings.Keywords: calligraphy therapy, Chinese elderly, mild cognitive impairment, cognitive function, randomized controlled trial

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of Telephone-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnedt, J. Todd; Cuddihy, Leisha; Swanson, Leslie M.; Pickett, Scott; Aikens, James; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare the efficacy of telephone-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia to an information pamphlet control on sleep and daytime functioning at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 12-wk follow-up. Design: Randomized controlled parallel trial. Setting: N/A. Participants: Thirty individuals with chronic insomnia (27 women, age 39.1 ± 14.4 years, insomnia duration 8.7 ± 10.7 years). Interventions: Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) delivered in up to eight weekly telephone sessions (CBTI-Phone, n = 15) versus an information pamphlet control (IPC, n = 15). Measurements and Results: Sleep/wake diary, sleep-related questionnaires (Insomnia Severity Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, 16-item Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep), and daytime symptom assessments (fatigue, depression, anxiety, and quality of life) were completed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 12-wk follow-up. Linear mixed models indicated that sleep/wake diary sleep efficiency and total sleep time improved significantly at posttreatment in both groups and remained stable at 12-wk follow-up. More CBTI-Phone than IPC patients showed posttreatment improvements in unhelpful sleep-related cognitions (P insomnia at follow-up (P insomnia. Future larger-scale studies with more diverse samples are warranted. Some individuals with insomnia may also benefit from pamphlet-delivered CBTI with brief telephone support. Citation: Arnedt JT; Cuddihy L; Swanson LM; Pickett S; Aikens J; Chervin RD. Randomized controlled trial of telephone-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic insomnia. SLEEP 2013;36(3):353-362. PMID:23450712

  3. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Koes, B.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  4. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. A randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Jan Lucas; Koes, Bart W.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; van Mameren, Henk; Devillé, Walter L. J. M.; Pool, Jan J. M.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  5. Massage Therapy for Pain and Function in Patients With Arthritis: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicole L; Churilla, James R

    2017-09-01

    Massage therapy is gaining interest as a therapeutic approach to managing osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. To date, there have been no systematic reviews investigating the effects of massage therapy on these conditions. Systematic review was used. The primary aim of this review was to critically appraise and synthesize the current evidence regarding the effects of massage therapy as a stand-alone treatment on pain and functional outcomes among those with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Relevant randomized controlled trials were searched using the electronic databases Google Scholar, MEDLINE, and PEDro. The PEDro scale was used to assess risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was assessed with the GRADE approach. This review found seven randomized controlled trials representing 352 participants who satisfied the inclusion criteria. Risk of bias ranged from four to seven. Our results found low- to moderate-quality evidence that massage therapy is superior to nonactive therapies in reducing pain and improving certain functional outcomes. It is unclear whether massage therapy is more effective than other forms of treatment. There is a need for large, methodologically rigorous randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of massage therapy as an intervention for individuals with arthritis.

  6. Psychological therapy for inpatients receiving acute mental health care: A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Charlotte; Karatzias, Thanos; Dickson, Adele; Harper, Sean; Dougall, Nadine; Hutton, Paul

    2018-04-16

    The effectiveness of psychological therapies for those receiving acute adult mental health inpatient care remains unclear, partly because of the difficulty in conducting randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in this setting. The aim of this meta-analysis was to synthesize evidence from all controlled trials of psychological therapy carried out with this group, to estimate its effects on a number of important outcomes and examine whether the presence of randomization and rater blinding moderated these estimates. A systematic review and meta-analysis of all controlled trials of psychological therapy delivered in acute inpatient settings was conducted, with a focus on psychotic symptoms, readmissions or emotional distress (anxiety and depression). Studies were identified through ASSIA, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO using a combination of the key terms 'inpatient', 'psychological therapy', and 'acute'. No restriction was placed on diagnosis. The moderating effect of the use of assessor-blind RCT methodology was examined via subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Overall, psychological therapy was associated with small-to-moderate improvements in psychotic symptoms at end of therapy but the effect was smaller and not significant at follow-up. Psychological therapy was also associated with reduced readmissions, depression, and anxiety. The use of single-blind randomized controlled trial methodology was associated with significantly reduced benefits on psychotic symptoms and was also associated with reduced benefits on readmission and depression; however, these reductions were not statistically significant. The provision of psychological therapy to acute psychiatric inpatients is associated with improvements; however, the use of single-blind RCT methodology was associated with reduced therapy-attributable improvements. Whether this is a consequence of increased internal validity or reduced external validity is unclear. Trials with both high internal and

  7. Moderating factors for the effectiveness of group art therapy for schizophrenia: secondary analysis of data from the MATISSE randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Leurent, Baptiste; Killaspy, Helen; Osborn, David P.; Crawford, Mike J.; Hoadley, Angela; Waller, Diane; King, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Although some studies suggest that art therapy may be useful in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia, a recent large trial of group art therapy found no clinical advantage over standard care, but the study population was heterogeneous and uptake of the intervention was poor. This study aimed to investigate whether art therapy was more effective for specific subgroups of patients. METHODS Secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial of group art therapy ...

  8. Cognitive enhancement therapy for adult autism spectrum disorder: Results of an 18-month randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M; Hogarty, Susan S; Greenwald, Deborah P; Litschge, Maralee Y; Porton, Shannondora A; Mazefsky, Carla A; Minshew, Nancy J

    2018-03-01

    Cognitive remediation is a promising approach to treating core cognitive deficits in adults with autism, but rigorously controlled trials of comprehensive interventions that target both social and non-social cognition over a sufficient period of time to impact functioning are lacking. This study examined the efficacy of cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) for improving core cognitive and employment outcomes in adult autism. Verbal adult outpatients with autism spectrum disorder (N = 54) were randomized to an 18-month, single-blind trial of CET, a cognitive remediation approach that integrates computer-based neurocognitive training with group-based training in social cognition, or an active enriched supportive therapy (EST) comparison focused on psychoeducation and condition management. Primary outcomes were composite indexes of neurocognitive and social-cognitive change. Competitive employment was a secondary outcome. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that CET produced significant differential increases in neurocognitive function relative to EST (d = .46, P = .013). Both CET and EST were associated with large social-cognitive improvements, with CET demonstrating an advantage at 9 (d = .58, P = 0.020), but not 18 months (d = .27, P = 0.298). Effects on employment indicated that participants treated with CET were significantly more likely to gain competitive employment than those in EST, OR = 6.21, P = 0.023, which was mediated by cognitive improvement. CET is a feasible and potentially effective treatment for core cognitive deficits in adult autism spectrum disorder. The treatment of cognitive impairments in this population can contribute to meaningful improvements in adult outcomes. Autism Res 2018, 11: 519-530. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Cognitive enhancement therapy (CET), an 18-month cognitive remediation intervention designed to improve thinking and social understanding, was

  9. Self-reported use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies in a reflexology randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Gwen; Sikorskii, Alla; You, Mei

    2013-01-01

    According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), about one-third of American cancer patients have used complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The objective of this secondary analysis was an assessment of the use of other CAM by women with advanced breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy and who participated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) studying the safety and efficacy of reflexology. For this secondary analysis, the research team hypothesized an increased CAM use due to exposure to the reflexology trial. For this secondary analysis, the team conducted telephone interviews at baseline, wk 5, and wk 11 to assess the use of 23 common CAM therapies. The study took place at 14 medical oncology clinics across the Midwestern United States. Participants included women with advanced breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy. In the study related to this secondary analysis, the research team randomly assigned the women to one of three primary groups: (1) reflexology; (2) lay foot manipulation (LFM); and (3) control. In addition, the research team used two test groups to establish the study's protocol: (1) test reflexology and (2) test LFM. For this secondary analysis, the research team considered the two reflexology groups (test and intervention) and the two LFM groups (test and intervention) to be the active groups, comparing their use of CAM to the control group's use at the selected time points. The research team used a linear, mixed-effects model to analyze the number of therapies used at the three time points. The team performed t tests to compare therapy use at baseline for those women who completed the study vs those who dropped out. The team used the CAM-use instrument. In total, 385 women participated. The research team found no differences in CAM use for the active groups vs the control group over time or in those women who stayed in the study vs those who dropped out. The team

  10. Cognitive-behavioral group therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordioli Aristides V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a cognitive-behavioral group therapy protocol and to verify its efficacy to reduce obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Methods: An open clinical trial with 32 obsessive-compulsive patients was performed, in which a cognitive-behavioral group therapy protocol of 12 weekly sessions of two hours, in 5 consecutive groups, was applied. The severity of symptoms was rated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive (Y-BOCS, Hamilton Anxiety (HAM A and Hamilton Depression (HAM D scales. The patients were followed up for 3 months after the end of the treatment. Results: There was a significant reduction in the scores of Y-BOCS, HAM A and HAM D scales with the treatment regardless the use of anti-obsessive medications. The rate of improved patients (decrease of > or = 35% in Y-BOCS was 78.1%. Two patients (6.25% dropped out from the study. The effect size calculated for the Y-BOCS scale was 1.75. Conclusions: This study suggests that cognitive-behavioral group therapy reduces obsessive-compulsive symptoms. In addition, patients presented good compliance.

  11. Occupational Therapy Predischarge Home Visits in Acute Hospital Care: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Lindy; Lannin, Natasha A; Wales, Kylie; Salkeld, Glenn; Rubenstein, Laurence; Gitlin, Laura; Barris, Sarah; Mackenzie, Lynette; Cameron, Ian D

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether an enhanced occupational therapy discharge planning intervention that involved pre- and postdischarge home visits, goal setting, and follow-up (the HOME program) would be superior to a usual care intervention in which an occupational therapy in-hospital consultation for planning and supporting discharge to home is provided to individuals receiving acute care. Randomized controlled trial. Acute and medical wards. Individuals aged 70 and older (N = 400). Primary outcomes: activities daily living (ADLs; Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living) and participation in life roles and activities (Late Life Disability Index (LLDI)). Occupational therapist recommendations differed significantly between groups (P occupational therapy recommendations as the in-hospital only consultation, which had a greater emphasis on equipment provision, but HOME did not demonstrate greater benefit in global measures of ADLs or participation in life tasks than in-hospital consultation alone. It is not recommended that home visits be conducted routinely as part of discharge planning for acutely hospitalized medical patients. Further work should develop guidelines for quality in-hospital consultation. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. The effectiveness of massage therapy in the treatment of infantile colic symptoms: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheidaei, Ali; Abadi, Alireza; Zayeri, Farid; Nahidi, Fatemeh; Gazerani, Nafiseh; Mansouri, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Infantile colic, cry-fuss and sleep problems are transient in the initial months of life, but they contribute to maternal depression, parenting stress and family mental health problems. In this randomized clinical trial, we aimed to explore the efficacy of massage therapy compared to rocking in reducing infantile colic symptoms including duration and number of cries, sleep duration and severity of infant colic. This was a single blind RCT study with a one-week follow-up. One hundred colicky infants aged younger than 12 weeks old were randomly assigned into massage and rocking groups. Infants in the massage group received a massage for 15-20 minutes once during a day and once at night before sleeping for a week. In the control group, mothers rocked their infants gently for 5-25 minutes when the symptoms of colic appeared. Parents recorded the details of the colic symptoms in a diary every day. A GEE approach was applied to explore the effect of the intervention. Efficiency of massage therapy was significantly higher than rocking. At the end of the study, the mean number of daily cries was 4.26±1.40 in the massage and 6.9±2.14 the rocking groups (pmassage therapy is more effective than rocking for treating infant colic symptoms.

  13. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial

  14. Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgett, Rhianna; Klose, Petra; Duffield, Rob; Mydock, Suni; Lauche, Romy

    2018-03-01

    Despite the recent re-emergence of the process of cupping by athletes, supporting evidence for its efficacy and safety remains scarce. This systematic review aims to summarize the evidence of clinical trials on cupping for athletes. SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, PubMed, AMED, and CNKI databases were searched from their inception to December 10, 2016. Randomized controlled trials on cupping therapy with no restriction regarding the technique, or cointerventions, were included, if they measured the effects of cupping compared with any other intervention on health and performance outcomes in professionals, semi-professionals, and leisure athletes. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool were conducted independently by two pairs of reviewers. Eleven trials with n = 498 participants from China, the United States, Greece, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates were included, reporting effects on different populations, including soccer, football, and handball players, swimmers, gymnasts, and track and field athletes of both amateur and professional nature. Cupping was applied between 1 and 20 times, in daily or weekly intervals, alone or in combination with, for example, acupuncture. Outcomes varied greatly from symptom intensity, recovery measures, functional measures, serum markers, and experimental outcomes. Cupping was reported as beneficial for perceptions of pain and disability, increased range of motion, and reductions in creatine kinase when compared to mostly untreated control groups. The majority of trials had an unclear or high risk of bias. None of the studies reported safety. No explicit recommendation for or against the use of cupping for athletes can be made. More studies are necessary for conclusive judgment on the efficacy and safety of cupping in athletes.

  15. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves, E-mail: pierre-yves.bondiau@nice.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Courdi, Adel [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Bahadoran, Phillipe [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Nice, Nice (France); Chamorey, Emmanuel [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Queille-Roussel, Catherine [Centre de Pharmacologie Clinique Appliquée à la Dermatologie, Nice (France); Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  16. Multimodal hypoxia imaging and intensity modulated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: the HIL trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askoxylakis Vasileios

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy, preferably combined with chemotherapy, is the treatment standard for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The tumor response to different therapy protocols is variable, with hypoxia known to be a major factor that negatively influences treatment effectiveness. Visualisation of tumor hypoxia prior to the use of modern radiation therapy strategies, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, might allow optimized dose applications to the target volume, leading to improvement of therapy outcome. 18 F-fluoromisonidazole dynamic positron emission tomography and computed tomography (18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional magnetic resonance imaging (functional MRI are attractive options for imaging tumor hypoxia. Methods/design The HIL trial is a single centre study combining multimodal hypoxia imaging with 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI, with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in patients with inoperable stage III NSCLC. 15 patients will be recruited in the study. All patients undergo initial FDG PET-CT and serial 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI before treatment, at week 5 of radiotherapy and 6 weeks post treatment. Radiation therapy is performed as inversely planned IMRT based on 4D-CT. Discussion Primary objectives of the trial are to characterize the correlation of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for tumor hypoxia imaging in NSCLC and evaluate possible effects of radiation therapy on tumor re-oxygenation. Further objectives include the generation of data regarding the prognostic value of 18 F-FMISO dPET-CT and functional MRI for locoregional control, progression free survival and overall survival of NSCLC treated with IMRT, which will form the basis for larger clinical trials focusing on possible interactions between tumor oxygenation and radiotherapy outcome. Trial registration The ClinicalTrials.gov protocol ID is NCT01617980

  17. NHLBI’s Program for VAD Therapy for Moderately Advanced Heart Failure: The REVIVE-IT Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J. Timothy; Mann, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    Background VADs are used to bridge heart failure patients to transplantation, to allow their own hearts to recover, or as permanent (“destination”) therapy. To date, the use of VADs has been limited to late-stage heart failure patients because of the associated device risks. In 2008, an NHLBI working group met to evaluate the treatment of heart failure using VADs and to advise the institute on how therapy for heart failure may be best advanced by clinical trials involving the devices. Discussion and Recommendations Recognizing the improvements in VAD technology and in patient care and selection over the past decade, the working group recommended that a trial be performed to assess the use of chronic VAD therapy in patients who are less ill than those currently eligible for destination therapy. The hypothesis proposed for the trial is that VAD therapy may improve both survival and quality of life in moderately advanced heart failure patients who are neither inotrope-dependent nor exercise-intolerant and have not yet developed serious consequences such as malnourishment, end-organ damage, and immobility. Based on the group’s recommendations, NHLBI issued an RFP in 2009 for the REVIVE-IT Pilot Trail which will serve to test the hypothesis and inform the pivotal trial. PMID:21055648

  18. Cellulite and extracorporeal Shockwave therapy (CelluShock-2009 - a Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joest Beatrice

    2010-10-01

    strength exercise training. Follow-up: 12 weeks. Blinding was achieved for all participants enrolled in the trial, the photograph taking the digital images for the primary outcome measure, the two assessors of the outcome measures, all additional health care providers and for the analyst from the biometrical department. Only one researcher (BJ was aware of the group assignment performing the randomisation and the extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Discussion This randomised-controlled trial will provide much needed evidence on the clinical effectiveness of focused extracorporal shock wave therapy as an adjunct to gluteal strength training in females suffering cellulite. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00947414

  19. Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine, Bevacizumab, and Erlotinib for Rectal Cancer: A Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eng, Cathy [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; You, Y. Nancy [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Maru, Dipen M. [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Clemons, Marilyn V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kopetz, Scott E.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Shureiqi, Imad [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this phase 1 trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib with preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with clinical stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma, within 12 cm from the anal verge, were treated in 4 escalating dose levels, using the continual reassessment method. Patients received preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks), erlotinib, and capecitabine. Capecitabine dose was increased from 650 mg/m{sup 2} to 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the days of radiation therapy; erlotinib dose was increased from 50 mg orally daily in weeks 1 to 3, to 50 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6, to 100 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6. Patients underwent surgery at least 9 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Results: A total of 19 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients were considered evaluable. No patient had grade 4 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had grade 3 acute toxicity (hypertension). The MTD was not reached. All 18 evaluable patients underwent surgery, with low anterior resection in 7 (39%), proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis in 4 patients (22%), posterior pelvic exenteration in 1 (6%), and abdominoperineal resection in 6 (33%). Of the 18 patients, 8 (44%) had pathologic complete response, and 1 had complete response of the primary tumor with positive nodes. Three patients (17%) had grade 3 postoperative complications (ileus, small bowel obstruction, and infection). With a median follow-up of 34 months, 1 patient developed distant metastasis, and no patient had local recurrence or died. The 3-year disease-free survival was 94%. Conclusions: The combination of preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib was well tolerated. The pathologic complete response rate appears promising and may warrant further investigation.

  20. Randomized, controlled trial of Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy for young people with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inder, Maree L; Crowe, Marie T; Luty, Suzanne E; Carter, Janet D; Moor, Stephanie; Frampton, Christopher M; Joyce, Peter R

    2015-03-01

    This randomized, controlled clinical trial compared the effect of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) to that of specialist supportive care (SSC) on depressive outcomes (primary), social functioning, and mania outcomes over 26-78 weeks in young people with bipolar disorder receiving psychopharmacological treatment. Subjects were aged 15-36 years, recruited from a range of sources, and the patient groups included bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified. Exclusion criteria were minimal. Outcome measures were the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation and the Social Adjustment Scale. Paired-sample t-tests were used to determine the significance of change from baseline to outcome period. Analyses of covariance were used to determine the impact of therapy, impact of lifetime and current comorbidity, interaction between comorbidity and therapy, and impact of age at study entry on depression. A group of 100 participants were randomized to IPSRT (n = 49) or SSC (n = 51). The majority had bipolar I disorder (78%) and were female (76%), with high levels of comorbidity. After treatment, both groups had improved depressive symptoms, social functioning, and manic symptoms. Contrary to our hypothesis, there was no significant difference between therapies. There was no impact of lifetime or current Axis I comorbidity or age at study entry. There was a relative impact of SSC for patients with current substance use disorder. IPSRT and SSC used as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy appear to be effective in reducing depressive and manic symptoms and improving social functioning in adolescents and young adults with bipolar disorder and high rates of comorbidity. Identifying effective treatments that particularly address depressive symptoms is important in reducing the burden of bipolar disorder. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Tamibarotene as maintenance therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagawa, Katsuji; Yanada, Masamitsu; Sakura, Toru; Ueda, Yasunori; Sawa, Masashi; Miyatake, Junichi; Dobashi, Nobuaki; Kojima, Minoru; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Emi, Nobuhiko; Tamaki, Shigehisa; Gomyo, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Etsuko; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Asou, Norio; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ohtake, Shigeki; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Yukio; Naoe, Tomoki

    2014-11-20

    The introduction of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) has significantly improved outcomes for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), although a subset of patients still suffer relapse. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of maintenance therapy with the synthetic retinoid tamibarotene in APL. Patients with newly diagnosed APL in molecular remission at the end of consolidation therapy were randomly assigned to receive ATRA or tamibarotene, both orally, for 14 days every 3 months for up to 2 years. A total of 347 patients were enrolled. Of the 344 eligible patients, 319 (93%) achieved complete remission. After completing three courses of consolidation therapy, 269 patients underwent maintenance random assignment. The relapse-free survival (RFS) rate at 4 years was 84% for the ATRA arm and 91% for the tamibarotene arm (hazard ratio [HR], 0.54; 95% CI, 0.26 to 1.13). When the analysis was restricted to 52 high-risk patients with an initial WBC count ≥ 10.0 × 10(9)/L, the intergroup difference was statistically significant, with 4-year RFS rates of 58% for the ATRA arm and 87% for the tamibarotene arm (HR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.95). For patients with non-high-risk disease, the HR was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.32 to 2.01). The test for interaction between treatment effects and these subgroups resulted in P = .075. Both treatments were generally well tolerated. In this trial, no difference was detected between ATRA and tamibarotene for maintenance therapy. In an exploratory analysis, there was a suggestion of improved efficacy of tamibarotene in high-risk patients, but this requires further study. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Trial of Music, Sucrose, and Combination Therapy for Pain Relief during Heel Prick Procedures in Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Swapnil R; Kadage, Shahajahan; Sinn, John

    2017-11-01

    To compare the effectiveness of music, oral sucrose, and combination therapy for pain relief in neonates undergoing a heel prick procedure. This randomized, controlled, blinded crossover clinical trial included stable neonates >32 weeks of postmenstrual age. Each neonate crossed over to all 3 interventions in random order during consecutive heel pricks. A video camera on mute mode recorded facial expressions, starting 2 minutes before until 7 minutes after the heel prick. The videos were later analyzed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile-Revised (PIPP-R) scale once per minute by 2 independent assessors, blinded to the intervention. The PIPP-R scores were compared between treatment groups using Friedman test. For the 35 participants, the postmenstrual age was 35 weeks (SD, 2.3) with an average weight of 2210 g (SD, 710). The overall median PIPP-R scores following heel prick over 6 minutes were 4 (IQR 0-6), 3 (IQR 0-6), and 1 (IQR 0-3) for the music, sucrose, and combination therapy interventions, respectively. The PIPP-R scores were significantly lower at all time points after combination therapy compared with the groups given music or sucrose alone. There was no difference in PIPP-R scores between the music and sucrose groups. In relatively stable and mature neonates, the combination of music therapy with sucrose provided better pain relief during heel prick than when sucrose or music was used alone. Recorded music in isolation had a similar effect to the current gold standard of oral sucrose. www.anzctr.org.au ACTRN12615000271505. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy's effectiveness for children with autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A): study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.e., number of music therapy sessions per week) affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design Children aged between 4;0 and 6;11 years who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Parents of all participants will receive three sessions of parent counselling (at 0, 2, and 5 months). In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity) or three sessions (high-intensity) per week. Generalised effects of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS) and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS) before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness will be calculated as man years. A group sequential design with first interim look at N = 235 will ensure both power and efficiency. Discussion Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well generalisable to clinical practice. Addressing the issue of dose variation, this study's results will also provide information on the relevance of session frequency for therapy

  4. Spiritual Therapy to Improve the Spiritual Well-Being of Iranian Women with Breast Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Najmeh; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Zamani, Ahmadreza; Bahrami, Fatemeh; Emami, Hamid; Loghmani, Amir; Jafari, Nooshin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of spiritual therapy intervention in improving the spiritual well-being and quality of life (QOL) of Iranian women with breast cancer. Methods. This randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) recruited 65 women with breast cancer, randomly assigned to a 6-week spirituality-based intervention (n = 34) or control group (n = 31). Before and after six-week spiritual therapy intervention, spiritual well-being and quality of life (QOL) were...

  5. Randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy's effectiveness for children with autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geretsegger Monika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.e., number of music therapy sessions per week affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design Children aged between 4;0 and 6;11 years who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Parents of all participants will receive three sessions of parent counselling (at 0, 2, and 5 months. In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity or three sessions (high-intensity per week. Generalised effects of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness will be calculated as man years. A group sequential design with first interim look at N = 235 will ensure both power and efficiency. Discussion Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well generalisable to clinical practice. Addressing the issue of dose variation, this study's results will also provide information on the relevance of session

  6. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C.M.; Ostelo, Raymond W.J.G.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical

  7. Phase I/II trial evaluating combined radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer--A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, Bin S.; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Kernen, Kenneth; Chou, C.-C.; Shalev, Moshe; Vlachaki, Maria T.; Miles, Brian; Kadmon, Dov; Mai, W.-Y.; Caillouet, James; Davis, Maria; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas; Brady, Jett; Carpenter, L. Steve; Lu, Hsin H.; Chiu, J. Kam; Woo, Shiao Y.; Thompson, Timothy; Butler, E. Brian

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To report the preliminary results of a Phase I/II study combining radiotherapy and in situ gene therapy (adenovirus/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene/valacyclovir) with or without hormonal therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Arm A: low-risk patients (T1-T2a, Gleason score <7, pretreatment PSA <10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy. A mean dose of 76 Gy was delivered to the prostate with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Arm B: high-risk patients (T2b-T3, Gleason score ≥7, pretreatment PSA ≥10) were treated with combined radio-gene therapy and hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy was comprised of a 4-month leuprolide injection and 2-week use of flutamide. Arm C: Stage D1 (positive pelvic lymph node) patients received the same regimen as Arm B, with the additional 45 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics. Treatment-related toxicity was assessed using Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program common toxicity score and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity score. Results: Thirty patients (13 in Arm A, 14 in Arm B, and 3 in Arm C) completed the trial. Median follow-up was 5.5 months. Eleven patients (37%) developed flu-like symptoms (Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Grade 1) of fatigue and chills/rigors after gene therapy injection but recovered within 24 h. Four patients (13%) and 2 patients (7%) developed Grade 1 and 2 fever, respectively. There was no patient with weight loss. One patient in Arm B developed Grade 3 elevation in liver enzyme, whereas 11 and 2 patients developed Grade 1 and 2 abnormal liver function tests. There was no Grade 2 or above hematologic toxicity. Three patients had transient rise in creatinine. There was no RTOG Grade 3 or above lower gastrointestinal toxicity. Toxicity levels were as follows: 4 patients (13%), Grade 2; 6 patients (20%), Grade 1; and 20 patients (67%), no toxicity. There was 1 patient with RTOG Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, 12 patients (40%) with Grade 2, 8 patients

  8. Exercise and Manual therapy Arthritis Research Trial (EMPART) for osteoarthritis of the hip: A Multicentre Randomised Controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    French, Helen P

    2012-10-16

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy (ET) compared to ET with adjunctive manual therapy (ET+MT) for people with hip osteoarthritis (OA). A secondary aim was to identify if immediate commencement of ET or ET+MT was more beneficial than a 9 week waiting period for either intervention. DESIGN: Assessor-blind randomised controlled trial with 9 and 18 week follow-ups. SETTING: Four academic teaching hospitals, Dublin, Ireland. PARTICIPANTS: 131 patients with hip OA recruited from general practitioners, rheumatologists, orthopaedic surgeons, and other hospital consultants were randomised to one of three groups: ET (n=45), ET+MT (n=43) and wait-list control (n=43). INTERVENTIONS: Participants in both ET and ET+ MT groups received up to 8 treatments over 8 weeks. Control group participants were re-randomised into either ET or ET+MT group after 9 week follow-up. Their data were pooled with original treatment group data: ET (n=66) and ET+MT (n=65). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the WOMAC physical function (PF) subscale. Secondary outcomes included physical performance, pain, hip range of motion (HROM), anxiety\\/depression, quality of life, medication usage, patient-perceived change and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in WOMAC PF between ET (n=66) and ET+MT (n=65) groups at 9 weeks (mean diff 0.09 (95% CI -4.41, 5.25)) or at 18 weeks (mean diff 0.42 (95% CI -3.98, 6.83)), or other outcomes, except \\'patient satisfaction with outcome\\' which was higher in the ET+MT group (p=0.02). Improvements in WOMAC, HROM and patient-perceived change occurred in both treatment groups compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: Self-reported function, HROM and patient-perceived improvement occurred after an 8 week programme of ET for patients with hip OA MT as an adjunct provided no further benefit, except for higher patient satisfaction.

