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Sample records for therapeutics program dtp

  1. Analýza postury polohovým snímačem DTP2 u žen ve věku senescence po aplikaci cíleného cvičebního programu Posture analysis using position detector DTP2 in senescent women after the application of a targeted exercise program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Přidalová

    2008-01-01

    66 years using the diagnostic device DTP2 following the interventional procedure of a targeted exercise program (the Chinese therapeutic exercise known as "Hui chun gong". The exercise influenced mainly the pelvic area; the trends suggesting improved posture and stability did not reach statistical significance in all cases. Since the exercise technique is technically difficult, improperly performed positions resulted in a zero effect rather than improvement.Positive changes were always found in terms of improved stance stability and significant shift of the thoracic kyphosis towards the vertical axis, which suggests improved posture. Shoulder position showed a certain degree of inconsistency in terms of changes in shoulder asymmetry. Pelvic position also responded to the intervention procedures by shifting the asymmetry of the spinal angles after the 1st and 2nd phases of exercise, while a statistically significant offset of the left sided asymmetry was achieved after the 3rd phase. We found a reduced extent of titubation of the axial skeleton, which was evaluated to be an accompanying effect of the improved stance stability. In total, best results were manifested following the intervention in 2007, when the extent of titubation was decreased in the direction of both the x and y axes, a statistically significant positive change was found in the adjustment of symmetry of the posterior superior iliac spine, and a materially significant trend of a decrease in the axial values of lordoses and thoracic kyphosis was observed. The reasons for these changes can be found in an increased emphasis on the proper performance of exercise techniques and thus adjustment of muscle imbalances.Subjective feelings of the senior patients were very beneficial, as they evaluated very positively the feeling of improved stance stability.

  2. A software environment to execute automatic operational sequences on the ITER-FEAT DTP facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermani, G.; Zarfino, M.

    2001-01-01

    The divertor test platform (DTP) maintenance operations are carried out by means of the remote handling equipments (RHE), each dedicated to perform a set of specialised remote actions. Each RHE is controlled by an RHE control system (RHE-CS) and can be locally operated by an RHE-operator using the local control panel (LOP). To perform the maintenance activity, the DTP-operator coordinates the remote operations of every RHEs, using the supervisory system (DTP S S). Because the remote maintenance activities demand for a high degree of parallelism, automation and cooperation between various RHEs, the development of a software environment (OSAExE) that had the indicated characteristics has been necessary. The OSAExE environment is applicable to any distributed and cooperating system that is modelled as a set of autonomous subsystems. Each maintenance remote sequence needs to be modelled as a modified Petri-net diagram and subsequently 'compiled', in order to be automatically executed on OSAExE environment. The OSAExE architecture allows both, to program 'event driven' automatic sequences, and to maintain unchanged all the existing DTP S S features

  3. Incidência de episódios hipotônicos-hiporresponsivos associados à vacina combinada DTP/Hib usada no Programa Nacional de Imunizações Incidence of hypotonic-hyporesponsive episodes associated to the combined DTP/Hib vaccine used in Brazilian National Immunizations Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo M. Martins

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a segurança da vacina combinada de difteria-tétano-coqueluche de células inteiras e Haemophilus influenzae tipo b usada no Programa Nacional de Imunizações, e em especial a incidência de episódios hipotônicos-hiporresponsivos. MÉTODO: Acompanhamento de uma coorte de 21.064 lactentes (20.925 ou 99,7% aderiram ao protocolo de estudo, nas 48 horas após a aplicação da vacina de difteria, tétano, coqueluche de células inteiras e Haemophilus influenzae tipo b em centros de saúde na cidade do Rio de Janeiro, para determinar e investigar eventos adversos graves, espontâneos e solicitados. Cada criança foi monitorada durante somente uma dose. RESULTADOS: A incidência de episódios hipotônicos-hiporresponsivos foi de 1:1.744 doses (casos confirmados e de 1:1.495 doses (casos confirmados mais casos suspeitos. A taxa de incidência de convulsões foi de 1:5.231 doses. Não foram detectados casos de apnéia. Esses resultados são comparáveis àqueles relatados na literatura para a vacina contra difteria-tétano-coqueluche de células inteiras. CONCLUSÃO: A vacina contra difteria, tétano, coqueluche de células inteiras e Haemophilus influenzae tipo b em estudo pode ser usada com segurança no Programa Nacional de Imunizações, de acordo com as precauções e contra-indicações correntes.OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the safety of a combined diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine used on the Brazilian National Immunizations Program, chiefly the incidence of hypotonic-hyporesponsive episodes. METHOD: Follow-up of a cohort of 21,064 infants (20,925 or 99.7% adhered to the study protocol, within 48 hours of vaccination with diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine in health care units in the City of Rio de Janeiro, to ascertain and investigate spontaneous and solicited severe adverse events. Each child was followed-up for one dose only. RESULTS: The rate

  4. An analysis of DTP- associated reactions by manufacturer, batch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Merieux J5497 or SAIMR F08609. Methods of randomisation varied slightly between the two clinic groups in order to minimise clinic disruption. DTP dose numbers and batches were recorded on clinic cards to ensure vaccination with the same ...

  5. Is diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) associated with increased female mortality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Fisker, Ane B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ten years ago, we formulated two hypotheses about whole-cell diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination: first, when given after BCG, DTP increases mortality in girls and, second, following DTP there is an increase in the female/male mortality rate ratio (MRR). A recent review...

  6. Programming supramolecular biohybrids as precision therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, David Yuen Wah; Wu, Yuzhou; Kuan, Seah Ling; Weil, Tanja

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Chemical programming of macromolecular structures to instill a set of defined chemical properties designed to behave in a sequential and precise manner is a characteristic vision for creating next generation nanomaterials. In this context, biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids provide an attractive platform for the integration of complex chemical design due to their sequence specificity and geometric definition, which allows accurate translation of chemical functionalities to biological activity. Coupled with the advent of amino acid specific modification techniques, "programmable" areas of a protein chain become exclusively available for any synthetic customization. We envision that chemically reprogrammed hybrid proteins will bridge the vital link to overcome the limitations of synthetic and biological materials, providing a unique strategy for tailoring precision therapeutics. In this Account, we present our work toward the chemical design of protein- derived hybrid polymers and their supramolecular responsiveness, while summarizing their impact and the advancement in biomedicine. Proteins, in their native form, represent the central framework of all biological processes and are an unrivaled class of macromolecular drugs with immense specificity. Nonetheless, the route of administration of protein therapeutics is often vastly different from Nature's biosynthesis. Therefore, it is imperative to chemically reprogram these biopolymers to direct their entry and activity toward the designated target. As a consequence of the innate structural regularity of proteins, we show that supramolecular interactions facilitated by stimulus responsive chemistry can be intricately designed as a powerful tool to customize their functions, stability, activity profiles, and transportation capabilities. From another perspective, a protein in its denatured, unfolded form serves as a monodispersed, biodegradable polymer scaffold decorated with functional side

  7. Modelling of bubbly and annular two-phase flow in subchannel geometries with BACCHUS-3D/TP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottoni, M.; Lyczkowski, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The theoretical and computational bases of the BACCHUS-3D/TP computer program are reviewed. The computer program is used for thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear fuel bundles under normal and accident conditions. The present program combines two models and solution procedures previously used separately, namely, the Improved Slip Model (ISM) and the Separated-Phases Model (SPM). The former model uses mixture equations with accounting for slip between the phases, whereas the latter uses separate continuity and momentum equations. At the present stage of development, both assume thermodynamic equilibrium. Techniques used to affect smooth transition between the two models are described. including treatment of frictional pressure drop and solution of the Poisson and momentum equations. A detailed derivation of the computation of mass transfer between the phases is given because it is a central and novel feature of the model

  8. Co-administration of BCG and Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) Vaccinations May Reduce Infant Mortality More Than the WHO-schedule of BCG First and Then DTP. A Re-analysis of Demographic Surveillance Data From Rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaby, Peter; Andersen, Andreas; Ravn, Henrik; Zaman, K

    2017-08-01

    WHO recommends BCG at birth and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP)-containing vaccine at 6, 10 and 14weeks of age. However, BCG and DTP are often co-administered in low-income countries. The health implications have not been examined. We reanalysed data from Matlab, Bangladesh, to examine the influence of co-administration on mortality; 37,894 children born 1986-1999 were followed with registration of vaccinations and survival. Using Cox models, survival was analysed from 6weeks to 9months of age when measles vaccine is given; 712 children died in this age group. We calculated mortality rate ratios (MRR) for children starting the vaccination schedule with BCG-first, BCG+DTP1-first or DTP1-first. Only 17% followed the WHO-schedule with BCG-first. Mortality was 16/1000 person-years for children who initiated the vaccination schedule with BCG+DTP1 but 32/1000 and 20/1000 for children who received BCG-first or DTP-first, respectively. Compared with BCG+DTP1-first and adjusting for background factors, the BCG-first-schedule was associated with 2-fold higher mortality (MRR=1.94 (1.42-2.63)). DTP1 administered after BCG-first was associated with higher mortality than receiving DTP1 with BCG (MRR=1.78 (1.03-3.03)). Co-administration of BCG and DTP may further reduce mortality. Since all observational studies support this trend, co-administration of BCG and DTP should be tested in randomised trials. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DTP with or after measles vaccination is associated with increased in-hospital mortality in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Biai, Sidu; Veirum, Jens Erik

    2007-01-01

    The sequence of routine immunisations may be important for childhood mortality. Three doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine (DTP) should be given at 6, 10, and 14 weeks and measles vaccine (MV) at 9 months of age. The sequence is not always respected. We examined in-hospital mortality...... of children having received DTP with or after measles vaccine....

  10. Improving the performance of DTP2 bilateral teleoperation control system with haptic augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viinikainen, Mikko; Tuominen, Janne; Alho, Pekka; Mattila, Jouni

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •An experimental haptic shared control system, called CAT developed at the DTP2. •We investigate how the system integrates with the ITER compliant DTP2 RHCS. •The effect of CAT experimentally assessed in an ITER relevant maintenance scenario. -- Abstract: The remote maintenance of the ITER divertor is largely dependent on the usage of haptically teleoperated manipulators and man-in-the-loop operations. These maintenance operations are very demanding for the manipulator operators, yet vital for the success of the whole ITER experiment. Haptic shared control of the maintenance manipulators offers a promising solution for assisting the teleoperators in the maintenance tasks. A shared control system assists the operator by generating artificial guiding force effects and overlaying them on top of the haptic feedback from the teleoperation environment. An experimental haptic shared control system, called the Computer Assisted Teleoperation (CAT) has been developed at the Divertor Test Platform 2 (DTP2). In this paper, we investigate the design of the system and how the system integrates with the ITER compliant DTP2 prototype Remote Handling Control System (RHCS). We also experimentally assess the effect of the guidance to the operator performance in an ITER-relevant maintenance scenario using the Water Hydraulic MANipulator (WHMAN), which is specially designed for the divertor maintenance. The result of the experiment gives suggestive indication that the CAT system improves the performance of the operators of the system

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of TetractHib (a vaccine combining DTP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The safety and immunogenicity of TETRActHIB (a vaccine combining diphtheria and tetanus toxoids-pertussis vaccine (DTP) with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine (polyribosyl ribitol phosphate conjugated to tetanus protein) (PRP-T)) was assessed in 131 Cape Town infants immunised at 6, 10 and 14 ...

  12. Improving the performance of DTP2 bilateral teleoperation control system with haptic augmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viinikainen, Mikko, E-mail: mikko.viinikainen@tut.fi; Tuominen, Janne; Alho, Pekka; Mattila, Jouni

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •An experimental haptic shared control system, called CAT developed at the DTP2. •We investigate how the system integrates with the ITER compliant DTP2 RHCS. •The effect of CAT experimentally assessed in an ITER relevant maintenance scenario. -- Abstract: The remote maintenance of the ITER divertor is largely dependent on the usage of haptically teleoperated manipulators and man-in-the-loop operations. These maintenance operations are very demanding for the manipulator operators, yet vital for the success of the whole ITER experiment. Haptic shared control of the maintenance manipulators offers a promising solution for assisting the teleoperators in the maintenance tasks. A shared control system assists the operator by generating artificial guiding force effects and overlaying them on top of the haptic feedback from the teleoperation environment. An experimental haptic shared control system, called the Computer Assisted Teleoperation (CAT) has been developed at the Divertor Test Platform 2 (DTP2). In this paper, we investigate the design of the system and how the system integrates with the ITER compliant DTP2 prototype Remote Handling Control System (RHCS). We also experimentally assess the effect of the guidance to the operator performance in an ITER-relevant maintenance scenario using the Water Hydraulic MANipulator (WHMAN), which is specially designed for the divertor maintenance. The result of the experiment gives suggestive indication that the CAT system improves the performance of the operators of the system.

  13. Large clinical study shows value of therapeutic touch program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newshan, Gayle; Schuller-Civitella, Donna

    2003-01-01

    Representing the largest published sample size of therapeutic touch (TT) outcomes to date, data from this continuous quality improvement (CQI) clinical study suggests that TT, when provided in the clinical setting, promotes comfort, calmness, and well-being among hospitalized patients. In addition, patients are highly satisfied with TT. The newly developed Patient Satisfaction Survey and TT Performance Improvement Tool provide an effective means by which to evaluate a TT program.

  14. The crystal structure of 1,6-dithiapyrene(DTP)-7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane(TCNQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Niels; Rindorf, G.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The crystal structure of the charge-transfer complex between 1,6-dithiapyrene (DTP) and 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quino-dimethane (TCNQ) is reported. The structure correlates well with the observed physical properties......The crystal structure of the charge-transfer complex between 1,6-dithiapyrene (DTP) and 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quino-dimethane (TCNQ) is reported. The structure correlates well with the observed physical properties...

  15. Increasing Fathers' Participation in Therapeutic Intervention Programs for Exceptional Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelj, Elizabeth O.

    In response to a research review indicating that few programs address the father's role in early intervention and preschool programs for the young exceptional child, a three-month practicum was designed which included fathers in physical therapy sessions and in daily home exercise programming for their developmentally disabled children. Practicum…

  16. A Hospital-Based Therapeutic Lifestyle Program for Women With Metabolic Syndrome

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    Hei-Jen Jou

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: The therapeutic lifestyle program with diet control and regular exercise improves most markers of MetS except for levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Therapeutic lifestyle intervention may be the best way of reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in women with MetS.

  17. Exploring Animal-Assisted Programs with Children in School and Therapeutic Contexts

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    Friesen, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Animal-Assisted programs with children are becoming increasingly popular in school and therapeutic settings. This article provides an overview of the benefits accrued by children as well as the concerns with programs which involve animals, and therapy dogs in particular, in these environments. Research over the past 30 years indicates that therapy…

  18. Seguimiento de la reactogenicidad de la vacuna DTP cubana, utilizando dos métodos paralelos

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    María de los Ángeles Peña Machado

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de caracterizar la reactogenicidad de la vacuna Antidiftérica-Antitetánica- Antipertusis (DTP cubana, desarrollada por el Instituto Finlay, se realizó un estudio utilizando dos métodos o fuentes de información diferentes y paralelos. La primera se obtuvo de un ensayo clínico (EC Fase IV, abierto, no controlado, en el que se incluyeron 57 lactantes. La segunda fuente de información se obtuvo de los reportes de los eventos temporalmente asociados a la vacunación (ETAV, recepcionados por la Unidad Coordinadora Nacional de Farmacovigilancia (UCNFv que incluyen a 86 lactantes que fueron atendidos por sospechas de ETAV. En el EC se aplicaron 167 dosis, los eventos adversos esperados e inesperados se observaron en un escaso número de lactantes, fueron mayoritariamente ligeros y autolimitados en el tiempo y su frecuencia de aparición se redujo en la 2da y 3ra dosis. El dolor fue el evento local más frecuente y la fiebre fue el evento general que más se presentó. No se reportaron vómitos y la anorexia, la somnolencia, y el llanto persistente aparecieron en un número limitado de sujetos vacunados.Se presentaron 12 eventos no esperados, solo en 2 de ellos se consideró que existía relación causal con la vacunación. Se reportó un evento adverso grave (niña hospitalizada por síndrome febril prolongado postvacunación, que se estudió y demostró que fue causado por una sepsis urinaria persistente provocada por una malformación vesico-ureteral. Los 86 reportes recepcionados por la UCNFv incluían un total de 141 ETAV, dentro de los síntomas locales, el eritema alcanzó un 9,30% y la induración un 5,81%, la fiebre fue un síntoma frecuente aunque no se especifica la temperatura corporal alcanzada. Aunque existen varias diferencias con relación a las condiciones en que se realiza la vigilancia de eventos adversos en un EC o en la práctica clínica habitual, los resultados aquí analizados nos confirman que la

  19. A poetry program for the very elderly—Narrative perspective on one therapeutic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Marvin

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this report is a poetry program that the author has been conducting at a nursing home/short-stay rehabilitation facility for the past three and a half years. The program involves reading poetry to groups of very elderly residents who have significant mental and/or physical disabilities. This article includes a description of the program and the author's observations of its beneficial effects. Poetry readings were also given to individual seniors who have significant dementia. The therapeutic value of the program to the elders and to the person reading the poetry to the elders is discussed. PMID:24899783

  20. A poetry program for the very elderly-Narrative perspective on one therapeutic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Marvin

    2014-03-01

    The focus of this report is a poetry program that the author has been conducting at a nursing home/short-stay rehabilitation facility for the past three and a half years. The program involves reading poetry to groups of very elderly residents who have significant mental and/or physical disabilities. This article includes a description of the program and the author's observations of its beneficial effects. Poetry readings were also given to individual seniors who have significant dementia. The therapeutic value of the program to the elders and to the person reading the poetry to the elders is discussed.

  1. [Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry professionals. 2. Prevention, ergonomic strategies and therapeutic programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorio, F; Franchignoni, F; Ferriero, G; Vercelli, S; Odescalchi, L; Augusti, D; Migliario, M

    2005-01-01

    In dental professionals the risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) can be minimized through a combination of prevention, ergonomic strategies, and specific therapeutic programs. Prevention includes early identification of symptoms, analysis of working posture and activity, and the evaluation of equipment (such as dental instruments, position of the dental unit, patient and operator chairs, and lighting). The ergonomic strategies are based on identifying the best daily timetable (including periodic pauses) and most efficient team organization, as well as establishing the correct position that should be held at the patient chair. Finally specific therapeutic programs are very important in preventing or treating WMSD. In fact, fitness exercises such as mobilization, stretching or muscular and cardiovascular training are recognized as fundamental for dental professionals, and when WMSD occurs physiatric care and physical therapy are recommended.

  2. Combined DTP-HBV-HIB vaccine versus separately administered DTP-HBV and HIB vaccines for primary prevention of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and Haemophilus influenzae B (HIB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Edna S; Goldberg, Elad; Hellmann, Sarah; Leibovici, Leonard

    2012-04-18

    Advantages to combining childhood vaccines include reducing the number of visits, injections and patient discomfort, increasing compliance and optimising prevention. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that routine infant immunisation programmes include a vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) type B (HIB) in the combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination. The effectiveness and safety of the combined vaccine should be carefully and systematically assessed to ensure its acceptability by the community. To compare the effectiveness of combined DTP-HBV-HIB vaccines versus combined DTP-HBV and separate HIB vaccinations. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4), which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to week 1, November 2011), EMBASE (January 1990 to November 2011) and www.clinicaltrials.gov (up to April 2011). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing vaccination with any combined DTP-HBV-HIB vaccine, with or without three types of inactivated polio virus (IPV) or concomitant oral polio vaccine (OPV) in any dose, preparation or time schedule, compared with separate vaccines or placebo, administered to infants up to two years old. Two review authors independently inspected references identified by the searches and evaluated them against the inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of included trials. Data for the primary outcome (prevention of disease) were lacking. We performed a meta-analysis to pool the results of 20 studies with 5874 participants in an immunogenicity analysis and 5232 participants in the reactogenicity analysis. There were no data on clinical outcomes for the primary outcome (prevention of disease) and all studies used immunogenicity and reactogenicity (adverse events). The number of vaccine

  3. Proactive retention and therapeutic adherence in programs for male perpetrators of intimate partner violence

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    Montse Subirana-Malaret

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to treatment in intervention programs for male perpetrators of intimate partner violence is one of the most relevant factors of the effectiveness of prevention of intimate partner violence. Despite controversies arising from different studies on this subject, there is unanimity in highlighting the key role that participants' motivation plays in adherence to treatment and program completion. Techniques ensuring participants' motivation in therapeutic programs include proactive retention techniques. In this paper we analyze the effect of proactive retention techniques at the beginning and throughout the treatment sessions in an intervention program for male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. The results indicate that both proactive retention techniques and support influence adherence to treatment

  4. Helping War Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Incarcerated Individuals' Role in Therapeutic Animal Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Gennifer

    2016-05-01

    A grassroots movement of nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations is creating programs in which incarcerated individuals train rescued shelter dogs as therapeutic canines for Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Driven in part by reports of Veterans not receiving adequate treatment for PTSD, the programs are the latest iteration of prison-based animal programs and are founded on the principles of animal therapy and healing powers of animals. The far-reaching and deleterious collateral consequences of PTSD create social and economic burdens on the country; providing beneficial interventions for Veterans is a pressing social problem. Without oversight, a patchwork of agencies has developed that provides Veterans with dogs with varying levels of training and differing abilities. To best serve the needs of Veterans, the programs need regulation and standardized methods of training. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(5), 49-57.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Fostering Distance Training Programme (DTP) Students' Access to Semester Examination Results via SMS at University of Rwanda-College of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizeyimana, Gerard; Yonah, Zaipuna O.; Nduwingoma, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a situation analysis and implementation of Distance Training Programme (DTP) Semester Examination Results Access (SERA) through Short Message Service (SMS) available anytime and anywhere. "Texting" or SMS mobile phone messaging is rapidly increasing communication in business and community service. The prompting…

  6. The effect of high-dose vitamin A supplementation administered with BCG vaccine at birth may be modified by subsequent DTP vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Unexpectedly, we found no overall beneficial effect on mortality in a randomised trial of vitamin A supplementation (VAS) or placebo administered with BCG vaccine at birth in Guinea-Bissau. We conducted an explorative analysis to examine whether subsequent diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP...

  7. How a Fully Automated eHealth Program Simulates Three Therapeutic Processes: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Marianne T S; Johansen, Ayna; Brendryen, Håvar

    2016-06-28

    eHealth programs may be better understood by breaking down the components of one particular program and discussing its potential for interactivity and tailoring in regard to concepts from face-to-face counseling. In the search for the efficacious elements within eHealth programs, it is important to understand how a program using lapse management may simultaneously support working alliance, internalization of motivation, and behavior maintenance. These processes have been applied to fully automated eHealth programs individually. However, given their significance in face-to-face counseling, it may be important to simulate the processes simultaneously in interactive, tailored programs. We propose a theoretical model for how fully automated behavior change eHealth programs may be more effective by simulating a therapist's support of a working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses. We show how the model is derived from theory and its application to Endre, a fully automated smoking cessation program that engages the user in several "counseling sessions" about quitting. A descriptive case study based on tools from the intervention mapping protocol shows how each therapeutic process is simulated. The program supports the user's working alliance through alliance factors, the nonembodied relational agent Endre and computerized motivational interviewing. Computerized motivational interviewing also supports internalized motivation to quit, whereas a lapse management component responds to lapses. The description operationalizes working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses, in terms of eHealth support of smoking cessation. A program may simulate working alliance, internalization of motivation, and lapse management through interactivity and individual tailoring, potentially making fully automated eHealth behavior change programs more effective.

  8. Changes in psychiatric symptoms and psychological processes among veterans participating in a therapeutic adventure program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettmann, Joanna E; Scheinfeld, David E; Prince, Kort C; Garland, Eric L; Ovrom, Katherine V

    2018-02-08

    When veterans need effective mental health treatment, many are reluctant to engage in traditional treatment modalities because of stigma. Therapeutic adventure shows promise as a way to engage veterans and enact positive changes in functioning, but little is known about how therapeutic adventure impacts mental health symptoms among veterans. This study examined changes in mental health symptoms and related psychological processes over the course of a 6-day Outward Bound for Veterans (OB4V) program and at a 1-month follow-up. This study examined data from 77 U.S. military veterans with psychiatric diagnoses. The authors hypothesized that participants would report significant reductions in mental health symptoms over the course of the program and following its completion, as well as significant improvements in psychological processes that included initiative for psychological growth, psychological attitudes, attitudes toward help-seeking, psychological mindedness, and emotional suppression. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed on each of the dependent variables. Results showed that, from pre- to postprogram, participants reported significant improvement in life purpose satisfaction and self-confidence during stressful situations. Further, from preprogram to 1-month postprogram, veterans reported increased psychological mindedness, increased engagement to promote personal growth, decreased mental health symptomology, decreased emotional suppression, and an increase in positive attitude toward seeking professional psychological help. These improvements were significant during the OB4V program and even continued to improve after the program ended, showing the promise of therapeutic adventure as a modality to address veterans' mental health issues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Amplitude-Integrated Electroencephalography Interpretation During Therapeutic Hypothermia: An Educational Program and Novel Teaching Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is now considered a standard in tertiary NICUs. Amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) is an important adjunct to this therapy and is gaining acceptance for use on the neonatal population. It can be easily incorporated into practice with appropriate education and training. Current publications are lacking regarding nursing care of neonatal patients undergoing th with the use of aEEG. This article presents a broad educational program as well as novel teaching tool for neonatal nurses caring for this population.

  10. [A therapeutic education program for parents of children with ASD: Preliminary results about the effectiveness of the ETAP program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derguy, C; Poumeyreau, M; Pingault, S; M'bailara, K

    2017-11-24

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are characterized by particularities of cognitive and socio-adaptive functioning. Daily, they require specific interventions for the disabled person as well as support for parents who often report deterioration in their physical and mental health. To this end, the latest Autism Plan 2013-2017 highlights the need "to help families to be present and active alongside their loved ones, to avoid situations of exhaustion and stress and to enable them to play their role fully in the long term". The support devices must therefore be based on an analysis of the parents' needs and propose multiple intervention modalities, which respond to the complexity of the caregiving mission. Therapeutic education (TE) seems to answer to these different elements by proposing a global approach improving the development of child-centered skills and the educational challenges (self-care skills) but also of skills centered on the projects and the fulfillment of the parent (psychosocial skills). The ETAP (Therapeutic Education Autism and Parenting) program is an initial TE offer intended for parents of children with ASD aged between 3 and 10years. It consists of seven group sessions and two semi-structured interviews, called educational diagnosis. A booster session is also proposed three months after the last session. It was developed following rigorously the guidelines on program construction, published by the High Authority of Health. In addition, it is based on an assessment of the needs of the parents, an in-depth analysis of the literature and the opinion of nine experts in this area. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the ETAP program on the quality of life and anxio-depressive symptoms of parents of a child with ASD. To our knowledge, the ETAP program is the first TE program in France for parents of children with an ASD that has been evaluated. Our sample is composed of 40 participants, including 30 parents who participated

  11. The Effect of a Program Using Some Therapeutic Methods to Rehabilitate Patients Suffering from Neck Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayad O MAR

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neck pain is one of the common physical problems of the adults which needs to be taken seriously in order to prevent further health problems. As the daily life of the modern people leads physical in activity, and the use of electronic devices causes imprope r effect on certain parts of the body, specials programs have to be developed as preventive treatment. Therapeutic methods can also be listed through such preventive methods. The purpose of this study was to i dentify the impact of the proposed program usin g some natural methods of treatment for the rehabilitation of people with neck pain , to i dentify the improved range of motion in all directions to the neck area , and also t o identify the extent of improvement in muscle strength for the neck and back. Twelv e patients in Ain Zara Physiotherapy Center and Tripoli Clinic (in Tripoli city were chosen as voluntarily whose age ranged from 30 to 50 years, and the subjects were divided into two groups , as experimental and control groups. This study proved that pro posed therapeutic methods help the treatment of neck pain.

  12. From Blue to Green: The Development and Implementation of a Therapeutic Horticulture Program for Residents of a Battered Women's Shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzetti, Claire M; Follingstad, Diane R

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic services to clients is influenced by service providers' understanding of the "fit" of a specific program with their service mandate as well as their perceptions of the potential benefits of the program. This article discusses the development and implementation of a therapeutic horticulture (TH) program at a battered women's shelter that serves 17 counties in Central Kentucky. Through semistructured interviews, we gauge the shelter staff's perceptions of the relationship of the TH program to the shelter's overall mission; their sense of the program's benefits for residents, for the shelter as a community organization, and for themselves; and their concerns about the TH program. We consider how these findings may impact future programming at the shelter, and we discuss plans for further evaluation of the TH program in terms of its impact on shelter residents' long-term outcomes.

  13. More than just dancing: experiences of people with Parkinson's disease in a therapeutic dance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Stephanie; DeFaria, Anne Marie; O'Dwyer, Casey; Pankiw, Elana; Simic Bogler, Jennifer; Teixeira, Suzanne; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Evans, Cathy

    2017-06-01

    To understand why individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) participate in a community-based therapeutic dance program and to explore its influence on perceived physical, social and emotional well-being of participants. A qualitative descriptive design was employed using one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Individuals with PD who participated in the Dancing with Parkinson's program were recruited from two locations. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, de-identified and then placed into NVivo 10 software for analysis. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive analysis method to generate a coding scheme. Group discussion facilitated development of overarching themes. Ten participants' responses revealed that the dance program allows for self-improvement and regaining identity through disease self-management. Positive influences of socialization arose through the class, decreasing isolation and improving quality of life. Participants communicate through music and dance to enhance connection with others. Dancing with Parkinson's classes allow for re-development of the social self, which can increase sense of enjoyment in life. Dance programs provide opportunities for social interaction, non-verbal communication and self-improvement, reestablishing self-identity and a sense of usefulness. This study provides unique insight into the experience of participating in a dance program from the perspective of individuals with PD. Implications for rehabilitation Dance is emerging as a strategy to address the physical and psychosocial effects of Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known regarding participants' perceptions of community-based therapeutic dance programs for PD. This study found that Dancing with Parkinson's (DWP) facilitated an improvement in social participation, resulting in decreased isolation and improved quality of life. Participation in the DWP program can facilitate a positive change in perspective and attitude toward a PD

  14. Web-Based Treatment Program Using Intensive Therapeutic Contact for Patients With Eating Disorders: Before-After Study

    OpenAIRE

    ter Huurne, Elke D; Postel, Marloes G; de Haan, Hein A; Drossaert, Constance H.C; DeJong, Cor A.J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although eating disorders are common in the Netherlands, only a few patients are treated by mental health care professionals. To reach and treat more patients with eating disorders, Tactus Addiction Treatment developed a web-based treatment program with asynchronous and intensive personalized communication between the patient and the therapist. Objective: This pilot study evaluated the web-based treatment program using intensive therapeutic contact in a population of 165 patients ...

  15. [Patients' intervention in a therapeutic education program dedicated to systemic lupus: definitions, setting and benefits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervier, B; Magar, Y; Allab, F; Richard, K; Neves, Y; Danjou, S; Amoura, Z; Ayçaguer, S

    2015-10-01

    Though recommended, participation of patients with specific expertise in therapeutic education programs (TEP) is rare. This work reports the experience of a national reference centre for rare systemic diseases. Involvement of "expert patients" (EP) has been planned from the development of a TEP dedicated to systemic lupus: patients' roles and required expertise have been defined and linked to the pedagogical tools. Such patients have been recruited during individual interviews and called to participate to specific pedagogical training. EP intervention have been evaluated by questionnaire to EP and health care providers. Three EP's functions have been identified: sharing experiences, giving "tips and tricks" and promoting dialogue. EP's interventions has been organised into a hierarchy (from sharing to co-animation). Among 298 patients enrolled in the TEP, 25 (8.4%) have been identified as possible EP. Eight of them (32%) benefited from a specific training of 12 hours. Among these patients, two (25%) regularly participate to the education sessions. For EP as well as for health care providers, EP's intervention seems beneficial (visual scale scores of 7.5 and 9.5, respectively). Though difficult to organise, EP's intervention in TEP dedicated to rare systemic diseases seems useful and would earn to be increase. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. A comprehensive linear programming tool to optimize formulations of ready-to-use therapeutic foods: An application to Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) is the standard of care for children suffering from noncomplicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The objective was to develop a comprehensive linear programming (LP) tool to create novel RUTF formulations for Ethiopia. A systematic approach that surveyed inter...

  17. Gender-specific mortality in DTP-IPV- and MMR±MenC-eligible age groups to determine possible sex-differential effects of vaccination: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurink-van't Klooster, Tessa M; Knol, Mirjam J; de Melker, Hester E; van der Sande, Marianne A B

    2015-03-24

    Several studies suggested that vaccines could have non-specific effects on mortality depending on the type of vaccine. Non-specific effects seem to be different in boys and girls. In this study we want to investigate whether there are differences in gender-specific mortality among Dutch children according to the last vaccination received. We tested the hypothesis that the mortality rate ratio for girls versus boys is more favourable for girls following MMR±MenC vaccination (from 14 months of age) compared with the ratio following DTP-IPV vaccination (2-13 months of age). Secondarily, we investigated whether there were gender-specific changes in mortality following booster vaccination at 4 years of age. This observational study included all Dutch children aged 0-11 years from 2000 until 2011. Age groups were classified according to the last vaccination offered. The mortality rates for all natural causes of death were calculated by gender and age group. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were computed using a multivariable Poisson analysis to compare mortality in boys and girls across different age groups. The study population consisted of 6,261,472 children. During the study period, 14,038 children (0.22%) died, 91% of which were attributed to a known natural cause of death. The mortality rate for natural causes was higher among boys than girls in all age groups. Adjusted IRRs for girls compared with boys ranged between 0.81 (95% CI 0.74-0.89) and 0.91 (95% CI 0.77-1.07) over the age groups. The IRR did not significantly differ between all vaccine-related age groups (p=0.723), between children 2-13 months (following DTP-IPV vaccination) and 14 months-3 years (following MMR±MenC vaccination) (p=0.493) and between children 14 months-3 years and 4-8 years old (following DTP-IPV vaccination) (p=0.868). In the Netherlands, a high income country, no differences in gender-specific mortality related to the type of last vaccination received were observed in DTP-IPV- and MMR

  18. Uptake of oral rotavirus vaccine and timeliness of routine immunization in Brazil’s National Immunization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Brendan; Samad, Samia; de Moraes, José Cássio; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Danovaro-Holliday, M. Carolina; de Oliveira, Lúcia Helena; Rainey, Jeanette J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In March, 2006, oral rotavirus vaccine was added to Brazil’s infant immunization schedule with recommended upper age limits for initiating (by age 14 weeks) and completing (by age 24 weeks) the two-dose series to minimize age-specific risk of intussusception following rotavirus vaccination. Several years after introduction, estimated coverage with rotavirus vaccine (83%) was lower compared to coverage for other recommended childhood immunizations (≥94%). Methods We analyzed data from Brazil’s national immunization program on uptake of oral rotavirus vaccine by geographic region and compared administrative coverage estimates for first and second doses of oral rotavirus vaccine (Rota1 and Rota2) with first and second doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (DTP-Hib1 and DTP-Hib2). For 27 Brazilian cities, we compared differences between estimated rotavirus and DTP-Hib coverage in 2010 with delayed receipt of DTP-Hib vaccine among a cohort of children surveyed before rotavirus introduction. Results In 2010, infant vaccination coverage was 99.0% for DTP-Hib1 versus 95.2% for Rota1 (3.8% difference), and 98.4% for DTP-Hib2 versus 83.0% for Rota2 (15.4% difference), with substantial regional variation. Differences between DTP-Hib and rotavirus vaccination coverage in Brazilian cities correlated with delay in DTP-Hib vaccination among children surveyed. Age restrictions for initiating and completing the rotavirus vaccination series likely contributed to lower coverage with rotavirus vaccine in Brazil. Conclusion To maximize benefits of rotavirus vaccination, strategies are needed to improve timeliness of routine immunizations; monitoring rotavirus vaccine uptake and intussusception risk is needed to guide further recommendations for rotavirus vaccination. PMID:23313652

  19. The Role of Program Consistency in a Summer Therapeutic Camp for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Colleen; Nowosielski, Ashley; Kitchen, Tom; Belfiore, Phillip J.

    2014-01-01

    Although evidenced-based practices, delivered with procedural integrity are increasingly common in the field of autism, generalizing those practices to less traditional settings is not. The present study, conducted at a summer therapeutic camp used a single subject multiple baseline across participants research design to evaluate the effects of…

  20. Veterans in substance abuse treatment program self-initiate box gardening as a stress reducing therapeutic modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Lauren P; Detweiler, Jonna G; Detweiler, Mark B

    2018-02-01

    To assess the experiences of a veteran initiated horticultural therapy garden during their 28-day inpatient Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Program (SARRTP). Retrospective study. Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), Salem, Virginia, USA INTERVENTIONS: Group interviews with veterans from the last SARRTP classes and individual interviews with VAMC greenhouse staff in summer of 2016. Time spent in garden, frequency of garden visits, types of passive and active garden activities, words describing the veterans' emotional reactions to utilizing the garden. In 3 summer months of 2016, 50 percent of the 56 veterans interviewed visited and interacted with the gardens during their free time. Frequency of visits generally varied from 3 times weekly to 1-2 times a day. Amount of time in the garden varied from 10min to 2h. The veterans engaged in active and/or passive gardening activities during their garden visits. The veterans reported feeling "calm", "serene", and "refreshed" during garden visitation and after leaving the garden. Although data was secured only at the end of the 2016 growing season, interviews of the inpatient veterans revealed that they used their own initiative and resources to continue the horticulture therapy program for 2 successive growing years after the original pilot project ended in 2014. These non-interventionist, therapeutic garden projects suggest the role of autonomy and patient initiative in recovery programs for veterans attending VAMC treatment programs and they also suggest the value of horticulture therapy as a meaningful evidence- based therapeutic modality for veterans. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Discovery and development of anticancer agents from marine sponges: perspectives based on a chemistry-experimental therapeutics collaborative program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriote, Frederick A; Tenney, Karen; Media, Joseph; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Edelstein, Matthew; Johnson, Tyler A; Amagata, Taro; Crews, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative program was initiated in 1990 between the natural product chemistry laboratory of Dr. Phillip Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz and the experimental therapeutics laboratory of Dr. Fred Valeriote at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The program focused on the discovery and development of anticancer drugs from sponge extracts. A novel in vitro disk diffusion, solid tumor selective assay was used to examine 2,036 extracts from 683 individual sponges. The bioassay-directed fractionation discovery component led to the identification of active pure compounds from many of these sponges. In most cases, pure compound was prepared in sufficient quantities to both chemically identify the active compound(s) as well as pursue one or more of the biological development components. The latter included IC50, clonogenic survival-concentration exposure, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and therapeutic assessment studies. Solid tumor selective compounds included fascaplysin and 10-bromofascaplysin (Fascaplysinopsis), neoamphimedine, 5-methoxyneoamphimedine and alpkinidine (Xestospongia), makaluvamine C and makaluvamine H (Zyzzya), psymberin (Psammocinia and Ircinia), and ethylplakortide Z and ethyldidehydroplakortide Z (Plakortis). These compounds or analogs thereof continue to have therapeutic potential.

  2. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses of horses to therapeutic riding program: effects of different riders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Esterina; Medica, Pietro; Cravana, Cristina; Ferlazzo, Adriana

    2013-06-13

    In order to determine whether therapeutic riding could result in higher levels of stress than recreational riding, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response was evaluated in six horses by monitoring circulating β-endorphin, ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Horses were already accustomed to be trained both for therapy and riding school activity since 2004. Intervention consisted of 60-minute therapeutic sessions, two times per week for 6weeks with different riders: disabled and recreational riders (session A and B respectively). The therapeutic riders' group (A) consisted of six children with psychomotor disabilities; the recreational riders' group (B) consisted of six healthy children without any previous horse riding experience. Horses were asked to perform the same gaits and exercises at all sessions, both with disabled and healthy users. The statistical analysis showed that during both sessions the mean basal β-endorphin and ACTH levels of horses did not show any significant changes, while the one way RM-ANOVA showed significant effects of sessions A on the cortisol (F=11.50; PHorses submitted to sessions A showed lower cortisol levels both at 5min (Phorses and for the variables settled, HPA axis was less responsive to disabled than healthy, recreational riders. Among the endocrine responses, cortisol was one of the indicators of HPA axis stress response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-HBs levels in infants of hepatitis B carrier mothers after delayed active immunization with recombinant vaccine concomitant with DTP-polio vaccine: Is there need for a second dose of HBIg?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Grosheide (Pia Maria); R. Del Canho (R.); M. Voogd (M.); R.A. Heijtink; S.W. Schalm (Solko)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe need for an additional dose of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIg) was studied by comparing infants receiving 1 ml HBIg at birth followed by hepatitis B immunization, concomitant with DTP-polio vaccine, at 3, 4, 5 and 11 months (schedule E), with infants receiving the same schedule

  4. A school peer mediation program as a context for exploring therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ): Can a peer mediation program inform the law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam, Nicky

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports an exploratory study of a school peer mediation program implemented as an alternative way to manage bullying and other destructive conflict. The study explores the effects of the program on the well-being of members of the school community by examining perceptions of students, staff and a sample of parents and former students. Drawing on therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) the study explores whether the component parts of the program, separately or together, promote intended or unintended therapeutic effects. The preliminary findings of the study emphasise the importance of peer mediation training and suggest that existing scholarship in the area of school conflict resolution and peer mediation, when viewed through a TJ lens, may provide valuable insights into how to optimally configure programs for development and adoption in schools and other community settings. The study highlights the lack of attention paid by the legal system to valuable scholarship in the area of school conflict resolution and peer mediation, which may have implications for the understanding and development of legal processes and the law in general. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancing Therapeutic Gains: Examination of Fidelity to the Model for the Intensive Mental Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Camille J.; Biggs, Bridget K.

    2008-01-01

    Given that the development of treatment fidelity assessment protocol is an integral but too frequently ignored aspect of clinical trials for psychological treatments, the Intensive Mental Health Program (IMHP) sought to build fidelity activities into training, program evaluation, and clinical recordkeeping from the outset of a 3 year study period.…

  6. Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume II. Detailed technical plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The four sections which comprise Part II describe in detail the technical basis for each of the four Program Elements (PE's) of the FWBS Engineering Technology Program (ETP). Each PE is planned to be executed in a number of phases. The purpose of the DTP's is to delineate detailed near-term research, development, and testing required to establish a FWBS engineering data base. Optimum testing strategies and construction of test facilities where needed are identified. The DTP's are based on guidelines given by Argonne National Laboratory which included the basic programmatic goals and the requirements for the types of tests and test conditions

  7. Web-based treatment program using intensive therapeutic contact for patients with eating disorders: before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Huurne, Elke D; Postel, Marloes G; de Haan, Hein A; Drossaert, Constance H C; DeJong, Cor A J

    2013-02-04

    Although eating disorders are common in the Netherlands, only a few patients are treated by mental health care professionals. To reach and treat more patients with eating disorders, Tactus Addiction Treatment developed a web-based treatment program with asynchronous and intensive personalized communication between the patient and the therapist. This pilot study evaluated the web-based treatment program using intensive therapeutic contact in a population of 165 patients with an eating disorder. In a pre-post design with 6-week and 6-month follow-ups, eating disorder psychopathology, body dissatisfaction, Body Mass Index, physical and mental health, and quality of life were measured. The participant's satisfaction with the web-based treatment program was also studied. Attrition data were collected, and participants were classified as noncompleters if they did not complete all 10 assignments of the web-based treatment program. Differences in baseline characteristics between completers and noncompleters were studied, as well as reasons for noncompletion. Furthermore, differences in treatment effectiveness, treatment adherence, and baseline characteristics between participants of the three major eating disorder diagnostic groups EDNOS (n=115), BN purging (n=24), and BN nonpurging (n=24) were measured. Of the 165 participants who started the web-based treatment program, 89 participants (54%) completed all of the program assignments (completers) and 76 participants (46%) ended the program prematurely (noncompleters). Severe body dissatisfaction and physical and mental health problems seemed to have a negative impact on the completion of the web-based treatment program. Among the participants who completed the treatment program, significant improvements were found in eating disorder psychopathology (F=54.6, df = 68, Pphysical and mental health also significantly improved, and almost all of these positive effects were sustained up to 6 months after the participants had

  8. Translation of an evidence-based therapeutic exercise program for patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Dereck L; Whipple, Mary O; Burt, Marsha; Brown, Rebecca J L; Hirsch, Alan; Foley, Christopher; Treat-Jacobson, Diane

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate quality outcomes including referral, enrollment, and completion rates of a new peripheral artery disease (PAD)-specific supervised exercise therapy (SET) program within a preexisting clinical exercise wellness program and to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes derived from 12 weeks of PAD-specific SET. Recruited participants completed an individualized, minimally supervised, PAD-specific SET program based on the AHA-ACC guidelines. Exercise workloads (metabolic equivalents of task [METs]) were tracked and evaluated throughout the program. Short Physical Performance Battery, 6-minute walk test (6MWT) Walking Impairment Questionnaire, Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and Peripheral Artery Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PADQOL) were assessed before and after the program. Paired t-tests were used to examine differences between baseline and follow-up outcome variables. On average, participants (n = 46) attended 23 (standard deviation [SD] 12.9) out of the possible 36 training sessions, for a 64% attendance rate. Among participants who used treadmill walking as the primary mode of exercise (n = 40), the overall mean MET level just prior to program completion was 3.79 (SD 1.49), which represented an increase of 0.92 (34%) METs compared to baseline (P < .001). Total distance on the 6MWT increased 115 (11%) feet (P = .011), which is considered a clinically meaningful improvement. Significant improvements were noted in the PADQOL: symptoms and limitations in physical functioning (P = .007). This study demonstrates that a minimally staffed PAD-specific SET program can improve functional performance in patients with claudication due to PAD and serves as a foundation to help build a clinically effective, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid reimbursed PAD-specific rehabilitation program. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sensory education program development, application and its therapeutic effect in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hae-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    There has recently been Increased interest in the emotional intelligence (EQ) of elementary school students, which is recognized as a more important value than IQ (intelligence quotient) for predict of their success in school or later life. However, there are few sensory education programs, available to improve the EQ of elementary school student's in Korea. This study was conducted to develop an educational program that reflects the characteristics and contents of traditional rice culture and verify the effects of those programs on the EQ of children. The program was developed based on the ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation) model and participants were elementary school students in 3rd and 4th grade (n = 120) in Cheonan, Korea. Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests were used. EQ scores pertaining to the basic sense group, culture group, and food group were significantly improved after the sensory educational program(P education contributed to improving elementary school children's Emotional Intelligence (EI) and their actual understanding about Korean traditional rice culture. PMID:24611113

  10. Infection homeostasis: implications for therapeutic and immune programming of metabolism in controlling infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzamanis, Konstantinos; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Homeostasis underpins at a systems level the regulatory control of immunity and metabolism. While physiologically these systems are often viewed as independent, there is increasing evidence showing a tight coupling between immune and metabolic functions. Critically upon infection, the homeostatic regulation for both immune and metabolic pathways is altered yet these changes are often investigated in isolation. Here, we summarise our current understanding of these processes in the context of a clinically relevant pathogen, cytomegalovirus. We synthesise from the literature an integrative view of a coupled immune-metabolic infection process, centred on sugar and lipid metabolism. We put forward the notion that understanding immune control of key metabolic enzymatic steps in infection will promote the future development of novel therapeutic modalities based on metabolic modifiers that either enhance protection or inhibit infection.

  11. The Ocean as a Unique Therapeutic Environment: Developing a Surfing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Emily D.; Armitano, Cortney N.; Lamont, Linda S.; Audette, Jennifer G.

    2014-01-01

    Educational aquatic programming offers necessary physical activity opportunities to children with disabilities and the benefits of aquatic activities are more pronounced for children with disabilities than for their able-bodied peers. Similar benefits could potentially be derived from surfing in the ocean. This article describes an adapted surfing…

  12. A human type 5 adenovirus-based Trypanosoma cruzi therapeutic vaccine re-programs immune response and reverses chronic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Resende Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a prototypical neglected tropical disease. Specific immunity promotes acute phase survival. Nevertheless, one-third of CD patients develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC associated with parasite persistence and immunological unbalance. Currently, the therapeutic management of patients only mitigates CCC symptoms. Therefore, a vaccine arises as an alternative to stimulate protective immunity and thereby prevent, delay progression and even reverse CCC. We examined this hypothesis by vaccinating mice with replication-defective human Type 5 recombinant adenoviruses (rAd carrying sequences of amastigote surface protein-2 (rAdASP2 and trans-sialidase (rAdTS T. cruzi antigens. For prophylactic vaccination, naïve C57BL/6 mice were immunized with rAdASP2+rAdTS (rAdVax using a homologous prime/boost protocol before challenge with the Colombian strain. For therapeutic vaccination, rAdVax administration was initiated at 120 days post-infection (dpi, when mice were afflicted by CCC. Mice were analyzed for electrical abnormalities, immune response and cardiac parasitism and tissue damage. Prophylactic immunization with rAdVax induced antibodies and H-2Kb-restricted cytotoxic and interferon (IFNγ-producing CD8+ T-cells, reduced acute heart parasitism and electrical abnormalities in the chronic phase. Therapeutic vaccination increased survival and reduced electrical abnormalities after the prime (analysis at 160 dpi and the boost (analysis at 180 and 230 dpi. Post-therapy mice exhibited less heart injury and electrical abnormalities compared with pre-therapy mice. rAdVax therapeutic vaccination preserved specific IFNγ-mediated immunity but reduced the response to polyclonal stimuli (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, CD107a+ CD8+ T-cell frequency and plasma nitric oxide (NO levels. Moreover, therapeutic rAdVax reshaped immunity in the heart tissue as reduced the number of perforin+ cells

  13. Treatment of congential vascular disorders: classification, step program, and therapeutic procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Carsten M.; Poetke, Margitta; Engel-Murke, Frank; Waldschmidt, J.; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1994-02-01

    Because of the different step programs concerning the preoperative diagnostic and the onset of therapy for the various types of congenital vascular disorders (CVD) a clear classification is important. One has to discern the vascular malformations, including the port wine stain, from the real hemangiomas which are vascular tumors. As former classification, mostly based on histological findings, showed little evidence to a clinical step program, we developed a descriptive classification which allows an early differentiation between the two groups of CVD. In most cases this can be done by a precise medical history of the onset and development of the disorder, a close look to the clinical signs and by Duplex-Ultrasound and MRI-diagnostic. With this protocol and the case adapted use of different lasers and laser techniques we have not seen any severe complications as skin necrosis or nerve lesions.

