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  1. Serum amyloid P therapeutically attenuates murine bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis via its effects on macrophages.

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    Lynne A Murray

    Full Text Available Macrophages promote tissue remodeling but few mechanisms exist to modulate their activity during tissue fibrosis. Serum amyloid P (SAP, a member of the pentraxin family of proteins, signals through Fcgamma receptors which are known to affect macrophage activation. We determined that IPF/UIP patients have increased protein levels of several alternatively activated pro-fibrotic (M2 macrophage-associated proteins in the lung and monocytes from these patients show skewing towards an M2 macrophage phenotype. SAP therapeutically inhibits established bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, when administered systemically or locally to the lungs. The reduction in aberrant collagen deposition was associated with a reduction in M2 macrophages in the lung and increased IP10/CXCL10. These data highlight the role of macrophages in fibrotic lung disease, and demonstrate a therapeutic action of SAP on macrophages which may extend to many fibrotic indications caused by over-exuberant pro-fibrotic macrophage responses.

  2. Therapeutic immunization with radio-attenuated Leishmania parasites through i.m. route revealed protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis.

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    Datta, Sanchita; Manna, Madhumita; Khanra, Supriya; Ghosh, Moumita; Bhar, Radhaballav; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal

    2012-07-01

    After our promising results from prophylactic and therapeutic study (i.p. route) with the radio-attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites against experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis, we prompted to check their therapeutic efficacy through i.m route. BALB/c mice were infected with highly virulent L. donovani parasites. After 75 days, mice were treated with gamma (γ)-irradiated parasites. A second therapeutic immunization was given after 15 days of first immunization. The protection against kala-azar was estimated with the reduction of Leishman-Donovan unit from spleen and liver that scored up to 80% and 93%, respectively, while a twofold increase in nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions has been observed in the immunized groups of animals. These groups of mice also showed disease regression by skewing Th2 cytokines (IL-10) towards Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) bias along with the increased generation of NO and ROS, while the infected control group of mice without such treatment surrendered to the disease. Establishment of Th1 ambience in the treated groups has also been supported from the measured antileishmanial antibody IgG subsets (IgG2a and IgG1) with higher anti-soluble Leishmania antigen-specific IgG2a titer. As seen in our previous studies, doses of attenuation by γ-radiation should be taken into serious consideration. Attenuation of parasites at 50 Gy of absorbed dose of gamma rays has not worked well. Thus, therapeutic use of L. donovani parasites radio-attenuated at particular doses can be exploited as a promising vaccine agent. Absence of any adjuvant may increase its acceptability as vaccine candidate further.

  3. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

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    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  4. Novel guggulsterone derivative GG-52 inhibits NF-kappaB signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and attenuates acute murine colitis.

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    Kim, Jung Mogg; Kang, Hyoun Woo; Cha, Mi Yeon; Yoo, Doyoung; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, In-Kyoung; Ku, Jeounghun; Kim, Sunil; Ma, Sang-Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae; Song, In Sung; Kim, Joo Sung

    2010-07-01

    We already showed that the plant sterol guggulsterone has been reported to inhibit nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and to attenuate dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory effects of novel guggulsterone derivatives on IEC and preventive and therapeutic murine models of DSS-induced colitis. Novel guggulsterone derivates with high lipophilicity were designed and four derivates, including GG-46, GG-50B, GG-52, and GG-53, were synthesized. Two guggulsterone derivatives, GG-50B and GG-52, significantly inhibited the activated NF-kappaB signals and the upregulated expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in COLO 205 cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Pretreatment with GG-50B and GG-52 attenuated the increased IkappaB kinase (IKK) and IkappaBalpha phsophorylation induced by TNF-alpha. In preventive and therapeutic models of murine colitis, administration of GG-52 significantly reduced the severity of DSS-induced colitis, as assessed by disease activity index, colon length, and histology. In contrast, GG-50B did not show a significant reduction in the colitis severity. Moreover, the efficacy on attenuating colitis by GG-52 was comparable to that by sulfasalazine or prednisolone. These results indicate that the novel guggulsterone derivative GG-52 blocks NF-kappaB activation in IEC and ameliorates DSS-induced acute murine colitis, which suggests that GG-52 is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  5. S-Nitrosoglutathione Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Murine Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

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    Raffay, Thomas M; Dylag, Andrew M; Di Fiore, Juliann M; Smith, Laura A; Einisman, Helly J; Li, Yuejin; Lakner, Mitchell M; Khalil, Ahmad M; MacFarlane, Peter M; Martin, Richard J; Gaston, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by lifelong obstructive lung disease and profound, refractory bronchospasm. It is observed among survivors of premature birth who have been treated with prolonged supplemental oxygen. Therapeutic options are limited. Using a neonatal mouse model of BPD, we show that hyperoxia increases activity and expression of a mediator of endogenous bronchoconstriction, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase. MicroRNA-342-3p, predicted in silico and shown in this study in vitro to suppress expression of GSNO reductase, was decreased in hyperoxia-exposed pups. Both pretreatment with aerosolized GSNO and inhibition of GSNO reductase attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo among juvenile and adult mice exposed to neonatal hyperoxia. Our data suggest that neonatal hyperoxia exposure causes detrimental effects on airway hyperreactivity through microRNA-342-3p-mediated upregulation of GSNO reductase expression. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that this adverse effect can be overcome by supplementing its substrate, GSNO, or by inhibiting the enzyme itself. Rates of BPD have not improved over the past two decades; nor have new therapies been developed. GSNO-based therapies are a novel treatment of the respiratory problems that patients with BPD experience. Copyright © 2016 by The Author(s).