  9. Reports from the 2010 Clinical and Translational Cancer Research Think Tank meeting: design strategies for personalized therapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donald A; Herbst, Roy S; Rubin, Eric H

    2012-02-01

    It has long been evident that cancer is a heterogeneous disease, but only relatively recently have we come to realize the extent of this heterogeneity. No single therapy is effective for every patient with tumors having the same histology. A clinical strategy based on a single-therapy approach results in overtreatment for the majority of patients. Biomarkers can be considered as knives that dissect the disease ever more finely. The future of clinical research will be based on learning whether certain therapies are more appropriate than others for biomarker-defined subsets of patients. Therapies will eventually be tailored to narrow biomarker subsets. The ability to determine which therapies are appropriate for which patients requires information from biological science as well as empirical evidence from clinical trials. Neither is easy to achieve. Here we describe some nascent approaches for designing clinical trials that are biomarker-based and adaptive. Our focus is on adaptive trials that address many questions at once. In a way, these clinical experiments are themselves part of a much larger experiment: learning how (or whether it is possible) to design experiments that match patients in small subsets of disease with therapies that are especially effective and possibly even curative for them.

  10. Effectiveness of Aquatic Therapy vs Land-based Therapy for Balance and Pain in Women with Fibromyalgia: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas Neira, Sabela; Pasqual Marques, Amélia; Pegito Pérez, Irene; Fernández Cervantes, Ramón; Vivas Costa, Jamile

    2017-01-19

    Fibromyalgia is a disease with an increasing incidence. It impairs the quality of life of patients and decreases their functional capacity. Aquatic therapy has already been used for managing the symptoms of this syndrome. However, aquatic therapy has only recently been introduced as a treatment modality for improving proprioception in fibromyalgia. The main objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of two physiotherapy protocols, one in and one out of water, for improving balance and decreasing pain in women with fibromyalgia. The study protocol will be a single-blind randomised controlled trial. Forty women diagnosed with fibromyalgia will be randomly assigned into 2 groups: Aquatic Therapy (n = 20) or Land-based Therapy (n = 20). Both interventions include 60-min therapy sessions, structured into 4 sections: Warm-up, Proprioceptive Exercises, Stretching and Relaxation. These sessions will be carried out 3 times a week for 3 months. Primary outcomes are balance (static and dynamic) and pain (intensity and threshold). Secondary outcomes include functional balance, quality of life, quality of sleep, fatigue, self-confidence in balance and physical ability. Outcome measures will be evaluated at baseline, at the end of the 3-month intervention period, and 6-weeks post-treatment. Statistical analysis will be carried out using the SPSS 21.0 program for Windows and a significance level of p ≤ 0.05 will be used for all tests. This study protocol details two physiotherapy interventions in women with fibromyalgia to improve balance and decrease pain: aquatic therapy and land-based therapy. In current literature there is a lack of methodological rigour and a limited number of studies that describe physiotherapy protocols to manage fibromyalgia symptoms. High-quality scientific works are required to highlight physiotherapy as one of the most recommended treatment options for this syndrome. Date of publication in ClinicalTrials.gov: 18

  11. Easy rider wheelchair biking. A nursing-recreation therapy clinical trial for the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, S

    2001-05-01

    Depression is a common condition among long-term care residents with limited treatment options available. There are few nonpharmacological interventions available to this population. This study examined the use of a prescribed, therapeutic recreation-nursing intervention, wheelchair biking, for treatment of symptoms of depression in older adults in a long-term care setting. A classical experimental design was used and was guided by the Roy Adaptation Model. Forty residents were pretested for depression and randomly assigned to two groups. A 2-week trial of biking therapy was provided to the treatment group. All participants were posttested. Findings indicated there was a statistically significant improvement in depression scores for the treatment group and no significant change for the control group. This study contributes to the body of knowledge of nursing regarding options for the treatment of depression in older adults, and is an encouraging indicator that psychosocial interventions may be effective in reducing depression.

  12. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Increase Self-Compassion: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadavaia, James E; Hayes, Steven C; Vilardaga, Roger

    2014-10-01

    Self-compassion has been shown to be related to several types of psychopathology, including traumatic stress, and has been shown to improve in response to various kinds of interventions. Current conceptualizations of self-compassion fit well with the psychological flexibility model, which underlies acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). However, there has been no research on ACT interventions specifically aimed at self-compassion. This randomized trial therefore compared a 6-hour ACT-based workshop targeting self-compassion to a wait-list control. From pretreatment to 2-month follow-up, ACT was significantly superior to the control condition in self-compassion, general psychological distress, and anxiety. Process analyses revealed psychological flexibility to be a significant mediator of changes in self-compassion, general psychological distress, depression, anxiety, and stress. Exploratory moderation analyses revealed the intervention to be of more benefit in terms of depression, anxiety, and stress to those with greater trauma history.

  13. Affective-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Woolfolk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess the efficacy of an individually administered form of cognitive behavioral treatment for fibromyalgia. In an additive design, 76 patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to either the experimental treatment (affective-cognitive behavioral therapy, 10 individual sessions, one per week administered concurrently with treatment-as-usual or to an unaugmented treatment-as-usual condition. Statistical analysis conducted at the end of treatment (3 months after the baseline assessment and at a followup (9 months after the baseline assessment indicated that the patients receiving the experimental treatment reported less pain and overall better functioning than control patients, both at posttreatment and at followup. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

  14. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy of bladder cancer with alasens (results of multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of multicenter prospective trial for efficacy of combined modality treatment: transurethral resection (TUR + photodynamic therapy (PDT with alasens for bladder cancer are represented in the article. Trials were organized by Research Institute of Organic Intermediates and Dyes and conducted according to clinical protocol approved by Ministry of Health of Russia, at the sites of leading Russian cancer clinical centers. The trial included 45 subjects with verified diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients underwent TUR of bladder with simultaneous PDT as anti-relapse treatment. Alasens was administered to patients as intravesicular instillation of 3% solution in volume of 50 ml with 1.5–2h exposure (prior to TUR. TUR was performed after instillation. PDT session was conducted immediately after the completion of TUR on a single occasion by means of combined local irradiation on tumor bed with diffuse irradiation on whole urinary bladder mucosa (light dose of local irradiation – 100 J/cm2, diffuse irradiation – 20 J/cm2. Good tolerance of the treatment was noticed, there were no complications. Among 45 patients included in the trial, 35 (78% completed 12 month protocol follow-up without relapse. The recurrence of bladder tumor was registered in 10 (22% cases 6–12 months after TUR+PDT including 3 patients with recurrence 6 months after treatment, 3–9 months and 4–12 months. These patients underwent repeated TUR, whereafter their follow-up in the settings of the clinical trial was disposed. Thus, PDT with alasens after TUR allowed to decrease the recurrence rate of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer for 1st year after treatment to 22% versus 40–80% for TUR as monotherapy according to literature data. The obtained results were comparable by efficiency with TUR combined with methods of adjuvant treatment for bladder tumors (the recurrence rates for 1-year follow-up after TUR+chemotherapy – 36–44%, after TUR

  15. Dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents with bipolar disorder: results from a pilot randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Tina R; Fersch-Podrat, Rachael K; Rivera, Maribel; Axelson, David A; Merranko, John; Yu, Haifeng; Brent, David A; Birmaher, Boris

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot randomized trial of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) versus psychosocial treatment as usual (TAU) for adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BP). We recruited participants 12-18 years of age with a primary BP diagnosis (I, II, or operationalized not otherwise specified [NOS] criteria) from a pediatric specialty clinic. Eligible patients were assigned using a 2:1 randomization structure to either DBT (n=14) or psychosocial TAU (n=6). All patients received medication management from a study-affiliated psychiatrist. DBT included 36 sessions (18 individual, 18 family skills training) over 1 year. TAU was an eclectic psychotherapy approach consisting of psychoeducational, supportive, and cognitive behavioral techniques. An independent evaluator, blind to treatment condition, assessed outcomes including affective symptoms, suicidal ideation and behavior, nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior, and emotional dysregulation, quarterly over 1 year. Adolescents receiving DBT attended significantly more therapy sessions over 1 year than did adolescents receiving TAU, possibly reflecting greater engagement and retention; both treatments were rated as highly acceptable by adolescents and parents. As compared with adolescents receiving TAU, adolescents receiving DBT demonstrated significantly less severe depressive symptoms over follow-up, and were nearly three times more likely to demonstrate improvement in suicidal ideation. Models indicate a large effect size, for more weeks being euthymic, over follow-up among adolescents receiving DBT. Although there were no between-group differences in manic symptoms or emotional dysregulation with treatment, adolescents receiving DBT, but not those receiving TAU, evidenced improvement from pre- to posttreatment in both manic symptoms and emotional dysregulation. DBT may offer promise as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy in the treatment of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation for

  16. Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for major depressive disorder: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Isabelle M; Killgore, William D S; Olson, Elizabeth A; Webb, Christian A; Fukunaga, Rena; Auerbach, Randy P; Gogel, Hannah; Buchholz, Jennifer L; Rauch, Scott L

    2017-03-01

    Prior research has shown that the Sadness Program, a technician-assisted Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) intervention developed in Australia, is effective for treating major depressive disorder (MDD). The current study aimed to expand this work by adapting the protocol for an American population and testing the Sadness Program with an attention control group. In this parallel-group, randomized controlled trial, adult MDD participants (18-45 years) were randomized to a 10-week period of iCBT (n = 37) or monitored attention control (MAC; n = 40). Participants in the iCBT group completed six online therapy lessons, which included access to content summaries and homework assignments. During the 10-week trial, iCBT and MAC participants logged into the web-based system six times to complete self-report symptom scales, and a nonclinician technician contacted participants weekly to provide encouragement and support. The primary outcome was the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), and the secondary outcomes were the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Kessler-10. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed significantly greater reductions in depressive symptoms in iCBT compared with MAC participants, using both the self-report measures and the clinician-rated HRSD (d = -0.80). Importantly, iCBT participants also showed significantly higher rates of clinical response and remission. Exploratory analyses did not support illness severity as a moderator of treatment outcome. The Sadness Program led to significant reductions in depression and distress symptoms. With its potential to be delivered in a scalable, cost-efficient manner, iCBT is a promising strategy to enhance access to effective care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Individual Versus Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Partner-Violent Men: A Preliminary Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Christopher M; Eckhardt, Christopher I; Clifford, Judith M; Lamotte, Adam D; Meis, Laura A

    2017-04-01

    A randomized clinical trial tested the hypothesis that a flexible, case formulation-based, individual treatment approach integrating motivational interviewing strategies with cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT) is more efficacious than a standardized group cognitive-behavioral approach (GCBT) for perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV). Forty-two men presenting for services at a community domestic violence agency were randomized to receive 20 sessions of ICBT or a 20-week group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) program. Participants and their relationship partners completed assessments of relationship abuse and relationship functioning at baseline and quarterly follow-ups for 1 year. Treatment uptake and session attendance were significantly higher in ICBT than GCBT. However, contrary to the study hypothesis, GCBT produced consistently equivalent or greater benefits than ICBT. Participant self-reports revealed significant reductions in abusive behavior and injuries across conditions with no differential benefits between conditions. Victim partner reports revealed more favorable outcomes for group treatment, including a statistically significant difference in psychological aggression, and differences exceeding a medium effect size for physical assault, emotional abuse, and partner relationship adjustment. In response to hypothetical relationship scenarios, GCBT was associated with greater reductions than ICBT (exceeding a medium effect) in articulated cognitive distortions and aggressive intentions. Treatment competence ratings suggest that flexible, individualized administration of CBT creates challenges in session agenda setting, homework implementation, and formal aspects of relationship skills training. Although caution is needed in generalizing findings from this small-scale trial, the results suggest that the mutual support and positive social influence available in group intervention may be particularly helpful for IPV perpetrators.

  18. Effect of periodontal therapy on arterial structure and function among aboriginal australians: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; Jamieson, Lisa M; Do, Loc G; O'Dea, Kerin; Brown, Alex; Cai, Tommy Y; Anstey, Nicholas M; Sullivan, David R; Wang, Hao; Celermajer, David S; Slade, Gary D; Skilton, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment. Prespecified primary end points measured 12-month change in carotid intima-media thickness, an indicator of arterial structure, and 3- and 12-month change in pulse wave velocity, an indicator of arterial function. ANCOVA used complete case data to evaluate treatment group differences. End points could be calculated for 169 participants with follow-up data at 3 months and 168 participants at 12 months. Intima-media thickness decreased significantly after 12 months in the intervention group (mean reduction=-0.023 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.038 to -0.008] mm) but not in the control group (mean increase=0.002 [95% CI, -0.017 to 0.022] mm). The difference in intima-media thickness change between treatment groups was statistically significant (-0.026 [95% CI, -0.048 to -0.003] mm; P=0.03). In contrast, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in pulse wave velocity at 3 months (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.29] m/s; P=0.594) or 12 months (mean difference, 0.21 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.43] m/s; P=0.062). Periodontal therapy reduced subclinical arterial thickness but not function in Aboriginal Australians with periodontal disease, suggesting periodontal disease and atherosclerosis are significantly associated. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Lisa S; Maguen, Shira; Metzler, Thomas J; Schmitz, Martha; McCaslin, Shannon E; Richards, Anne; Perlis, Michael L; Posner, Donn A; Weiss, Brandon; Ruoff, Leslie; Varbel, Jonathan; Neylan, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Examine whether cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) improves sleep in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as nightmares, nonsleep PTSD symptoms, depression symptoms, and psychosocial functioning. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL WITH TWO ARMS: CBT-I and monitor-only waitlist control. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center. Forty-five adults (31 females: [mean age 37 y (22-59 y)] with PTSD meeting research diagnostic criteria for insomnia, randomly assigned to CBT-I (n = 29; 22 females) or monitor-only waitlist control (n = 16; nine females). Eight-session weekly individual CBT-I delivered by a licensed clinical psychologist or a board-certified psychiatrist. Measures included continuous monitoring of sleep with diary and actigraphy; prepolysomnography and postpolysomnography and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS); and pre, mid, and post self-report questionnaires, with follow-up of CBT-I participants 6 mo later. CBT-I was superior to the waitlist control condition in all sleep diary outcomes and in polysomnography-measured total sleep time. Compared to waitlist participants, CBT-I participants reported improved subjective sleep (41% full remission versus 0%), disruptive nocturnal behaviors (based on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-Addendum), and overall work and interpersonal functioning. These effects were maintained at 6-mo follow-up. Both CBT-I and waitlist control participants reported reductions in PTSD symptoms and CAPS-measured nightmares. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) improved sleep in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder, with durable gains at 6 mo. Overall psychosocial functioning improved following CBT-I. The initial evidence regarding CBT-I and nightmares is promising but further research is needed. Results suggest that a comprehensive approach to treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder should include behavioral sleep medicine. TRIAL NAME: Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Of Insomnia

  20. Phase II Radiation therapy oncology group trial of weekly paclitaxel and conventional external beam radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.; Ruffer, James; Rhodes, Harker; Paulus, Rebecca; Murray, Kevin; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± carmustine (BCNU) is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but survival results remain poor. Preclinical studies indicate synergy between RT and paclitaxel (TAX) in astrocytoma cell lines. Phase I studies in GBM have demonstrated a maximum tolerated dose for TAX of 225 mg/m 2 /3 h/week x 6, during EBRT, with no exacerbation of typical RT-induced toxicities. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) therefore mounted a Phase II study to determine the feasibility and efficacy of conventional EBRT and concurrent weekly TAX at its MTD. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with histologic diagnosis of GBM were enrolled from 8/16/96 through 3/21/97 in a multi-institutional Phase II trial of EBRT and TAX 225 mg/m 2 /3 h (1-3 h before EBRT), administered the first treatment day of each RT week. Total EBRT dose was 60 Gy (200 cGy/fraction), 5 days per week. A smaller treatment field, to include gross disease plus a margin only, was used after 46 Gy. Results: Sixty-one patients (98%) were evaluable. Median age was 55 years (range, 28-78). Seventy-four percent were ≥50 years. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Classes III, IV, V, VI included 10 (17%), 21 (34%), 25 (41%), and 5 (8%) patients, respectively. Gross total resection was performed in only 16%. There was no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Hypersensitivity reactions precluding further use of TAX occurred in 4 patients. There were 2 instances of late neurotoxicity (4% Grade 3 or 4). Ninety-one percent of patients received treatment per protocol. Seventy-seven percent completed prescribed treatment (6 weeks). Of 35 patients with measurable disease, CR/PR was observed in 23%, MR in 17%, and SD in 43%. Seventeen percent demonstrated progression at first follow-up. Median potential follow-up time is 20 months. Median survival is 9.7 months, with median survivals for RPA classes III, IV, V, and VI of 16.3, 10

  1. Sensor-augmented pump therapy lowers HbA(1c) in suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes; a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, J.; Nørgaard, K.; Bruttomesso, D.; Mathieu, C.; Frid, A.; Dayan, C. M.; Diem, P.; Fermon, C.; Wentholt, I. M. E.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; DeVries, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of sensor-augmented pump therapy vs. multiple daily injection therapy in patients with suboptimally controlled Type 1 diabetes. In this investigator-initiated multi-centre trial (the Eurythmics Trial) in eight outpatient centres in Europe, we randomized 83 patients with

  2. Comparison of doses delivered in clinical trials of neutron capture therapy in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albritton, J.R.; Binns, P.J.; Riley, K.J.; Coderre, J.A.; Harling, O.K.; Kiger, W.S. III

    2006-01-01

    A combined 81 brain tumor patients have been treated in dose escalation trials of Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) at Harvard-MIT and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Pooling the clinical outcomes from these trials will permit evaluation with more statistical rigor. However, differences in physical and computational dosimetry between the institutions make direct comparison of the clinical dosimetry difficult. This paper describes work performed to normalize the BNL clinical dosimetry to that of Harvard-MIT for combined dose response analysis. This normalization involved analysis of MIT measurements and calculations using the BNL treatment planning system (TPS), BNCT - Rtpe, for two different phantoms. The BNL TPS was calibrated to dose measurements made by MIT at the BMRR in the BNL calibration phantom, a Lucite cube, and then validated by MIT dose measurements at the BMMR in an ellipsoidal water phantom. Treatment plans for all BNL patients were recomputed using the newly determined TPS calibration, yielding reductions in reported mean brain doses of 19% on average in the initial 15 patients and 31% in the latter 38 patients. These reductions in reported doses have clinically significant implications for those relying on reported BNL doses as a basis for initial dose selection in clinical studies. (author)

  3. JAK2 inhibitor therapy in myeloproliferative disorders: rationale, preclinical studies and ongoing clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanani, A

    2008-01-01

    The recent identification of somatic mutations such as JAK2V617F that deregulate Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling has spurred development of orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitors that selectively target JAK2 kinase as an approach to pathogenesis-directed therapy of myeloproliferative disorders (MPD). In pre-clinical studies, these compounds inhibit JAK2V617F-mediated cell growth at nanomolar concentrations, and in vivo therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated in mouse models of JAK2V617F-induced disease. In addition, ex vivo growth of progenitor cells from MPD patients harboring JAK2V617F or MPLW515L/K mutations is also potently inhibited. JAK2 inhibitors currently in clinical trials can be grouped into those designed to primarily target JAK2 kinase (JAK2-selective) and those originally developed for non-MPD indications, but that nevertheless have significant JAK2-inhibitory activity (non-JAK2 selective). This article discusses the rationale for using JAK2 inhibitors for the treatment of MPD, as well as relevant aspects of clinical trial development for these patients. For instance, which group of MPD patients is appropriate for initial Phase I studies? Should JAK2V617F-negative MPD patients be included in the initial studies? What are the likely consequences of 'off-target' JAK3 and wild-type JAK2 inhibition? How should treatment responses be monitored?

  4. Music in mind, a randomized controlled trial of music therapy for young people with behavioural and emotional problems: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Sam; Holmes, Valerie; McLaughlin, Katrina; Lynn, Fiona; Cardwell, Chris; Braiden, Hannah-Jane; Doran, Jackie; Rogan, Sheelagh

    2012-10-01

    This article is a report of a trial protocol to determine if improvizational music therapy leads to clinically significant improvement in communication and interaction skills for young people experiencing social, emotional or behavioural problems. Music therapy is often considered an effective intervention for young people experiencing social, emotional or behavioural difficulties. However, this assumption lacks empirical evidence. Music in mind is a multi-centred single-blind randomized controlled trial involving 200 young people (aged 8-16 years) and their parents. Eligible participants will have a working diagnosis within the ambit of international classification of disease 10 mental and behavioural disorders and will be recruited over 15 months from six centres within the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services of a large health and social care trust in Northern Ireland. Participants will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive standard care alone or standard care plus 12 weekly music therapy sessions delivered by the Northern Ireland Music Therapy Trust. Baseline data will be collected from young people and their parents using standardized outcome measures for communicative and interaction skills (primary endpoint), self-esteem, social functioning, depression and family functioning. Follow-up data will be collected 1 and 13 weeks after the final music therapy session. A cost-effectiveness analysis will also be carried out. This study will be the largest trial to date examining the effect of music therapy on young people experiencing social, emotional or behavioural difficulties and will provide empirical evidence for the use of music therapy among this population. Trial registration. This study is registered in the ISRCTN Register, ISRCTN96352204. Ethical approval was gained in October 2010. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Cardiopulmonary Conditions: Preliminary Outcomes From an Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Deswal, Anita; Hanania, Nicola A.; Phillips, Laura L.; Kunik, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effectiveness of tailored cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for veterans with congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with comorbid symptoms of depression and/or anxiety. Method: Twenty-three veterans with CHF and/or COPD, identified from electronic medical records at a large Veterans Affairs medical center, with clinically significant symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II] score ≥ 14) and/or anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI] score ≥ 40) were enrolled in an open trial from August 2007 to August 2008. All patients received CBT delivered mostly by advanced psychology trainees that consisted of 6 weekly sessions and 3 telephone booster calls. The intervention expanded traditional CBT techniques in order to address patients’ emotional and physical health difficulties using in-person and telephone-based sessions. Outcomes examined depression (BDI-II), anxiety (STAI), and disease-specific quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire [CRQ] and Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire [KCCQ]) postintervention and at 3-month follow-up. Results: Symptoms of depression (effect size = 0.97) and anxiety (effect size = 0.57) were improved at 8 weeks and maintained at 3-month follow-up. Physical disease outcomes were also improved for COPD (CRQ mastery effect size = 0.65, CRQ fatigue effect size = 0.75) and CHF (KCCQ overall summary score effect size = 1.19). Conclusions: Modifications to traditional CBT approaches have the potential to address the emotional and physical health challenges associated with complex cardiopulmonary patients. The brief duration and use of telephone-based sessions increase the opportunity for CBT interventions to be integrated within primary care settings, but additional trials are needed. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00727155 PMID:21085552

  6. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of herbal therapy for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eliza L Y; Sung, Rita Yn Tz; Leung, Ting Fan; Wong, Yeuk Oi; Li, Albert M C; Cheung, Kam Lau; Wong, Chun Kwok; Fok, Tai Fai; Leung, Ping Chung

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this trial was to evaluate whether the herbal formula of CUF2 used as complementary therapy improves the clinical symptoms and biochemical markers in children with asthma using inhaled corticosteroids. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled prospective trial, 85 children with asthma aged 7-15 years were randomly assigned to receive either a daily oral herbal formula of 0.619-g CUF2 capsule of dried aqueous extract with an equal weight of five herbs (Astragalus mongholius Bunge, Cordyceps sinensis Sacc., Radix stemonae, Bulbus fritillariae cirrhosae, and Radix scutellariae) or placebo for 6 months. The primary endpoint was the change in steroids dosage; the secondary outcomes included the disease severity score, lung function test, and biochemical markers in blood. Eighty-five (85) children (42 on active treatment and 43 on placebo) completed the 6-month clinical trial. Children randomized to the herbal formula of CUF2 and the placebo showed a similar improvement in clinical symptoms and biomedical markers. The comparison between the CUF2 group and the placebo group showed no significant difference on the dosage of steroids (-2.3 versus -3.1 mg, p = 0.915), disease severity score (-2.3 versus -3.1, p = 0.215), and lung function test of forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity percent (0.1 versus 0.6%, p = 0.809) and peak expiratory flow rate (-7.3 versus -0.6 l/minutes, p = 0.118). No significant difference was found between the two study groups in the biochemical outcomes measured. The intervention effect of CUF2 was smaller than the placebo effect. This study provides no evidence to support the use of the herbal formula of CUF2 in children with asthma. Parents are thus advised to discuss with health professionals before choosing an herbal formula in preference to conventional treatment modes.

  7. Singing teaching as a therapy for chronic respiratory disease - a randomised controlled trial and qualitative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Julia L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite optimal pharmacological therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation, patients with COPD continue to be breathless. There is a need to develop additional strategies to alleviate symptoms. Learning to sing requires control of breathing and posture and might have benefits that translate into daily life. Methods To test this hypothesis we performed a randomised controlled trial, comparing a six week course of twice weekly singing classes to usual care, in 28 COPD patients. The experience of singing was assessed in a qualitative fashion, through interviews with a psychologist. In addition, we surveyed patients with chronic respiratory conditions who participated in a series of open singing workshops. Results In the RCT, the physical component score of the SF36 improved in the singers (n = 15 compared to the controls (n = 13; +7.5(14.6 vs. -3.8(8.4 p = 0.02. Singers also had a significant fall in HAD anxiety score; -1.1(2.7 vs. +0.8(1.7 p = 0.03. Singing did not improve single breath counting, breath hold time or shuttle walk distance. In the qualitative element, 8 patients from the singing group were interviewed. Positive effects on physical sensation, general well-being, community/social support and achievement/efficacy emerged as common themes. 150 participants in open workshops completed a questionnaire. 96% rated the workshops as "very enjoyable" and 98% thought the workshop had taught them something about breathing in a different way. 81% of attendees felt a "marked physical difference" after the workshop. Conclusion Singing classes can improve quality of life measures and anxiety and are viewed as a very positive experience by patients with respiratory disease; no adverse consequences of participation were observed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials - ISRCTN17544114.

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for trials with cutting-edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and ... trials that involve high-risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A ...

  9. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community), pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC) (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings). Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8%) were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group) during follow-up (time to healing 79 days). The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT) and 5.7 (SC); 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT) and 5.0 (SC) months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034. PMID:22839453

  10. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashby Rebecca L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community, pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings. Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8% were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group during follow-up (time to healing 79 days. The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT and 5.7 (SC; 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT and 5.0 (SC months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034.

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mindfulness and Acceptance Group Therapy for Residential Substance Use Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, Ryan C; Elmquist, Joanna; Gawrysiak, Michael J; Strauss, Catherine; Haynes, Ellen; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L

    2017-09-19

    Substance use disorders are understood as a chronically relapsing condition that is difficult to treat. However, in recent years there have been promising developments in the treatment of substance use disorders, specifically with interventions based on mindfulness and acceptance and commitment therapy. Little research has examined whether these types of interventions may positively impact residential substance use treatment outcomes. Thus, in the current study we developed and examined, in a randomized controlled trial, a 4-week, eight-session, adjunctive mindfulness and acceptance group therapy for patients in residential substance use treatment. Our primary outcomes were substance use cravings, psychological flexibility, and dispositional mindfulness at treatment discharge. Patients (N = 117) from a private residential substance use facility were randomized to receive the adjunctive mindfulness and acceptance group or treatment-as-usual. Patients were assessed at treatment intake and at discharge from a 28-30-day residential program. Although treatment groups did not statistically differ at discharge on any primary outcome, small effect sizes favored the mindfulness and acceptance group on cravings and psychological flexibility. Conclusions/Importance: Continued research is needed to determine whether the addition of mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions improve outcomes long term following residential substance use treatment.

  12. Medication therapy management and complex patients with disability: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrischilles, Elizabeth A; Doucette, William; Farris, Karen; Lindgren, Scott; Gryzlak, Brian; Rubenstein, Linda; Youland, Kelly; Wallace, Robert B

    2014-02-01

    Drug therapy problems, adverse drug events (ADEs), and symptom burden are high among adults with disabilities. To compare the effects of a modified medication therapy management (MTM) program within a self-efficacy workshop versus the workshop alone or usual care on symptom burden among adults with activity limitations. Three-group randomized controlled trial among adults (age 40 and older) with self-reported activity limitations in community practice. 8 weekly Living Well With a Disability (LWD) 2-hour workshop sessions with and without a collaborative medication management (CMM) module. mean number of moderate to very severe symptoms from a list of 11 physical and mental symptoms. Process measures: changes in medication regimens and self-reported ADEs. general linear mixed models (continuous outcomes) and generalized estimating equations (categorical outcomes). Participants had high symptom burden, low physical health, and took many medications. There was a significant increase in ADE reporting in the LWD + CMM group relative to the other 2 groups (Study group × Time P = .014), and there were significantly more changes in medication regimens in the LWD + CMM group (P = .013 LWD only vs LWD + CMM). The oldest third of participants had significantly fewer mean symptoms but received more intense CMM. There was no difference between the LWD-only, LWD + CMM, and usual care groups in symptom burden over time. Pharmacist MTM practices and MTM guidelines may need to be modified to affect symptom burden in a population with physical activity limitations.