  14. Optimization of radio-therapeutic treatment and the program of quality assurance in ionizing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, A.; Bahnarel, I.; Coretchi, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Program of Quality Assurance (PQA) in Ionizing Radiation Therapy (IRT) addresses the most important problems of assuring the quality of IRT utilization in the treatment of patients with neoplasm. In this context, the IRT value grows considerably, hence the implementation of PQA is of great significance. The study concentrates on a detailed description of the PQA as concerns the activity involving IRT devices applied in the IRT departments (rooms) of public medical/sanitary institutions, science research institutions etc., where IRT is employed using technogenic sources and ionizing radiation generators. For the performing of the study, annual statistics reports about the activity of the IRT, and data of Cancer Registry of the Oncologic Institute of the Republic of Moldova were analyzed. The work also includes an in-depth description of the personnel categories involved in PQA, possible errors in radiotherapy, the responsibilities of the bioengineer in this program, importance of source calibration, the impact of the quality control in PQA, the role of topometric training, the interaction between the medical and technical personnel and the patient. Optimization of IRT is very important and necessary in the Republic of Moldova. PQA incontestably contributes to reducing specialist's errors in planning correct treatment, dictates the need of team work and proper delegation of the responsibilities in co-optation of other professionals, performance of duty of bioengineering, the influence of quality control of profile installations, meaning accurate topographic planning, applying several methods of work, quality assurance program assuming the major importance. (authors)

  15. [MODen: Psychoeducationnal therapeutic group program for schizophrenic patients, based on nutritional balance and pleasure, using cognitive functions: A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, S L; Hochard, C; Orens, S; Gautier, C; Lambert, T; Geret, L; Bralet, M C

    2016-10-01

    Schizophrenia causes psychological difficulties (with positive and/or negative symptoms) as well as cognitive disabilities (attention, memory, executive functions and social cognition). Moreover, 40 to 60% of patients suffer from an excess of weight or obesity (due to bad eating habits, eating disorders or medication). All these difficulties impair their autonomy and their insertion into the society. In this context, setting-up a therapeutic tool, which may have cognitive benefits seems relevant. Thus, MODen is a therapeutic educational tool whose aim is to improve cognitive functions and the symptoms by using "nutritional balance" as an aid. In this treatment program, two therapists lead a group of 5 to 8 patients which group meets once a week during two to four hours for 16 weeks, divided in 4 cycles. The first three weeks of each cycle consists of theoretical instruction: patients talk about their eating habits, information is given about nutritional balance and preparation of meals. In the different cycles, flexibility, planning, memory and attention are trained. For instance, the work on categorisation of foods and nutritional balance allow enhancing flexibility abilities. Writing down the lists of different ingredients needed for one week's meals and preparation of meals train planning abilities. MODen also takes into account ecological issues such as the limited budget of patients to do their shopping (this budget is around 4 euros per meal in France). The budget is also linked to planning abilities and reasoning. Finally, during the last session of each cycle the group prepares a meal (from the shopping to cooking). This last session is all about sharing and social cognition abilities. By the end of the program, patients will have prepared four meals together. Also "homework" has to be done each week in order to facilitate memorisation of what has been learned during the last session and to prepare the beginning of the next session. In a pilot study with 8

  16. Physical Activity, Exercise and Sport Programs as Effective Therapeutic Tools in Psychosocial Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancassiani, Federica; Machado, Sergio; Preti, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    People with severe psychosocial disabilities have a 20-years shorter lifespan due to chronic somatic comorbidities and the long-term consequences of the side-effects of antipsychotic drugs. They often are sedentary and show lower levels of physical activity, factors which can contribute to their shorter lifespan, because of the greater cardiovascular risk. An increasing amount of evidence, including clinical trials, pointed out that sport, physical activity and structured exercise programs improve physical and psychological wellbeing of people with psychosocial disabilities, playing also an important role against their social isolation and self-stigma. The NICE and APA guidelines include exercise and physical activity for the management of depressive symptoms. Safe and effective programs require multidisciplinary teams that should always include mental health professionals, able to recognize the psychosocial needs, the impact of symptomatology, the role of secondary effects of psychotropic medication, the effect of previous exercise history, the lack of motivation, the inexperience with effort intensity and the frustration of people with psychosocial disabilities.

  17. Using a data-centric event-driven architecture approach in the integration of real-time systems at DTP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuominen, Janne, E-mail: janne.m.tuominen@tut.fi; Viinikainen, Mikko; Alho, Pekka; Mattila, Jouni

    2014-10-15

    Integration of heterogeneous and distributed systems is a challenging task, because they might be running on different platforms and written with different implementation languages by multiple organizations. Data-centricity and event-driven architecture (EDA) are concepts that help to implement versatile and well-scaling distributed systems. This paper focuses on the implementation of inter-subsystem communication in a prototype distributed remote handling control system developed at Divertor Test Platform 2 (DTP2). The control system consists of a variety of heterogeneous subsystems, including a client–server web application and hard real-time controllers. A standardized middleware solution (Data Distribution Services (DDS)) that supports a data-centric EDA approach is used to integrate the system. One of the greatest challenges in integrating a system with a data-centric EDA approach is in defining the global data space model. The selected middleware is currently only used for non-deterministic communication. For future application, we evaluated the performance of point-to-point communication with and without the presence of additional network load to ensure applicability to real-time systems. We found that, under certain limitations, the middleware can be used for soft real-time communication. Hard real-time use will require more validation with a more suitable environment.

  18. [Differences in effectiveness of intensive programs of treatment for neurotic and personality disorders. Is it worth to monitor the effectiveness of the therapeutic team?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styła, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    To test whether three different intensive programs of treatment for neurotic and personality disorders are effective in decreasing neurotic symptoms and traits of neurotic personality and whether there are differences between them in clinical outcome. The sample consisted of 105 patients (83% female, mean age 35) diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders that were treated in three therapeutic wards under routine inpatient conditions. The therapeutic programs are designed for patients with neurotic and personality disorders. They consist of 6-12 weeks of approximately 5 hours of eclectic group treatment (group psychotherapy, psychodrama, psychoeducation etc.). Participants filled in Symptoms' Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The treatment proved to be effective in diminishing neurotic symptoms (d Cohen = 0.56). More detailed analysis revealed that there was a significant interaction between the three analysed therapeutic wards and the effectiveness (12 = 0.09). The treatments offered in two institutions were effective (d Cohen = 0.80) while one of the programs did not lead to significant improvement of the patients. None of the therapeutic wards proved to be effective in changing the neurotic personality traits. There are significant differences in effectiveness of the intensive programs of treatment for neurotic and personality disorders. In the light of the literature, one can assume that the differences are more connected with the characteristics of therapeutic teams than with the methods used. The need for standard methods of effectiveness monitoring is discussed.

  19. A comprehensive linear programming tool to optimize formulations of ready-to-use therapeutic foods: an application to Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kelsey N; Adams, Katherine P; Vosti, Stephen A; Ordiz, M Isabel; Cimo, Elizabeth D; Manary, Mark J

    2014-12-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) is the standard of care for children suffering from noncomplicated severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The objective was to develop a comprehensive linear programming (LP) tool to create novel RUTF formulations for Ethiopia. A systematic approach that surveyed international and national crop and animal food databases was used to create a global and local candidate ingredient database. The database included information about each ingredient regarding nutrient composition, ingredient category, regional availability, and food safety, processing, and price. An LP tool was then designed to compose novel RUTF formulations. For the example case of Ethiopia, the objective was to minimize the ingredient cost of RUTF; the decision variables were ingredient weights and the extent of use of locally available ingredients, and the constraints were nutritional and product-quality related. Of the new RUTF formulations found by the LP tool for Ethiopia, 32 were predicted to be feasible for creating a paste, and these were prepared in the laboratory. Palatable final formulations contained a variety of ingredients, including fish, different dairy powders, and various seeds, grains, and legumes. Nearly all of the macronutrient values calculated by the LP tool differed by cost RUTF formulations that meet international standards and thereby potentially allow more children to be treated for SAM. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Therapeutical Intervention, Relaxation, Mental Images, and Spirituality (RIME for Spiritual Pain in Terminal Patients. A Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina de Araújo Elias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention involving the technique of Relaxation, Mental Images, and Spirituality (RIME can foster the redefinition of spiritual pain in terminal patients. A training course was developed to instruct health care professionals in its use, and the results were followed up by evaluating reactions of professionals to its use in intervention with patients. Six subjects (a nurse, a doctor, three psychologists, and an alternative therapist, all skilled in palliative care, were invited to take part in the experience. They worked with 11 terminal patients in public hospitals of the cities of Campinas, Piracicaba, and São Paulo, located in Brazil. The theoretical basis for the study involves action research and phenomenology, and the results were analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The analysis of the experience of the professionals revealed 5 categories and 15 subcategories. The analysis of the nature of spiritual pain revealed 6 categories and 11 subcategories. The administration of RIME revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.0001, i.e., patients reported a greater level of well-being at the end than at the beginning of sessions, which suggests that RIME led to the redefinition of spiritual pain for these terminal patients. The training program proposed has shown itself to be effective in preparing health care professionals for the use of RIME intervention.

  1. A 9-month follow-up of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive asynchronous therapeutic support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postel, M.G.; Huurne, E.D. ter; Haan, H.A. de; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: Web-based alcohol interventions have demonstrated efficacy in randomized controlled trials. However, most studies have involved self-help interventions without therapeutic support. Objectives: To examine the results of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive,

  2. A 9-month follow-up of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive asynchronous therapeutic support.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postel, Marloes Gerda; ter Huurne, E.D.; de Haan, H.A.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; de Jong, Cor A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Web-based alcohol interventions have demonstrated efficacy in randomized controlled trials. However, most studies have involved self-help interventions without therapeutic support. Objectives: To examine the results of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive,

  3. 77 FR 27785 - Request for Information Regarding the NIH-Industry Program To Discover New Therapeutic Uses for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... companies with the best ideas for new therapeutic uses put forward by the biomedical research community... and associated data from participating companies with the best ideas for new therapeutic uses put... Molecules is designed to be carried out through collaborations between pharmaceutical companies and the...

  4. Treatment outcome and factors affecting time to recovery in children with severe acute malnutrition treated at outpatient therapeutic care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melkamu Merid Mengesha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The outpatient therapeutic care program (OTP of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM has been decentralized to health post level in Ethiopia since 2008–2009. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding treatment outcomes and factors related to the duration of stay on treatment after its decentralization to health post level. Objective: This study was aimed to assess treatment outcome and factors affecting time to recovery in children with SAM treated at OTP. Design: Health facility–based retrospective cohort study was conducted using data from 348 patient cards. The outcome variable was time to recovery. Descriptive analysis was done using percentages for categorical data and mean/median for continuous variables. A robust method of analyzing time to event data, the Cox proportional-hazard regression, was used. All statistical tests in this study are declared significant at p<0.05. Result: 89.1% of children with kwashiorkor and 69.4% of children with marasmus were recovered. Of the total children studied, 22% were readmitted cases. The median time of recovery was 35 days for children with kwashiorkor and 49 days for children with marasmus. Children older than 3 years were 33% less likely to achieve nutritional recovery [adjusted hazard ratio, AHR=0.67, 95% confidence interval, CI (0.46, 0.97]. Similarly, marasmic children stayed longer on treatment [AHR=0.42, 95% CI (0.32, 0.56]. However, children who gained Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC ≥ 0.24 mm/day were 59% more likely to recover faster [AHR=1.59, 95% CI (1.23, 2.06]. Conclusions: Close monitoring of weight and MUAC gain to assess nutritional improvement with due emphasis given to children with lower admission weight, children of age 3 years and above and marasmic children will have a positive effect on treatment duration and outcome.

  5. Therapeutic Alliance and Group Cohesion in an Online Support Program for Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: Lessons from "Recapture Life".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Brittany C; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M; Wakefield, Claire E; Ellis, Sarah J; Robertson, Eden G; Cohn, Richard J

    2017-12-01

    Psychological support services for adolescent and young adults (AYAs) with cancer are moving online and are increasingly peer based. It is unclear whether online service delivery impacts critical therapeutic elements such as collaborative patient-therapist rapport and group cohesion. AYA cancer survivors (N = 39) participating in a six-week online cognitive-behavioral therapy group program-"Recapture Life"-rated their perception of therapeutic alliance and group cohesion. Participant-rated alliance and group cohesion were high throughout the program, and therapist-rated participant openness, trust, and motivation strengthened over time. The findings provide further support for the expansion of AYA cancer support services to the online domain.

  6. Development and evaluation of a training program for therapeutic radiographers as a basis for online adaptive radiation therapy for bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Wong, Jacky; Kron, Tomas; Roxby, Paul; Haworth, Annette; Bailey, Alistair; Rolfo, Aldo; Paneghel, Andrea; Styles, Colin; Laferlita, Marcus; Tai, Keen Hun; Williams, Scott; Duchesne, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Online adaptive radiotherapy requires a new level of soft tissue anatomy recognition and decision making by therapeutic radiographers at the linear accelerator. We have developed a therapeutic radiographer training workshop encompassing soft tissue matching for an online adaptive protocol for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Our aim is to present the training program, and its evaluation which compares pre and post training staff soft tissue matching and bladder contouring using Cone Beam Computer Tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Prior to commencement of an online adaptive bladder protocol, a staff training program for 33 therapeutic radiographers, with a separate ethics approved evaluation component was developed. A multidisciplinary training program over two days was carried out with a total of 11 h of training, covering imaging technology, pelvic anatomy and protocol specific decision making in both practical and theoretical sessions. The evaluation included both pre training and post training testing of staff. Results: Pre training and post training, the standard deviations in the contoured bladder between participants in left-right direction were 0.64 vs 0.59 cm, superior-inferior 0.89 vs 0.77 cm and anterior-posterior direction was 0.88 vs 0.52 cm respectively. Similarly the standard deviation in the volume contoured decreased from 40.7 cc pre training to 24.5 cc post training. Time taken in contouring was reduced by the training program (19.8 vs 17.2 min) as was the discrepancy in choice of adaptive radiotherapy plans. The greatest reduction in variations in contouring was seen in staff whose pre training had the largest deviations from the reference radiation oncologist contours. Conclusion: A formalized staff training program is feasible, well received by staff and reduces variation in organ matching and contouring. The improvement was particularly noticed in staff who pre training had larger deviations from the reference standard.

  7. Effects of a Program of Adapted Therapeutic Horse-Riding in a Group of Autism Spectrum Disorder Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Andrés; Risco, Manuel López; Rubio, Jesús Carlos; Guerrero, Eloisa; García-Peña, Inés Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The use of horses in therapy has a fairly long history. There are many references to the therapeutic benefits of this activity. Such therapies have been undergoing a boom internationally in recent years. However scientific research into the effective use of this activity in children with autism is still in the early stages of…

  8. Outpatient Therapeutic Feeding Program Outcomes and Determinants in Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebyo, Henock Gebremedhin; Kendall, Carl; Nigusse, Daniel; Lemma, Wuleta

    2013-01-01

    Background Outpatient Therapeutic feeding Program (OTP) brings the services for management of Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) closer to the community by making services available at decentralized treatment points within the primary health care settings, through the use of ready-to-use therapeutic foods, community outreach and mobilization. Little is known about the program outcomes. This study revealed the levels of program outcome indictors and determinant factors to recovery rate. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 628 children who had been managed for SAM under OTP from April/2008 to January/2012. The children were selected using systematic random sampling from 12 health posts and 4 health centers. The study relied on information of demographic characteristics, anthropometries, Plumpy'Nut, medical problems and routine medications intakes. The results were estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log-rank test and Cox-regression. Results The recovery, defaulter, mortality and weight gain rates were 61.78%, 13.85%, 3.02% and 5.23 gm/kg/day, respectively. Routine medications were administered partially and children with medical problems were managed inappropriately under the program. As a child consumed one more sachet of Plumpy'Nut, the recovery rate from SAM increased by 4% (HR = 1.04, 95%-CI = 1.03, 1.05, Pworming had 95% (HR = 1.95, 95%-CI = 1.17, 3.23) and 74% (HR = 1.74, 95%-CI = 1.07, 2.83) more probability to recover from SAM as compared to those who didn't take them. Conclusions The OTP was partially successful. Management of children with comorbidities under the program and partial administration of routine drugs were major threats for the program effectiveness. The stakeholders should focus on creating the capacity of the OTP providers on proper management of SAM to achieve fully effective program. PMID:23755286

  9. The reaction of TcCl3(Me2PhP)3 with dithio ligands. Synthesis, characterization and X-ray crystal structures of [TcCl2(Me2PhP)2(Me2dtp)]and [Tc(Me2PhP)(Etxan)3](Me2PhP=dimethylphenylphosphine, Me2dtp-=O,O'-dimethyldithiophosphate, Etxan-=ethylxanthate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B.; Schmidt, K.; Hiller, W.; Abram, U.; Huebener, R.

    1993-01-01

    Trichlorotris (dimethylphenylphosphine)technetium(III); [TcCl 3 (Me 2 PhP) 3 ], reacts with dithio ligands to form chelate complexes of different compositions and coordinations geometries. The reaction with ethylxanthate (Etxan - ) yields the diamagnetic seven-coordinate [Tc(Me 2 PhP)(Etxan) 3 ], which crystallizes monoclinic in the space group P2 2 /c with Z = 4 (a = 18.44(5), b = 9.2(1), c = 15.36(6) A, β = 104.3(2) ). The final R value is 0.029. The metal has a pentagonal-bipyramidal environment. With ammonium dimethyldithiophosphate, (NH 4 )Me 2 dtp, [TcCl 3 (Me 2 PhP) 3 ] forms the paramagnetic [TcCl 2 (Me 2 PhP) 2 (Me 2 dtp) in which the technetium atom has a distorted octahedral coordination sphere. The compound crystallizes orthorhombic, space group Pbcn, with Z = 4 (a = 16.20(1), b = 10.445(1), c 14.878(1)). The final R value is 0.031. The chloro ligands are in trans arrangement. (orig.)

  10. The effectiveness of combining inspiratory muscle training with manual therapy and a therapeutic exercise program on maximum inspiratory pressure in adults with asthma: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Candelas-Fernández, Pablo; de-Diego-Cano, Beatriz; Mínguez-Calzada, Orcález; Del Corral, Tamara

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of manual therapy and therapeutic exercise protocol to inspiratory muscle training was more effective in improving maximum inspiratory pressure than inspiratory muscle training in isolation. This is a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. In total, 43 patients with asthma were included in this study. The patients were allocated into one of the two groups: (1) inspiratory muscle training ( n = 21; 20-minute session) or (2) inspiratory muscle training (20-minute session) combined with a program of manual therapy (15-minute session) and therapeutic exercise (15-minute session; n = 22). All participants received 12 sessions, two days/week, for six weeks and performed the domiciliary exercises protocol. The main measures such as maximum inspiratory pressure, spirometric measures, forward head posture, and thoracic kyphosis were recorded at baseline and after the treatment. For the per-protocol analysis, between-group differences at post-intervention were observed in maximum inspiratory pressure (19.77 cmH 2 O (11.49-28.04), P inspiratory muscle training combined with a manual therapy and therapeutic exercise program is more effective than its application in isolation for producing short-term maximum inspiratory pressure and forward head posture improvements in patients with asthma.

  11. An Analysis of a Novel, Short-Term Therapeutic Psychoeducational Program for Children and Adolescents with Chronic Neurological Illness and Their Parents; Feasibility and Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonglim Joo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this intervention was to develop a therapeutic psycho-educational program that improves quality of life in children and adolescents who are experiencing chronic neurological illness, including epilepsy, and their parents, and to analyze the intervention's feasibility and efficacy and participants' satisfaction. Participants were eight children (n = 8 and adolescents and their parents; participating children were experiencing chronic neurological illness with psychological comorbidity; children with intellectual impairment were excluded (IQ < 80. The program was carried out weekly for four sessions. In each of the 4 weeks, children's session content addressed self, emotion, coping skills, and finishing up, respectively; and parents' session content targeted family dynamic and emotional intervention, coping skills, childcare and education, and finishing up, respectively. Clinical psychologists administered psychological assessments (viz., Child Behavior Checklist, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Parenting Stress Index, Beck Depression Inventory, Children's Depression Inventory, and Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale at pre- and post-intervention, and administered satisfaction surveys following the intervention. Participants' opinions about the program's necessity, contents, and process, and participants' overall program satisfaction were analyzed. Parents and children reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. Externalizing behavioral problems, anxiety/depression, and emotional functioning from quality of life showed improvement after the intervention. Although not statistically significant, total child stress trended downward from pre- to post-intervention. A four-session structured therapeutic psycho-educational program for children and adolescents with chronic neurological illness and their parents was successfully implemented, showing good compliance and high satisfaction and efficacy.

  12. PP2AC Level Determines Differential Programming of p38-TSC-mTOR Signaling and Therapeutic Response to p38-Targeted Therapy in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjie Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The p38 MAP kinase is a promising cancer drug target but its therapeutic effect is not fully understood. Here we report that the response of colorectal cancer (CRC to p38 inhibitors (p38i is highly variable: while p38i induces regression of one subgroup of CRCs, it stimulates growth of another subgroup. We further show that PP2AC is differentially expressed in the two different CRC subgroups, which determines the programing of p38-TSC-mTORC1 signaling through differential TSC2 phosphorylation at S664, 1254 and 1798, and the antitumor activity by p38i. Remarkably, modulation of PP2AC level is sufficient to reprogram p38-to-mTORC1 signaling and antitumor response. PP2AC expression accurately predicts therapeutic response to p38i in several CRC models, including a large cohort of patient-derived xenografts (PDXs. Moreover, we demonstrate that combination of p38 and mTOR kinase inhibitors effectively overcomes resistance to either inhibitor in single agent therapy. These results demonstrate that alternative routing of signal transduction underlies differential response to p38 and mTOR targeted therapies. The biomarker-guided therapeutic strategies described herein provide a compelling reason for testing in metastatic CRC patients who suffer very poor prognosis due to lack of efficacious drug therapies.

  13. Urinary tract diseases revealed after DTP vaccination in infants and young children: cytokine irregularities and down-regulation of cytochrome P-450 enzymes induced by the vaccine may uncover latent diseases in genetically predisposed subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandota, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Prophylactic vaccinations may sometimes shorten the incubation period of some illnesses and/or convert a latent infection/inflammation into a clinically apparent disease. Cytokines play a major role in mediating the inflammatory process in various clinical entities and represent a potential source of tissue damage if their production is not sufficiently well controlled. It seems that irregularities in production of proinflammatory cytokines may be responsible for the abnormalities associated with full-blown clinical symptoms of various urinary tract diseases observed after DTP vaccination in 13 infants and young children hospitalized over the past 24 years. On admission, upper respiratory tract diseases, atopic dermatitis, and/or latent urinary tract infection/inflammation were found in these children. It is suggested that the whole-cell pertussis present in DTP vaccine, acting as an excessive stimulus in these patients, produced symptoms reminiscent of biologic responses to circulating proinflammatory monokines such as IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 because earlier it was reported that in vitro the whole-cell vaccine induced significantly more such cytokine production than did the acellular pertussis or diphtheria-tetanus-only vaccine. Analysis of the cellular immune disturbances previously reported in urinary tract infection/inflammation (increased serum and/or urinary IL-1alpha, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6 and IL-8), steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (increased IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and decreased or increased IL-4, depending on the cells studied), and atopic dermatitis (decreased IFN-gamma and increased IL-4 production), may suggest that similar subclinical chronic cytokine-mediated abnormalities produced in the course of latent diseases revealed in our patients, combined with those caused by DTP vaccination stimulus, were responsible for the pathomechanism of these clinical entities. This speculation is in agreement with the reports on the long

  14. Outpatient therapeutic feeding program outcomes and determinants in treatment of severe acute malnutrition in tigray, northern ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henock Gebremedhin Yebyo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outpatient Therapeutic feeding Program (OTP brings the services for management of Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM closer to the community by making services available at decentralized treatment points within the primary health care settings, through the use of ready-to-use therapeutic foods, community outreach and mobilization. Little is known about the program outcomes. This study revealed the levels of program outcome indictors and determinant factors to recovery rate. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 628 children who had been managed for SAM under OTP from April/2008 to January/2012. The children were selected using systematic random sampling from 12 health posts and 4 health centers. The study relied on information of demographic characteristics, anthropometries, Plumpy'Nut, medical problems and routine medications intakes. The results were estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log-rank test and Cox-regression. RESULTS: The recovery, defaulter, mortality and weight gain rates were 61.78%, 13.85%, 3.02% and 5.23 gm/kg/day, respectively. Routine medications were administered partially and children with medical problems were managed inappropriately under the program. As a child consumed one more sachet of Plumpy'Nut, the recovery rate from SAM increased by 4% (HR = 1.04, 95%-CI = 1.03, 1.05, P<0.001. The adjusted hazard ratios to recovery of children with diarrhea, appetite loss with Plumpy'Nut and failure to gain weight were 2.20 (HR = 2.20, 95%-CI = 1.31, 3.41, P = 0.001, 4.49 (HR = 1.74, 95%-CI = 1.07, 2.83, P = 0.046 and 3.88 (HR = 1.95, 95%-CI = 1.17, 3.23, P<0.001, respectively. Children who took amoxicillin and de-worming had 95% (HR = 1.95, 95%-CI = 1.17, 3.23 and 74% (HR = 1.74, 95%-CI = 1.07, 2.83 more probability to recover from SAM as compared to those who didn't take them. CONCLUSIONS: The OTP was partially successful. Management of

  15. Web-Based Treatment Program Using Intensive Therapeutic Contact for Patients With Eating Disorders: Before-After Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Huurne, E.D.; Postel, Marloes Gerda; de Haan, H.A.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Jong, C.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although eating disorders are common in the Netherlands, only a few patients are treated by mental health care professionals. To reach and treat more patients with eating disorders, Tactus Addiction Treatment developed a web-based treatment program with asynchronous and intensive

  16. Adolescents and eating disorders: an examination of a day treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancyger, I; Fornari, V; Schneider, M; Fisher, M; Frank, S; Goodman, B; Sison, C; Wisotsky, W

    2003-09-01

    In this study, we report on our day treatment program (DTP) for adolescents and young adults with eating disorders (EDs). Data for the 82 female patients in DTP were examined, compared across ED diagnosis and by age (adolescents vs. young adults). At admission, patients completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale- II (FACES-II). Forty-nine percent of patients successfully completed the day program and 13% required hospitalization following day treatment. Overall, there were no significant differences between the adolescents and adults at discharge of the day program. With shortened inpatient (IP) hospitalizations, DTPs can provide the long-term care required by many adolescent patients for psychological and physical recovery. This may be particularly important for the development of children and adolescents.

  17. The therapeutic CD38 monoclonal antibody daratumumab induces programmed cell death via fcg receptor-mediated cross-linking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overdijk, Marije B.; Jansen, J. H. Marco; Nederend, Maaike

    2016-01-01

    programmed cell death (PCD) of CD38+ multiple myeloma tumor cell lines when cross-linked in vitro by secondary Abs or via an FcgR. By comparing DARA efficacy in a syngeneic in vivo tumor model using FcRg-chain knockout or NOTAM mice carrying a signaling-inactive FcRg-chain, we found that the inhibitory Fcg......-treated patients and the drug's multifaceted mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc....

  18. Assessment of the influence of examination postures on postural stability by means of the DTP-3 diagnostic system [Hodnocení vlivu vyšetřovacích poloh na posturální stabilitu pomocí diagnostického systému DTP-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. C. Phiri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When examining spinal shape by means of radiographic methods, as well as non radiographic non invasive methods, standardisation of the examined person's posture is essential. OBJECTIVE: Standardizing examination posture serves to enable the mutual comparison of the results from examinations when performed using different methods. Furthermore, a suitable examination posture should reduce postural sway and thus increase the reliability of such an examination. METHODS: For the purpose of assessing the influence of fixation on reducing postural sway in a subject undergoing an examination, two examination postures with different degrees of fixation were proposed: posture D – a standing position with shoulders supported against a fixation frame and posture F – prone lying on a fixation bed. Those postures were compared with posture A – the free standing position. For the examination of spinal shape and postural stability, the DTP-3 microcomputer diagnostic system was used, which makes it possible to measure a three-dimensional position of points by applying a non invasive contact method. The examination consists of palpating and marking the skin projection of the left and right lateral parts of the acromion, bilateral posterior superior iliac spine, and the processus spinosi. The marked points are scanned by touching them with the position sensor stylus and transmitted into a computer, where they are displayed as output protocols in the form of tables and graphs. The experimental part included the measurement of 80 subjects (40 men and 40 women, aged 23.1 ± 2.5 years. Each subject was measured five times in each examination posture, and the average spinal curve was calculated, as well as the standard deviation, evaluating the postural sway of the examined subject. RESULTS: It results from the assessment of the effects of fixation on postural sway reduction, which increased fixation in examination postures A–D–F results to

  19. [Theoretic basis on the same therapeutic program for different degenerative brain diseases in terms of the Governor Vessel: Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junyan; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Junlong

    2015-05-01

    Through the consultation of TCM ancient classical theory, the relationship of kidney essence, marrow and brain is analyzed. It is discovered that the degenerative brain diseases, represented by Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) share the same etiological basis as "kidney essence deficiency and brain marrow emptiness" and have the mutual pathological outcomes as yang qi declining. The Governor Vessel gathers yang qi of the whole body and maintains the normal functional activity of zangfu organs in the human body through the storage, regulation and invigoration of yang qi. It is viewed that the theory of the Governor Vessel is applied to treat the different degenerative brain diseases, which provides the theoretic support and practice guide for the thought of TCM as the same therapeutic program for the different diseases. As a result, the degenerative brain diseases can be retarded and the approach is provided to the effective prevention and treatment of degenerative diseases in central nerve system:

  20. The Effect of Ursolic Acid on Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis Is Related to Programed Cell Death and Presents Therapeutic Potential in Experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Eduardo S; Campos, Bruno L S; Jesus, Jéssica A; Laurenti, Márcia D; Ribeiro, Susan P; Kallás, Esper G; Rafael-Fernandes, Mariana; Santos-Gomes, Gabriela; Silva, Marcelo S; Sessa, Deborah P; Lago, João H G; Levy, Débora; Passero, Luiz F D

    2015-01-01

    Among neglected tropical diseases, leishmaniasis is one of the most important ones, affecting more than 12 million people worldwide. The available treatments are not well tolerated, and present diverse side effects, justifying the search for new therapeutic compounds. In the present study, the activity of ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) were assayed in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis (in vitro and in vivo). Promastigote forms of L. amazonensis were incubated with OA and UA for 24h, and effective concentration 50% (EC50) was estimated. Ultraestructural alterations in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes after UA treatment were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, and the possible mode of action was assayed through Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, caspase 3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and transmembrane mitochondrial potential. The UA potential was evaluated in intracellular amastigotes, and its therapeutic potential was evaluated in L. amazonensis infected BALB/c mice. UA eliminated L. amazonensis promastigotes with an EC50 of 6.4 μg/mL, comparable with miltefosine, while OA presented only a marginal effect on promastigote forms at 100 μg/mL. The possible mechanism by which promastigotes were eliminated by UA was programmed cell death, independent of caspase 3/7, but it was highly dependent on mitochondria activity. UA was not toxic for peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice, and it was able to eliminate intracellular amastigotes, associated with nitric oxide (NO) production. OA did not eliminate amastigotes nor trigger NO. L. amazonensis infected BALB/c mice submitted to UA treatment presented lesser lesion size and parasitism compared to control. This study showed, for the first time, that UA eliminate promastigote forms through a mechanism associated with programed cell death, and importantly, was effective in vivo. Therefore, UA can be considered an interesting candidate for future tests as a prototype drug for the treatment

  1. The Effect of Ursolic Acid on Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis Is Related to Programed Cell Death and Presents Therapeutic Potential in Experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo S Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Among neglected tropical diseases, leishmaniasis is one of the most important ones, affecting more than 12 million people worldwide. The available treatments are not well tolerated, and present diverse side effects, justifying the search for new therapeutic compounds. In the present study, the activity of ursolic acid (UA and oleanolic acid (OA were assayed in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis (in vitro and in vivo. Promastigote forms of L. amazonensis were incubated with OA and UA for 24h, and effective concentration 50% (EC50 was estimated. Ultraestructural alterations in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes after UA treatment were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, and the possible mode of action was assayed through Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, caspase 3/7 activity, DNA fragmentation and transmembrane mitochondrial potential. The UA potential was evaluated in intracellular amastigotes, and its therapeutic potential was evaluated in L. amazonensis infected BALB/c mice. UA eliminated L. amazonensis promastigotes with an EC50 of 6.4 μg/mL, comparable with miltefosine, while OA presented only a marginal effect on promastigote forms at 100 μg/mL. The possible mechanism by which promastigotes were eliminated by UA was programmed cell death, independent of caspase 3/7, but it was highly dependent on mitochondria activity. UA was not toxic for peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice, and it was able to eliminate intracellular amastigotes, associated with nitric oxide (NO production. OA did not eliminate amastigotes nor trigger NO. L. amazonensis infected BALB/c mice submitted to UA treatment presented lesser lesion size and parasitism compared to control. This study showed, for the first time, that UA eliminate promastigote forms through a mechanism associated with programed cell death, and importantly, was effective in vivo. Therefore, UA can be considered an interesting candidate for future tests as a prototype drug for

  2. Therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Hong, Young Don; Lee, So Young

    2006-01-01

    Since the development of sophisticated molecular carriers such as octereotides for peptide receptor targeting and monoclonal antibodies against various associated with specific tumor types, radionuclide therapy (RNT) employing open sources of therapeutic agents is promising modality for treatment of tumors. Furthermore, the emerging of new therapeutic regimes and new approaches for tumor treatment using radionuclide are anticipated in near future. In targeted radiotherapy using peptides and other receptor based carrier molecules, the use of radionuclide with high specific activity in formulating the radiopharmaceutical is essential in order to deliver sufficient number of radionuclides to the target site without saturating the target. In order to develop effective radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic applications, it is crucial to carefully consider the choice of appropriate radionuclides as well as the carrier moiety with suitable pharmacokinetic properties that could result in good in vivo localization and desired excretion. Up to date, only a limited number of radionuclides have been applied in radiopharmaceutical development due to the constraints in compliance with their physical half-life, decay characteristics, cost and availability in therapeutic applications. In this review article, we intend to provide with the improved understanding of the factors of importance of appropriate radionuclide for therapy with respect to their physical properties and therapeutic applications

  3. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  4. Therapeutic Gardening

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Phyllis; Fox, Laurie; Parkhurst, James A. (James Albert)

    2013-01-01

    Gardening can be therapeutic for anyone and has been used as therapy for those with physical, emotional and social disabilities, for children, and for those who are elderly. Through careful adaptations to the garden, the gardener and the plants, almost anyone can benefit from the activity of gardening

  5. Children and Caregivers' Exposure to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES): Association with Children's and Caregivers' Psychological Outcomes in a Therapeutic Preschool Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Yair; Sofri, Inbar; Capps Umphlet, Kristen L; Olarte, Stephanie; Venza, Jimmy

    2018-03-31

    Exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACE) has been found to have a profound negative impact on multiple child outcomes, including academic achievement, social cognition patterns, and behavioral adjustment. However, these links have yet to be examined in preschool children that are already experiencing behavior or social-emotional problems. Thus, the present study examined the links between the caregiver's and the child's exposure to ACE and multiple child and caregiver's outcomes in a sample of 30 preschool children enrolled in a Therapeutic Nursery Program (TNP). Children are typically referred to this TNP due to significant delays in their social emotional development that often result in difficulty functioning in typical childcare, home, and community settings. Analyses revealed some contradictory patterns that may be specific to this clinical sample. Children with higher exposure to ACE showed more biased social information processing patterns and their caregivers reported lower child social skills than caregivers of children with less exposure, however their inhibitory control levels were higher (better control) and staff reported that these children exhibited better social skills as well as better approaches to learning than children with less exposure. No such contradictions were found in relation to the caregiver's exposure to ACE, as it was positively associated with a number of negative child and caregiver outcomes.

  6. Children and Caregivers’ Exposure to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES: Association with Children’s and Caregivers’ Psychological Outcomes in a Therapeutic Preschool Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Ziv

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACE has been found to have a profound negative impact on multiple child outcomes, including academic achievement, social cognition patterns, and behavioral adjustment. However, these links have yet to be examined in preschool children that are already experiencing behavior or social-emotional problems. Thus, the present study examined the links between the caregiver’s and the child’s exposure to ACE and multiple child and caregiver’s outcomes in a sample of 30 preschool children enrolled in a Therapeutic Nursery Program (TNP. Children are typically referred to this TNP due to significant delays in their social emotional development that often result in difficulty functioning in typical childcare, home, and community settings. Analyses revealed some contradictory patterns that may be specific to this clinical sample. Children with higher exposure to ACE showed more biased social information processing patterns and their caregivers reported lower child social skills than caregivers of children with less exposure, however their inhibitory control levels were higher (better control and staff reported that these children exhibited better social skills as well as better approaches to learning than children with less exposure. No such contradictions were found in relation to the caregiver’s exposure to ACE, as it was positively associated with a number of negative child and caregiver outcomes.

  7. Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program regimens with and without directly observed treatment, short-course: A comparative study of therapeutic cure rate and adverse reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rengaraj Sivaraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the therapeutic cure rate and adverse reactions in the regimens of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP with directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS and without DOTS. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients in the DOTS regimen and 50 patients in the non-DOTS regimen were enrolled in the study. All the participants were asked to come regularly for 3 consecutive days for sputum collection, and the sputum samples were examined for acid-fast bacilli. If tuberculosis (TB was confirmed, the disease status was confirmed through a chest X-ray (PA view. The participants were monitored for adverse events arising from the use of anti-TB drugs for the next 6 months. Results: The TB cure rates for RNTCP with DOTS and RNTCP with non-DOTS were 80% and 66%, respectively. The DOTS therapy had a better cure rate for radiologically positive, sputum-positive cases compared with the non-DOTS regimen group. The non-DOTS treatment regimen had significantly increased numbers of adverse events in the hepatic and hematinic systems. Conclusion: The DOTS regimen has higher cure rates and a lower incidence of adverse reactions compared with the non-DOTS regimen.

  8. Therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  9. Influence of Population Demography and Immunization History on the Impact of an Antenatal Pertussis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Patricia Therese; McVernon, Jodie; McIntyre, Peter; Geard, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Antenatal pertussis vaccination is being considered as a means to reduce the burden of infant pertussis in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), but its likely impact in such settings is yet to be quantified. Methods. An individual-based model was used to simulate the demographic structure and dynamics of a population with characteristics similar to those of LMICs. Transmission of pertussis within this population was simulated to capture the incidence of infection in (1) the absence of vaccination; (2) with a primary course only (three doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines [DTP3] commencing in 1985, 1995, or 2005 at 20%, 50%, or 80% coverage); and (3) with the addition of an antenatal pertussis program. Results. Modeled annual incidence averaged over the period 2015–2024 reduced with increasing DTP3 coverage, regardless of the year childhood vaccination commenced. Over the same period, the proportion of infants born with passive protection did not change substantially compared with the prevaccination situation, regardless of DTP3 coverage and start year. We found minimal impact of antenatal vaccination on infection in all infants when mothers were eligible for a single antenatal dose. When mothers were eligible for multiple antenatal doses, incidence in infants aged 0–2 months was reduced by around 30%. This result did not hold for the full 0- to 1-year age group, for whom antenatal vaccination did not reduce infection levels. Conclusions. While antenatal vaccination could potentially reduce infant mortality in LMICs, broader gains at the population level are likely to be achieved by focusing efforts on increasing DTP3 coverage. PMID:27838675

  10. Infant vaccination timing: Beyond traditional coverage metrics for maximizing impact of vaccine programs, an example from southern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michelle M; Katz, Joanne; Englund, Janet A; Khatry, Subarna K; Shrestha, Laxman; LeClerq, Steven C; Steinhoff, Mark; Tielsch, James M

    2016-02-10

    Immunization programs currently measure coverage by assessing the proportion of children 12-24 months who have been immunized but this does not address the important question of when the scheduled vaccines were administered. Data capturing the timing of vaccination in first 6 months, when severe disease is most likely to occur, are limited. To estimate the time to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) (recommended at birth), diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-H, influenza b-hepatitis B (DTP-Hib-HepB), and oral polio vaccine (OPV) (recommended at 6, 10, and 14 weeks) vaccinations and risk factors for vaccination delay in infants vaccination were visited weekly at home from birth through age 6 months to ascertain if any vaccinations had been given in the prior week. Infant, maternal, and household characteristics were recorded. BCG, DTP-Hib-HepB, and OPV vaccination coverage at 4 and 6 months was estimated. Time to vaccination was estimated through Kaplan-Meier curves; Cox-proportional hazards models were used to examine risk factors for delay for the first vaccine. The median age of BCG, first OPV and DTP-Hib-HepB receipt was 22, 21, and 18 weeks, respectively. Almost half of infants received no BCG by age 6 months. Only 8% and 7% of infants had received three doses of OPV and DTP-Hib-HepB, respectively, by age 6 months. A significant delay in receipt of infant vaccines was found in a prospective, population-based, cohort in southern Nepal despite traditional coverage metrics being high. Immunization programs should consider measuring time to receipt relative to the official schedule in order to maximize benefits for disease control and child health. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical applications of therapeutic phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim KH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kyung Hee Kim,1 Ki Young Oh,2 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, South Korea Abstract: Phlebotomy is the removal of blood from the body, and therapeutic phlebotomy is the preferred treatment for blood disorders in which the removal of red blood cells or serum iron is the most efficient method for managing the symptoms and complications. Therapeutic phlebotomy is currently indicated for the treatment of hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with hyperferritinemia. This review discusses therapeutic phlebotomy and the related disorders and also offers guidelines for establishing a therapeutic phlebotomy program. Keywords: therapeutic phlebotomy, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

  12. Therapeutic misadventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, N J

    2010-10-01

    Therapeutic misadventure can be defined as an injury or an adverse event caused by medical management rather than by an underlying disease. Within the National Health Service there were over 86,000 reported adverse incidents in 2007. In the USA medication errors have been rated as the fourth highest cause of death. Unfortunately one of the greatest contributors to iatrogenic injury is human error. The potential types of misadventure are infinite. Medication errors are a major part of this, being responsible for over 70% of cases that cause serious harm. However, many medication errors caused by slips, lapses, technical errors and mistakes are preventable; intentional violations of safe operating procedures are not. While medication errors were tolerated by society in the past, the readiness to institute criminal proceedings against health-care professionals has increased greatly in the UK over the last decade. The medication process consists of writing prescriptions, dispensing the product, administering it and monitoring its effects. Prescription errors arise owing to incomplete information, lack of appropriate labelling, environmental factors and human blunders. Even with a perfect prescription the right medication must be dispensed and appropriately labelled. Dispensing errors are not uncommon and may be compounded by non-clinical considerations. Administration of a drug by injection is one of the most dangerous aspects of the medication process, especially in inexperienced hands. The final component of medication supply is monitoring the effect of the medication. With short courses of medication such monitoring is easy, but with long-term medication, particularly with potent drugs where the margin between efficacy and toxicity is small, active procedures may be required to ensure toxicity does not ensue. Despite the endeavour of health-care professions to stick to the rule of 'first, do no harm', in reality this is difficult to achieve all of the time. When

  13. A Cognitive- Behavioral Therapeutic Program for Patients with Obesity and Binge Eating Disorder: Short- and Long- Term Follow-Up Data of a Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, Johan; Adriaensen, An; Vancampfort, Davy; Pieters, Guido; Probst, Michel; Vansteelandt, Kristof

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the efficacy of a manualized cognitive-behavioral therapeutic (CBT) approach for patients with obesity and binge eating disorder (BED) on the short and longer term. A prospective study without a control group consisting of three measurements (a baseline measurement and two follow-up assessments up to 5…

  14. Low-cost, ready-to-use therapeutic foods can be designed using locally available commodities with the aid of linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibari, Filippo; Diop, El Hadji I; Collins, Steven; Seal, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    According to the United Nations (UN), 25 million children commodities (soy, sorghum, maize, oil, and sugar), respectively. The LP constraints were based on current UN recommendations for the macronutrient content of therapeutic food and included palatability, texture, and maximum food ingredient weight criteria. Nonlinear constraints for nutrient ratios were converted to linear equations to allow their use in LP. The formulation was considered accurate if laboratory results confirmed an energy density difference commodities that are cheaper, regionally available, and meet local cultural preferences. However, as with all prototype feeding products for medical use, composition analysis, safety, acceptability, and clinical effectiveness trials must be conducted to validate the formulation.

  15. Effectiveness of a web-based treatment program using intensive therapeutic support for female patients with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and eating disorders not otherwise specified: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Huurne, Elke D; Postel, Marloes G; de Haan, Hein A; DeJong, Cor A J

    2013-11-16

    Disordered eating behavior and body dissatisfaction affect a large proportion of the Dutch population and account for severe psychological, physical and social morbidity. Yet, the threshold for seeking professional care is still high. In the Netherlands, only 7.5% of patients with bulimia nervosa and 33% of patients with anorexia nervosa are treated within the mental health care system. Easily accessible and low-threshold interventions, therefore, are needed urgently. The internet has great potential to offer such interventions. The aim of this study is to determine whether a web-based treatment program for patients with eating disorders can improve eating disorder psychopathology among female patients with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and eating disorders not otherwise specified. This randomized controlled trial will compare the outcomes of an experimental treatment group to a waiting list control group. In the web-based treatment program, participants will communicate personally and asynchronously with their therapists exclusively via the internet. The first part of the program will focus on analyzing eating attitudes and behaviors. In the second part of the program participants will learn how to change their attitudes and behaviors. Participants assigned to the waiting list control group will receive no-reply email messages once every two weeks during the waiting period of 15 weeks, after which they can start the program. The primary outcome measure is an improvement in eating disorder psychopathology as determined by the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include improvements in body image, physical and mental health, body weight, self-esteem, quality of life, and social contacts. In addition, the participants' motivation for treatment and their acceptability of the program and the therapeutic alliance will be measured. The study will follow the recommendations in the CONSORT statement relating to designing and reporting on

  16. Implementing a Family Centered Program for Physically Impaired/Developmentally Delayed Preschool Children To Bridge the Therapeutic Gap between School and Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Karen P.

    This practicum addresses the problem of limited interaction between physical therapists and families of developmentally delayed/physically impaired preschool-age children. A program was developed in which the physical therapist was videotaped handling and exercising a child, while explaining the purpose of the movements and instructing the parent…

  17. Treatment of the Aged Patients at a Large Cardiac Rehabilitation Center in the Southern Brazil and Some Aspects of Their Dropout from the Therapeutic Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Felice Tomazini Nesello

    2016-11-01

    CONCLUSION: The Non-Old and the Middle-Old patients showed higher dropout rates compared to Young-Old. To ensure the best possible rehabilitation and to improve patients´ participation in CR, these programs should be adjusted to the needs of patients in terms of their age.

  18. [Therapeutic benefit of a registered psychoeducation program on treatment adherence, objective and subjective quality of life: French pilot study for schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvanaud, F; Kebir, O; Vlasie, M; Doste, V; Amado, I; Krebs, M-O

    2017-05-01

    In schizophrenic disorders, supportive psychosocial therapies have been used as adjuncts to pharmacotherapy to help alleviate residual symptoms and to improve social functioning and quality of life. Among these therapies, psychoeducational therapies showed a significant efficacy on improving drug adherence and on reducing relapses. However, according to the French Health Agency, fewer than 10% of psychiatric structures in France offer registered psychoeducation programs. Caregiver apprehension of patients' depressive reactions to the awareness of the disease could underlie the underuse of psychoeducation therapies. Indeed, the psychoeducation programs' impact on objective and subjective quality of life is discussed among the literature. In this context, we conducted a retrospective, monocentric, open-labelled and non-controlled pilot study to measure the impact of a registered psychoeducation program on objective and subjective quality of life of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Secondary objectives included measures of the effects on drug observance and awareness of the disease. We included stabilized patients over the age of eighteen suffering from schizophrenia. Referent psychiatrics were asked to inform the patient of the diagnosis and to prescribe psychoeducation therapy. From 2011 to 2014, we offered three ambulatory programs, each program including fifteen two-hour group sessions. The groups were opened for three to six patients and managed by two caregivers. Themes discussed during the sessions included: schizophrenic disease, treatments, relationships to family, diet, social issues, toxics, relaxation. Objective and subjective quality of life were evaluated one month before and one month after the program using respectively the global assessment functioning (GAF) and the subjective quality of life (SQoL) scales. The Medical Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) and the French IQ8 scale evaluated respectively drug adherence and awareness of the disease. All

  19. Eficiencia en la prescripción de medicamentos: impacto de un programa de intercambio terapéutico The efficiency of drug prescription: impact of a therapeutic exchange program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Rosich

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar el impacto de un programa de intercambio terapéutico a omeprazol de los inhibidores de la bomba de protones (IBP. Método: Ensayo comunitario que compara el impacto de un programa de intercambio terapéutico en los equipos de atención primaria de una comarca respecto a la no aplicación en una comarca control. Se incluyó a los pacientes con prescripción de un IBP entre mayo de 2008 y junio de 2009. La intervención consistió en sesiones educativas y facilitar a cada médico (n=68 los pacientes con un IBP que pudiera cambiarse a omeprazol. Se obtuvo información de la historia clínica (IBP prescrito, equipo de atención primaria y de la aplicación de farmacia (coste de la dosis diaria definida de los IBP. A partir del riesgo relativo (RR se comparó el porcentaje de intercambio terapéutico en cada comarca antes y después de la intervención. También se calculó el porcentaje de omeprazol al final de cada periodo de estudio y los cambios en los costes en IBP. Resultados: Hubo más intercambios terapéuticos en el grupo de intervención (RR: 4,2; intervalo de confianza del 95% [IC95%]:3,1-5,8 respecto al control (RR: 1,8; IC95%:1,2-2,6. En el grupo de intervención, el porcentaje de pacientes con omeprazol pasó del 86,2% al 89,3%, y en el control del 84,3% al 84,7%. El coste del grupo IBP disminuyó un 7,6% en el grupo de intervención y aumentó un 2,0% en el control. Conclusiones: El programa de intercambio terapéutico se ha mostrado efectivo. Se trata de una intervención sencilla, capaz de modificar las prescripciones y reducir sus costes.Objective: To assess the impact of substituting proton pump inhibitors (PPI for omeprazole. Method: We performed a community trial of the impact of a therapeutic exchange program in the primary care teams of a region compared with non-implementation in a control region. The study included patients prescribed a PPI between May 2008 and June 2009. The intervention consisted of

  20. Beneficio a largo plazo del Programa Terapéutico de la Nefropatía Diabética Long-term benefit of the Therapeutic Program of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Bustillo Solano

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Se aplicó el programa terapéutico de la nefropatía diabética a 2 grupos diferentes de pacientes diabéticos tipo 1 (grupo A: 1990-1999, grupo B: 1995-1999, ambos en etapas proteinúricas. Se comprobó que una década después de haber comenzado el programa terapéutico, a un subgrupo de pacientes del grupo A (etapa proteinúrica tardía se les retrasó su evolución hacia la insuficiencia renal crónica terminal. La mortalidad acumulativa de estos pacientes fue del 44,7 % (LC. 95 %: 28,9 - 60,5. Se halló como su principal causa de muerte, la uremia. En los 5 primeros años de tratamiento, exponer a los pacientes diabéticos al programa terapéutico en la etapa proteinúrica tardía, representó un riesgo relativo de insuficiencia renal crónica terminal y/o tratamiento sustitutivo renal de: 5,3 % (LC-95 %: 1,23-22,8 y un mayor riesgo de muerte (RR:2,6 (LC-95 %: 1,01-6,7 con respecto a los pacientes no expuestos (grupo B. Se concluyó que el programa terapéutico ha favorecido a un mejoramiento de la supervivencia y calidad de la vida a un subgrupo de pacientes diabéticos tipo 1 con nefropatía diabética clínica.A therapeutic program of diabetic nephropathy was applied to 2 different groups of type I diabetic patients (group A: 1990-1999, group B: 1995-1999, both in proteinuric stages. It was proved that a decade after the beginning of the therapeutic program, a subgroup of patients from group A (late proteinuric stage delayed their evolution towards end-stage chronic kidney failure. The accumulative mortality of these patients was 44.7 % LC-95 %: 28.9-60.5 %. Uremia was considered as the main cause of death. Applying the threapeutic program to diabetic patients in the late proteinuric stage, during the first 5 years of treatment, represented a relative risk for end-stage chronic kidney failure and/or kidney substitutive treatment of 5.3 (LC-95 %: 1.23-22.8 and a higher death risk (RR:2.6 LC-95 %: 1.01-6.7 compared with those patients

  1. Programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, this model is elaborated to produce the required program outputs; third, the resulting program is transformed to run efficiently in the execution environment. The first two stages deal in network structures of sequential processes; only the third is concerned with procedure hierarchies. (orig.)