  6. Chemoprophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of thymol in murine cystic echinococcosis.

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    Maggiore, M; Pensel, P E; Denegri, G; Elissondo, M C

    2015-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the larval stage of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. The drugs commonly used against cystic echinococcosis are benzimidazoles. Unfortunately, 20%-40% of cases do not respond favorably to such chemotherapy. Consequently, the search of new therapeutic alternatives such as the use of traditional medicinal plants has been increased. The aim of the current experimental work was to investigate the chemoprophylactic and clinical efficacy of thymol on mice infected with E. granulosus metacestodes. Thymol (40 mg/kg) was administered under two different therapeutic schemes: dosing every 24h over 20 days and treatment every 12h for 10 days. Thymol demonstrated efficacy against experimental murine cystic echinococcosis. The chemoprophylactic and therapeutic effects of thymol were comparable to that of albendazole. Due to the lack of toxicity observed in mice at the tested doses; we consider that thymol is a potential alternative to be applied for the treatment of human hydatid disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic treatment with a novel hypoxia-inducible factor hydroxylase inhibitor (TRC160334 ameliorates murine colitis

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    Gupta R

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ram Gupta,1 Anita R Chaudhary,2 Binita N Shah,1 Avinash V Jadhav,3 Shitalkumar P Zambad,1 Ramesh Chandra Gupta,4 Shailesh Deshpande,4 Vijay Chauthaiwale,4 Chaitanya Dutt4 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Cellular and Molecular Biology, 3Preclinical Safety Evaluation, 4Discovery, Torrent Research Centre, Torrent Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India Background and aim: Mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD can be achieved by improvement of intestinal barrier protection. Activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF has been identified as a critical factor for barrier protection during mucosal insult and is linked with improvement in symptoms of colitis. Although prophylactic efficacy of HIF hydroxylase inhibitors in murine colitis have been established, its therapeutic efficacy in clinically relevant therapeutic settings have not been established. In the present study we aim to establish therapeutic efficacy of TRC160334, a novel HIF hydroxylase inhibitor, in animal models of colitis. Methods: The efficacy of TRC160334 was evaluated in two different mouse models of colitis by oral route. A prophylactic efficacy study was performed in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced mouse model of colitis representing human Crohn's disease pathology. Additionally, a therapeutic efficacy study was performed in a dextran sulfate sodium-induced mouse model of colitis, a model simulating human ulcerative colitis. Results: TRC160334 treatment resulted in significant improvement in disease end points in both models of colitis. TRC160334 treatment resulted into cytoprotective heatshock protein 70 induction in inflamed colon. TRC160334 successfully attenuated the rate of fall in body weight, disease activity index, and macroscopic and microscopic scores of colonic damage leading to overall improvement in study outcome. Conclusion: Our findings are the first to demonstrate that therapeutic intervention with a HIF hydroxylase inhibitor

  8. Role of Claudin-5 in the Attenuation of Murine Acute Lung Injury by Simvastatin

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    Chen, Weiguo; Sharma, Rajesh; Rizzo, Alicia N.; Siegler, Jessica H.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2014-01-01

    The statins are now recognized to have pleiotropic properties, including augmentation of endothelial barrier function. To explore the mechanisms involved, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on endothelial cell (EC) tight junctions. Western blotting of human pulmonary artery ECs treated with simvastatin (5 μM) confirmed a significant time-dependent increase (16–48 h) in claudin-5 protein expression compared with controls, without detectable alterations in zonula occludens-1 or occludin. These effects were associated with membrane translocation of VE-cadherin, whereas translocation of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin; silencing RNA) inhibited simvastatin-induced claudin-5 up-regulation. Moreover, simvastatin treatment of ECs induced increased phosphorylation of both FoxO1 and β-catenin, transcriptional regulators of claudin-5 expression mediated by VE-cadherin. Subsequently, we found no effect of claudin-5 silencing on EC barrier protection by simvastatin in response to thrombin stimulation, as measured by either transendothelial electrical resistance or by EC monolayer flux of FITC-dextran (2,000 kD). However, silencing of claudin-5 did significantly attenuate simvastatin-mediated EC barrier protection in response to thrombin, as measured by monolayer flux of sodium fluorescein (376 Da). Finally, employing a murine model of LPS-induced acute lung injury, there was no effect of claudin-5 silencing in vivo (intratracheal injection) on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein or cell counts, but LPS-induced lung tissue extravasation of the small molecular weight markers, sodium fluorescein and Hochst stain (562 Da), were significantly increased in claudin-5–silenced animals compared with simvastatin-treated control animals. These findings implicate a distinct mechanism underlying size-selective endothelial barrier–protective properties of statins, and may ultimately lead to new novel therapeutic targets for patients with acute lung injury. PMID

  9. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

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    Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jia, Dongwei, E-mail: jiadongwei@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  10. Radio-attenuated leishmanial parasites as immunoprophylactic agent against experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis.

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    Datta, Sanchita; Adak, Rupchand; Chakraborty, Priyanka; Haldar, Arun Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2012-01-01

    The present study intends to evaluate the role of radio-attenuated leishmania parasites as immunoprophylactic agents for experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis. BALB/c mice were immunized with gamma (γ)-irradiated Leishmania donovani. A second immunization was given after 15 days of first immunization. After two immunizations, mice were infected with virulent L. donovani promastigotes. Protection against Kala-azar (KA) was estimated from spleen and liver parasitic burden along with the measurement of nitrite and superoxide anion generation by isolation of splenocytes and also by T-lymphocyte helper 1(Th1) and T-lymphocyte helper 2(Th2) cytokines release from the experimental groups. It was observed that BALB/c mice having prior immunization with radio-attenuated parasites showed protection against L. donovani infection through higher expression of Th1 cytokines and suppression of Th2 cytokines along with the generation of protective free radicals. The group of mice without prior priming with radio-attenuated parasites surrendered to the disease. Thus it can be concluded that radio-attenuated L. donovani may be used for. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral Bromelain Attenuates Inflammation in an Ovalbumin-Induced Murine Model of Asthma