  13. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Isakoff, Steven J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

  14. Hypothalamic Obesity following Craniopharyngioma Surgery: Results of a Pilot Trial of Combined Diazoxide and Metformin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Alexandra

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effect of combined diazoxide-metformin therapy in obese adolescents treated for craniopharyngioma. Design. A prospective open-label 6-month pilot treatment trial in 9 obese subjects with craniopharyngioma. Diazoxide (2 mg/kg divided b.i.d., maximum 200 mg/day and metformin (1000 mg b.i.d.. Whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI and area-under-the-curve insulin (AUCins were calculated. Results. Seven subjects completed: 4M/3F, mean ± SD age years, weight  kg, BMI  kg/m2, and BMI SDS . Two were withdrawn due to vomiting and peripheral edema. Of participants completing the study, the mean ± SD weight gain, BMI, and BMI SDS during the 6 months were reduced compared to the 6 months prestudy ( versus  kg, ; versus  kg/m2, ; versus , , resp.. AUCins correlated with weight loss (, and BMI decrease (, . Conclusion. Combined diazoxide-metformin therapy was associated with reduced weight gain in patients with hypothalamic obesity. AUCins at study commencement predicted effectiveness of the treatment.

  15. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea; Specht, Michelle; Isakoff, Steven J.; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods

  16. Early Intervention for Symptomatic Youth at Risk for Bipolar Disorder: A Randomized Trial of Family-Focused Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklowitz, David J.; Schneck, Christopher D.; Singh, Manpreet K.; Taylor, Dawn O.; George, Elizabeth L.; Cosgrove, Victoria E.; Howe, Meghan E.; Dickinson, L. Miriam; Garber, Judy; Chang, Kiki D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Depression and brief periods of (hypo)mania are linked to an increased risk of progression to bipolar I or II disorder (BD) in children of bipolar parents. This randomized trial examined the effects of a 4-month family-focused therapy (FFT) program on the 1-year course of mood symptoms in youth at high familial risk for BD, and explored…

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for 4- to 7-Year-Old Children with Anxiety Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Masek, Bruce; Henin, Aude; Blakely, Lauren Raezer; Pollock-Wurman, Rachel A.; McQuade, Julia; DePetrillo, Lillian; Briesch, Jacquelyn; Ollendick, Thomas H.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of a developmentally appropriate parent-child cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for anxiety disorders in children ages 4-7 years. Method: Design: Randomized wait-list controlled trial. Conduct: Sixty-four children (53% female, mean age 5.4 years, 80% European American) with anxiety disorders were…

  18. Cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and general practitioner care for neck pain: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals-de Bos, Ingeborg B. C.; Hoving, Jan L.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P. M. H.; Adèr, Herman J.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Koes, Bart W.; Vondeling, Hindrik; Bouter, Lex M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain. DESIGN: Economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Primary care. PARTICIPANTS: 183 patients with neck pain for at least two weeks

  19. Emotion Regulation Enhancement of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for College Student Problem Drinkers: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julian D.; Grasso, Damion J.; Levine, Joan; Tennen, Howard

    2018-01-01

    This pilot randomized clinical trial tested an emotion regulation enhancement to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with 29 college student problem drinkers with histories of complex trauma and current clinically significant traumatic stress symptoms. Participants received eight face-to-face sessions of manualized Internet-supported CBT for problem…

  20. A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy in the Netherlands: post-treatment changes and moderator effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, J.J.; Dekovic, M.; Manders, W.A.; Prins, P.J.M.; van der Laan, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In the present randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy (MST) in The Netherlands was examined. Moderator tests were conducted for ethnicity, age and gender. Methods: The sample consisted of N = 256 adolescents, referred because of conduct problems, and

  1. A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy in the Netherlands: post-treatment changes and moderator effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, J.J.; Deković, M.; Manders, W.A.; van der Laan, P.H.; Prins, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In the present randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy (MST) in The Netherlands was examined. Moderator tests were conducted for ethnicity, age and gender. Methods: The sample consisted of N = 256 adolescents, referred because of conduct problems, and

  2. Early conversion from calcineurin inhibitor- to everolimus-based therapy following kidney transplantation : Results of the randomized ELEVATE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Fijter, Johan W; Holdaas, Hallvard; Øyen, Ole; Sanders, Jan Stephan; Sundar, Sankaran; Bemelman, Frederike J; Sommerer, Claudia; Pascual, Julio; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Pongskul, Cholatip; Oppenheimer, Frederic; Toselli, Lorenzo; Russ, Graeme; Wang, Zailong; Lopez, Patricia; Kochuparampil, Jossy; Cruzado, Josep M; van der Giet, Markus

    In a 24-month, multicenter, open-label, randomized trial, 715 de novo kidney transplant recipients were randomized at 10-14 weeks to convert to everolimus (n=359) or remain on standard calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) therapy (n=356; 231 tacrolimus; 125 cyclosporine), all with mycophenolic acid and

  3. Percutaneous coronary intervention and antiplatelet therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation receiving apixaban or warfarin: Insights from the ARISTOTLE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopin, D.; Jones, W.S.; Sherwood, M.W.; Wojdyla, D.M.; Wallentin, L.; Lewis, B.S.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Vinereanu, D.; Bahit, M.C.; Halvorsen, S.; Huber, K.; Parkhomenko, A.; Granger, C.B.; Lopes, R.D.; Alexander, J.H.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed antiplatelet therapy use and outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) during the ARISTOTLE trial. METHODS: Patients were categorized based on the occurrence of PCI during follow-up (median 1.8 years); PCI details and outcomes post-PCI are

  4. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T.B.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Methods: A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were

  5. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, M. E.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T. B.; Lemmens, J. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were selected. Two intervention

  6. Trials to optimize dosimetry for 153Sm-EDTMP therapy to improve therapeutic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, G.; Moncayo-Naveda, R.; Oberlandstaetter, M.; Donnemiller, E.; Kendler, D.

    2001-01-01

    In a trial to improve results of therapy with 153 Sm-EDTMP for pain control in patients with disseminated bone metastases dosimetric studies were performed. Out of 30 treated patients 8 were selected for the study at random (5 breast Ca., 3 prostate Ca.). Whole body retention (WBR) of 99m Tc-DPD and 99m Tc-EDTMP was compared with WBR of 153 Sm-EDTMP. Volume of metastases and regional 99 m Tc-phosphonate uptake were assessed by SPECT and conjugated whole body scan data after phantom studies. Effective half-life was estimated also. Clinically results of pain control, side effects and changes of in vitro parameters were followed after therapy for up to 8 months. Therapy was performed in these patients with 55,5 MBq/kg body weight. Results showed an identical pattern of radioactivity distribution on 99 Tc-phosphonate and 153 Sm-EDTMP posttherapy scans, WBR of tracers and therapeutic agent was similar. Tumour volumes were 151-652 mL, count ratios metastases/normal bone 1,72-2,41, so that 6-50% of applied 153 Sm-EDTMP were concentrated in bone lesions. This gave dose estimates of 2,8-13,7 Gy in metastases. Evaluation of clinical results showed that the majority of very good results were observed in patients receiving > 10 Gy (n=3) while with lower doses only 1/4 responded very well. 1 patient was lost to follow-up due to death in the first month after therapy. Moderate and transient myelodepression (platelets) was seen in 3/7 patients without relation to Gy applied. As obviously 153 Sm concentration is not homogenous in bone metastases it can be assumed, that in border zones between tumour and bone 30-40 Gy can be delivered when 10 Gy are calculated for the whole lesion, which would explain the satisfactory therapeutic effect in our study. The dosimetric approach to 153 Sm-EDTMP therapy could necessitate the application of higher amounts of 153 Sm-EDTMP to reach adequate radiation doses in lesions without necessarily increasing risk of myelodepression and with even

  7. Effectiveness of adjuvant occupational therapy in employees with depression: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hees Hiske L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depressive disorder is among the medical conditions with the highest negative impact on work outcome. However, little is known regarding evidence-based interventions targeting the improvement of work outcomes in depressed employees. In this paper, the design of a randomized controlled trial is presented in order to evaluate the effectiveness of adjuvant occupational therapy in employees with depression. This occupational intervention is based on an earlier intervention, which was designed and proven effective by our research group, and is the only intervention to date that specifically targets work outcome in depressed employees. Methods/Design In a two-arm randomized controlled trial, a total of 117 participants are randomized to either 'care as usual' or ' care as usual' with the addition of occupational therapy. Patients included in the study are employees who are absent from work due to depression for at least 25% of their contract hours, and who have a possibility of returning to their own or a new job. The occupational intervention consists of six individual sessions, eight group sessions and a work-place visit over a 16-week period. By increasing exposure to the working environment, and by stimulating communication between employer and employee, the occupational intervention aims to enhance self-efficacy and the acquisition of more adaptive coping strategies. Assessments take place at baseline, and at 6, 12, and 18-month follow-ups. Primary outcome measure is work participation (hours of absenteeism and time until work resumption. Secondary outcome measures are work functioning, symptomatology, health-related quality of life, and neurocognitive functioning. In addition, cost-effectiveness is evaluated from a societal perspective. Finally, mechanisms of change (intermediate outcomes and potential patient-treatment matching variables are investigated. Discussion This study hopes to provide valuable knowledge

  8. Effectiveness of massage therapy as co-adjuvant treatment to exercise in osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés Godoy, Virginia; Gallego Izquierdo, Tomás; Lázaro Navas, Irene; Pecos Martín, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of exercise therapy in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee (KOA) is widely evidenced. The current study aims to compare the effectiveness of massage therapy as a co-adjuvant treatment for KOA. A blind, randomized controlled trial design was used. Eighteen women were randomly allocated to two different groups. Group A was treated with massage therapy and an exercise program, and Group B was treated with the exercise program alone. The intervention lasted for 6 weeks. Outcomes were assessed using a verbal analogue scale (VAS), the WOMAC index, and the Get-Up and Go test. Baseline, post-treatment, and 1- and 3- month follow-up data were collected. Values were considered statistically significant at a p massage therapy may lead to clinical improvement in patients with KOA. The use of massage therapy combined with exercise as a treatment for gonarthrosis does not seem to have any beneficial effects.

  9. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Quaranta, Brian P.; Pura, John A.; Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gerber, Leah; Haake, Michael; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes

  10. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koontz, Bridget F., E-mail: Bridget.Koontz@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Quaranta, Brian P. [21st Century Oncology, Asheville, North Carolina (United States); Pura, John A. [Division of Biostatistics, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Haake, Michael [Southeast Radiation Oncology, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W. [Department of Surgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes.

  11. Negative pressure wound therapy after partial diabetic foot amputation: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David G; Lavery, Lawrence A

    2005-11-12

    Diabetic foot wounds, particularly those secondary to amputation, are very complex and difficult to treat. We investigated whether negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) improves the proportion and rate of wound healing after partial foot amputation in patients with diabetes. We enrolled 162 patients into a 16-week, 18-centre, randomised clinical trial in the USA. Inclusion criteria consisted of partial foot amputation wounds up to the transmetatarsal level and evidence of adequate perfusion. Patients who were randomly assigned to NPWT (n=77) received treatment with dressing changes every 48 h. Control patients (n=85) received standard moist wound care according to consensus guidelines. NPWT was delivered through the Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) Therapy System. Wounds were treated until healing or completion of the 112-day period of active treatment. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study has been registered with , number NCT00224796. More patients healed in the NPWT group than in the control group (43 [56%] vs 33 [39%], p=0.040). The rate of wound healing, based on the time to complete closure, was faster in the NPWT group than in controls (p=0.005). The rate of granulation tissue formation, based on the time to 76-100% formation in the wound bed, was faster in the NPWT group than in controls (p=0.002). The frequency and severity of adverse events (of which the most common was wound infection) were similar in both treatment groups. NPWT delivered by the VAC Therapy System seems to be a safe and effective treatment for complex diabetic foot wounds, and could lead to a higher proportion of healed wounds, faster healing rates, and potentially fewer re-amputations than standard care.

  12. Reinforcement Behavior Therapy by Kindergarten Teachers on Preschool Children’s Aggression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Yektatalab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aggression is a kind of behavior that causes damage or harm to others. The prevalence of aggression is 8–20% in 3–6 years old children. The present study aimed to assess the effect of training kindergarten teachers regarding reinforcement behavior therapy on preschoolers’ aggression. Methods: In this cluster randomized control trial, 14 out of 35 kindergarten and preschool centers of Mohr city, Iran, were chosen using random cluster sampling and then randomly assigned to an intervention and a control group. All 370 kindergarten and preschool children in 14 kindergarten were assessed by preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire and 60 children who obtained a minimum aggression score of 117.48 for girls and 125.77 for boys were randomly selected. The teachers in the intervention group participated in 4 educational sessions on behavior therapy and then practiced this technique under the supervision of the researcher for two months. Preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire was computed in both intervention and control groups before and after a two-month period. Results: The results demonstrated a significant statistical difference in the total aggression score (P=0.01, verbal (P=0.02 and physical (P=0.01 aggression subscales scores in the intervention group in comparison to the control group after the intervention. But the scores of relational aggression (P=0.09 and impulsive anger (P=0.08 subscales were not statistically different in the intervention group compared to the controls. Conclusion: This study highlighted the importance of teaching reinforcement behavior therapy by kindergarten teachers in decreasing verbal and physical aggression in preschoolers.

  13. Group Music Therapy as a Preventive Intervention for Young People at Risk: Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Christian; Saarikallio, Suvi; Crooke, Alexander Hew Dale; McFerran, Katrina Skewes

    2017-07-01

    Music forms an important part of the lives and identities of adolescents and may have positive or negative mental health implications. Music therapy can be effective for mental disorders such as depression, but its preventive potential is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether group music therapy (GMT) is an effective intervention for young people who may be at risk of developing mental health problems, as indicated via unhealthy music use. The main question was whether GMT can reduce unhealthy uses of music and increase potentials for healthy uses of music, compared to self-directed music listening (SDML). We were also interested in effects of GMT on depressive symptoms, psychosocial well-being, rumination, and reflection. In an exploratory cluster-randomized trial in Australian schools, 100 students with self-reported unhealthy music use were invited to GMT (weekly sessions over 8 weeks) or SDML. Changes in the Healthy-Unhealthy Music Scale (HUMS) and mental health outcomes were measured over 3 months. Both interventions were well accepted. No effects were found between GMT and SDML (all p > 0.05); both groups tended to show small improvements over time. Younger participants benefited more from GMT, and older ones more from SDML (p = 0.018). GMT was associated with similar changes as SDML. Further research is needed to improve the processes of selecting participants for targeted interventions; to determine optimal dosage; and to provide more reliable evidence of effects of music-based interventions for adolescents. © the American Music Therapy Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G.; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph; Henderson, Randal

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low–risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

  15. Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph [Division of Urology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

  16. Supportive treatment with megestrol acetate during radio-(chemo-)therapy. A randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Background: The value of megestrol acetate in treating tumor anorexia and cachexia of terminal patients is well known. However, the supportive effect of megestrol acetate during intensive radio-(chemo-)therapy was not investigated up to now. Therefore a randomized trial was performed including patients with advanced tumors in the head and neck region. Patients and Methods: From June 1991 to December 1993 a total of 64 patients were admitted to a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study. During and up to 6 weeks following radiotherapy patients received 160 mg/d megestrol acetate or placebo. The nutritional status (anthropometric and laboratory parameters) and the quality-of-life index according to Padilla et al. were determined prior to therapy, 1, 4, 6 weeks later during radiotherapy and 12, 18 weeks after completion. Results: Sixty-one out of 64 patients were evaluable (control group: n=30; megestrol acetate patients: n=31). One patients refused further participation after randomization. One patient in each arm was excluded due to side effects (impotence, diarrhoea). Further side effects were not observed. In the control group the nutrititional parameters (body weight, triceps skinfold) and the subjective feeling of the patients deteriorated during radiotherapy and did not restore following radiotherapy. By contrast, the patients of the megestrol acetate group were able to stabilize these parameters. This difference was most prominent in the orally nourished patients (weight loss during therapy: Control group: -4.1 kg; megestrol acetate group: -0.8 kg; p=0.004); but not in the patients fed by percutaneous endoscopically guided gastrostomy (weight loss control group: -2.4 kg; megestrol acetate group: -0.8 kg; p=0.14). Conclusion: In patients on radiochemotherapy megestrol acetate prevents patients from further deterioration of the nutritional status and quality of life. (orig.) [de

  17. Virtual reality therapy for refractory auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia: A pilot clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Sert, Olivier Percie; Potvin, Stéphane; Lipp, Olivier; Dellazizzo, Laura; Laurelli, Mélanie; Breton, Richard; Lalonde, Pierre; Phraxayavong, Kingsada; O'Connor, Kieron; Pelletier, Jean-François; Boukhalfi, Tarik; Renaud, Patrice; Dumais, Alexandre

    2018-02-24

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe mental illness that poses significant challenges. While many pharmacological and psychosocial interventions are available, many treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients continue to suffer from persistent psychotic symptoms, notably auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH), which are highly disabling. This unmet clinical need requires new innovative treatment options. Recently, a psychological therapy using computerized technology has shown large therapeutic effects on AVH severity by enabling patients to engage in a dialogue with a computerized representation of their voices. These very promising results have been extended by our team using immersive virtual reality (VR). Our study was a 7-week phase-II, randomized, partial cross-over trial. Nineteen schizophrenia patients with refractory AVH were recruited and randomly allocated to either VR-assisted therapy (VRT) or treatment-as-usual (TAU). The group allocated to TAU consisted of antipsychotic treatment and usual meetings with clinicians. The TAU group then received a delayed 7weeks of VRT. A follow-up was ensured 3months after the last VRT therapy session. Changes in psychiatric symptoms, before and after TAU or VRT, were assessed using a linear mixed-effects model. Our findings showed that VRT produced significant improvements in AVH severity, depressive symptoms and quality of life that lasted at the 3-month follow-up period. Consistent with previous research, our results suggest that VRT might be efficacious in reducing AVH related distress. The therapeutic effects of VRT on the distress associated with the voices were particularly prominent (d=1.2). VRT is a highly novel and promising intervention for refractory AVH in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Effects of Gua-Sha therapy on breast engorgement: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jin-Yu; Gau, Meei-Ling; Kuo, Shu-Yu; Chang, Yung-Hsien; Kuo, Su-Chen; Tu, Hui-Chuan

    2010-03-01

    Breast engorgement is a common problem that affects the initiation and duration of breastfeeding. Limited solutions are available to relieve the discomfort associated with breast engorgement. Thus, further investigation of methods to achieve effective relief of symptoms is critical to promote breastfeeding success. : The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two breast care methods, that is, scraping (Gua-Sha) therapy (administered to the experimental group) and traditional breast care (i.e., massage and heating; administered to the control group). A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 54 postpartum women at a Level III medical teaching hospital. Participant inclusion criteria included postpartum breastfeeding women (a) who had an uncomplicated delivery and (b) who were experiencing breast engorgement problems. The Gua-Sha protocol selected appropriate acupoint positions, which included ST16, ST18, SP17, and CV17. Each position was lightly scraped seven times in two cycles. For the control group, we used hot packs and massage for 20 min in accordance with recommendations given in an obstetrical technique textbook. Results showed no statistical differences between the two groups at baseline. Body temperature, breast temperature, breast engorgement, pain levels, and discomforting levels were statistically different between the two groups at 5 and 30 min after intervention (p account. Our findings provided empirical evidence supporting that Gua-Sha therapy may be used as an effective technique in the management of breast engorgement. By using Gua-Sha therapy, nurses can handle breast engorgement problems more effectively in primary care and hence help patients both physically and psychologically.

  19. Does Computerized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Help People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombie, Andrew; Gearry, Richard; Andrews, Jane; Mulder, Roger; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy may be useful for improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of at least some patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially those with psychiatric comorbidities. However, cognitive behavioral therapy can be difficult to access. These difficulties can be overcome by computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT). This is a randomized controlled trial of a self-administered CCBT intervention for patients with IBD focused on improving HRQOL. It is hypothesized that CCBT completers will have an improved HRQOL relative to people not allocated to CCBT. Patients with IBD were randomly allocated to CCBT (n = 113) versus treatment as usual (n = 86). The IBD Questionnaire at 12 weeks after baseline was the primary outcome, while generic HRQOL, anxiety, depression, coping strategies, perceived stress, and IBD symptoms were secondary outcomes. Outcomes were also measured at 6 months after baseline. Predictors of dropout were also determined. Twenty-nine CCBT participants (25.7%) completed the CCBT. The IBD Questionnaire was significantly increased at 12 weeks in CCBT completers compared with treatment-as-usual patients (F = 6.38, P = 0.01). Short Form-12 mental score (F = 5.00, P = 0.03) was also significantly better in CCBT compared with treatment-as-usual patients at 12 weeks. These outcomes were not maintained at 6 months. The predictors of dropout were baseline depression, biological use, lower IBD Questionnaire scores, and not having steroids. Improvements at 12 weeks after baseline were not maintained at 6 months. Future research should aim to improve adherence rates. Moreover, CCBT may not work for patients with IBD with comorbid depression.

  20. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy as a Treatment for Chronic Tinnitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Laurence; Marks, Elizabeth M; Hallsworth, Christopher A; Schaette, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Tinnitus is experienced by up to 15% of the population and can lead to significant disability and distress. There is rarely a medical or surgical target and psychological therapies are recommended. We investigated whether mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) could offer an effective new therapy for tinnitus. This single-site randomized controlled trial compared MBCT to intensive relaxation training (RT) for chronic, distressing tinnitus in adults. Both treatments involved 8 weekly, 120-min sessions focused on either relaxation (RT) or mindfulness meditation (MBCT). Assessments were completed at baseline and at treatment commencement 8 weeks later. The primary outcomes were tinnitus severity (Tinnitus Questionnaire) and psychological distress (Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Non-Risk, CORE-NR), 16 weeks after baseline. The analysis utilized a modified intention-to-treat approach. A total of 75 patients were randomly allocated to MBCT (n = 39) or RT (n = 36). Both groups showed significant reductions in tinnitus severity and loudness, psychological distress, anxiety, depression, and disability. MBCT led to a significantly greater reduction in tinnitus severity than RT, with a mean difference of 6.3 (95% CI 1.3-11.4, p = 0.016). Effects persisted 6 months later, with a mean difference of 7.2 (95% CI 2.1-2.3, p = 0.006) and a standardized effect size of 0.56 (95% CI 0.16-0.96). Treatment was effective regardless of initial tinnitus severity, duration, or hearing loss. MBCT is effective in reducing tinnitus severity in chronic tinnitus patients compared to intensive RT. It also reduces psychological distress and disability. Future studies should explore the generalizability of this approach and how outcome relates to different aspects of the intervention. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Photodynamic therapy as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulides, Nicos; Nikolidakis, Dimitris; Chondros, Panagiotis; Becker, Jürgen; Schwarz, Frank; Rössler, Ralf; Sculean, Anton

    2008-09-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical data have suggested a potential benefit of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontitis. However, there are very limited data from controlled clinical trials evaluating the effect of PDT in the treatment of periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiologic effects of the adjunctive use of PDT to non-surgical periodontal treatment. Twenty-four subjects with chronic periodontitis were randomly treated with scaling and root planing followed by a single episode of PDT (test) or scaling and root planing alone (control). Full-mouth plaque score (FMPS), full-mouth bleeding score (FMBS), probing depth (PD), gingival recession, and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured at baseline and 3 and 6 months after therapy. Primary outcome variables were changes in PD and CAL. Microbiologic evaluation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans), Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia (previously T. forsythensis), Treponema denticola, Parvimonas micra (previously Peptostreptococcus micros or Micromonas micros), Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, Eubacterium nodatum, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. was performed at baseline and 3 and 6 months following therapy by using a commercially available polymerase chain reaction test. At 3 and 6 months after treatment, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to CAL, PD, FMPS, or microbiologic changes. At 3 and 6 months, a statistically significantly greater improvement in FMBS was found in the test group. The additional application of a single episode of PDT to scaling and root planing failed to result in an additional improvement in terms of PD reduction and CAL gain, but it resulted in a significantly higher reduction in bleeding scores compared to scaling and root planing alone.