  2. Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, M A

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, this model is elaborated to produce the required program outputs; third, the resulting program is transformed to run efficiently in the execution environment. The first two stages deal in network structures of sequential processes; only the third is concerned with procedure hierarchies.

  3. Changes in Expanded Program for Immunization coverage for mother and child in Krakor, Cambodia 1996--1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, B; Lower, T; James, R; Rouse, I

    2001-07-01

    We evaluated a training intervention aimed at enhancing the roles of health centre staff, Village Health Volunteers (VHVs) and Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) within the Expanded Program for Immunization (EPI) in the district of Krakor, Cambodia. We conducted population-based surveys to determine the coverage of the EPI at baseline (1996) and after the intervention (1998), using data from health cards for mothers and their children and history data. Statistically significant changes over the 2-year period were apparent for tetanus, BCG, polio and DTP, supporting the positive impact the training intervention had on immunization coverage in the district.

  4. An experimental therapeutics test of whether adding dissonance-induction activities improves the effectiveness of a selective obesity and eating disorder prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, E; Rohde, P; Shaw, H; Gau, J M

    2018-03-01

    Compare the Healthy Weight obesity and eating disorder prevention program, which promotes participant-driven gradual lifestyle changes to bring energy intake and expenditure into balance, to a new intervention, Project Health, which adds activities to create cognitive dissonance about unhealthy eating, a sedentary lifestyle, and excess body fat, and an obesity education video-control condition. College students at risk for both outcomes because of weight concerns (N=364, 72% female) were randomized to condition, completing pretest, posttest, and 6, 12 and 24-month follow-up assessments. Project Health participants showed significantly smaller increases in measured body mass index (BMI) through 2-year follow-up than both Healthy Weight participants and controls (both d=-0.18), and significantly lower onset of overweight/obesity over 2-year follow-up than Healthy Weight participants and controls (13 vs 21% and 22%). Healthy Weight and Project Health participants showed significantly greater eating disorder symptom reductions than controls through 2-year follow-up. Healthy Weight and Project Health participants showed marginally lower eating disorder onset over follow-up than controls (3 and 3% vs 8% respectively). The reduced increases in BMI and future overweight/obesity onset for Project Health relative to both an active matched intervention and a minimal intervention control condition are noteworthy, especially given the short 6-h intervention duration. The reduction in eating disorder symptoms for Healthy Weight and Project Health relative to controls was also encouraging. Results suggest that adding dissonance-induction activities increased weight loss effects. Yet, effects for both were generally small and the eating disorder onset prevention effects were only marginal, potentially because intervention groups included both sexes, which reduced eating disorder incidence and sensitivity.

  5. Effects of therapeutic goal management (TGM) on treatment attendance and drug abstinence among men with co-occurring substance use and axis I mental disorders who are homeless: results of the Birmingham EARTH program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Anna; Jensen, Michael; Burgess, Emilee; Stevens, Angee; Hayes, Lauren; Sieweke, Susan; Stough, Karen; Wright, Anne; McCarty, Robin; Eddleman, Lillian; Kim, Young-Il; Milby, Jesse B; Schumacher, Joseph E

    2013-10-27

    This study describes the implementation and impact of Therapeutic Goal Management (TGM) in a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)-sponsored demonstration project entitled Enhanced Addiction Recovery through Housing (EARTH). The sample included 28 male participants followed at six months who completed some treatment. Forty-three percent were Caucasian, and 57% were African American. The average age of participants was 42 years. The relationships between TGM goal achievement, treatment attendance, and drug abstinence outcomes were studied among EARTH program participants who were homeless and met criteria for co-occurring substance use and severe DSM-IV Axis I mental disorders. The results revealed an overall drug abstinence rate of 72.4% over six months and significant positive relationships between TGM goal achievement and drug abstinence (r=0.693) and TGM goal achievement and treatment attendance (r=0.843). This research demonstrated the relationship and potential positive impact of systematically setting, monitoring, and reinforcing personalized goals in multiple life areas on drug abstinence and treatment attendance outcomes among persons who are homeless with co-occurring substance use and other Axis I disorders in a integrated community service delivery program.

  6. Systematic in-vitro evaluation of the NCI/NIH Developmental Therapeutics Program Approved Oncology Drug Set for the identification of a candidate drug repertoire for MLL-rearranged leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeksema KA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Kimberley A Hoeksema1, Aarthi Jayanthan1, Todd Cooper2, Lia Gore3, Tanya Trippett4, Jessica Boklan6, Robert J Arceci5, Aru Narendran11Division of Pediatric Oncology, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Children's Hospital, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 4Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 5Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 6Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: Despite significant progress made in the overall cure rate, the prognosis for relapsed and refractory malignancies in children remains extremely poor. Hence, there is an urgent need for studies that enable the timely selection of appropriate agents for Phase I clinical studies. The Pediatric Oncology Experimental Therapeutics Investigators' Consortium (POETIC is systematically evaluating libraries of known and novel compounds for activity against subsets of high-risk pediatric malignancies with defined molecular aberrations for future clinical development. In this report, we describe the in-vitro activity of a diverse panel of approved oncology drugs against MLL-rearranged pediatric leukemia cell lines. Agents in the Approved Oncology Drug Set II (National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health Developmental Therapeutics Program were evaluated by in-vitro cytotoxicity assays in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia cell lines with MLL gene rearrangements. Validation studies were carried out with patient leukemia cells in culture. Comparative analysis for toxicity against nonmalignant cells was evaluated in normal bone marrow stromal cells and normal human lymphocytes. Results from this study show that 42 of the 89 agents tested have

  7. Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0387 TITLE: Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mikhail Papisov, PhD...SUBTITLE Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0387 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...for neoplastic meningitis ( meningeal metastasis of breast cancer). The proposed therapy will be based on direct (intrathecal) administration of

  8. Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    A narrow therapeutic window. □ Good correlation between drug ... Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an additional monitoring tool to assist in the management of HIV-infected patients. Antiretroviral TDM is ... Antiretroviral TDM could play an important adjunctive role in our area. Clearly this will be a limited ...

  9. A Study of Ethics Education within Therapeutic Recreation Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbett, Nancy; Brown-Welty, Sharon; O'Keefe, Cathy

    2002-01-01

    Explored the status of ethics education within therapeutic recreation. Researchers surveyed all entry-level undergraduate and graduate therapeutic recreation training programs in one state, examining responses for differences in content and delivery. Programs appeared consistent with regard to ethics instruction, integrating similar content…

  10. Vesicant Therapeutics Collaborative Core Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202- 4302. Respondents...labeled nanoparticles by this administration route . There were plentiful nanoparticles found at or near the site of injection. We are trouble-shooting...enhancement properties of three grades of hyaluronic acid using porcine buccal and vaginal tissue, Caco-2 cell lines, and rat jejunum. The Journal of

  11. Exubera. Inhale therapeutic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Sanjit; Cefalu, William T

    2002-05-01

    Inhale, in colaboration with Pfizer and Aventis Pharma (formerly Hoechst Marion Roussel; HMR), is developing an insulin formulation utilizing its pulmonary delivery technology for macromolecules for the potential treatment of type I and II diabetes. By July 2001, the phase III program had been completed and the companies had begun to assemble data for MAA and NDA filings; however, it was already clear at this time that additional data might be required for filing. By December 2001, it had been decided that the NDA should include an increased level of controlled, long-term pulmonary safety data in diabetic patients and a major study was planned to be completed in 2002, with the NDA filed thereafter (during 2002). US-05997848 was issued to Inhale Therapeutic Systems in December 1999, and corresponds to WO-09524183, filed in February 1995. Equivalent applications have appeared to date in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Europe, Finland, Hungary, Japan, Norway, New Zealand, Poland and South Africa. This family of applications is specific to pulmonary delivery of insulin. In February 1999, Lehman Brothers gave this inhaled insulin a 60% probability of reaching market, with a possible launch date of 2001. The analysts estimated peak sales at $3 billion in 2011. In May 2000, Aventis predicted that estimated peak sales would be in excess of $1 billion. In February 2000, Merrill Lynch expected product launch in 2002 and predicted that it would be a multibillion-dollar product. Analysts Merril Lynch predicted, in September and November 2000, that the product would be launched by 2002, with sales in that year of e75 million, rising to euro 500 million in 2004. In April 2001, Merrill Lynch predicted that filing for this drug would occur in 2001. Following the report of the potential delay in regulatory filing, issued in July 2001, Deutsche Banc Alex Brown predicted a filing would take place in the fourth quarter of 2002 and launch would take place in the first

  12. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...... garnered a great deal of interest due to the substantial room for improvement inherent to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Chemotherapeutic agents and antiviral agents have a lot of features in common due to both of them typically targeting endogenous targets, unlike antibacterial compounds, though...... the examples of polymer therapeutics being applied as an antiviral treatment are few and far in-between. This work aims to explore antiviral therapeutics, specifically in context of hepatitis virus C (HCV) and HIV. The current treatment of hepatitis C consists of a combination of drugs, of which ribavirin...

  13. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  14. Therapeutic neutrality reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, R H

    1982-06-01

    This paper suggests that therapists' tendency to ignore the impact of their own religious beliefs on their patients constitutes an area of potential abuse of psychotherapy. The author reviews the religious stance of the founders of psychotherapy, as well as recent criticisms of the therapeutic process, and proposes steps to safeguard against the inadvertent fostering of therapists' religious views on the patient.

  15. Can a Compact Pre-Filled Auto-Disable Injection System (cPAD) Save Costs for DTP-HepB-Hib Vaccine as Compared with Single-Dose (SDV) and Multi-Dose Vials (MDV)? Evidence from Cambodia, Ghana, and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogier, Cyril; Hanlon, Patrick; Wiedenmayer, Karin; Maire, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    A compact pre-filled auto-disable injection (cPAD) presentation is being developed for the fully liquid pentavalent DTP-HepB-Hib vaccine. A cost analysis (CA) to compare this presentation with the presently used single-dose vial (SDV) and multi-dose vial (MDV) was conducted in Cambodia, Ghana, and Peru. The CA included the development of an excel-based costing model and considered the costs of vaccine, safe injection equipment, procurement, storage, transport and distribution, vaccine administration by health staff, medical waste management, start-up activities, as well as coverage, birth cohort, vaccine, and safe injection equipment wastage rates. The outcome was the change in cost per pentavalent fully immunized child (PFIC) for a switch to cPAD. Field visits to health facilities, and interviews with key informants from immunization services and regulatory authorities, were conducted to collect data and to test the costing model in country context. Cost data were also obtained from manufacturers, published price lists, and author estimates. A sensitivity analysis (SA) was conducted to explore possible variations in values of data collected. Based on vaccine price trends estimated for 2016, cPAD is less costly in Ghana [incremental cost per PFIC: $US-0.59 (-6.46 %)] than the current presentation (ten-dose MDV) and in Peru (SDV): $US-0.89 (-7.14 %). In Cambodia, cPAD is more costly than SDV: $US+0.33 (+3.90 %). The most significant cost item per PFIC is the vaccine (reflecting wastage rates) in all presentations. The dominance of the vaccine price per dose and, to a lesser extent, the wastage rates in the incremental cost per PFIC show potential to simplify future analyses. Other relevant considerations at country level for a change of presentation include the potential for improved safety with cPAD, planned introduction of other vaccines, environmental and safety issues, and financial sustainability.

  16. Therapeutic kitchens for residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, J P; Meehan, R A; Calkins, M P

    2001-01-01

    Long-term care facilities are increasingly incorporating some sort of kitchen, often referred to as a therapeutic kitchen, for resident, staff, and family use through remodeling efforts or new construction. A study, consisting of five site visits and a questionnaire mailed to 631 facilities providing dementia care, was conducted to identify physical features that are typically included in therapeutic kitchen design and to explore how these features support daily use in relation to activities programming and food service systems. Findings indicate that universal design features should be incorporated to a greater extent and certain features are more common, reinforce homelike imagery, or enhance safety. Results also suggest that a higher number of residents participate in more recreational activities, such as baking, than they do in household chores, such as meal set-up, and therapeutic kitchens are not always linked to food service systems.

  17. Evaluación de los programas de vacunación mediante estudios serológicos y vacunas distribuidas Evaluation of vaccination programs through serological studies and distributed vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Plans

    2005-12-01

    centers; b reported vaccination history, and c serological analysis of antibodies. Methods: Vaccination coverage was calculated on the basis of vaccination history collected by questionnaire, and by serological analysis of antibodies against measles for the MMR vaccine and against tetanus for the DTP vaccine in a representative sample of schoolchildren in 2001. The vaccination coverage from vaccination registries was obtained by dividing the number of individuals who could have completed their vaccinations by the target population. The concordance between the vaccination history and serological analysis was evaluated using the kappa test. Results: The vaccination coverage obtained by questionnaire in schoolchildren aged 6-8 and 9-11 years was 85.5 and 87.6% for the DTP vaccine, 89.9 and 89.6% for the MMR vaccine, and 90.4 and 89.4% for the poliomyelitis vaccine, respectively, while the vaccination coverage obtained by serological analysis was 100 and 99.6% for the DTP vaccine and 85.5 and 93.3% for the MMR vaccine, respectively. The vaccination coverages obtained from distributed vaccines were significantly higher: 93.5 and 100% for the DTP vaccine, 96.3 and 98.8% for the MMR vaccine and 100% for the poliomyelitis vaccine. A low concordance was obtained between the vaccination history and serological analysis of antibodies (κ < 0.2. Conclusion: Planning and evaluation of vaccination programs should be based on vaccination coverages obtained from serological analysis of antibodies in representative samples of schoolchildren.

  18. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis y Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Therapeutic approaches to cellulite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jeremy B; Cohen, Joel L; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Kaminer, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Cellulite is a condition that affects the vast majority of women. Although it is of no danger to one's overall health, cellulite can be psychosocially debilitating. Consequently, much research has been devoted to understanding cellulite and its etiopathogenesis. With additional insights into the underlying causes of its clinical presentation, therapeutic modalities have been developed that offer hope to cellulite sufferers. This review examines evidence for topical treatments, noninvasive energy-based devices, and recently developed minimally invasive interventions that may finally provide a solution. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  20. Revitalizing Psychiatric Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Despite high prevalence and enormous unmet medical need, the pharmaceutical industry has recently de-emphasized neuropsychiatric disorders as ‘too difficult' a challenge to warrant major investment. Here I describe major obstacles to drug discovery and development including a lack of new molecular targets, shortcomings of current animal models, and the lack of biomarkers for clinical trials. My major focus, however, is on new technologies and scientific approaches to neuropsychiatric disorders that give promise for revitalizing therapeutics and may thus answer industry's concerns. PMID:24317307

  1. Rethinking Therapeutic Misconception in Biobanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tupasela, Aaro; Snell, Karoliina; Cañada, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Some authors have noted that in biobank research participants may be guided by what is called therapeutic misconception, whereby participants attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures.This article argues that the notion of therapeutic misconception is increasingly less justified when ev...

  2. Mechanisms of Plasma Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2015-09-01

    In this talk, I address research directed towards biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasma such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy. The field has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that plasmas readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. It is postulated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) can trigger a therapeutic shielding response in tissue in part by creating a time- and space-localized, burst-like form of oxy-nitrosative stress on near-surface exposed cells through the flux of plasma-generated RONS. RONS-exposed surface layers of cells communicate to the deeper levels of tissue via a form of the ``bystander effect,'' similar to responses to other forms of cell stress. In this proposed model of CAP therapeutics, the plasma stimulates a cellular survival mechanism through which aerobic organisms shield themselves from infection and other challenges.

  3. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Richard P. (ed.) [ENETS Center of Excellence, Bad Berka (Germany). THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging

    2014-07-01

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  4. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  5. [Hemoglobinopathies. Current therapeutic possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgens, H S; Karle, H

    1995-05-29

    In recent years, the number of immigrants has increased considerably in Denmark. Consequently, a series of new clinical pictures has appeared in the Danish health care system. Typical examples are the genetic diseases, the haemoglobinopathies. Most of the immigrants come from areas, where the gene frequency of these disorders is widely distributed, for instance the Mediterranean countries, the Middle East, Southeast Asia and Africa. Most frequent are the heterozygous thalassaemias, but also the number of patients with severe thalassaemia and other clinically important haemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell anaemia has also increased in recent years. The clinical problems concerning these patients focus on two important topics, namely genetic counselling of heterozygous individuals (in some cases combined with prenatal diagnostics) and the treatment of patients with clinically severe haemoglobinopathy. The only curative treatment of the haemoglobinopathies is allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, but this treatment can only be offered to a few of these patients. However, a variety of therapeutic options exist which can improve their prognosis and quality of life. Since the number of patients with these diseases will probably increase over the next years we find it relevant, based on typical case stories, to give a review of the present therapeutic possibilities for these disorders.

  6. Pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seok Hwee; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2006-01-01

    1. Pharmacogenetics refers to the study of genetically controlled variations in drug response. Functional variants caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding drug-metabolising enzymes, transporters, ion channels and drug receptors have been known to be associated with interindividual and interethnic variation in drug response. Genetic variations in these genes play a role in influencing the efficacy and toxicity of medications. 2. Rapid, precise and cost-effective high-throughput technological platforms are essential for performing large-scale mutational analysis of genetic markers involved in the aetiology of variable responses to drug therapy. 3. The application of a pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics in general clinical practice is still far from being achieved today owing to various constraints, such as limited accessibility of technology, inadequate knowledge, ambiguity of the role of variants and ethical concerns. 4. Drug actions are determined by the interplay of several genes encoding different proteins involved in various biochemical pathways. With rapidly emerging SNP discovery technological platforms and widespread knowledge on the role of SNPs in disease susceptibility and variability in drug response, the pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics is anticipated to take off in the not-too-distant future. This will present profound clinical, economic and social implications for health care.

  7. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    polymerized in a controlled manner with carrier monomers of historically proven biocompatible polymers. The carrier polymers, the loading of ribavirin as well as the size of the polymer were varied systematically with the aid of an automated synthesis platform. These polymers were tested in a cellular assay...... of reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, which not only controls the size of polymer, but also allows the introduction of a terminal amine on the polymer which can be used for further conjugation. This has allowed for not only fluorescent labeling of the polymer, but also protein......The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...

  8. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation....... This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of two therapeutic peptides by systematically increasing acyl chain length in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. The studied peptides are the 33 amino acid Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2...... peptides can increase in vitro intestinal permeability, modestly for GLP-2 and drastically for sCT, and might benefit oral delivery. GLP-2 results provide a well-founded predictive power for future peptide analogues, whereas sCT results hold great promise for future analogues, albeit with a larger...

  9. Therapeutic and diagnostic nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Devasena T

    2017-01-01

    This brief highlights nanoparticles used in the diagnosis and treatment of prominent diseases and toxic conditions. Ecofriendly methods which are ideal for the synthesis of medicinally valued nanoparticles are explained and the characteristic features of these particles projected. The role of these particles in the therapeutic field, and the induced biological changes in some diseases are discussed. The main focus is on inflammation, oxidative stress and cellular membrane integrity alterations. The effect of nanoparticles on these changes produced by various agents are highlighted using in vitro and in vivo models. The mechanism of nanoparticles in ameliorating the biological changes is supported by relevant images and data. Finally, the brief demonstrates recent developments on the use of nanoparticles in diagnosis or sensing of some biological materials and biologically hazardous environmental materials.

  10. [Therapeutic education didactic techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Maite; Vidal, Mercè; Jansa, Margarida

    2012-10-01

    This article includes an introduction to the role of Therapeutic Education for Diabetes treatment according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the Diabetes Education Study Group (DESG) of the "European Association for Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) of the Spanish Ministry of Health. We analyze theoretical models and the differences between teaching vs. learning as well as current trends (including Internet), that can facilitate meaningful learning of people with diabetes and their families and relatives. We analyze the differences, similarities, advantages and disadvantages of individual and group education. Finally, we describe different educational techniques (metaplan, case method, brainstorming, role playing, games, seminars, autobiography, forums, chats,..) applicable to individual, group or virtual education and its application depending on the learning objective.

  11. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  12. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, and immune system functions. Selective pathways for autophagic degradation of cargoes may have variable significance in disease pathogenesis. Among these, the autophagic clearance of bacteria (xenophagy may represent a crucial host defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of sepsis and inflammatory diseases. Our recent studies indicate that the autophagic clearance of mitochondria, a potentially protective program, may aggravate the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by activating cell death programs. We report similar findings with respect to the autophagic clearance of cilia components, which can contribute to airways dysfunction in chronic lung disease. In certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, autophagy may confer protection by modulating proliferation and cell death. In other disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis, impaired autophagy may contribute to pathogenesis. In lung cancer, autophagy has multiple consequences by limiting carcinogenesis, modulating therapeutic effectiveness, and promoting tumor cell survival. In this review we highlight the multiple functions of autophagy and its selective autophagy subtypes that may be of significance to the pathogenesis of human disease, with an emphasis on lung disease and therapeutics.

  13. Therapeutic vaccines for leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamesipour, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Numerous therapeutic strategies are used to treat leishmaniasis. The treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is solely depends on antimonate derivatives with safety issues and questionable efficacy and there is no fully effective modality to treat CL caused by Leishmania tropica and Leishmania braziliensis. There is no prophylactic vaccine available against any form of leishmaniasis. Immunotherapy for CL has a long history; immunotherapy trials of first and second generation vaccines showed promising results. The current article briefly covers the prophylactic vaccines and explains different immunotherapy strategies that have been used to treat leishmaniasis. This paper does not include experimental vaccines and only lays emphasis on human trials and those vaccines which reached human trials. Immunotherapy is currently used to successfully treat several disorders; Low cost, limited side effects and no possibility to develop resistance make immunotherapy a valuable choice especially for infectious disease with chemotherapy problems. Efforts are needed to explore the immunological surrogate marker(s) of cure and protection in leishmaniasis and overcome the difficulties in standardization of crude Leishmania vaccines. One of the reasons for anti-leishmaniasis vaccine failure is lack of an appropriate adjuvant. So far, not enough attention has been paid to develop vaccines for immunotherapy of leishmaniasis.

  14. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittaker, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated

  15. Psychomotor re-education: Movement as therapeutic method

    OpenAIRE

    Golubović Špela; Tubić Tatjana; Marković Slavica

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Psychomotor re-education represents a multidimensional therapeutic approach in dealing with children and adults with psychomotor disorders. Therapeutic programs should be based on individual differences, abilities and capabilities, relationships, feelings and individual developmental needs as well as emotional condition of a child. Body and movement as the bases of the treatment. A movement, glance, touch, voice and word, all being an integral part of a process of psychomo...

  16. Intra-Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    loading and disease progression timeframe in a large animal model in order to outline a pathway to human clinical trials of the treatment method . Our...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0188 TITLE: Intra-Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert...Intra-Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0188 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  17. Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0205 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lisa Laury-Kleintop...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0205 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Systemic lupus erythematosus, autoantibodies. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF

  18. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990's when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine) receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A 2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y 12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y 12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y 2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  19. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Burnstock

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  20. Therapeutical aspect of trichomoniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukićević Jelica

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichomoniasis is frequent, parasitic and sexually transmitted infection of genitourinary tract. It is treated by metronidazole (5-nitroimidazole according to protocol recommended by Center for Disease Control (CDC formerly called: Communicable Disease Center [19]. The resistance of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV strains to metronidazole (MND was described in USA in 1960, and later on in many European countries [8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]. In these cases, due to persistent trichomonas infection, it is necessary to repeat MND treatment with moderate modification of dose and/or length of its application. Nevertheless, oncogenic and toxic effects of MND have to be taken into consideration. OBJECT The aim of this study was to investigate and analyze the incidence of TV in STD and lower susceptibility of certain TV strains to MND were analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS In three-year period (1999-2001 612 patients (244 females and 368 males suspected of STD were examined clinically and microbiologically at the Institute of Dermatovenereology in Belgrade. The patients detected for TV were treated according to CDC protocol. The affected were considered cured if there was no manifest clinical infection, and no TV verified by microbiological test. Results TV was isolated in 216 patients (35.29 % of all subjects. Trichomonas infection was found in 90 (36.88 % out of 244 tested females and in 126 (32.34 % of 368 males. Clinically manifested infection, with extensive urethral and vaginal secretion, was recorded in 161 patients, while the asymptomatic form was found in 55 subjects. This result indicates the predominance of manifested trichomonas infections (75.54 % of cases. The difference of distribution of clinical forms of trichomoniasis, in relation to sex, was not statistically significant (c2=0.854; p>0.05. The patients with verified trichomonas infection were treated by metronidazole according to CDC protocol. The recommended therapeutical scheme consisted of three

  1. Integrating School-Based and Therapeutic Conflict Management Models at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Oosterlinck, Franky; Broekaert, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Explores the possibility of integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models, comparing two management models: a school-based conflict management program, "Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers"; and a therapeutic conflict management program, "Life Space Crisis Intervention." The paper concludes that integration might be possible…

  2. Pediatric health, medicine, and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Wainwright

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Claire E Wainwright1,21Royal Children’s Hospital, Brisbane and Queensland, Queensland, Australia; 2Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, AustraliaThe idea of children as small adults with health care needs that can be managed by extrapolation from adult studies has now largely been abandoned. We now recognize that adult health and disease are closely linked to childhood factors and the critical and ethical importance of clinical research in pediatrics is increasingly being recognized.  While funding and output from pediatric clinical research continues to lag behind health research in adults, particularly in the area of therapeutics, the last decade has thankfully seen a dramatic increase in the number of pediatric studies and particularly randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs. Since the 1997 Food and Drug Administration (FDA Modernization Act in the United States (US and the subsequent changes in drug registration regulatory systems in the US and Europe, there has been a huge increase in the number of pediatric studies sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. In the United Kingdom, the Medicine for Children’s Research Network was established in 2005 to address the lack of clinical studies in pediatrics. Over the first five years they reported an exciting increase in the number of high quality clinical studies and on their website they have a current portfolio of over 200 pediatric studies, half of which are RCTs and half are sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. Other countries particularly across Europe are also establishing similar programs

  3. Frontiers in nano-therapeutics

    CERN Document Server

    Tasnim, Nishat; Sai Krishna, Katla; Kalagara, Sudhakar; Narayan, Mahesh; Noveron, Juan C; Joddar, Binata

    2017-01-01

    This brief highlights recent research advances in the area of nano-therapeutics. Nanotechnology holds immense potential for application in a wide range of biological and engineering applications such as molecular sensors for disease diagnosis, therapeutic agents for the treatment of diseases, a vehicle for delivering therapeutics and imaging agents for theranostic applications, both in-vitro and in-vivo. The brief is grouped into the following sections namely, A) Discrete Nanosystems ; B) Anisotropic Nanoparticles; C) Nano-films/coated/layered and D) Nano-composites.

  4. [End therapeutic nihilism towards COPD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergens, Uwe R

    2007-03-15

    Prevention of COPD requires appropriate patient education, especially of adolescents, as well as the establishment of an effective national health policy. The new GOLD guidelines represent the current standard of knowledge on the management of chronic, progressive, obstructive pulmonary diseases. It points out that COPD is avoidable and treatable,and hence, there is no reason for therapeutic nihilism. Chronic bronchitis preceding a progressive respiratory obstruction cannot be improved with the presently available respiratory therapeutics. For this reason, therapeutic measures concentrate on the avoidance of exacerbations, which are primarily responsible for the severity of the course of COPD.

  5. Mining the Genome for Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Jose C

    2017-07-01

    Current pharmacological options for type 2 diabetes do not cure the disease. Despite the availability of multiple drug classes that modulate glycemia effectively and minimize long-term complications, these agents do not reverse pathogenesis, and in practice they are not selected to correct the molecular profile specific to the patient. Pharmaceutical companies find drug development programs increasingly costly and burdensome, and many promising compounds fail before launch to market. Human genetics can help advance the therapeutic enterprise. Genomic discovery that is agnostic to preexisting knowledge has uncovered dozens of loci that influence glycemic dysregulation. Physiological investigation has begun to define disease subtypes, clarifying heterogeneity and suggesting molecular pathways for intervention. Convincing genetic associations have paved the way for the identification of effector transcripts that underlie the phenotype, and genetic or experimental proof of gain or loss of function in select cases has clarified the direction of effect to guide therapeutic development. Genetic studies can also examine off-target effects and furnish causal inference. As this information is curated and made widely available to all stakeholders, it is hoped that it will enhance therapeutic development pipelines by accelerating efficiency, maximizing cost-effectiveness, and raising ultimate success rates. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  6. [Therapeutic advances in cystic fibrosis in 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durupt, S; Mazur, S; Reix, P

    2016-02-01

    Twenty-five years after the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene identification, this discovery actually begins to benefit to patients. Increasing our knowledge on CFTR biology, as well as technical progress made in order to screen for new drugs have made therapeutic strategies move an important step forward. It is likely that in the forthcoming years, the panel of molecules available for CF patients will be larger, with new activators and potentiators. The disease by itself may consequently change in its natural history. CF is an example of the so-called personalized medicine, aiming to fit treatment according to patient's genetic background. Ongoing clinical trials may enlarge the actually limited eligible number of CF patients for new drugs such as ivacaftor. Beyond this exciting and promising new therapeutic approach, one may not push symptomatic treatments on the side. Improvements have been made for inhaled antibiotics administration, aiming to simplify patient's life; clinical trials using new molecules able to liquefy mucus or with anti-inflammatory properties are actually underway. One important next step in the care for CF will be to design and conduct early intervention trials in CF infants. Newborn screening program have been widely implanted around the word, and cohorts studies have shown that both functional and structural abnormalities occurred very early, making the therapeutic window of opportunity tight. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic Value of the Periodic Health Examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, T. A.; Hurt, H. B.

    1965-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting periodic health examinations on all of its employees for over 10 years. The original purpose of this program was the early detection of disease to be followed by referral or appropriate counseling. Because of the relatively young age of this group, we expected that this service would be of greatest benefit to only the small percentage who had significant findings. However, over this 10 year period we have been increasingly impressed that those who had no significant findings have expressed almost as much enthusiasm and gratitude as those in whom we found early but potentially serious disease. This response caused us to look more critically at the reasons for this favorable reaction. As a result, we have become convinced that these examinations have an important therapeutic value to the healthy, as well as the sick, and that this fact should be considered in their justification. A health examination can quite properly be considered therapeutic, even though no disease is found or treated, providing it "serves" or meets some of the needs of the person being examined. After all, the literal definition of the word therapeutic is service, since it is derived from the Greek word therapeutikos, which means an attendant or servant.

  8. Practical management of therapeutic diphenylhydantoin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Development of easy, practical methods for the management and optimisation of therapeutic diphenylhydantoin (DPH) concentrations in children. Design. Investigation of DPH concentration profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters in children with poorly controlled epilepsy. Subsequent determination of ...

  9. Therapeutic Vaccines for Chronic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Combadiere, Béhazine; Debre, Patrice

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to prevent severe complications of a chronic infection by reinforcing host defenses when some immune control, albeit insufficient, can already be demonstrated and when a conventional antimicrobial therapy either is not available or has limited efficacy. We focus on the rationale and challenges behind this still controversial strategy and provide examples from three major chronic infectious diseases-human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and human papillomavirus-for which the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines is currently being evaluated.

  10. Evaluation of therapeutic patient education

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ivernois, Jean-François; Gagnayre, Rémi; Assal, Jean-Philippe; Golay, Alain; Libion, France; Deccache, Alain

    2006-01-01

    9 pages; These guidelines mainly focus on the principles of evaluating Therapeutic Patient Education; Over the past thirty years, therapeutic patient education (TPE) has become an essential part of the treatment of long-term diseases. Evaluations of this new practice are expected, and are sometimes imposed according to protocols and criteria that do not always reflect the complexity of changes taking place within patients and healthcare providers. Sometimes, expected results are not achieved ...

  11. Profiling Prostate Cancer Therapeutic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron A. Wade; Natasha Kyprianou

    2018-01-01

    The major challenge in the treatment of patients with advanced lethal prostate cancer is therapeutic resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and chemotherapy. Overriding this resistance requires understanding of the driving mechanisms of the tumor microenvironment, not just the androgen receptor (AR)-signaling cascade, that facilitate therapeutic resistance in order to identify new drug targets. The tumor microenvironment enables key signaling pathways promoting cancer cell survival ...

  12. Structure-guided deimmunization of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew S; Choi, Yoonjoo; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Therapeutic proteins continue to yield revolutionary new treatments for a growing spectrum of human disease, but the development of these powerful drugs requires solving a unique set of challenges. For instance, it is increasingly apparent that mitigating potential anti-therapeutic immune responses, driven by molecular recognition of a therapeutic protein's peptide fragments, may be best accomplished early in the drug development process. One may eliminate immunogenic peptide fragments by mutating the cognate amino acid sequences, but deimmunizing mutations are constrained by the need for a folded, stable, and functional protein structure. These two concerns may be competing, as the mutations that are best at reducing immunogenicity often involve amino acids that are substantially different physicochemically. We develop a novel approach, called EpiSweep, that simultaneously optimizes both concerns. Our algorithm identifies sets of mutations making such Pareto optimal trade-offs between structure and immunogenicity, embodied by a molecular mechanics energy function and a T-cell epitope predictor, respectively. EpiSweep integrates structure-based protein design, sequence-based protein deimmunization, and algorithms for finding the Pareto frontier of a design space. While structure-based protein design is NP-hard, we employ integer programming techniques that are efficient in practice. Furthermore, EpiSweep only invokes the optimizer once per identified Pareto optimal design. We show that EpiSweep designs of regions of the therapeutics erythropoietin and staphylokinase are predicted to outperform previous experimental efforts. We also demonstrate EpiSweep's capacity for deimmunization of the entire proteins, case analyses involving dozens of predicted epitopes, and tens of thousands of unique side-chain interactions. Ultimately, Epi-Sweep is a powerful protein design tool that guides the protein engineer toward the most promising immunotolerant biotherapeutic

  13. Therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J; Biley, F C; Dolk, H

    2007-07-18

    Anxiety disorders are a common occurrence in today's society. There is interest from the community in the use of complementary therapies for anxiety disorders. This review examined the currently available evidence supporting the use of therapeutic touch in treating anxiety disorders. To examine the efficacy and adverse effects of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders. We searched the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Registers (CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References) (search date 13/01/06), the Controlled Trials website and Dissertation Abstracts International. Searches of reference lists of retrieved papers were also carried out and experts in the field were contacted. Inclusion criteria included all published and unpublished randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing therapeutic touch with sham (mimic) TT, pharmacological therapy, psychological treatment, other treatment or no treatment /waiting list. The participants included adults with an anxiety disorder defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV),the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), validated diagnostic instruments, or other validated clinician or self-report instruments. Two review authors independently applied inclusion criteria. Further information was sought from trialists where papers contained insufficient information to make a decision about eligibility. No randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders were identified. Given the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and the current paucity of evidence on therapeutic touch in this population, there is a need for well conducted randomised controlled trials to examine the effectiveness of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders.

  14. Therapeutic Relationship Between Male Nursing Students and Female Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y; Chan, Vera W S; Tse, Judy K M

    2014-07-01

    This article explores the therapeutic relationship between male nursing students and female patients, through the use of autobiography in a qualitative approach. For this study, 18 male nursing students enrolled in master's and bachelor's programs in Hong Kong were recruited. They were asked to make records in a diary and draw pictures of their therapeutic relationship with female patients from their clinical experiences and then participate in a focus group interview. Content analysis was carried out on the collected data. The essential factors influencing the development of a therapeutic relationship were found to be gender, symbolic meanings, and career features. Good experiences were also discussed. The results shed light on the experiences of male nursing students and how they make sense of their therapeutic relationship with female patients. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. [Therapeutic education of total laryngectomy patients: Influence of social factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woisard, V; Galtier, A; Baumann, L; Delpierre, C; Puech, M; Balaguer, M

    Current health policies promote patient education, parti­cu­lar­ly in oncology. Therapeutic education program must be tailo­red to the characteristics, needs and expectations of the population. In the ENT Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Larrey Hospital in Toulouse, a therapeutic education program for patient with total laryngectomy has been experienced since 2011. But its propagation remains difficult. The aim of this study is to determine if social factors are nfluencing the parti­cipation of the laryngectomized population in the program. The brochure explaining this program and a registration form coupled with a survey questionnaire were distributed to the regio­nal population of patient with total laryngectomy. After two months of investigation we collected 42 responses. It is clear from their analysis that social factors underlie partici­pa­tion, particularly educational level, available financial resources level and the socio-professional group.

  16. Are hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance programs effective at improving the therapeutic options?: ¿mejoran las opciones terapéuticas de estos pacientes? Eficacia de los programas de cribado de hepatocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zapata

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate whether the current surveillance programs (ultrasonography and alpha-fetoprotein testing every six months are successful in detecting patients in the early stages. Material and methods: the health records of all patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma in Donostia Hospital between 2003 and 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Eighty-five patients (11 women and 74 men were included in the study and demographic data, risk factors and clinical data were obtained. Patients were split into two groups according to whether or not they had been included in a surveillance program. Results: seventy per cent of patients of the surveillance group is diagnosed in early stage opposite to 26.7% of patients in no surveillance group (p Objetivo: determinar si la utilización en nuestro medio del programa de cribado de HCC establecido -alfa-fetoproteína (AFP y ecografia semestral- en pacientes con hepatopatía crónica permite detectar pacientes en estadios precoces de la enfermedad. Material y métodos: Diseño experimental: estudio retrospectivo. Criterios diagnósticos de HCC: 2 o más técnicas de imagen con lesión hipervascular mayor de 2 cm o 1 técnica de imagen con lesión hipervascular mayor de 2 cm asociado a AFP mayor de 400 ng/ml. Pacientes: 85 pacientes diagnosticados de HCC en el Hospital Donostia entre los años 2003 y 2005. Datos analizados: información demográfica (sexo, edad, factores de riesgo (alcohol, virus de hepatitis, hemocromatosis, otras enfermedades asociadas, e información clínica (etiología de la hepatopatía, estadio de Child-Pugh, determinación de AFP, hallazgos radiológicos, criterios de resecabilidad, tratamiento recibido, evolución. Se divide la muestra en dos grupos según hubieran seguido o no un programa de cribado. Resultados: el 70% de los pacientes del grupo de cribado se diagnostican en estadio precoz frente al 26,7% del grupo de no cribado (p < 0,05. Trece pacientes no pueden recibir

  17. Bone-seeking therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Suresh C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone-seeking therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are utilized on the basis of the radionuclide?s particulate emissions (primarily low to intermediate beta emission. The requirements therefore are different from those of bone imaging agents that consist mainly of short-lived single photon emitters. Lately, the therapeutic bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals have attained increasing importance due to their potential role in alleviating pain from osseous metastases in cancer patients, for the treatment of joint pain resulting from inflamed synovium (radiosynoviorthesis, or radiosynovectomy, or from various other forms of arthritic disease. There is, however, a paucity of published data on the bio-pharmacokinetics of these agents when used following intravenous administration for bone pain palliation. This paper will briefly review and summarize the presently available chemical and biopharmacokinetic information on the various clinically approved as well as experimental bone-localizing therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, and make projections on their clinical application for the treatment of primary/metastatic cancer in bone.

  18. Conflicts in the therapeutic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Aprea

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How the analytical knowledge that compare human consciousness with that, even more disturbing, moving behind his fifth can be said to be “for peace”? It can be - and this will be the contribution of the proposal - the same tortuous and enigmatic of therapeutic practice, with its hesitations and his impulses, to outline a path crossing and overcoming the conflict? May, finally, peace, in the sense of feasibility of intra-and interpersonal dialectic instead of tearing and hostileconfrontation with oneself and with the other, to be a reference in some crucial pivot of ethical therapeutic work? To these questions the intervention seeks to answer retracing some of the highlights of almost three years of therapeutic work with a young woman and her family.

  19. Potential therapeutic applications of biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiña, Eduardo J; Rangarajan, Vivek; Sen, Ramkrishna; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have recently emerged as promising molecules for their structural novelty, versatility, and diverse properties that are potentially useful for many therapeutic applications. Mainly due to their surface activity, these molecules interact with cell membranes of several organisms and/or with the surrounding environments, and thus can be viewed as potential cancer therapeutics or as constituents of drug delivery systems. Some types of microbial surfactants, such as lipopeptides and glycolipids, have been shown to selectively inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and to disrupt cell membranes causing their lysis through apoptosis pathways. Moreover, biosurfactants as drug delivery vehicles offer commercially attractive and scientifically novel applications. This review covers the current state-of-the-art in biosurfactant research for therapeutic purposes, providing new directions towards the discovery and development of molecules with novel structures and diverse functions for advanced applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reactor-produced therapeutic radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The significant worldwide increase in therapeutic radioisotope applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology requires the dependable production of sufficient levels of radioisotopes for these applications (Reba, 2000; J. Nucl. Med., 1998; Nuclear News, 1999; Adelstein and Manning, 1994). The issues associated with both accelerator- and reactor-production of therapeutic radioisotopes is important. Clinical applications of therapeutic radioisotopes include the use of both sealed sources and unsealed radiopharmaceutical sources. Targeted radiopharmaceutical agents include those for cancer therapy and palliation of bone pain from metastatic disease, ablation of bone marrow prior to stem cell transplantation, treatment modalities for mono and oligo- and polyarthritis, for cancer therapy (including brachytherapy) and for the inhibition of the hyperplastic response following coronary angioplasty and other interventional procedures (For example, see Volkert and Hoffman, 1999). Sealed sources involve the use of radiolabeled devices for cancer therapy (brachytherapy) and also for the inhibition of the hyperplasia which is often encountered after angioplasty, especially with the exponential increase in the use of coronary stents and stents for the peripheral vasculature and other anatomical applications. Since neutron-rich radioisotopes often decay by beta decay or decay to beta-emitting daughter radioisotopes which serve as the basis for radionuclide generator systems, reactors are expected to play an increasingly important role for the production of a large variety of therapeutic radioisotopes required for these and other developing therapeutic applications. Because of the importance of the availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes for these applications, an understanding of the contribution of neutron spectra for radioisotope production and determination of those cross sections which have not yet been established is important. This

  1. [Therapeutic touch and anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satori, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    An innovative practice, therapeutic touch has been used for around ten years in the treatment of eating disorders. Delivered by nurse clinicians having received specific training, this approach is based on nursing diagnoses which identify the major symptoms of this pathology. The support is built around the body and its perceptions. Through the helping relationship, it mobilises the patient's resources to favour a relationship of trust, a letting-go, physical, psychological and emotional relaxation, and improves the therapeutic alliance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Amore Patricia A

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor, has fueled interest in using such factors to induce therapeutic angiogenesis. The results of numerous animal studies and clinical trials have offered promise for new treatment strategies for various ischemic diseases. Increased understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of vessel growth has, however, prompted investigators and clinicians alike to reconsider the complexity of therapeutic angiogenesis. The realization that formation of a stable vessel is a complex, multistep process may provide useful insights into the design of the next generation of angiogenesis therapy.

  3. Colorectal cancer: diagnostic and therapeutic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaillant, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Technical advances that has been achieved during the past two decades have not dramatically improved the 35 % five-year rate observed in patients with colorectal cancer. These tumours remain one of the most challenging problems in public health policies in western countries. Screening applies to some subgroups of high-risk individuals and the general population aged over 50. In order to improve their efficacy, such screening programs imply large-scale information campaigns and a strong cooperation with the general physicians. The diagnosis is strongly suggested by any recent modification of bowel habits ad by rectal bleeding. It has to be confirmed by rectal examination and by colonoscopy which allows sampling to the tumour. Loco-regional and distant metastatic tumour spread must be assessed precisely before any therapeutic strategy is decided. Surgery, which resects the tumour en bloc with the corresponding lymphatic territories, is the only treatment that can achieve long term cure. In localized tumours, surgery alone can provide patients with 5-years survival rates close to 95 %. On the other hand, surgery alone is not sufficient to cure patients with advances cancers. In recent years, several adjuvant therapeutic modalities have been shown to improve the results of surgery in these cases (rectal cancer: pre-operative radiotherapy or post-operative radio-chemotherapy, colon cancer with nodal metastases: post-operative chemotherapy). There is a hope that a better use of our diagnostic and therapeutic armementarium would be able to avoid or to cure up to 75 % of the colorectal cancers we are dealing with. (author)

  4. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature i...

  5. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Lithium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Damkier, Per; Petersen, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum lithium is monitored to ensure levels within the narrow therapeutic window. This study examines the interlaboratory variation and inaccuracy of lithium monitoring in Denmark. METHODS: In 16 samples consisting of (1) control materials (n = 4), (2) pooled patient serum (n = 5), an...

  6. Therapeutic Versatility of Resveratrol Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Waqas Nawaz; Zhongqin Zhou; Sa Deng; Xiaodong Ma; Xiaochi Ma; Chuangang Li; Xiaohong Shu

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin, exhibits a remarkable range of biological activities, such as anticancer, cardioprotective, neuroprotective and antioxidant properties. However, the therapeutic application of resveratrol was encumbered for its low bioavailability. Therefore, many researchers focused on designing and synthesizing the derivatives of resveratrol to enhance the bioavailability and the pharmacological activity of resveratrol. During the past decades, a large number of natural a...

  7. Therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Aktas (Huseyin); P.B.F. Mensink (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSince the introduction of the first balloon-based enteroscopic technique in 2001, therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE) using either the single or double balloon enteroscopy technique (respectively SBE and DBE) has evolved rapidly. Argon plasma coagulation (APC), polypectomy,

  8. The renaissance of complement therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system - many of which affect the kidneys - has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond.

  9. The renaissance of complement therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Reis, Edimara S.; Lambris, John D.

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system — many of which affect the kidneys — has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond. PMID:29199277

  10. DNA molecules and human therapeutics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... Nucleic acid molecules are championing a new generation of reverse engineered biopharmaceuticals. In terms of potential application in gene medicine, plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectors have exceptional therapeutic and immunological profiles as they are free from safety concerns associated with viral vectors ...

  11. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Indran; Shorten, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    As pathology services become more centralized and automated, the measurement of therapeutic antimicrobial drugs concentrations is increasingly performed in clinical biochemistry or 'blood science' laboratories. This review outlines key groups of antimicrobial agents: aminoglycosides, glycopeptides, antifungal agents and antituberculosis agents, their role in managing infectious diseases, and the reasons why serum concentration measurement is important. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Pentosan polysulfate binds to STRO-1+mesenchymal progenitor cells, is internalized, and modifies gene expression: a novel approach of pre-programing stem cells for therapeutic application requiring their chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiehua; Shimmon, Susan; Paton, Sharon; Daly, Christopher; Goldschlager, Tony; Gronthos, Stan; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Ghosh, Peter

    2017-12-13

    expression of 42 genes. This study has shown that priming of MPCs with low concentrations of PPS enhanced chondrogenesis and MPC proliferation by modifying their characteristic basal gene and protein expression. These findings offer a novel approach to re-programming mesenchymal stem cells for clinical indications which require the repair or regeneration of cartilaginous tissues such as in osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease.

  13. Exploring the therapeutic effects of yoga and its ability to increase quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Woodyard, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the findings of selected articles regarding the therapeutic effects of yoga and to provide a comprehensive review of the benefits of regular yoga practice. As participation rates in mind-body fitness programs such as yoga continue to increase, it is important for health care professionals to be informed about the nature of yoga and the evidence of its many therapeutic effects. Thus, this manuscript provides information regarding the therapeutic effects...

  14. Therapeutic Management of the Hallux Rigidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Aggarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hallux rigidus is a chronic, disabling condition of foot characterized by reduced great toe extension. The manual therapy approaches are described theoretically however their practical published evidence has not been analyzed well. Objective. Aim of the present paper was to systematically review the literature available for therapeutic management of the hallux rigidus by identifying and evaluating the randomized controlled trials (RCTs and non-RCTs. Methods. To view the hallux rigidus and its rehabilitation, a webbased published literature search of Pubmed, Ovid Medline, Science direct, Cochrane Database, PEDro database, CINAHL was conducted for last 35 years in August 2010 using 4 specific keywords “hallux rigidus, physical therapy, chiropractic, and manual therapy” typed in exactly same manner in the search column of the databases. Result. the review finds that there is acute need of the quality studies and RCTs for the manual therapy, chiropractic, or physiotherapeutic management of the hallux rigidus. Conclusion. Review conclude that conservative programs for hallux rigidus consists of comprehensive intervention program that includes great toe mobilization, toe flexor strengthening, sesamoid bones mobilization and long MTP joint. The clinician should put an emphasis on the mobilization program with proper follow up along with comparative studies for rehabilitation of hallux rigidus.

  15. Therapeutic approaches for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plugis, Nicholas M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common, lifelong autoimmune disorder for which dietary control is the only accepted form of therapy. A strict gluten-free diet is burdensome to patients and can be limited in efficacy, indicating there is an unmet need for novel therapeutic approaches to supplement or supplant dietary therapy. Many molecular events required for disease pathogenesis have been recently characterized and inspire most current and emerging drug-discovery efforts. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confirm the importance of human leukocyte antigen genes in our pathogenic model and identify a number of new risk loci in this complex disease. Here, we review the status of both emerging and potential therapeutic strategies in the context of disease pathophysiology. We conclude with a discussion of how genes identified during GWAS and follow-up studies that enhance susceptibility may offer insight into developing novel therapies. PMID:26060114

  16. Sinigrin and Its Therapeutic Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha Mazumder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sinigrin (allyl-glucosinolate or 2-propenyl-glucosinolate is a natural aliphatic glucosinolate present in plants of the Brassicaceae family, such as broccoli and brussels sprouts, and the seeds of Brassica nigra (mustard seeds which contain high amounts of sinigrin. Since ancient times, mustard has been used by mankind for its culinary, as well as medicinal, properties. It has been systematically described and evaluated in the classical Ayurvedic texts. Studies conducted on the pharmacological activities of sinigrin have revealed anti-cancer, antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, wound healing properties and biofumigation. This current review will bring concise information about the known therapeutic activities of sinigrin. However, the information on known biological activities is very limited and, hence, further studies still need to be conducted and its molecular mechanisms also need to be explored. This review on the therapeutic benefits of sinigrin can summarize current knowledge about this unique phytocompounds.

  17. Therapeutic Dancing for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenna Pryscia Carvalho Aguiar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic dancing has been advocated as an effective adjunct to conventional physical therapies for people living with Parkinson's disease (PD. This systematic review evaluates studies on the outcomes of different dance genres on mobility and quality of life in PD. We searched databases including CINHAL (1982–2015, Medline (1922–2015, Scopus (1996–2015, Web of Science (2002–2015, Embase (2007–2015, PEDro (1999–2015 and the Cochrane Library (1996–2015. The key words were: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson*, Parkinsonism, dance, dance therapy, dance genres, safety, feasibility, and quality of life. Two independent investigators reviewed the texts. Only randomized controlled trials, quasirandomized controlled trials, and case series studies were included. There was emerging evidence that therapeutic dance can be safe and feasible for people with mild to moderately severe PD, with beneficial effects on walking, freezing of gait, and health related quality of life.