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    Eric R. Secor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromelain, a widely used pineapple extract with cysteine protease activity, has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects in a variety of immune system models. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of orally administered bromelain in an ovalbumin (OVA-induced murine model of acute allergic airway disease (AAD. To establish AAD, female C57BL/6J mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal (i.p. OVA/alum and then challenged with OVA aerosols for 3 days. Mice were gavaged with either (phosphate buffered salinePBS or 200 mg/kg bromelain in PBS, twice daily for four consecutive days, beginning 1 day prior to OVA aerosol challenge. Airway reactivity and methacholine sensitivity, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cellular differential, Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13, and lung histology were compared between treatment groups. Oral bromelain-treatment of AAD mice demonstrated therapeutic efficacy as evidenced by decreased methacholine sensitivity (P ≤ 0.01, reduction in BAL eosinophils (P ≤ 0.02 and IL-13 concentrations (P ≤ 0.04 as compared with PBS controls. In addition, oral bromelain significantly reduced BAL CD19+ B cells (P ≤ 0.0001 and CD8+ T cells (P ≤ 0.0001 in AAD mice when compared with controls. These results suggest that oral treatment with bromelain had a beneficial therapeutic effect in this murine model of asthma and bromelain may also be effective in human conditions.

  12. Bystander attenuation of neuronal and astrocyte intercellular communication by murine cytomegalovirus infection of glia.

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    Ho, Winson S C; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2007-07-01

    Astrocytes are the first cells infected by murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in primary cultures of brain. These cells play key roles in intercellular signaling and neuronal development, and they modulate synaptic activity within the nervous system. Using ratiometric fura-2 digital calcium imaging of >8,000 neurons and glia, we found that MCMV-infected astrocytes showed an increase in intracellular basal calcium levels and an enhanced response to neuroactive substances, including glutamate and ATP, and to high potassium levels. Cultured neurons with no sign of MCMV infection showed attenuated synaptic signaling after infection of the underlying astrocyte substrate, and intercellular communication between astrocytes with no sign of infection was reduced by the presence of infected glia. These bystander effects would tend to cause further deterioration of cellular communication in the brain in addition to the problems caused by the loss of directly infected cells.

  13. Preventive and therapeutic euphol treatment attenuates experimental colitis in mice.

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    Rafael C Dutra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tetracyclic triterpene euphol is the main constituent found in the sap of Euphorbia tirucalli. This plant is widely known in Brazilian traditional medicine for its use in the treatment of several kinds of cancer, including leukaemia, prostate and breast cancers. Here, we investigated the effect of euphol on experimental models of colitis and the underlying mechanisms involved in its action. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Colitis was induced in mice either with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS or with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS, and the effect of euphol (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg on colonic injury was assessed. Pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines were measured by immunohistochemistry, enzyme-Linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA, real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and flow cytometry. Preventive and therapeutic oral administration of euphol attenuated both DSS- and TNBS-induced acute colitis as observed by a significant reduction of the disease activity index (DAI, histological/microscopic damage score and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in colonic tissue. Likewise, euphol treatment also inhibited colon tissue levels and expression of IL-1β, CXCL1/KC, MCP-1, MIP-2, TNF-α and IL-6, while reducing NOS2, VEGF and Ki67 expression in colonic tissue. This action seems to be likely associated with inhibition of activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB. In addition, euphol decreased LPS-induced MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ, but increased IL-10 secretion from bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. Of note, euphol, at the same schedule of treatment, markedly inhibited both selectin (P- and E-selectin and integrin (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and LFA-1 expression in colonic tissue. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these results clearly demonstrated that orally-administered euphol, both preventive or therapeutic treatment were effective in reducing the severity of colitis in two models of chemically-induced mouse colitis and suggest

  14. Preventive and Therapeutic Euphol Treatment Attenuates Experimental Colitis in Mice

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    Bento, Allisson F.; Marcon, Rodrigo; Schmidt, Éder C.; Bouzon, Zenilda L.; Pianowski, Luiz F.; Calixto, João B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The tetracyclic triterpene euphol is the main constituent found in the sap of Euphorbia tirucalli. This plant is widely known in Brazilian traditional medicine for its use in the treatment of several kinds of cancer, including leukaemia, prostate and breast cancers. Here, we investigated the effect of euphol on experimental models of colitis and the underlying mechanisms involved in its action. Methodology/Principal Findings Colitis was induced in mice either with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), and the effect of euphol (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg) on colonic injury was assessed. Pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines were measured by immunohistochemistry, enzyme-Linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA), real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Preventive and therapeutic oral administration of euphol attenuated both DSS- and TNBS-induced acute colitis as observed by a significant reduction of the disease activity index (DAI), histological/microscopic damage score and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in colonic tissue. Likewise, euphol treatment also inhibited colon tissue levels and expression of IL-1β, CXCL1/KC, MCP-1, MIP-2, TNF-α and IL-6, while reducing NOS2, VEGF and Ki67 expression in colonic tissue. This action seems to be likely associated with inhibition of activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, euphol decreased LPS-induced MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ, but increased IL-10 secretion from bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. Of note, euphol, at the same schedule of treatment, markedly inhibited both selectin (P- and E-selectin) and integrin (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and LFA-1) expression in colonic tissue. Conclusions/Significance Together, these results clearly demonstrated that orally-administered euphol, both preventive or therapeutic treatment were effective in reducing the severity of colitis in two models of chemically-induced mouse colitis and suggest this plant