  2. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, David; Fernández de la Cruz, Lorena; Isomura, Kayoko; Anson, Martin; Turner, Cynthia; Monzani, Benedetta; Cadman, Jacinda; Bowyer, Laura; Heyman, Isobel; Veale, David; Krebs, Georgina

    2015-11-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically starts in adolescence, but evidence-based treatments are yet to be developed and formally evaluated in this age group. We designed an age-appropriate cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for adolescents with BDD and evaluated its acceptability and efficacy in a pilot randomized controlled trial. Thirty adolescents aged 12 to 18 years (mean = 16.0, SD = 1.7) with a primary diagnosis of BDD, together with their families, were randomly assigned to 14 sessions of CBT delivered over 4 months or a control condition of equivalent duration, consisting of written psycho-education materials and weekly telephone monitoring. Blinded evaluators assessed participants at baseline, midtreatment, posttreatment, and at 2-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for BDD, Adolescent Version (mean baseline score = 37.13, SD = 4.98, range = 24-43). The CBT group showed a significantly greater improvement than the control group, both at posttreatment (time × group interaction coefficient [95% CI] = -11.26 [-17.22 to -5.31]; p = .000) and at 2-month follow-up (time × group interaction coefficient [95% CI] = -9.62 [-15.74 to -3.51]; p = .002). Six participants (40%) in the CBT group and 1 participant (6.7%) in the control condition were classified as responders at both time points (χ(2) = 4.658, p = .031). Improvements were also seen on secondary measures, including insight, depression, and quality of life at posttreatment. Both patients and their families deemed the treatment as highly acceptable. Developmentally tailored CBT is a promising intervention for young people with BDD, although there is significant room for improvement. Further clinical trials incorporating lessons learned in this pilot study and comparing CBT and pharmacological therapies, as well as their combination, are warranted. Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy for Adolescents With Body Dysmorphic Disorder; http

  3. Bright light treatment as add-on therapy for depression in 28 adolescents: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhofer, Helmut; von Klitzing, Kai

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, a significant incidence of depression in the younger population has been observed. Bright light therapy, an effective therapeutic option for depressed adults, could also provide safe, economical, and effective rapid recovery in adolescents. The randomized trial included 28 inpatients (18 females and 10 males) between 14 and 17 years old with depressive complaints. The study was conducted between February and December of 2010 in Rodewisch, Germany. Half of the patients (n = 14) first received placebo (50 lux) 1 hour a day in the morning from 9:00 am to 10:00 am for 1 week and then received bright light therapy (2,500 lux) for 1 week in the morning from 9:00 am to 10:00 am. The other half (n = 14) first received bright light therapy and then received placebo. Patients were encouraged to continue ongoing treatment (fluoxetine 20 mg/day and 2 sessions of psychotherapy/week) because there were no changes in medication/dosage and psychotherapy since 1 month before the 4-week study period. For assessment of depressive symptoms, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered 1 week before and 1 day before placebo treatment, on the day between placebo and bright light treatment, and on the day after and 1 week after bright light treatment. Saliva samples of melatonin and cortisol were collected at 8:00 am and 8:00 pm 1 week before and 1 day before placebo treatment, on the day between placebo and bright light treatment, on the day after bright light treatment, and 1 week after bright light treatment and were assayed for melatonin and cortisol to observe any change in circadian timing. The BDI scores improved significantly (P = .015). The assays of saliva showed significant differences between treatment and placebo for evening melatonin (P = .040). No significant adverse reactions were observed. Antidepressant response to bright light treatment in this age group was statistically superior to placebo. World Health Organization International Clinical

  4. Medication Therapy Management after Hospitalization in CKD: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Katherine R; Alicic, Radica Z; Short, Robert A; Neumiller, Joshua J; Gates, Brian J; Daratha, Kenn B; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; McPherson, Sterling M; Chaytor, Naomi S; Dieter, Brad P; Setter, Stephen M; Corbett, Cynthia F

    2018-02-07

    CKD is characterized by remarkably high hospitalization and readmission rates. Our study aim was to test a medication therapy management intervention to reduce subsequent acute care utilization. The CKD Medication Intervention Trial was a single-blind (investigators), randomized clinical trial conducted at Providence Health Care in Spokane, Washington. Patients with CKD stages 3-5 not treated by dialysis who were hospitalized for acute illness were recruited. The intervention was designed to improve posthospitalization care by medication therapy management. A pharmacist delivered the intervention as a single home visit within 7 days of discharge. The intervention included these fundamental elements: comprehensive medication review, medication action plan, and a personal medication list. The primary outcome was a composite of acute care utilization (hospital readmissions and emergency department and urgent care visits) for 90 days after hospitalization. Baseline characteristics of participants ( n =141) included the following: age, 69±11 (mean±SD) years old; women, 48% (67 of 141); diabetes, 56% (79 of 141); hypertension, 83% (117 of 141); eGFR, 41±14 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 (serum creatinine-based Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation); and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio median, 43 mg/g (interquartile range, 8-528) creatinine. The most common primary diagnoses for hospitalization were the following: cardiovascular events, 36% (51 of 141); infections, 18% (26 of 141); and kidney diseases, 12% (17 of 141). The primary outcome occurred in 32 of 72 (44%) of the medication intervention group and 28 of 69 (41%) of those in usual care (log rank P =0.72). For only hospital readmission, the rate was 19 of 72 (26%) in the medication intervention group and 18 of 69 (26%) in the usual care group (log rank P =0.95). There was no between-group difference in achievement of guideline-based goals for use of renin-angiotensin system inhibition or for BP

  5. Randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy's effectiveness for children with autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-05

    Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.e., number of music therapy sessions per week) affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. Children aged between 4;0 and 6;11 years who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Parents of all participants will receive three sessions of parent counselling (at 0, 2, and 5 months). In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity) or three sessions (high-intensity) per week. Generalised effects of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS) and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS) before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness will be calculated as man years. A group sequential design with first interim look at N = 235 will ensure both power and efficiency. Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well generalisable to clinical practice. Addressing the issue of dose variation, this study's results will also provide information on the relevance of session frequency for therapy outcome. Current Controlled Trials

  6. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) versus acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for dementia family caregivers with significant depressive symptoms: Results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losada, Andrés; Márquez-González, María; Romero-Moreno, Rosa; Mausbach, Brent T; López, Javier; Fernández-Fernández, Virginia; Nogales-González, Celia

    2015-08-01

    The differential efficacy of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for dementia family caregivers' is analyzed through a randomized controlled trial. Participants were 135 caregivers with high depressive symptomatology who were randomly allocated to the intervention conditions or a control group (CG). Pre-, postintervention, and follow-up measurements assessed depressive symptomatology, anxiety, leisure, dysfunctional thoughts, and experiential avoidance. Depression: Significant effects of interventions compared with CG were found for CBT (p dementia caregivers. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. The efficacy of music therapy for people with dementia: A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Shiun; Chu, Hsin; Yang, Chyn-Yng; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Chung, Min-Huey; Liao, Yuan-Mei; Chi, Mei-ju; Liu, Megan F; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2015-12-01

    To (1) perform a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials pertaining to the efficacy of music therapy on disruptive behaviours, anxiety levels, depressive moods and cognitive functioning in people with dementia; and (2) clarify which interventions, therapists and participant characteristics exerted higher and more prominent effects. Present study was the first to perform a meta-analysis that included all the randomised controlled trials found in literature relating to music therapy for people with dementia over the past 15 years. A meta-analysis study design. Quantitative studies were retrieved from PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library Database, CINAHL, SCOPUS and PsycINFO. A meta-analysis was used to calculate the overall effect sizes of music therapy on outcome indicators. Music therapy significantly improved disruptive behaviours [Hedges' g = -0·66; 95% confidence interval (CI) = -0·44 to -0·88] and anxiety levels (Hedges' g = -0·51; 95% CI = -0·02 to -1·00) in people with dementia. Music therapy might affect depressive moods (Hedges' g = -0·39; 95% CI = 0·01 to -0·78), and cognitive functioning (Hedges' g = 0·19; 95% CI = 0·45 to -0·08). Music therapy exerted a moderately large effect on disruptive behaviours of people with dementia, a moderate effect on anxiety levels and depressive moods, and a small effect on cognitive functioning. Individual music therapy provided once a week to patients with cognitive functioning and manual guided in music intervention construction is suggested. Group music therapy is provided several times a week to reduce their disruptive behaviours, anxiety levels and depressive moods. Music therapy is a cost-effective, enjoyable, noninvasive therapy and could be useful for clinical nurses in creating an environment that is conducive to the well-being of patients with dementia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mobile Phone-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomized Waitlist Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancee, Jaap; Griffioen-Both, Fiemke; Spruit, Sandor; Fitrianie, Siska; Neerincx, Mark A; Beun, Robbert Jan; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Background This study is one of the first randomized controlled trials investigating cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered by a fully automated mobile phone app. Such an app can potentially increase the accessibility of insomnia treatment for the 10% of people who have insomnia. Objective The objective of our study was to investigate the efficacy of CBT-I delivered via the Sleepcare mobile phone app, compared with a waitlist control group, in a randomized controlled trial. Methods We recruited participants in the Netherlands with relatively mild insomnia disorder. After answering an online pretest questionnaire, they were randomly assigned to the app (n=74) or the waitlist condition (n=77). The app packaged a sleep diary, a relaxation exercise, sleep restriction exercise, and sleep hygiene and education. The app was fully automated and adjusted itself to a participant’s progress. Program duration was 6 to 7 weeks, after which participants received posttest measurements and a 3-month follow-up. The participants in the waitlist condition received the app after they completed the posttest questionnaire. The measurements consisted of questionnaires and 7-day online diaries. The questionnaires measured insomnia severity, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, and anxiety and depression symptoms. The diary measured sleep variables such as sleep efficiency. We performed multilevel analyses to study the interaction effects between time and condition. Results The results showed significant interaction effects (Papp condition on the primary outcome measures of insomnia severity (d=–0.66) and sleep efficiency (d=0.71). Overall, these improvements were also retained in a 3-month follow-up. Conclusions This study demonstrated the efficacy of a fully automated mobile phone app in the treatment of relatively mild insomnia. The effects were in the range of what is found for Web-based treatment in general. This supports the applicability of such technical

  9. Phase II Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial of Patient-Led Therapies (Mirror Therapy and Lower-Limb Exercises) During Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Sarah; Wilkinson, Jack; Thomas, Nessa; Selles, Ruud; McCabe, Candy; Tyrrell, Pippa; Vail, Andy

    2015-10-01

    Patient-led therapy has the potential to increase the amount of therapy patients undertake during stroke rehabilitation and to enhance recovery. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of 2 patient-led therapies during the acute stages of stroke care: mirror therapy for the upper limb and lower-limb exercises for the lower limb. This was a blind assessed, multicenter, pragmatic randomized controlled trial of patient-led upper-limb mirror therapy and patient-led lower leg exercises. Stroke survivors with upper and lower limb limitations, undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and able to consent were recruited at least 1 week poststroke. Both interventions proved feasible, with >90% retention. No serious adverse events were reported. Both groups did less therapy than recommended; typically 5 to 15 minutes for 7 days or less. Participants receiving mirror therapy (n = 63) tended to do less practice than those doing lower-limb exercises (n = 31). Those with neglect did 69% less mirror therapy than those without (P = .02), which was not observed in the exercise group. Observed between-group differences were modest but neglect, upper-limb strength, and dexterity showed some improvement in the mirror therapy group. No changes were seen in the lower-limb group. Both patient-led mirror therapy and lower-limb exercises during inpatient stroke care are safe, feasible, and acceptable and warrant further investigation. Practice for 5 to 15 minutes for 7 days is a realistic prescription unless strategies to enhance adherence are included. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Trial sponsorship and self-reported conflicts of interest in breast cancer radiation therapy: An analysis of prospective clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Elton T T; Moraes, Fabio Y; Marta, Gustavo N; Taunk, Neil K; Vieira, Marina T L; Hanna, Samir A; Silva, João Luis F; Carvalho, Heloisa A

    2017-06-01

    We aim to assess any association between study and self-reported conflict of interest (COI) or trial sponsorship in breast cancer radiation clinical trials. We searched PubMed for all clinical trials (CTs) published between 09/2004 and 09/2014 related to breast cancer. We included only radiotherapy CTs with primary clinical endpoints. We classified eligible trials according to the funding source, presence or absence of conflict of interest, study conclusion and impact factor (IF). 1,603 CTs were retrieved. 72 randomized clinical trials were included for analysis. For-profit (PO), not for profit organization (nPO), none and not reported sponsorship rates were 9/72 (12.5%), 35/72 (48.6%), 1/72 (1.4%), 27/72 (37.5%), respectively. Present, absent or not reported COI were found in 6/72 (8.3%), 43/72 (59.7%) and 23/72 (32%) of the CTs, respectively. Conclusion was positive, neutral and negative in 57/72 (79.1%), 9/72 (12.5%) and 6/72 (8.4%) of the trials, respectively. Positive conclusion was reported in 33/44 (75%) funded trials (PO and nPO) and 5/6 (83.3%) CTs with reported COI. On univariate analysis no association with funding source (P=0.178), COI (P=0.678) or trial region (P=0.567) and trial positive conclusion was found. Sponsored trials (HR 4.50, 95CI-0.1.23-16.53;P=0.0023) and positive trials (HR 4.78, 95CI- 1.16-19.63;P=0.030) were more likely to be published in higher impact factor journals in the multivariate analysis. nPO funding was reported in almost 50% of the evaluated CTs. No significant association between study conclusion and funding source, COI or trial region was identified. Sponsored trials and positive trials were more likely to be published in higher impact factor journals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Prolonged Exposure Therapy Delivered Over 2 Weeks vs 8 Weeks vs Present-Centered Therapy on PTSD Symptom Severity in Military Personnel: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foa, Edna B; McLean, Carmen P; Zang, Yinyin; Rosenfield, David; Yadin, Elna; Yarvis, Jeffrey S; Mintz, Jim; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Borah, Elisa V; Dondanville, Katherine A; Fina, Brooke A; Hall-Clark, Brittany N; Lichner, Tracey; Litz, Brett T; Roache, John; Wright, Edward C; Peterson, Alan L

    2018-01-23

    Effective and efficient treatment is needed for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in active duty military personnel. To examine the effects of massed prolonged exposure therapy (massed therapy), spaced prolonged exposure therapy (spaced therapy), present-centered therapy (PCT), and a minimal-contact control (MCC) on PTSD severity. Randomized clinical trial conducted at Fort Hood, Texas, from January 2011 through July 2016 and enrolling 370 military personnel with PTSD who had returned from Iraq, Afghanistan, or both. Final follow-up was July 11, 2016. Prolonged exposure therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy involving exposure to trauma memories/reminders, administered as massed therapy (n = 110; 10 sessions over 2 weeks) or spaced therapy (n = 109; 10 sessions over 8 weeks); PCT, a non-trauma-focused therapy involving identifying/discussing daily stressors (n = 107; 10 sessions over 8 weeks); or MCC, telephone calls from therapists (n = 40; once weekly for 4 weeks). Outcomes were assessed before and after treatment and at 2-week, 12-week, and 6-month follow-up. Primary outcome was interviewer-assessed PTSD symptom severity, measured by the PTSD Symptom Scale-Interview (PSS-I; range, 0-51; higher scores indicate greater PTSD severity; MCID, 3.18), used to assess efficacy of massed therapy at 2 weeks posttreatment vs MCC at week 4; noninferiority of massed therapy vs spaced therapy at 2 weeks and 12 weeks posttreatment (noninferiority margin, 50% [2.3 points on PSS-I, with 1-sided α = .05]); and efficacy of spaced therapy vs PCT at posttreatment. Among 370 randomized participants, data were analyzed for 366 (mean age, 32.7 [SD, 7.3] years; 44 women [12.0%]; mean baseline PSS-I score, 25.49 [6.36]), and 216 (59.0%) completed the study. At 2 weeks posttreatment, mean PSS-I score was 17.62 (mean decrease from baseline, 7.13) for massed therapy and 21.41 (mean decrease, 3.43) for MCC (difference in decrease, 3.70 [95% CI,0.72 to 6.68]; P = .02

  12. Randomized Controlled Trials to Define Viral Load Thresholds for Cytomegalovirus Pre-Emptive Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D Griffiths

    Full Text Available To help decide when to start and when to stop pre-emptive therapy for cytomegalovirus infection, we conducted two open-label randomized controlled trials in renal, liver and bone marrow transplant recipients in a single centre where pre-emptive therapy is indicated if viraemia exceeds 3000 genomes/ml (2520 IU/ml of whole blood.Patients with two consecutive viraemia episodes each below 3000 genomes/ml were randomized to continue monitoring or to immediate treatment (Part A. A separate group of patients with viral load greater than 3000 genomes/ml was randomized to stop pre-emptive therapy when two consecutive levels less than 200 genomes/ml (168 IU/ml or less than 3000 genomes/ml were obtained (Part B. For both parts, the primary endpoint was the occurrence of a separate episode of viraemia requiring treatment because it was greater than 3000 genomes/ml.In Part A, the primary endpoint was not significantly different between the two arms; 18/32 (56% in the monitor arm had viraemia greater than 3000 genomes/ml compared to 10/27 (37% in the immediate treatment arm (p = 0.193. However, the time to developing an episode of viraemia greater than 3000 genomes/ml was significantly delayed among those randomized to immediate treatment (p = 0.022. In Part B, the primary endpoint was not significantly different between the two arms; 19/55 (35% in the less than 200 genomes/ml arm subsequently had viraemia greater than 3000 genomes/ml compared to 23/51 (45% among those randomized to stop treatment in the less than 3000 genomes/ml arm (p = 0.322. However, the duration of antiviral treatment was significantly shorter (p = 0.0012 in those randomized to stop treatment when viraemia was less than 3000 genomes/ml.The results illustrate that patients have continuing risks for CMV infection with limited time available for intervention. We see no need to alter current rules for stopping or starting pre-emptive therapy.

  13. Immediate Changes After Manual Therapy in Patients With Persistent, Nonspecific Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Ruescas-Nicolau, Maria-Arantzazu; Sanchez-Sanchez, M Luz; Arnal-Gómez, Anna; Balasch-Bernat, Mercè; Marques-Sule, Elena

    2018-02-10

    Context • Thoracic manipulation decreases pain and disability. However, when such manipulation is contraindicated, the use of other manual techniques based on the regional interdependence of the thoracic spine, upper ribs, and shoulders is an alternative approach. Objective • The study intended to investigate the immediate changes resulting from 3 manual therapy treatments on spinal mobility, flexibility, comfort, and pain perception in patients with persistent, nonspecific back pain as well as changes in their sense of physical well-being and their perception of change after treatment. Design • The study was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. Setting • The study took place in the Department of Physiotherapy of the Faculty of Physiotherapy at the University of Valencia (Valencia, Spain). Participants • Participants were 112 individuals from the community-56.6% female, with a mean age of 21.8 ± 0.2 y-who had persistent, nonspecific back pain. Intervention • Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups, receiving (1) neurolymphatic therapy (NL group), (2) articulatory spinal manual therapy (AS group), or (3) articulatory costal manual therapy (AC group). Outcome Measures • Cervical mobility, lumbar flexibility, comfort, pain perception, and physical well-being were assessed at baseline and immediately postintervention. Perception of change was evaluated postintervention. Results • Between baseline and postintervention, the AC group showed a significant increase in cervical flexion (P = .010), whereas the NL and AS groups improved in lumbar flexibility, P = .047 and P = .012, respectively. For that period, significant changes were found in lumbar comfort for the AS group (P < .001) and the NL group (P < .026) and in thoracic comfort (P < .001) for the AC group. All groups improved in physical well-being and pain perception (P < .05). Changes in thoracic comfort, lumbar comfort, and physical well-being differed among the groups, with

  14. Efficacy of paraffin bath therapy in hand osteoarthritis: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, Banu; Gözüm, Mehtap; Şahin, Ebru; Baydar, Meltem; Ergör, Gül; El, Ozlem; Bircan, Çigdem; Gülbahar, Selmin

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of paraffin bath therapy on pain, function, and muscle strength in patients with hand osteoarthritis. Prospective single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Department of physical medicine and rehabilitation in a university hospital. Patients with bilateral hand osteoarthritis (N=56). Patients were randomized into 2 groups with a random number table by using block randomization with 4 patients in a block. Group 1 (n=29) had paraffin bath therapy (5 times per week, for 3-week duration) for both hands. Group 2 (n=27) was the control group. All patients were informed about joint-protection techniques, and paracetamol intake was recorded. The primary outcome measures were pain (at last 48h) at rest and during activities of daily living (ADL), assessed with a visual analog scale (0-10cm) at 12 weeks. The secondary outcome measures were the Australian Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN) and the Dreiser Functional Index (DFI), used for subjective functional evaluation, loss of range of motion (ROM), grip and pinch strength, painful and tender joint counts, and paracetamol intake. A researcher blind to group allocation recorded the measures for both hands at baseline, 3 weeks, and 12 weeks at the hospital setting. At baseline, there were no significant differences between groups in any of the parameters (P>.05). After treatment, the paraffin group exhibited significant improvement in pain at rest and during ADL, ROM of the right hand, and pain and stiffness dimensions of the AUSCAN (P.05). The control group showed a significant deterioration in right hand grip and bilateral lateral pinch and right chuck pinch strength (Pparaffin group (Pparaffin group were significantly higher than the control group at 12 weeks (PParaffin bath therapy seemed to be effective both in reducing pain and tenderness and maintaining muscle strength in hand osteoarthritis. It may be regarded as a beneficial short-term therapy option, which is effective for a 12

  15. Bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke: A meta-analysis of randomized control animal trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Wang, Yuexiang; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Ghimire, Saruna; Wellik, Kay E; Qu, Wenchun

    2017-04-01

    Background Results of animal studies assessing efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke remain inconsistent. Aims The aims are to assess efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy for ischemic stroke in animal studies. Methods Randomized controlled animal trials assessing efficacy of bone marrow stromal cell therapy were eligible. Stroke therapy academic industry round table was used to assess methodologic quality of included studies. Primary outcomes were total infarction volume and modified Neurological Severity Score. Multiple prespecified sensitivity analyses and subgroup analyses were conducted. Random effects models were used for meta-analysis. Results Thirty-three randomized animal trials were included with a total of 796 animals. The median quality score was 6 (interquartile range, 5-7). Bone marrow stromal cell therapy decreased total infarction volume (standardized mean difference, 0.897; 95% confidence interval, 0.553-1.241; P animals treated with bone marrow stromal cell and controls was 2.47 (95% confidence interval, 1.84-3.11; P animal studies. Conclusions Bone marrow stromal cell therapy significantly decreased total infarction volume and increased neural functional recovery in randomized controlled animal models of ischemic stroke.

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy vs. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing for Treating Panic Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Ferdinand; Den Oudsten, Brenda; Zijlstra, Wobbe; de Jongh, Ad; Lobbestael, Jill; De Vries, Jolanda

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is an effective intervention for patients with panic disorder (PD). From a theoretical perspective, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy could also be useful in the treatment of PD because: (1) panic attacks can be experienced as life threatening; (2) panic memories specific to PD resemble traumatic memories as seen in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); and (3) PD often develops following a distressing life event. The primary objective of this Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT), was to compare EMDR therapy with CBT for PD and determine whether EMDR is not worse than CBT in reducing panic symptoms and improving Quality Of Life (QOL). Methods: Two-arm (CBT and EMDR) parallel RCT in patients with PD (N = 84). Patients were measured at baseline (T1), directly after the last therapy session (T2), and 3 months after ending therapy (T3). Non-inferiority testing (linear mixed model with intention-to-treat analysis) was applied. Patients were randomly assigned to 13 weekly 60-min sessions of CBT (N = 42) or EMDR therapy (N = 42). Standard protocols were used. The primary outcome measure was severity of PD at T3, as measured with the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ), the Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ), and the Mobility Inventory (MI). The secondary outcome measure was QOL, as measured with the World Health Organization Quality of Life short version (WHOQOL-Bref), at T3. Results: The severity of PD variables ACQ and BSQ showed non-inferiority of EMDR to CBT, while MI was inconclusive (adjusted analyses). Overall QOL and general health, Psychological health, Social relationships, and Environment showed non-inferiority of EMDR to CBT, while Physical health was inconclusive. Conclusion: EMDR therapy proved to be as effective as CBT for treating PD patients. Trial Registration: Dutch Trial Register, Nr. 3134 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=3134 PMID:28868042

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy vs. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing for Treating Panic Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Horst

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT is an effective intervention for patients with panic disorder (PD. From a theoretical perspective, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR therapy could also be useful in the treatment of PD because: (1 panic attacks can be experienced as life threatening; (2 panic memories specific to PD resemble traumatic memories as seen in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; and (3 PD often develops following a distressing life event. The primary objective of this Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT, was to compare EMDR therapy with CBT for PD and determine whether EMDR is not worse than CBT in reducing panic symptoms and improving Quality Of Life (QOL.Methods: Two-arm (CBT and EMDR parallel RCT in patients with PD (N = 84. Patients were measured at baseline (T1, directly after the last therapy session (T2, and 3 months after ending therapy (T3. Non-inferiority testing (linear mixed model with intention-to-treat analysis was applied. Patients were randomly assigned to 13 weekly 60-min sessions of CBT (N = 42 or EMDR therapy (N = 42. Standard protocols were used. The primary outcome measure was severity of PD at T3, as measured with the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ, the Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ, and the Mobility Inventory (MI. The secondary outcome measure was QOL, as measured with the World Health Organization Quality of Life short version (WHOQOL-Bref, at T3.Results: The severity of PD variables ACQ and BSQ showed non-inferiority of EMDR to CBT, while MI was inconclusive (adjusted analyses. Overall QOL and general health, Psychological health, Social relationships, and Environment showed non-inferiority of EMDR to CBT, while Physical health was inconclusive.Conclusion: EMDR therapy proved to be as effective as CBT for treating PD patients.Trial Registration: Dutch Trial Register, Nr. 3134 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=3134

  18. Cost-utility of COBRA-light versus COBRA therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: the COBRA-light trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Wee, Marieke M.; Coupé, Veerle M. H.; den Uyl, Debby; Blomjous, Birgit S.; Kooijmans, Esmee; Kerstens, Pit J. S. M.; Nurmohamed, Mike T.; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Boers, Maarten; Lems, Willem F.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate if COmbinatie therapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis (COBRA)-light therapy is cost-effective in treating patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with COBRA therapy. This economic evaluation was performed next to the open-label, randomised non-inferiority COBRA-light trial in 164

  19. The effect of hormone therapy on women's quality of life in the first year of the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerus Piret

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For postmenopausal women, the main reason to start hormone therapy (HT is to reduce menopausal symptoms and to improve quality of life (QOL. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of HT on different aspects of symptom experience and QOL during a randomised trial. A total of 1823 postmenopausal women were recruited into the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy (EPHT trial in 1999–2001. Women were randomised to blind HT, open-label HT, placebo or non-treatment arm. After one year in the trial, a questionnaire was mailed and 1359 women (75% responded, 686 in the HT arms and 673 in the non-HT arms. Mean age at filling in the questionnaire was 59.8 years. The questionnaire included Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ to assess menopause specific QOL of middle-aged women together with a 17-item questionnaire on symptoms related to menopause, a question about painful intercourse, and a question about women's self-rated health. Results After one year in the trial, fewer women in the HT arms reported hot flashes, trouble sleeping, and sweating on the symptom questionnaire. According to WHQ, women in the HT arms had fewer vasomotor symptoms, sleep problems, and problems with sexual behaviour, but more menstrual symptoms; HT had no effect on depression, somatic symptoms, memory, attractiveness, or anxiety. A smaller proportion of women reported painful intercourse in the HT arms. There were no significant differences between the trial arms in women’s self-rated subjective health. Conclusions The results from the EPHT trial confirm that HT is not justified for treating symptoms, other than vasomotor symptoms, among postmenopausal women. WHQ proved to be a useful and sensitive tool to assess QOL in this age group of women.

  20. The effect of massage therapy and/or exercise therapy on subacute or long-lasting neck pain--the Stockholm neck trial (STONE): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillgate, Eva; Bill, Anne-Sylvie; Côté, Pierre; Viklund, Peter; Peterson, Anna; Holm, Lena W

    2015-09-16

    Neck pain is a major health problem in populations worldwide and an economic burden in modern societies due to its high prevalence and costs in terms of health care expenditures and lost productivity. Massage and exercise therapy are widely used management options for neck pain. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding their effectiveness for subacute and long-lasting neck pain. This study protocol describes a randomized controlled trial aiming to determine the effect of massage and/or exercise therapy on subacute and long-lasting neck pain over the course of 1 year. A randomized controlled trial in which at least 600 study participants with subacute or long-lasting nonspecific neck pain will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of four treatment arms: massage therapy (A), exercise therapy (B), exercise therapy plus massage therapy (C) and advice to stay active (D). The study has an E-health approach, and study participants are being recruited through advertising with a mix of traditional and online marketing channels. Web-based self-report questionnaires measure the main outcomes at 7, 12, 26 and 52 weeks after inclusion. The primary outcomes are a clinically important improvement in pain intensity and pain-related disability at follow-up, measured with a modified version of the Chronic Pain Questionnaire (CPQ). The secondary outcomes are global improvement, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), sick leave, drug consumption and healthcare utilization. Adverse events are measured by questionnaires at return visits to the clinic, and automated text messages (SMSes) survey neck pain intensity and pain-related disability every week over one year. The results of this study will provide clinicians and stakeholders much needed knowledge to plan medical care for subacute and long-lasting neck pain disorders. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN01453590. Date of registration: 3 July 2014.

  1. Evaluation of Wet Cupping Therapy: Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bedah, Abdullah M N; Khalil, Mohamed K M; Posadzki, Paul; Sohaibani, Imen; Aboushanab, Tamer Shaaban; AlQaed, Meshari; Ali, Gazzaffi I M

    2016-10-01

    Wet cupping is a widely used traditional therapy in many countries, which justifies a continuous scientific evaluation of its efficacy and safety. To perform a systematic review to critically evaluate and update the available evidence of wet cupping in traditional and complementary medicine. Ten electronic databases were searched from their inceptions to February 2016. Included studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated wet cupping against any type of control interventions in patients with any clinical condition, as well as healthy individuals. Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to appraise the included RCTs. Fourteen RCTs met the eligibility criteria. The included studies evaluated the following clinical conditions: nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP), hypertension, brachialgia, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), chronic neck pain, metabolic syndrome, migraine headaches, oxygen saturation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease. Two RCTs evaluated physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals. Overall, 9 RCTs favored wet cupping over various control interventions in NSLBP (n = 2), hypertension (n = 1), brachialgia (n = 1), CTS (n = 1), chronic neck pain (n = 2), oxygen saturation in smokers with COPD (n = 1), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease (n = 1). Five RCTs showed no statistically significant between-group differences: NSLBP (n = 1), metabolic syndrome (n = 1), migraine headaches (n = 1), and physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals (n = 2). Included RCTs had a variable risk of bias across all domains and suffered methodologic limitations. There is a promising evidence in favor of the use of wet cupping for musculoskeletal pain, specifically NSLBP, neck pain, CTS, and brachialgia. Better-quality trials are needed to generate solid evidence and firmly inform policy makers.

  2. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder: an open trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Lenhard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: International guidelines recommend Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT as the first line treatment for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. However, a substantial proportion of patients do not have access to such treatment. We developed and tested the feasibility, efficacy and acceptability of a novel therapist-guided, Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT platform for adolescents with OCD. METHODS: An interactive, age-appropriate ICBT platform ("BiP OCD" was developed. Twenty-one adolescents (12-17 years with a DSM-IV diagnosis of OCD and their parents were enrolled in the study. All participants received 12 weeks of ICBT with therapist support. The primary outcome measure was the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS. Acceptability was assessed at post-treatment. RESULTS: Participants completed on average 8.29 (SD = 3.0 of the 12 treatment chapters. Treatment yielded significant improvements on all clinician-, parent- and most self-administered outcome measures, with a large effect size of d = 2.29 (95% CI 1.5-3.07 on the CY-BOCS. Patients continued to improve at follow-up. At 6-month follow-up, 71% were classified as responders (≥35% decrease on the CY-BOCS and 76% as being in remission (CY-BOCS score ≤12. Average clinician support time was less than 20 minutes per patient per week. The majority of participants felt that BiP OCD was age-appropriate and rated the treatment as good or very good. CONCLUSIONS: ICBT could be efficacious, acceptable, and cost-effective for adolescents with OCD. More rigorously controlled studies are needed to further evaluate the treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01809990.