  18. Therapeutic Versatility of Resveratrol Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Waqas; Zhou, Zhongqin; Deng, Sa; Ma, Xiaodong; Ma, Xiaochi; Li, Chuangang; Shu, Xiaohong

    2017-10-29

    Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin, exhibits a remarkable range of biological activities, such as anticancer, cardioprotective, neuroprotective and antioxidant properties. However, the therapeutic application of resveratrol was encumbered for its low bioavailability. Therefore, many researchers focused on designing and synthesizing the derivatives of resveratrol to enhance the bioavailability and the pharmacological activity of resveratrol. During the past decades, a large number of natural and synthetic resveratrol derivatives were extensively studied, and the methoxylated, hydroxylated and halogenated derivatives of resveratrol received particular more attention for their beneficial bioactivity. So, in this review, we will summarize the chemical structure and the therapeutic versatility of resveratrol derivatives, and thus provide the related structure activity relationship reference for their practical applications.

  19. Cell kinetics and therapeutic efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeff, M.; Abenhardt, W.; Gruner, B.; Stoffner, D.; Mainz Univ.

    1976-01-01

    The study shows that cell kinetics effects correlate with the effects of cytostatic drugs in the tumour model investigated here. It should, however, be noted that even genetically related tumour cell types may react differently to the same cytostatic drug, and that the cell kinetics effects, due to the changes in the cell cycle, cannot be predicted but should be followed with a very fast method, e.g. sequential flan fluorescence cytophotometry, for optimal therapeutic results. (orig./GSE) [de

  20. Therapeutic advances in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Doris G; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that produce progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. There has been rapid growth and change in our understanding of these disorders in recent years, and advances in basic science are being translated into increasing numbers of clinical trials. This review will discuss therapeutic developments in 3 of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystr...

  1. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  2. [Scientific ethics of therapeutic abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2003-05-01

    Therapeutic abortion is proposed when a pregnancy threatens a woman's life and the fetus is not viable ex utero. As the intention is not to kill the fetus, this action should be named "therapeutic interruption of pregnancy". However, in some cases the fetus directly hampers the mother's health. Thus, the removal of the cause of the disease coincides with killing the fetus. Therapeutic abortion has been proposed for several situations. A) When pregnancy and not the fetus, impairs maternal life (e.g. ovular infection, ectopic pregnancy, decompensation of a preexisting disease or diseases of pregnancy as pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, HELLP and Ballantyne syndromes, choriocarcinoma). B) A risk for maternal survival caused by the embryo or fetal genetic constitution: autoimmune diseases of the mother generated by fetal antigens, some types of eclampsia with or without HELLP syndrome due to an immune or exaggerated inflammatory response of the mother, Ballantyne syndrome associated to eclampsia due to fetal-maternal genetic incompatibility, the classic fetus-maternal genetic incompatibility, embryo or fetus diseases caused by their genomic constitution, mainly hydatidiform mole and the triploid, or fetal cancer. Scientific knowledge and a prudential Medical Ethics are capable to solve most cases.

  3. Conotoxins that confer therapeutic possibilities

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2012-06-04

    Cone snails produce a distinctive repertoire of venom peptides that are used both as a defense mechanism and also to facilitate the immobilization and digestion of prey. These peptides target a wide variety of voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, which make them an invaluable resource for studying the properties of these ion channels in normal and diseased states, as well as being a collection of compounds of potential pharmacological use in their own right. Examples include the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pharmaceutical drug, Ziconotide (Prialt; Elan Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) that is the synthetic equivalent of the naturally occurring ?-conotoxin MVIIA, whilst several other conotoxins are currently being used as standard research tools and screened as potential therapeutic drugs in pre-clinical or clinical trials. These developments highlight the importance of driving conotoxin-related research. A PubMed query from 1 January 2007 to 31 August 2011 combined with hand-curation of the retrieved articles allowed for the collation of 98 recently identified conotoxins with therapeutic potential which are selectively discussed in this review. Protein sequence similarity analysis tentatively assigned uncharacterized conotoxins to predicted functional classes. Furthermore, conotoxin therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative disorders (NDD) was also inferred. 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  4. Conotoxins: Therapeutic Potential and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Layer

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological variety of conotoxins, diverse peptides found in the venoms of marine cone snails, is well recognized. Venoms from each of the estimated 500 species of cone snails contain 50 to 200 distinct biologically active peptides. Most conotoxins characterized to date target receptors and ion channels of excitable tissues, such as ligandgated nicotinic acetylcholine, N-methyl-D-aspartate, and type 3 serotonin receptors, as well as voltage-gated calcium, sodium, and potassium channels, and G-protein-coupled receptors including α-adrenergic, neurotensin, and vasopressin receptors, and the norepinephrine transporter. Several conotoxins have shown promise in preclinical models of pain, convulsive disorders, stroke, neuromuscular block, and cardioprotection. The pharmacological selectivity of the conotoxins, coupled with the safety and efficacy demonstrated in preclinical models, has led to their investigation as human therapeutic agents. In the following review, we will survey the pharmacology and therapeutic rationale of those conotoxins with potential clinical application, and discuss the unique challenges that each will face in the course of their transition from venom component to human therapeutic.

  5. Enzyme therapeutics for systemic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Lu, Yunfeng

    2015-08-01

    Life relies on numerous biochemical processes working synergistically and correctly. Certain substances disrupt these processes, inducing living organism into an abnormal state termed intoxication. Managing intoxication usually requires interventions, which is referred as detoxification. Decades of development on detoxification reveals the potential of enzymes as ideal therapeutics and antidotes, because their high substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency are essential for clearing intoxicating substances without adverse effects. However, intrinsic shortcomings of enzymes including low stability and high immunogenicity are major hurdles, which could be overcome by delivering enzymes with specially designed nanocarriers. Extensive investigations on protein delivery indicate three types of enzyme-nanocarrier architectures that show more promise than others for systemic detoxification, including liposome-wrapped enzymes, polymer-enzyme conjugates, and polymer-encapsulated enzymes. This review highlights recent advances in these nano-architectures and discusses their applications in systemic detoxifications. Therapeutic potential of various enzymes as well as associated challenges in achieving effective delivery of therapeutic enzymes will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute Organophosphate Poisonings: Therapeutic Dilemmas and New Potential Therapeutic Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucinic, S.; Jovanovic, D.; Vucinic, Z.; Todorovic, V.; Segrt, Z.

    2007-01-01

    It has been six decades since synthesis of organophosphates, but this chapter has not yet come to a closure. Toxic effects of organophosphates are well known and the current therapeutic scheme includes supportive therapy and antidotes. There is a dilemma on whether and when to apply gastric lavage and activated charcoal. According to Position Statement (by EAPCCT) it should be applied only if the patient presents within one hour of ingestion, with potentially lethal ingested dose. Atropine, a competitive antagonist of acetylcholine at m-receptors, which antagonizes bronchosecretion and bronchoconstriction, is the corner stone of acute organophosphate poisoning therapy. There were many attempts to find a more efficient drug, including glycopyrrolate which has been used even in clinical trials, but it still can not replace atropine. The only dilemma about atropine usage which still exists, concerns usage of high atropine dose and scheme of application. The most efficient atropinization is achieved with bolus doses of 1-2mg of atropine i.v push, with repeating the dose on each 5 minutes until signs of atropinization are registered. Diazepam, with its GABA stabilizing effect, reduces central nervous system damage and central respiratory weakness. Oximes reactivate phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase, which still has not gone ageing, reducing acetylcholine concentration and cholinergic crisis. These effects are clearly demonstrated in experimental conditions, but the clinical significance of oximes is still unclear and there are still those who question oxime therapy. For those who approve it, oxime dosage, duration of therapy, the choice of oxime for certain OP is still an open issue. We need new, more efficient antidotes, and those that are in use are only the small part of the therapy which could be used. Experimental studies show favorable therapeutic effect of many agents, but none of them has been introduced in standard treatment of OPI poisoning in the last 30

  7. Therapeutic effect of a moderate intensity interval training program ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-30

    Aug 30, 2011 ... of 6 minutes each, while the control hypertensive (n=105; 58.27 ± 6.24 years) group remained sedentary during this period. ... arterial wall.[6,7] Hypertension has become one of the most powerful predictors of CHD and the risk increased markedly when HBP is accompanied with other risk factors.[8].

  8. therapeutic effect of continuous exercise training program on serum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-01

    Sep 1, 2014 ... concomitant risks of cardiovascular events (such as stroke, kidney disease, decreased disability adjusted and mortality), hypertension has been claimed to be a major global health problem and public-health challenge; demanding a vast proportion of health care resources directly and indirectly.3,4.

  9. An innovative therapeutic program for aphasia patients and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, P; Linell, S; Währborg, P

    1987-01-01

    Eleven aphasia patients and seven family members participated in a five-day residential course led by a speech pathologist, a psychologist and a neurologist. The aim of the course was to give the aphasics and their relatives information on the etiology, treatment possibilities and prognosis of aphasia; work on personal and interpersonal problems through psychological counseling; improve language function through comprehensive and intensive stimulation; examine the psychological, linguistic and neurological effects of the intensive course. The course participants met again one year after the course and were found to have changed positively both psychologically and interpersonally but, as expected, only to a minor degree linguistically and neurologically. Through this intensive course it was possible to assess the problems of the families more easily than in the hospital. The patients and their relatives reported that they had learnt how to identify and to deal with their psychological problems in a more constructive way. They also felt that they had support from the other families and were able to share their experiences. We found that this type of intervention had many positive effects on the ability of the participants to cope with the chronic disability.

  10. Heterogeneity of publicly accessible online critical values for therapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colt M McClain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Critical values are reported to clinicians when laboratory values are life threatening and require immediate attention. To date no definitive critical value limit recommendations have been produced regarding therapeutic drug monitoring. Some laboratories choose to publish critical value lists online. These publicly available values may be accessed and potentially utilized by laboratory staff, patient care providers, and patients. Materials and Methods: A web-based search of laboratories associated with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pathology residency programs was initiated to determine which therapeutic drugs had critical values and to examine the degree of variation in published critical values for these institutions. Results: Of the 107 institutions with university-based pathology training programs, 36 had published critical values online for review. Thirteen therapeutic drugs were investigated and the number of institutions reporting critical value limits for the drug, as well as the median, range, standard deviation, and the coefficient of variation of critical value concentration limits for each drug were determined. A number of the online critical value limits were deemed to be erroneous, most likely due to incorrectly listed units of measurement. Conclusions: There was a large degree of heterogeneity with regard to the chosen critical value limits for therapeutic drugs. This wide variance in critical values appears to be greater than that observed in interassay proficiency testing. Institutions should reexamine the rationale for their current critical value parameters and ensure that critical value limits and associated units are accurately published online.

  11. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by

  12. Novel Therapeutics for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Maeve A; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    The last decade has seen significant developments in the use of combination systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), with median survival approaching 1 year for select patients treated with FOLFIRINOX in the metastatic setting. However, it is sobering that these developments have been achieved with the use of traditional cytotoxics rather than from successes in the more modern fields of molecularly targeted therapies or immunotherapy. This article highlights several promising therapeutic approaches to PDAC currently under clinical evaluation, including immune therapies, molecularly targeted therapies, strategies for stromal depletion, and targeted therapy for genetically selected patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Current therapeutics in infectious dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascaux, A S; Chosidow, O

    NEW AGENTS: Among new treatments used for infectious dermatology diseases, new agents for genital herpes, valaciclovir and famciclovir, have greatly simplified therapeutic schemes. Cidofovir has also been shown to be effective against aciclovir-resistant cutaneous and mucosal herpetic lesions and for the treatment of molluscum contagiosum. NEW ADMINISTRATION ROUTES: For genital papillomavirus infections, trials using systemic or intralesional administered interferon have not provided conclusive evidence but imiquimode appears to be quite promising. Itaconazole and fluconazole are effective for onchomycoses. NEW POSSIBILITIES: Ivermectine is effective against scabies, but must be reserved for particularly severe forms. Finally, the emergence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains resistant to fluoroquinolones is disquieting.

  14. Therapeutic irradiation and brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheline, G.E.; Wara, W.M.; Smith, V.

    1980-01-01

    This is a review and reanalysis of the literature on adverse effects of therapeutic irradiation on the brain. Reactions have been grouped and considered according to time of appearance. The emphasis of the analysis is on delayed reactions, especially those that occur from a few months to several years after irradiation. All dose specifications were converted into equivalent megavoltage rads. The data were analyzed in terms of total dose, overall treatment time and number of treatment fractions. Also discussed were acute radiation reactions, early delayed radiation reactions, somnolence and leukoencephalopathy post-irradiation/chemotherapy and combined effects of radiation and chemotherapy

  15. Enactments in Psychoanalysis: Therapeutic Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Stanley

    The therapeutic benefits of enactments are addressed. Relevant literature reveals disparate conceptions about the nature and use of enactments. Clarification of the term is discussed. This analyst's theoretical and technical evolution is addressed; it is inextricably related to using enactments. How can it not be? A taxonomy of enactments is presented. The article considers that enactments may be fundamental in the evolution from orthodox to contemporary analytic technique. Assumptions underlying enactments are explored, as are guidelines for using enactments. Finally, the article posits that enactments have widened the scope of analysis and contributed to its vitality.

  16. [Post-polio syndrome. Part II. Therapeutic management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyja, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    The care of patients with post-polio syndrome ought to be carried out by a multidisciplinary team of specialists, including medical professionals, specialists of rehabilitation, psychologists and social workers. Many therapeutic strategies might be employed to reduce the late effects of polio. Today, the management of post-polio syndrome is based on non-pharmacological intervention, including lifestyle modification, decrease of physical activity, rest periods during the day and an individually tailored training program.

  17. Therapeutic modality: rehabilitation of the injured athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Nolan, Michael F

    2004-04-01

    Traditional therapeutic modalities include cryotherapy, sonotherapy, pulsed electrical stimulation, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, high-volt pulsed current, and iotopheresis. Alternative modalities include acupuncture, magnetic field therapy, biofeedback,and massage. All therapeutic modalities should be considered adjuncts to progressive functional exercise. Controlled studies rarely reach consensus regarding the efficacy of therapeutic modalities,so their use should be individualized to the patient.

  18. EXETRA Perspectives: Concepts in Therapeutic Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.; Edginton, Christopher R.

    Fifteen papers address issues in therapeutic recreation for disabled persons from the perspectives of practitioners, educators, and students. The following papers are presented. "Therapeutic Recreation Service: The Past and Challenging Present" (H. Sessoms); "Therapeutic Recreatiion in an Era of Limits: A Crisis...A Challenge... An Opportunity"…

  19. [Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic polypectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzsch, K H; Stibenz, J; Fürstenau, M; Winkelvoss, H; Büttner, W; Jacobasch, K H; Gütz, H J; Irro, F

    1980-02-15

    466 endoscopic polypectomies of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract were analysed according to their curative value. In 254 removed polyps of the upper gastrointestinal tract the result of the histological examination was twice a proof of a carcinoma. One it had to be after-resected, once a carcinoid, five times bleeding polyps were removed. Four times prolapsing gastric polyps were removed in the bulbus duodeni. In these cases intermittent disturbances of the passage could be repaired. Thus the endoscopic polypectomy in the upper gastrointestinal tract was of therapeutic value in 4.3%. In the lower intestinal tract in 204 polypectomies 16 focal carcinomas or invasive carcinomas removed in the healthy tissue, 1 carcinoid and 98 bleeding adenomas were cut away. Thus the coloscopic polypectomy was connected with a therapeutic use in 56.3%. 81.8% of the polyps was tubular, papillary or villous adenomas. Taking into consideration the "adenoma-cancer-sequence", the coloscopic polypectomy must thus be regarded as a prophylactic and curative method, while in the polypectomy in the upper gastrointestinal tract the diagnostic value is in the first place.

  20. Shiga Toxin Therapeutics: Beyond Neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Hall

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribotoxic Shiga toxins are the primary cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS in patients infected with Shiga toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (STEC, a pathogen class responsible for epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease around the globe. HUS is a leading cause of pediatric renal failure in otherwise healthy children, resulting in a mortality rate of 10% and a chronic morbidity rate near 25%. There are currently no available therapeutics to prevent or treat HUS in STEC patients despite decades of work elucidating the mechanisms of Shiga toxicity in sensitive cells. The preclinical development of toxin-targeted HUS therapies has been hindered by the sporadic, geographically dispersed nature of STEC outbreaks with HUS cases and the limited financial incentive for the commercial development of therapies for an acute disease with an inconsistent patient population. The following review considers potential therapeutic targeting of the downstream cellular impacts of Shiga toxicity, which include the unfolded protein response (UPR and the ribotoxic stress response (RSR. Outcomes of the UPR and RSR are relevant to other diseases with large global incidence and prevalence rates, thus reducing barriers to the development of commercial drugs that could improve STEC and HUS patient outcomes.

  1. [Therapeutic Aggressiveness and Liquid Oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón Duarte, F J; Rodríguez Calvo, M S; Amor Pan, J R

    2017-01-01

    Aggressiveness criteria proposed in the scientific literature a decade ago provide a quality judgment and are a reference in the care of patients with advanced cancer, but their use is not generalized in the evaluation of Oncology Services. In this paper we analyze the therapeutic aggressiveness, according to standard criteria, in 1.001 patients with advanced cancer who died in our Institution between 2010 and 2013. The results seem to show that aggressiveness at the end of life is present more frequently than experts recommend. About 25% of patients fulfill at least one criterion of aggressiveness. This result could be explained by a liquid Oncology which does not prioritize the patient as a moral subject in the clinical appointment. Medical care is oriented to necessities and must be articulated in a model focused on dignity and communication. Its implementation through Advanced Care Planning, consideration of patient's values and preferences, and Limitation of therapeutic effort are ways to reduce aggressiveness and improve clinical practice at the end of life. We need to encourage synergic and proactive attitudes, adding the best of cancer research with the best clinical care for the benefit of human being, moral subject and main goal of Medicine.

  2. Structurally Based Therapeutic Evaluation: A Therapeutic and Practical Approach to Teaching Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Explains structurally based therapeutic evaluation of drugs, which uses seven therapeutic criteria in translating chemical and structural knowledge into therapeutic decision making in pharmaceutical care. In a Creighton University (Nebraska) medicinal chemistry course, students apply the approach to solve patient-related therapeutic problems in…

  3. Using therapeutic touch in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdtner, S

    2000-01-01

    This article is an introduction to "therapeutic touch" and its implications for nursing. A case study provides an example of how therapeutic touch was used with an individual who fell from a ladder and injured his elbow. A brief history and assumptions that support the practice of therapeutic touch are discussed. Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings, a nursing theory, provides a theoretical basis for therapeutic touch. The method developed by Kunz and Krieger involves four phases and each of these is identified and described. General uses for therapeutic touch are presented and a variety of research studies validate the practice of therapeutic touch in nursing. Resources are provided for those who may be interested in learning more about therapeutic touch.

  4. The therapeutic relationship after psychiatric admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Eric

    2014-03-01

    The therapeutic relationship is one of the most central and important factors in the treatment of mental health disorders. A better therapeutic relationship is associated with service engagement, medication adherence, and satisfaction with services. This study aimed to compare the demographic and clinical factors associated with the therapeutic relationship in voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric service users. We found that individuals who had been admitted involuntarily, who had a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, and who reported higher levels of perceived pressures on admission were more likely to have a poorer therapeutic relationship with their consultant psychiatrist. Greater levels of insight and treatment satisfaction, together with higher levels of procedural justice experienced on admission, were associated with a better therapeutic relationship. We found that the level of perceived coercion on admission was not related to the therapeutic relationship. Targeted interventions to improve the therapeutic relationship, particularly for involuntarily admitted service users, are discussed.

  5. Angiogenesis and Its Therapeutic Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays critical roles in human physiology that range from reproduction and fetal growth to wound healing and tissue repair. The sophisticated multistep process is tightly regulated in a spatial and temporal manner by “on-off switch signals” between angiogenic factors, extracellular matrix components, and endothelial cells. Uncontrolled angiogenesis may lead to several angiogenic disorders, including vascular insufficiency (myocardial or critical limb ischemia and vascular overgrowth (hemangiomas, vascularized tumors, and retinopathies. Thus, numerous therapeutic opportunities can be envisaged through the successful understanding and subsequent manipulation of angiogenesis. Here, we review the clinical implications of angiogenesis and discuss pro- and antiangiogenic agents that offer potential therapy for cancer and other angiogenic diseases.

  6. Levodopa: History and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovallath, Sujith; Sulthana, Bahiya

    2017-01-01

    Levodopa - the aromatic amino acid L-3,4-dihydroxy phenylalanine has held the attention of neurologists and pharmacologists alike for more than half a century. Even though extensive research has been done across the globe in treatment of Parkinson's disease, with different molecules, none could replace the gold standard treatment or provide complete relief for the debilitated. Although research brought us better tips and tricks to modulate the dopamine blood levels to balance between the desired and deleterious effects, it could never replace the basic substrate. From simple oral preparation to more advanced treatment like duodenal dopa administration for better efficacy and compliance, L-dopa has sure undergone scrutiny and stayed strong as the fundamental neurotransmitter replacement therapy to pave path for many more new therapeutic strategies. So as a token of gratitude to the revolutionary agent and pioneers behind it, a trip down the memory lane is in order.

  7. Therapeutic options for severe asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jilcy; Chandy, Dipak

    2012-01-01

    As the overall prevalence of asthma has escalated in the past decades, so has the population of patients with severe asthma. This condition is often difficult to manage due to the relative limitation of effective therapeutic options for the physician and the social and economic burden of the disease on the patient. Management should include an evaluation and elimination of modifiable risk factors such as smoking, allergen exposure, obesity and non-adherence, as well as therapy for co-morbidities like gastro-esophageal reflux disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Current treatment options include conventional agents such as inhalational corticosteroids, long acting β2 agonists, leukotriene antagonists, and oral corticosteroids. Less conventional treatment options include immunotherapy with methotrexate, cyclosporine and tacrolimus, biological drugs like monoclonal antibodies, tumor necrosis factor-α blockers and oligonucleotides, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, antimicrobials and bronchial thermoplasty. PMID:23056066

  8. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of clonazepam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, Danièle; Pailliet-Loilier, Magalie; Lelong-Boulouard, Véronique; Coquerel, Antoine; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle

    2010-01-01

    Clonazepam is a 1-4 benzodiazepine mainly used to treat epilepsy and epileptiform convulsion state. Rapidly absorbed after oral administration, it is widely distributed in the organism and is extensively converted in metabolites, poorly or not active, eliminated mainly in urine (70%) and feces. Elimination half-life is long, around 40 h. In adult and child, several studies showed a concentration-effect relation. Meanwhile, a large inter-individual variability in the dose-concentration relation was observed. A 15-50 microg/L range of clonazepam blood concentrations appears to be retained as an acceptable target to control a majority of epileptic seizures. The Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of clonazepam can be considered as possibly useful in case of association with CYP450 inducers or inhibitors, suspicion of poor observance, or toxicity signs. © 2010 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  9. Host modulation by therapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugumari Elavarasu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease susceptible group present advanced periodontal breakdown even though they achieve a high standard of oral hygiene. Various destructive enzymes and inflammatory mediators are involved in destruction. These are elevated in case of periodontal destruction. Host modulation aims at bringing these enzymes and mediators to normal level. Doxycycline, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, bisphosphonates, nitrous oxide (NO synthase inhibitors, recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11, omega-3 fatty acid, mouse anti-human interleukin-6 receptor antibody (MRA, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitors, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kb inhibitors, osteoprotegerin, and tumor necrosis factor antagonist (TNF-α are some of the therapeutic agents that have host modulation properties.

  10. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  11. Therapeutical uses of 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lago, Graciela.

    1994-01-01

    Physiology of thyroid gland, pathology of thyroid , papillary, follicular cancer is considered together as differentiated thyroid cancer with very good results under therapy with iodine, invitro determination of calcitonin, search of metastasis, anaplastic carcinoma, as indifferentiated carcinoma with similar results as medullary carcinoma. This work gives a protocol for therapeutical use of 131I , in hyperthyroidism due to Graves-Basedow disease, thyrotoxic adenoma or Plummer disease, toxic multi nodular goiter, subacute thyroiditis. Is studied too the treatment with pharmaceuticals, surgery and radioactive iodine. A recommended use of each and protocol for iodine administration, fixed dose technique, dose estimation,absorbed dose, recommendations about when to use and not use 131I are included in this work

  12. Therapeutic options for lip augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Lorne; Ellis, David A F

    2007-11-01

    Aesthetic ideals vary with emerging fashion trends and within different cultures. However, over the past few decades, fuller lips have been considered a desirable trait. Many younger patients are presenting for lip augmentation to achieve the sought-after look commonly seen in many fashion magazines. In addition, as individuals age, they lose lip volume, with a thinning of the red lip, some effacement of the vermillion border, and elongation and flattening of the white portion of the lip. Rejuvenation of the lips plays a key role in restoring a more youthful appearance. As a result, lip augmentation appeals to a wide spectrum of patients who present with various different aesthetic goals and expectations. Numerous therapeutic options exist for aesthetic lip augmentation, ranging from temporary and permanent injectable fillers to implants and other surgical techniques.

  13. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Dharmendar [Blacksburg, VA; Jani, Dewal [Blacksburg, VA; Nagarkatti, Rana [Blacksburg, VA

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  14. Guidelines for Rational Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byunghee Yoo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cancer therapy has relied on surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. In recent years, these interventions have become increasingly replaced or complemented by more targeted approaches that are informed by a deeper understanding of the underlying biology. Still, the implementation of fully rational patient-specific drug design appears to be years away. Here, we present a vision of rational drug design for cancer that is defined by two major components: modularity and image guidance. We suggest that modularity can be achieved by combining a nanocarrier and an oligonucleotide component into the therapeutic. Image guidance can be incorporated into the nanocarrier component by labeling with a specific imaging reporter, such as a radionuclide or contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. While limited by the need for additional technological advancement in the areas of cancer biology, nanotechnology, and imaging, this vision for the future of cancer therapy can be used as a guide to future research endeavors.

  15. Optimization algorithms for functional deimmunization of therapeutic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griswold Karl E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop protein therapeutics from exogenous sources, it is necessary to mitigate the risks of eliciting an anti-biotherapeutic immune response. A key aspect of the response is the recognition and surface display by antigen-presenting cells of epitopes, short peptide fragments derived from the foreign protein. Thus, developing minimal-epitope variants represents a powerful approach to deimmunizing protein therapeutics. Critically, mutations selected to reduce immunogenicity must not interfere with the protein's therapeutic activity. Results This paper develops methods to improve the likelihood of simultaneously reducing the anti-biotherapeutic immune response while maintaining therapeutic activity. A dynamic programming approach identifies optimal and near-optimal sets of conservative point mutations to minimize the occurrence of predicted T-cell epitopes in a target protein. In contrast with existing methods, those described here integrate analysis of immunogenicity and stability/activity, are broadly applicable to any protein class, guarantee global optimality, and provide sufficient flexibility for users to limit the total number of mutations and target MHC alleles of interest. The input is simply the primary amino acid sequence of the therapeutic candidate, although crystal structures and protein family sequence alignments may also be input when available. The output is a scored list of sets of point mutations predicted to reduce the protein's immunogenicity while maintaining structure and function. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in a number of case study applications, showing that, in general, our best variants are predicted to be better than those produced by previous deimmunization efforts in terms of either immunogenicity or stability, or both factors. Conclusions By developing global optimization algorithms leveraging well-established immunogenicity and stability prediction techniques, we provide

  16. Optimization algorithms for functional deimmunization of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew S; Zheng, Wei; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2010-04-09

    To develop protein therapeutics from exogenous sources, it is necessary to mitigate the risks of eliciting an anti-biotherapeutic immune response. A key aspect of the response is the recognition and surface display by antigen-presenting cells of epitopes, short peptide fragments derived from the foreign protein. Thus, developing minimal-epitope variants represents a powerful approach to deimmunizing protein therapeutics. Critically, mutations selected to reduce immunogenicity must not interfere with the protein's therapeutic activity. This paper develops methods to improve the likelihood of simultaneously reducing the anti-biotherapeutic immune response while maintaining therapeutic activity. A dynamic programming approach identifies optimal and near-optimal sets of conservative point mutations to minimize the occurrence of predicted T-cell epitopes in a target protein. In contrast with existing methods, those described here integrate analysis of immunogenicity and stability/activity, are broadly applicable to any protein class, guarantee global optimality, and provide sufficient flexibility for users to limit the total number of mutations and target MHC alleles of interest. The input is simply the primary amino acid sequence of the therapeutic candidate, although crystal structures and protein family sequence alignments may also be input when available. The output is a scored list of sets of point mutations predicted to reduce the protein's immunogenicity while maintaining structure and function. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in a number of case study applications, showing that, in general, our best variants are predicted to be better than those produced by previous deimmunization efforts in terms of either immunogenicity or stability, or both factors. By developing global optimization algorithms leveraging well-established immunogenicity and stability prediction techniques, we provide the protein engineer with a mechanism for exploring the

  17. Culture, context and therapeutic processes: delivering a parent-child intervention in a remote Aboriginal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Sarah; Robinson, Gary

    2012-04-01

    Little is written about the process of delivering mainstream, evidence-based therapeutic interventions for Aboriginal children and families in remote communities. Patterns of interaction between parents and children and expectations about parenting and professional roles and responsibilities vary across cultural contexts. This can be a challenging experience for professionals accustomed to work in urban settings. Language is only a part of cultural difference, and the outsider in a therapeutic group in an Aboriginal community is outside not only in language but also in access to community relationships and a place within those relationships. This paper uses examples from Let's Start, a therapeutic parent-child intervention to describe the impact of distance, culture and relationships in a remote Aboriginal community, on the therapeutic framework, group processes and relationships. Cultural and contextual factors influence communication, relationships and group processes in a therapeutic group program for children and parents in a remote Aboriginal community. Group leaders from within and from outside the community, are likely to have complementary skills. Cultural and contextual factors influence communication, relationships and group processes in a therapeutic group program for children and parents in a remote Aboriginal community. Group leaders from within and from outside the community, are likely to have complementary skills. Program adaptation, evaluation and staff training and support need to take these factors into account to ensure cultural accessibility without loss of therapeutic fidelity and efficacy.

  18. Therapeutic Touch(®) in a geriatric Palliative Care Unit - A retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senderovich, Helen; Ip, Mary Lou; Berall, Anna; Karuza, Jurgis; Gordon, Michael; Binns, Malcolm; Wignarajah, Shaira; Grossman, Daphna; Dunal, Lynda

    2016-08-01

    Complementary therapies are increasingly used in palliative care as an adjunct to the standard management of symptoms to achieve an overall well-being for patients with malignant and non-malignant terminal illnesses. A Therapeutic Touch Program was introduced to a geriatric Palliative Care Unit (PCU) in October 2010 with two volunteer Therapeutic Touch Practitioners providing treatment. To conduct a retrospective review of Therapeutic Touch services provided to patients in an in-patient geriatric palliative care unit in order to understand their responses to Therapeutic Touch. A retrospective medical chart review was conducted on both patients who received Therapeutic Touch as well as a random selection of patients who did not receive Therapeutic Touch from October 2010-June 2013. Client characteristics and the Therapeutic Touch Practitioners' observations of the patients' response to treatment were collected and analyzed. Patients who did not receive Therapeutic Touch tended to have lower admitting Palliative Performance Scale scores, shorter length of stay and were older. Based on a sample of responses provided by patients and observed by the Therapeutic Touch practitioner, the majority of patients receiving treatment achieved a state of relaxation or sleep. This retrospective chart review suggests that implementation of a TT program for an inpatient geriatric Palliative Care Unit is feasible, and appears to be safe, and well-tolerated. Moreover, patient responses, as recorded in the Therapeutic Touch practitioners' session notes, suggest beneficial effects of Therapeutic Touch for a significant number of participants with no evidence of negative sequelae. Therefore, the use of TT in this difficult setting appears to have potential value as an adjunct or complementary therapy to help patients relax. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Relationship of Caregiver Burden and Morale to Alzheimer's Disease Patient Function in a Therapeutic Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winoground, Iris R.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Findings from a study of 18 Alzheimer's patients in a day hospital program and their caregivers in family support groups indicated that such therapeutic programs may slow behavior deterioration in patients and promote enhanced coping in caregivers. Other findings suggest an improvement in caregivers' coping. (Author/ABB)

  20. Therapeutic Riding for a Student with Multiple Disabilities and Visual Impairment: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrman, Jennifer; Ross, David B.

    2001-01-01

    A 9-year-old with multiple disabilities and visual impairments was the focus of a 10-week developmental therapeutic riding program incorporating hippotherapy. The program has led to increased mobility, an increase in visual attention span and fixation time, signs of greater verbal communication, and the acquisition of new functional signs.…

  1. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of therapeutic proteins: Advances and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugmeyster, Yulia; Xu, Xin; Theil, Frank-Peter; Khawli, Leslie A; Leach, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), as well as toxicity profiles of therapeutic proteins in animals and humans, which have been in commercial development for more than three decades. However, in the PK arena, many fundamental questions remain to be resolved. Investigative and bioanalytical tools need to be established to improve the translation of PK data from animals to humans, and from in vitro assays to in vivo readouts, which would ultimately lead to a higher success rate in drug development. In toxicology, it is known, in general, what studies are needed to safely develop therapeutic proteins, and what studies do not provide relevant information. One of the major complicating factors in nonclinical and clinical programs for therapeutic proteins is the impact of immunogenicity. In this review, we will highlight the emerging science and technology, as well as the challenges around the pharmacokinetic- and safety-related issues in drug development of mAbs and other therapeutic proteins. PMID:22558487

  2. Programa de treinamento sobre a intervenção terapêutica "relaxamento, imagens mentais e espiritualidade" (RIME para re-significar a dor espiritual de pacientes terminais Training program about the therapeutical intervention "relaxation, mental images and spirituality" (RIME to resignify the spiritual pain of terminal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina Araújo Elias

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Neste artigo, apresentamos um programa de treinamento sobre a intervenção terapêutica relaxamento, imagens mentais e espiritualidade (RIME para profissionais de saúde, que objetiva re-significar a dor espiritual de pacientes terminais. OBJETIVO: Analisar um programa de treinamento por meio da compreensão da experiência de profissionais na utilização da Intervenção RIME e da compreensão da experiência dos doentes na re-significação da dor espiritual, manifestada durante a aplicação do RIME por profissionais treinados. MÉTODOS: Os sujeitos foram uma enfermeira, uma médica, três psicólogos e uma terapeuta alternativa voluntária, todos experientes ou estudiosos em cuidados paliativos, selecionados por convite e que atenderam 11 pacientes terminais internados em hospitais públicos das cidades de Campinas, Piracicaba e São Paulo (SP. A metodologia utilizada teve como base a pesquisa-ação e a fenomenologia. Os resultados qualitativos foram analisados pelo método análise do conteúdo por meio da técnica análise temática e os quantitativos foram analisados pelo método descritivo, utilizando-se o teste de Wilcoxon. RESULTADOS: Na análise da vivência dos profissionais, encontramos cinco categorias e 15 subcategorias. Na análise da natureza da dor espiritual, encontramos como categorias mais prevalentes os medos da morte expresso pela negação e pela percepção do quadro clínico. Na aplicação do RIME, observamos diferença estatisticamente significativa (p BACKGROUND: This article presents a training program for a therapeutic intervention involving relaxation, mental images and spirituality (RIME, which can be administered to help terminal patients to resignify their spiritual pain. OBJECTIVE: Analysis of a training program based on the understanding of the experience of professionals in the use of RIME intervention and of patients in their resignification of spiritual pain, as revealed during the

  3. Therapeutic ultrasound for pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba-Akbari Sari, A; Flemming, K; Cullum, N A; Wollina, U

    2006-07-19

    Pressure ulcers have been recorded as occurring in 5 to 32% of patients admitted to a UK District General Hospital (the precise rate depends on case-mix) and 4 to 7% in the community. They represent a major burden of sickness and reduced quality of life for patients and their carers, and are costly to health service providers. Pressure ulcers are treated by using wound dressings, relieving pressure on the wound, by treating concurrent conditions which may delay healing, and by the use of physical therapies such as electrical stimulation, laser therapy and ultrasound. To assess the effect of therapeutic ultrasound on the healing of pressure ulcers. We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in May 2006. In addition we hand searched journals, conference proceedings, bibliographies and reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing therapeutic ultrasound with sham ultrasound or standard treatment. Two authors independently checked the result of the search to identify relevant RCTs. Details of eligible studies were extracted and summarised using a data extraction sheet. Attempts were made to obtain missing information by contacting authors. Data extraction was checked by a second author. Meta-analysis was used to combine the results of trials where the interventions and outcome measures were sufficiently similar. Three trials involving 146 people were included. Two RCTs compared ultrasound therapy with sham ultrasound and the third compared a combination of ultrasound and ultraviolet light with laser and with standard treatment. Neither of the two RCTs comparing ultrasound with sham found a significant difference in healing rates. The trials were pooled, in the absence of significant heterogeneity. There was no evidence of benefit associated with the use of ultrasound in the treatment of pressure ulcers. In the three-arm comparison there was no statistically significant

  4. Translational nanomedicine--through the therapeutic window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robin L

    2015-01-01

    Translational nanomedicine occurs only through the successful integration of multiple inputs and iterative modifications. The therapeutic window plays a pivotal role in the trajectory of translational nanomedicine. Often defined in terms of the range of dosage for safe and effective therapeutic effect, a second definition of the therapeutic window refers to the often narrow temporal window in which a therapeutic effect can be obtained. Expanding the second definition to explicitly include the spatial dimension, this article explores aspects of the therapeutic spaces created by nanomedicine that shift the traditional dimensions of symptom, sign and pathology. This article analyzes three aspects of the therapeutic window in nanomedicine - temporal, spatial and manner of construction and their impact on the dimensions of modern medicine.

  5. [Hepatitis C infection: Therapeutic strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diatta, Thierno; Chavade, Delphine; Degos, Françoise; d'Andon, Anne; Guillevin, Loïc

    2016-05-01

    The development of new direct acting antivirals has significantly modified strategies to treat chronic hepatitis C. Treatments were previously made of an interferon-based combination. This article aims to review the direct acting antivirals clinical data and to discuss the new regimens for the management of chronic hepatitis C. Direct acting antivirals combinations - with or without ribavirin - are the new chronic hepatitis C standard treatment regimen. These combinations often result in sustained viral response rate (>90%, including in patients with uncomplicated cirrhosis) after a 12-week treatment for most patients. The innovation could represent a new era for patients with unmet medical need (especially ineligible or non-responders to interferon and/or ribavirin patients). Further investigations are required to confirm the efficacy in specific population (complicated cirrhosis, pre- or post-transplantation, chronic renal failure, comorbidities, etc.) where clinical data are still limited. Other treatments are currently being developed and might lead to new perspectives, especially in terms of treatment duration or therapeutic simplification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic targets in liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallowfield, Jonathan A

    2011-05-01

    Detailed analysis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate liver fibrosis has provided a framework for therapeutic approaches to prevent, slow down, or even reverse fibrosis and cirrhosis. A pivotal event in the development of liver fibrosis is the activation of quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to scar-forming myofibroblast-like cells. Consequently, HSCs and the factors that regulate HSC activation, proliferation, and function represent important antifibrotic targets. Drugs currently licensed in the US and Europe for other indications target HSC-related components of the fibrotic cascade. Their deployment in the near future looks likely. Ultimately, treatment strategies for liver fibrosis may vary on an individual basis according to etiology, risk of fibrosis progression, and the prevailing pathogenic milieu, meaning that a multiagent approach could be required. The field continues to develop rapidly and starts to identify exciting potential targets in proof-of-concept preclinical studies. Despite this, no antifibrotics are currently licensed for use in humans. With epidemiological predictions for the future prevalence of viral, obesity-related, and alcohol-related cirrhosis painting an increasingly gloomy picture, and a shortfall in donors for liver transplantation, the clinical urgency for new therapies is high. There is growing interest from stakeholders keen to exploit the market potential for antifibrotics. However, the design of future trials for agents in the developmental pipeline will depend on strategies that enable equal patient stratification, techniques to reliably monitor changes in fibrosis over time, and the definition of clinically meaningful end points.

  7. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason A; Norris, Ross; Paterson, David L; Martin, Jennifer H

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing the prescription of antimicrobials is required to improve clinical outcome from infections and to reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance. One such method to improve antimicrobial dosing in individual patients is through application of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). The aim of this manuscript is to review the place of TDM in the dosing of antimicrobial agents, specifically the importance of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) to define the antimicrobial exposures necessary for maximizing killing or inhibition of bacterial growth. In this context, there are robust data for some antimicrobials, including the ratio of a PK parameter (e.g. peak concentration) to the minimal inhibitory concentration of the bacteria associated with maximal antimicrobial effect. Blood sampling of an individual patient can then further define the relevant PK parameter value in that patient and, if necessary, antimicrobial dosing can be adjusted to enable achievement of the target PK/PD ratio. To date, the clinical outcome benefits of a systematic TDM programme for antimicrobials have only been demonstrated for aminoglycosides, although the decreasing susceptibility of bacteria to available antimicrobials and the increasing costs of pharmaceuticals, as well as emerging data on pharmacokinetic variability, suggest that benefits are likely. PMID:21831196

  8. [Glucomannan: properties and therapeutic applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Canga, A; Fernández Martínez, N; Sahagún, A M; García Vieitez, J J; Díez Liébana, M J; Calle Pardo, A P; Castro Robles, L J; Sierra Vega, M

    2004-01-01

    Glucomannan is a dietary fiber employed quite frequently in the western countries since two decades now, as its ingestion plays an important role in human health. However, eastern people have used this fiber for more than a thousand years. This dietary fiber is the main polysaccharide obtain from the tubers of the Amorphophallus konjac plant, a member of the family Araceae found in east Asia. The chemical structure of glucomannan consists, mainly, in mannose and glucose in the ratio 8:5 linked by beta (1-->4) glycosidic bonds. This soluble fiber has a extraordinarily high waterholding capacity, forming highly viscous solutions when dissolved in water. It has the highest molecular weight and viscosity of any known dietary fiber. It has been demonstrated that this product is highly effective in the treatment of obesity due to the satiety sensation that it produces; as a remedy for constipation, because it increases the faeces volume; as hypocholesterolemic agent, interfering in the transport of cholesterol and of bile acids and as hypoglycemic and hypoinsulinemic agent, probably, by delaying gastric emptying and slowering glucose delivery to the intestinal mucosa. To the beneficial properties of this fiber, several disadvantages can be added as the production of flatulence, abdominal pain, esophageal obstruction, lower gastrointestinal obstruction or even the possible modification of the bioavailability of other drugs. This paper reviews the main characteristics of glucomannan, as well as its properties, physiologic effects and therapeutic uses.

  9. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Thymoquinone and its therapeutic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darakhshan, Sara; Bidmeshki Pour, Ali; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicine has attracted great attention in the recent years and is increasingly used as alternatives to chemical drugs. Several lines of evidence support the positive impact of medicinal plants in the prevention and cure of a wide range of diseases. Thymoquinone (TQ) is the most abundant constituent of the volatile oil of Nigella sativa seeds and most properties of N sativa are mainly attributed to TQ. A number of pharmacological actions of TQ have been investigated including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-histaminic, anti-microbial and anti-tumor effects. It has also gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective and neuroprotective activities. In addition, positive effects of TQ in cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, reproductive disorders and respiratory ailments, as well as in the treatment of bone complications as well as fibrosis have been shown. In addition, a large body of data shows that TQ has very low adverse effects and no serious toxicity. More recently, a great deal of attention has been given to this dietary phytochemical with an increasing interest to investigate it in pre-clinical and clinical researches for assessing its health benefits. Here we report on and analyze numerous properties of the active ingredient of N. sativa seeds, TQ, in the context of its therapeutic potentials for a wide range of illnesses. We also summarize the drug's possible mechanisms of action. The evidence reported sugests that TQ should be developed as a novel drug in clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutic approach to epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigevano, Federico; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Plouin, Perrine; Specchio, Nicola

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies (EEs) are electroclinical entities with a peculiar course of disease; seizures and electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptiform abnormalities, ictal and interictal, contribute to progressive disturbance of cerebral functions. Frequently EEs are drug resistant, and consequences may be catastrophic. The main goal of treatment is to stop the peculiar course of epilepsy, operating on three parameters: seizure control, reduction of EEG abnormalities, and developmental outcome. For a correct therapeutic approach it is mandatory to have an as accurate as possible syndromic and etiologic diagnosis. Given the poor efficacy of conventional antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the use of specific drugs for EEs, such as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosteroids or stiripentol is suggested. In some cases the choice of treatment is strictly related to the etiology: vigabatrin in tuberous sclerosis, ketogenic diet in glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency, and pyridoxine in pyridoxine deficiency. Some AEDs combinations, such as sodium valproate with lamotrigine, have also provided interesting results, for example, in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, although controlled studies are lacking. Finally, early surgery can be an option in children with focal structural abnormalities responsible for EEs preferably before irreversible damage on developmental outcome. Multispecialist support is recommended in EE. Management should be global from the onset, integrating not only seizure control but also all issues related to comorbidities, particularly neuropsychological and psychiatric. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF COMBINED ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Роман Андреевич Моргунов

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The correct and timely appointment of combined oral contraceptives not only eliminates the risk of unwanted pregnancies, but also provides a therapeutic effect in various gynecological diseases.

  13. [Therapeutic massage on behavioral disturbances of elderly patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquilla Ávila, Carolina; Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan

    2015-12-01

    To know the efficacy of therapeutic massage on behavioral disturbances of elderly patients with dementia. Literature review. The literature search was done in six scientific databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, PEDro, Dialnet, Scopus and CSIC, between 1983 and 2013. The search terms were "massage", "dementia", "therapy", "behavior disorders" and "Alzheimer". Of the 496 articles analyzed, 11 scientific articles have met the selection criteria. Inclusion criteria were: clinical trials, published in English or Spanish, which had analyzed the effects of massage therapy on altered behaviors in people with dementia. The variables were massage benefits, type of massage and massage lubricant. Their authors use different massage techniques (effleurage, pétrissage, pressures, frictions and kneading), obtain better conduct disorders (aggression, anxiety, agitation, and resistance to care) of elderly. The therapeutic massage can be a complementary treatment in the rehabilitation program for better behavior disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthetic Immunology: Hacking Immune Cells to Expand Their Therapeutic Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roybal, Kole T; Lim, Wendell A

    2017-04-26

    The ability of immune cells to survey tissues and sense pathologic insults and deviations makes them a unique platform for interfacing with the body and disease. With the rapid advancement of synthetic biology, we can now engineer and equip immune cells with new sensors and controllable therapeutic response programs to sense and treat diseases that our natural immune system cannot normally handle. Here we review the current state of engineered immune cell therapeutics and their unique capabilities compared to small molecules and biologics. We then discuss how engineered immune cells are being designed to combat cancer, focusing on how new synthetic biology tools are providing potential ways to overcome the major roadblocks for treatment. Finally, we give a long-term vision for the use of synthetic biology to engineer immune cells as a general sensor-response platform to precisely detect disease, to remodel disease microenvironments, and to treat a potentially wide range of challenging diseases.

  15. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0238 TITLE: Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL...of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Oxygen-rich environments can create pro- mutagenic DNA lesions such as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) that can be misreplicated during translesion DNA synthesis

  16. A Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    as an oral contraceptive [6, 7]. Recently, its anti- cancer activity has been reported against advanced breast cancer [8] and head and neck squamous...Award Number: W81XWH-141-0154 TITLE: “A Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER: 5b. GRANT NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0154 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  17. Therapeutic strategies in pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonello eFuso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a life-threatening condition characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. It is clinically classified into five groups: patients in the first group are considered to have pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH whereas patients of the other groups have PH that is due to cardiopulmonary or other systemic diseases. The management of patients with PH has advanced rapidly over the last decade and the introduction of specific treatments especially for PAH has lead to an improved outcome. However, despite the progress in the treatment, the functional limitation and the survival of these patients remain unsatisfactory and there is no cure for PAH. Therefore the search for an ideal therapy still goes on. At present, two levels of treatment can be identified: primary and specific therapy. Primary therapy is directed at the underlying cause of the PH. It also includes a supportive therapy consisting in oxygen supplementation, diuretics, and anticoagulation which should be considered in all patients with PH. Specific therapy is directed at the PH itself and includes treatment with vasodilatators such as calcium channel blockers and with vasodilatator and pathogenetic drugs such as prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. These drugs act in several pathogenetic mechanisms of the PH and are specific for PAH although they might be used also in the other groups of PH. Finally, atrial septostomy and lung transplantation are reserved for patients refractory to medical therapy. Different therapeutic approaches can be considered in the management of patients with PH. Therapy can be established on the basis of both the clinical classification and the functional class. It is also possible to adopt a goal-oriented therapy in which the timing of treatment escalation is determined by inadequate response to known prognostic indicators.

  18. Therapeutic Strategies in Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuso, Leonello; Baldi, Fabiana; Perna, Alessandra Di

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening condition characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. It is clinically classified into five groups: patients in the first group are considered to have pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) whereas patients of the other groups have PH that is due to cardiopulmonary or other systemic diseases. The management of patients with PH has advanced rapidly over the last decade and the introduction of specific treatments especially for PAH has lead to an improved outcome. However, despite the progress in the treatment, the functional limitation and the survival of these patients remain unsatisfactory and there is no cure for PAH. Therefore the search for an “ideal” therapy still goes on. At present, two levels of treatment can be identified: primary and specific therapy. Primary therapy is directed at the underlying cause of the PH. It also includes a supportive therapy consisting in oxygen supplementation, diuretics, and anticoagulation which should be considered in all patients with PH. Specific therapy is directed at the PH itself and includes treatment with vasodilatators such as calcium channel blockers and with vasodilatator and pathogenetic drugs such as prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. These drugs act in several pathogenetic mechanisms of the PH and are specific for PAH although they might be used also in the other groups of PH. Finally, atrial septostomy and lung transplantation are reserved for patients refractory to medical therapy. Different therapeutic approaches can be considered in the management of patients with PH. Therapy can be established on the basis of both the clinical classification and the functional class. It is also possible to adopt a goal-oriented therapy in which the timing of treatment escalation is determined by inadequate response to known prognostic indicators. PMID:21687513

  19. Developing Rapport and Therapeutic Alliance During Telemental Health Sessions with Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Felissa; Glueck, Dehra

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the special considerations for building rapport and establishing a therapeutic alliance when conducting mental health evaluations for children and adolescents via videoconferencing. The authors review the literature and describe their experience in conducting mental health evaluations, developing rapport, and establishing a therapeutic alliance during telemental health practice. Clinical need and shortages of clinicians with expertise in evaluating mental conditions for children and adolescents in underserved communities have stimulated the rapid expansion of telemental health programs while the research base continues to develop. The emerging evidence base and clinical experience suggest that teleclinicians can, and do, build rapport and establish a therapeutic alliance during telemental health sessions with youth and families. Families may be more accepting of telemental health approaches than clinicians. The impact that technology, equipment, site staff, community supports, cultural identification, and teleclinicians' characteristics have on building rapport and establishing a therapeutic alliance should be considered when establishing a telemental health service. Staff at the patient site and referring providers have a valuable role in supporting the therapeutic alliance between telemental health providers and their patients, and ultimately supporting the success of a telemental health program. Teleclinicians are creative in transcending the videoconferencing technology to evaluate patients using guideline-based care. Further research is needed to determine how clinicians build rapport and establish a therapeutic alliance during telemental health sessions, and whether the therapeutic alliance is associated with the accuracy of evaluation and outcomes.