  15. CMV infection attenuates the disease course in a murine model of multiple sclerosis.

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    Istvan Pirko

    Full Text Available Recent evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS suggests that active CMV infection may result in more benign clinical disease. The goal of this pilot study was to determine whether underlying murine CMV (MCMV infection affects the course of the Theiler's murine encephalitis virus (TMEV induced murine model of MS. A group of eight TMEV-infected mice were co-infected with MCMV at 2 weeks prior to TMEV infection while a second group of TMEV-infected mice received MCMV two weeks post TMEV. We also used 2 control groups, where at the above time points MCMV was replaced with PBS. Outcome measures included (1 monthly monitoring of disability via rotarod for 8 months; (2 in vivo MRI for brain atrophy studies and (3 FACS analysis of brain infiltrating lymphocytes at 8 months post TMEV infection. Co-infection with MCMV influenced the disease course in mice infected prior to TMEV infection. In this group, rotarod detectable motor performance was significantly improved starting 3 months post-infection and beyond (p≤0.024. In addition, their brain atrophy was close to 30% reduced at 8 months, but this was only present as a trend due to low power (p = 0.19. A significant reduction in the proportion of brain infiltrating CD3+ cells was detected in this group (p = 0.026, while the proportion of CD45+ Mac1+ cells significantly increased (p = 0.003. There was also a strong trend for a reduced proportion of CD4+ cells (p = 0.17 while CD8 and B220+ cell proportion did not change. These findings support an immunomodulatory effect of MCMV infection in this MS model. Future studies in this co-infection model will provide insight into mechanisms which modulate the development of demyelination and may be utilized for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  16. No evidence of murine leukemia virus-related viruses in live attenuated human vaccines.

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    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents.All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV (SA-14-14-2, varicella (Varivax, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II, measles (Attenuvax, rubella (Meruvax-II, rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix, and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells.We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans.

  17. Hyperoxygenation attenuated a murine model of atopic dermatitis through raising skin level of ROS.

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    Kim, Hyung-Ran; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Lee, Yeo Kyong; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Jang, Myoung Ho; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from excessive stimulation of immune cells. Traditionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases, but several opposing observations suggest the protective role of ROS in inflammatory disease. Recently, we demonstrated ROS prevented imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis through enhancing regulatory T cell function. Thus, we hypothesized AD might also be attenuated in elevated levels of ROS through tissue hyperoxygenation, such as by hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or applying an oxygen-carrying chemical, perfluorodecalin (PFD). Elevated levels of ROS in the skin have been demonstrated directly by staining with dihydroethidum as well as indirectly by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). A murine model of AD was developed by repeated application of a chemical irritant (1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene) and house dust mite (Dermatophagoide farinae) extract on one ear of BALB/c mice. The results showed treatment with HBOT or PFD significantly attenuated AD, comparably with 0.1% prednicarbate without any signs of side effects, such as telangiectasia. The expressions of interleukin-17A and interferon-γ were also decreased in the AD lesions by treatment with HBOT or PFD. Enhanced expression of IDO and reduced level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, in association with increased frequency of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the AD lesions, might be involved in the underlying mechanism of oxygen therapy. Taken together, it was suggested that tissue hyperoxygenation, by HBOT or treatment with PFD, might attenuate AD through enhancing skin ROS level.

  18. Hyperoxygenation attenuated a murine model of atopic dermatitis through raising skin level of ROS.

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    Hyung-Ran Kim

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from excessive stimulation of immune cells. Traditionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases, but several opposing observations suggest the protective role of ROS in inflammatory disease. Recently, we demonstrated ROS prevented imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis through enhancing regulatory T cell function. Thus, we hypothesized AD might also be attenuated in elevated levels of ROS through tissue hyperoxygenation, such as by hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT or applying an oxygen-carrying chemical, perfluorodecalin (PFD. Elevated levels of ROS in the skin have been demonstrated directly by staining with dihydroethidum as well as indirectly by immunohistochemistry (IHC for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO. A murine model of AD was developed by repeated application of a chemical irritant (1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene and house dust mite (Dermatophagoide farinae extract on one ear of BALB/c mice. The results showed treatment with HBOT or PFD significantly attenuated AD, comparably with 0.1% prednicarbate without any signs of side effects, such as telangiectasia. The expressions of interleukin-17A and interferon-γ were also decreased in the AD lesions by treatment with HBOT or PFD. Enhanced expression of IDO and reduced level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, in association with increased frequency of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the AD lesions, might be involved in the underlying mechanism of oxygen therapy. Taken together, it was suggested that tissue hyperoxygenation, by HBOT or treatment with PFD, might attenuate AD through enhancing skin ROS level.

  19. Digoxin Attenuates Murine Experimental Colitis by Downregulating Th17-related Cytokines.

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    Tani, Shinya; Takano, Ryosuke; Tamura, Satoshi; Oishi, Shinji; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Hamaya, Yasushi; Takagaki, Kosuke; Nagata, Toshi; Seto, Shintaro; Horii, Toshinobu; Kosugi, Isao; Iwashita, Toshihide; Osawa, Satoshi; Furuta, Takahisa; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Sugimoto, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Digoxin, a cardiac glycoside used for the treatment of heart failure, was reported to inhibit the retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) and attenuate the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and arthritis in mice. However, the effects of digoxin in a mice model of inflammatory bowel disease have not been elucidated. Colitis was induced in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by adoptive transfer of CD45RB CD4 T cells. Digoxin or a vehicle was injected into mice with colitis intraperitoneally every other day and changes in body weight were evaluated. After 6 to 8 weeks, the treated mice were killed and evaluated for histological score, T-cell subset, and cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the colonic tissue. Wasting disease and histological damage were significantly attenuated in digoxin-treated mice with colitis compared with those in the vehicle-treated mice. In addition, the mRNAs of Th17-related cytokines were downregulated, whereas those of interleukin-10 were upregulated in the colonic mucosa of digoxin-treated mice. However, unexpectedly, the mRNA expression level of tumor necrosis factor alpha did not decrease in the colonic mucosa of digoxin-treated mice with colitis. This observation suggests that digoxin may ameliorate colitis by a tumor necrosis factor alpha-independent pathway. This study has shown for the first time that treatment with digoxin can ameliorate murine experimental colitis. This finding suggests that the suppression of Th17 using reagents such as digoxin could be effective in treating Crohn's disease refractory to anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy.