  3. The effect of aquatic therapy on postural balance and muscle strength in stroke survivors--a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Dong Koog; Lim, Jae-Young; Shin, Hyung-Ik; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of an aquatic therapy programme designed to increase balance in stroke survivors. A randomized, controlled pilot trial. Rehabilitation department of a university hospital. Ambulatory chronic stroke patients (n = 25):13 in an aquatic therapy group and 12 in a conventional therapy group. The aquatic therapy group participated in a programme consisting of Ai Chi and Halliwick methods, which focused on balance and weight-bearing exercises. The conventional therapy group performed gym exercises. In both groups, the interventions occurred for 1 hour, three times per week, for eight weeks. The primary outcome measures were Berg Balance Scale score and weight-bearing ability, as measured by vertical ground reaction force during four standing tasks (rising from a chair and weight-shifting forward, backward and laterally). Secondary measures were muscle strength and gait. Compared with the conventional therapy group, the aquatic therapy group attained significant improvements in Berg Balance Scale scores, forward and backward weight-bearing abilities of the affected limbs, and knee flexor strength (P aquatic therapy based on the Halliwick and Ai Chi methods in stroke survivors. Because of limited power and a small population base, further studies with larger sample sizes are required.

  4. Fast neutron therapy for squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region: results of a randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Orr, J.A.; Arnott, S.J.; Jack, W.J.; Kerr, G.R.; Williams, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A randomized trial of fast neuron therapy compared with 4MV photons for patients with head and neck cancer is reported. One hundred and sixty-eight patients were recruited between 1977 and 1984. The minimum follow-up is 2 years. Three patients were withdrawn before treatment began. Eighty-five were allocated to neutron therapy and 80 to receive photon therapy. All patients had squamous cell cancers in one of four primary sites: oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx. Local tumor control was similar in both groups: 44.7% after neutrons and 45.0% after photons. Salvage surgery was performed on 18 patients in each treatment group for residual or recurrent cancer. Acute radiation reactions of the mucous membranes were significantly more severe after photons. The number of patients with serious late reactions was greater after neutron therapy but the difference was not statistically significant. There were six deaths related to late morbidity after neutron therapy but none after photon therapy. Survival was better after photon therapy but the difference compared with the neutron group failed to reach statistical significance. When intercurrent deaths are excluded, the difference is less marked. Photon therapy was clearly better in terms of disease-free survival giving a 2-year local disease-free rate of 41.3% (s.e. 5.5%) compared with 29.4% (s.e. 4.9%) after neutrons

  5. Analysis of the radiation related morbidity observed in a randomized trial of neutron therapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Williams, J.R.; Kerr, G.R.; Arnott, S.J.; Quilty, P.M.; Rodger, A.; MacDougall, R.H.; Jack, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report is an analysis of the morbidity in the bladder and bowel observed in a randomized trial of d(15)+Be neutrons versus megavoltage photons in the treatment of bladder cancer. Acute reactions in the bladder and bowel were significantly worse after photon therapy. Of the patients treated with photons 45.7% had severe reactions in the bladder compared with 10.6% after neutron therapy (p less than 0.001). Severe acute bowel reactions were observed in 8.5% of the patients after photon therapy compared with 3.8% after neutron therapy (p less than 0.05). Late reactions were significantly worse after neutrons. Severe late reactions in the bladder were seen in 58.5% of patients after neutron therapy and in 40.5% after photon therapy (p less than 0.05). In the bowel they were observed in 53.3% of patients after neutron therapy compared with 8% after photon therapy (p less than 0.0001). The disparity in the degree of early and late complications makes assessment of RBE values difficult. It is estimated that for bladder morbidity the RBE value, for photon dose fractions of 2.75 Gy, is less than 3.3 for early reactions and equal to 3.4 for late effects. The respective RBE values for early and late effects in the bowel are less than 3.4 and 3.8

  6. Focal psychodynamic therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, and optimised treatment as usual in outpatients with anorexia nervosa (ANTOP study): randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipfel, Stephan; Wild, Beate; Groß, Gaby; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Teufel, Martin; Schellberg, Dieter; Giel, Katrin E; de Zwaan, Martina; Dinkel, Andreas; Herpertz, Stephan; Burgmer, Markus; Löwe, Bernd; Tagay, Sefik; von Wietersheim, Jörn; Zeeck, Almut; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Schauenburg, Henning; Herzog, Wolfgang

    2014-01-11

    Psychotherapy is the treatment of choice for patients with anorexia nervosa, although evidence of efficacy is weak. The Anorexia Nervosa Treatment of OutPatients (ANTOP) study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of two manual-based outpatient treatments for anorexia nervosa--focal psychodynamic therapy and enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy--versus optimised treatment as usual. The ANTOP study is a multicentre, randomised controlled efficacy trial in adults with anorexia nervosa. We recruited patients from ten university hospitals in Germany. Participants were randomly allocated to 10 months of treatment with either focal psychodynamic therapy, enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy, or optimised treatment as usual (including outpatient psychotherapy and structured care from a family doctor). The primary outcome was weight gain, measured as increased body-mass index (BMI) at the end of treatment. A key secondary outcome was rate of recovery (based on a combination of weight gain and eating disorder-specific psychopathology). Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org, number ISRCTN72809357. Of 727 adults screened for inclusion, 242 underwent randomisation: 80 to focal psychodynamic therapy, 80 to enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy, and 82 to optimised treatment as usual. At the end of treatment, 54 patients (22%) were lost to follow-up, and at 12-month follow-up a total of 73 (30%) had dropped out. At the end of treatment, BMI had increased in all study groups (focal psychodynamic therapy 0·73 kg/m(2), enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy 0·93 kg/m(2), optimised treatment as usual 0·69 kg/m(2)); no differences were noted between groups (mean difference between focal psychodynamic therapy and enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy -0·45, 95% CI -0·96 to 0·07; focal psychodynamic therapy vs optimised treatment as usual -0·14, -0·68 to 0·39; enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy vs optimised treatment as usual -0·30

  7. Randomized Controlled Trial of Family Therapy in Advanced Cancer Continued Into Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissane, David W; Zaider, Talia I; Li, Yuelin; Hichenberg, Shira; Schuler, Tammy; Lederberg, Marguerite; Lavelle, Lisa; Loeb, Rebecca; Del Gaudio, Francesca

    2016-06-01

    Systematic family-centered cancer care is needed. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of family therapy, delivered to families identified by screening to be at risk from dysfunctional relationships when one of their relatives has advanced cancer. Eligible patients with advanced cancer and their family members screened above the cut-off on the Family Relationships Index. After screening 1,488 patients or relatives at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center or three related community hospice programs, 620 patients (42%) were recruited, which represented 170 families. Families were stratified by three levels of family dysfunction (low communicating, low involvement, and high conflict) and randomly assigned to one of three arms: standard care or 6 or 10 sessions of a manualized family intervention. Primary outcomes were the Complicated Grief Inventory-Abbreviated (CGI) and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Generalized estimating equations allowed for clustered data in an intention-to-treat analysis. On the CGI, a significant treatment effect (Wald χ(2) = 6.88; df = 2; P = .032) and treatment by family-type interaction was found (Wald χ(2) = 20.64; df = 4; P families. Low-communicating families improved by 6 months of bereavement. In the standard care arm, 15.5% of the bereaved developed a prolonged grief disorder at 13 months of bereavement compared with 3.3% of those who received 10 sessions of intervention (Wald χ(2) = 8.31; df = 2; P =.048). No significant treatment effects were found on the BDI-II. Family-focused therapy delivered to high-risk families during palliative care and continued into bereavement reduced the severity of complicated grief and the development of prolonged grief disorder. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children with Dental Anxiety: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnavaz, S; Hedman, E; Grindefjord, M; Reuterskiöld, L; Dahllöf, G

    2016-10-01

    Dental anxiety affects approximately 9% of children and is associated with poor oral health, pain, and psychosocial problems. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for children with dental anxiety in specialist pediatric dentistry. The study used a parallel-group superiority randomized controlled trial design. The primary outcome measure was the behavioral avoidance test; assessors were blind to treatment allocation. Participants were 8 boys and 22 girls 7 to 18 y old (mean ± SD, 10 ± 3.1). Children fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for dental anxiety were randomized to CBT (n = 13) or treatment as usual (n = 17), such as various sedation methods. Psychologists provided 10 h of CBT based on a treatment manual. Treatments were conducted in a naturalistic real-world clinical setting. Assessments were conducted before the treatment, 3 mo after the start of treatment, and at 1-y follow-up. The analyses of the primary outcome measure by repeated-measures analysis of variance and independent t test showed that children receiving CBT made superior, statistically significant improvements at follow-up (16.8 ± 2.4) compared with treatment as usual (11.4 ± 3.1, P Knowledge transfer statement: The results of this study can be used by decision makers and clinicians when planning to implement evidence-based treatment in pediatric dentistry and give children and adolescents access to methods for treating dental anxiety. The results can also be used by parents of children with dental anxiety when asking dentists to cooperate with psychologists using cognitive behavioral therapy.

  9. Efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy for treatment of dental phobia: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Kumar; Van Wijk, A J; Abdullah, Fawzia; Islam, Md Nurul; Bernatchez, Marc; De Jongh, Ad

    2016-02-27

    Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) is found to be a promising and a viable alternative for in vivo exposure in the treatment of specific phobias. However, its usefulness for treating dental phobia is unexplored. The aims of the present study are to determine: (a) the efficacy of VRET versus informational pamphlet (IP) control group in terms of dental trait and state anxiety reductions at 1 week, 3 months and 6 months follow-up (b) the real-time physiological arousal [heart rate (HR)] of VRET group participants during and following therapy (c) the relation between subjective (presence) and objective (HR) measures during VRET. This study is a single blind, randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms in which participants will be allocated to VRET or IP with a ratio of 1:1. Thirty participants (18-50 years) meeting the Phobia Checklist criteria of dental phobia will undergo block randomization with allocation concealment. The primary outcome measures include participants' dental trait anxiety (Modified Dental Anxiety Scale and Dental Fear Survey) and state anxiety (Visual Analogue Scale) measured at baseline (T0), at intervention (T1), 1-week (T2), 3 months (T3) and 6 months (T4) follow-up. A behavior test will be conducted before and after the intervention. The secondary outcome measures are real-time evaluation of HR and VR (Virtual Reality) experience (presence, realism, nausea) during and following the VRET intervention respectively. The data will be analyzed using intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis. This study uses novel non-invasive VRET, which may provide a possible alternative treatment for dental anxiety and phobia. ISRCTN25824611 , Date of registration: 26 October 2015.

  10. Pilot trial of osteopathic manipulative therapy for patients with frequent episodic tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, Guido; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Somalvico, Francesco; Ferrarese, Carlo; Bressan, Livio C

    2014-09-01

    Osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMTh; manipulative care provided by foreign-trained osteopaths) may be used for managing headache pain and related disability, but there is a need for high-quality randomized controlled trials to assess the effectiveness of this intervention. To explore the efficacy of OMTh for pain management in frequent episodic tension-type headache (TTH). Single-blind randomized placebo-controlled pilot study. Patients were recruited from 5 primary care settings. Forty-four patients who were affected by frequent episodic TTH and not taking any drugs for prophylactic management of episodic TTH were recruited. Patients were randomly allocated to an experimental or control group. The experimental group received corrective OMTh techniques, tailored for each patient; the control group received assessment of the cranial rhythmic impulse (sham therapy). The study included a 1-month baseline period, a 1-month treatment period, and a 3-month follow-up period. The primary outcome was the change in patient-reported headache frequency, and secondary outcomes included changes in headache pain intensity (discrete score, 1 [lowest perceived pain] to 5 [worst perceived pain]), over-the-counter medication use, and Headache Disability Inventory score. Forty patients completed the study (OMTh, n=21; control, n=19). The OMTh group had a significant reduction in headache frequency over time that persisted 1 month (approximate reduction, 40%; Ptreatment. Moreover, there was an absolute difference between the 2 treatment groups at the end of the study, with a 33% lower frequency of headache in the OMTh group (Ptreatment modalities and may benefit patients who have adverse effects to medications or who have difficulty complying with pharmacologic regimens. This protocol may serve as a model for future studies. © 2014 The American Osteopathic Association.

  11. Basic Body Awareness Therapy in patients suffering from fibromyalgia: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Cristina; Skjaerven, Liv Helvik; Espart, Anna; Guitard Sein-Echaluce, Luisa; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel

    2018-05-03

    The aim of this study is to assess whether Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) improves musculoskeletal pain, movement quality, psychological function, and quality of life. The effects of BBAT in addition to treatment as usual (TAU) were studied in a randomized controlled trial. Forty-one patients were randomly assigned to a control group (n = 21) and an intervention group (n = 20). Both groups received TAU including pharmacological therapy. The intervention group took part in 10 BBAT sessions. Outcome variables were measured regarding pain, movement quality, psychological function, and quality of life. Outcome measures were assessed before intervention, in posttest, and in follow-ups at 12 and 24 weeks. The BBAT group showed significant improvement in 'pain' at posttest (p = 0.037) and in 'movement quality' from baseline to 24 weeks (p = 0.000). Intragroup analysis showed significant improvements in the SF-36 body pain subscale at 12 and 24 weeks (p = 0.001, p = 0.014), Hospital Anxiety Depression scale in anxiety subscale at 12 weeks (p = 0.019), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaire at 12 and 24 weeks (p = 0.012, p = 0.002), and STAI state at 12 and 24 weeks (p = 0.042, p = 0.004). This study showed that BBAT might be an effective intervention in patients suffering from fibromyalgia in relation to pain, movement quality, and anxiety.

  12. The study protocol of the Norwegian randomized controlled trial of electroconvulsive therapy in treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oedegaard Ketil J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of depressive phases of bipolar disorder is challenging. The effects of the commonly used antidepressants in bipolar depression are questionable. Electroconvulsive therapy is generally considered to be the most effective treatment even if there are no randomized controlled trials of electroconvulsive therapy in bipolar depression. The safety of electroconvulsive therapy is well documented, but there are some controversies as to the cognitive side effects. The aim of this study is to compare the effects and side effects of electroconvulsive therapy to pharmacological treatment in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Cognitive changes and quality of life during the treatment will be assessed. Methods/Design A prospective, randomised controlled, multi-centre six- week acute treatment trial with seven clinical assessments. Follow up visit at 26 weeks or until remission (max 52 weeks. A neuropsychological test battery designed to be sensitive to changes in cognitive function will be used. Setting: Nine study centres across Norway, all acute psychiatric departments. Sample: n = 132 patients, aged 18 and over, who fulfil criteria for treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Score of at least 25 at baseline. Intervention: Intervention group: 3 sessions per week for up to 6 weeks, total up to 18 sessions. Control group: algorithm-based pharmacological treatment as usual. Discussion This study is the first randomized controlled trial that aims to investigate whether electroconvulsive therapy is better than pharmacological treatment as usual in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Possible long lasting cognitive side effects will be evaluated. The study is investigator initiated, without support from industry. Trial registration NCT00664976

  13. Effectiveness of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na) for chronic low back pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxiao; Feng, Yue; Pei, Hong; Deng, Shufang; Wang, Minyu; Xiao, Xianjun; Zheng, Hui; Lai, Zhenhong; Chen, Jiao; Li, Xiang; He, Xiaoguo; Liang, Fanrong

    2014-10-29

    Low back pain is a common, disabling musculoskeletal disorder in both developing and developed countries. Although often recommended, the potential efficacy of massage therapy in general, and Chinese massage (tuina) in particular, for relief of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has not been fully established due to inadequate sample sizes, low methodological quality, and subclinical dosing regimens of trials to date. Thus, the purpose of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of tuina massage therapy versus conventional analgesics for CLBP. The present study is a single center, two-arm, open-label RCT. A total of 150 eligible CLBP patients will be randomly assigned to either a tuina treatment group or a conventional drug control group in a 1:1 ratio. Patients in the tuina group receive a 20 minutes, 4-step treatment protocol which includes both structural and relaxation massage, administered in 20 sessions over a period of 4 weeks. Patients in the conventional drug control group are instructed to take a specific daily dose of ibuprofen. The primary outcome measure is the change from baseline back pain and function, measured by Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, at two months. Secondary outcome measures include the visual analogue scale, Japanese orthopedic association score (JOAS), and McGill pain questionnaire. The design and methodological rigor of this trial will allow for collection of valuable data to evaluate the efficacy of a specific tuina protocol for treating CLBP. This trial will therefore contribute to providing a solid foundation for clinical treatment of CLBP, as well as future research in massage therapy. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov of the National Institute of Health on 22 October 2013 (http://NCT01973010).

  14. Protocol for: Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT: A randomised controlled trial of exercise therapy and mental health outcomes in obese adolescents [ISRCNT83888112

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Neil P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While obesity is known to have many physiological consequences, the psychopathology of this condition has not featured prominently in the literature. Cross-sectional studies have indicated that obese children have increased odds of experiencing poor quality of life and mental health. However, very limited trial evidence has examined the efficacy of exercise therapy for enhancing mental health outcomes in obese children, and the Sheffield Obesity Trial (SHOT will provide evidence of the efficacy of supervised exercise therapy in obese young people aged 11–16 years versus usual care and an attention-control intervention. Method/design SHOT is a randomised controlled trial where obese young people are randomised to receive; (1 exercise therapy, (2 attention-control intervention (involving body-conditioning exercises and games that do not involve aerobic activity, or (3 usual care. The exercise therapy and attention-control sessions will take place three times per week for eight weeks and a six-week home programme will follow this. Ninety adolescents aged between 11–16 years referred from a children's hospital for evaluation of obesity or via community advertisements will need to complete the study. Participants will be recruited according to the following criteria: (1 clinically obese and aged 11–16 years (Body Mass Index Centile > 98th UK standard (2 no medical condition that would restrict ability to be active three times per week for eight weeks and (3 not diagnosed with insulin dependent diabetes or receiving oral steroids. Assessments of outcomes will take place at baseline, as well as four (intervention midpoint and eight weeks (end of intervention from baseline. Participants will be reassessed on outcome measures five and seven months from baseline. The primary endpoint is physical self-perceptions. Secondary outcomes include physical activity, self-perceptions, depression, affect, aerobic fitness and BMI.

  15. NEOadjuvant therapy monitoring with PET and CT in Esophageal Cancer (NEOPEC-trial)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijl, Mark van; Gaast, Ate van der; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard AP; Bonenkamp, Han J; Plukker, John ThM; Bilgen, Ernst J Spillenaar; Kate, Fibo JW ten; Boellaard, Ronald; Pruim, Jan; Sloof, Gerrit W; Lanschot, J Jan B van; Omloo, Jikke MT; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I van; Busch, Olivier RC; Tilanus, Hugo W; Bossuyt, Patrick MM; Hoekstra, Otto S; Stoker, Jaap; Hulshof, Maarten CCM

    2008-01-01

    Surgical resection is the preferred treatment of potentially curable esophageal cancer. To improve long term patient outcome, many institutes apply neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. In a large proportion of patients no response to chemoradiotherapy is achieved. These patients suffer from toxic and ineffective neoadjuvant treatment, while appropriate surgical therapy is delayed. For this reason a diagnostic test that allows for accurate prediction of tumor response early during chemoradiotherapy is of crucial importance. CT-scan and endoscopic ultrasound have limited accuracy in predicting histopathologic tumor response. Data suggest that metabolic changes in tumor tissue as measured by FDG-PET predict response better. This study aims to compare FDG-PET and CT-scan for the early prediction of non-response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with potentially curable esophageal cancer. Prognostic accuracy study, embedded in a randomized multicenter Dutch trial comparing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for 5 weeks followed by surgery versus surgery alone for esophageal cancer. This prognostic accuracy study is performed only in the neoadjuvant arm of the randomized trial. In 6 centers, 150 consecutive patients will be included over a 3 year period. FDG-PET and CT-scan will be performed before and 2 weeks after the start of the chemoradiotherapy. All patients complete the 5 weeks regimen of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, regardless the test results. Pathological examination of the surgical resection specimen will be used as reference standard. Responders are defined as patients with < 10% viable residual tumor cells (Mandard-score). Difference in accuracy (area under ROC curve) and negative predictive value between FDG-PET and CT-scan are primary endpoints. Furthermore, an economic evaluation will be performed, comparing survival and costs associated with the use of FDG-PET (or CT-scan) to predict tumor response with survival and costs of neoadjuvant

  16. NEOadjuvant therapy monitoring with PET and CT in Esophageal Cancer (NEOPEC-trial)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijl, Mark van [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gaast, Ate van der [Department of Medical Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard AP [Department of Surgery, Catharina Hospital Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bonenkamp, Han J [Department of Surgery, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Plukker, John ThM [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bilgen, Ernst J Spillenaar [Department of Surgery, Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem (Netherlands); Kate, Fibo JW ten [Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boellaard, Ronald [Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET research, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pruim, Jan [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Sloof, Gerrit W [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lanschot, J Jan B van [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Omloo, Jikke MT; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I van; Busch, Olivier RC [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tilanus, Hugo W [Department of Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick MM [Department of Clinical Epidiomiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Otto S [Department of Nuclear Medicine, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten CCM [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-07-31

    Surgical resection is the preferred treatment of potentially curable esophageal cancer. To improve long term patient outcome, many institutes apply neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. In a large proportion of patients no response to chemoradiotherapy is achieved. These patients suffer from toxic and ineffective neoadjuvant treatment, while appropriate surgical therapy is delayed. For this reason a diagnostic test that allows for accurate prediction of tumor response early during chemoradiotherapy is of crucial importance. CT-scan and endoscopic ultrasound have limited accuracy in predicting histopathologic tumor response. Data suggest that metabolic changes in tumor tissue as measured by FDG-PET predict response better. This study aims to compare FDG-PET and CT-scan for the early prediction of non-response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with potentially curable esophageal cancer. Prognostic accuracy study, embedded in a randomized multicenter Dutch trial comparing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for 5 weeks followed by surgery versus surgery alone for esophageal cancer. This prognostic accuracy study is performed only in the neoadjuvant arm of the randomized trial. In 6 centers, 150 consecutive patients will be included over a 3 year period. FDG-PET and CT-scan will be performed before and 2 weeks after the start of the chemoradiotherapy. All patients complete the 5 weeks regimen of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, regardless the test results. Pathological examination of the surgical resection specimen will be used as reference standard. Responders are defined as patients with < 10% viable residual tumor cells (Mandard-score). Difference in accuracy (area under ROC curve) and negative predictive value between FDG-PET and CT-scan are primary endpoints. Furthermore, an economic evaluation will be performed, comparing survival and costs associated with the use of FDG-PET (or CT-scan) to predict tumor response with survival and costs of neoadjuvant

  17. Guided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Access to Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT for depression is limited. One solution is CBT self-help books. Trial Objectives: To assess the impact of a guided self-help CBT book (GSH-CBT on mood, compared to treatment as usual (TAU. HYPOTHESES: GSH-CBT will have improved mood and knowledge of the causes and treatment of depression compared to the control receiving TAUGuided self-help will be acceptable to patients and staff. METHODS AND FINDINGS: PARTICIPANTS: Adults attending seven general practices in Glasgow, UK with a BDI-II score of ≥14. 141 randomised to GSH-CBT and 140 to TAU. INTERVENTIONS: RCT comparing 'Overcoming Depression: A Five Areas Approach' book plus 3-4 short face to face support appointments totalling up to 2 hours of guided support, compared with general practitioner TAU. PRIMARY OUTCOME: The BDI (II score at 4 months. Numbers analysed: 281 at baseline, 203 at 4 months (primary outcome, 117 at 12 months. OUTCOME: Mean BDI-II scores were lower in the GSH-CBT group at 4 months by 5.3 points (2.6 to 7.9, p<0.001. At 4 and 12 months there were also significantly higher proportions of participants achieving a 50% reduction in BDI-II in the GSH-CBT arm. The mean support was 2 sessions with 42.7 minutes for session 1, 41.4 minutes for session 2 and 40.2 minutes of support for session 3. Adverse effects/Harms: Significantly less deterioration in mood in GSH-CBT (2.0% compared to 9.8% in the TAU group for BDI-II category change. LIMITATIONS: Weaknesses: Our follow-up rate of 72.2% at 4 months is better than predicted but is poorer at 12 months (41.6%. In the GSH-CBT arm, around 50% of people attended 2 or fewer sessions. 22% failed to take up treatment. CONCLUSIONS: GSH-CBT is substantially more effective than TAU. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN13475030.

  18. Psychosocial therapy for Parkinson's-related dementia: study protocol for the INVEST randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Sheree A; McDonald, Kathryn R; Vatter, Sabina; Orgeta, Vasiliki; Poliakoff, Ellen; Smith, Sarah; Silverdale, Monty A; Fu, Bo; Leroi, Iracema

    2017-06-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI-PD) or dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are characterised by motor and 'non-motor' symptoms which impact on quality of life. Treatment options are generally limited to pharmacological approaches. We developed a psychosocial intervention to improve cognition, quality of life and companion burden for people with MCI-PD, PDD or DLB. Here, we describe the protocol for a single-blind randomised controlled trial to assess feasibility, acceptability and tolerability of the intervention and to evaluate treatment implementation. The interaction among the intervention and selected outcome measures and the efficacy of this intervention in improving cognition for people with MCI-PD, PDD or DLB will also be explored. Dyads will be randomised into two treatment arms to receive either 'treatment as usual' (TAU) or cognitive stimulation therapy specifically adapted for Parkinson's-related dementias (CST-PD), involving 30 min sessions delivered at home by the study companion three times per week over 10 weeks. A mixed-methods approach will be used to collect data on the operational aspects of the trial and treatment implementation. This will involve diary keeping, telephone follow-ups, dyad checklists and researcher ratings. Analysis will include descriptive statistics summarising recruitment, acceptability and tolerance of the intervention, and treatment implementation. To pilot an outcome measure of efficacy, we will undertake an inferential analysis to test our hypothesis that compared with TAU, CST-PD improves cognition. Qualitative approaches using thematic analysis will also be applied. Our findings will inform a larger definitive trial. Ethical opinion was granted (REC reference: 15/YH/0531). Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conferences. We will prepare reports for dissemination by organisations involved with PD and dementia. ISRCTN (ISRCTN11455062). © Article author

  19. Web-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Distressed Cancer Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Suzanne K; Ritterband, Lee M; Thorndike, Frances; Nielsen, Lisa; Aitken, Joanne F; Clutton, Samantha; Scuffham, Paul A; Youl, Philippa; Morris, Bronwyn; Baade, Peter D; Dunn, Jeff

    2018-01-31

    Web-based interventions present a potentially cost-effective approach to supporting self-management for cancer patients; however, further evidence for acceptability and effectiveness is needed. The goal of our research was to assess the effectiveness of an individualized Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention on improving psychological and quality of life outcomes in cancer patients with elevated psychological distress. A total of 163 distressed cancer patients (111 female, 68.1%) were recruited through the Queensland Cancer Registry and the Cancer Council Queensland Cancer Helpline and randomly assigned to either a Web-based tailored CBT intervention (CancerCope) (79/163) or a static patient education website (84/163). At baseline and 8-week follow-up we assessed primary outcomes of psychological and cancer-specific distress and unmet psychological supportive care needs and secondary outcomes of positive adjustment and quality of life. Intention-to-treat analyses showed no evidence of a statistically significant intervention effect on primary or secondary outcomes. However, per-protocol analyses found a greater decrease for the CancerCope group in psychological distress (P=.04), cancer-specific distress (P=.02), and unmet psychological care needs (P=.03) from baseline to 8 weeks compared with the patient education group. Younger patients were more likely to complete the CancerCope intervention. This online CBT intervention was associated with greater decreases in distress for those patients who more closely adhered to the program. Given the low costs and high accessibility of this intervention approach, even if only effective for subgroups of patients, the potential impact may be substantial. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001026718; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=364768&isReview=true (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6uPvpcovl). ©Suzanne K Chambers, Lee M Ritterband

  20. Niacin therapy and the risk of new-onset diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, Christina; Taylor, Allen J; Nguyen, Peter; McCoy, Cody; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Preiss, David

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that niacin treatment raises glucose levels in patients with diabetes and may increase the risk of developing diabetes. We undertook a meta-analysis of published and unpublished data from randomised trials to confirm whether an association exists between niacin and new-onset diabetes. We searched Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, from 1975 to 2014, for randomised controlled trials of niacin primarily designed to assess its effects on cardiovascular endpoints and cardiovascular surrogate markers. We included trials with ≥50 non-diabetic participants and average follow-up of ≥24 weeks. Published data were tabulated and unpublished data sought from investigators. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for new-onset diabetes with random-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity between trials was assessed using the I(2) statistic. In 11 trials with 26 340 non-diabetic participants, 1371 (725/13 121 assigned niacin; 646/13 219 assigned control) were diagnosed with diabetes during a weighted mean follow-up of 3.6 years. Niacin therapy was associated with a RR of 1.34 (95% CIs 1.21 to 1.49) for new-onset diabetes, with limited heterogeneity between trials (I(2)=0.0%, p=0.87). This equates to one additional case of diabetes per 43 (95% CI 30 to 70) initially non-diabetic individuals who are treated with niacin for 5 years. Results were consistent regardless of whether participants received background statin therapy (p for interaction=0.88) or combined therapy with laropiprant (p for interaction=0.52). Niacin therapy is associated with a moderately increased risk of developing diabetes regardless of background statin or combination laropiprant therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Procrastination: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Background Procrastination, to voluntarily delay an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse-off for the delay, is a persistent behavior pattern that can cause major psychological suffering. Approximately half of the student population and 15%-20% of the adult population are presumed having substantial difficulties due to chronic and recurrent procrastination in their everyday life. However, preconceptions and a lack of knowledge restrict the availability of adequate care. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is often considered treatment of choice, although no clinical trials have previously been carried out. Objective The aim of this study will be to test the effects of CBT for procrastination, and to investigate whether it can be delivered via the Internet. Methods Participants will be recruited through advertisements in newspapers, other media, and the Internet. Only people residing in Sweden with access to the Internet and suffering from procrastination will be included in the study. A randomized controlled trial with a sample size of 150 participants divided into three groups will be utilized. The treatment group will consist of 50 participants receiving a 10-week CBT intervention with weekly therapist contact. A second treatment group with 50 participants receiving the same treatment, but without therapist contact, will also be employed. The intervention being used for the current study is derived from a self-help book for procrastination written by one of the authors (AR). It includes several CBT techniques commonly used for the treatment of procrastination (eg, behavioral activation, behavioral experiments, stimulus control, and psychoeducation on motivation and different work methods). A control group consisting of 50 participants on a wait-list control will be used to evaluate the effects of the CBT intervention. For ethical reasons, the participants in the control group will gain access to the same intervention following the 10-week treatment

  2. Landscape of current and emerging cell therapy clinical trials in the UK: current status, comparison to global trends and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Isabelle; Green, Emma; Sharpe, Michaela; Herbert, Chris; Hyllner, Johan; Mount, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Cell Therapy Clinical Trial and Preclinical Research databases have been established by the Cell Therapy Catapult to document current and future cell therapy clinical trials in the UK. We identified 41 ongoing trials in April 2014, an increase of seven trials from April 2013. In addition, we identified 45 late-stage preclinical research projects. The majority of the clinical trials are early phase, primarily led by academic groups. The leading therapeutic areas are cancer, cardiology and neurology. The trends in the UK are also seen globally. As the field matures, more later phase and commercial studies will emerge and the challenges will likely evolve into how to manufacture sufficient cell quantities, manage complex logistics for multi-center trials and control cost.