  20. Woodland in Practical Skills Therapeutic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Paula; Gibons, Kenneth; Mata, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Modern urban life provides less opportunities to contact with nature, which is a potential cause of developmental deviances in children. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of woodlands, within the context of Practical Skills Therapeutic Education at the Ruskin Mill College, UK. Data on physical and emotional perceptions were…

  1. [A therapeutic education tool in paediatric dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquillier, Thomas; Trentesaux, Thomas; Catteau, Céline; Delfosse, Caroline

    Therapeutic education for children is developing in the treatment of dental caries. The Elmy pathway, a pedagogical game aiming to improve children's oral health skills, has been designed. The qualitative assessment of this tool seems to confirm its benefit for use in therapeutic education sessions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Translational nanomedicine : Through the therapeutic window

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierce, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Translational nanomedicine occurs only through the successful integration of multiple inputs and iterative modifications. The therapeutic window plays a pivotal role in the trajectory of translational nanomedicine. Often defined in terms of the range of dosage for safe and effective therapeutic

  3. The effects of therapeutic touch on pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Carolyn Magdalen

    2009-06-01

    To better understand how Therapeutic Touch can be used in today's health care arena, this integrative literature review will examine current research that will help answer the question, Does Therapeutic Touch reduce pain? An extensive search was conducted of the online databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PsychLIT, and PubMed to retrieve research articles published from 1997 to 2007. Seven studies that were conducted between 1997 and 2004 were found and only five of the seven were included as pertinent evidence to answer the question. All of the research that was reviewed to answer whether Therapeutic Touch could significantly reduce pain revealed a majority of statistically significant positive results for implementing this intervention. Because there are no identified risks to Therapeutic Touch as a pain relief measure, it is safe to recommend despite the limitations of current research. Therapeutic Touch should be considered among the many possible nursing interventions for the treatment of pain.

  4. Therapeutic letters as relationally responsive practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Nathan R

    2009-02-01

    Therapeutic letters have become a practice adopted by many clinicians as an adjunct to therapeutic conversations. This article presents selected findings from a larger study that examined both the letter-writing practices of nine clinicians as well as the experiences of seven adult clients who received a therapeutic letter or letters during the course of individual or family therapy. A novel aspect of this study is that data from clients were gathered in the form of letters-eight letters written by the clients to the researcher about their experience of receiving a therapeutic letter or letters from their clinician. Thematic analysis guided the analysis of the data. Findings are placed within the context of relationally responsive (or relationally engaged) practice. An invitation is extended to conceptualize letters not as monologic documents but as a means of dialogically relating to clients and to the "goings-on" of therapeutic conversations.

  5. Outcomes of homeless mentally ill chemical abusers in community residences and a therapeutic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttbrock, L A; Rahav, M; Rivera, J J; Ng-Mak, D S; Link, B G

    1998-01-01

    The feasibility and effectiveness of treating homeless mentally ill chemical abusers in community residences compared with a therapeutic community were evaluated. A total of 694 homeless mentally ill chemical abusers were randomly referred to two community residences or a therapeutic community. All programs were enhanced to treat persons with dual diagnoses. Subjects' attrition, substance use, and psychopathology were measured at two, six, and 12 months. Forty-two percent of the 694 referred subjects were admitted to their assigned program and showed up for treatment, and 13 percent completed 12 months or more. Clients retained at both types of program showed reductions in substance use and psychopathology, but reductions were greater at the therapeutic community. Compared with subjects in the community residences, those in the therapeutic community were more likely to be drug free, as measured by urine analysis and self-reports, and showed greater improvement in psychiatric symptoms, as measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies--Depression Scale and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Their functioning also improved, as measured by the Global Assessment of Functioning scale. Homeless mentally ill chemical abusers who are retained in community-based residential programs, especially in therapeutic communities, can be successfully treated.

  6. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J. Breitbach

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OV are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a “one-size fits all” approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms.

  7. [Relationship between defense mechanism and therapeutic alliance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laconi, S; Cailhol, L; Pourcel, L; Thalamas, C; Lapeyre-Mestre, M; Chabrol, H

    2015-10-01

    The therapeutic alliance can be defined as a collaborative relationship between the patient and the practitioner. It represents an essential component of the psychotherapeutic process (Ambresin et al., 2007; Cungi, 2006; Martin et al., 2000). Some authors suggest that a good alliance can have a favorable impact on the therapeutic success (Barber et al., 2000; Hubble, Duncan, & Miller 1999; Horvath & Luborsky, 1993; Horvath & Symonds, 1991). This alliance can be influenced by psychological and behavioral factors (Cungi, 2006) Thus, some defense mechanisms could prevent change or, on the contrary could facilitate adaptation (Ambresin et al., 2007) and have an impact on the therapeutic success (Muris & Merckelbach, 1996). However, the relationship between therapeutic alliance and defense mechanisms represents an insufficiently explored field (Ambresin et al., 2007; Cungi, 2006). The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between therapeutic alliance and twenty defense mechanisms in a sample of French psychiatric patients, by differentiating results in men and women. We also examined the positive and the negative therapeutic alliance. Sixty patients aged from 18 to 58 (M=41.50; SD=11.03) completed the French versions of the Defense Style Questionnaire-40 (DSQ-40) and the Helping Alliance questionnaire-II (HAq-II). Therapeutic alliance was significantly associated with each defense style: mature (0.62), neurotic (0.45) Pdefense style was a significant predictor of therapeutic alliance (R(2) adj=36, F=12.39, β=0.65, Pdefenses, three neurotic defenses (reaction formation, pseudo-altruism, idealization) and four immature defenses (splitting, denial, somatization, passive aggression). Among men, three mature defenses were associated (anticipation, humor, sublimation), four neurotic (reaction formation, pseudo-altruism, idealization and undoing) and two immature (somatization and denial). The negative therapeutic alliance, in our total sample, was

  8. Protein nanoparticles for therapeutic protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Estrada, L P; Champion, J A

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic proteins can face substantial challenges to their activity, requiring protein modification or use of a delivery vehicle. Nanoparticles can significantly enhance delivery of encapsulated cargo, but traditional small molecule carriers have some limitations in their use for protein delivery. Nanoparticles made from protein have been proposed as alternative carriers and have benefits specific to therapeutic protein delivery. This review describes protein nanoparticles made by self-assembly, including protein cages, protein polymers, and charged or amphipathic peptides, and by desolvation. It presents particle fabrication and delivery characterization for a variety of therapeutic and model proteins, as well as comparison of the features of different protein nanoparticles.

  9. Indirect comparisons of therapeutic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulkhemair, Dalila

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: The comparison of the effectiveness of health technologies is not only laid down in German law (Social Code Book V, § 139 and § 35b but also constitutes a central element of clinical guidelines and decision making in health care. Tools supporting decision making (e. g. Health Technology Assessments (HTA are therefore in need of a valid methodological repertoire for these comparisons. Scientific background: Randomised controlled head-to-head trials which directly compare the effects of different therapies are considered the gold standard methodological approach for the comparison of the efficacy of interventions. Because this type of trial is rarely found, comparisons of efficacy often need to rely on indirect comparisons whose validity is being controversially debated. Research questions: Research questions for the current assessment are: Which (statistical methods for indirect comparisons of therapeutic interventions do exist, how often are they applied and how valid are their results in comparison to the results of head-to-head trials? Methods: In a systematic literature research all medical databases of the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI are searched for methodological papers as well as applications of indirect comparisons in systematic reviews. Results of the literature analysis are summarized qualitatively for the characterisation of methods and quantitatively for the frequency of their application. The validity of the results from indirect comparisons is checked by comparing them to the results from the gold standard – a direct comparison. Data sets from systematic reviews which use both direct and indirect comparisons are tested for consistency by of the z-statistic. Results: 29 methodological papers and 106 applications of indirect methods in systematic reviews are being analysed. Four methods for indirect comparisons can be identified: 1. Unadjusted indirect comparisons

  10. Therapeutic vaccination strategies to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Graham S; Steven, Neil M

    2016-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects most people worldwide. EBV has oncogenic potential and is strongly associated with several lymphomas and carcinomas, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), that together total 200,000 cases of cancer each year. All EBV-associated cancers express viral proteins that allow highly selective immunotherapeutic targeting of the malignant cells. A number of therapeutic EBV vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with evidence of immune boosting and clinical responses in NPC patients. Therapeutic vaccination could be used after adoptive T-cell transfer to increase and sustain the number of infused T-cells or combined with immunotherapies acting at different stages of the cancer immunity cycle to increase efficacy. The therapeutic EBV vaccines tested to date have been well tolerated with minimal off-target toxicity. A safe therapeutic vaccine that was also able to be mass produced could, in principle, be used to vaccinate large numbers of patients after first line therapy to reduce recurrence.

  11. Therapeutic opportunities in biological responses of ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Sumit; Mitragotri, Samir

    2008-08-01

    The therapeutic benefits of several existing ultrasound-based therapies such as facilitated drug delivery, tumor ablation and thrombolysis derive largely from physical or mechanical effects. In contrast, ultrasound can also trigger various time-dependent biochemical responses in the exposed biological milieu. Several biological responses to ultrasound exposure have been previously described in the literature but only a handful of these provide therapeutic opportunities. These include the use of ultrasound for healing of soft tissues and bones, the use of ultrasound for inducing non-necrotic tumor atrophy as well as for potentiation of chemotherapeutic drugs, activation of the immune system, angiogenesis and suppression of phagocytosis. A review of these therapeutic opportunities is presented with particular emphasis on their mechanisms. Overall, this review presents the increasing importance of ultrasound's role as a biological sensitizer enabling novel therapeutic strategies.

  12. Therapeutic potential of fecal microbiota transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Loek P.; Bouter, Kristien E. C.; de Vos, Willem M.; Borody, Thomas J.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2013-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of fecal microbiota for the treatment of patients with chronic gastrointestinal infections and inflammatory bowel diseases. Lately, there has also been interest in its therapeutic potential for cardiometabolic, autoimmune, and other extraintestinal

  13. Malignant mesothelioma: biology, diagnosis and therapeutic approaches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomasetti, M.; Amati, M.; Santarelli, L.; Alleva, R.; Neužil, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2009), s. 190-206 ISSN 1874-4672 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : malignant mesothelioma * biology * diagnosis and therapeutic approaches Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  14. Therapeutic Strategy for Chronic Headache in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.O. Lezhenko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic efficacy of a combined homeopathic preparation Cefavora, which consists of alcoholic extracts of Ginkgo biloba, hawthorn (Crataegus and white mistletoe (Viscum album, has been studied in the treatment of chronic tension-type headache in children. It has been shown that alongside with elimination of headache manifestations, the use of homeopathic medicine has contributed to the normalization of adaptive mechanisms of autonomic regulation in children indicating its high therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  16. Economic Cost of the Therapeutic Workplace Intervention Added to Methadone Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knealing, Todd W.; Roebuck, M. Christopher; Wong, Conrad J.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    The therapeutic workplace is a novel intervention that uses access to paid training and employment to reinforce drug abstinence within the context of standard methadone maintenance. We used the Drug Abuse Treatment Cost Analysis Program as a standard method of estimating the economic costs of this intervention. Over a one-year period, the therapeutic workplace served 122 methadone maintenance clients who had a median length of stay of 22 weeks. The workplace maintained a mean daily census of 48 clients. The combined cost of methadone maintenance and the therapeutic workplace was estimated at $362 per week. This cost is less than other treatments that might be used to promote abstinence in individuals who continue to use drugs during methadone treatment. Given prior evidence of effectiveness, these cost data may be useful to policymakers, social service agencies, and researchers interested in using or further developing the therapeutic workplace intervention. PMID:17614239

  17. Gluteal muscle activation during common therapeutic exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, Lindsay J; Blackburn, J Troy; Marshall, Stephen W; Padua, Darin A

    2009-07-01

    Experimental laboratory study. To quantify and compare electromyographic signal amplitude of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles during exercises of varying difficulty to determine which exercise most effectively recruits these muscles. Gluteal muscle weakness has been proposed to be associated with lower extremity injury. Exercises to strengthen the gluteal muscles are frequently used in rehabilitation and injury prevention programs without scientific evidence regarding their ability to activate the targeted muscles. Surface electromyography was used to quantify the activity level of the gluteal muscles in 21 healthy, physically active subjects while performing 12 exercises. Repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to compare normalized mean signal amplitude levels, expressed as a percent of a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), across exercises. Significant differences in signal amplitude among exercises were noted for the gluteus medius (F5,90 = 7.9, Pgluteus maximus (F5,95 = 8.1, PGluteus medius activity was significantly greater during side-lying hip abduction (mean +/- SD, 81% +/- 42% MVIC) compared to the 2 types of hip clam (40% +/- 38% MVIC, 38% +/- 29% MVIC), lunges (48% +/- 21% MVIC), and hop (48% +/- 25% MVIC) exercises. The single-limb squat and single-limb deadlift activated the gluteus medius (single-limb squat, 64% +/- 25% MVIC; single-limb deadlift, 59% +/- 25% MVIC) and maximus (single-limb squat, 59% +/- 27% MVIC; single-limb deadlift, 59% +/- 28% MVIC) similarly. The gluteus maximus activation during the single-limb squat and single-limb deadlift was significantly greater than during the lateral band walk (27% +/- 16% MVIC), hip clam (34% +/- 27% MVIC), and hop (forward, 35% +/- 22% MVIC; transverse, 35% +/- 16% MVIC) exercises. The best exercise for the gluteus medius was side-lying hip abduction, while the single-limb squat and single-limb deadlift exercises led to the greatest activation of the gluteus maximus

  18. Integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models at schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Oosterlinck, Franky; Broekaert, Eric

    2003-08-01

    Including children with emotional and behavioral needs in mainstream school systems leads to growing concern about the increasing number of violent and nonviolent conflicts. Schools must adapt to this evolution and adopt a more therapeutic dimension. This paper explores the possibility of integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models and compares two management models: a school-based conflict management program. Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers; and a therapeutic conflict management program, Life Space Crisis Intervention. The authors conclude that integration might be possible, but depends on establishing a positive school atmosphere, the central position of the teacher, and collaborative and social learning for pupils. Further implementation of integrated conflict management models can be considered but must be underpinned by appropriate scientific research.

  19. Immunogenicity, reactogenicity and consistency of production of a Brazilian combined vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and Haemophilus influenzae type b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo de Menezes Martins

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A randomized, double-blinded study evaluating the immunogenicity, safety and consistency of production of a combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine entirely produced in Brazil by Bio-Manguinhos and Instituto Butantan (DTP/Hib-BM was undertaken. The reference vaccine had the same DTP vaccine but the Hib component was produced using purified materials supplied by GlaxoSmithKline (DTP/Hib-GSK, which is registered and has supplied the Brazilian National Immunization Program for over more than five years. One thousand infants were recruited for the study and received vaccinations at two, four and six months of age. With respect to immunogenicity, the vaccination protocol was followed in 95.6% and 98.4% of infants in the DTP/Hib-BM and DTP/Hib-GSK groups, respectively. For the Hib component of the study, there was 100% seroprotection (>0.15 µg/mL with all three lots of DTP/Hib-BM and DTP/Hib-GSK. The geometric mean titer (GMT was 9.3 µg/mL, 10.3 µg/mL and 10.3 µg/mL for lots 1, 2 and 3 of DTP/Hib-BM, respectively, and the GMT was 11.3 g/mL for DTP/Hib-GSK. For diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, seroprotection was 99.7%, 100% and 99.9%, respectively, for DTP/Hib-BM, three lots altogether and 99.2%, 100% and 100% for DTP/Hib-GSK. GMTs were similar across all lots and vaccines. Adverse events rates were comparable among the vaccine groups. The Brazilian DTP/Hib vaccine demonstrated an immunogenicity and reactogenicity profile similar to that of the reference vaccine.

  20. Development of Antibody Therapeutics against Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyan; Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang

    2017-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of Zika virus (ZIKV) highlight the urgent need to develop efficacious interventions against flaviviruses, many of which cause devastating epidemics around the world. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have been at the forefront of treatment for cancer and a wide array of other diseases due to their specificity and potency. While mammalian cell-produced mAbs have shown promise as therapeutic candidates against several flaviviruses, their eventual approval for human application still faces several challenges including their potential risk of predisposing treated patients to more severe secondary infection by a heterologous flavivirus through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The high cost associated with mAb production in mammalian cell cultures also poses a challenge for the feasible application of these drugs to the developing world where the majority of flavivirus infection occurs. Here, we review the current therapeutic mAb candidates against various flaviviruses including West Nile (WNV), Dengue virus (DENV), and ZIKV. The progress of using plants for developing safer and more economical mAb therapeutics against flaviviruses is discussed within the context of their expression, characterization, downstream processing, neutralization, and in vivo efficacy. The progress of using plant glycoengineering to address ADE, the major impediment of flavivirus therapeutic development, is highlighted. These advancements suggest that plant-based systems are excellent alternatives for addressing the remaining challenges of mAb therapeutic development against flavivirus and may facilitate the eventual commercialization of these drug candidates. PMID:29295568

  1. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeli A. Brinkman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  2. Therapeutic vaccination for HPV induced cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Joeli A; Hughes, Sarah H; Stone, Pamela; Caffrey, Angela S; Muderspach, Laila I; Roman, Lynda D; Weber, Jeffrey S; Kast, W Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  3. RNAi Therapeutic Platforms for Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Kuwano

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is rapidly becoming an important method for analyzing gene functions in many eukaryotes and holds promise for the development of therapeutic gene silencing. The induction of RNAi relies on small silencing RNAs, which affect specific messenger RNA (mRNA degradation. Two types of small RNA molecules, i.e. small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs, are central to RNAi. Drug discovery studies and novel treatments of siRNAs are currently targeting a wide range of diseases, including various viral infections and cancers. Lung diseases in general are attractive targets for siRNA therapeutics because of their lethality and prevalence. In addition, the lung is anatomically accessible to therapeutic agents via the intrapulmonary route. Recently, increasing evidence indicates that miRNAs play an important role in lung abnormalities, such as inflammation and oncogenesis. Therefore, miRNAs are being targeted for therapeutic purposes. In this review, we present strategies for RNAi delivery and discuss the current state-of-the-art RNAi-based therapeutics for various lung diseases.

  4. INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS IN THE NETHERLANDS - PREVALENCE, DIAGNOSTIC-CRITERIA AND THERAPEUTIC PREFERENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BADE, JJ; RIJCKEN, B; MENSINK, HJA

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We determine the prevalence of interstitial cystitis in The Netherlands, and analyze the most common diagnostic and therapeutic approaches among Dutch urologists. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was completed by urologists and analyzed with the help of a statistical computer program.

  5. Participatory Action Research with therapeutic arts practitioners : Research capacity building in a pediatric hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lind, Candace; Cantell, Marja; Baggott, Sandy; Houde, Marc; Coupal, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic arts (TA) encompass a vast area of practices including art, music, drama, dance, and horticultural therapy in multiple settings. However, TA often lack recognition in hospital settings and may be viewed as expendable programming. Credibility and visibility obtained through research

  6. College and Community Partnerships: Extending the Benefits of Therapeutic Recreation to Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Steven J.; Cannella, Lee grace; Pisano, Susan

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2010, St. Joseph's College initiated a partnership between the college, Northport VA Medical Center, and Long Island State Veterans Home that provides a therapeutic platform for the integration of the three communities through sustainable and mutually beneficial curricular and co-curricular service and experiential learning programs. In…

  7. Developing patient rapport, trust and therapeutic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    2017-08-09

    Rapport is established at the first meeting between the patient and nurse, and is developed throughout the therapeutic relationship. However, challenges can arise during this process. Initially, nurses can establish trust with the patient through the questions they ask, however, as care progresses, the nurse will be required to demonstrate a commitment to maintaining the patient's psychological well-being. When the therapeutic relationship ends, the nurse should assist the patient to assess progress and plan the next stage of recovery. This article provides three reflective exercises using case study examples to demonstrate how rapport is developed and sustained. Evidence is provided to identify why challenges arise in the therapeutic relationship and how the nurse can ensure they provide care that the patient regards as genuine.

  8. Therapeutic Residential Care for Children and Youth:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittaker, James K.; Holmes, Lisa; del Valle, Jorge F.

    2016-01-01

    for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University in the U.K. for a Summit meeting on therapeutic residential care for children and youth funded by the Sir Halley Stewart Trust (UK). The focus centered on what is known about therapeutic residential care and what key questions should inform a priority......In many developed countries around the world, ‘group care’ interventions for children and adolescents have come under increasing scrutiny from central government, private philanthropic and child advocacy agencies desirous of (1) achieving better outcomes for vulnerable children and youth; (2) doing...... alternatives to serve high-resource needing youth has had unintended and negative consequences. It is within this context that a working group international experts representing research, policy, service delivery and families (International Work Group for Therapeutic Residential Care) convened at the Centre...

  9. Molecular Engineering Solutions for Therapeutic Peptide Delivery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Handan; Ting, Jeffrey M.; Srivastava, Samanvaya; LaBelle, James L.; Tirrell, Matthew V.

    2017-11-07

    Proteins and their interactions in and out of cells must be well-orchestrated for the healthy functioning and regulation of the body. Even the slightest disharmony can cause diseases. Therapeutic peptides are short amino acid sequences (generally considered <50 amino acids) that can naturally mimic the binding interfaces between proteins and thus, influence protein-protein interactions. Because of their fidelity of binding, peptides are a promising next generation of personalized medicines to reinstate biological harmony. Peptides as a group are highly selective, relatively safe, and biocompatible. However, they are also vulnerable to many in vivo pharmacologic barriers limiting their clinical translation. Current advances in molecular, chemical, and nanoparticle engineering are helping to overcome these previously insurmountable obstacles and improve the future of peptides as active and highly selective therapeutics. In this review, we focus on self-assembled vehicles as nanoparticles to carry and protect therapeutic peptides through this journey, and deliver them to the desired tissue.

  10. Pharmacological caspase inhibitors: research towards therapeutic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudelova, J; Fleischmannova, J; Adamova, E; Matalova, E

    2015-08-01

    Caspases are key molecules of apoptosis and the inflammatory response. Up-regulation of the caspase cascade contributes to human pathologies such as neurodegenerative and immune disorders. Thus, blocking the excessive apoptosis by pharmacological inhibitors seems promising for therapeutic interventions in such diseases. Caspase inhibitors, both natural and artificial, have been used as research tools and have helped to define the role of the individual caspases in apoptosis and in non-apoptotic processes. Moreover, some caspase inhibitors have demonstrated their therapeutic efficiency in the reduction of cell death and inflammation in animal models of human diseases. However, no drug based on caspase inhibition has been approved on the market until now. Thus, the development of therapeutic approaches that specifically target caspases remains a great challenge and is now the focus of intense biological and clinical interest. Here, we provide a brief review of recent knowledge about pharmacological caspase inhibitors with special focus on their proposed clinical applications.

  11. Therapeutic Angiogenesis for Treating Cardiovascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveza, Lorenzo; Choi, Jeffrey; Yang, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and is often associated with partial or full occlusion of the blood vessel network in the affected organs. Restoring blood supply is critical for the successful treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Therapeutic angiogenesis provides a valuable tool for treating cardiovascular diseases by stimulating the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. In this review, we discuss strategies developed for therapeutic angiogenesis using single or combinations of biological signals, cells and polymeric biomaterials. Compared to direct delivery of growth factors or cells alone, polymeric biomaterials provide a three-dimensional drug-releasing depot that is capable of facilitating temporally and spatially controlled release. Biomimetic signals can also be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds to allow environmentally-responsive or cell-triggered release of biological signals for targeted angiogenesis. Recent progress in exploiting genetically engineered stem cells and endogenous cell homing mechanisms for therapeutic angiogenesis is also discussed. PMID:22916079

  12. Marine polysaccharides: therapeutic efficacy and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyeongmin; Seo, Changwon; Park, Taejun; Lee, Kyung Bin; Yoo, Seung-Yup; Hong, Seong-Chul; Kim, Jeong Tae; Lee, Jaehwi

    2017-09-01

    The ocean contains numerous marine organisms, including algae, animals, and plants, from which diverse marine polysaccharides with useful physicochemical and biological properties can be extracted. In particular, fucoidan, carrageenan, alginate, and chitosan have been extensively investigated in pharmaceutical and biomedical fields owing to their desirable characteristics, such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bioactivity. Various therapeutic efficacies of marine polysaccharides have been elucidated, including the inhibition of cancer, inflammation, and viral infection. The therapeutic activities of these polysaccharides have been demonstrated in various settings, from in vitro laboratory-scale experiments to clinical trials. In addition, marine polysaccharides have been exploited for tissue engineering, the immobilization of biomolecules, and stent coating. Their ability to detect and respond to external stimuli, such as pH, temperature, and electric fields, has enabled their use in the design of novel drug delivery systems. Thus, along with the promising characteristics of marine polysaccharides, this review will comprehensively detail their various therapeutic, biomedical, and miscellaneous applications.

  13. Observational therapeutics: Scope, challenges, and organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Vaidya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Observational Therapeutics in the progress of medicine has been neglected in the current era of the hierarchal position imparted to Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs for new drug discovery and practice of evidence-based medicine. There is a need to reflect on the reason for many new drugs being withdrawn during post marketing surveillance. There are several examples in literature where drug-discovery has originated initially from keen clinical and / or laboratory observations. The roots of these discoveries have often been from observations made by practitioners of traditional medicine including Ayurveda. The present article draws attention to the scope and challenges for observational therapeutics. There is an urgent need for the meticulous planning for a systematic organization of developing observational therapeutics, with a full understanding of its strengths and limitations.

  14. Playing and therapeutic action in child analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, L C; Cohen, D J

    1993-12-01

    From its inception, child psychoanalysis has used fantasy play as a window to both the content and process of children's inner worlds. Because of the link to action and primary process, young children's imaginary play is rich in symbolic expressions that facilitate analytic interpretive interventions addressing the conflicts impeding development. There are inevitable tensions between allowing play to emerge as a therapeutic process in its own right and the usual psychoanalytic emphasis on clarification, verbalisation and, above all, interpretation within and about the transference. For many children, the very act of playing carries much of the therapeutic work aimed toward facilitating their return to developmentally appropriate and adaptive psychic functioning. The mobilisation of capacities for play in the analysis allows children to do what is needed for their development to continue and makes use of the developmentally restorative functions of play in the service of therapeutic action.

  15. Nanotechnology—novel therapeutics for CNS disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Maya; Kessler, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Research into treatments for diseases of the CNS has made impressive strides in the past few decades, but therapeutic options are limited for many patients with CNS disorders. Nanotechnology has emerged as an exciting and promising new means of treating neurological disease, with the potential to fundamentally change the way we approach CNS-targeted therapeutics. Molecules can be nanoengineered to cross the blood–brain barrier, target specific cell or signalling systems, respond to endogenous stimuli, or act as vehicles for gene delivery, or as a matrix to promote axon elongation and support cell survival. The wide variety of available nanotechnologies allows the selection of a nanoscale material with the characteristics best suited to the therapeutic challenges posed by an individual CNS disorder. In this Review, we describe recent advances in the development of nanotechnology for the treatment of neurological disorders—in particular, neurodegenerative disease and malignant brain tumours—and for the promotion of neuroregeneration. PMID:22526003

  16. Botanical polysaccharides: macrophage immunomodulation and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Quinn, Mark T

    2006-03-01

    Botanical polysaccharides exhibit a number of beneficial therapeutic properties, and it is thought that the mechanisms involved in these effects are due to the modulation of innate immunity and, more specifically, macrophage function. In this review, we summarize our current state of understanding of the macrophage modulatory effects of botanical polysaccharides isolated from a wide array of different species of flora, including higher plants, mushrooms, lichens and algae. Overall, the primary effect of botanical polysaccharides is to enhance and/or activate macrophage immune responses, leading to immunomodulation, anti-tumor activity, wound-healing and other therapeutic effects. Furthermore, botanical and microbial polysaccharides bind to common surface receptors and induce similar immunomodulatory responses in macrophages, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved polysaccharide structural features are shared between these organisms. Thus, the evaluation of botanical polysaccharides provides a unique opportunity for the discovery of novel therapeutic agents and adjuvants that exhibit beneficial immunomodulatory properties.

  17. Therapeutic Responses of Psychopathic Sexual Offenders: Treatment Attrition, Therapeutic Change, and Long-Term Recidivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, Mark E.; Wong, Stephen C. P.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the therapeutic responses of psychopathic sex offenders (greater than or equal to 25 Psychopathy Checklist-Revised; PCL-R) in terms of treatment dropout and therapeutic change, as well as sexual and violent recidivism over a 10-year follow-up among 156 federally incarcerated sex offenders treated in a high-intensity inpatient…

  18. Therapeutic Engagement as a Predictor of Retention in Adolescent Therapeutic Community Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Sami; Gunter, Whitney D.

    2014-01-01

    The adolescent drug problem places a huge toll on society and a heavy burden on the criminal justice system. Research regarding the benefits of therapeutic community (TC) treatment for adolescents has shown it to be effective. Despite the ability of therapeutic communities to lower drug relapse and reduce criminality, a great deal remains unknown…

  19. Graves' disease. Manifestations and therapeutic options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, K.F.; Saleeby, G.

    1988-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Clinical features include thyroid enlargement, eye signs, tachycardia, heat intolerance, emotional lability, weight loss, and hyperkinesis. Three modes of therapy are available. The preferences of the patient and physician are usually prime considerations in devising the therapeutic plan. Radioactive iodine is the most frequently used and safest method of treatment for adults. Antithyroid drugs are preferred for children and pregnant women. Surgery is usually reserved for patients in whom the other forms of treatment are not acceptable. Considerable patient education during the decision-making process enhances the success of the therapeutic plan

  20. The Medicinal Chemistry of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W Brad; Seth, Punit P

    2016-11-10

    Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have made rapid progress in the clinic for treatment of a variety of disease indications. Unmodified oligonucleotides are polyanionic macromolecules with poor drug-like properties. Over the past two decades, medicinal chemists have identified a number of chemical modification and conjugation strategies which can improve the nuclease stability, RNA-binding affinity, and pharmacokinetic properties of oligonucleotides for therapeutic applications. In this perspective, we present a summary of the most commonly used nucleobase, sugar and backbone modification, and conjugation strategies used in oligonucleotide medicinal chemistry.

  1. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  2. Evaluating the effect of therapeutic gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Yuko

    2004-01-01

    Sometimes the visitors to therapeutic gardens do not necessarily experience the garden the way the designers intended. A postoccupancy evaluation (POE) can reveal discrepancies between the designer's intentions and use of the environment by the actual visitors. A POE is a user-oriented assessment that elicits the opinions of the visitors to a building, facility, or environment. This paper describes a POE of therapeutic gardens at a multilevel care facility for the aged. The population included patients at various stages of Alzheimer's disease progression.

  3. Midodrine: a novel therapeutic for refractory chylothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Douglas Z; Warren, Heather; Maher, Dermot P; Soukiasian, Harmik J; Melo, Nicolas; Salim, Ali; Ley, Eric J

    2013-09-01

    Thoracic duct injury is a rare but serious complication following surgery of the neck or chest that leads to uncontrolled chyle leak. Conventional management includes drainage, nutritional modification, or aggressive surgical interventions such as thoracic duct ligation, flap coverage, fibrin glue, or talc pleurodesis; few successful medical therapeutics are available. We report a case of a high-output chylothorax refractory to aggressive medical and surgical interventions. Chyle output decreased substantially after initiating midodrine, an α1-adrenergic agonist that causes vasoconstriction of the lymph system, reducing chyle flow. This case report suggests that midodrine may be a novel therapeutic for refractory chyle leaks.

  4. Warfarin therapeutic monitoring: is 70% time in the therapeutic range the best we can do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lader, E; Martin, N; Cohen, G; Meyer, M; Reiter, P; Dimova, A; Parikh, D

    2012-08-01

    Warfarin, an oral anticoagulant, which has been in clinical use for over sixty years, remains a challenge for clinicians to utilize, given the multiplicity of items which can limit its efficacy. Our objective is to review the evidence and comment on whether INR control can be better than has been currently reported in various studies. The duration of time a patient's international normalized ratio (INR) is maintained within the therapeutic range (time in the therapeutic range, TTR) for his or her particular indication for the drug impacts the effectiveness and safety of warfarin therapy. Maintaining a therapeutic INR while on warfarin is difficult, and numerous studies employing various strategies confirm the challenge, but not the impossibility of achieving a TTR above 70%. Maintaining a therapeutic INR requires a dedicated multi-faceted approach. With diligence, skill and various therapeutic strategies, a TTR >70% can be achieved. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Therapeutic Effects of Horseback Riding Interventions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, Alexandra; Tzoufi, Meropi; Ntzani, Evangelia; Varvarousis, Dimitrios; Beris, Alexandros; Ploumis, Avraam

    2017-10-01

    Equine-assisted therapies, such as therapeutic riding and hippotherapy, are believed to have positive physical and emotional effects in individuals with neuromotor, developmental, and physical disabilities. The purpose of this review was to determine whether therapeutic riding and hippotherapy improve balance, motor function, gait, muscle symmetry, pelvic movement, psychosocial parameters, and the patients' overall quality of life. In this study, a literature search was conducted on MEDLINE, CINAHL, MBASE, SportDiscus, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, PEDro, DARE, Google Scholar, and Dissertation Abstracts. Only studies with a control/comparison group or self-controlled studies performing preintervention and postintervention assessment were included. Excluded were (1) studies not providing data on baseline score or end-point outcome, (2) single-subject studies, (3) studies providing only qualitative data, and (4) studies that used a mechanical horse. Sixteen trials were included. The methodologic quality of each study was evaluated using Downs and Black quality assessment tool. Most of the studies showed a trend toward a beneficial effect of therapeutic riding and hippotherapy on balance and gross motor function. The meta-analysis showed improvement in both the Berg Balance Scale and the Gross Motor Function Measure in therapeutic riding and hippotherapy programs. Programs such as therapeutic riding and hippotherapy are a viable intervention option for patients with balance, gait, and psychomotor disorders.

  6. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danbo Yang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(L-g-glutamylglutamine-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX. PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic.

  7. Effect of therapeutic ultrasound on endochondral ossification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiltink, A.; Nijweide, P.J.; Oosterbaan, W.A.; Hekkenberg, R.T.; Helders, P.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of therapeutic doses of ultrasound was tested on endochondral ossification of in vitro developing metatarsal long bone rudiments of 16- and 17-day-old fetal mice. Bone growth, calcification and resorption following exposure to several doses of pulse-wave (PW) or continuous-wave (CW)

  8. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Danbo; Yu, Lei; Van, Sang

    2010-01-01

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic

  9. [Therapeutic equivalence of the new oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villar, A; Nacle López, I; Barbero Hernández, M J; Lizan Tudela, L

    2015-10-01

    In an attempt to minimize the economic impact due to the incorporation of innovative drugs, health authorities have promoted and supported the evaluation and market positioning of drugs, as equivalent therapeutic alternatives. This issue has recently gained importance, possibly due to the current economic crisis. The equivalent therapeutic alternatives are justified by the need to compete on price, and by the authorities recommendation to establish therapeutic equivalence, price and financing of medicinal products at the same time. The establishment of the new oral anticoagulants and the equivalent therapeutic alternatives is a problematic issue if it is based on the absence of direct comparisons between different drugs and the questionable methodology used in the current indirect comparisons. Currently, it is difficult to determine when a new oral anticoagulant is more recommendable than others, but efforts are being made in order to propose alternatives for the decision based on patient characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These ne...

  11. Emotional Readiness and Music Therapeutic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossinou-Korea, Maria; Fragkouli, Aspasia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the children's expression with verbal and nonverbal communication in the Autistic spectrum. We study the emotional readiness and the music therapeutic activities which exploit the elements of music. The method followed focused on the research field of special needs education. Assumptions on the parameters…

  12. Autoimmune diseases: MIF as a therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Dorothee; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Areas covered in this review: Our aim is to discuss MIF-directed therapies as a novel therapeutic approach. The review covers literature from the past 10 years. What the reader will gain: MIF inhibition has been shown to be efficacious in many experimental and pre-clinical studies of autoimmune

  13. Reflections about therapeutic internments and his specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Estalayo Hernández

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There are cases treated in detention centers that present some specificities with respect to other affordable educational strategies from social component. This we refer to the need to address situations in which the same symptom of transgression resulting in an offense that carries a legal measure has other bases that generate and / or maintain, or etiology marking its expression and so much attention. The approach to interventions with children and young people is a seriously disruptive content submitted to numerous debates, discussions and disagreements. In this regard, therapeutic placements would be for those cases in which the intervention on symptom requires a specific and specialized perspective. Beyond clinical approaches, therapeutic placements should from the intervention on self-regulation problems (emotional, behavioral, and cognitive and behavioral expression and as a key defining element. To this we add that we have observed in our practice in recent years an increase in problems related to the field of mental health and / or drug and alcohol consumption on children and young people entering the judicial context. This requires expertise and implement a therapeutic approach in centers for juvenile justice. It is particularly important in these cases performed from the beginning of internment clinical and social diagnostics to guide and design the specific educational and therapeutic intervention required for each particular case, in the interest of optimizing the operation and achieve higher levels of efficiency

  14. Therapeutic Exercise and Hypertension | Sikiru | African Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension implies chronic elevation in SBP and DBP above levels considered desirable or healthy for the person\\'s age and size. The focus of this review is to discuss the therapeutic efficacy of exercise on human hypertension. The paper revealed that hypertension is common among African, also that acute exercise ...

  15. Interpreting quantum theory a therapeutic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Friederich, S

    2014-01-01

    Is it possible to approach quantum theory in a 'therapeutic' vein that sees its foundational problems as arising from mistaken conceptual presuppositions? The book explores the prospects for this project and, in doing so, discusses such fascinating issues as the nature of quantum states, explanation in quantum theory, and 'quantum non-locality'.

  16. Therapeutic effects of Saikosapoin D on bleomycininduced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the therapeutic effects of saikosapoin D (SSD) on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF) in mice and its probable mechanisms. Methods: PF mice were prepared by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of BLM (5 mg/kg). Twenty-four hours later, 72 mice in SSD group were administered SSD (1.8 ...

  17. Introduction to the Therapeutic Drawing Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of Del Giacco's Neuro-Art Therapy is to help the client regenerate the sensory system at a decoding/encoding (for our purposes we use the two words interchangeably) levels in the brain while using developmental visual spatial exercises or the Therapeutic Drawing Series (TDS). The specialty of Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy (DAT)…

  18. Therapeutic role of glucogalactan polysaccharide extracted from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therapeutic role of glucogalactan polysaccharide extracted from Agaricus bisporus on trimethyltin chloride induced neuropathy in rats. ... lowers the average of MDA, HSP70, homocystein and the neurotransmitters in brain tissue homogenate; they were markedly reduced by the administration of GA to almost normal levels.

  19. The Fragility of a Robust Therapeutic Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikkelsø, Signe

    2012-01-01

    How can therapeutic techniques simultaneously be tools for emancipation and act as subtle forms of control? The article investigates this seeming paradox by examining a technique for group analysis developed by Wilfred Bion aimed at surfacing the inclination of a group to prompt inexpedient leade...

  20. A critical view on singular therapeutic projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Sfair Kinker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the issue of unique therapeutic projects within the mental health services built in the Brazilian psychiatric reform process. Starting from the concepts that have gained strength in both the psychiatric reform as in the collective health, this study proposes that current notions of the therapeutic project still are influenced by biological, psychological or social paradigms that simplify the complexity of the experience suffered by the subjects. Despite therapeutic projects are an essential achievement for the qualification of mental health care, it is still necessary to produce an epistemological rupture in the relationship with mental suffering so that they can achieve the greatest potential for transformation. Therefore, the article suggests that the practice of therapeutic projects should hold discussions with the reality of users life of and their relationships in the territories of existence, to transform the relations of power and knowledge that reproduce the subjects annulment. Thus, it is possible to dialogue with the complexity of the mental suffering experience, producing changes in the scenes that produce it.

  1. Automated (Centrifugal) Therapeutic Plasma Exchange Option for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is performed frequently and effectively in developed countries, whereas the reverse is the case in developing countries. Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), synonymous with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, is an important indication for TPE, but this is.

  2. Applications to the design of human therapeutics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Strategies for multi-target therapeutics and network analysis with a focus on cancer and HIV are dis- cussed. Methods for gene and siRNA delivery are .... sis for cancer treatment. Most of the current anticancer drugs have low thera- ...... Colorectal Cancer 6 29. 37. Sidhu S S, Li B, Chen Y, Fellouse F A, Eigenbrot C and Fuh ...

  3. Reading Philemon as therapeutic narrative | Jordaan | HTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article analysed the different narratives implied in Philemon by utilising the narrative therapeutic approach, as developed by Epston and White (1990). A dominant narrative (the harsh treatment of slaves in the early Christian environment) and a challenging narrative (a more humane conduct of slaves) were clearly ...

  4. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Danbo [Biomedical Engineering and Technology Institute, Institutes for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Yu, Lei, E-mail: yu-lei@gg.nitto.co.jp [Biomedical Engineering and Technology Institute, Institutes for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Biomedical Group, Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States); Van, Sang [Biomedical Group, Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States)

    2010-12-23

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic.

  5. Mindfulness and the Therapeutic Function of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Although it has been given qualified approval by a number of philosophers of education, the so-called "therapeutic turn" in education has been the subject of criticism by several commentators on post-compulsory and adult learning over the last few years. A key feature of this alleged development in recent educational policy is said to be the…

  6. THERAPEUTIC DECISION-MAKING OF PHYSICIANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENIG, P; HAAIJER-RUSKAMP, FM

    1992-01-01

    In this review the therapeutic decision-making process of physicians is described. This process is divided into two steps: the generation of a limited set of possible options (the 'evoked set') and the selection from this evoked set of a treatment for a specific patient. Factors that are important

  7. Therapeutic applications of collagenase (metalloproteases: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzeh Alipour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive therapeutic methods have recently been used in medical sciences. Enzymes have shown high activity at very low concentrations in laboratories and pharmaceutical, enabling them to play crucial roles in different biological phenomena related to living organism, especially human medicine. Recently, using the therapeutic methods based on non-invasive approaches has been emphasized in medical society. Researchers have focused on producing medicines and tools reducing invasive procedures in medical. Collagenases are proteins which catalyze chemical processes and break the peptide bonds in collagen. Collagen may be generated more than the required amount or produced in unsuitable sites or may not degrade after a certain time. In such cases, using an injectable collagenase or its ointment can be helpful in collagen degradation. In both in vitro and in vivo tests, it has been revealed that collagenases have several therapeutic properties in wound healing, burns, nipple pain and some diseases including intervertebral disc herniation, keloid, cellulite, lipoma among others. This review describes the therapeutic application of collagenase in medical sciences and the process for its production using novel methods, paving the way for more effective and safe applications of collagenases.

  8. Digesting dietary miRNA therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippocrates famously advised, "Let food be thy medicine and thy medicine be thy food." Numerous plant-derived compounds are used as cancer therapeutics including antimitotics, topoisomerase inhibitors, and kinase inhibitors. Here we will review emerging evidence suggesting that diet derived small RN...

  9. Therapeutic hypothermia reduces intestinal ischemia/reperfusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate the effects of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on the morphology and function of intestine after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, 45 male rats were randomly assigned into three groups: (1) normothermia group, animals underwent ventricular fibrillation (VF) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with the rectal ...

  10. Therapeutic touch: the conventional versus the alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tse Yan Alexander

    2004-04-01

    Pain is a complex personal, subjective and unpleasant experience involving many sensations and perceptions and it has a profound impact on the well being of an individual, both physically and psychologically. With an increasing costs and pharmacological implications, many patients are beginning to look at alternative methods of pain relief. This paper reviews some issues in the use of Therapeutic Touch on pain management.

  11. [Video games, a therapeutic mediator for teens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickler, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    Teenagers love video games and other multimedia tools. Sometimes they love them too much, leading to addictive use. A child psychiatry team in Nancy has developed a therapeutic multimedia workshop to contribute to treating teens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Humor: A Therapeutic Intervention for Child Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rachelle G.; Parr, Gerald; Bradley, Loretta J.; Berry, Jeremy J.

    2009-01-01

    Counselors utilize many strategies, techniques, and tools when building a therapeutic alliance or addressing children's issues. Due to the serious nature of discussing problems or perhaps because of the fear of seeming insensitive, counselors often overlook humor as a means to enhance therapy. Whether deliberate or spontaneous, humor can add…

  13. Therapeutic Dimensions of the Black Aesthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldson, Ivory L.; Pasteur, Alfred B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors of this article see the black aesthetic largely in terms of the affective component. Emotional oneness which is foreign to the white world view is the means by which the black man can achieve optimal mental health and development. The therapeutic implications of the black aesthetic are outlined. (NG)

  14. Glycosylation profiles of therapeutic antibody pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Christoph; Berger, Christoph N; Girard, Philippe; Meier, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are often used as therapeutics and represent a major class of drug products. Their therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of antibody complexes resulting in the elimination of a target molecule or the modulation of specific signalling pathways. The physiological effects of antibody therapeutics are known to depend on the structural characteristics of the antibody molecule, specifically on the glycosylation which is the result of posttranslational modifications. Hence, production of therapeutic antibodies with a defined and consistent glycoform profile is needed which still remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. To provide an insight into the industries capability to control their manufacturing process and to provide antibodies of highest quality, we conducted a market surveillance study and compared major oligosaccharide profiles of a number of monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals sampled on the Swiss market. Product lot-to-lot variability was found to be generally low, suggesting that a majority of manufacturers have implemented high quality standards in their production processes. However, proportions of G0, G1 and G2 core-fucosylated chains derived from different products varied considerably and showed a bias towards the immature agalactosidated G0 form. Interestingly, differences in glycosylation caused by the production cell type seem to be of less importance compared with process related parameters such as cell growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurosteroids in Schizophrenia: Pathogenic and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HuaLin Cai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurosteroids are a group of important endogenous molecules affecting many neural functions in the brain. Increasing evidence suggests a possible role of these neurosteroids in the pathology and symptomatology of schizophrenia (SZ and other mental disorders. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the neural functions of neurosteroids in the brain, and to evaluate the role of the key neurosteroids as candidate modulators in the etiology and therapeutics of SZ. The present paper provides a brief introduction of neurosteroid metabolism and distribution, followed by a discussion of the mechanisms underlying neurosteroid actions in the brain. The content regarding the modulation of the GABAA receptor is elaborated, given the considerable knowledge of its interactions with other neurotransmitter and neuroprotective systems, as well as its ameliorating effects on stress that may play a role in the SZ pathophysiology. In addition, several preclinical and clinical studies suggested a therapeutic benefit of neurosteroids in SZ patients, even though the presence of altered neurosteroid pathways in the circulating blood and/or brain remains debatable. Following treatment of antipsychotic drugs in SZ, therapeutic benefits have also been linked to the regulation of neurosteroid signaling. Specifically, the neurosteroids such as pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone affect a broad spectrum of behavioral functions through their unique molecular characteristics and may represent innovative therapeutic targets for SZ. Future investigations in larger cohorts with long-term follow-ups will be required to ascertain the neuropsychopharmacological role of this yet unexploited class of neurosteroid agents.

  16. automated (centrifugal) therapeutic plasma exchange option for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is performed frequently and effectively in developed countries, whereas the reverse is the case in developing countries. Guillain‑Barre syndrome (GBS), synonymous with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, is an important indication for TPE, but this is rarely administered ...

  17. "You Think You're Helping Them, But They're Helping You Too": Experiences of Scottish Male Young Offenders Participating in a Dog Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Rebecca J; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M; McIvor, Gill; Vick, Sarah-Jane

    2017-08-22

    Interaction with animals can be beneficial to humans and animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) are increasingly popular in a range of contexts. Dog training programs (DTPs) are the most popular form of AAI in custodial contexts; prisoners often have multiple needs and DTPs seem to facilitate a diverse range of positive outcomes, including improvements in well-being, behavior, and offending behavior. However, evidence on the efficacy of prison-based DTPs is still limited and these evaluations often lack detail or methodological rigor. We examined the experiences of male young offenders (N = 70) using thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews conducted following completion of a DTP. The themes that emerged indicated a broad range of inter-related experiences and positive outcomes. The most prevalent theme related to their experiences with Dogs (including feelings and attitudes), and there were perceived improvements categorized as: Positive Effects (including mood and well-being), Motivation, Charitable Purpose, Self-Efficacy, Improved Skills, Impulsivity, and Emotional Management. These themes mapped well onto outcomes previously identified in research on DTPs, and to the program's core aims of improving behavior, educational engagement, employability, and well-being. The diversity and nature of these themes indicates that DTPs have considerable potential to engage and benefit those individuals with multiple needs, such as young offenders, and ultimately to achieve positive long-term outcomes with significant social, health, and economic impact.

  18. Flight test report Focke Wulf Piaggio P149D-TP 2015

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Barker, D

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available turboprop engine + 1300 hours on Pratt & Whitney turbo- propeller engines. Aircraft Maintenance Organisation. Mr Johan Lok, (Warbirds, (Pty) Ltd). Flight Test Management. The flight test programme was managed by the programme manager through a Safety... weights in baggage compartment. Cradle tested to 2 limit loading cases required by FAR 23.361 and 23.363. A turbine torque factor of 1.6 and a factor of safety of 1.5 were included in load calcs Inspections on critical airframe structure viz...

  19. Poremećaj agregacije trombocita nakon cijepljenja DTP-Polio-HIBERIX cjepivom

    OpenAIRE

    Tomić Rajić, Marijana; Drakulec, Vlado; Šimić Klarić, Andrea; Tesari, Helena; Banožić, Ljerka; Andrić, Zdravko; Tešović, Goran

    2009-01-01

    Najčešće opisane nuspojave unutar 24 sata od cijepljenja su lokalne reakcije i febrilitet. Vrlo rijetko su opisane sustavne reakcije: febrilne konvulzije, hipotono-hiporesponzivni poremećaji, gastrointestinalni poremećaji, razdražljivost, slabost i neutješni plač. Zabilježene su i akutne alergijske reakcije –također vrlo rijetke: dispneja, cijanoza, angioneurotski edem, hipotenzija i rijetko anafilaktička reakcija. Opisana je i reakcija lokalnog edema s cijanozom, crvenilom, purpurom i jakim ...

  20. Flight test report: Focke wulf PIAGGIO P149D-TP

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Barker, D

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It’s a story of following one’s dream. Belonging to Werner Heiml, ZU-SFP originated from Germany where it was used as a basic trainer in the Luftwaffe. The P149D was originally developed and manufactured by Piaggio & Co, Italy, in 1953...

  1. Therapeutic touch and dementia care: an ongoing journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Donna; Wright, Stephen; Aveyard, Barry; Sykes, Meg

    2006-12-01

    Touch is considered a core aspect of care provision and therapeutic relationships. Therapeutic touch allows nurses to facilitate healing and forge therapeutic relationships through touch or non-touch and maintain channels of communication often lost in dementia as the disease progresses. This article reports the findings of a research project to examine the effectiveness of therapeutic touch in dementia care.