  20. Superior protection elicited by live-attenuated vaccines in the murine model of paratuberculosis.

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    Ghosh, Pallab; Shippy, Daniel C; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-12-16

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a chronic enteric infection in ruminants with severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. Currently, available vaccines have limited protective efficacy against disease progression and does not prevent spread of the infection among animals. Because of their ability to elicit wide-spectrum immune responses, we adopted a live-attenuated vaccine approach based on a sigH knock-out strain of M. paratuberculosis (ΔsigH). Earlier analysis of the ΔsigH mutant in mice indicated their inadequate ability to colonize host tissues, unlike the isogenic wild-type strain, validating the role of this sigma factor in M. paratuberculosis virulence. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the ΔsigH mutant compared to inactivated vaccine constructs in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. The presented analysis indicated that ΔsigH mutant with or without QuilA adjuvant is capable of eliciting strong immune responses (such as interferon gamma-γ, IFN-γ) suggesting their immunogenicity and ability to potentially initiate effective vaccine-induced immunity. Following a challenge with virulent strains of M. paratuberculosis, ΔsigH conferred protective immunity as indicated by the reduced bacterial burden accompanied with reduced lesions in main body organs (liver, spleen and intestine) usually infected with M. paratuberculosis. More importantly, our data indicated better ability of the ΔsigH vaccine to confer protection compared to the inactivated vaccine constructs even with the presence of oil-adjuvant. Overall, our approach provides a rational basis for using live-attenuated mutant strains to develop improved vaccines that elicit robust immunity against this chronic infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Live, Attenuated Bordetella pertussis Vaccine Provides Long-Term Protection against Virulent Challenge in a Murine Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Skerry, C. M.; Mahon, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    Despite successful mass vaccination programs, whooping cough remains a significant cause of neonatal mortality. Immunity induced by current vaccines wanes in adolescence, requiring additional immunizations to prevent resurgence. There is a need for a new generation of vaccines capable of conferring long-lasting immunity from birth. Recently, a live, attenuated whooping cough vaccine, BPZE1, has been developed. Here, an established murine immunization model was used to examine the induction an...

  2. Salidroside attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine responses and improves survival in murine endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shuang; Feng, Haihua; Song, Bocui; Guo, Weixiao; Xiong, Ying; Huang, Guoren; Zhong, Weiting; Huo, Meixia; Chen, Na; Lu, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2011-12-01

    Salidroside is a major component isolated from the Rhodiola rosea. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of salidroside on cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages in vitro, and the results showed that salidroside reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretions. This inspired us to further study the effects of salidroside in vivo. Salidroside significantly attenuated TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 productions in serum from mice challenged with LPS, and consistent with the results in vitro. In the murine model of endotoxemia, mice were treated with salidroside prior to or after LPS challenge. The results showed that salidroside significantly increased mouse survival. Further studies revealed that salidroside could downregulate LPS-induced nuclear transcription factor-қB (NF-қB) DNA-binding activation and ERK/MAPKs signal transduction pathways production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These observations indicated that salidroside modulated early cytokine responses by blocking NF-қB and ERK/MAPKs activation, and thus, increased mouse survival. These effects of salidroside may be of potential usefulness in the treatment of inflammation-mediated endotoxemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Therapeutic effects on murine oral candidiasis by oral administration of cassia (Cinnamomum cassia) preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Yuuki; Takizawa, Toshio; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Sagawa, Takehito; Arai, Ryo; Inoue, Shigeharu; Yamaguchi, Hideyo; Abe, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effects of spices and herbs on Candida albicans growth using in vitro assay and therapeutic activity of some selected herbal preparations against murine oral candidiasis. All tested samples: lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa), green tea (Camellia sinensis), and cassia (Cinnamomum cassia) inhibited Candida mycelial growth in vitro. The results of this assay showed that the anti-Candida activity of lemongrass, green tea, and cassia is stronger than that of the other tested herbs. Oral administration of lemongrass or green tea did not result in significant improvement in the murine oral candidiasis, while the administration of cassia improved the symptoms and reduced the number of viable Candida cells in the oral cavity. The results of in vitro Candida growth assay including GC/MS analysis suggested that cinnamaldehyde in the cassia preparation was the principal component responsible for the inhibitory activity of Candida mycelial growth. These findings suggest that oral intake of a cassia preparation is a clinical candidate for a prophylactic or therapeutic tool against oral Candida infection.

  4. Bifidobacterium breve attenuates murine dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases regulatory T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    Full Text Available While some probiotics have shown beneficial effects on preventing or treating colitis development, others have shown no effects. In this study, we have assessed the immunomodulating effects of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium breve (B. breve on T cell polarization in vitro, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, and in vivo, using murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS colitis model. With respect to the latter, the mRNA expression of T cell subset-associated transcription factors and cytokines in the colon was measured and the T helper type (Th 17 and regulatory T cell (Treg subsets were determined in the Peyer's patches. Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve incubations in vitro reduced Th17 and increased Th2 cell subsets in human PBMCs. In addition, B. breve incubation was also able to reduce Th1 and increase Treg cell subsets in contrast to L. rhamnosus. In vivo intervention with B. breve, but not L. rhamnosus, significantly attenuated the severity of DSS-induced colitis. In DSS-treated C57BL/6 mice, intervention with B. breve increased the expression of mRNA encoding for Th2- and Treg-associated cytokines in the distal colon. In addition, intervention with B. breve led to increases of Treg and decreases of Th17 cell subsets in Peyer's patches of DSS-treated mice. B. breve modulates T cell polarization towards Th2 and Treg cell-associated responses in vitro and in vivo. In vivo B. breve intervention ameliorates DSS-induced colitis symptoms and this protective effect may mediated by its effects on the T-cell composition.