  3. Psychometric analysis of the Melancholia Scale in trials with non-pharmacological augmentation of patients with therapy-resistant depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Lauritzen, Lise; Lunde, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    . Patients resistant to anti-depressant medication (therapy-resistant depression) have participated in our trials with non-pharmacological augmentation. On the basis of these trials, we have evaluated to what extent the neuropsychiatric subscale of the MES (concentration difficulties, fatigability, emotional...... of transferability, we have tested item ranks across the rating weeks. RESULTS: In the Mokken analysis, the coefficient of homogeneity was above 0.40 for both the HAM-D subscale and the apathia subscale at week 4. The numerical transferability across the weeks was statistically significant (p

  4. Music Therapy Reduces Radiotherapy-Induced Fatigue in Patients With Breast or Gynecological Cancer: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcântara-Silva, Tereza Raquel; de Freitas-Junior, Ruffo; Freitas, Nilceana Maya Aires; de Paula Junior, Wanderley; da Silva, Delson José; Machado, Graziela Dias Pinheiro; Ribeiro, Mayara Kelly Alves; Carneiro, Jonathas Paiva; Soares, Leonardo Ribeiro

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the influence of music therapy on the reduction of fatigue in women with breast or gynecological malignant neoplasia during radiotherapy, since it is one of the most frequent side effects of this type of treatment, and may interfere with self-esteem, social activities, and quality of life. Randomized controlled trial (control group [CG] and music therapy group [MTG]) to assess fatigue, quality of life, and symptoms of depression in women undergoing radiotherapy using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy: Fatigue (FACT-F) version 4, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) version 4, and Beck Depression Inventory in 3 separate times, namely, during the first week of radiotherapy, on the week of the intermediary phase, and during the last week of radiotherapy. Individual 30- to 40-minute sessions of music therapy with the presence of a trained music therapist were offered to participants. In this study, 164 women were randomized and 116 (63 CG and 53 MTG) were included in the analyses, with mean age of 52.90 years (CG) and 51.85 years (MTG). Participants in the MTG had an average of 10 music therapy sessions, totaling 509 sessions throughout the study. FACT-F results were significant regarding Trial Outcome Index ( P = .011), FACT-G ( P = .005), and FACT-F ( P = .001) for the MTG compared with the CG. Individual music therapy sessions may be effective to reduce fatigue related to cancer and symptoms of depression, as well as to improve quality of life for women with breast or gynecological cancer undergoing radiotherapy. Further well-designed research studies are needed to adequately determine the effects of music therapy on fatigue.

  5. Behavioural outcomes of subthalamic stimulation and medical therapy versus medical therapy alone for Parkinson's disease with early motor complications (EARLYSTIM trial): secondary analysis of an open-label randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhommée, Eugénie; Wojtecki, Lars; Czernecki, Virginie; Witt, Karsten; Maier, Franziska; Tonder, Lisa; Timmermann, Lars; Hälbig, Thomas D; Pineau, Fanny; Durif, Franck; Witjas, Tatiana; Pinsker, Marcus; Mehdorn, Maximilian; Sixel-Döring, Friederike; Kupsch, Andreas; Krüger, Rejko; Elben, Saskia; Chabardès, Stephan; Thobois, Stéphane; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Regis, Jean-Marie; Maltête, David; Sauvaget, Anne; Rau, Jörn; Schnitzler, Alfons; Schüpbach, Michael; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Deuschl, Gunther; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Krack, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Although subthalamic stimulation is a recognised treatment for motor complications in Parkinson's disease, reports on behavioural outcomes are controversial, which represents a major challenge when counselling candidates for subthalamic stimulation. We aimed to assess changes in behaviour in patients with Parkinson's disease receiving combined treatment with subthalamic stimulation and medical therapy over a 2-year follow-up period as compared with the behavioural evolution under medical therapy alone. We did a parallel, open-label study (EARLYSTIM) at 17 surgical centres in France (n=8) and Germany (n=9). We recruited patients with Parkinson's disease who were disabled by early motor complications. Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to either medical therapy alone or bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy. The primary outcome was mean change in quality of life from baseline to 2 years. A secondary analysis was also done to assess behavioural outcomes. We used the Ardouin Scale of Behavior in Parkinson's Disease to assess changes in behaviour between baseline and 2-year follow-up. Apathy was also measured using the Starkstein Apathy Scale, and depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory. The secondary analysis was done in all patients recruited. We used a generalised estimating equations (GEE) regression model for individual items and mixed model regression for subscores of the Ardouin scale and the apathy and depression scales. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00354133. The primary analysis has been reported elsewhere; this report presents the secondary analysis only. Between July, 2006, and November, 2009, 251 participants were recruited, of whom 127 were allocated medical therapy alone and 124 were assigned bilateral subthalamic stimulation plus medical therapy. At 2-year follow-up, the levodopa-equivalent dose was reduced by 39% (-363·3 mg/day [SE 41·8]) in individuals allocated bilateral

  6. Cognitive behavioural therapy with optional graded exercise therapy in patients with severe fatigue with myotonic dystrophy type 1: a multicentre, single-blind, randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkersen, Kees; Jimenez-Moreno, Cecilia; Wenninger, Stephan; Daidj, Ferroudja; Glennon, Jeffrey; Cumming, Sarah; Littleford, Roberta; Monckton, Darren G; Lochmüller, Hanns; Catt, Michael; Faber, Catharina G; Hapca, Adrian; Donnan, Peter T; Gorman, Gráinne; Bassez, Guillaume; Schoser, Benedikt; Knoop, Hans; Treweek, Shaun; van Engelen, Baziel G M

    2018-06-18

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults and leads to severe fatigue, substantial physical functional impairment, and restricted social participation. In this study, we aimed to determine whether cognitive behavioural therapy optionally combined with graded exercise compared with standard care alone improved the health status of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. We did a multicentre, single-blind, randomised trial, at four neuromuscular referral centres with experience in treating patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 located in Paris (France), Munich (Germany), Nijmegen (Netherlands), and Newcastle (UK). Eligible participants were patients aged 18 years and older with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy type 1, who were severely fatigued (ie, a score of ≥35 on the checklist-individual strength, subscale fatigue). We randomly assigned participants (1:1) to either cognitive behavioural therapy plus standard care and optional graded exercise or standard care alone. Randomisation was done via a central web-based system, stratified by study site. Cognitive behavioural therapy focused on addressing reduced patient initiative, increasing physical activity, optimising social interaction, regulating sleep-wake patterns, coping with pain, and addressing beliefs about fatigue and myotonic dystrophy type 1. Cognitive behavioural therapy was delivered over a 10-month period in 10-14 sessions. A graded exercise module could be added to cognitive behavioural therapy in Nijmegen and Newcastle. The primary outcome was the 10-month change from baseline in scores on the DM1-Activ-c scale, a measure of capacity for activity and social participation (score range 0-100). Statistical analysis of the primary outcome included all participants for whom data were available, using mixed-effects linear regression models with baseline scores as a covariate. Safety data were presented as descriptives. This trial is registered

  7. Treating acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder with cognitive behavioral therapy or structured writing therapy: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Emmerik, A.A.P.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Writing assignments have shown promising results in treating traumatic symptomatology. Yet no studies have compared their efficacy to the current treatment of choice, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The present study evaluated the efficacy of structured writing therapy (SWT) and CBT as

  8. Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) versus Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Mixed Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Joanna J.; Eifert, Georg H.; Davies, Carolyn; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized comparisons of acceptance-based treatments with traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders are lacking. To address this gap, we compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) to CBT for heterogeneous anxiety disorders. Method: One hundred twenty-eight individuals (52% female, mean age = 38, 33%…

  9. Resource-oriented music therapy for psychiatric patients with low therapy motivation: Protocol for a randomised controlled trial [NCT00137189

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarre Trond

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown positive effects of music therapy for people with schizophrenia and other mental disorders. In clinical practice, music therapy is often offered to psychiatric patients with low therapy motivation, but little research exists about this population. The aim of this study is to examine whether resource-oriented music therapy helps psychiatric patients with low therapy motivation to improve negative symptoms and other health-related outcomes. An additional aim of the study is to examine the mechanisms of change through music therapy. Methods 144 adults with a non-organic mental disorder (ICD-10: F1 to F6 who have low therapy motivation and a willingness to work with music will be randomly assigned to an experimental or a control condition. All participants will receive standard care, and the experimental group will in addition be offered biweekly sessions of music therapy over a period of three months. Outcomes will be measured by a blind assessor before and 1, 3, and 9 months after randomisation. Discussion The findings to be expected from this study will fill an important gap in the knowledge of treatment effects for a patient group that does not easily benefit from treatment. The study's close link to clinical practice, as well as its size and comprehensiveness, will make its results well generalisable to clinical practice.

  10. A qualitative feasibility study to inform a randomised controlled trial of fluid bolus therapy in septic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hara, Caitlin B; Canter, Ruth R; Mouncey, Paul R; Carter, Anjali; Jones, Nicola; Nadel, Simon; Peters, Mark J; Lyttle, Mark D; Harrison, David A; Rowan, Kathryn M; Inwald, David; Woolfall, Kerry

    2018-01-01

    Objective The Fluids in Shock (FiSh) Trial proposes to evaluate whether restrictive fluid bolus therapy (10 mL/kg) is more beneficial than current recommended practice (20 mL/kg) in the resuscitation of children with septic shock in the UK. This qualitative feasibility study aimed to explore acceptability of the FiSh Trial, including research without prior consent (RWPC), potential barriers to recruitment and participant information for a pilot trial. Design Qualitative interview study involving parents of children who had presented to a UK emergency department or been admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit with severe infection in the previous 3 years. Participants Twenty-one parents (seven bereaved) were interviewed 16 (median) months since their child’s hospital admission (range: 1–41). Results All parents said they would have provided consent for the use of their child’s data in the FiSh Trial. The majority were unfamiliar with RWPC, yet supported its use. Parents were initially concerned about the change from currently recommended treatment, yet were reassured by explanations of the current evidence base, fluid bolus therapy and monitoring procedures. Parents made recommendations about the timing of the research discussion and content of participant information. Bereaved parents stated that recruiters should not discuss research immediately after a child’s death, but supported a personalised postal ‘opt-out’ approach to consent. Conclusions Findings show that parents whose child has experienced severe infection supported the proposed FiSh Trial, including the use of RWPC. Parents’ views informed the development of the pilot trial protocol and site staff training. Trial registration number ISRCTN15244462—results. PMID:28847877

  11. Spiritual therapy to improve the spiritual well-being of Iranian women with breast cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Najmeh; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Zamani, Ahmadreza; Bahrami, Fatemeh; Emami, Hamid; Loghmani, Amir; Jafari, Nooshin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of spiritual therapy intervention in improving the spiritual well-being and quality of life (QOL) of Iranian women with breast cancer. Methods. This randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) recruited 65 women with breast cancer, randomly assigned to a 6-week spirituality-based intervention (n = 34) or control group (n = 31). Before and after six-week spiritual therapy intervention, spiritual well-being and quality of life (QOL) were assessed using Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Spiritual Well-being scale (FACIT-Sp12) and cancer quality-of-life questionnaire (QLQ-C30), respectively. t-test, Paired t-test, pearson's correlation, and hierarchical regression analyses were used for analysis using Predictive Analytic software (PASW, version 18) for Windows. Results. After six spiritual therapy sessions, the mean spiritual well-being score from 29.76 (SD = 6.63) to 37.24 (SD = 3.52) in the intervention group (P spiritual well-being and overall QOL. Social functioning was another significant predictor of spiritual well-being. Conclusion. The results of this randomized controlled trial study suggest that participation in spiritual therapy program is associated with improvements in spiritual well-being and QOL. Targeted interventions to acknowledge and incorporate spiritual needs into conventional treatment should be considered in caring of Iranian patients with breast cancer.

  12. Effectiveness of horticultural therapy: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Hiroharu; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Yamada, Minoru; Park, Hyuntae; Okuizumi, Hiroyasu; Honda, Takuya; Okada, Shinpei; Park, Sang-Jun; Kitayuguchi, Jun; Abe, Takafumi; Handa, Shuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiteru

    2014-10-01

    To summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of horticultural therapy (HT). Studies were eligible if they were RCTs. Studies included one treatment group in which HT was applied. We searched the following databases from 1990 up to August 20, 2013: MEDLINE via PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Ichushi-Web, GHL, WPRIM, and PsyclNFO. We also searched all Cochrane Database and Campbell Systematic Reviews up to September 20, 2013. Four studies met all inclusion criteria. The language of all eligible publications was English and Korean. Target diseases and/or symptoms were dementia, severe mental illness such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression, frail elderly in nursing home, and hemiplegic patients after stroke. These studies showed significant effectiveness in one or more outcomes for mental health and behavior. However, our review especially detected omissions of the following descriptions: method used to generate randomization, concealment, blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. In addition, the results of this study suggested that the RCTs conducted have been of relatively low quality. Although there was insufficient evidence in the studies of HT due to poor methodological and reporting quality and heterogeneity, HT may be an effective treatment for mental and behavioral disorders such as dementia, schizophrenia, depression, and terminal-care for cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Task-Based Mirror Therapy Augmenting Motor Recovery in Poststroke Hemiparesis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Kamal Narayan; Pandian, Shanta; Kumar, Dharmendra; Puri, Vinod

    2015-08-01

    To establish the effect of the task-based mirror therapy (TBMT) on the upper limb recovery in stroke. A pilot, randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded trial was conducted in a rehabilitation institute. A convenience sample of 33 poststroke (mean duration, 12.5 months) hemiparetic subjects was randomized into 2 groups (experimental, 17; control, 16). The subjects were allocated to receive either TBMT or standard motor rehabilitation-40 sessions (5/week) for a period of 8 weeks. The TBMT group received movements using various goal-directed tasks and a mirror box. The movements were performed by the less-affected side superimposed on the affected side. The main outcome measures were Brunnstrom recovery stage (BRS) and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA)-FMA of upper extremity (FMA-UE), including upper arm (FMA-UA) and wrist-hand (FMA-WH). The TBMT group exhibited highly significant improvement on mean scores of FMA-WH (P hemiparesis. MT using tasks may be used as an adjunct in stroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Rosalie H; Bourdon, Céline; Potani, Isabel; Mhango, Brian; van den Brink, Deborah A; Mponda, John S; Muller Kobold, Anneke C; Bandsma, Robert H; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael; Voskuijl, Wieger P

    2017-11-01

    To assess the benefits of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in 90 children aged 6-60 months with complicated severe acute malnutrition at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Malawi. All children received standard care; the intervention group also received PERT for 28 days. Children treated with PERT for 28 days did not gain more weight than controls (13.7 ± 9.0% in controls vs 15.3 ± 11.3% in PERT; P = .56). Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was present in 83.1% of patients on admission and fecal elastase-1 levels increased during hospitalization mostly seen in children with nonedematous severe acute malnutrition (P Children who died had low fecal fatty acid split ratios at admission. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was not improved by PERT, but children receiving PERT were more likely to be discharged with every passing day (P = .02) compared with controls. PERT does not improve weight gain in severely malnourished children but does increase the rate of hospital discharge. Mortality was lower in patients on PERT, a finding that needs to be investigated in a larger cohort with stratification for edematous and nonedematous malnutrition. Mortality in severe acute malnutrition is associated with markers of poor digestive function. ISRCTN.com: 57423639. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Multisite, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Computerized Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomar, Jesús J; Valls, Elia; Radua, Joaquim; Mareca, Celia; Tristany, Josep; del Olmo, Francisco; Rebolleda-Gil, Carlos; Jañez-Álvarez, María; de Álvaro, Francisco J; Ovejero, María R; Llorente, Ana; Teixidó, Cristina; Donaire, Ana M; García-Laredo, Eduardo; Lazcanoiturburu, Andrea; Granell, Luis; Mozo, Cristina de Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Mónica; Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) for the neuropsychological deficits seen in schizophrenia is supported by meta-analysis. However, a recent methodologically rigorous trial had negative findings. In this study, 130 chronic schizophrenic patients were randomly assigned to computerized CRT, an active computerized control condition (CC) or treatment as usual (TAU). Primary outcome measures were 2 ecologically valid batteries of executive function and memory, rated under blind conditions; other executive and memory tests and a measure of overall cognitive function were also employed. Carer ratings of executive and memory failures in daily life were obtained before and after treatment. Computerized CRT was found to produce improvement on the training tasks, but this did not transfer to gains on the primary outcome measures and most other neuropsychological tests in comparison to either CC or TAU conditions. Nor did the intervention result in benefits on carer ratings of daily life cognitive failures. According to this study, computerized CRT is not effective in schizophrenia. The use of both active and passive CCs suggests that nature of the control group is not an important factor influencing results. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  16. Cue exposure therapy for the treatment of opiate addiction: results of a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marissen, Marlies A E; Franken, Ingmar H A; Blanken, Peter; van den Brink, Wim; Hendriks, Vincent M

    2007-01-01

    Persistent cue reactivity to drug-related stimuli is a well-known phenomenon among abstinent drug users and has been found to be a predictor of relapse. Cue exposure therapy (CET) aims to reduce this cue reactivity by exposing abstinent drug users to conditioned drug-related stimuli while preventing their habitual response, i.e. drug use. 127 abstinent heroin-dependent Dutch inpatients were randomized to CET (n = 65; 55 completers) and placebo psychotherapy treatment (PPT) (n = 62; 59 completers). It was examined whether CET would lead to a decrease in drug-related cue reactivity (using mixed-design ANOVA) and subsequently to lower dropout and relapse rates (using logistic regression) compared to PPT. Both groups responded with a similar decrease in self-reported cue reactivity (craving, mood). The CET group did show a significant decrease in physiological reactivity (skin conductance) compared to PPT. However, dropout and relapse rates were, contrary to our expectations, significantly higher in the CET group. This is the first randomized controlled trial showing that CET, compared to a non-specific psychotherapy, might increase dropout and relapse rates among abstinent heroin-dependent clients in a drug-free setting. Caution is warranted when applying CET in this specific context. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM as a novel therapy for pressure Ulcers: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamimi Nouri K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of pressure ulcers of the foot is a major health care problem in frail elderly patients. A pressure sore dramatically increases the cost of medical and nursing care, and effective treatment has always been an essential nursing concern. Management options for pressure ulcers include local wound care; surgical repair and, more recently, topical application of growth factors.The main goal of this study was to examine the effects of intravenous treatment of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a new herbal extract in patients with severe, noninfected pressure ulcers of the foot.As a randomized clinical trial, 18 patients with pressure ulcers were recruited from Vali-e-Asr hospital, Medical Sciences/ University of Tehran, Iran. Nine patients received intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM besides to conventional therapy and nine received only conventional treatment.At the baseline, the treatment and control groups did not differ across demographic variables, clinical characteristics, and functional measures. The mean surface areas of the ulcers were reduced 43.2 ± 57.4 cm2 (80.3% and 2.8± 6.2 cm² (6.3% in the treatment and control groups, respectively (p=0.000. The average reduction in pressure ulcer area at four weeks was statistically and clinically greater in the treatment group than in the control group So, intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM can be recommended as an effective treatment for patients with severe pressure ulcers.

  18. Computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy for adults with intellectual disability: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Patricia; Jackman, Catherine; Coyle, David; O'Reilly, Gary

    2017-08-01

    Background Despite the evidence base for computer-assisted cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in the general population, it has not yet been adapted for use with adults who have an intellectual disability. Aims To evaluate the utility of a CBT computer game for adults who have an intellectual disability. Method A 2 × 3 (group × time) randomised controlled trial design was used. Fifty-two adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability and anxiety or depression were randomly allocated to two groups: computerised CBT (cCBT) or psychiatric treatment as usual (TAU), and assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. Forty-nine participants were included in the final analysis. Results A significant group × time interaction was observed on the primary outcome measure of anxiety (Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with an Intellectual Disability), favouring cCBT over TAU, but not on the primary outcome measure of depression (Glasgow Depression Scale for people with a Learning Disability). A medium effect size for anxiety symptoms was observed at post-treatment and a large effect size was observed after follow-up. Reliability of Change Indices indicated that the intervention produced clinically significant change in the cCBT group in comparison with TAU. Conclusions As the first application of cCBT for adults with intellectual disability, this intervention appears to be a useful treatment option to reduce anxiety symptoms in this population. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  19. Rapid course radiation therapy vs. more standard treatment: a randomized trial for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, Marcus; Tkocz, Heinz-Joachim; Abel, Ulrich; Scheib, Thomas; Walter, Karin; Nieder, Carsten; Schnabel, Klaus; Berberich, Werner; Kubale, Reinhard; Fuchs, Marcus

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In a prospective randomized trial we examined whether radiotherapy of painful bone metastases can be shortened using larger single doses without impairing effectivity. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with painful bone metastases having no prior surgical intervention or treatment with x-ray therapy and had a median follow-up of 12 months were analyzed. The primary tumor was located in the breast in 43%, in the lung in 24%, and in the prostate in 14%. The most frequent sites of metastases were the pelvis (31%), the vertebral column (30%), and the ribs (20%). Further percentages of sites were: lower extremity 11%, upper extremity 6%, and skull 2%. Fifty-one patients received a short course radiotherapy with a total dose of 20 Gy in 1 week (daily dose 4 Gy), and 49 patients received 30 Gy in 3 weeks (daily dose 2 Gy). Results: There were no significant differences in frequency, duration of pain relief, improvement of mobility, recalcification, frequency of pathologic fractures nor survival. There was a light trend favoring 30 Gy in frequency of pain relief and recalcification. Survival was mostly influenced by primary tumor site, Karnofsky performance status, and possibly by the response to radiotherapy (pain relief). Conclusions: Because of the very short life expectancy of patients with metastatic bone disease, we now use 20 Gy in 1 week as our standard to reduce hospital stay

  20. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Behavioral Voice Therapy for Dysphonia Related to Prematurity of Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Victoria; Meldrum, Suzanne; Simmer, Karen; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; French, Noel

    2017-03-01

    Dysphonia is a potential complication of prematurity. Preterm children may sustain iatrogenic laryngeal damage from medical intervention in the neonatal period, and further, adopt compensatory, maladaptive voicing behaviors. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effects of a voice therapy protocol on voice quality in school-aged, very preterm (VP) children. Twenty-seven VP children with dysphonia were randomized to an immediate intervention group (n = 7) or a delayed-intervention, waiting list control group (n = 14). Following analysis of these data, a secondary analysis was conducted on the pooled intervention data (n = 21). Six participants did not complete the trial. Change to voice quality was measured via pre- and posttreatment assessments using the Consensus Auditory Perceptual Evaluation of Voice. The intervention group did not demonstrate statistically significant improvements in voice quality, whereas this was observed in the control group (P = 0.026). However, when intervention data were pooled including both the immediate and delayed groups following intervention, dysphonia severity was significantly lower (P = 0.026) in the treatment group. Dysphonia in most VP children in this cohort was persistent. These pilot data indicate that some participants experienced acceptable voice outcomes on spontaneous recovery, whereas others demonstrated a response to behavioral intervention. Further research is needed to identify the facilitators of and barriers to intervention success, and to predict those who may experience spontaneous recovery. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  1. Randomized Controlled Trial of Online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simister, Heather D; Tkachuk, Gregg A; Shay, Barbara L; Vincent, Norah; Pear, Joseph J; Skrabek, Ryan Q

    2018-03-02

    In this study, 67 participants (95% female) with fibromyalgia (FM) were randomly assigned to an online acceptance and commitment therapy (online ACT) and treatment as usual (TAU; ACT + TAU) protocol or a TAU control condition. Online ACT + TAU participants were asked to complete 7 modules over an 8-week period. Assessments were completed at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up periods and included measures of FM impact (primary outcome), depression, pain, sleep, 6-minute walk, sit to stand, pain acceptance (primary process variable), mindfulness, cognitive fusion, valued living, kinesiophobia, and pain catastrophizing. The results indicated that online ACT + TAU participants significantly improved in FM impact, relative to TAU (P online ACT + TAU were also found on measures of depression (P = .02), pain (P = .01), and kinesiophobia (P = .001). Although preliminary, this study highlights the potential for online ACT to be an efficacious, accessible, and cost-effective treatment for people with FM and other chronic pain conditions. Online ACT reduced FM impact relative to a TAU control condition in this randomized controlled trial. Reductions in FM impact were mediated by improvements in pain acceptance. Online ACT appears to be a promising intervention for FM. Copyright © 2018 The American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exposure-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Children with Abdominal Pain: A Pilot Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lalouni

    Full Text Available Children with pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (P-FGIDs have an increased risk for school absenteeism, depression, anxiety and low quality of life. Exposure-based cognitive behavior therapy (CBT has shown large treatment effects in adults with irritable bowel syndrome, but has not been tested for children 8-12 years with P-FGIDs.The aim of this trial was to test the feasibility, acceptability and potential efficacy of a newly developed exposure-based CBT for children with P-FGIDs.The children (n = 20 with a P-FGID, were referred by their treating physicians. The participants received 10 weekly sessions of exposure-based CBT and were assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up.Children improved significantly on the primary outcome measure pain intensity at post (Cohen's d = 0.40, p = 0.049 and at 6-month follow-up (Cohen's d = 0.85, p = 0.004. Improvements were also seen in pain frequency, gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life, depression, anxiety, school absenteeism and somatic symptoms. Improvements were maintained or further increased at 6-month follow-up. The children engaged in the exposures and were satisfied with the treatment.Exposure-based CBT for children with P-FGIDs is feasible, acceptable and potentially efficacious.