  2. Synergizing vaccinations with therapeutics for measles eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plemper, Richard K; Hammond, Anthea L

    2014-02-01

    The measles virus is a major human pathogen responsible for approximately 150,000 deaths annually. The disease is vaccine preventable and eradication of the virus is considered feasible, in principle. However, a herd immunity exceeding 95% is required to prevent sporadic viral outbreaks in a population. Declining disease prevalence, combined with public anxiety over the vaccination's safety, has led to increased vaccine refusal, especially in Europe. This has led to the resurgence of measles in some areas. This article discusses whether synergizing effective measles therapeutics with the measles vaccination could contribute to finally eradicating measles. The authors identify key elements in a desirable drug profile and review current disease management strategies and the state of experimental inhibitor candidates. The authors also evaluate the risk associated with viral escape from inhibition, and consider the potential of measles therapeutics in the management of persistent central nervous system (CNS) viral infection. Finally, the authors contemplate the possible impact of therapeutics in controlling the threat imposed by closely related zoonotic pathogens of the same genus as measles. Efficacious therapeutics used for post-exposure prophylaxis of high-risk social contacts of confirmed index cases may aid measles eradication by closing herd immunity gaps; this is due to vaccine refusal or failure in populations with overall good vaccination coverage. The envisioned primarily prophylactic application of measles therapeutics to a predominantly pediatric and/or adolescent population, dictates the drug profile. It also has to be safe and efficacious, orally available, shelf-stable at ambient temperature and amenable to cost-effective manufacturing.

  3. Therapeutic enhancement: nursing intervention category for patients diagnosed with Readiness for Therapeutic Regimen Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cynthia W

    2008-04-01

    To present a new nursing intervention category called therapeutic enhancement. Fewer than half of North Americans follow their physician's recommendations for diet and exercise, even when such are crucial to their health or recovery. It is imperative that nurses consider new ways to promote healthy behaviours. Therapeutic enhancement is intended to provide such a fresh approach. Traditional intervention techniques focusing on education, contracts, social support and more frequent interaction with physicians appear not to be effective when used alone. Successful strategies have been multidisciplinary; and have included interventions by professional nurses who assist patients to understand their disease and the disease process and that helps them to develop disease-management and self-management skills. Therapeutic enhancement incorporates The Stages of Change Theory, Commitment to Health Theory, Motivational Interviewing techniques and instrumentation specifically designed for process evaluation of health-promoting interventions. This is a critical review of approaches that, heretofore, have not been synthesised in a single published article. Based on the commonly used Stages of Change model, therapeutic enhancement is useful for patients who are at the action stage of change. Using therapeutic enhancement as well as therapeutic strategies identified in Stages of Change Theory, such as contingency management, helping relationships, counterconditioning, stimulus control and Motivational Interviewing techniques, nursing professionals can significantly increase the chances of patients moving from action to the maintenance stage of change for a specific health behaviour. Using the nursing intervention category, therapeutic enhancement can increase caregivers' success in helping patients maintain healthy behaviours.

  4. Therapeutic horticulture in clinical depression: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil W; Kirkevold, Marit

    2009-01-01

    Clinically depressed persons suffer from impaired mood and distortion of cognition. This study assessed changes in depression severity and perceived attentional capacity of clinically depressed adults (N=18) during a 12-week therapeutic horticulture program. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Attentional Function Index (AFI) were administered at baseline, twice during (4 and 8 weeks), and immediately after the intervention (12 weeks), and at a 3-month follow-up. Experiences of being away and fascination related to the intervention were measured at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The mean BDI score declined 9.7 points from pretest (27.3) to posttest (p or =6) for 72% of the cases. The mean AFI score increased 10.2 points from pretest (68.8) to posttest (p = .06). The greatest change in BDI and AFI scores occurred in the initial weeks of the intervention. The reduction in BDI scores remained significant and clinically relevant at the 3-month follow-up (N=16). The decline in depression severity during the intervention correlated strongly with the degree to which the participants found that it captured their attention. Therapeutic horticulture may decrease depression severity and improve perceived attentional capacity by engaging effortless attention and interrupting rumination.

  5. Virtual reality as therapeutic tool in the confines of social anxiety disorder treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grillon, Helena; Riquier, Francoise; Herbelin, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    , is identical in content and structure for each patient. This study’s second goal is to use the confines of virtual exposure to objectively evaluate a specific parameter present in social phobia, namely eye contact avoidance, by using an eye-tracking system. Analysis of our results shows......We hereby present a study whose aim is to evaluate the efficiency and flexibility of virtual reality as a therapeutic tool in the confines of a social phobia behavioural therapeutic program. Our research protocol, accepted by the ethical commission of the cantonal hospices’ psychiatry service...... that there is a tendency to improvement in both the questionnaires and eye contact avoidance....

  6. A prospective study of existential issues in therapeutic horticulture for clinical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil Wilhelm; Kirkevold, Marit

    2011-01-01

    Two studies with single-group design (Study 1 N = 18, Study 2 N = 28) addressed whether horticultural activities ameliorate depression severity and existential issues. Measures were obtained before and after a 12-week therapeutic horticulture program and at 3-month follow-up. In both studies, depression severity declined significantly during the intervention and remained low at the follow-up. In both studies the existential outcomes did not change significantly; however, the change that did occur during the intervention correlated (rho > .43) with change in depression severity. Participants' open-ended accounts described the therapeutic horticulture experience as meaningful and influential for their view of life.

  7. Promises and Challenges of Smac Mimetics as Cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-11-15

    Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins block programmed cell death and are expressed at high levels in various human cancers, thus making them attractive targets for cancer drug development. Second mitochondrial activator of caspases (Smac) mimetics are small-molecule inhibitors that mimic Smac, an endogenous antagonist of IAP proteins. Preclinical studies have shown that Smac mimetics can directly trigger cancer cell death or, even more importantly, sensitize tumor cells for various cytotoxic therapies, including conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or novel agents. Currently, several Smac mimetics are under evaluation in early clinical trials as monotherapy or in rational combinations (i.e., GDC-0917/CUDC-427, LCL161, AT-406/Debio1143, HGS1029, and TL32711/birinapant). This review discusses the promise as well as some challenges at the translational interface of exploiting Smac mimetics as cancer therapeutics. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. [Management of infectious risk associated with therapeutic pools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, C; Gardes, S; Tasseau, F

    2004-06-01

    There is no specific legislation concerning pools and others medical hydrotherapy equipments relating hygiene and security rules. For this reason, the hydrotherapy pools use the public swimming pools legislation. This article is based on literature review (database Medline and Embase--manual research). This article offers a review of pool associated infections along with the description of the measures designed to minimise the possible transmission of infection during hydrotherapy activities such as: Technical measures: pool and premises conception, water treatments, feed tanks, air quality. Hygiene rules for patients and hospital staff and pathologies which are contra-indications to hydrotherapy activities. Microbiological and physico-chemical monitoring. The infectious risk remains low with therapeutic pools. However, the development of specific legislation and surveillance should be enhanced. All these measures are part of the quality assurance program that must be implemented to control the safety of these installations.

  9. Control of Bovine Mastitis: Old and Recent Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Fernanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Mastitis is defined as the inflammatory response resulting of the infection of the udder tissue and it is reported in numerous species, namely in domestic dairy animals. This pathology is the most frequent disease of dairy cattle and can be potentially fatal. Mastitis is an economically important pathology associated with reduced milk production, changes in milk composition and quality, being considered one of the most costly to dairy industry. Therefore, the majority of research in the field has focused on control of bovine mastitis and many efforts are being made for the development of new and effective anti-mastitis drugs. Antibiotic treatment is an established component of mastitis control programs; however, the continuous search for new therapeutic alternatives, effective in the control and treatment of bovine mastitis, is urgent. This review will provide an overview of some conventional and emerging approaches in the management of bovine mastitis' infections.

  10. A new therapeutic proposal for writer's cramp: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Quadros Boisson Waissman

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Writer's cramp is a kind of focal hand dystonia that appears when individuals are writing. Since pharmacological treatment has not shown the desired therapeutic response, a study on immobilization of the damaged musculature was performed on two individuals with writer's cramp, using splints with the objective of reducing the handwriting abnormalities. CASE REPORT: Two patients presenting writer's cramp who had previously undergone different therapies, including botulinum toxin, without an adequate response, participated in a body awareness program, followed by immobilization of the hand musculature damaged by dystonia, by means of splints, with handwriting training. At the end of the procedure, objective and subjective improvements in the motor pattern of writing could be observed. The immobilization of the dystonic musculature of the hand by means of splints and the motor training of handwriting helped to improve and consequently to reduce the dystonic component observed in the writer's cramp.

  11. [Therapeutic education in oncology: involving patient in the management of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérol, David; Toutenu, Pauline; Lefranc, Anne; Régnier, Véronique; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Saltel, Pierre; Chauvin, Franck

    2007-03-01

    The notion of therapeutic education was only recently introduced in cancer. Although the term is commonly used, no standard definition exists for the concept and principles of therapeutic education and its efficacy remains to be assessed. Therapeutic education is complementary to the healthcare approach and aims to get the patients more involved in their disease and the treatment decision-making process. This discipline, placed at the interface of human and social sciences, was first developed for the management of chronic diseases (diabetes, asthma). It derives from the principle that involving patients in their own care and management can help them better adjust to life with a chronic disease. The lengthening survival time of cancer patients, which contributes to making cancer a chronic disease, as well as changes in the patient-caregiver relationship contribute to the development of therapeutic education in cancer. Pilot studies, conducted principally in the United States, evaluating the side effects of chemotherapy and the management of pain, have demonstrated that such educational programs could improve patient quality of life and decrease the side effects of treatments. The success of these programs depends on several parameters: taking into account patient's opinion in the elaboration and preparation of the programs; involving skilled multidisciplinary teams engaged in iterative educational actions; having recourse to methodological tools to evaluate the impact of implemented programs. Consistent with the World Health Organization guidelines, research should be conducted in France in order to elaborate and implement cancer-specific education programs and evaluate their potential benefit. Patient education programs on pain, fatigue, nutrition and treatment compliance are currently being developed at Saint-Etienne Regional Resource Centre for cancer information, prevention and education, within the framework of the Canceropole Lyon Auvergne Rhône-Alpes.

  12. A randomized controlled trial of the therapeutic workplace for community methadone patients: a partial failure to engage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knealing, Todd W; Wong, Conrad J; Diemer, Karly N; Hampton, Jacqueline; Silverman, Kenneth

    2006-08-01

    The Therapeutic Workplace is an employment-based treatment for drug addiction that uses wages for work to reinforce drug abstinence. The Therapeutic Workplace has promoted abstinence from heroin and cocaine in treatment-resistant mothers in methadone treatment. This study attempted to replicate that effect in crack cocaine users recruited from community-based methadone programs. Participants were randomly assigned to a Therapeutic Workplace (n=22) or usual care control (n=25) group. Therapeutic Workplace participants were invited to work in the workplace and earn vouchers every weekday for 9 months contingent on documented opiate and cocaine abstinence. The two groups did not differ significantly on measures of cocaine or opiate use collected during study participation. Daily attendance and urinalysis results of the Therapeutic Workplace group were analyzed, and only 7 of the 22 participants initiated consistent periods of abstinence and workplace attendance. Two individuals gained access to the workplace on a few days, and 9 participants attempted to gain access to the workplace but never provided a drug-negative urine sample. Possible reasons for differences between the current study and the previous Therapeutic Workplace study are considered. Procedures that increase participant contact with the Therapeutic Workplace and its reinforcement contingencies might increase the likelihood of these individuals being successful in the treatment program.

  13. Therapeutic conversations: Therapists' use of observational language contributes to optimal therapeutic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banham, James A; Schweitzer, Robert D

    2017-09-01

    Reflexivity is the process of critically examining one's own experience. Emerging literature suggests that reflexivity is a positive predictor of outcomes in psychotherapy. However, limited research has been conducted regarding therapists' use of reflexivity as a therapeutic technique. In particular, we have a limited understanding of how therapists use language to initiate reflexive conversations. This study investigates the characteristics of therapist language that elicit reflexivity focused on internal and external processes. Therapeutic outcomes of 42 trainee-therapists who provided psychotherapy to 173 clients were tracked with the OQ-45.2 with the view of identifying client-trainee-therapist dyads (CTTDs) with the best and poorest outcomes. Six best outcome and six poorest outcome CTTDs were identified. Thirty-six therapy transcripts were initially coded with the Narrative Process Coding System to identify each Narrative Process Mode (NPM). Sixty external, internal, and reflexive NPMs (N = 180 NPMs) were randomly selected across all therapy transcripts for the best outcome group and the same number for the poorest outcome group. The Narrative Initiating Language Element Coding Manual, developed for this study, was used to code therapists' use of language to initiate each NPM. Therapists belonging to the best outcome group utilized more observational language to initiate internal and reflexive NPMs. Therapists belonging to the poorest outcome group evidenced high proportions of questioning language to elicit each NPM. Examining how therapists use language to elicit NPMs provides further insight as to how therapeutic language may contribute to successful therapeutic outcomes. Reflexive therapeutic conversations characterized by a greater use of observational language were associated with positive therapeutic outcomes. Therapeutic conversations characterized by a high proportion of questioning language were associated with poorer therapeutic outcomes

  14. Cobalt Derivatives as Promising Therapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffern, Marie C.; Yamamoto, Natsuho; Holbrook, Robert J.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic complexes are versatile platforms for the development of potent and selective pharmaceutical agents. Cobalt possesses a diverse array of properties that can be manipulated to yield promising drug candidates. Investigations into the mechanism of cobalt therapeutic agents can provide valuable insight into the physicochemical properties that can be harnessed for drug development. This review presents examples of bioactive cobalt complexes with special attention to their mechanisms of action. Specifically, cobalt complexes that elicit biological effects through protein inhibition, modification of drug activity, and bioreductive activation are discussed. Insights gained from these examples reveal features of cobalt that can be rationally tuned to produce therapeutics with high specificity and improved efficacy for the biomolecule or pathway of interest. PMID:23270779

  15. [Therapeutic strategies for systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic strategy means the definition of a long-term target, which should be reached by a chosen management. As for rheumatoid arthritis, the treat to target initiative recommends remission as the target for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but the command variables of remission are not yet defined. The basis of a therapeutic strategy is first the analysis of those factors that may influence the achievement of the objectives: SLE disease activity, the differentiation of damage, organ manifestations, comorbidities, genetics, sex, age of onset and considering the pathophysiological basis are some of these factors. The next step is the analysis of the available substances and concepts that allow the target to be reached. Finally, rules for management (e.g. guidelines) are needed that enrich the possibility to reach the target and improve the prognosis of patients suffering from SLE.

  16. Atherosclerosis and Nanotechnology: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Jeremy D; Chaddha, Ashish; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Goonewardena, Sascha N

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several decades, tremendous advances have been made in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, with shifting demographics and evolving risk factors we now face new challenges that must be met in order to further advance are management of patients with CAD. In parallel with advances in our mechanistic appreciation of CAD and atherosclerosis, nanotechnology approaches have greatly expanded, offering the potential for significant improvements in our diagnostic and therapeutic management of CAD. To realize this potential we must go beyond to recognize new frontiers including knowledge gaps between understanding atherosclerosis to the translation of targeted molecular tools. This review highlights nanotechnology applications for imaging and therapeutic advancements in CAD.

  17. Therapeutic management of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromeur, Cécile; Van Der Pol, Liselotte M; Couturaud, Francis; Klok, Frederikus A; Huisman, Menno V

    2017-08-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially fatal manifestation of venous thromboembolism. Prompt anticoagulant treatment is crucial for PE patients, which can decrease morbidity and mortality. Risk assessment is the cornerstone of the therapeutic management of PE. It guides physicians to the most appropriate treatment and selects patients for early discharge or home treatment. Areas covered: Here, we review the current treatments of acute PE according to contemporary risk stratification strategies, highlighting each step of PE therapeutic management. Expert commentary: Currently, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent the first-line therapy of patients presenting with non-high risk PE with a better risk-benefit ratios than vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) due to lower risk of major bleeding. Only high-risk patients with PE who present in shock should be treated with systematic thrombolysis, while surgical thrombectomy or catheter direct thrombolysis (CDT) should only be considered when thrombolysis is contraindicated because of too high bleeding risk.

  18. Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-03-26

    Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

  19. Towards universal therapeutics for memory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Miao-Kun; Nelson, Thomas J; Alkon, Daniel L

    2015-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating that many memory disorders, including those due to neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury (TBI), vascular disease, or abnormal brain development, share common features of memory-related pathology. Structural and functional deficits of synapses are at the core of the underlying pathophysiology, constituting a critical point of convergence in memory disorders. Memory therapeutics that target synaptic loss and dysfunction - that is, to slow, halt, or reverse progression of the disorders at the level of synapses, via synaptogenic molecular cascades such as those of protein kinase C (PKC) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) - possess universal therapeutic value for many forms of memory disorder. They may be useful either as standalone interventions for patients with memory disorders or as adjuncts to drugs that target the underlying pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Therapeutic application of multipotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Sichani, Laleh Shiri

    2018-01-01

    Cell therapy is an emerging fields in the treatment of various diseases such as cardiovascular, pulmonary, hepatic, and neoplastic diseases. Stem cells are an integral tool for cell therapy. Multipotent stem cells are an important class of stem cells which have the ability to self-renew through...... been showed that multipotent stem cells exert their therapeutic effects via inhibition/activation of a sequence of cellular and molecular pathways. Although the advantages of multipotent stem cells are numerous, further investigation is still necessary to clarify the biology and safety of these cells...... before they could be considered as a potential treatment for different types of diseases. This review summarizes different features of multipotent stem cells including isolation, differentiation, and therapeutic applications....

  1. Unexplored therapeutic opportunities in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor I; Bologa, Cristian G; Brunak, Søren

    2018-01-01

    A large proportion of biomedical research and the development of therapeutics is focused on a small fraction of the human genome. In a strategic effort to map the knowledge gaps around proteins encoded by the human genome and to promote the exploration of currently understudied, but potentially...... Management Center have enabled the development of evidence-based criteria for tracking the target development level (TDL) of human proteins, which indicates a substantial knowledge deficit for approximately two out of five proteins in the human proteome. We then present spotlights on the TDL categories...... as well as key drug target classes, including G protein-coupled receptors, protein kinases and ion channels, which illustrate the nature of the unexplored opportunities for biomedical research and therapeutic development....

  2. Rett syndrome: genes, synapses, circuits and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek eBanerjee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of the nervous system proceeds through a set of complex checkpoints which arise from a combination of sequential gene expression and early neural activity sculpted by the environment. Genetic and environmental insults lead to neurodevelopmental disorders which encompass a large group of diseases that result from anatomical and physiological abnormalities during maturation and development of brain circuits. Rett syndrome (RTT is a postnatal neurological disorder of genetic origin, caused by mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2. It features neuropsychiatric abnormalities like motor dysfunctions and mild to severe cognitive impairment. This review discusses several key questions and attempts to evaluate recently developed animal models, cell-type specific function of MeCP2, defects in neural circuit plasticity and possible therapeutic strategies. Finally, we also discuss how genes, proteins and overlapping signaling pathways affect the molecular etiology of apparently unrelated neuropsychiatric disorders, an understanding of which can offer novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. Genome Engineering for Personalized Arthritis Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Brunger, Jonathan M; Willard, Vincent P; Wu, Chia-Lung; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    Arthritis represents a family of complex joint pathologies responsible for the majority of musculoskeletal conditions. Nearly all diseases within this family, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions with few or no disease-modifying therapeutics available. Advances in genome engineering technology, most recently with CRISPR-Cas9, have revolutionized our ability to interrogate and validate genetic and epigenetic elements associated with chronic diseases such as arthritis. These technologies, together with cell reprogramming methods, including the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, provide a platform for human disease modeling. We summarize new evidence from genome-wide association studies and genomics that substantiates a genetic basis for arthritis pathogenesis. We also review the potential contributions of genome engineering in the development of new arthritis therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Therapeutic value of the genus Alpinia, Zingiberaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane P. Victório

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants containing bioactive substances have increasingly become the object of research studies, particularly those plants with therapeutic value. Many species of the genus Alpinia provide a variety of medicinal properties, such as, Alpinia zerumbet (Pers. Burtt et Smith and A. purpurata (Vieill K. Schum, which have a significant presence in Brazil. These species have been commercialized in the food and cosmetic industries. However, their greatest importance arises from the medicinal properties of their essential oils containing flavonoids, terpenoids and kavalactones which have been used in folk medicine to treat, for example, arterial hypertension and inflammatory processes. In addition, such species are also used in multidisciplinary studies, including phytochemistry, ethnobotany and biology, indicating the key pharmacological role of this genus in everyday life. Therefore, this work aims to present a bibliographic review of the genus Alpinia and its significance in therapeutic applications.

  5. Applying Complement Therapeutics to Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Edimara S.; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M.; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis. PMID:26341313

  6. Therapeutic Utilities of Pediatric Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Giannis A.; Kolokythas, Argyrios; Charitakis, Konstantinos; Avgerinos, Dimitrios 
V.

    2016-01-01

    In an era when less invasive techniques are favored, therapeutic cardiac catheterization constantly evolves and widens its spectrum of usage in the pediatric population. The advent of sophisticated devices and well-designed equipment has made the management of many congenital cardiac lesions more efficient and safer, while providing more comfort to the patient. Nowadays, a large variety of heart diseases are managed with transcatheter techniques, such as patent foramen ovale, atrial and ventricular septal defects, valve stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic coarctation, pulmonary artery and vein stenosis and arteriovenous malformations. Moreover, hybrid procedures and catheter ablation have opened new paths in the treatment of complex cardiac lesions and arrhythmias, respectively. In this article, the main therapeutic utilities of cardiac catheterization in children are discussed. PMID:26926291

  7. Innovative therapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesus K

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, which clinically present as one of two disorders, Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Mainstays of drug treatments for IBD include aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclosporin. Advances in basic research of the pathophysiological process in IBD have been applied to generate a variety of new therapeutics targeting at different le...

  8. Immunology. Therapeutic manipulation of gut flora.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    In developed countries as many as two individuals in every thousand suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn\\'s disease). In his Perspective, Shanahan discusses a new therapeutic approach to treating these conditions in which bacteria normally found in the gut are engineered to produce the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 and then are fed as probiotics to mice with these disorders (Steidler et al.).

  9. [Therapeutic education in the transplant patient's pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Laure; Dalmon, Pauline; Mosnier, Magali; Marceillac, Anne; Kamar, Nassim

    2016-12-01

    The success of a transplant in the long term depends to a large extent on the taking of immunosuppressant treatments and its follow-up. Therapeutic education plays an important role in the follow-up of transplant patients and in nurses' daily practice. It is integrated into the patient's pre-transplant care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Macropinocytosis Exploitation by Cancers and Cancer Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Kevin D.; Bidlingmaier, Scott M.; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Macropinocytosis has long been known as a primary method for cellular intake of fluid-phase and membrane-bound bulk cargo. This review seeks to re-examine the latest studies to emphasize how cancers exploit macropinocytosis to further their tumorigenesis, including details in how macropinocytosis can be adapted to serve diverse functions. Furthermore, this review will also cover the latest endeavors in targeting macropinocytosis as an avenue for novel therapeutics.

  11. Macropinocytosis Exploitation by Cancers and Cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kevin D; Bidlingmaier, Scott M; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Macropinocytosis has long been known as a primary method for cellular intake of fluid-phase and membrane-bound bulk cargo. This review seeks to re-examine the latest studies to emphasize how cancers exploit macropinocytosis to further their tumorigenesis, including details in how macropinocytosis can be adapted to serve diverse functions. Furthermore, this review will also cover the latest endeavors in targeting macropinocytosis as an avenue for novel therapeutics.

  12. Therapeutic Touch dan Nyeri Pasca Pembedahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumpuni Mumpuni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Penanganan nyeri pada pasien yang dilakukan oleh profesi perawat lebih banyak mengacu pada pendekatan terapi medis dan farmakologis. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh therapeutic touch terhadap nyeri pasien pasca operasi. Penelitian ini menggunakan desain kuasi eksperimental yang dilakukan pada 60 orang responden, terdiri dari 30 orang kelompok intervensi dengan therapeutic touch dan 30 orang kelompok kontrol dengan teknik napas dalam. Penelitian berlangsung di ruang rawat bedah pasien dewasa RSUD Pasar Rebo. Data dikumpulkan dari bulan April hingga Oktober 2012. Hasil penelitian dengan uji Wilcoxon Signed Ranks menunjukkan adanya perbedaan yang signifikan antara skala nyeri sebelum dan sesudah tindakan baik pada kelompok intervensi maupun kelompok kontrol (nilai p = 0,000. Hasil uji Mann-Whitney pun memperlihatkan adanya perbedaan yang signifikan pada penurunan skala nyeri antara kelompok intervensi dengan kelompok kontrol (nilai p = 0,000. Pain management for patients by nurses refers to medical therapy and pharmacological approaches. This study aimed to determine the effect of therapeutic touch on post-operative pain. This study used a quasi-experimental design conducted on 60 respondents, comprised 30 person for intervention group (therapeutic touch and 30 person for control group (deep-breaths technique. The study conducted in the surgical ward for adult patients at Pasar Rebo Hospital Jakarta. Data collected from April until October 2012. The result of Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test showed a significant difference between the pain scale before and after treatment either the intervention group or the control group (p value = 0.000. The Mann-Whitney test’s result also showed a significant difference in pain reduction between the scale of the intervention group with the control group (p value = 0.000.

  13. Biomedical and therapeutic applications of biosurfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, L. R.; Teixeira, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    During the last years, several applications of biosurfactants with medical purposes have been reported. Biosurfactants are considered relevant molecules for applications in combating many diseases and as therapeutic agents due to their antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities. Furthermore, their role as anti-adhesive agents against several pathogens illustrate their utility as suitable anti-adhesive coating agents for medical insertional materials leading to a reduction of a large n...

  14. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman, Joeli A.; Hughes, Sarah H.; Stone, Pamela; Caffrey, Angela S.; Muderspach, Laila I.; Roman, Lynda D.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Kast, W. Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining th...

  15. Dexmedetomidine in PRES: An appropriate therapeutic decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta Ahlawat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available PRES, a reversible white matter lesion characterized by cerebral edema, found in 7–20% of the patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia, needs early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. We report PRES in a young preeclamptic primigravida and the role of dexmedetomidine in controlling her uncontrollable blood pressure in ICU. Dexmedetomidine, has cerebroprotective cardioprotective and renoprotective properties all of which, helped the patient improving clinically.

  16. Secukinumab: a promising therapeutic option in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Ficco, Hernan; Perez-Alamino, Rodolfo; Maldonado-Cocco, José A

    2016-09-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most common chronic inflammatory joint disease. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is another less common but equally chronic and disabling spondyloarthritis (SpA). Therapeutic agents for the treatment of these diseases have been somewhat lacking as compared with those available for rheumatoid arthritis, which represents a significant challenge for both the treating physician and the pharmaceutical industry. A promising development for our understanding of the physiopathology of PsA and AS involves new targets to interrupt IL-17 and IL-12/IL-23 pathways. Up to 30-40 % of SpA patients have inadequate or poor response, or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapies. Therefore, there has been a clear unmet medical need in an important group of these patients. As a result, new therapeutic targets have emerged for the treatment of both axial and peripheral SpA. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is increased in psoriatic lesions as well as in the synovial fluid of patients with PsA and in sites of enthesitis in SpA. IL-23 has been shown to play an important role in the polarization of CD4+ T-cells to become IL-17 producers. Based on these evidences, blockade of the cytokine IL-17 or its receptors was considered to have therapeutic implications for the treatment of psoriasis, as well as PsA and AS.This article presents a thorough review of an IL-17 A blocking agent, its mechanism of action, its clinical efficacy and its therapeutic safety.

  17. Mesenteric venous thrombosis: multidisciplinary therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pieri

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a particular form of intestinal ischemia related to high mortality. The lack of a characteristic clinical picture often leads to a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic classification. We report the case of a young woman, using estrogenic and progestinic oral therapy, affected by a severe form of mesenteric thrombosis and complicated by segmental post ischemic stenosis of small intestine.

  18. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    a cystatin -like molecule, inhibits ERK-dependent lymphocyte proliferation. Mech Ageing Dev 126:1284-91 7. Gomez, C.R., Acuña-Castillo, C ., Nishimura...the development of better prostate cancer cell vaccines 2. Gomez, C.R., Kosari, F., Munz, J.M., Schreiber, C ., Knutson, G., Charlesworth, C ., Karnes...TITLE: Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christian R. Gomez, Ph.D

  20. Therapeutic Benefits of Cannabis: A Patient Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Charles W; Webb, Sandra M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research regarding the therapeutic benefits of cannabis (“marijuana”) has been almost non-existent in the United States since cannabis was given Schedule I status in the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. In order to discover the benefits and adverse effects perceived by medical cannabis patients, especially with regards to chronic pain, we hand-delivered surveys to one hundred consecutive patients who were returning for yearly re-certification for medical cannabis use in Hawai‘i.

  1. Therapeutic Effect of Arsenicum album on Leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Ive, Elaine C.; Couchman, Ingrid M. S.; Reddy, Lalini

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of homoeopathic Arsenicum album potencies were investigated in-vitro, using a continuous cell line (MT4), pre-intoxicated with arsenic trioxide (As2O3), and then treated with succussed and unsuccussed homoeopathic potencies, 6CH, 30CH and 200CH. This study aimed to verify the homoeopathic law of similars and to determine whether potencies diluted beyond Avogadro’s constant had physiological effects on cells; whether various potencies would cause different effects as su...

  2. Implementation of nanoparticles in therapeutic radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Erik; Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Om V.

    2017-05-01

    Development and progress of cancer is a very complex disease process to comprehend because of the multiple changes in cellular physiology, pathology, and pathophysiology resulting from the numerous genetic changes from which cancer originates. As a result, most common treatments are not directed at the molecular level but rather at the tissue level. While personalized care is becoming an increasingly aim, the most common cancer treatments are restricted to chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, each of which has a high likelihood of resulting in rather severe adverse side effects. For example, currently used radiation therapy does not discriminate between normal and cancerous cells and greatly relies on the external targeting of the radiation beams to specific cells and organs. Because of this, there is an immediate need for the development of new and innovative technologies that help to differentiate tumor cells and micrometastases from normal cells and facilitate the complete destruction of those cells. Recent advancements in nanoscience and nanotechnology have paved a way for the development of nanoparticles (NPs) as multifunctional carriers to deliver therapeutic radioisotopes for tumor targeted radiation therapy, to monitor their delivery, and improve the therapeutic index of radiation and tumor response to the treatment. The application of NPs in radiation therapy has aimed to improve outcomes in radiation therapy by increasing therapeutic effect in tumors and reducing toxicity on normal tissues. Because NPs possess unique properties, such as preferential accumulation in tumors and minimal uptake in normal tissues, it makes them ideal for the delivery of radiotherapy. This review provides an overview of the recent development of NPs for carrying and delivering therapeutic radioisotopes for systemic radiation treatment for a variety of cancers in radiation oncology.

  3. Macropinocytosis Exploitation by Cancers and Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Ha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Macropinocytosis has long been known as a primary method for cellular intake of fluid-phase and membrane-bound bulk cargo. This review seeks to re-examine the latest studies to emphasize how cancers exploit macropinocytosis to further their tumorigenesis, including details in how macropinocytosis can be adapted to serve diverse functions. Furthermore, this review will also cover the latest endeavors in targeting macropinocytosis as an avenue for novel therapeutics.

  4. Charcot as therapeutic interventionist and treating neurologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, C G; Bonduelle, M

    1995-11-01

    Although Jean-Martin Charcot's best-known medical and scientific contributions relate to anatomical-clinical correlation, he was also a highly regarded physician. His published lectures and articles, as well as documents at the Bibliothèque Charcot, demonstrate his active interest in therapeutic interventions and in bringing new experimental treatments to France for study. He investigated the efficacy of bromides for epilepsy, colchicine for gout, and ergots and anticholinergic drugs for Parkinson's disease. Nonpharmacologic treatments in which he took interest included physical rehabilitation/speech therapy, hydrotherapy, electrical stimulation of weakened muscles, isolation, and exotic interventions such as suspension and vibratory treatments with special chairs and helmets. Letters from his patients reveal an active interchange, with patients complimenting Charcot on successful treatments but also demanding more effective ones when his prescriptions did not abate their conditions. These documents demonstrate that Charcot was not a therapeutic nihilist but was particularly active in therapeutic investigations in the context of 19th-century medical science.

  5. Cannabidiol and epilepsy: Rationale and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Antonio; Russo, Emilio; Elia, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the quality of life and therapeutic response for patients with epilepsy remains still poor. Unfortunately, besides several advantages, these new AEDs have not satisfactorily reduced the number of refractory patients. Therefore, the need for different other therapeutic options to manage epilepsy is still a current issue. To this purpose, emphasis has been given to phytocannabinoids, which have been medicinally used since ancient time in the treatment of neurological disorders including epilepsy. In particular, the nonpsychoactive compound cannabidiol (CBD) has shown anticonvulsant properties, both in preclinical and clinical studies, with a yet not completely clarified mechanism of action. However, it should be made clear that most phytocannabinoids do not act on the endocannabinoid system as in the case of CBD. In in vivo preclinical studies, CBD has shown significant anticonvulsant effects mainly in acute animal models of seizures, whereas restricted data exist in chronic models of epilepsy as well as in animal models of epileptogenesis. Likewise, clinical evidence seems to indicate that CBD is able to manage epilepsy both in adults and children affected by refractory seizures, with a favourable side effect profile. However, to date, clinical trials are both qualitatively and numerically limited, thus yet inconsistent. Therefore, further preclinical and clinical studies are undoubtedly needed to better evaluate the potential therapeutic profile of CBD in epilepsy, although the actually available data is promising. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, R; Krammer, F

    2017-04-01

    Current influenza virus vaccines are effective when well matched to the circulating strains. Unfortunately, antigenic drift and the high diversity of potential emerging zoonotic and pandemic viruses make it difficult to select the right strains for vaccine production. This problem causes vaccine mismatches, which lead to sharp drops in vaccine effectiveness and long response times to manufacture matched vaccines in case of novel pandemic viruses. To provide an overview of universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies in preclinical and clinical development. PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov were used as sources for this review. Universal influenza virus vaccines that target conserved regions of the influenza virus including the haemagglutinin stalk domain, the ectodomain of the M2 ion channel or the internal matrix and nucleoproteins are in late preclinical and clinical development. These vaccines could confer broad protection against all influenza A and B viruses including drift variants and thereby abolish the need for annual re-formulation and re-administration of influenza virus vaccines. In addition, these novel vaccines would enhance preparedness against emerging influenza virus pandemics. Finally, novel therapeutic antibodies against the same conserved targets are in clinical development and could become valuable tools in the fight against influenza virus infection. Both universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies are potential future options for the control of human influenza infections. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging Multidimensional Therapeutically Relevant Circadian Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Singletary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks gate cellular proliferation and, thereby, therapeutically target availability within proliferative pathways. This temporal coordination occurs within both cancerous and noncancerous proliferating tissues. The timing within the circadian cycle of the administration of drugs targeting proliferative pathways necessarily impacts the amount of damage done to proliferating tissues and cancers. Concurrently measuring target levels and associated key pathway components in normal and malignant tissues around the circadian clock provides a path toward a fuller understanding of the temporal relationships among the physiologic processes governing the therapeutic index of antiproliferative anticancer therapies. The temporal ordering among these relationships, paramount to determining causation, is less well understood using two- or three-dimensional representations. We have created multidimensional multimedia depictions of the temporal unfolding of putatively causative and the resultant therapeutic effects of a drug that specifically targets these ordered processes at specific times of the day. The systems and methods used to create these depictions are provided, as well as three example supplementary movies.

  8. Polyphenols: Multipotent Therapeutic Agents in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Khushwant S.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Aging leads to numerous transitions in brain physiology including synaptic dysfunction and disturbances in cognition and memory. With a few clinically relevant drugs, a substantial portion of aging population at risk for age-related neurodegenerative disorders require nutritional intervention. Dietary intake of polyphenols is known to attenuate oxidative stress and reduce the risk for related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Polyphenols exhibit strong potential to address the etiology of neurological disorders as they attenuate their complex physiology by modulating several therapeutic targets at once. Firstly, we review the advances in the therapeutic role of polyphenols in cell and animal models of AD, PD, MS, and HD and activation of drug targets for controlling pathological manifestations. Secondly, we present principle pathways in which polyphenol intake translates into therapeutic outcomes. In particular, signaling pathways like PPAR, Nrf2, STAT, HIF, and MAPK along with modulation of immune response by polyphenols are discussed. Although current polyphenol researches have limited impact on clinical practice, they have strong evidence and testable hypothesis to contribute clinical advances and drug discovery towards age-related neurological disorders. PMID:23840922

  9. Synergistic drug combinations improve therapeutic selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehàr, Joseph; Krueger, Andrew S.; Avery, William; Heilbut, Adrian M.; Johansen, Lisa M.; Price, E. Roydon; Rickles, Richard J.; Short, Glenn F.; Staunton, Jane E.; Jin, Xiaowei; Lee, Margaret S.; Zimmermann, Grant R.; Borisy, Alexis A.

    2009-01-01

    Prevailing drug discovery approaches focus on compounds with molecular selectivity, inhibiting disease-relevant targets over others in vitro. However in vivo, many such agents are not therapeutically selective, either because of undesirable activity at effective doses or because the biological system responds to compensate. In theory, drug combinations should permit increased control of such complex biology, but there is a common concern that therapeutic synergy will generally be mirrored by synergistic side-effects. Here we provide evidence, from 94,110 multi-dose combination experiments representing diverse disease areas and large scale flux balance simulations of inhibited bacterial metabolism, that multi-target synergies are more specific than single agent activities to particular cellular contexts. Using an anti-inflammatory combination, we show how multi-target synergy can achieve therapeutic selectivity in animals through differential target expression. Synergistic combinations can increase the number of selective therapies using the current pharmacopeia, and offer opportunities for more precise control of biological systems. PMID:19581876

  10. Therapeutic follow-up in hospitalization: social inclusion, recovery of citizenship and respect for individuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Célia Fiorati

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in a psychiatric crisis hospitalization unit, with the aim of drawing up a proposal for implementing therapeutic follow-up as part of the therapeutic program at this unit. The concept of therapeutic follow-up was envisaged as an important resource to be included in psychosocial rehabilitation projects, with the following goals: linking users with extra-hospital services, avoiding re-hospitalization and achieving inclusion in social networks. The study consisted of an exploratory-descriptive case study with a qualitative approach to data. Participant observation and a field diary were the techniques used for gathering and recording data. The difficulties experienced were correlated with the spheres of social networks, family, institutional relationships and society. The results included heeding the patient's and the family's suffering and including users in social networks, extra-hospital services and community organizations.

  11. Liver as a target for oligonucleotide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Alfica; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Fitzgerald, Kevin

    2013-12-01

    Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are an emerging class of drugs that hold the promise for silencing "un-druggable" targets,thus creating unique opportunities for innovative medicines. As opposed to gene therapy, oligonucleotides are considered to be more akin to small molecule therapeutics because they are small,completely synthetic in origin, do not integrate into the host genome,and have a defined duration of therapeutic activity after which effects recover to baseline. They offer a high degree of specificity at the genetic level, thereby reducing off-target effects.At the same time, they provide a strategy for targeting any gene in the genome, including transcripts that produce mutated proteins.Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics include short interfering RNA (siRNA), that degrade target mRNA through RISC mediated RNAi; anti-miRs, that target miRNAs; miRNA mimics, that regulate target mRNA; antisense oligonucleotides, that may be working through RNAseH mediated mRNA decay; mRNA upregulation,by targeting long non-coding RNAs; and oligonucleotides induced alternative splicing [1]. All these approaches require some minimal degree of homology at the nucleic acid sequence level for them to be functional. The different mechanisms of action and their relevant activity are outlined in Fig. 1. Besides homology,RNA secondary structure has also been exploited in the case of ribozymes and aptamers, which act by binding to nucleic acids or proteins, respectively. While there have been many reports of gene knockdown and gene modulation in cell lines and mice with all these methods, very few have advanced to clinical stages.The main obstacle to date has been the safe and effective intracellular delivery of these compounds in higher species, including humans. Indeed, their action requires direct interaction with DNA/RNA within the target cell so even when one solves the issues of tissue and cellular access, intracellular/intranuclear location represents yet another barrier to

  12. Therapeutic results in sixth nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruna Violeta-Ioana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors aim to assess through a retrospective study the efficiency of different therapeutic methods used in VIth nerve palsy. 60 patients with VIth nerve palsy, admitted and treated in Oftapro Clinic, were divided into two groups: a group with partial dysfunction (paresis of sixth nerve and a group with the complete abolition of neuromuscular function (VIth nerve palsy. Initial examination included assessment of neuromuscular function, binocular vision and existence of medial rectus muscle contracture (ipsi- and contralateral and contralateral lateral rectus inhibitory palsy. Neuromuscular dysfunction was graded from - 8 (paralysis to 0 (normal abduction. Therapeutic modalities ranged from conservative treatment (occlusion, prism correction, botulinum toxin chemodenervation and surgical treatment: medial rectus recession + lateral rectus resection, in cases of paresis, and transposition procedures (Hummelscheim and full tendon transfer in cases of sixth nerve palsy. Functional therapeutic success was defined as absence of diplopia in primary position, with or without prism correction, and surgical success was considered obtaining orthoptic alignment in primary position or a small residual deviation (under 10 PD. 51 patients had unilateral dysfunction, and 9 patients had bilateral VI-th nerve dysfunction. 8 patients had associated fourth or seventh cranial nerves palsy. The most common etiology was traumatic, followed by tumor and vascular causes. There were 18 cases of spontaneous remission, partial or complete (4-8 months after the onset, and 6 cases enhanced by botulinum toxin chemodenervation. 17 paretic eyes underwent surgery, showing a very good outcome, with restoration of binocular single vision. The procedure of choice was recession of medial rectus muscle, combined with resection of lateral rectus muscle. All patients with sixth nerve palsy underwent surgery, except one old female patient, who refused surgery. Hummelscheim procedure was

  13. Supramolecular Nanoparticles for Molecular Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Ju

    Over the past decades, significant efforts have been devoted to explore the use of various nanoparticle-based systems in the field of nanomedicine, including molecular imaging and therapy. Supramolecular synthetic approaches have attracted lots of attention due to their flexibility, convenience, and modularity for producing nanoparticles. In this dissertation, the developmental story of our size-controllable supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) will be discussed, as well as their use in specific biomedical applications. To achieve the self-assembly of SNPs, the well-characterized molecular recognition system (i.e., cyclodextrin/adamantane recognition) was employed. The resulting SNPs, which were assembled from three molecular building blocks, possess incredible stability in various physiological conditions, reversible size-controllability and dynamic disassembly that were exploited for various in vitro and in vivo applications. An advantage of using the supramolecular approach is that it enables the convenient incorporation of functional ligands onto SNP surface that confers functionality ( e.g., targeting, cell penetration) to SNPs. We utilized SNPs for molecular imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) by introducing reporter systems (i.e., radio-isotopes, MR contrast agents, and fluorophores) into SNPs. On the other hand, the incorporation of various payloads, including drugs, genes and proteins, into SNPs showed improved delivery performance and enhanced therapeutic efficacy for these therapeutic agents. Leveraging the powers of (i) a combinatorial synthetic approach based on supramolecular assembly and (ii) a digital microreactor, a rapid developmental pathway was developed that is capable of screening SNP candidates for the ideal structural and functional properties that deliver optimal performance. Moreover, SNP-based theranostic delivery systems that combine reporter systems and therapeutic payloads into a

  14. Preventive and therapeutic effects of physical exercise on bleomycin-induced lung injury and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Aurino Pinho

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that regular physical exercise of moderate intensity is an important tool for the control of pulmonary oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to examine the preventive and therapeutic effect of physical exercise on oxidative stress in the lungs of mice exposed to bleomycin (BLM. Thirty-six male mice (CF1, 30-35 g received a single endotracheal dose of BLM (2.5 U/kg body weight dissolved in 0.25 mL 0.9% NaCl or saline (0.9% NaCl and were divided into six groups (n=6: untrained saline or BLM, preventive training saline or BLM, and therapeutic training saline or BLM. The trained groups underwent a program of progressive exercise on a treadmill for 8 weeks (up to 17 m.min-1, 50 min.day-1. The preventive group started the exercise program 62 days before the administration of BLM and the therapeutic group 62 days after the administration of BLM. All animals were killed by decapitation 48 hours after the experimental period, and the right lung was surgically removed for the determination of biochemical parameters. Hydroxyproline content, TBARS level, protein carbonylation, and superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities were analyzed. The results showed that preventive and therapeutic training led to a significant reduction in hydroxyproline content and inhibited the increase in oxidative damage to lipids and proteins. However, only therapeutic training decreased SOD and CAT activities in mice exposed to BLM. The results suggest that preventive and therapeutic physical exercise is able to minimize pulmonary oxidative stress induced by BLM.

  15. Preventive and therapeutic effects of physical exercise on bleomycin-induced lung injury and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Aurino Pinho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2009v11n4p415 Studies have shown that regular physical exercise of moderate intensity is an important tool for the control of pulmonary oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to examine the preventive and therapeutic effect of physical exercise on oxidative stress in the lungs of mice exposed to bleomycin (BLM. Thirty-six male mice (CF1, 30-35 g received a single endotracheal dose of BLM (2.5 U/kg body weight dissolved in 0.25 mL 0.9% NaCl or saline (0.9% NaCl and were divided into six groups (n=6: untrained saline or BLM, preventive training saline or BLM, and therapeutic training saline or BLM. The trained groups underwent a program of progressive exercise on a treadmill for 8 weeks (up to 17 m.min-1, 50 min.day-1. The preventive group started the exercise program 62 days before the administration of BLM and the therapeutic group 62 days after the administration of BLM. All animals were killed by decapitation 48 hours after the experimental period, and the right lung was surgically removed for the determination of biochemical parameters. Hydroxyproline content, TBARS level, protein carbonylation, and superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities were analyzed. The results showed that preventive and therapeutic training led to a significant reduction in hydroxyproline content and inhibited the increase in oxidative damage to lipids and proteins. However, only therapeutic training decreased SOD and CAT activities in mice exposed to BLM. The results suggest that preventive and therapeutic physical exercise is able to minimize pulmonary oxidative stress induced by BLM.

  16. [Eye contact effects: A therapeutic issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, M; Conty, L

    2016-12-01

    The perception of a direct gaze - that is, of another individual's gaze directed at the observer that leads to eye contact - is known to influence a wide range of cognitive processes and behaviors. We stress that these effects mainly reflect positive impacts on human cognition and may thus be used as relevant tools for therapeutic purposes. In this review, we aim (1) to provide an exhaustive review of eye contact effects while discussing the limits of the dominant models used to explain these effects, (2) to illustrate the therapeutic potential of eye contact by targeting those pathologies that show both preserved gaze processing and deficits in one or several functions that are targeted by the eye contact effects, and (3) to propose concrete ways in which eye contact could be employed as a therapeutic tool. (1) We regroup the variety of eye contact effects into four categories, including memory effects, activation of prosocial behavior, positive appraisals of self and others and the enhancement of self-awareness. We emphasize that the models proposed to account for these effects have a poor predictive value and that further descriptions of these effects is needed. (2) We then emphasize that people with pathologies that affect memory, social behavior, and self and/or other appraisal, and self-awareness could benefit from eye contact effects. We focus on depression, autism and Alzheimer's disease to illustrate our proposal. To our knowledge, no anomaly of eye contact has been reported in depression. Patients suffering from Alzheimer disease, at the early and moderate stage, have been shown to maintain a normal amount of eye contact with their interlocutor. We take into account that autism is controversial regarding whether gaze processing is preserved or altered. In the first view, individuals are thought to elude or omit gazing at another's eyes while in the second, individuals are considered to not be able to process the gaze of others. We adopt the first stance

  17. Therapeutic hypertension system based on a microbreathing pressure sensor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diao Z

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Ziji Diao1, Hongying Liu1, Lan Zhu1, Xiaoqiang Gao1, Suwen Zhao1, Xitian Pi1,2, Xiaolin Zheng1,21Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Chongqing University, Ministry of Education, Chongqing; 2Key Laboratories for National Defense Science and Technology of Innovative Micronano Devices and System Technology, Chongqing, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground and methods: A novel therapeutic system for the treatment of hypertension was developed on the basis of a slow-breath training mechanism, using a microbreathing pressure sensor device for the detection of human respiratory signals attached to the abdomen. The system utilizes a single-chip AT89C51 microcomputer as a core processor, programmed by Microsoft Visual C++6.0 to communicate with a PC via a full-speed PDIUSBD12 interface chip. The programming is based on a slow-breath guided algorithm in which the respiratory signal serves as a physiological feedback parameter. Inhalation and exhalation by the subject is guided by music signals.Results and conclusion: Our study indicates that this microbreathing sensor system may assist in slow-breath training and may help to decrease blood pressure.Keywords: hypertension, microbreathing sensor, single-chip microcomputer, slow-pace breathing

  18. [Other care in Parkinson's disease: Psychological, rehabilitation, therapeutic education and new technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupouy, Julia; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Brefel-Courbon, Christine

    2017-03-01

    Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is often traumatic. It is then important to organize this announcement in order to support the patient in this major step of his care course. Anxiety and depression are present in about 50% of PD patients. Besides pharmacological treatment, cognitive-behavioral therapy induces improvement in anxio-depressive symptoms. We have to promote physical activity for PD patients, from the beginning of the disease, because it prevents from deconditioning, improves motor and non-motor symptoms, quality of life, and decreases loneliness. Rehabilitation may be also proposed (physiotherapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy). But there is no specific recommendation in PD, and usual activities can be proposed. Therapeutic education is an answer for PD patients who need to know and understand their disease and treatment. Organization of therapeutic education is different depending of the teams: group workshop and/or individual sessions, conduct by doctors or paramedical staff (nurse, physiotherapist, psychologist…). Therapeutic education programs are always evolving. It will soon be proposed therapeutic education for care partners, and some patients may join therapeutic education staff. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Program specialization

    CERN Document Server

    Marlet, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the principles and techniques of program specialization - a general method to make programs faster (and possibly smaller) when some inputs can be known in advance. As an illustration, it describes the architecture of Tempo, an offline program specializer for C that can also specialize code at runtime, and provides figures for concrete applications in various domains. Technical details address issues related to program analysis precision, value reification, incomplete program specialization, strategies to exploit specialized program, incremental specialization, and data speci

  20. “You Think You’re Helping Them, But They’re Helping You Too”: Experiences of Scottish Male Young Offenders Participating in a Dog Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J. Leonardi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Interaction with animals can be beneficial to humans and animal-assisted interventions (AAIs are increasingly popular in a range of contexts. Dog training programs (DTPs are the most popular form of AAI in custodial contexts; prisoners often have multiple needs and DTPs seem to facilitate a diverse range of positive outcomes, including improvements in well-being, behavior, and offending behavior. However, evidence on the efficacy of prison-based DTPs is still limited and these evaluations often lack detail or methodological rigor. We examined the experiences of male young offenders (N = 70 using thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews conducted following completion of a DTP. The themes that emerged indicated a broad range of inter-related experiences and positive outcomes. The most prevalent theme related to their experiences with Dogs (including feelings and attitudes, and there were perceived improvements categorized as: Positive Effects (including mood and well-being, Motivation, Charitable Purpose, Self-Efficacy, Improved Skills, Impulsivity, and Emotional Management. These themes mapped well onto outcomes previously identified in research on DTPs, and to the program’s core aims of improving behavior, educational engagement, employability, and well-being. The diversity and nature of these themes indicates that DTPs have considerable potential to engage and benefit those individuals with multiple needs, such as young offenders, and ultimately to achieve positive long-term outcomes with significant social, health, and economic impact.