  5. Pharmacologic attenuation of pelvic pain in a murine model of interstitial cystitis

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    Schaeffer Anthony J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin, and IC/PBS symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. Similar to IC/PBS patients, pseudorabies virus (PRV infection in mice induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with bladder lamina propria mast cell accumulation and pelvic pain. We evaluated several drugs to determine the effectiveness of reducing PRV-induced pelvic pain. Methods Neurogenic cystitis was induced by the injection of Bartha's strain of PRV into the abductor caudalis dorsalis tail base muscle of female C57BL/6 mice. Therapeutic modulation of pelvic pain was assessed daily for five days using von Frey filament stimulation to the pelvic region to quantify tactile allodynia. Results Significant reduction of PRV-induced pelvic pain was observed for animals treated with antagonists of neurokinin receptor 1 (NK1R and histamine receptors. In contrast, the H1R antagonist hydroxyzine, proton pump inhibitors, a histamine receptor 3 agonist, and gabapentin had little or no effect on PRV-induced pelvic pain. Conclusion These data demonstrate that bladder-associated pelvic pain is attenuated by antagonists of NK1R and H2R. Therefore, NK1R and H2Rrepresent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC/PBS and potentially other chronic pain conditions.

  6. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  7. Therapeutic activity of two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia

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    Berthou Christian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that allanxanthone C and macluraxanthone, two xanthones purified from Guttiferae trees, display in vitro antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities in leukemic cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and leukemia B cell lines. Results Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of the two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human CLL, developed by engrafting CD5-transfected chronic leukemia B cells into SCID mice. Treatment of the animals with five daily injections of either allanxanthone C or macluraxanthone resulted in a significant prolongation of their survival as compared to control animals injected with the solvent alone (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0141, respectively. The same treatment of mice which were not xenografted induced no mortality. Conclusion These data show for the first time the in vivo antileukemic activities of two plant-derived xanthones, and confirm their potential interest for CLL therapy.

  8. CSF-1R inhibition attenuates renal and neuropsychiatric disease in murine lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Wen, Jing; Shum, Justine; Doerner, Jessica; Herlitz, Leal; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-08-26

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease that can affect multiple end organs. Kidney and brain are two of the organs most commonly involved in SLE. Past studies have suggested the importance of macrophages in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). Furthermore, as the immune effectors of the brain, microglia have been implicated in pathways leading to neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE). We depleted macrophages and microglia using GW2580, a small colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) kinase inhibitor, in MRL-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mice, a classic murine lupus model that displays features of both LN and NPSLE. Treatment was initiated before the onset of disease, and mice were followed for the development of LN and neurobehavioral dysfunction throughout the study. Treatment with GW2580 significantly ameliorated kidney disease, as evidenced by decreased proteinuria, BUN, and improved renal histopathology, despite equivalent levels of IgG and C3 deposition in the kidneys of treated and control mice. We were able to confirm macrophage depletion within the kidney via IBA-1 staining. Furthermore, we observed specific improvement in the depression-like behavioral deficit of MRL/lpr mice with GW2580 treatment. Circulating antibody and autoantibody levels were, however, not affected. These results provide additional support for the role of macrophages as a potentially valuable therapeutic target in SLE. Inhibiting CSF-1 receptor signaling would be more targeted than current immunosuppressive therapies, and may hold promise for the treatment of renal and neuropsychiatric end organ disease manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment attenuates coagulation imbalance in a lethal murine model of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Li, Yongqing; Liu, Baoling; Wu, Erxi; Sillesen, Martin; Velmahos, George C; Halaweish, Ihab; Alam, Hasan B

    2014-08-01

    Sepsis has a profound impact on the inflammatory and hemostatic systems. In addition to systemic inflammation, it can produce disseminated intravascular coagulation, microvascular thrombosis, consumptive coagulopathy, and multiple organ failure. We have shown that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), improves survival in a lethal model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice, but its effect on coagulation remains unknown. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of SAHA treatment on coagulopathy in sepsis. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to CLP, and 1 hour later given intraperitoneally either SAHA dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or DMSO only. Sham-operated animals were handled in similar manner without CLP. Blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture and evaluated using the TEG 5000 Thrombelastograph Hemostasis Analyzer System. Compared with the sham group, all animals in DMSO vehicle group died within 72 hours, and developed coagulopathy that manifested as prolonged initial fibrin formation and fibrin cross-linkage time, and decreased clot formation speed, platelet function, and clot rigidity. SAHA treatment significantly improved survival and was associated with improvement in fibrin cross-linkage and clot formation, as well as platelet function and clot rigidity, without a significant impact on the clot initiation parameters. SAHA treatment enhances survival and attenuates sepsis-associated coagulopathy by improving fibrin cross-linkage, rate of clot formation, platelet function, and clot strength. HDACI may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for correcting sepsis-associated coagulopathy. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biological studies of samarium-153 bleomycin complex in human breast cancer murine xenografts for therapeutic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami-Samani, A. [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir Univ. of Tech., Tehran (Iran); Ghannadi-Maragheh, M. [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir Univ. of Tech., Tehran (Iran); Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab. (RRDL), Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst. (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran); Jalilian, A.R.; Mazidi, M. [Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab. (RRDL), Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst. (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a potential therapeutic DNA targeting agent, {sup 153}Sm-bleomycin complex ({sup 153}Sm-BLM), was developed and the tumor accumulation studies were performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and scarification studies. {sup 153}Sm-BLM was prepared at optimized conditions (room temperature, 4-8 h, 0.1 mg bleomycin for 740-3700 MBq {sup 153}SmCl{sub 3}, radiochemical purity over 98%, HPLC, specific activity = 55 TBq/mmol). {sup 153}Sm-BLM was administered into human breast cancer murine xenografts and the biodistribution and imaging studies were performed up to 48 h. {sup 153}Sm-BLM demonstrated superior tumor accumulation properties in contrast with the other radiolabeled bleomycins with tumor:blood ratios of 41, 72 and 182 at 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively, and tumor:muscle ratios of 23, 33 and > 1490 at 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively, while administered intravenously. The SPECT images also demonstrated the obvious tumor uptake at the chest region of the breast-tumor bearing mice. These initial experiments demonstrate significant accumulation of {sup 153}Sm-BLM in tumor tissues. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of therapeutic potential of nanosilver particles synthesised using aloin in experimental murine mastitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya Kumar, Thota Venkata; Muralidhar, Yegireddy; Prasad, Pagadala Eswara; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara; Alpha Raj, Mekapogu