  3. Periodontal Therapy Effects on Nitrite Related to Oral Bacteria: A 6-Month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortelli, Sheila C; Costa, Fernando O; Rodrigues, Edson; Cota, Luis O M; Cortelli, Jose R

    2015-08-01

    Nitrite is a biologic factor relevant to oral and systemic homeostasis. Through an oral bacteria reduction process, it was suggested that periodontal therapy and chlorhexidine (CHX) rinse could affect nitrite levels, leading to negative effects, such as an increase in blood pressure. This 6-month randomized clinical trial evaluated the effects of periodontal therapeutic protocols on salivary nitrite and its relation to subgingival bacteria. One hundred patients with periodontitis were allocated randomly to debridement procedures in four weekly sections (quadrant scaling [QS]) or within 24 hours (full-mouth scaling [FMS]) in conjunction with a 60-day CHX (QS + CHX and FMS + CHX), placebo (QS + placebo and FMS + placebo), or no mouthrinse (QS + none and FMS + none) use. Real-time polymerase chain reaction determined total bacterial, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Streptococcus oralis, and Actinomyces naeslundii levels. Salivary nitrite concentration was determined with Griess reagent. Data were analyzed statistically at baseline and 3 and 6 months by analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Spearman correlation tests (P periodontal pockets. The relationship between nitrite and bacterial levels appears weak. Short-term scaling exhibited a greater influence on nitrite concentrations then long-term CHX use.

  4. Cognitive remediation therapy for adolescent inpatients with severe and complex anorexia nervosa: A treatment trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Amy; Stavri, Pamela; Ormond, Lynn; McEnemy, Francine; Akyol, Dilan; Qureshi, Annum; Al-Khairulla, Hind

    2018-05-01

    Cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) is a low-intensity treatment adjunct for individuals with severe and complex anorexia nervosa (AN) with difficulties in globally oriented, flexible thinking. Previously trialled in adults, this study investigated whether individual and group CRT was a feasible, acceptable, and beneficial treatment for 125 adolescent inpatients with severe and complex AN. Seventy patients (mean age = 15.22, SD = 1.44) received 10 sessions of individual CRT, and 55 patients (mean age = 14.89, SD = 1.74) received 10 sessions of group CRT. In individual CRT, 1 patient (1.43%) dropped out, and there were medium-sized improvements in bigger picture thinking and set-shifting, small to large-sized improvements in switching-related initiation and inhibition skills, and large-sized improvements in motivation to recover. Group CRT had higher dropout (9.09%; n = 5) and produced small-sized improvements in global information processing and medium-sized improvements in self-reported cognitive flexibility and high acceptability ratings. Data suggest that a randomised controlled trial for adolescents with AN is warranted. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. Formal Physical Therapy May Not Be Necessary After Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, Yale A; Darrith, Brian; Lonner, Jess H; Culvern, Chris; Crizer, Meredith; Della Valle, Craig J

    2018-02-21

    The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to compare formal outpatient physical therapy (PT) and unsupervised home exercises after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Fifty-two patients were randomized to 6 weeks of outpatient PT or an unsupervised home exercise program after UKA. The primary outcome was change in range of motion at 6 weeks with secondary outcomes including total arc of motion, Knee Society Score, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Jr, Lower Extremity Functional Scale, and Veterans Rands-12 score. Twenty-five patients received outpatient PT, 22 patients the self-directed exercise program, while 3 patients deviated from the protocol, 1 patient withdrew, and 1 patient was lost to follow-up. There was no difference in the change of range of motion (P = .43) or total arc of motion at 6 weeks (P = .17) between the groups and likewise no significant differences were found in any of the secondary outcomes. Two patients who crossed over from the unsupervised home exercise program to formal outpatient PT within the first 2 weeks postoperatively required a manipulation under anesthesia. Our results suggest self-directed exercises may be appropriate for most patients following UKA. However, there is a subset of patients who may benefit from formal PT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of acupuncture therapy as treatment for tinnitus: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Yugi Doi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Tinnitus is a subjective sensation of hearing a sound in the absence of an external stimulus, which significantly worsens the quality of life in 15-25% of affected individuals. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for tinnitus. METHODS: Randomized clinical trial (REBEC: 2T9T7Q with 50 participants with tinnitus, divided into two groups: 25 participants in the acupuncture group and 25 participants in the control group. The acupuncture group received acupuncture treatment and the control group received no treatment. After a period of 5 weeks, they were called to perform the final evaluation and the control group received acupuncture treatment for ethical reasons. RESULTS: A statistically significant result was found for the primary outcome, reducing the intensity of tinnitus, with p = 0.0001 and the secondary endpoint, showing improvement in quality of life, with p = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Chinese scalp acupuncture associated with bilateral electroacupuncture demonstrated, in the short term, a statistically significant improvement by reducing the level of tinnitus intensity, as well as improving the quality of life of individuals with tinnitus.

  7. Cognitive behavior therapy for pediatric functional abdominal pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veek, Shelley M C; Derkx, Bert H F; Benninga, Marc A; Boer, Frits; de Haan, Else

    2013-11-01

    This randomized controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of a 6-session protocolized cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) compared with 6 visits to a pediatrician (intensive medical care; IMC) for the treatment of pediatric functional abdominal pain (FAP). One hundred four children aged 7 to 18 were randomized to CBT or IMC. CBT was delivered primarily by trained master's degree students in psychology; IMC was delivered by pediatricians or pediatric gastroenterologists. Assessments were performed pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were level of abdominal pain (AP) as reported on questionnaires and diaries. Secondary outcomes were other gastrointestinal complaints, functional disability, other somatic complaints, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Both CBT and IMC resulted in a significant decrease in AP (P .05 for all end points). According to the questionnaire-derived data, 1 year after treatment, 60% of children that received CBT had significantly improved or recovered, versus 56.4% of children receiving IMC, which did not significantly differ (P = .47). These percentages were 65.8% versus 62.8% according to the diary-derived data, which also did not significantly differ (P = .14). Additionally, nearly all secondary outcomes improved after treatment. CBT was equally effective as IMC in reducing AP in children with FAP. More research into the specific working mechanisms of CBT for pediatric FAP is needed.

  8. Effectiveness of acupuncture therapy as treatment for tinnitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Marcelo Yugi; Tano, Simone Sayomi; Schultz, Adriane Rocha; Borges, Ricardo; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is a subjective sensation of hearing a sound in the absence of an external stimulus, which significantly worsens the quality of life in 15-25% of affected individuals. To assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for tinnitus. Randomized clinical trial ( 2T9T7Q) with 50 participants with tinnitus, divided into two groups: 25 participants in the acupuncture group and 25 participants in the control group. The acupuncture group received acupuncture treatment and the control group received no treatment. After a period of 5 weeks, they were called to perform the final evaluation and the control group received acupuncture treatment for ethical reasons. A statistically significant result was found for the primary outcome, reducing the intensity of tinnitus, with p=0.0001 and the secondary endpoint, showing improvement in quality of life, with p=0.0001. Chinese scalp acupuncture associated with bilateral electroacupuncture demonstrated, in the short term, a statistically significant improvement by reducing the level of tinnitus intensity, as well as improving the quality of life of individuals with tinnitus. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness of animal-assisted therapy: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Hiroharu; Okada, Shinpei; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Park, Hyuntae; Okuizumi, Hiroyasu; Handa, Shuichi; Oshio, Takuya; Park, Sang-Jun; Kitayuguchi, Jun; Abe, Takafumi; Honda, Takuya; Mutoh, Yoshiteru

    2014-04-01

    The objectives of this review were to summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of animal-assisted therapy (AAT). Studies were eligible if they were RCTs. Studies included one treatment group in which AAT was applied. We searched the following databases from 1990 up to October 31, 2012: MEDLINE via PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Ichushi Web, GHL, WPRIM, and PsycINFO. We also searched all Cochrane Database up to October 31, 2012. Eleven RCTs were identified, and seven studies were about "Mental and behavioral disorders". Types of animal intervention were dog, cat, dolphin, bird, cow, rabbit, ferret, and guinea pig. The RCTs conducted have been of relatively low quality. We could not perform meta-analysis because of heterogeneity. In a study environment limited to the people who like animals, AAT may be an effective treatment for mental and behavioral disorders such as depression, schizophrenia, and alcohol/drug addictions, and is based on a holistic approach through interaction with animals in nature. To most effectively assess the potential benefits for AAT, it will be important for further research to utilize and describe (1) RCT methodology when appropriate, (2) reasons for non-participation, (3) intervention dose, (4) adverse effects and withdrawals, and (5) cost. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Dehghani; Navabzadeh, Maryam; Roudsari, Mohammad Khodashenas; Zahmatkash, Mohsen

    2014-12-01

    Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients) and conventional treatment group (30 patients). An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months). Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6) and 32.6 (±12.7) years, respectively (P = 0.45). After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80), frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63) and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48) were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care.

  11. Clinical efficacy, onset time and safety of bright light therapy in acute bipolar depression as an adjunctive therapy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian-Hang; Dang, Wei-Min; Ma, Yan-Tao; Hu, Chang-Qing; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Guo-Yi; Wang, Gang; Shi, Chuan; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Bin; Zhou, Shu-Zhe; Feng, Lei; Geng, Shu-Xia; Tong, Yu-Zhen; Tang, Guan-Wen; He, Zhong-Kai; Zhen, Long; Yu, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Bright light therapy (BLT) is an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder and non- seasonal depression. The efficacy of BLT in treating patients with bipolar disorder is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy, onset time and clinical safety of BLT in treating patients with acute bipolar depression as an adjunctive therapy (trial registration at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02009371). This was a multi-center, single blind, randomized clinical trial. Seventy-four participants were randomized in one of two treatment conditions: BLT and control (dim red light therapy, dRLT). Sixty-three participants completed the study (33 BLT, 30 dRLT). Light therapy lasted for two weeks, one hour every morning. All participants were required to complete several scales assessments at baseline, and at the end of weeks 1 and 2. The primary outcome measures were the clinical efficacy of BLT which was assessed by the reduction rate of HAMD-17 scores, and the onset time of BLT which was assessed by the reduction rate of QIDS-SR16 scores. The secondary outcome measures were rates of switch into hypomania or mania and adverse events. 1) Clinical efficacy: BLT showed a greater ameliorative effect on bipolar depression than the control, with response rates of 78.19% vs. 43.33% respectively (p < 0.01). 2) Onset day: Median onset day was 4.33 days in BLT group. 3) BLT-emergent hypomania: No participants experienced symptoms of hypomania. 4) Side effects: No serious adverse events were reported. BLT can be considered as an effective and safe adjunctive treatment for patients with acute bipolar depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effective therapy to reduce edema after total knee arthroplasty Multi-layer compression therapy or standard therapy with cool pack - a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Brigitta; Babendererde, Christine; Rohner-Spengler, Manuela; Müller, Urs W; Meichtry, André; Luomajoki, Hannu

    2018-02-01

    Background: After total knee arthroplasty (TKA) efficient control and reduction of postoperative edema is of great importance. Aim: The aim of this pilot study (EKNZ 2014 – 225 DRKS00006271) was to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layer compression therapy (MLCT) to reduce edema in the early period after surgery compared to the standard treatment with Cool Pack. Methods: In this randomized controlled pilot trial, sixteen patients after TKA were randomized into an intervention group (IG) or a control group (CG). Circumferential measurements were used to assess edema. Secondary outcomes were range of motion (ROM), pain (numeric rating scale, NRS) and function as measured with the fast Self Paced Walking Test (fSPWT). Results: Clinically relevant differences in edema reduction between the two groups were found in the early postoperative period and at the six weeks follow up. Six days postoperatively the group time interaction (IE) in favor of the IG were −3.8 cm (95 % CI: −5.1; −2.4) when measured 10 cm proximal to the joint space and −2.7 cm (CI: −4.1; −1.3) when measured 5 cm proximally. We further observed differences in secondary outcomes in favor of the CG. Six days postoperatively the IE for knee flexion was –8.3 ° (CI: −22.0; 5.4) and for the fSPWT it was 12.8 seconds (CI: −16.4; 41.3). Six weeks postoperatively these differences diminished. Conclusions: The findings suggest that MLCT could be an alternative treatment to reduce postoperative edema in patients after total knee arthroplasty. Eventually possible negative effects on early knee flexion and function must be considered.

  13. A 12-Words-for-Life-Nurturing Exercise Program as an Alternative Therapy for Cervical Spondylosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we carried out a randomized controlled clinical trial to explore the effect of 12-words-for-life-nurturing exercise on patients presenting with cervical spondylosis. After exercise intervention, the mean VAS and NDI scores of the patients decreased significantly and the scores of BP, VT, and MH in SF-36 Health Questionnaire were significantly higher. Exercise therapy showed significant effect on relieving pain and improving vitality and mental health. The 12-words-for-life-nurturing exercise may be a potential effective therapy for patients with cervical spondylosis.

  14. Latino values in the context of palliative care: illustrative cases from the Family Focused Grief Therapy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Gaudio, F; Hichenberg, S; Eisenberg, M; Kerr, E; Zaider, T I; Kissane, D W

    2013-05-01

    Clinicians meet a variety of ethnicities among patients and families in hospice programs. This article focuses on Latino families. Within a controlled trial of family therapy in the context of palliative care, 17 families identified as Hispanic. Five were examined qualitatively herein. A synopsis of each family's narrative is presented here. Patterns of strong family loyalty (Familismo), the gender roles of Machismo and Marianismo, the importance of family tradition, expectations about caregiving, and the place of faith and religion emerged as prominent and able potentially to impact on the therapy. Family therapists need to be thoughtful about cultural issues as they strive to support families.

  15. Clinical trial of cancer therapy with heavy ions at heavy ion research facility in lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong

    With collaborative efforts of scientists from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences and hospitals in Gansu, initial clinical trial on cancer therapy with heavy ions has been successfully carried out in China. From November 2006 to December 2007, 51 patients with superficially-placed tumors were treated with carbon ions at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) within four beam time blocks of 6-11 days, collaborating with the General Hospital of Lanzhou Command and the Tumor Hospital of Gansu Province. Patients and Methods: There were 51 patients (31 males and 20 females) with superficially-placed tumors (squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma of the skin, malignant skin melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, breast cancer, metastatic lymph nodes of carcinomas and other skin lesions). The tumors were less than 2.1 cm deep to the skin surface. All patients had histological confirmation of their tumors. Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) of all patients was more than 70. The majority of patients were with failures or recurrences of conventional therapies. Median age at the time of radiotherapy (RT) was 55.5 years (range 5-85 years). Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion or a head mask and irradiated by carbon ion beams with energy 80-100 MeV/u at spread-out Bragg peak field generated from HIRFL, with two and three-dimensional conformal irradiation methods. Target volume was defined by physical palpation [ultrasonography and Computerized tomography (CT), for some cases]. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the gross total volume GTV with a 0.5-1.0cm margin axially. Field placement for radiation treatment planning was done based on the surface markings. RBE of 2.5-3 within the target volume, and 40-75 GyE with a weekly fractionation of 7 × 3-15 GyE/fraction were used in the trial. Patients had follow-up examinations performed 1 month after treatment, in 1 or 2 months for the first 6 months, and 3

  16. Standards for gene therapy clinical trials based on pro-active risk assessment in a London NHS Teaching Hospital Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, K B; Wood, S; Shaw, R J

    2005-02-01

    Conducting gene therapy clinical trials with genetically modified organisms as the vectors presents unique safety and infection control issues. The area is governed by a range of legislation and guidelines, some unique to this field, as well as those pertinent to any area of clinical work. The relevant regulations covering gene therapy using genetically modified vectors are reviewed and illustrated with the approach taken by a large teaching hospital NHS Trust. Key elements were Trust-wide communication and involvement of staff in a pro-active approach to risk management, with specific emphasis on staff training and engagement, waste management, audit and record keeping. This process has led to the development of proposed standards for clinical trials involving genetically modified micro-organisms.

  17. Adjunctive Non-Surgical Therapy of Inflamed Periodontal Pockets During Maintenance Therapy Using Diode Laser: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Naomi-Trang; Byarlay, Matthew R; Reinhardt, Richard A; Marx, David B; Meinberg, Trudy A; Kaldahl, Wayne B

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have documented the clinical outcomes of laser therapy for untreated periodontitis, but very few have reported on lasers treating inflamed pockets during maintenance therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP) plus the adjunctive use of diode laser therapy to SRP alone on changes in the clinical parameters of disease and on the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) inflammatory mediator interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in patients receiving regular periodontal maintenance therapy. This single-masked and randomized, controlled, prospective study includes 22 patients receiving regular periodontal maintenance therapy who had one or more periodontal sites with a probing depth (PD) ≥ 5 mm with bleeding on probing (BOP). Fifty-six sites were treated with SRP and adjunctive laser therapy (SRP + L). Fifty-eight sites were treated with SRP alone. Clinical parameters, including PD, clinical attachment level (CAL), and BOP, and GCF IL-1β levels were measured immediately before treatment (baseline) and 3 months after treatment. Sites treated with SRP + L and SRP alone resulted in statistically significant reductions in PD and BOP and gains in CAL. These changes were not significantly different between the two therapies. Similarly, differences in GCF IL-1β levels between SRP + L and SRP alone were not statistically significant. In periodontal maintenance patients, SRP + L did not enhance clinical outcomes compared to SRP alone in the treatment of inflamed sites with ≥ 5 mm PD.

  18. Effects of massage therapy and occlusal splint therapy on mandibular range of motion in individuals with temporomandibular disorder: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cid André Fidelis de Paula; Politti, Fabiano; Andrade, Daniel Ventura; de Sousa, Dowglas Fernando Magalhães; Herpich, Carolina Marciela; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of massage therapy compared with occlusal splint therapy on mandibular range of motion (ROM) in individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and compare the results with ROM obtained in a group of individuals without this disorder. A blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted. Twenty-eight volunteers with TMD were randomly distributed into either a massage therapy group or an occlusal splint group. Both treatments were provided for 4 weeks. Fourteen individuals without TMD were consecutively allocated to a comparison group. Fonseca anamnestic index was used to characterize TMD and allocate the volunteers to either of the intervention groups or asymptomatic comparison group. Mandibular ROM was evaluated before and after treatment using a digital caliper. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with a post hoc Bonferroni testing was used for intergroup and intragroup comparisons (level of significance was set to 5%). Cohen d was used to calculate the effect size. In the intragroup analysis, significant increases in ROM were found for all measures in both the massage and occlusal splint groups (P massage therapy and asymptomatic comparison groups (0.2 Massage therapy on the masticatory muscles and the use of an occlusal splint lead to an increase in mandibular ROM similar to that of the asymptomatic comparison group with regard to maximum active mouth opening and both right and left excursion in individuals with TMD. © 2013. Published by National University of Health Sciences All rights reserved.

  19. Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for procrastination: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, Alexander; Carlbring, Per

    2013-11-12

    Procrastination, to voluntarily delay an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse-off for the delay, is a persistent behavior pattern that can cause major psychological suffering. Approximately half of the student population and 15%-20% of the adult population are presumed having substantial difficulties due to chronic and recurrent procrastination in their everyday life. However, preconceptions and a lack of knowledge restrict the availability of adequate care. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is often considered treatment of choice, although no clinical trials have previously been carried out. The aim of this study will be to test the effects of CBT for procrastination, and to investigate whether it can be delivered via the Internet. Participants will be recruited through advertisements in newspapers, other media, and the Internet. Only people residing in Sweden with access to the Internet and suffering from procrastination will be included in the study. A randomized controlled trial with a sample size of 150 participants divided into three groups will be utilized. The treatment group will consist of 50 participants receiving a 10-week CBT intervention with weekly therapist contact. A second treatment group with 50 participants receiving the same treatment, but without therapist contact, will also be employed. The intervention being used for the current study is derived from a self-help book for procrastination written by one of the authors (AR). It includes several CBT techniques commonly used for the treatment of procrastination (eg, behavioral activation, behavioral experiments, stimulus control, and psychoeducation on motivation and different work methods). A control group consisting of 50 participants on a wait-list control will be used to evaluate the effects of the CBT intervention. For ethical reasons, the participants in the control group will gain access to the same intervention following the 10-week treatment period, albeit without

  20. Magnet therapy for the relief of pain and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (CAMBRA: A randomised placebo-controlled crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richmond Stewart J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory autoimmune disease. Although disease activity may be managed effectively with prescription drugs, unproven treatments such as magnet therapy are sometimes used as an adjunct for pain control. Therapeutic devices incorporating permanent magnets are widely available and easy to use. Magnets may also be perceived as a more natural and less harmful alternative to analgesic compounds. Of interest to health service researchers is the possibility that magnet therapy might help to reduce the economic burden of managing chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Magnets are extremely cheap to manufacture and prolonged treatment involves a single cost. Despite this, good quality scientific evidence concerning the safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of magnet therapy is scarce. The primary aim of the CAMBRA trial is to investigate the effectiveness of magnet therapy for relieving pain and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods/Design The CAMBRA trial employs a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design. Participant will each wear four devices: a commercially available magnetic wrist strap; an attenuated wrist strap; a demagnetised wrist strap; and a copper bracelet. Device will be allocated in a randomised sequence and each worn for five weeks. The four treatment phases will be separated by wash out periods lasting one week. Both participants and researchers will be blind, as far as feasible, to the allocation of experimental and control devices. In total 69 participants will be recruited from general practices within the UK. Eligible patients will have a verified diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis that is being managed using drugs, and will be experiencing chronic pain. Outcomes measured will include pain, inflammation, disease activity, physical function, medication use, affect, and health related costs. Data will be collected using questionnaires, diaries, manual

  1. Single-session gamified virtual reality exposure therapy for spider phobia vs. traditional exposure therapy: study protocol for a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloff, Alexander; Lindner, Philip; Hamilton, William; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-02-02

    Traditional one-session exposure therapy (OST) in which a patient is gradually exposed to feared stimuli for up to 3 h in a one-session format has been found effective for the treatment of specific phobias. However, many individuals with specific phobia are reluctant to seek help, and access to care is lacking due to logistic challenges of accessing, collecting, storing, and/or maintaining stimuli. Virtual reality (VR) exposure therapy may improve upon existing techniques by facilitating access, decreasing cost, and increasing acceptability and effectiveness. The aim of this study is to compare traditional OST with in vivo spiders and a human therapist with a newly developed single-session gamified VR exposure therapy application with modern VR hardware, virtual spiders, and a virtual therapist. Participants with specific phobia to spiders (N = 100) will be recruited from the general public, screened, and randomized to either VR exposure therapy (n = 50) or traditional OST (n = 50). A behavioral approach test using in vivo spiders will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures will include spider phobia questionnaires and self-reported anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Outcomes will be assessed using a non-inferiority design at baseline and at 1, 12, and 52 weeks after treatment. VR exposure therapy has previously been evaluated as a treatment for specific phobias, but there has been a lack of high-quality randomized controlled trials. A new generation of modern, consumer-ready VR devices is being released that are advancing existing technology and have the potential to improve clinical availability and treatment effectiveness. The VR medium is also particularly suitable for taking advantage of recent phobia treatment research emphasizing engagement and new learning, as opposed to physiological habituation. This study compares a market-ready, gamified VR spider phobia exposure application, delivered using consumer VR hardware, with

  2. Overcoming Barriers to Disseminating Exposure Therapies for Anxiety Disorders: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Training Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Harned, Melanie S.; Dimeff, Linda A.; Woodcock, Eric A.; Skutch, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated methods for training mental health providers (N=46) in exposure therapies (ETs) for anxiety disorders. A pilot randomized controlled trial compared: 1) an interactive, multimedia online training (ET OLT), 2) the ET OLT plus a brief Motivational Interviewing-based intervention (ET OLT + MI), and 3) a placebo control OLT. Assessments were completed at baseline, post-training, and one week following training. Both ET OLT and ET OLT + MI received high satisfaction rati...

  3. Randomized controlled trial of supervised patient self-testing of warfarin therapy using an internet-based expert system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, F

    2009-08-01

    Increased frequency of prothrombin time testing, facilitated by patient self-testing (PST) of the International Normalized Ratio (INR) can improve the clinical outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT). However, oversight of this type of management is often difficult and time-consuming for healthcare professionals. This study reports the first randomized controlled trial of an automated direct-to-patient expert system, enabling remote and effective management of patients on OAT.

  4. Internet-versus group-administered cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder in a psychiatric setting: a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstrom, Jan; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljotsson, Brjann; Ruck, Christian; Andreewitch, Sergej; Karlsson, Andreas; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Erik; Lindefors, Nils

    2010-01-01

    Background: Internet administered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is a promising new way to deliver psychological treatment, but its effectiveness in regular care settings and in relation to more traditional CBT group treatment has not yet been determined. The primary aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Internet- and group administered CBT for panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia) in a randomised trial within a regular psychiatric care setting. The second aim of the...

  5. The Effect of Debriefing and Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Postpartum Depression in Traumatic Childbirth: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sedigheh Abdollahpour; Afsaneh Keramat; Seyyed Abbas Mousavi; Ahmad Khosravi; zahra motaghi

    2018-01-01

    Background & aim: Childbirth is a stressful event in women’s lives, and if a mother perceives it as an unpleasant event, it can influence her postpartum mental health. Depression is a common mental disorder, which can has serious consequences depending on its severity. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of debriefing and brief cognitive-behavioral therapy on postpartum depression in traumatic childbirth. Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 179 mothers who experien...

  6. Clinical and cost-effectiveness of computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care: Design of a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severens Johan L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a common mental health problem in the general population, associated with a substantial impact on quality of life and societal costs. However, many depressed patients in primary care do not receive the care they need. Reason for this is that pharmacotherapy is only effective in severely depressed patients and psychological treatments in primary care are scarce and costly. A more feasible treatment in primary care might be computerised cognitive behavioural therapy. This can be a self-help computer program based on the principles of cognitive behavioural therapy. Although previous studies suggest that computerised cognitive behavioural therapy is effective, more research is necessary. Therefore, the objective of the current study is to evaluate the (cost- effectiveness of online computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care. Methods/Design In a randomised trial we will compare (a computerised cognitive behavioural therapy with (b treatment as usual by a GP, and (c computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in combination with usual GP care. Three hundred mild to moderately depressed patients (aged 18–65 will be recruited in the general population by means of a large-scale Internet-based screening (N = 200,000. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three treatment groups. Primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation is the severity of depression. Other outcomes include psychological distress, social functioning, and dysfunctional beliefs. The economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective, in which all costs will be related to clinical effectiveness and health-related quality of life. All outcome assessments will take place on the Internet at baseline, two, three, six, nine, and twelve months. Costs are measured on a monthly basis. A time horizon of one year will be used without long-term extrapolation of either costs or quality of life

  7. Effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery in pain processing due to carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, C; Cleland, J; Palacios-Ceña, M; Fuensalida-Novo, S; Alonso-Blanco, C; Pareja, J A; Alburquerque-Sendín, F

    2017-08-01

    People with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) exhibit widespread pressure pain and thermal pain hypersensitivity as a manifestation of central sensitization. The aim of our study was to compare the effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery for improving pain and nociceptive gain processing in people with CTS. The trial was conducted at a local regional Hospital in Madrid, Spain from August 2014 to February 2015. In this randomized parallel-group, blinded, clinical trial, 100 women with CTS were randomly allocated to either manual therapy (n = 50), who received three sessions (once/week) of manual therapies including desensitization manoeuvres of the central nervous system, or surgical intervention (n = 50) group. Outcomes including pressure pain thresholds (PPT), thermal pain thresholds (HPT or CPT), and pain intensity which were assessed at baseline, and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the intervention by an assessor unaware of group assignment. Analysis was by intention to treat with mixed ANCOVAs adjusted for baseline scores. At 12 months, 95 women completed the follow-up. Patients receiving manual therapy exhibited higher increases in PPT over the carpal tunnel at 3, 6 and 9 months (all, p < 0.01) and higher decrease of pain intensity at 3 month follow-up (p < 0.001) than those receiving surgery. No significant differences were observed between groups for the remaining outcomes. Manual therapy and surgery have similar effects on decreasing widespread pressure pain sensitivity and pain intensity in women with CTS. Neither manual therapy nor surgery resulted in changes in thermal pain sensitivity. The current study found that manual therapy and surgery exhibited similar effects on decreasing widespread pressure pain sensitivity and pain intensity in women with carpal tunnel syndrome at medium- and long-term follow-ups investigating changes in nociceptive gain processing after treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  8. Efficacy of Cellular Therapy for Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Deng, Hong; Tang, Zhouping

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a widely spread chronic disease with growing incidence worldwide, and diabetic foot ulcer is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Cellular therapy has shown promise in the management of diabetic foot ulcer in many preclinical experiments and clinical researches. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cellular therapy in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. We systematically searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases from inception to May 2017 for randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of cellular therapy in diabetic foot ulcer, and a meta-analysis was conducted. A total of 6 randomized controlled clinical trials involving 241 individuals were included in this meta-analysis. The results suggested that cellular therapy could help accelerating the healing of diabetic foot ulcer, presented as higher ankle-brachial index (mean difference = 0.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.23), higher transcutaneous oxygen pressure (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09- to 1.78), higher ulcer healing rate (relative risk [RR] = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.41 to 2.25), higher amputation-free survival (RR = 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.40), and lower scale of pain (SMD = -1.69; 95% CI, -2.05 to -1.33). Furthermore, cellular therapy seemed to be safe, with no serious complications and low risk of short-term slight complications. Cellular therapy could accelerate the rate of diabetic foot ulcer healing and may be more efficient than standard therapy for diabetic foot treatment.