  1. “You Think You’re Helping Them, But They’re Helping You Too”: Experiences of Scottish Male Young Offenders Participating in a Dog Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Interaction with animals can be beneficial to humans and animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) are increasingly popular in a range of contexts. Dog training programs (DTPs) are the most popular form of AAI in custodial contexts; prisoners often have multiple needs and DTPs seem to facilitate a diverse range of positive outcomes, including improvements in well-being, behavior, and offending behavior. However, evidence on the efficacy of prison-based DTPs is still limited and these evaluations often lack detail or methodological rigor. We examined the experiences of male young offenders (N = 70) using thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews conducted following completion of a DTP. The themes that emerged indicated a broad range of inter-related experiences and positive outcomes. The most prevalent theme related to their experiences with Dogs (including feelings and attitudes), and there were perceived improvements categorized as: Positive Effects (including mood and well-being), Motivation, Charitable Purpose, Self-Efficacy, Improved Skills, Impulsivity, and Emotional Management. These themes mapped well onto outcomes previously identified in research on DTPs, and to the program’s core aims of improving behavior, educational engagement, employability, and well-being. The diversity and nature of these themes indicates that DTPs have considerable potential to engage and benefit those individuals with multiple needs, such as young offenders, and ultimately to achieve positive long-term outcomes with significant social, health, and economic impact. PMID:28829389

  2. Voriconazole therapeutic drug monitoring practices in the intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wanrooy, Marjolijn J. P.; Rodgers, Michael G. G.; Span, Lambert F. R.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Uges, Donald R. A.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    BACKGROUND: Routine therapeutic drug monitoring of voriconazole appears to be beneficial. This study investigated the therapeutic drug monitoring practices in intensive care to derive possible recommendations for improvement. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed for patients aged ≥ 18

  3. Responsive crosslinked polymer nanogels for imaging and therapeutics delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkelenkamp, Antonie E.; Elzes, Marie-Louise Rachel; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Paulusse, Jos M.J.

    2018-01-01

    Water-soluble, nano-sized crosslinked polymer networks, or nanogels, are delivery vehicles, which have highly interesting properties for therapeutic delivery and imaging. Nanogels may also possess responsive properties, depending on the employed polymers, allowing controlled release of therapeutics

  4. Therapeutic radionuclides: Production and decay property considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkert, W.A.; Goeckeler, W.F.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    The development of effective therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals requires careful consideration in the selection of the radionuclide. The in vivo targeting and clearance properties of the carrier molecule must be balanced with the decay properties of the attached radionuclide. Radionuclides for therapeutic applications fall into three general categories: beta-particle emitters, alpha-particle emitters, and Auger and Coster-Kronig-electron emitters following electron capture. Alpha particles and Auger electrons deposit their energy over short distances with a high LET that limits the ability of cells to repair damage to DNA. Despite their high levels of cytotoxicity, the relatively short range of alpha particles requires binding of the carrier molecule to most cancer cells within a tumor in order to be effective. Because of the extremely short range of Auger electrons, the radionuclide must be carried directly into the nucleus to elicit high radiotoxicity, making it necessary to deliver the radionuclide to every cell within a tumor cell population. These characteristics impose rigid restrictions on the nature of the carrier molecules for these types of particle emitters but successful targeting of these types of radionuclides could result in high therapeutic ratios. Most beta-emitting radionuclides are produced in nuclear rectors via neutron capture reactions; however, a few are produced in charged-particle accelerators. For radionuclides produced by direct neutron activation, the quantities and specific activities that can be produced are determined in large part by the cross-section of the target isotope and the flux of the reactor. Many applications do not require high-specific activities and can therefore utilize the wide range of radionuclides that can be produced in sufficient quantity by direct neutron activation. 114 refs

  5. Agile delivery of protein therapeutics to CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2014-09-28

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Curcumin Nanomedicine: A Road to Cancer Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Conventional therapies cause widespread systemic toxicity and lead to serious side effects which prohibit their long term use. Additionally, in many circumstances tumor resistance and recurrence is commonly observed. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify suitable anticancer therapies that are highly precise with minimal side effects. Curcumin is a natural polyphenol molecule derived from the Curcuma longa plant which exhibits anticancer, chemo-preventive, chemo- and radio-sensitization properties. Curcumin’s widespread availability, safety, low cost and multiple cancer fighting functions justify its development as a drug for cancer treatment. However, various basic and clinical studies elucidate curcumin’s limited efficacy due to its low solubility, high rate of metabolism, poor bioavailability and pharmacokinetics. A growing list of nanomedicine(s) using first line therapeutic drugs have been approved or are under consideration by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to improve human health. These nanotechnology strategies may help to overcome challenges and ease the translation of curcumin from bench to clinical application. Prominent research is reviewed which shows that advanced drug delivery of curcumin (curcumin nanoformulations or curcumin nanomedicine) is able to leverage therapeutic benefits by improving bioavailability and pharmacokinetics which in turn improves binding, internalization and targeting of tumor(s). Outcomes using these novel drug delivery systems have been discussed in detail. This review also describes the tumor-specific drug delivery system(s) that can be highly effective in destroying tumors. Such new approaches are expected to lead to clinical trials and to improve cancer therapeutics. PMID:23116309

  7. The endocannabinoid system and cancer: therapeutic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindon, Josée; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2011-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system is implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions (inflammation, immunomodulation, analgesia, cancer and others). The main active ingredient of cannabis, Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC), produces its effects through activation of CB(1) and CB(2) receptors. CB(1) receptors are expressed at high levels in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas CB(2) receptors are concentrated predominantly, although not exclusively, in cells of the immune system. Endocannabinoids are endogenous lipid-signalling molecules that are generated in the cell membrane from phospholipid precursors. The two best characterized endocannabinoids identified to date are anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Here we review the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and anti-tumour actions (inhibition of cell proliferation and migration, induction of apoptosis, reduction of tumour growth) of the cannabinoids in different types of cancer. This review will focus on examining how activation of the endocannabinoid system impacts breast, prostate and bone cancers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. The therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for cancer, as identified in clinical trials, is also discussed. Identification of safe and effective treatments to manage and improve cancer therapy is critical to improve quality of life and reduce unnecessary suffering in cancer patients. In this regard, cannabis-like compounds offer therapeutic potential for the treatment of breast, prostate and bone cancer in patients. Further basic research on anti-cancer properties of cannabinoids as well as clinical trials of cannabinoid therapeutic efficacy in breast, prostate and bone cancer is therefore warranted. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Establishing an institutional therapeutic apheresis registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Steven A; McCleskey, Brandi; Marques, Marisa B; Adamski, Jill

    2016-12-01

    Apheresis was first performed as a therapeutic procedure in the 1950s. The first national therapeutic apheresis (TA) registry was established in Canada in 1981 and other national registries followed, including two attempts at establishing an international TA registry. There is no national registry in the United States. Our large, academic, tertiary hospital has a very active TA service. We created a TA database to track all procedures performed by the apheresis service by transferring data from paper appointment logs and the electronic medical records into a Microsoft Access database. Retrospective data from each TA procedure performed at UAB from January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2012 were entered, including the type of procedure, indication, date, and patient demographics. Microsoft Excel was used for data analysis. During the 10-year period, our TA service treated 1,060 patients and performed 11,718 procedures. Of these patients, 70% received therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), 21% received extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP), 4.5% received red cell exchange (RCE), 4.2% received leukocytapheresis, and 0.6% underwent platelet depletion. Among the procedures, 54% were TPEs, 44% were ECPs, 1.3% were RCEs, 0.5% were leukocytaphereses, and 0.1% were platelet depletions. According to the current literature, national and international TA use is underreported. We believe that the UAB TA registry provides useful information about TA practices in our region and can serve as a model for other institutions. Furthermore, data from multiple institutional registries can be used for clinical research to increase the available evidence for the role of TA in various conditions. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:516-522, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Long QT syndrome: A therapeutic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Maully

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS is one of the most common cardiac channelopathies and is characterized by prolonged ventricular repolarization and life-threatening arrhythmias. The mortality is high among untreated patients. The identification of several LQTS genes has had a major impact on the management strategy for both patients and family members. An impressive genotype-phenotype correlation has been noted and genotype identification has enabled genotype specific therapies. Beta blockers continue to be the primary treatment for prevention of life threatening arrhythmias in the majority of patients. Other therapeutic options include pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, left cardiac sympathetic denervation, sodium channel blocking medications and lifestyle modification.

  10. New and exploratory therapeutic agents for asthma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yeadon, Michael; Diamant, Zuzana

    2000-01-01

    ... been accomplished. It is well recognized that new drugs are essentially the result of basic and applied research. Early in this century, the advent of a chemical approach to medicine led to many extraordinary developments. The past few decades have been characterized by a search to understand the mechanisms of disease- a quest spurred by the recognition that if pathogenic processes were known, new therapeutic opportunities would ensue. The validity of this concept is beautifully illustrated in the case of asthma. Here is a d...

  11. Molecular hydrogen: a therapeutic antioxidant and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 medicine research has flourished since a landmark publication in Nature Medicine that revealed the antioxidant and cytoprotective effects of hydrogen gas in a focal stroke model. Emerging evidence has consistently demonstrated that molecular hydrogen is a promising therapeutic option for a variety of diseases and the underlying comprehensive mechanisms is beyond pure hydroxyl radicals scavenging. The non-toxicity at high concentrations and rapid cellular diffusion features of molecular hydrogen ensure the feasibility and readiness of its clinical translation to human patients.

  12. Epigenetics and Therapeutic Targets Mediating Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. PMID:26236020

  13. Tapping the RNA world for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Judy

    2018-04-16

    A recent revolution in RNA biology has led to the identification of new RNA classes with unanticipated functions, new types of RNA modifications, an unexpected multiplicity of alternative transcripts and widespread transcription of extragenic regions. This development in basic RNA biology has spawned a corresponding revolution in RNA-based strategies to generate new types of therapeutics. Here, I review RNA-based drug design and discuss barriers to broader applications and possible ways to overcome them. Because they target nucleic acids rather than proteins, RNA-based drugs promise to greatly extend the domain of 'druggable' targets beyond what can be achieved with small molecules and biologics.

  14. [Therapeutic approaches using genetically modified cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anliker, Brigitte; Renner, Matthias; Schweizer, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Medicinal products containing genetically modified cells are, in most cases, classified as gene therapy and cell therapy medicinal products. Although no medicinal product containing genetically modified cells has been licensed in Europe yet, a variety of therapeutic strategies using genetically modified cells are in different stages of clinical development for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. In this chapter, several examples of promising approaches are presented, with an emphasis on gene therapy for inherited immunodeficiencies and on tumour immunotherapy with genetically modified T-cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor or a recombinant T-cell receptor.

  15. Bee Pollen: Chemical Composition and Therapeutic Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Komosinska-Vassev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bee pollen is a valuable apitherapeutic product greatly appreciated by the natural medicine because of its potential medical and nutritional applications. It demonstrates a series of actions such as antifungal, antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, anticancer immunostimulating, and local analgesic. Its radical scavenging potential has also been reported. Beneficial properties of bee pollen and the validity for their therapeutic use in various pathological condition have been discussed in this study and with the currently known mechanisms, by which bee pollen modulates burn wound healing process.

  16. Continuous integrated manufacturing of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Daniel Johannes; Steinebach, Fabian; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2017-12-28

    With the growth of our understanding of biopharmaceutical processes, a transition from classical batch to continuous integrated manufacturing of therapeutic proteins is taking place across laboratory, clinical and commercial scales. Encouraged by regulatory authorities, this transition is favoured by new emerging technologies as well as by the development of better simulation models. The current status of continuous cell culture and downstream processes and requirements for their successful integration are discussed in this article, with specific reference to product quality attributes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Overgrowth conditions: a diagnostic and therapeutic conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Matthew J; Taghinia, Amir; Upton, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Over the past five decades, one of the major problems in the treatment of overgrowth syndromes of the hand has been classification. Currently, a number of specific conditions with known natural histories have been delineated and reviewed. Treatment is highly individualized. Amputation is still recommended for grotesque deformities of the upper limb. Early aggressive surgery, when indicated, will improve contour, function, and appearance. Specific therapeutic techniques include radical debulking, microvascular neurolysis, vascular reconstruction, epiphysiodesis, and, in some cases, thumb or digit replacement. Long-term outcomes remain in the good-to-fair range and are dependent upon the condition, reconstructive techniques employed, age of patient, and the severity of deformity.

  18. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringue, V; Deslys, J P; Adjou, K T; Dormont, D

    1997-04-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare neurodegenerative illness which belongs to the group of transmissible subacute spongiform encephalopathies (TSSE). Today, no treatment is available for TSSE. The appearance of a new variant of CJD, which affects young people and could be linked to so-called ;mad cow disease', has stimulated researchers to develop new therapies against CJD. A few drugs have already been shown to delay the onset of experimental TSSE. They could contribute to the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in TSSE and, therefore, could be the basis for therapeutic strategies against CJD.

  19. [Potential therapeutic usefulness of cannabis and cannabinoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo Fernández, P

    2000-01-01

    Diseases in which Cannabis and cannabinoids have demonstrated some medicinal putative properties are: nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy, muscle spasticity (multiple sclerosis, movement disorders), pain, anorexia, epilepsy, glaucoma, bronchial asthma, neuroegenerative diseases, cancer, etc. Although some of the current data comes from clinical controlled essays, the majority are based on anecdotic reports. Basic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies and more extensive controlled clinical essays with higher number of patients and long term studies are necessary to consider these compounds useful since a therapeutical point of view.

  20. Therapeutic potential of cannabis-related drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Stephen P H

    2016-01-04

    In this review, I will consider the dual nature of Cannabis and cannabinoids. The duality arises from the potential and actuality of cannabinoids in the laboratory and clinic and the 'abuse' of Cannabis outside the clinic. The therapeutic areas currently best associated with exploitation of Cannabis-related medicines include pain, epilepsy, feeding disorders, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. As with every other medicinal drug of course, the 'trick' will be to maximise the benefit and minimise the cost. After millennia of proximity and exploitation of the Cannabis plant, we are still playing catch up with an understanding of its potential influence for medicinal benefit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Internet addiction neuroscientific approaches and therapeutical interventions

    CERN Document Server

    Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This book combines a scholarly introduction with state-of-the-art research in the characterization of Internet addiction. It is intended for a broad audience including scientists, students and practitioners. The first part of the book contains an introduction to Internet addiction and their pathogenesis. The second part of the book is dedicated to an in-depth review of neuroscientific findings which cover studies using a variety of biological techniques including brain imaging and molecular genetics. The last part of the book will focus on therapeutic interventions for Internet addiction.

  2. Martorell's Ulcer: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Pinto, Ana Paula Frade; Silva, Nelson Araújo; Osorio, Carolina Teixeira; Rivera, Lina Maria; Carneiro, Sueli; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia; Gomes Bica, Blanca Elena Rios

    2015-01-01

    Martorell's ulcer is an uncommon ischemic and extremely painful lesion located in the distal portion of the lower limb, resulting from severe systemic and poorly controlled hypertension. It is common in women between 50 and 70 years of age. The diagnosis is clinical and mostly belated, following exclusion of other causes. The response to treatment takes time and is unsatisfactory. A combination of several drugs associated with surgery may be required for wound healing. The authors present a case of Martorell's hypertensive ulcer, with emphasis on the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. PMID:26351431

  3. Martorell's Ulcer: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Frade Lima Pinto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Martorell's ulcer is an uncommon ischemic and extremely painful lesion located in the distal portion of the lower limb, resulting from severe systemic and poorly controlled hypertension. It is common in women between 50 and 70 years of age. The diagnosis is clinical and mostly belated, following exclusion of other causes. The response to treatment takes time and is unsatisfactory. A combination of several drugs associated with surgery may be required for wound healing. The authors present a case of Martorell's hypertensive ulcer, with emphasis on the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties.

  4. New concepts in therapeutic photomedicine: photochemistry, optical targeting and the therapeutic window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Advances in optics technology, synthetic photochemistry, and the science of photobiology make it possible to think beyond phototherapy and photochemotherapy which is dependent on direct photochemical alteration of metabolites or direct phototoxic insult to cells. This report discusses another gender of photomedicine therapy which includes in vivo photoactivation of medicines, photon-dependent drug delivery, and manipulation of host and exposure source to maximize therapeutic index. These therapeutic manipulations are made possible because the skin is highly overperfused and because non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation that enters skin and blood has adequate photon energy to cause electronic excitation. Radiation of 320-800 nm is not very directly phototoxic, is absorbed by a variety of relatively nontoxic photolabile molecules and has an internal dosimetric depth profile. This radiation can therefore be used to activate, deactivate, bind, release or biotransform medications in vivo in skin or other organs. The photochemist, synthetic chemist and photobiologist can collaborate to significantly increase therapeutic possibilities

  5. Therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on evidence-based interventions to prevent mobility decline and enhance physical performance in older adults. Several modalities, in addition to traditional strengthening programs, have been designed to manage age-related functional decline more effectively. In this study, we reviewed the current relevant literatures to assess the therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy (sarcopenia). Age-related changes in human skeletal muscle, ...

  6. Using High Throughput Screens to Identify Lead Compounds for Alzheimer’s Disease Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Throughput Screens To Identify Lead Compounds For Alzheimers Disease Therapeutics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...inhibitors ......................... 11  Figure 1.8. Structure of melatonin, curcumin , and nicotine ............................... 12  Chapter 2...and curcumin . Nicotine is suggested to bind to the small, soluble β- sheet aggregate (63). The hormone melatonin has been shown to prevent β-sheet

  7. Combined Kinesiotaoe and Therapeutic Ultrasound in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, O.G.; Elhafez, H.M.; Alshatoury, H.A.; Refaat, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background : Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy of the upper limb and a significant contributor to hand functional impairment and disability. Hand is an Accepted November 2016 . important part of body to perform the complex daily living activities. Purpose: To find out effect of combined kinesiotape and therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Material and Methods :Thirty Carpal Tunnel Syndrome female patients with positive electro diagnostic findings (MMDL >4.2 ms) participated in this study, their ages ranged between 40 and 50 years. Design of study :They were divided randomly into two equal groups. Group (A) received kinesiotape applicatio n on the affected wrist for 3 days, then day off and then another three days each week for 4 weeks combined with a program of 12 sessions of continuous ultrasound, 3 sessions per week for 5 minute persession in addition nerve and tendon gliding exercise . While, Group (B) received a program of 12 sessions of continuous ultrasound, 3 sessions per week for 5 minute per session in addition tendon and nerve gliding exercise. The treatment program continued for 4 weeks. Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire and median motor distallatency, visual analogue scale and hand grip dynamometer were performed before and after the treatment program for all patients of the two groups. Results : The obtained results showed a highly statistically significant (P< 0.0001) improvement in both groups (A and B) concerning Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire , visual analogue scale and hand grip dynamometer but there was significant improvement in group (A) only concerning median motor distal latency. The improvement was highly significant (P< 0.0001) in group (A) when compared with group (B). Conclusion: It could be concluded that the use of combined kinesiotape and therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome appeared to be effective. Yet the combined effect of kinesiotape with

  8. The Use of Video Role Play for Teaching Therapeutic Communication Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Elaine Ng; Anthony O’Brien; Sandra Mackey; Hong-Gu He; David G. Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Background: Effective Communication is a fundamental skill for practice across health care settings and is a component ofundergraduate nursing programs around the world. Resource materials appropriate for the teaching of communication in an Asiancontext are lacking.Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a self-developed video using role play in facilitating teaching andlearning associated with therapeutic communication.Methods: Videos were produced which demonstrated the...

  9. Therapeutic Touch and Healing Meditation: A Threesome with Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Marlene

    1994-01-01

    Briefly reviews the use of therapeutic touch in early Western culture and Judaic tradition and by modern practitioners. Discusses modern scientific approaches to therapeutic touch, including its use by nurses. Offers suggestions for and examples of the use of meditation, relaxation exercises, and therapeutic touch with adolescents in classroom and…

  10. Therapeutic Theory and Social Context: A Social Constructionist Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Gordon

    1997-01-01

    Explores the foundation of therapeutic theory from the perspective of social constructionism. Proposes a theoretical description of the interaction between an individual and the social context in the formation of therapeutic theory. Then explores this description in relation to the early life and subsequent therapeutic theory of Carl Rogers. (RJM)

  11. The therapeutic collaboration in life design counselling: The case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The collaboration coding system enables the assessment of each therapeutic exchange within and outside of the client's therapeutic zone of proximal development, defined as the space between the client's actual therapeutic developmental level and his/her potential developmental level fomented by a collaborative ...

  12. Student Wellbeing and the Therapeutic Turn in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This article considers current concerns with promoting student mental health and wellbeing against the backdrop of critiques of the "therapeutic turn" in education. It begins by situating accounts of "therapeutic education" within broader theorisation of therapeutic culture. In doing so, the importance of this work is…

  13. Mucinous ovarian cancer: A therapeutic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Rush, Jack; Rickett, Kirsty; Coward, Jermaine I G

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous ovarian cancer represents approximately 3% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC). Despite this seemingly low prevalence, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic conundrum that has resulted in numerous attempts to adopt novel strategies in managing this disease. Anecdotally, there has been a prevailing notion that established gold standard systemic regimens should be substituted for those utilised in cancers such as gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies; tumours that share more biological similarities than other EOC subtypes. This review summarises the plethora of small studies which have adopted this philosophy and influenced the design of the multinational GOG142 study, which was ultimately terminated due to poor accrual. To date, there is a paucity of evidence to support delivering 'GI style' chemotherapy for mucinous ovarian cancer over and above carboplatin-paclitaxel doublet therapy. Hence there is an urge to develop studies focused on targeted therapeutic agents driven by refined mutational analysis and conducted within the context of harmonised international collaborations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical and Therapeutic Trials of Nigella Sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragaa H.M. Salama

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of Nigella sativa (N. sativa have been used for thousands of years as a spice and food preservative. The oil and seed constituents have shown potential medicinal properties in traditional medicine. This review lists and discusses different therapeutic trials of N. sativa seeds and its active ingredients in many diseases affecting body systems. It has anti–oxidant effects through enhancing the oxidant scavenger system that leads to antitoxic effects induced by several insults. Its anti–inflammatory effects conduct through suppression of the inflammatory mediators’ prostaglandins and leukotriens. Its immunomodulatory properties were proved by augmenting the T cell and natural killer cell–mediated immune responses. It expresses antimicrobial and anti–tumor properties toward different microbes and cancers. It decreases DNA damage and thereby prevents initiation of carcinogenesis in colonic tissue secondary to exposure to toxic agents. N. sativa is of immense therapeutic benefit in DM. It stimulates glucose–induced secretion of insulin besides having a negative impact on glucose absorption from the intestinal mucosa. N. sativa administration protects hepatic tissue from deleterious effects of toxic substances and attenuates hepatic lipid peroxidation. N. sativa provides a promising strategy that combines anti–inflammatory, antioxidants, and antineoplastics modes of action. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 513-522

  15. Ondansetron. Therapeutic use as an antiemetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, R.J.; Heel, R.C. (Adis Drug Information Services, Auckland (New Zealand))

    1991-04-01

    Ondansetron (GR 38032F) is a highly selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, one of a new class of compounds which may have several therapeutic applications. Animal and clinical studies show that ondansetron reduces the 24-hour incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting induced by cytotoxic drugs, including cisplatin, and by single exposure, high dose radiation. Ondansetron is more effective than high dose metoclopramide in the 24 hours following chemotherapy, and preliminary clinical evidence suggests that it is equally effective in the following 4 days. It is also more effective than the moderate doses of metoclopramide used to suppress emesis following radiotherapy. The antiemetic efficacy of ondansetron is enhanced by dexamethasone in cisplatin-treated patients. Importantly, extrapyramidal effects have not been reported with ondansetron. Further comparisons are required with standard combination antiemetic therapy to complement the data presently available. Thus, ondansetron is a promising new agent for prophylaxis against nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It may be particularly useful in young and elderly patients who are more susceptible to extrapyramidal symptoms induced by high dose metoclopramide. With its improved tolerability and clinical response profiles, ondansetron represents an important advance in a difficult area of therapeutics. 101 refs.

  16. Ondansetron. Therapeutic use as an antiemetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milne, R.J.; Heel, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Ondansetron (GR 38032F) is a highly selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, one of a new class of compounds which may have several therapeutic applications. Animal and clinical studies show that ondansetron reduces the 24-hour incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting induced by cytotoxic drugs, including cisplatin, and by single exposure, high dose radiation. Ondansetron is more effective than high dose metoclopramide in the 24 hours following chemotherapy, and preliminary clinical evidence suggests that it is equally effective in the following 4 days. It is also more effective than the moderate doses of metoclopramide used to suppress emesis following radiotherapy. The antiemetic efficacy of ondansetron is enhanced by dexamethasone in cisplatin-treated patients. Importantly, extrapyramidal effects have not been reported with ondansetron. Further comparisons are required with standard combination antiemetic therapy to complement the data presently available. Thus, ondansetron is a promising new agent for prophylaxis against nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It may be particularly useful in young and elderly patients who are more susceptible to extrapyramidal symptoms induced by high dose metoclopramide. With its improved tolerability and clinical response profiles, ondansetron represents an important advance in a difficult area of therapeutics. 101 refs

  17. Advances in spinal muscular atrophy therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Valeria; Corti, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a progressive, recessively inherited neuromuscular disease, characterized by the degeneration of lower motor neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem, which leads to weakness and muscle atrophy. SMA currently represents the most common genetic cause of infant death. SMA is caused by the lack of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein due to mutations, which are often deletions, in the SMN1 gene. In the absence of treatments able to modify the disease course, a considerable burden falls on patients and their families. Greater knowledge of the molecular basis of SMA pathogenesis has fuelled the development of potential therapeutic approaches, which are illustrated here. Nusinersen, a modified antisense oligonucleotide that modulates the splicing of the SMN2 mRNA transcript, is the first approved drug for all types of SMA. Moreover, the first gene therapy clinical trial using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors encoding SMN reported positive results in survival and motor milestones achievement. In addition, other strategies are in the pipeline, including modulation of SMN2 transcripts, neuroprotection, and targeting an increasing number of other peripheral targets, including the skeletal muscle. Based on this premise, it is reasonable to expect that therapeutic approaches aimed at treating SMA will soon be changed, and improved, in a meaningful way. We discuss the challenges with regard to the development of novel treatments for patients with SMA, and depict the current and future scenarios as the field enters into a new era of promising effective treatments.

  18. Personalized gene silencing therapeutics for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, C; Skotte, N H; Southwell, A L; Hayden, M R

    2014-07-01

    Gene silencing offers a novel therapeutic strategy for dominant genetic disorders. In specific diseases, selective silencing of only one copy of a gene may be advantageous over non-selective silencing of both copies. Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Silencing both expanded and normal copies of HTT may be therapeutically beneficial, but preservation of normal HTT expression is preferred. Allele-specific methods can selectively silence the mutant HTT transcript by targeting either the expanded CAG repeat or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium with the expansion. Both approaches require personalized treatment strategies based on patient genotypes. We compare the prospect of safe treatment of HD by CAG- and SNP-specific silencing approaches and review HD population genetics used to guide target identification in the patient population. Clinical implementation of allele-specific HTT silencing faces challenges common to personalized genetic medicine, requiring novel solutions from clinical scientists and regulatory authorities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  20. Therapeutic management of botulism in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jegaveera Pandian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the successful recovery of few dairy cattle from botulism in response to a modified therapeutic strategy. Materials and Methods: Seventy four naturally-occurring clinical cases of bovine botulism encountered during the period of 2012-2014 which were confirmed by mouse lethality test became material for this study. Affected animals were made into three groups based on the treatment modifications made during the course of study. Results and Discussion: With the modified therapeutic regimen, 17 animals recovered after 7-10 days of treatment. Clinical recovery took 2-30 days. Animals which were not given intravenous fluid and calcium recovered uneventfully. Cattle which were already treated with intravenous fluids, calcium borogluconate, and antibiotics did not recover. They were either died or slaughtered for salvage. Conclusion: In cattle with botulism, administration of Vitamin AD3E and activated charcoal aid the clinical recovery. Besides, strictly avoiding anti-clostridial antibiotics, fluid therapy, and calcium therapy may facilitate the clinical recovery. Upon fluid administration, the pulmonary congestion existed in the ailing cattle might have worsened the anoxia. Administration of antibiotics like penicillin, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines further worsen the neuronal paralysis by increasing the availability of botulinum neurotoxin. Cattle in early botulism have fair chances of recovery with the modified therapy.

  1. Mustard Gas Inhalation Injury: Therapeutic Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Brian M; Andres, Devon K; Holmes, Wesley W; Paradiso, Danielle; Appell, Ashley; Letukas, Valerie A; Benton, Betty; Clark, Offie E; Gao, Xiugong; Ray, Prabhati; Anderson, Dana R; Ray, Radharaman

    2014-07-01

    Mustard gas (sulfur mustard [SM], bis-[2-chloroethyl] sulfide) is a vesicating chemical warfare agent and a potential chemical terrorism agent. Exposure of SM causes debilitating skin blisters (vesication) and injury to the eyes and the respiratory tract; of these, the respiratory injury, if severe, may even be fatal. Therefore, developing an effective therapeutic strategy to protect against SM-induced respiratory injury is an urgent priority of not only the US military but also the civilian antiterrorism agencies, for example, the Homeland Security. Toward developing a respiratory medical countermeasure for SM, four different classes of therapeutic compounds have been evaluated in the past: anti-inflammatory compounds, antioxidants, protease inhibitors and antiapoptotic compounds. This review examines all of these different options; however, it suggests that preventing cell death by inhibiting apoptosis seems to be a compelling strategy but possibly dependent on adjunct therapies using the other drugs, that is, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and protease inhibitor compounds. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Improving therapeutics in anorexia nervosa with tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2017-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that our diet is an important contributing factor in the development, management and prevention of a number of psychiatric illnesses. Tryptophan, an essential amino acid, is the sole precursor of neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin). Administration of tryptophan can boost serotonin neurotransmission to produce therapeutically important effects in serotonin deficiency disorders. Anorexia nervosa (AN) an eating disorder associated with high levels of psychiatric comorbidity including psychosis, hyperactivity, depression and anxiety has highest lethality of all psychiatric illnesses. Evidence suggests that excessive dieting and food restriction can decrease brain tryptophan and serotonin in AN patients to precipitate depression, psychosis and hyperactivity. There are currently no FDA approved pharmacological treatments available for AN patients; antidepressants and antipsychotics, largely used to treat associated psychiatric comorbidities are also not very effective. The aim of this non-systematic review article is to evaluate and document a potential importance of tryptophan supplementation in improving therapeutics in AN patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Hodgkin lymphoma: Current and future therapeutic strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Anthony; Michot, Jean-Marie; Kempf, Emmanuelle; Mazeron, Renaud; Dartigues, Peggy; Terroir, Marie; Boros, Angela; Bonnetier, Serge; Castilla-Llorente, Cristina; Coman, Tereza; Danu, Alina; Ghez, David; Pilorge, Sylvain; Arfi-Rouche, Julia; Dercle, Laurent; Soria, Jean-Charles; Carde, Patrice; Ribrag, Vincent; Fermé, Christophe; Lazarovici, Julien

    2018-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a cancer that mostly affects young people, in which modern therapeutic strategies using chemotherapy and radiotherapy result in a cure rate exceeding 80%. Survivors are exposed to long-term consequences of treatments, such as secondary malignancies and cardiovascular diseases, whose mortality exceeds the one of the disease itself, with long-term follow-up. The current therapeutic strategy in HL, based on the assessment of initial risk factors, is the result of large clinical trials led by the main international cooperating groups. More recently, several groups have tried to develop treatment strategies adapted to the response to chemotherapy, evaluated by interim PET/CT scan. However to date, the combined treatment with chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy remains a standard in most of the above-diaphragmatic localized forms. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, and especially anti-PD1 antibodies, have shown dramatic results in some serious forms of relapsed or refractory HL, with limited toxicity, and may contribute in the future to reduce the toxicities of treatments. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Therapeutic nanomedicine surmounts the limitations of pharmacotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odiba Arome

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Science always strives to find an improved way of doing things and nanoscience is one such approach. Nanomaterials are suitable for pharmaceutical applications mostly because of their size which facilitates absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of the nanoparticles. Whether labile or insoluble nanoparticles, their cytotoxic effect on malignant cells has moved the use of nanomedicine into focus. Since nanomedicine can be described as the science and technology of diagnosing, treating and preventing diseases towards ultimately improving human health, a lot of nanotechnology options have received approval by various regulatory agencies. Nanodrugs also have been discovered to be more precise in targeting the desired site, hence maximizing the therapeutic effects, while minimizing side-effects on the rest of the body. This unique property and more has made nanomedicine popular in therapeutic medicine employing nanotechnology in genetic therapy, drug encapsulation, enzyme manipulation and control, tissue engineering, target drug delivery, pharmacogenomics, stem cell and cloning, and even virus-based hybrids. This review highlights nanoproducts that are in development and have gained approval through one clinical trial stage or the other.

  5. Therapeutic manuka honey: no longer so alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dee A Carter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal honey research is undergoing a substantial renaissance. From a folklore remedy largely dismissed by mainstream medicine as alternative, we now see increased interest by scientists, clinical practitioners and the general public in the therapeutic uses of honey. There are a number of drivers of this interest: first, the rise in antibiotic resistance by many bacterial pathogens has prompted interest in developing and using novel antibacterials; second, an increasing number of reliable studies and case reports have demonstrated that certain honeys are very effective wound treatments; third, therapeutic honey commands a premium price, and the honey industry is actively promoting studies that will allow it to capitalize on this; and finally, the very complex and rather unpredictable nature of honey provides an attractive challenge for laboratory scientists. In this paper we review manuka honey research, from observational studies on its antimicrobial effects through to current experimental and mechanistic work that aims to take honey into mainstream medicine. We outline current gaps and remaining controversies in our knowledge of how honey acts, and suggest new studies that could make honey a no longer alternative alternative.

  6. Potential use of vanadium compounds in therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, D A; Etcheverry, S B

    2010-01-01

    Vanadium is a trace element present in practically all cells in plants and animals. While the essentiality of vanadium for human beings remains to be well established, vanadium has become an increasingly important environmental metal. Vanadium compounds exert a variety of biological activities and responses. At pharmacological doses, vanadium compounds display relevant biological actions such as insulin and growth factor mimetic or enhancing effects, as well as osteogenic and cardioprotective activity. On the other hand, depending on the nature of compounds and their concentrations, toxicological actions and adverse side effects may also be shown. Nevertheless, the toxic effects may be useful to develop new antitumoral drugs. In this review, the authors summarize current knowledge and new advances on in vitro and in vivo effects of inorganic and organically-chelated vanadium compounds. The effects of vanadium derivatives on some cellular signaling pathways related to different diseases are compiled. In particular, the pathways relevant to the insulin mimetic, osteogenic, cadioprotective and antitumoral actions of vanadium compounds have been comprehensively reviewed. The knowledge of these intracellular signaling pathways may facilitate the rational design of new vanadium compounds with promising therapeutic applications as well as the understanding of secondary side effects derived from the use of vanadium as a therapeutic agent.

  7. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in digestive diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulbecco, Pietro; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-12-28

    Curcumin is a low-molecular-weight hydrophobic polyphenol that is extracted from turmeric, which possesses a wide range of biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-microbial activities. Despite its diverse targets and substantial safety, clinical applications of this molecule for digestive disorders have been largely limited to case series or small clinical trials. The poor bioavailability of curcumin is likely the major hurdle for its more widespread use in humans. However, complexation of curcumin into phytosomes has recently helped to bypass this problem, as it has been demonstrated that this new lecithin formulation enables increased absorption to a level 29-fold higher than that of traditional curcuminoid products. This allows us to achieve much greater tissue substance delivery using significantly lower doses of curcumin than have been used in past clinical studies. As curcumin has already been shown to provide good therapeutic results in some small studies of both inflammatory and neoplastic bowel disorders, it is reasonable to anticipate an even greater efficacy with the advent of this new technology, which remarkably improves its bioavailability. These features are very promising and may represent a novel and effective therapeutic approach to both functional and organic digestive diseases.

  8. Ayahuasca: Pharmacology, neuroscience and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Clavé, Elisabet; Soler, Joaquim; Elices, Matilde; Pascual, Juan C; Álvarez, Enrique; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Friedlander, Pablo; Feilding, Amanda; Riba, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Ayahuasca is the Quechua name for a tea obtained from the vine Banisteriopsis caapi, and used for ritual purposes by the indigenous populations of the Amazon. The use of a variation of the tea that combines B. caapi with the leaves of the shrub Psychotria viridis has experienced unprecedented expansion worldwide for its psychotropic properties. This preparation contains the psychedelic 5-HT 2A receptor agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) from P. viridis, plus β-carboline alkaloids with monoamine-oxidase-inhibiting properties from B. caapi. Acute administration induces a transient modified state of consciousness characterized by introspection, visions, enhanced emotions and recollection of personal memories. A growing body of evidence suggests that ayahuasca may be useful to treat substance use disorders, anxiety and depression. Here we review the pharmacology and neuroscience of ayahuasca, and the potential psychological mechanisms underlying its therapeutic potential. We discuss recent findings indicating that ayahuasca intake increases certain mindfulness facets related to acceptance and to the ability to take a detached view of one's own thoughts and emotions. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that ayahuasca shows promise as a therapeutic tool by enhancing self-acceptance and allowing safe exposure to emotional events. We postulate that ayahuasca could be of use in the treatment of impulse-related, personality and substance use disorders and also in the handling of trauma. More research is needed to assess the full potential of ayahuasca in the treatment of these disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Therapeutic progress in lumbar spinal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shao-Yan; Huang, Yan-Sheng; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2017-05-25

    Along with the population aging in China, patients with lumbar spinal stenosis(LSS) caused by recessive change incessantly increase. At present, there is no adequate evidence to recommend any specific nonoperative treatment for LSS, and surgery is still an effective method. The cilincal symptoms of the patients without conservative treatment got improvement after surgery, which is the strongest evidence base. Spinal instability after simple decompression promotes the development of fusion technique, and the accelerated adjacent segment degeneration and no relief in symptoms after fusion lead to dynamic fixation technology emerge as the times require. Patients with spinal canal decompression whether need bone fusion or not is still controversial. For the past few years, the operation of simple decompression for LSS obviously decreased, whereas the decompression plus fusion surgery showed sustainable growth. Decompression complicated with fusion was more and more adopted in LSS, in order to reduce the hidden risk of spinal instability and deformity. Although decompressive operation has determinate effect, now it is still unclear if the therapeutic effect of decompression complicated with fusion is better than simple decompression. This article reviews the current studies to explore whether decompression plus bone fusion is applicable for LSS. To further explore the best choice of surgical treatment for LSS, we focused on evidence-based therapeutic options. Copyright© 2017 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  10. Tumor Evolution as a Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirouchene-Angelozzi, Nabil; Swanton, Charles; Bardelli, Alberto

    2017-07-20

    Recent technological advances in the field of molecular diagnostics (including blood-based tumor genotyping) allow the measurement of clonal evolution in patients with cancer, thus adding a new dimension to precision medicine: time. The translation of this new knowledge into clinical benefit implies rethinking therapeutic strategies. In essence, it means considering as a target not only individual oncogenes but also the evolving nature of human tumors. Here, we analyze the limitations of targeted therapies and propose approaches for treatment within an evolutionary framework. Significance: Precision cancer medicine relies on the possibility to match, in daily medical practice, detailed genomic profiles of a patient's disease with a portfolio of drugs targeted against tumor-specific alterations. Clinical blockade of oncogenes is effective but only transiently; an approach to monitor clonal evolution in patients and develop therapies that also evolve over time may result in improved therapeutic control and survival outcomes. Cancer Discov; 7(8); 1-13. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Therapeutic Manuka Honey: No Longer So Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Dee A.; Blair, Shona E.; Cokcetin, Nural N.; Bouzo, Daniel; Brooks, Peter; Schothauer, Ralf; Harry, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal honey research is undergoing a substantial renaissance. From a folklore remedy largely dismissed by mainstream medicine as “alternative”, we now see increased interest by scientists, clinical practitioners and the general public in the therapeutic uses of honey. There are a number of drivers of this interest: first, the rise in antibiotic resistance by many bacterial pathogens has prompted interest in developing and using novel antibacterials; second, an increasing number of reliable studies and case reports have demonstrated that certain honeys are very effective wound treatments; third, therapeutic honey commands a premium price, and the honey industry is actively promoting studies that will allow it to capitalize on this; and finally, the very complex and rather unpredictable nature of honey provides an attractive challenge for laboratory scientists. In this paper we review manuka honey research, from observational studies on its antimicrobial effects through to current experimental and mechanistic work that aims to take honey into mainstream medicine. We outline current gaps and remaining controversies in our knowledge of how honey acts, and suggest new studies that could make honey a no longer “alternative” alternative. PMID:27148246

  12. Towards new therapeutic approaches for malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Ivan; Buzea, Cristina; Tron, Victor

    2011-11-01

    Recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of the initiation and progression of melanoma has created new opportunities for developing novel therapeutic modalities to manage this potentially lethal disease. Although at first glance, melanoma carcinogenesis appears to be a chaotic system, it is indeed, arguably, a deterministic multistep process involving sequential alterations of proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressors and miRNA genes. The scope of this article is to discuss the most recent and significant advances in melanoma molecular therapeutics. It is apparent that using single agents targeting solely individual melanoma pathways might be insufficient for long-term survival. However, the outstanding results on melanoma survival observed with novel selective inhibitors of B-RAF, such as PLX4032 give hope that melanoma can be cured. The fact that melanoma develops acquired resistance to PLX4032 emphasises the importance of simultaneously targeting several pathways. Because the most striking feature of melanoma is its unsurpassed ability to metastasise, it is important to implement newer systems for drug delivery adapted from research on stem cells and nanotechnology.

  13. A modular platform for targeted RNAi therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedmi, Ranit; Veiga, Nuphar; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Goldsmith, Meir; Rosenblum, Daniel; Dammes, Niels; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Nahary, Limor; Leviatan-Ben-Arye, Shani; Harlev, Michael; Behlke, Mark; Benhar, Itai; Lieberman, Judy; Peer, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have identified relevant genes and signalling pathways that are hampered in human disorders as potential candidates for therapeutics. Developing nucleic acid-based tools to manipulate gene expression, such as short interfering RNAs1-3 (siRNAs), opens up opportunities for personalized medicine. Yet, although major progress has been made in developing siRNA targeted delivery carriers, mainly by utilizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for targeting4-8, their clinical translation has not occurred. This is in part because of the massive development and production requirements and the high batch-to-batch variability of current technologies, which rely on chemical conjugation. Here we present a self-assembled modular platform that enables the construction of a theoretically unlimited repertoire of siRNA targeted carriers. The self-assembly of the platform is based on a membrane-anchored lipoprotein that is incorporated into siRNA-loaded lipid nanoparticles that interact with the antibody crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain. We show that a simple switch of eight different mAbs redirects the specific uptake of siRNAs by diverse leukocyte subsets in vivo. The therapeutic potential of the platform is demonstrated in an inflammatory bowel disease model by targeting colon macrophages to reduce inflammatory symptoms, and in a Mantle Cell Lymphoma xenograft model by targeting cancer cells to induce cell death and improve survival. This modular delivery platform represents a milestone in the development of precision medicine.

  14. Therapeutic application of lasers in ophthalmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misiuk-Hojlo, M.; Krzyzanowska-Berkowska, P.; Hill-Bator, A.

    2007-01-01

    Lasers have found application in diverse branches of medicine. In ophthalmology, laser technology has various therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The purpose of this article is to review the major therapeutic applications of lasers in different eye disorders. The effects of lasers on biological tissues and different laser techniques as well as the indications for laser therapy in various parts of the eye are discussed. Lasers are used to treat glaucoma and many vascular disorders of the retina. Laser treatment may be useful in preventing the development of neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy, BRVO, or CRVO. Laser techniques are also available for the treatment of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and some malignant and benign intraocular tumors and in retina abnormalities which predispose to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Corneal laser surgery is the most frequently applied laser procedure in ophthalmology. PRK, LASIK, and LASEK are used to correct errors in vision such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. Laser photocoagulation is also helpful in cataract surgery. Nowadays, lasers have become so universal that it is difficult to imagine ophthalmology without them. We are still witnessing rapid advances in the development of laser techniques, especially in plastic surgery, cataract extraction, and ocular imaging. (authors)

  15. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity Drives Therapeutic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary R. Doherty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The connection between epithelial-mesenchymal (E-M plasticity and cancer stem cell (CSC properties has been paradigm-shifting, linking tumor cell invasion and metastasis with therapeutic recurrence. However, despite their importance, the molecular pathways involved in generating invasive, metastatic, and therapy-resistant CSCs remain poorly understood. The enrichment of cells with a mesenchymal/CSC phenotype following therapy has been interpreted in two different ways. The original interpretation posited that therapy kills non-CSCs while sparing pre-existing CSCs. However, evidence is emerging that suggests non-CSCs can be induced into a transient, drug-tolerant, CSC-like state by chemotherapy. The ability to transition between distinct cell states may be as critical for the survival of tumor cells following therapy as it is for metastatic progression. Therefore, inhibition of the pathways that promote E-M and CSC plasticity may suppress tumor recurrence following chemotherapy. Here, we review the emerging appreciation for how plasticity confers therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence.

  16. The social dimensions of therapeutic horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Holly

    2017-07-01

    Harnessing nature to promote mental health is increasingly seen as a sustainable solution to healthcare across the industrialised world. The benefits of these approaches to well-being include reduced symptoms of anxiety, depression and improved social functioning. Many studies assume that contact with nature is the main therapeutic component of these interventions yet 'green care' programmes typically include activities not based on 'nature' that may contribute to positive outcomes. This study explored the views of service users participating in a Therapeutic Horticultural programme on what factors promoted their engagement in the project, to identify variables other than 'nature' that may be responsible for successful engagement in these programmes. A secondary aim was to assess the significance 'nature' plays including, for example whether a prior interest in horticultural-related activities, such as gardening, is significant. Two focus groups were held with mental health service users (n = 15) attending a gardening project in south-east England. Findings revealed that the social element of the project was the key facilitator to engagement; the flexible structure of the gardening project was also significant and allowed service users to feel empowered. 'Nature' evoked a sense of calm and provided participants with a non-threatening space that was engaging. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Enhancer-associated RNAs as therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léveillé, Nicolas; Melo, Carlos A; Agami, Reuven

    2015-05-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves a variety of mechanisms driven by a complex regulatory network of factors. Control of transcription is an important step in gene expression regulation, which integrates the function of cis-acting and trans-acting elements. Among cis-regulatory elements, enhancer RNA (eRNA)-producing domains recently emerged as widespread and potent regulators of transcription and cell fate decision. Thus, manipulation of eRNA levels becomes a novel and appealing avenue for the design of new therapeutic treatments. In this review, we focus on eRNA-producing domains. We describe mechanisms involved in their cell-type specific selection and activation as well as their epigenetic features. In addition, we present their function and the growing evidences of their deregulation in human diseases. Finally, we discuss eRNAs as potential therapeutic targets. As key factors in the control of transcription, eRNAs appear to possess a great potential for the establishment of new therapy options. However, thorough testing as well as providing the genetic toolbox to target eRNAs will be needed to fully assess the practical and clinical possibilities.

  18. Unexplored therapeutic opportunities in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea, Tudor I; Bologa, Cristian G; Brunak, Søren; Campbell, Allen; Gan, Gregory N; Gaulton, Anna; Gomez, Shawn M; Guha, Rajarshi; Hersey, Anne; Holmes, Jayme; Jadhav, Ajit; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Johnson, Gary L; Karlson, Anneli; Leach, Andrew R; Ma'ayan, Avi; Malovannaya, Anna; Mani, Subramani; Mathias, Stephen L; McManus, Michael T; Meehan, Terrence F; von Mering, Christian; Muthas, Daniel; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Overington, John P; Papadatos, George; Qin, Jun; Reich, Christian; Roth, Bryan L; Schürer, Stephan C; Simeonov, Anton; Sklar, Larry A; Southall, Noel; Tomita, Susumu; Tudose, Ilinca; Ursu, Oleg; Vidovic, Dušica; Waller, Anna; Westergaard, David; Yang, Jeremy J; Zahoránszky-Köhalmi, Gergely

    2018-03-23

    A large proportion of biomedical research and the development of therapeutics is focused on a small fraction of the human genome. In a strategic effort to map the knowledge gaps around proteins encoded by the human genome and to promote the exploration of currently understudied, but potentially druggable, proteins, the US National Institutes of Health launched the Illuminating the Druggable Genome (IDG) initiative in 2014. In this article, we discuss how the systematic collection and processing of a wide array of genomic, proteomic, chemical and disease-related resource data by the IDG Knowledge Management Center have enabled the development of evidence-based criteria for tracking the target development level (TDL) of human proteins, which indicates a substantial knowledge deficit for approximately one out of three proteins in the human proteome. We then present spotlights on the TDL categories as well as key drug target classes, including G protein-coupled receptors, protein kinases and ion channels, which illustrate the nature of the unexplored opportunities for biomedical research and therapeutic development.

  19. New therapeutic strategies for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Mara A; Fumarola, Claudia; La Monica, Silvia; Alfieri, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive malignant disease affecting the mesothelium, commonly associated to asbestos exposure. Therapeutic actions are limited due to the late stage at which most patients are diagnosed and the intrinsic chemo-resistance of the tumor. The recommended systemic therapy for MPM is cisplatin/pemetrexed regimen with a mean overall survival of about 12months and a median progression free survival of less than 6months. Considering that the incidence of this tumor is expected to increase in the next decade and that its prognosis is poor, novel therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. For some tumors, such as lung cancer and breast cancer, druggable oncogenic alterations have been identified and targeted therapy is an important option for these patients. For MPM, clinical guidelines do not recommend biological targeted therapy, mainly because of poor target definition or inappropriate trial design. Further studies are required for a full comprehension of the molecular pathogenesis of MPM and for the development of new target agents. This review updates pre-clinical and clinical data on the efficacy of targeted therapy and immune checkpoint inhibition in the treatment of mesothelioma. Finally, future perspectives in this deadly disease are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thyroid abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, Steven L.; McDougall, I. Ross; Constine, Louis S.