    2013-09-01

    Nanobiotechnology is an emerging biological branch of nanotechnology. Application of nanoparticles with specific size and shape in biology has already shown unforeseen and interesting results. A study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of phytogenically derived aloin mediated nanosilver particles (AAgNPs), prepared by reduction of silver nitrate with aloin, in Staphylococcus aureus induced murine mastitis. A total of 40 female mice were divided into five groups of eight animals each. Group I served as lactating control, groups II-V were inoculated with 20 μl of 24 h broth culture of S. aureus containing 4.0 × 105 cfu/quarter under ketamine anaesthesia. After 6 h post inoculation, groups III and IV received 20 μl of aloin nanosilver (AAgNPs) through intramammary and intraperitoneal routes, respectively. Group V received antibiotic cefepime at 1 mg/kg body weight through the intra-peritoneal route. After 18 h post-treatment, serum C reactive protein, weights of mammary glands, mammary gland bacterial load, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content, reduced glutathione content, superoxide dismutase activity and catalase activity and histopathology were determined. The compound showed a minimum inhibitory concentration of 21.8 ng/ml against S. aureus. Significant reduction (98%) in poly-morpho nuclear cell infiltration was observed with AAgNPs than antibiotic (50%).

  12. Identification of potential cytokine pathways for therapeutic intervention in murine primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito Kawata

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is considered a model autoimmune disease, with the most highly directed and specific autoantibody in both murine and human autoimmunity, the anti-mitochondrial autoantibody (AMA. However, therapeutic advances in this disease have lagged behind. Herein we have taken advantage of our unique model of murine PBC in which mice immunized with 2-octynoic acid coupled to BSA (2OA-BSA, a compound identified by quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR of human AMA binding, develop an intense inflammatory cholangitis with striking similarities to humans with PBC. In particular, we have constructed several unique gene-deleted mice, including mice deleted of IL-12p40, IL-12p35, IFN-γ, IL-23p19, IL-17A, IL-17F and IL-22, immunized these animals with 2OA-BSA and followed the natural history of immunopathology to identify key pathways that might provide clues for successful therapy. Our data indicate that whereas both IL-12/Th1 and IL-23/Th17 are involved in cholangitis, it is the IL-12/Th1 signaling pathway that elicits pathology. In fact, deletion of IFN-γ prevents disease and suppresses autoantibodies. Importantly, deletion of the Th17 cytokines IL-17A and IL-22, but not IL-17F, reduces biliary damage; IL-17A-knockout mice have reduced levels of anti-mitochondrial antibody. We further demonstrate that the production of IFN-γ is significantly decreased in the liver of IL-23p19(-/-, IL-17A(-/- and IL-22(-/- mice compared with controls. However, the ability of T cells to produce IFN-γ was not affected in Th17 cytokine-deficient mice. Our data indicate that a deficient Th17 pathway suppresses the accumulation of IFN-γ producing cells in liver during the early phase of cholangitis. In conclusion, whereas IFN-γ has a pivotal role in the early events involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune cholangitis induced by 2OA-BSA, the IL-23/Th17 pathway potentiates the effects of IL-12/IFN-γ-mediated immunopathology.

  13. Therapeutic effects of rosmarinic acid on airway responses in a murine model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhengmin; Nie, Haiying; Xu, Yangfeng; Peng, Jianbo; Zeng, Yun; Wei, Yingyi; Wen, Xuemei; Qiu, Jiaming; Zhong, Weiting; Deng, Xuming; He, Jiakang

    2016-12-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is an active component of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Previously, we reported that RA exerted a strong anti-inflammatory effect in a mouse acute lung injury model. Therefore, we hypothesized that RA might also have potential therapeutic effects in a murine model of asthma. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-asthmatic activity of RA and explored its possible molecular mechanisms of action. Female BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to and challenged with ovalbumin (Ova) were treated with RA (20mg/kg) 1h after challenge. The results showed that RA greatly diminished the number of inflammatory cells and the production of Th2 cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); significantly reduced the secretion of total IgE, Ova-specific IgE, and eotaxin; and markedly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) compared with Ova-induced mice. Histological studies further revealed that RA substantially decreased inflammatory cells infiltration and mucus hypersecretion compared with Ova-induced mice. Moreover, our results suggested that the protective effects of RA were mediated by the inhibition of JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Furthermore, RA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the mRNA expression of AMCase, CCL11, CCR3, Ym2 and E-selectin in lung tissue. These findings suggest that RA may effectively delay the development of airway inflammation and could thus be used as a therapy for allergic asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Therapeutic Role for TSP-2 Antibody in a Murine Asthma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Huang, En Ping; Su, Jin; Zhu, Ping; Lin, Jun; Luo, Shen Qiu; Yang, Cui Lan