  9. Efficacy of manual therapy treatments for people with cervicogenic dizziness and pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Susan A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervicogenic dizziness is a disabling condition characterised by postural unsteadiness that is aggravated by cervical spine movements and associated with a painful and/or stiff neck. Two manual therapy treatments (Mulligan’s Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glides (SNAGs and Maitland’s passive joint mobilisations are used by physiotherapists to treat this condition but there is little evidence from randomised controlled trials to support their use. The aim of this study is to conduct a randomised controlled trial to compare these two forms of manual therapy (Mulligan glides and Maitland mobilisations to each other and to a placebo in reducing symptoms of cervicogenic dizziness in the longer term and to conduct an economic evaluation of the interventions. Methods Participants with symptoms of dizziness described as imbalance, together with a painful and/or stiff neck will be recruited via media releases, advertisements and mail-outs to medical practitioners in the Hunter region of NSW, Australia. Potential participants will be screened by a physiotherapist and a neurologist to rule out other causes of their dizziness. Once diagnosed with cervciogenic dizziness, 90 participants will be randomly allocated to one of three groups: Maitland mobilisations plus range-of-motion exercises, Mulligan SNAGs plus self-SNAG exercises or placebo. Participants will receive two to six treatments over six weeks. The trial will have unblinded treatment but blinded outcome assessments. Assessments will occur at baseline, post-treatment, six weeks, 12 weeks, six months and 12 months post treatment. The primary outcome will be intensity of dizziness. Other outcome measures will be frequency of dizziness, disability, intensity of cervical pain, cervical range of motion, balance, head repositioning, adverse effects and treatment satisfaction. Economic outcomes will also be collected. Discussion This paper describes the methods for a randomised

  10. Placebo response and remission rates in randomised trials of induction andmaintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jairath, Vipul; Zou, G. Y.; Parker, Claire E.; Macdonald, John K.; AlAmeel, Turki; Al Beshir, Mohammad; Almadi, Majid A.; Al-Taweel, Talal; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Biswas, Sujata; Chapman, Thomas; Dulai, Parambir S.; Glaire, Mark A.; Hoekman, Daniel R.; Koutsoumpas, Andreas; Minas, Elizabeth; Mosli, Mahmoud H.; Samaan, Mark; Khanna, Reena; Travis, Simon; D'Haens, Geert; Sandborn, William J.; Feagan, Brian G.

    2017-01-01

    Background It is important to minimize placebo rates in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to efficiently detect treatment differences between interventions. Historically, high placebo rates have been observed in clinical trials of ulcerative colitis (UC). A better understanding of factors

  11. Circuit class therapy and 7-day-week therapy increase physiotherapy time, but not patient activity: early results from the CIRCIT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Coralie; Bernhardt, Julie; Hillier, Susan

    2014-10-01

    The optimum model of physiotherapy service delivery for maximizing active task practice during rehabilitation after stroke is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine the relative effectiveness of 2 alternative models of physiotherapy service delivery against a usual care control with regard to increasing patient activity. Substudy within a large 3-armed randomized controlled trial, which compared 3 different models of physiotherapy service delivery, was provided for 4 weeks during subacute, inpatient rehabilitation (n=283). The duration of all physiotherapy sessions was recorded. In addition, 32 participants were observed at 10-minute intervals for 1 weekday and 1 weekend day between 8:00 am and 4:30 pm. At each observation, we recorded physical activity, location, and people present. Participants receiving 7-day-week and circuit class therapy received an additional 3 hours and 22 hours of physiotherapy time, respectively, when compared with usual care. Participants were standing or walking for a median of 8.2% of observations. On weekdays, circuit class therapy participants spent more time in therapy-related activity (10.2% of observations) when compared with usual care participants (6.1% of observations). On weekends, 7-day therapy participants spent more time in therapy-related activity (4.2% of observations) when compared with both usual care and circuit class therapy participants (0% of observations for both groups). Activity levels outside of therapy sessions did not differ between groups. A greater dosage of physiotherapy time did not translate into meaningful increases in physical activity across the day. http://www.anzctr.org.au/. Unique identifier: ACTRN12610000096055. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. A pragmatic randomised multi-centre trial of multifamily and single family therapy for adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, Ivan; Simic, Mima; Hodsoll, John; Asen, Eia; Berelowitz, Mark; Connan, Frances; Ellis, Gladys; Hugo, Pippa; Schmidt, Ulrike; Treasure, Janet; Yi, Irene; Landau, Sabine

    2016-11-24

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in developing effective treatments for child and adolescent anorexia nervosa, with a general consensus in the field that eating disorders focussed family therapy (often referred to as Maudsley Family Therapy or Family Based Treatment) currently offers the most promising outcomes. Nevertheless, a significant number do not respond well and additional treatment developments are needed to improve outcomes. Multifamily therapy is a promising treatment that has attracted considerable interest and we report the results of the first randomised controlled trial of multifamily therapy for adolescent anorexia nervosa. The study was a pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled superiority trial comparing two outpatient eating disorder focussed family interventions - multifamily therapy (MFT-AN) and single family therapy (FT-AN). A total of 169 adolescents with a DSM-IV diagnosis of anorexia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified (restricting type) were randomised to the two treatments using computer generated blocks of random sizes to ensure balanced numbers in the trial arms. Independent assessors, blind to the allocation, completed evaluations at baseline, 3 months, 12 months (end of treatment) and 18 months. Both treatment groups showed clinically significant improvements with just under 60% achieving a good or intermediate outcome (on the Morgan-Russell scales) at the end of treatment in the FT-AN group and more than 75% in the MFT-AN group - a statistically significant benefit in favour of the multifamily intervention (OR = 2.55 95%; CI 1.17, 5.52; p = 0.019). At follow-up (18 months post baseline) there was relatively little change compared to end of treatment although the difference in primary outcome between the treatments was no longer statistically significant. Clinically significant gains in weight were accompanied by improvements in mood and eating disorder psychopathology. Approximately

  13. Timed Light Therapy for Sleep and Daytime Sleepiness Associated With Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Wang, Wei; Marconi, Angelica; Kuhta, Teresa; Zee, Phyllis C

    2017-04-01

    Impaired sleep and alertness are some of the most common nonmotor manifestations of Parkinson disease (PD) and currently have only limited treatment options. Light therapy (LT), a widely available treatment modality in sleep medicine, has not been systematically studied in the PD population. To determine the safety and efficacy of LT on excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) associated with PD. This randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical intervention study was set in PD centers at Northwestern University and Rush University. Participants were 31 patients with PD receiving stable dopaminergic therapy with coexistent EDS, as assessed by an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score of 12 or greater, and without cognitive impairment or primary sleep disorder. Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive bright LT or dim-red LT (controlled condition) twice daily in 1-hour intervals for 14 days. This trial was conducted between March 1, 2007, and October 31, 2012. Data analysis of the intention-to-treat population was conducted from November 1, 2012, through April 30, 2016. The primary outcome measure was the change in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score comparing the bright LT with the dim-red LT. Secondary outcome measures included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale score, the visual analog scale score for daytime sleepiness, and sleep log-derived and actigraphy-derived metrics. Among the 31 patients (13 males and 18 females; mean [SD] disease duration, 5.9 [3.6] years), bright LT resulted in significant improvements in EDS, as assessed by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (mean [SD], 15.81 [3.10] at baseline vs 11.19 [3.31] after the intervention). Both bright LT and dim-red LT were associated with improvements in sleep quality as captured by mean (SD) scores on the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (7.88 [4.11] at baseline vs 6.25 [4.27] after bright LT, and 8.87 [2.83] at baseline vs 7.33 [3.52] after dim-red LT) and the Parkinson's Disease

  14. Specific music therapy techniques in the treatment of primary headache disorders in adolescents: a randomized attention-placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Julian; Oelkers-Ax, Rieke; Kaess, Michael; Parzer, Peter; Lenzen, Christoph; Hillecke, Thomas Karl; Resch, Franz

    2013-10-01

    Migraine and tension-type headache have a high prevalence in children and adolescents. In addition to common pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, music therapy has been shown to be efficient in the prophylaxis of pediatric migraine. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of specific music therapy techniques in the treatment of adolescents with primary headache (tension-type headache and migraine). A prospective, randomized, attention-placebo-controlled parallel group trial was conducted. Following an 8-week baseline, patients were randomized to either music therapy (n = 40) or a rhythm pedagogic program (n = 38) designed as an "attention placebo" over 6 sessions within 8 weeks. Reduction of both headache frequency and intensity after treatment (8-week postline) as well as 6 months after treatment were taken as the efficacy variables. Treatments were delivered in equal dose and frequency by the same group of therapists. Data analysis of subjects completing the protocol showed that neither treatment was superior to the other at any point of measurement (posttreatment and follow-up). Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no impact of drop-out on these results. Both groups showed a moderate mean reduction of headache frequency posttreatment of about 20%, but only small numbers of responders (50% frequency reduction). Follow-up data showed no significant deteriorations or improvements. This article presents a randomized placebo-controlled trial on music therapy in the treatment of adolescents with frequent primary headache. Music therapy is not superior to an attention placebo within this study. These results draw attention to the need of providing adequate controls within therapeutic trials in the treatment of pain. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase I clinical trial of fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ishikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that less-differentiated T cells are ideal for adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT and that fibronectin CH296 (FN-CH296 together with anti-CD3 resulted in cultured cells that contain higher amounts of less-differentiated T cells. In this phase I clinical trial, we build on these prior results by assessing the safety and efficacy of FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Patients underwent fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy up to six times every two weeks and the safety and antitumor activity of the ACT were assessed. In order to determine immune function, whole blood cytokine levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T cells were analyzed prior to ACT and during the follow up. RESULTS: Transferred cells contained numerous less-differentiated T cells greatly represented by CD27+CD45RA+ or CD28+CD45RA+ cell, which accounted for approximately 65% and 70% of the total, respectively. No ACT related severe or unexpected toxicities were observed. The response rate among patients was 22.2% and the disease control rate was 66.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this phase I trial, indicate that FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy was very well tolerated with a level of efficacy that is quite promising. We also surmise that expanding T cell using CH296 is a method that can be applied to other T- cell-based therapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN UMIN000001835.

  16. PROCTITIS ONE WEEK AFTER STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Paydar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proctitis following prostate cancer radiation therapy is a primary determinant of quality of life (QOL. While previous studies have assessed acute rectal morbidity at 1 month after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, little data exist on the prevalence and severity of rectal morbidity within the first week following treatment. This study reports the acute bowel morbidity one week following prostate SBRT. Materials and methods: Between May 2013 and August 2014, 103 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35 to 36.25 Gy in five fractions using robotic SBRT delivered on a prospective clinical trial. Bowel toxicity was graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv.4. Bowel QOL was assessed using EPIC-26 questionnaire bowel domain at baseline, one week, one month, and three months. Time-dependent changes in bowel symptoms were statistically compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Clinically significant change was assessed by the minimally important difference (MID in EPIC score. This was defined as a change of one-half standard deviation (SD from the baseline score. Results: One hundred and three patients with a minimum of three months of follow-up were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 23%. There were no acute ≥ grade 3 bowel toxicities. EPIC bowel summary scores maximally declined at 1 week after SBRT (-13.9, p<0.0001 before returning to baseline at three months after SBRT (+0.03, p=0.94. Prior to treatment, 4.9% of men reported that their bowel bother was a moderate to big problem. This increased to 28.4% (p<0.0001 one week after SBRT and returned to baseline at three months after SBRT (0.0%, p=0.66. Only the bowel summary and bowel bother score declines at 1 week met the MID threshold for clinically significant change. Conclusion: The rate and severity of acute proctitis following prostate SBRT peaked at one week after

  17. Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Female Patients With Eating Disorders: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Huurne, Elke D; de Haan, Hein A; Postel, Marloes G; van der Palen, Job; VanDerNagel, Joanne E L; DeJong, Cornelis A J

    2015-06-18

    Many patients with eating disorders do not receive help for their symptoms, even though these disorders have severe morbidity. The Internet may offer alternative low-threshold treatment interventions. This study evaluated the effects of a Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention using intensive asynchronous therapeutic support to improve eating disorder psychopathology, and to reduce body dissatisfaction and related health problems among patients with eating disorders. A two-arm open randomized controlled trial comparing a Web-based CBT intervention to a waiting list control condition (WL) was carried out among female patients with bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The eating disorder diagnosis was in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, and was established based on participants' self-report. Participants were recruited from an open-access website, and the intervention consisted of a structured two-part program within a secure Web-based application. The aim of the first part was to analyze participant's eating attitudes and behaviors, while the second part focused on behavioral change. Participants had asynchronous contact with a personal therapist twice a week, solely via the Internet. Self-report measures of eating disorder psychopathology (primary outcome), body dissatisfaction, physical health, mental health, self-esteem, quality of life, and social functioning were completed at baseline and posttest. A total of 214 participants were randomized to either the Web-based CBT group (n=108) or to the WL group (n=106) stratified by type of eating disorder (BN: n=44; BED: n=85; EDNOS: n=85). Study attrition was low with 94% of the participants completing the posttest assignment. Overall, Web-based CBT showed a significant improvement over time for eating disorder psychopathology (F97=63.07, PWeb-based CBT participants in all three

  18. Adoption of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer After Publication of Randomized Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Falchook, Aaron D.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Curry, Heather; Chen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have established the noninferiority of shorter courses of “hypofractionated” radiation therapy (RT) to the whole breast compared to conventional courses using smaller daily doses in the adjuvant treatment of selected breast cancer patients undergoing lumpectomy. Hypofractionation is more convenient and less costly. Therefore, we sought to determine uptake of hypofractionated breast RT over time. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked database, we identified 16,096 women with node-negative breast cancer and 4269 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who received lumpectomy followed by more than 12 fractions of RT between 2004 and 2010. Based on Medicare claims, we determined the number of RT treatments given and grouped patients into those receiving hypofractionation (13-24) or those receiving conventional fractionation (≥25). We also determined RT technique (intensity modulated RT or not) using Medicare claims. We evaluated patterns and correlates of hypofractionation receipt using bivariate and multivariable analyses. Results: Hypofractionation use was similar in patients with DCIS and those with invasive disease. Overall, the use of hypofractionation increased from 3.8% in 2006 to 5.4% in 2007, to 9.4% in 2008, and to 13.6% in 2009 and 2010. Multivariable analysis showed increased use of hypofractionation in recent years and in patients with older age, smaller tumors, increased comorbidity, higher regional education, and Western SEER regions. However, even in patients over the age of 80, the hypofractionation rate in 2009 to 2010 was only 25%. Use of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) also increased over time (from 9.4% in 2004 to 22.7% in 2009-2010) and did not vary significantly between patients receiving hypofractionation and those receiving traditional fractionation. Conclusions: Hypofractionation use increased among low-risk older US breast cancer patients with

  19. Yoga, Physical Therapy, or Education for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Noninferiority Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saper, Robert B; Lemaster, Chelsey; Delitto, Anthony; Sherman, Karen J; Herman, Patricia M; Sadikova, Ekaterina; Stevans, Joel; Keosaian, Julia E; Cerrada, Christian J; Femia, Alexandra L; Roseen, Eric J; Gardiner, Paula; Gergen Barnett, Katherine; Faulkner, Carol; Weinberg, Janice

    2017-07-18

    Yoga is effective for mild to moderate chronic low back pain (cLBP), but its comparative effectiveness with physical therapy (PT) is unknown. Moreover, little is known about yoga's effectiveness in underserved patients with more severe functional disability and pain. To determine whether yoga is noninferior to PT for cLBP. 12-week, single-blind, 3-group randomized noninferiority trial and subsequent 40-week maintenance phase. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01343927). Academic safety-net hospital and 7 affiliated community health centers. 320 predominantly low-income, racially diverse adults with nonspecific cLBP. Participants received 12 weekly yoga classes, 15 PT visits, or an educational book and newsletters. The maintenance phase compared yoga drop-in classes versus home practice and PT booster sessions versus home practice. Primary outcomes were back-related function, measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and pain, measured by an 11-point scale, at 12 weeks. Prespecified noninferiority margins were 1.5 (RMDQ) and 1.0 (pain). Secondary outcomes included pain medication use, global improvement, satisfaction with intervention, and health-related quality of life. One-sided 95% lower confidence limits were 0.83 (RMDQ) and 0.97 (pain), demonstrating noninferiority of yoga to PT. However, yoga was not superior to education for either outcome. Yoga and PT were similar for most secondary outcomes. Yoga and PT participants were 21 and 22 percentage points less likely, respectively, than education participants to use pain medication at 12 weeks. Improvements in yoga and PT groups were maintained at 1 year with no differences between maintenance strategies. Frequency of adverse events, mostly mild self-limited joint and back pain, did not differ between the yoga and PT groups. Participants were not blinded to treatment assignment. The PT group had disproportionate loss to follow-up. A manualized yoga program for nonspecific cLBP was noninferior to PT for

  20. Hemoporfin Photodynamic Therapy for Port-Wine Stain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT has shown potentially beneficial results in treating port-wine stain, but its benefit-risk profile remains undefined. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PDT conducted with hemoporfin and a 532 nm continuous wave laser to treat port-wine stain clinically.This randomized clinical trial was conducted in eight hospitals in China. Participants were adolescent and adult patients (age range: 14-65 years old with port-wine stain. During stage 1 (day 1 to week 8 all patients were randomized at a 3:1 ratio to treatment (532 nm laser irradiation (96-120 J/cm2 with hemoporfin (5mg/kg; PDT-hemoporfin, n = 330 or placebo groups (irradiation with placebo (PDT-placebo, n = 110; during stage 2 (week 8 to 16 patients in both groups were offered treatment. Clinician-evaluators, who were blind to the study, classified each case on the following four-level scale according to assessment of before and after standardized pictures of the lesion area: no improvement: <20%; some improvement: 20-59%; great improvement: 60-89%; or nearly completely resolved: ≥90%. The primary efficacy endpoint was proportion of patients achieving at least some improvement at week 8. The secondary efficacy endpoints were proportion of patients achieving nearly completely resolved or at least great improvement at week 8, proportion of patients achieving early completely resolved, at least great improvement, or at least some improvement at week 16, and the corresponding satisfaction of the investigators and the patients (designated as 'excellent', 'good', 'moderate', or 'ineffective' at weeks 8 and 16.Compared to the PDT-placebo group, the PDT-hemoporfin group showed a significantly higher proportion of patients that achieved at least some improvement (89.7% [n = 295; 95% CI, 85.9%-92.5%] vs. 24.5% [n = 27; 95% CI, 17.4%-33.3%] at week 8 (P < 0.0001 and higher improvements for all secondary efficacy endpoints. Treatment reactions occurred in 99

  1. Adoption of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer After Publication of Randomized Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Falchook, Aaron D.; Hendrix, Laura H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Curry, Heather [Radiation Oncology, Eviti, Inc, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have established the noninferiority of shorter courses of “hypofractionated” radiation therapy (RT) to the whole breast compared to conventional courses using smaller daily doses in the adjuvant treatment of selected breast cancer patients undergoing lumpectomy. Hypofractionation is more convenient and less costly. Therefore, we sought to determine uptake of hypofractionated breast RT over time. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked database, we identified 16,096 women with node-negative breast cancer and 4269 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who received lumpectomy followed by more than 12 fractions of RT between 2004 and 2010. Based on Medicare claims, we determined the number of RT treatments given and grouped patients into those receiving hypofractionation (13-24) or those receiving conventional fractionation (≥25). We also determined RT technique (intensity modulated RT or not) using Medicare claims. We evaluated patterns and correlates of hypofractionation receipt using bivariate and multivariable analyses. Results: Hypofractionation use was similar in patients with DCIS and those with invasive disease. Overall, the use of hypofractionation increased from 3.8% in 2006 to 5.4% in 2007, to 9.4% in 2008, and to 13.6% in 2009 and 2010. Multivariable analysis showed increased use of hypofractionation in recent years and in patients with older age, smaller tumors, increased comorbidity, higher regional education, and Western SEER regions. However, even in patients over the age of 80, the hypofractionation rate in 2009 to 2010 was only 25%. Use of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) also increased over time (from 9.4% in 2004 to 22.7% in 2009-2010) and did not vary significantly between patients receiving hypofractionation and those receiving traditional fractionation. Conclusions: Hypofractionation use increased among low-risk older US breast cancer patients with

  2. A qualitative feasibility study to inform a randomised controlled trial of fluid bolus therapy in septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Caitlin B; Canter, Ruth R; Mouncey, Paul R; Carter, Anjali; Jones, Nicola; Nadel, Simon; Peters, Mark J; Lyttle, Mark D; Harrison, David A; Rowan, Kathryn M; Inwald, David; Woolfall, Kerry

    2018-01-01

    The Fluids in Shock (FiSh) Trial proposes to evaluate whether restrictive fluid bolus therapy (10 mL/kg) is more beneficial than current recommended practice (20 mL/kg) in the resuscitation of children with septic shock in the UK. This qualitative feasibility study aimed to explore acceptability of the FiSh Trial, including research without prior consent (RWPC), potential barriers to recruitment and participant information for a pilot trial. Qualitative interview study involving parents of children who had presented to a UK emergency department or been admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit with severe infection in the previous 3 years. Twenty-one parents (seven bereaved) were interviewed 16 (median) months since their child's hospital admission (range: 1-41). All parents said they would have provided consent for the use of their child's data in the FiSh Trial. The majority were unfamiliar with RWPC, yet supported its use. Parents were initially concerned about the change from currently recommended treatment, yet were reassured by explanations of the current evidence base, fluid bolus therapy and monitoring procedures. Parents made recommendations about the timing of the research discussion and content of participant information. Bereaved parents stated that recruiters should not discuss research immediately after a child's death, but supported a personalised postal 'opt-out' approach to consent. Findings show that parents whose child has experienced severe infection supported the proposed FiSh Trial, including the use of RWPC. Parents' views informed the development of the pilot trial protocol and site staff training. ISRCTN15244462-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Impact of different nasal masks on CPAP therapy for obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Morin, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    Patient interface is important for the success of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), but few trials have examined the influence of mask choice on CPAP adherence. To compare the impact of different nasal masks on CPAP in patients with newly-diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA patients were randomized in a 2:3 ratio to receive CPAP via different first-line nasal masks: ResMed Mirage FX® (MFX) or control mask (Fisher & Paykel Zest ® , HC407 ® or Philips EasyLife ® ). Mask acceptance, CPAP compliance and Home Care Provider (HCP) interventions were compared between groups after 3 months of CPAP therapy using modified intent-to-treat (mITT; after exclusion of patients with mouth leaks during CPAP initiation) and on-treatment (OT; CPAP adherent) analyses. Of 285 randomized patients, 90 requiring a full-face mask were excluded, leaving 195 and 151 in the mITT and OT analyses, respectively. Mask acceptance rate was higher in the MFX versus control group (mITT: 79% vs 68%, P = 0.067; OT: 90% vs 76%, P = 0.022). CPAP compliance was higher (5.9 ± 1.8 vs 5.1 ± 1.6 h/night, P = 0.011) and nasal mask issue-related HCP visits lower (3% vs 17%, P = 0.006) in the MFX group. Nasal mask failures due to mask discomfort (5% vs 1%) or unintentional leakage (5% vs 0%) were higher in control vs MFX group. Mask acceptance was significantly associated with fewer mask leaks (P = 0.002) and higher pressure therapy (P = 0.042). This study highlights differences between nasal masks for CPAP delivery and shows that initial mask selection can influence adherence and healthcare utilization during CPAP. © 2016 ResMed Germany Inc. The Clinical Respiratory Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Brief Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Anxiety and Depression in Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weersing, V Robin; Brent, David A; Rozenman, Michelle S; Gonzalez, Araceli; Jeffreys, Megan; Dickerson, John F; Lynch, Frances L; Porta, Giovanna; Iyengar, Satish

    2017-06-01

    Anxiety and depression affect 30% of youth but are markedly undertreated compared with other mental disorders, especially in Hispanic populations. To examine whether a pediatrics-based behavioral intervention targeting anxiety and depression improves clinical outcome compared with referral to outpatient community mental health care. This 2-center randomized clinical trial with masked outcome assessment conducted between brief behavioral therapy (BBT) and assisted referral to care (ARC) studied 185 youths (aged 8.0-16.9 years) from 9 pediatric clinics in San Diego, California, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, recruited from October 6, 2010, through December 5, 2014. Youths who met DSM-IV criteria for full or probable diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, major depression, dysthymic disorder, and/or minor depression; lived with a consenting legal guardian for at least 6 months; and spoke English were included in the study. Exclusions included receipt of alternate treatment for anxiety or depression, presence of a suicidal plan, bipolar disorder, psychosis, posttraumatic stress disorder, substance dependence, current abuse, intellectual disability, or unstable serious physical illness. The BBT consisted of 8 to 12 weekly 45-minute sessions of behavioral therapy delivered in pediatric clinics by master's-level clinicians. The ARC families received personalized referrals to mental health care and check-in calls to support accessing care from master's-level coordinators. The primary outcome was clinically significant improvement on the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale (score ≤2). Secondary outcomes included the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised, and functioning. A total of 185 patients were enrolled in the study (mean [SD] age, 11.3 [2.6] years; 107 [57.8%] female; 144 [77.8%] white; and 38 [20.7%] Hispanic). Youths in the BBT group (n = 95), compared with those in

  5. A Pilot Prospective Randomized Control Trial Comparing Exercises Using Videogame Therapy to Standard Physical Therapy: 6 Months Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Ingrid; Painting, Lynda; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Molitor, Fred; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available, interactive videogames that use body movements for interaction are used clinically in burn rehabilitation and have been shown to facilitate functional range of motion (ROM) but their efficacy with burn patients has not yet been proven. The purpose of this pilot randomized control study was to prospectively compare planar and functional ROM, compliance, pain, enjoyment, and exertion in pediatric burn patients receiving two types of rehabilitation therapy. Seventeen school-aged children with 31 affected limbs who demonstrated limited shoulder ROM from burn injury were randomized to receive exercises using either standard therapy ROM activities (ST) or interactive videogame therapy (VGT). Patients received 3 weeks of the designated therapy intervention twice daily. They were then given a corresponding home program of the same type of therapy to perform regularly for 6 months. Standard goniometry and three-dimensional motion analysis during functional tasks were used to assess ROM. Measures were taken at baseline, 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Pain was measured before and after each treatment session during the 3-week intervention. There was no difference in compliance, enjoyment, or exertion between the groups. Patients in both the ST and VGT groups showed significant improvement in shoulder flexion (P videogames were equally effective as traditional therapy for overall ROM gains and resulted in quicker recovery of motion with less pain experienced. Such videogames are a useful adjunct to therapy and should be considered as part of a holistic approach to rehabilitation within the hospital and at home after discharge in pediatric patients recovering from burn injury.

  6. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy versus supportive therapy in affective relapse prevention in bipolar patients with a history of trauma: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Radua, Joaquim; Landín-Romero, Ramon; Blanco, Laura; Madre, Mercè; Reinares, Maria; Comes, Mercè; Jiménez, Esther; Crespo, Jose Manuel; Vieta, Eduard; Pérez, Victor; Novo, Patricia; Doñate, Marta; Cortizo, Romina; Valiente-Gómez, Alicia; Lupo