    1995-01-01

    The thyroid gland is the largest pure endocrine gland in the body and one of the organs most likely to produce clinically significant abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation. Radiation doses to the thyroid that exceed approximately 26 Gy frequently produce hypothyroidism, which may be clinically overt or subclinical, as manifested by increased serum thyrotropin and normal serum-free thyroxine concentrations. Pituitary or hypothalamic hypothyroidism may arise when the pituitary region receives doses exceeding 50 Gy with conventional, 1.8-2 Gy fractionation. Direct irradiation of the thyroid may increase the risk of Graves' disease or euthyroid Graves' opthalmopathy. Silent thyroiditis, cystic degeneration, benign adenoma, and thyroid cancer have been observed after therapeutically relevant doses of external radiation. Direct or incidental thyroid irradiation increases the risk for well-differentiated, papillary, and follicular thyroid cancer from 15- to 53-fold. Thyroid cancer risk is highest following radiation at a young age, decreases with increasing age at treatment, and increases with follow-up duration. The potentially prolonged latent period between radiation exposure and the development of thyroid dysfunction, thyroid nodularity, and thyroid cancer means that individuals who have received neck or pituitary irradiation require careful, periodic clinical and laboratory evaluation to avoid excess morbidity

  1. Therapeutic benefits of Nanoparticles in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros ePanagiotou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke represents one of the major causes of death and disability worldwide, for which no effective treatments are available. The thrombolytic drug alteplase (tissue plasminogen activator or tPA is the only treatment for acute ischemic stroke but its use is limited by several factors including short therapeutic window, selective efficacy and subsequent haemorrhagic complications. Numerous preclinical studies have reported very promising results using neuroprotective agents but they have failed at clinical trials because of either safety issues or lack of efficacy. The delivery of many potentially therapeutic neuroprotectants and diagnostic compounds to the brain is restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Nanoparticles (NPs, which can readily cross the BBB without compromising its integrity, have immense applications in the treatment of ischemic stroke. In this review, potential uses of NPs will be summarized for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Additionally, an overview of targeted NPs will be provided, which could be used in the diagnosis of stroke. Finally, the potential limitations of using NPs in medical applications will be mentioned. Since the use of NPs in stroke therapy is now emerging and is still in development, this review is far from comprehensive or conclusive. Instead, examples of NPs and their current use will be provided, as well as the potentials of NPs in an effort to meet the high demand of new therapies in stroke.

  2. Myasthenia gravis: subgroup classification and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilhus, Nils Erik; Verschuuren, Jan J

    2015-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that is characterised by muscle weakness and fatigue, is B-cell mediated, and is associated with antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase (MUSK), lipoprotein-related protein 4 (LRP4), or agrin in the postsynaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction. Patients with myasthenia gravis should be classified into subgroups to help with therapeutic decisions and prognosis. Subgroups based on serum antibodies and clinical features include early-onset, late-onset, thymoma, MUSK, LRP4, antibody-negative, and ocular forms of myasthenia gravis. Agrin-associated myasthenia gravis might emerge as a new entity. The prognosis is good with optimum symptomatic, immunosuppressive, and supportive treatment. Pyridostigmine is the preferred symptomatic treatment, and for patients who do not adequately respond to symptomatic therapy, corticosteroids, azathioprine, and thymectomy are first-line immunosuppressive treatments. Additional immunomodulatory drugs are emerging, but therapeutic decisions are hampered by the scarcity of controlled studies. Long-term drug treatment is essential for most patients and must be tailored to the particular form of myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Gender roles in a geriatric therapeutic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isohanni, M

    1993-01-01

    During the years 1983-1989 an action research/intervention study in a 40-bed Finnish home for the elderly had as its goal the development of a modified therapeutic community. This paper focuses on the gender roles. Logistic regression analysis indicated that males (N = 17) were best differentiated from females (N = 38) by extramural functional activity, extramural social passivity, religious neutrality, passivity in contacts with a personal nurse, and better education. These five explanatory variables correctly predicted gender in 84% of the cases. These mild gender differences reflect the traditional sex roles of an agrarian Finnish village and were seen mainly as a positive phenomenon. The findings, and some other gender identity themes in the elderly, also were illustrated by qualitative case material. These data suggested that the therapeutic community of aged people should permit active preservation of even conservative and stereotyped gender roles, thereby aiding in the defense and continuity of their often frail identity. The search for new role elements should be supported as well, however, because some elderly continue to develop their gender roles during their final years.

  4. Potential therapeutic approaches for Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaoning; Sun, Jiandong; Ji, Angela X; Baudry, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deficiency of maternally inherited UBE3A, an ubiquitin E3 ligase. Despite recent progress in understanding the mechanism underlying UBE3A imprinting, there is no effective treatment. Further investigation of the roles played by UBE3A in the central nervous system (CNS) is needed for developing effective therapies. This review covers the literature related to genetic classifications of AS, recent discoveries regarding the regulation of UBE3A imprinting, alterations in cell signaling in various brain regions and potential therapeutic approaches. Since a large proportion of AS patients exhibit comorbid autism spectrum disorder (ASD), potential common molecular bases are discussed. Advances in understanding UBE3A imprinting provide a unique opportunity to induce paternal UBE3A expression, thus targeting the syndrome at its 'root.' However, such efforts have yielded less-than-expected rescue effects in AS mouse models, raising the concern that activation of paternal UBE3A after a critical period cannot correct all the CNS defects that developed in a UBE3A-deficient environment. On the other hand, targeting abnormal downstream cell signaling pathways has provided promising rescue effects in preclinical research. Thus, combined reinstatement of paternal UBE3A expression with targeting abnormal signaling pathways should provide better therapeutic effects.

  5. Willingness to Interact After Therapeutic Recreation in a Patient With Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayumi, Kohno; Mitsunobu, Matsuda

    2018-02-01

    The study aim was to describe how a patient with schizophrenia who had been in a psychiatric hospital for an extended period of time changed in his desire to interact with others after participating in the therapeutic recreation program, and to interpret his inner process based on symbolic interactionism theory. Data from a patient who showed marked changes in narratives of an interview held after the program and through observation during sessions were analyzed. The patient gained a sense of willingness, including the desire to interact with others and began to act accordingly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of Gestalt Therapy Within a Drug Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideroff, Stephen I.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a Gestalt therapeutic approach that has shown promise within a drug treatment program. The major issues discussed include the acquisition of self-support, taking responsibility, dealing with anxiety, contact, and the expression of pent-up feelings. (Author)

  7. Magic as a therapeutic intervention to promote coping in hospitalized pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robyn; Walton, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Magic as a therapeutic intervention is used in an innovative, hospital-based program to address the psychosocial issues children and adolescents often experience as a result of illness and hospitalization. A child life specialist and a magician with an MBA collaborated, blending clinical expertise with business acumen and professional-level magic skills to create the program. The program has two distinct components: (1) magicians using interactive, close-up magic and humor as a technique to promote socialization, enhance self-esteem, and increase opportunities for choice and control, and (2) magicians providing the personal instruction and materials that enable chronically ill and long-term patients to learn and perform magic to promote a sense of empowerment and feelings of mastery. Positive responses from patients, families, and staff to the program at one hospital led to the creation of Open Heart Magic, a non-profit children's foundation that maintains and staffs bedside, interactive therapeutic magic programs in five hospitals in the Chicago metropolitan area.

  8. Relação entre níveis de compreensão e estratégias de leitura utilizadas por surdos sinalizadores em um programa terapêutico Relationship between comprehension levels and reading strategies used in a therapeutic program by deaf individuals who communicate through sign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sílvia Cárnio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar as mudanças referentes às estratégias de aprendizagem nos níveis de compreensão de leitura durante um programa de intervenção fonoaudiológica direcionado aos surdos sinalizadores. MÉTODOS: Participaram cinco estudantes surdos, com idades entre dez anos e 15 anos, cuja língua preferencial para comunicação era a Língua Brasileira de Sinais. Todos frequentaram um programa de intervenção fonoaudiológica fundamentada na técnica de scaffolding (andaime. As variáveis consistiram dos desempenhos das avaliações individuais do nível de compreensão de leitura e das estratégias utilizadas para esta compreensão, antes de iniciar o programa e ao término do mesmo. RESULTADOS: Ao término do programa de intervenção, mais estudantes surdos utilizaram estratégias de elaboração (p=0,197 e menos estudantes utilizaram estratégias de monitoramento (p=0,197. Houve mudança significativa quanto à pontuação do nível de decodificação (p=0,109 e tendência à significância no nível de compreensão literal (p=0,197, com aumento da pontuação. Verificou-se significância somente entre a utilização da estratégia de elaboração e os dois momentos da avaliação (inicial e final (p=0,059. CONCLUSÃO: O programa de intervenção baseado na técnica de scaffolding propiciou que estudantes surdos sinalizadores utilizassem mais estratégias de elaboração e menos de monitoramento; consequentemente, uma tendência para a passagem do nível de decodificação para o nível de compreensão literal do texto.PURPOSE: To establish changes in learning strategies at reading comprehension levels during a speech-language intervention program for deaf individuals who use sign language. METHODS: Five deaf students, with ages between ten and 15 years, whose preferential modality of communication was the Brazilian Sign Language, participated in the study. All subjects were participating in a speech-language intervention program

  9. Therapeutic touch is not therapeutic for procedural pain in very preterm neonates: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Celeste; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; Rich, Bonnie; Whitley, Julie; Filion, Francoise; Cogan, Jennifer; Walker, Claire-Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Preterm neonates below 30 weeks' gestational age undergo numerous painful procedures. Many management approaches are not appropriate for this population. Therapeutic Touch, an alternative approach based on the theory of energy medicine, has been shown to promote physiological stability in preterm neonates and reduce pain in some adult studies. The objective was to determine whether Therapeutic Touch is efficacious in decreasing pain in preterm neonates. Infants Touch (n = 27) with infant behind curtains, leaving the curtained area for the heel lance, performed by another. In the sham condition (n = 28), the therapist stood by the incubator with hands by her side. The Premature Infant Pain Profile was used for pain response and time for heart rate to return to baseline for recovery. Heart rate variability and stress response were secondary outcomes. There were no group differences in any of the outcomes. Mean Premature Infant Pain Profile scores across 2 minutes of heel lance procedure in 30-second blocks ranged from 7.92 to 8.98 in the Therapeutic Touch group and 7.64 to 8.46 in the sham group. Therapeutic Touch given immediately before and after heel lance has no comforting effect in preterm neonates. Other effective strategies involving actual touch should be considered.

  10. Therapeutic options in the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Richard W; Hall, Rosemary M; Parry-Strong, Amber; Wilson, John M; Krebs, Jeremy D

    2013-11-22

    In New Zealand 28.4% of adults now classify as obese, whilst a total of 63.8% are overweight or obese (BMI >25 kg/m²). This presents an ever increasing social and economic burden to individuals, families and the healthcare system. Obesity is a major risk factor for cancer, cardiovascular, metabolic, and respiratory disorders. Preventing obesity is the optimal long-term population strategy and must be a government priority. There are many approaches which could be taken to facilitate this, however it is important not to forget those who are currently overweight or obese. This review addresses the current therapeutic options in the treatment of obesity, focusing on lifestyle changes, medications, and surgery in New Zealand. It also presents a suggested algorithm for the clinician assessing and managing obese patients in New Zealand.

  11. [Hereditary ichthyosis: A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Almendra, Nadia; Aranibar Duran, Ligia

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary ichthyoses are a group of genetic disorders of cornification, which are characterised by hyperkeratosis and scaling. The new classification identifies 36 types of ichthyosis, which are subdivided according to their frequency, pattern of inheritance and extracutaneous involvement. The diagnosis is mainly based on clinical features, since genetic studies are not available in our setting. Treatment is symptomatic and management should be performed by a multidisciplinary team. In this article, the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of different types of ichthyosis are reviewed, taking into account the nomenclature and modifications presented in the new classification. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Harnessing the Helminth Secretome for Therapeutic Immunomodulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandarajah, Emmanuela M.; Meissner, Kamila A.; Brattig, Norbert; Liebau, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Helminths are the largest and most complex pathogens to invade and live within the human body. Since they are not able to outpace the immune system by rapid antigen variation or faster cell division or retreat into protective niches not accessible to immune effector mechanisms, their long-term survival depends on influencing and regulating the immune responses away from the mode of action most damaging to them. Immunologists have focused on the excretory and secretory products that are released by the helminths, since they can change the host environment by modulating the immune system. Here we give a brief overview of the helminth-associated immune response and the currently available helminth secretome data. We introduce some major secretome-derived immunomodulatory molecules and describe their potential mode of action. Finally, the applicability of helminth-derived therapeutic proteins in the treatment of allergic and autoimmune inflammatory disease is discussed. PMID:25133189

  13. Monitoring therapeutic efficacy in breast carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardivon, Anne A.; Ollivier, Liliane; Khoury, Carl El; Thibault, Fabienne

    2006-01-01

    The aim of imaging during and after neoadjuvant therapy is to document and quantify tumor response: has the tumor size been accurately measured? Certainly, the most exciting information for the oncologists is: can we identify good or nonresponders, and can we predict the pathological response early after the initiation of treatment? This review article will discuss the role and the performance of the different imaging modalities (mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and FDG-PET imaging) for evaluating this therapeutic response. It is important to emphasize that, at this time, clinical examination and conventional imaging (mammography and ultrasound) are the only methods recognized by the international criteria. Magnetic resonance imaging and FDG-PET imaging are very promising for predicting the response early after the initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (orig.)

  14. Therapeutic drug monitoring of atypical antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grundmann Milan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder often associated with cognitive impairment and affective, mainly depressive, symptoms. Antipsychotic medication is the primary intervention for stabilization of acute psychotic episodes and prevention of recurrences and relapses in patients with schizophrenia. Typical antipsychotics, the older class of antipsychotic agents, are currently used much less frequently than newer atypical antipsychotics. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM of antipsychotic drugs is the specific method of clinical pharmacology, which involves measurement of drug serum concentrations followed by interpretation and good cooperation with the clinician. TDM is a powerful tool that allows tailor-made treatment for the specific needs of individual patients. It can help in monitoring adherence, dose adjustment, minimizing the risk of toxicity and in cost-effectiveness in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The review provides complex knowledge indispensable to clinical pharmacologists, pharmacists and clinicians for interpretation of TDM results.

  15. [Pharmacological therapeutic intervention in mild cognitive impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola Manchola, Enrique; Alaba Loinaz, Javier

    2017-06-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a syndrome encompassing affective and behavioural symptoms and various subtypes. MCI is a heterogeneous clinical entity with varied causes (degenerative, vascular, psychiatric, non-neurological disorders), and there is wide variation in symptoms and clinical course. There are multiple causes and consequently various treatments can be applied and should be combined with non-pharmacological measures. This article describes both preventive and therapeutic pharmacological interventions: control of vascular risk factors, avoidance of iatrogeny, use of nutraceuticals, CDP-choline, and Ginkgo biloba EGb 761 ® , and improvement in sense organs. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Biliary parasites: diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Niraj; Shaw, Joanna; Jain, Mamta K

    2008-04-01

    Parasitic infections of the biliary tract are a common cause of biliary obstruction in endemic areas. This article focuses on primary biliary parasites: Ascaris lumbricoides, Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini, Opisthorchis felineus, Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Fasciola hepatica, and Fasciola gigantica. Tropical and subtropical countries have the highest incidence and prevalence of these infections. Diagnosis is made primarily through direct microscopic examination of eggs in the stool, duodenal, or bile contents. Radiologic imaging may show intrahepatic ductal dilatation, whereas endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography can be used diagnostically and therapeutically. However, oral treatment is inexpensive and effective for most of these parasites and can prevent untoward consequences. Primary and alternative treatments are available and are reviewed in this article.

  17. Garlic: a review of potential therapeutic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayan, Leyla; Koulivand, Peir Hossain; Gorji, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Throughout history, many different cultures have recognized the potential use of garlic for prevention and treatment of different diseases. Recent studies support the effects of garlic and its extracts in a wide range of applications. These studies raised the possibility of revival of garlic therapeutic values in different diseases. Different compounds in garlic are thought to reduce the risk for cardiovascular diseases, have anti-tumor and anti-microbial effects, and show benefit on high blood glucose concentration. However, the exact mechanism of all ingredients and their long-term effects are not fully understood. Further studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of action of garlic as well as its efficacy and safety in treatment of various diseases. PMID:25050296

  18. Developing therapeutic vaccines against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Drummond, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia worldwide. It is characterized by an imbalance between the production and clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) and tau proteins. In AD these normal proteins accumulate, leading to aggregation and a conformational change forming oligomeric and fibrillary species with a high β-sheet content. Active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches result in dramatic reduction of Aβ pathology in AD animal models. However, there is much more limited evidence in human studies of significant clinical benefits from these strategies and it is becoming apparent that they may only be effective very early in AD. Vaccination targeting only tau pathology has shown benefits in some mouse studies but human studies are limited. Greater therapeutic efficacy for the next generation of vaccine approaches will likely benefit from specifically targeting the most toxic species of Aβ and tau, ideally simultaneously.

  19. Integrins as Therapeutic Targets: Successes and Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Raab-Westphal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrins are transmembrane receptors that are central to the biology of many human pathologies. Classically mediating cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell interaction, and with an emerging role as local activators of TGFβ, they influence cancer, fibrosis, thrombosis and inflammation. Their ligand binding and some regulatory sites are extracellular and sensitive to pharmacological intervention, as proven by the clinical success of seven drugs targeting them. The six drugs on the market in 2016 generated revenues of some US$3.5 billion, mainly from inhibitors of α4-series integrins. In this review we examine the current developments in integrin therapeutics, especially in cancer, and comment on the health economic implications of these developments.

  20. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Therapeutic strategies in the treatment of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liljana Bogdanovska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory process which affects the tooth - supporting structures of the teeth. The disease is initiated by subgingival periopathogenic bacteria in susceptible periodontal sites. The host immune response towards periodontal pathogens helps to sustain periodontal disease and eventual alveolar bone loss. Although scaling and root planing is the standard treatment modality for periodontitis, it suffers from several drawbacks such as the inability to reach the base of deep pockets and doesn’t arrest migration of periodontal pathogens from other sites in the oral cavity. In order to overcome the limitations of scaling and root planning, adjunctive chemotherapeutics and host modulatory agents to the treatment are used. These therapeutic agents show substantial beneficial effects when compared to scaling and root planning alone. This review will cover an update on chemotherapeutic and past and future host immune modulatory agents used adjunctively to treat and manage periodontal diseases.

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Epigallocatechin Gallate Nanodelivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Granja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the society is facing a large health problem with the rising of new diseases, including cancer, heart diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and obesity. Thus, it is important to invest in substances that enhance the health of the population. In this context, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is a flavonoid found in many plants, especially in tea. Several studies support the notion that EGCG has several benefits in fighting cancer, heart diseases, diabetes, and obesity, among others. Nevertheless, the poor intestinal absorbance and instability of EGCG constitute the main drawback to use this molecule in prevention and therapy. The encapsulation of EGCG in nanocarriers leads to its enhanced stability and higher therapeutic effects. A comprehensive review of studies currently available on the encapsulation of EGCG by means of nanocarriers will be addressed.

  3. Treating troubled families: therapeutic scenario in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Bino

    2012-04-01

    India, a country of diverse cultures, languages, life styles, and ethnicities, is becoming a land of economic change, political stability, technological advancement, and changing traditional structures of relationships as well as health consciousness. Being known for its ancient traditions, rituals, religious orientation, spiritual outlook and folk beliefs, Indian families attempt to continue certain healthy and traditional elements such as warmth, strong bond, hierarchy, extended support, cultural orientation, shared values and time, tolerance, respect for the aged and inculcation of religious teachings and traditions in families. These factors, or practices, in fact have strong therapeutic value in supplementing the growth and development of individuals in the family system in spite of its transitional position. This paper deals with the review of family-based mental health services and focuses on the changing trends of those practices in India and the advancement of Indian families in their engaging ability with mentally ill members as well as with the treating team.

  4. Vaidyavallabha: An Authoritative Work on Ayurveda Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Arhanth Kumar; Manjunath, Shreevathsa

    2016-01-01

    The text " Vaidyavallabha " is an authoritative work on Ayurvedic therapeutics written by Hastiruci , a Jain scholar. It belongs to the time period of 1673-1726 CE. Different physical and mental ailments with their treatments are addressed in the 274 verses spanned over eight chapters in this work. In this text many unique, special and simple medicinal preparations for different diseases are given. Many drugs which were easily available in the local area are given much more importance in the treatment. Added to this, method and uniqueness of naming the diseases in the text stand differently when compared to other texts. Even though the text seems to be small, the contribution to the field of Ayurveda practice is priceless.

  5. Iterative lobar lavages, early injuries, therapeutic benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, Daniel

    1979-01-01

    The therapeutic role of pulmonary lavage in vivo after plutonium oxide has been inhaled was studied in 123 baboons. The technical procedures for bilateral pulmonary lavage which enable a maximum number of alveolar macrophages to be removed with the rinsing fluid, are described. Study of the physiological and histological consequences does not indicate any long-term pathology in spite of early pathologic effects: inflammatory response and alterations of alveolar epithelium. With a schedule of ten bilateral bronchopulmonary lavages (at days 1, 4, 9 then once a week) 58% of the initial lung burden are removed. In addition, up to 30%, are removed by an accelerated natural clearance after lavage. The survival time of the treated animals is better than those untreated at a comparable cumulative dose. These results indicate that bronchopulmonary lavage is an efficient therapy for removing insoluble radionuclides [fr

  6. Graphene-based platforms for cancer therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunny C; Lee, Stephen; Lalwani, Gaurav; Suhrland, Cassandra; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a multifunctional carbon nanomaterial and could be utilized to develop platform technologies for cancer therapies. Its surface can be covalently and noncovalently functionalized with anticancer drugs and functional groups that target cancer cells and tissue to improve treatment efficacies. Furthermore, its physicochemical properties can be harnessed to facilitate stimulus responsive therapeutics and drug delivery. This review article summarizes the recent literature specifically focused on development of graphene technologies to treat cancer. We will focus on advances at the interface of graphene based drug/gene delivery, photothermal/photodynamic therapy and combinations of these techniques. We also discuss the current understanding in cytocompatibility and biocompatibility issues related to graphene formulations and their implications pertinent to clinical cancer management. PMID:26769305

  7. Ethical considerations of therapeutic hypnosis and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzrodt, Christine M

    2013-04-01

    Historically, therapeutic hypnosis has been met with skepticism within some fields, although acceptance has expanded in recent decades. Development and application of ethical standards and principles has contributed to increased acceptance of hypnosis with children. The Ethics Code of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2002) and the Code of Conduct of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH, 2000) serve as guides to ethical considerations when treating children. From a developmental and practical perspective, children have limited decision-making capacities, therefore special attention should be paid to their rights and welfare. Important ethical considerations relevant to children and hypnosis have emerged, including competence, supervision, informed consent, confidentiality, and boundaries. Considerations are reviewed from a normal and abnormal child development perspective.

  8. Hydrogels for central nervous system therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Teresa; Tunesi, Marta; Giordano, Carmen; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    The central nervous system shows a limited regenerative capacity, and injuries or diseases, such as those in the spinal, brain and retina, are a great problem since current therapies seem to be unable to achieve good results in terms of significant functional recovery. Different promising therapies have been suggested, the aim being to restore at least some of the lost functions. The current review deals with the use of hydrogels in developing advanced devices for central nervous system therapeutic strategies. Several approaches, involving cell-based therapy, delivery of bioactive molecules and nanoparticle-based drug delivery, will be first reviewed. Finally, some examples of injectable hydrogels for the delivery of bioactive molecules in central nervous system will be reported, and the key features as well as the basic principles in designing multifunctional devices will be described. © IMechE 2015.

  9. [Movement disorders in childhood: therapeutic update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubertie, A; Leydet, J; Rivier, F; Humbertclaude, V; Cheminal, R; Echenne, B

    2004-08-01

    Abnormal movements are not uncommon in childhood. Due to the severity of the abnormal movements or to the functional disability, a medical treatment is often required; the wide range of available pharmacological molecules and the absence of therapeutic consensus highlight the limited efficacy of the medical treatment on dystonic or athetoid movements, or severe tic disorders. The recent identification of the enzymatic defect implicated in metabolic diseases led to the development of specific treatment for newly recognized disorders, with more or less interesting results (creatine ou biotine supplementation). Recent progress in functional neurosurgery opened new fields in the treatment of movement disorders. Intrathecal baclofen was proved effective in the treatment of secondary dystonia, especially in patients with cerebral palsy. Deep brain stimulation is now an established therapy for patients with a generalized dystonic syndrome. Given the successful results of pallidal stimulation in dystonia, the indication of this procedure has been discussed in other types of abnormal movements.

  10. [Therapeutic problems in disorders of sex development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajszczak, Katarzyna; Słowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The compatibility between genetic, gonadal, genital, somatic and psychic sex should be present for the proper sexual development. If there is no such compatibility, disorders of sex development (DSD) appear. Medical procedure in such cases leads to many problems which mainly come from the lack of sufficient knowledge about the pathophysiology of the disorders. The main difficulties met by diagnostic and therapeutic team are: determination of the official sex, prediction of gender identity, hormonal activity of gonads and fertility, as well as the decision to undertake surgical procedures involving the genitals and gonads. Disorders of sex development lead also to psychological problems of patients and their families, because they disturb the proper social functioning. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  11. Therapeutic radiation apparatus having an optical pointer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification relates to a therapeutic irradiating apparatus including a radiation source arranged to provide a beam of penetrating radiation and an optical alignment indicator comprising at least two light sources each provided with means to provide a planar divergent beam of light located so that at least two light beams intersect along a line substantially coincident with the central axis of the path of the radiation beam. The claim relates to cylindrical lenses providing the means of providing the divergent beams, and to lasers as the light sources. Claims are also made for the apparatus providing means of supporting and aligning the patient, and for disposing the light sources so that the exit point of the radiation beam is illuminated. (U.K.)

  12. New approaches to molecular cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ian; Workman, Paul

    2006-12-01

    Cancer drug development is leading the way in exploiting molecular biological and genetic information to develop "personalized" medicine. The new paradigm is to develop agents that target the precise molecular pathology driving the progression of individual cancers. Drug developers have benefited from decades of academic cancer research and from investment in genomics, genetics and automation; their success is exemplified by high-profile drugs such as Herceptin (trastuzumab), Gleevec (imatinib), Tarceva (erlotinib) and Avastin (bevacizumab). However, only 5% of cancer drugs entering clinical trials reach marketing approval. Cancer remains a high unmet medical need, and many potential cancer targets remain undrugged. In this review we assess the status of the discovery and development of small-molecule cancer therapeutics. We show how chemical biology approaches offer techniques for interconnecting elements of the traditional linear progression from gene to drug, thereby providing a basis for increasing speed and success in cancer drug discovery.

  13. Exercise and cancer: from "healthy" to "therapeutic"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idorn, Manja; Thor Straten, Per

    2017-05-01

    Exercise improves functional capacity and patient-reported outcomes across a range of cancer diagnoses. The mechanisms behind this protection have been largely unknown, but exercise-mediated changes in body composition, sex hormone levels, systemic inflammation, and immune cell function have been suggested to play a role. We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors, and a more than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Given the common mechanisms of immune cell mobilization in mouse and man during exercise, we hypothesize that this link between exercise and the immune system can be exploited in cancer therapy in particular in combination with immunotherapy. Thus, we believe that exercise may not just be "healthy" but may in fact be therapeutic.

  14. Primitive defenses: cognitive aspects and therapeutic handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, L S

    In this paper the primitive defenses first described by Melanie Klein under the label of "schizoid mechanisms" are examined. The defenses considered are splitting the pathological uses of identification and projective identification, and the psychotic forms of denial. This examination is twofold: (1) the cognitive aspects of these defenses as described in terms of concepts developed by Jean Piaget; (2) concrete examples of the operation of these defenses during the treatment of schizophrenic patients are given and the effects of interventions based on the cognitive analysis are described. It is stressed that at times interventions, such as interpretation and confrontation, based on cognitive analysis, can temporarily and in some instances even permanently stop the operation of these defenses, allowing emotionally meaningful material to emerge which expedites the therapeutic process.

  15. Therapeutic potential of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Keith, W. Nicol

    2006-01-01

    is the necessity to be able to identify, select, expand and manipulate cells outside the body. Recent advances in adult stem cell technologies and basic biology have accelerated therapeutic opportunities aimed at eventual clinical applications. Adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate down multiple...... lineages are an attractive alternative to human embryonic stem cells (hES) in regenerative medicine. In many countries, present legislation surrounding hES cells makes their use problematic, and indeed the origin of hES cells may represent a controversial issue for many communities. However, adult stem...... cells are not subject to these issues. This review will therefore focus on adult stem cells. Based on their extensive differentiation potential and, in some cases, the relative ease of their isolation, adult stem cells are appropriate for clinical development. Recently, several observations suggest...

  16. Intestinal absorbtion from therapeutic iron doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, E.

    1977-01-01

    On a total of 105 persons with normal iron stores, iron depletion, and iron deficiency the intestinal absorption from therapeutic iron doses (100 mg Fe and 50 mg Fe as ferrous glycocoll sulphate) of a special galenic form was measured. The measurements were performed by means of a whole-body counter and preparations labelled with radio iron ( 59 Fe). Mean values of absorption rates from 100 mg Fe in healthy males were 5.0% and in healthy females 5.6% whereas in latent iron deficiency and in iron deficiency anemia mean values of 10% and 13% were obtained, respectively. The maximum absorption rate of 20 to 25% is reached already in the late stage of latent iron deficiency. Advancing severeness of iron deficiency is not followed by an increase of iron absorption. Investigations an 21 persons showed no significant difference between absorption rates of the galenic preparations used when administered orally before or after breakfast, respectively. (orig.) [de

  17. The molecular basis of therapeutic radiotracer localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, C.; Rusu, V.; Costin, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Therapeutical radiotracers are carriers or vectors of certain radionuclides to well established regions, usually tumors, of the organism that are targeted to be destroyed by the emitted radiation of the chosen radionuclide. The ideal radiotracer for therapy must have very high specificity for the target tumoral tissue and must have very suitable physical characteristics for the radionuclide (especially beta or alpha emission and short physical half life). A number of radiotracers enter in this ever-increasing therapeutic radiotracers family, starting with I-131, 32P, 89Sr, 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re-HEDP, 117mSn-DTPA, 90Y-Zevalin and so on. This paper aims to present the radiotracer uptake mechanism for some types of therapeutical radiotracers. Knowing radiotracers' uptake mechanisms may give rise to the possibility of finding an ideal radiotracer, with a highest specificity for a given tissue to be in vivo ablated by radiations. Radiotracers classification: The number of therapeutic radiotracers is increasing. Their diversity makes imperative their classification. A number of classification criteria can be distinguished: I) historical classification; II) related to the type of molecule where the radioisotope is linked; III) related to the target specificity; IV) related to the production way; V) related to the radiotracers' uptake mechanisms: 1) the interference of a normal function; 2) related to the alteration of metabolism and/or perfusion; 3) through unspecific accumulation or binding; 4) binding on some target cellular antigens; 5) binding on some target cellular surface receptors (with or without internalization); 6) miscellaneous cellular binding or uptake. From the complex cancer cell phenotype, each characteristic could be exploited in order to find a more suitable cancer radiotherapeutic, but only some of them were used until today. In how the first condition for a good radiotherapy is conducted rests the specificity of the radiotracer localization in

  18. Laboratory methods to evaluate therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga de Murphy, C.; Rodriguez-Cortes, J.; Pedraza-Lopez, M.; Ramirez-Iglesias, MT.; Ferro-Flores, G.

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim of this coordinated research project was to develop in vivo and in vitro laboratory methods to evaluate therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Towards this end, the laboratory methods used in this study are described in detail. Two peptides - an 8 amino acid minigastrin analogue and octreotate - were labelled with 177 Lu. Bombesin was labelled with 99 mTc, and its diagnostic utility was proven. For comparison, 99 mTc-TOC was used. The cell lines used in this study were AR42J cells, which overexpress somatostatin receptors found in neuroendocrine cancers, and PC3 cells, which overexpress gastric releasing peptide receptors (GRP-r) found in human prostate and breast cancers. The animal model chosen was athymic mice with implanted dorsal tumours of pathologically confirmed cell cancers. The methodology described for labelling, quality control, and in vitro and in vivo assays can be easily used with other radionuclides and other peptides of interest. (author)

  19. Therapeutic Capsule Endoscopy: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Rasouli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for non-invasive (or less-invasive monitoring and treatment of medical conditions has attracted both physicians and engineers to work together and investigate new methodologies. Wireless capsule endoscopy is a successful example of such techniques which has become an accepted routine for diagnostic inspection of the gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a non-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy and provides the opportunity for exploring distal areas of the small intestine which are otherwise not accessible. Despite these advantages, wireless capsule endoscopy is still limited in functionality compared to traditional endoscopy. Wireless capsule endoscopes with advanced functionalities, such as biopsy or drug delivery, are highly desirable. In this article, the current status of wireless capsule endoscopy is reviewed together with some of its possible therapeutic applications as well as the existing challenges.

  20. Therapeutic Songwriting in Music Therapy Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Felicity; Wigram, Tony; Stott, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Songwriting as therapeutic intervention has received increasing attention in the field of music therapy over the past decade however much of the publications focus on clinical outcomes rather than methods of practice. This paper, part of a two-part research report into trends in the clinical...... of songwriting clinical practice and the frequency with which songwriting is employed in practice. The data highlights that songwriting is frequently employed in developmental disability and ASD practice, with reports on songwriting with these diagnostic groups being underrepresented in the music therapy...... practice of songwriting, aims to describe the most frequently employed goal areas across a range of clinical populations and compare these findings with the published literature. Responses to a 21-question on-line survey were obtained from 477 professional music therapists practicing in 29 countries which...

  1. [Therapeutic prospects for subacute transmissible spongiform encephalopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seman, M; Adjou, K T

    1999-05-01

    There is currently no effective therapy available for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, a limited number of drugs such as polyanions, the amyloid-binding dye Congo red, amphotericin B and anthracyclines have been found to delay the appearance of the clinical signs in experimental prion diseases. Today, the most promising agent appears to be less toxic derivative the amphotericin B, MS-8209. Indeed this compound has a wide spectrum of anti-prion activity and constitute the unique molecule able to prolong survival time when treatment is performed at the late stages of infection. This result represents an important progress in therapeutical approaches of prion diseases and justify the development of new polyene antibiotic derivatives.

  2. Therapeutic aspects of Tulsi unraveled: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of the paper was to review the diverse pharmaceutical aspects of Tulsi. Materials and Methods: Several publications and books were electronically searched in google using the keywords “Tulsi as a medicine,” “Tulsi as a medicinal plant,” “Medicinal properties of Ocimum sanctum,” and “Tulsi in dentistry.” The search was limited to articles and books in the English literature. To prepare a thorough review on the therapeutic aspects of Tulsi, the contents were screened between the year 1985 to 2015 by going through the title and abstracts, and further shortlisting articles for full text reading. Conclusion: The present review revealed that Tulsi has an extensive array of medicinal uses, as evidenced by various studies conducted, but its use in allopathic medicine is still limited because of the lack of clinical trials on humans.

  3. The internal process of therapeutic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, Denise

    2008-03-01

    Therapeutic Touch (TT) is a complementary healing modality used by health care providers to reduce anxiety, accelerate relaxation, decrease pain, and enhance immunity. Research studies report outcomes of TT treatments, but few describe the specific process. This qualitative research study was conducted to describe the nature of the core process of TT in adults and full term infants as practiced by five professional nurses, each treating one adult and one infant. Analysis of data obtained from interviews and focused participant observations was conducted. Findings provide empirical data to depict an overall process divided into three phases: (a) preparation, (b) treatment, and (c) termination, that adheres to the standard process as described by Krieger. It expands on the description of each phase, including two new subcomponents, orienting and disengagement, not previously seen in the literature. Lastly, the study describes the modification of the TT process with infants compared to adults.

  4. Harnessing the Helminth Secretome for Therapeutic Immunomodulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Ditgen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminths are the largest and most complex pathogens to invade and live within the human body. Since they are not able to outpace the immune system by rapid antigen variation or faster cell division or retreat into protective niches not accessible to immune effector mechanisms, their long-term survival depends on influencing and regulating the immune responses away from the mode of action most damaging to them. Immunologists have focused on the excretory and secretory products that are released by the helminths, since they can change the host environment by modulating the immune system. Here we give a brief overview of the helminth-associated immune response and the currently available helminth secretome data. We introduce some major secretome-derived immunomodulatory molecules and describe their potential mode of action. Finally, the applicability of helminth-derived therapeutic proteins in the treatment of allergic and autoimmune inflammatory disease is discussed.

  5. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the exact mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects is required to be further elucidated. Methane can cross the membrane and is easy to collect due to its abundance in natural gas. Although methane is flammable, saline rich in methane can be prepared for clinical use. These seem to be good news in application of methane as a therapeutic gas. Conclusion Several problems should be resolved before its wide application in clinical practice.

  6. Organoid technology for brain and therapeutics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Miao, Zhu-Wei; Su, Ding-Feng; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2017-10-01

    Brain is one of the most complex organs in human. The current brain research is mainly based on the animal models and traditional cell culture. However, the inherent species differences between humans and animals as well as the gap between organ level and cell level make it difficult to study human brain development and associated disorders through traditional technologies. Recently, the brain organoids derived from pluripotent stem cells have been reported to recapitulate many key features of human brain in vivo, for example recapitulating the zone of putative outer radial glia cells. Brain organoids offer a new platform for scientists to study brain development, neurological diseases, drug discovery and personalized medicine, regenerative medicine, and so on. Here, we discuss the progress, applications, advantages, limitations, and prospects of brain organoid technology in neurosciences and related therapeutics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nanomedicine therapeutics and diagnostics are the goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Understanding and exploiting molecular mechanisms in biology is central to chemical biology. In 20 years, chemical biology research has advanced from simple mechanistic studies using isolated biological macromolecules to molecular-level and nanomolecular-level mechanistic studies involving whole organisms. This review documents the best of my personal and collaborative academic research work that has made use of a solid organic chemistry and chemical biology approach toward nanomedicine, in which my focus has been on the design, creation and use of synthetic, self-assembly lipid-based nanoparticle technologies for the functional delivery of active pharmaceutical ingredients to target cells in vivo. This research is now leading to precision therapeutics approaches (PTAs) for the treatment of diseases that may define the future of nanomedicine.

  8. [Cadavers and mummies as therapeutic means].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, D; Sohawon, S; Noordally, O

    2010-01-01

    Sickness befallen onto him, man found that plant and animal derivatives invigorated him. Thereafter, he found a therapeutic benefit in using man as a means of self cure and especially, dead man from violent death. The foam of the skull of cadaver was an excellent antiepileptic as well as blood coming out from a freshly decapitated man. By applying on diseased parts of his body, so as to get rid of inflammation or infection, cadaver's hands were used against tumors of all kinds. Dead human skin were processed into belts and used therein for helping delivery of parturition women. The mummy must be blackish, foul smelling and hard. Those who were whitish, odorless and powder-like, were unfit for use. Mummy powder applied to the nose would stop nose bleeding. Ambroise Paré (1510-1590) was an adversary of those practices.

  9. Radiosensitizers action on Iodine 131 therapeutical effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agote, Marcos; Kreimann, Erica L.; Bocanera, Laura V.; Dagrosa, Maria A.; Juvenal, Guillermo J.; Pisarev, Mario A.

    1999-01-01

    Present studies were aimed to research the possible application of a radiosensitizer, nicotinamide, to increase the therapeutical effect of radioiodine. There were used goitrous and normal rats with growing dose of Iodine 131, with and without simultaneous treatment with nicotinamide. The obtained results show that the nicotinamide treatment importantly increases the thyroid radio destructive effect induced by radioiodine. Under these experimental conditions, nicotinamide induces to a significant increase of thyroid vascularisation, without changes in the proteins ADP-ribosylation activity. These results show, for the first time, the radiosensitizer effect of nicotinamide in front of Iodine 131 and give the possibility of using it in the treatment of hyperthyroid or thyroid difference cancer patients. (author)

  10. Multispectral therapeutic endoscopy imaging and intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, John L.; Schwaitzberg, Steven D.

    2007-02-01

    With the debut of antibiotic drug therapy, and as a result of its ease of use and general success in treating infection, drugs have become the treatment of choice for most bacterial infections. However, the advent of multiple, very aggressive drug-resistant bacteria, an increasing population which cannot tolerate drugs, and the high cost of drug therapy suggest that a new modality for treating infections is needed. The complex interplay of clonal spread, persistence, transfer of resistance elements and cell-to-cell interaction all contribute to the difficulty in developing drugs to treat new antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. A dynamic non-drug system, using extant pulsed ultraviolet lightwave technology to kill infection, is being developed to destroy pathogens. This paper theorizes that the shock effect of pulsed xenon's high energy ultraviolet pulses at wavelengths between 250-270nm separates the bacteria's DNA bands, and, subsequently, destroys them. Preliminary laboratory tests have demonstrated the ability of the technology to destroy Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella punemonia, Bacillus subtillis, and Aspergillus fumigates at penetration depths of greater than 3mm in fluids with 100% effectiveness in less than five seconds of exposure to pulsed xenon lightwaves. Micro Invasive Technology, Inc is developing .pulsed xenon therapeutic catheters and endoscopic instruments for internal antimicrobial eradication and topographical devices for prophylactic wound, burn and surgical entrance/exit site sterilization. Pulsed Xenon light sources have a broad optical spectrum (190-1200nm), and can generate light pulses with sufficient energy for combined imaging and therapeutic intervention by multiplexing a fiber optic pathway into the body. In addition, Pulsed Xenon has proven ability to activate photo reactive dyes; share endoscopic lightguides with lasers while, simultaneously

  11. Integrated continuous production of recombinant therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warikoo, Veena; Godawat, Rahul; Brower, Kevin; Jain, Sujit; Cummings, Daniel; Simons, Elizabeth; Johnson, Timothy; Walther, Jason; Yu, Marcella; Wright, Benjamin; McLarty, Jean; Karey, Kenneth P; Hwang, Chris; Zhou, Weichang; Riske, Frank; Konstantinov, Konstantin

    2012-12-01

    In the current environment of diverse product pipelines, rapidly fluctuating market demands and growing competition from biosimilars, biotechnology companies are increasingly driven to develop innovative solutions for highly flexible and cost-effective manufacturing. To address these challenging demands, integrated continuous processing, comprised of high-density perfusion cell culture and a directly coupled continuous capture step, can be used as a universal biomanufacturing platform. This study reports the first successful demonstration of the integration of a perfusion bioreactor and a four-column periodic counter-current chromatography (PCC) system for the continuous capture of candidate protein therapeutics. Two examples are presented: (1) a monoclonal antibody (model of a stable protein) and (2) a recombinant human enzyme (model of a highly complex, less stable protein). In both cases, high-density perfusion CHO cell cultures were operated at a quasi-steady state of 50-60 × 10(6) cells/mL for more than 60 days, achieving volumetric productivities much higher than current perfusion or fed-batch processes. The directly integrated and automated PCC system ran uninterrupted for 30 days without indications of time-based performance decline. The product quality observed for the continuous capture process was comparable to that for a batch-column operation. Furthermore, the integration of perfusion cell culture and PCC led to a dramatic decrease in the equipment footprint and elimination of several non-value-added unit operations, such as clarification and intermediate hold steps. These findings demonstrate the potential of integrated continuous bioprocessing as a universal platform for the manufacture of various kinds of therapeutic proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  13. Molecular diagnostics and therapeutics for ectopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Stephen; Skubisz, Monika M; Horne, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    Ectopic pregnancies are a serious gynaecological emergency that can be fatal. As such, prompt diagnosis and safe timely treatment is essential. Here, we review the literature on the development of molecularly targeted diagnostics and therapeutics for ectopic pregnancy. A blood-based biomarker that accurately identifies an ectopic pregnancy could be used to offer early diagnostic certainty in cases where ultrasound cannot determine the location of the embryo ('a pregnancy of unknown location'). Molecules examined so far can be broadly grouped into biological themes of relevance to reproduction: (i) Fallopian tube (dys)function, (ii) embryo/trophoblast growth, (iii) corpus luteum function, (iv) inflammation, (v) uterine function and (vi) angiogenesis. While a sensitive and specific biomarker for ectopic pregnancy has yet to be identified, it is possible that improvements in platform technologies or a multi-modal biomarker approach may yield an accurate diagnostic biomarker test. Furthermore, with the advent of better imaging technology, the need for a blood-based biomarker test may be superseded by improvements in ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging technology. There have been some recent preclinical studies describing molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for ectopic pregnancy. Notably, bench-to-bedside studies have examined the use of combination gefitinib (orally available epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) and methotrexate. Preclinical studies suggest that combination gefitinib and methotrexate is highly effective in inducing placental cell death, and is significantly more effective than methotrexate alone. In early human trials, encouraging preliminary efficacy data have shown that combination gefitinib and methotrexate can rapidly resolve tubal ectopic pregnancies, and large extra-tubal ectopic pregnancies. If a large clinical randomized controlled trial confirms these findings, combination gefitinib and methotrexate could become a new

  14. Advancements in therapeutically-targeting orphan GPCRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eStockert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are popular biological targets for drug discovery and development. To date there are more than 140 orphan GPCRs, i.e. receptors whose endogenous ligands are unknown. Traditionally orphan GPCRs have been difficult to study and the development of therapeutic compounds targeting these receptors has been extremely slow although these GPCRs are considered important targets based on their distribution and behavioral phenotype revealed by animals lacking the receptor. Recent advances in several methods used to study orphan receptors, including protein crystallography and homology modeling are likely to be useful in the identification of therapeutics targeting these receptors. In the past 13 years, over a dozen different Class A GPCRs have been crystallized; this trend is exciting, since homology modeling of GPCRs has previously been limited by the availability of solved structures. As the number of solved GPCR structures continues to grow so does the number of templates that can be used to generate increasingly accurate models of phylogenetically-related orphan GPCRs. The availability of solved structures along with the advances in using multiple templates to build models (in combination with molecular dynamics simulations that reveal structural information not provided by crystallographic data and methods for modeling hard-to-predict flexible loop regions have improved the quality of GPCR homology models. This, in turn, has improved the success rates of virtual ligand screens that use homology models to identify potential receptor binding compounds. Experimental testing of the predicted hits and validation using traditional GPCR pharmacological approaches can be used to drive ligand-based efforts to probe orphan receptor biology as well as to define the chemotypes and chemical scaffolds important for binding. As a result of these advances, orphan GPCRs are emerging from relative obscurity as a new class of drug

  15. Therapeutic effect of Arsenicum album on leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ive, Elaine C; Couchman, Ingrid M S; Reddy, Lalini

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of homoeopathic Arsenicum album potencies were investigated in-vitro, using a continuous cell line (MT4), pre-intoxicated with arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)), and then treated with succussed and unsuccussed homoeopathic potencies, 6CH, 30CH and 200CH. This study aimed to verify the homoeopathic law of similars and to determine whether potencies diluted beyond Avogadro's constant had physiological effects on cells; whether various potencies would cause different effects as suggested by the concept of hormesis; whether succussed and unsuccussed homoeopathic potencies had different effects on the cells; and to establish whether a biotechnological method could be used to evaluate the above. As(2)O(3) was used to pre-intoxicate and the MTT assay was used to measure the percentage cytotoxicity and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of the cells. The homoeopathic potencies of Arsenicum album (6CH, 30CH and 200CH) were prepared by either succussing or allowing to diffuse for 30 s. After pre-intoxication of the MT4 cells with the IC(50) As(2)O(3) and treatment with succussed and unsuccussed Arsenicum album (6CH-200CH), the cell viability increased with increasing potency from 81% to 194% (over 72 h). The treatments and the times of exposure were found to be statistically significant determinants of cell viability, whereas succussion did not cause any significant variation in the results. The study provided evidence that a biotechnological method (namely cell viability) may be used to scientifically evaluate the physiological effects of homoeopathic potencies on human cells; it confirmed that the homoeopathic potencies did have therapeutic effects; and that succussion was not required in the potentization method in order to produce a curative remedy.

  16. [Palliative plastic surgery in multidisciplinary therapeutic concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippenhan, T; Hirche, C; Lehnhardt, M; Daigeler, A

    2015-04-01

    Survival rates even in advanced tumour stage have been improved for some tumour entities due to progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapeutic strategies. Nevertheless, painful, exulcerated or bleeding wounds can impair quality of life for palliative patients. Increasing evidence in palliative treatment has raised options for plastic-reconstructive surgery to be applied for treatment of local wounds which can improve quality of life for the remaining lifetime for the palliative patients in our institutions. In this review the role of plastic surgery in the palliative treatment concept is highlighted as well as conservative and operative treatment options are discussed. With regard to the limited evidence, an analysis of the currently available literature was performed and data reviewed. These data were added to a case series of patients of our hospital. The analysis of the literature revealed only few data which all indicate an improvement of quality of life due to reconstructive procedures in the palliative situation. There are some studies dealing with plastic surgical operations in advanced tumour diseases. Plastic surgery procedures become relevant after failure of conservative treatment wound care. The most frequent entities are soft tissue sarcomas, squamous cell carcinomas and breast cancer. Safe and simple flaps should be preferred, but free flaps and tendon transfer are optional procedures, and resection of the thoracic wall can be justified in palliative indications with sufficient soft tissue coverage. The indications for major limb amputation should be restricted to selective cases because quality of life is highly reduced. Radiation is possible even after tissue transfer in some cases, and radiation-induced dermatitis with ulcerations can be treated additionally. Opportunities and limitations in plastic and reconstructive surgery should be continuously presented in tumour boards, to clarify these important procedures for palliative patients to all

  17. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  18. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    brief description of research in the la boratories of each University of Iowa mentor. At this point in time the program is 8 weeks long...www.uihealthcare.com/depts/med/urology/urolo gymds/luo.html A major research project in our la boratory is to develop a novel therapeutic...wright.shtml?menu =1&tab=facultyTab The Wright Labo ratory is focuse d on defining the composition, activity, and overall cellul ar function of

  19. Bioengineering natural product biosynthetic pathways for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Cheng; Law, Brian; Wilkinson, Barrie; Micklefield, Jason

    2012-12-01

    With the advent of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, the number of microbial genome sequences has increased dramatically, revealing a vast array of new biosynthetic gene clusters. Genomics data provide a tremendous opportunity to discover new natural products, and also to guide the bioengineering of new and existing natural product scaffolds for therapeutic applications. Notably, it is apparent that the vast majority of biosynthetic gene clusters are either silent or produce very low quantities of the corresponding natural products. It is imperative therefore to devise methods for activating unproductive biosynthetic pathways to provide the quantities of natural products needed for further development. Moreover, on the basis of our expanding mechanistic and structural knowledge of biosynthetic assembly-line enzymes, new strategies for re-programming biosynthetic pathways have emerged, resulting in focused libraries of modified products with potentially improved biological properties. In this review we will focus on the latest bioengineering approaches that have been utilised to optimise yields and increase the structural diversity of natural product scaffolds for future clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuromuscular disorders: genes, genetic counseling and therapeutic trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayana Zatz

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuromuscular disorders (NMD are a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions, with autosomal dominant, recessive, or X-linked inheritance. They are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Here, we are presenting our major contributions to the field during the past 30 years. We have mapped and identified several novel genes responsible for NMD. Genotype-phenotype correlations studies enhanced our comprehension on the effect of gene mutations on related proteins and their impact on clinical findings. The search for modifier factors allowed the identification of a novel "protective"; variant which may have important implication on therapeutic developments. Molecular diagnosis was introduced in the 1980s and new technologies have been incorporated since then. Next generation sequencing greatly improved our capacity to identify disease-causing mutations with important benefits for research and prevention through genetic counseling of patients' families. Stem cells researches, from and for patients, have been used as tools to study human genetic diseases mechanisms and for therapies development. The clinical effect of preclinical trials in mice and canine models for muscular dystrophies are under investigation. Finally, the integration of our researches and genetic services with our post-graduation program resulted in a significant output of new geneticists, spreading out this expertise to our large country.