    2018-01-27

    Specific immunotherapy, including agonists for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), have been shown to protect from allergies and to have a high immunomodulatory capacity. A new antibody, TSP-2, reactive against an epitope of the extracellular domain of TLR2, was identified. The effect of the antibody on dendritic cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and flow cytometric analysis. The effect of TSP-2 in a murine asthma model induced with ovalbumin (OVA) was assessed. The model is a form of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and was analyzed by whole-body plethysmography, the measurement of Th1/Th2 cytokines in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum by ELISA, and the CCK-8 assay for lymphocyte proliferation. The effect of TSP-2 on the maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. TSP-2 promoted the maturation of dendritic cells and the proliferation of lymphocyte in vitro and in vivo. The effect of TSP-2 on T helper 1 (Th1)/Th2 cytokine secretion was slightly more powerful than that of Pam3CSK4. TSP-2 antibody reduced AHR and OVA-specific IgE levels in allergic asthma. TSP-2 antibody also reduced lung inflammation and decreased leukocyte numbers in an OVA-sensitized and challenged asthma model. TSP-2 antibody increased OVA-stimulated I-A, CD80, CD86, and MHC-II levels on BMDCs. This study identifies a novel therapeutic strategy for AHR, which uses antibodies reactive against TLR2. It also provides theoretical evidence for the control of allergic asthma by targeting TLR2. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Comparison of use of Vero cell line and suspension culture of murine macrophage to attenuation of virulence of Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordadmehr, Monireh; Namavari, Mehdi; Khodakaram-Tafti, Azizollah; Mansourian, Maryam; Rahimian, Abdollah; Daneshbod, Yahya

    2013-10-01

    In this study the tachyzoite yields of Neospora caninum were compared in two cell lines: Vero (African Green Monkey Kidney) and suspension culture of murine macrophage (J774) cell lines. Then, N. caninum were continuously passaged in these cell lines for 3 months and the effect of host cells on virulence of tachyzoites was assessed by broiler chicken embryonated eggs. Inoculation was performed in the chorioallantoic (CA) liquid of the embryonated eggs with different dilutions (0.5 × 10(4), 1.0 × 10(4), 1.5 × 10(4)) of tachtzoites isolated from these cell cultures. The mortality pattern and pathological changes of the dead embryos and hatched chickens were noted. Tissue samples of brain, liver and heart were examined by histopathological and detection of DNA of parasite by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Also, consecutive sections of the tissues examined histologically were used for immunohistochemical (IHC) examination. Embryos inoculated with tachyzoites derived from Vero cell line (group V) showed a higher mortality rate (100%) than the embryos that received tachyzoites derived from J774 cell line (group J) (10% mortality rate). The results of this study indicated that the culture of N. caninum in J774 cell led to a marked increase in the number of tachyzoite yields and rapid attenuation in comparison to Vero, so the results were confirmed by IHC and PCR. This study is the first report of the significant effect of host cell on the attenuation of virulence of N. caninum tachyzoites. These findings could potentially provide a practical approach in the mass production of N. caninum tachyzoites, and also in producing live attenuated vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Peritoneal administration of Met-RANTES attenuates inflammatory and nociceptive responses in a murine neuropathic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jiin-Tarng; Mao, Chih-Chieh; Ching-Wah Sum, Daniel; Liu, Fu-Chao; Lai, Ying-Shu; Li, Jui-Chin; Day, Yuan-Ji

    2013-01-01

    The C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5; also known as regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted, or RANTES) is a member of the CC family of chemokines that specifically attract and activate leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Although CCL5 has been implicated in the processing of pain, its detailed mechanisms of action are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential of the Met-RANTES, a selective CCL5 receptor antagonist, via peritoneal administration to modulate the recruitment of inflammatory cells in injured sites and attenuate nociceptive responses in a neuropathic pain model in mice. Nociceptive sensitization, immune cell infiltration, multiple cytokine secretion, and opioid peptide expression in damaged nerves were studied. Our results indicated that Met-RANTES-treated mice had less behavioral hypersensitivity after partial sciatic nerve ligation. Macrophage infiltration, pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFNγ) protein secretion, and enkephalin, β-endorphin, and dynorphin mRNA expression in damaged nerves following partial sciatic nerve ligation were significantly decreased, and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) protein was significantly increased in Met-RANTES-treated mice. These results suggest that CCL5 is capable of regulating the microenvironment that controls behavioral hypersensitivity at the level of the peripheral injured site in a murine chronic neuropathic pain model. The present study identifies the potent pro-inflammatory potential of CCL5 and verifies the possible role of selective CCL5 receptor inhibitor in a murine neuropathic pain model. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Calycosin attenuates triglyceride accumulation and hepatic fibrosis in murine model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis via activating farnesoid X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xingping; Meng, Qiang; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Zhihao; Liu, Qi; Sun, Huijun; Sun, Pengyuan; Yang, Xiaobo; Huo, Xiaokui; Peng, Jinyong; Liu, Kexin

    2017-02-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) represents the more severe end of hepatic steatosis and is associated with progressive liver disease. Calycosin, derived from the root of Radix Astragali, has been demonstrated to have favorable efficacy on acute liver injury. The present study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of calycosin on attenuating triglyceride accumulation and hepatic fibrosis, as well as explore the potential mechanism in murine model of NASH. The C57BL/6 male mice were fed with methionine choline deficient (MCD) diet for 4 weeks to induce NASH and treated with or without calycosin by oral gavage for 4 weeks. The body weight, liver weight and the liver to body weight ratios were measured. Serum ALT, AST, TG, TC, FFA, MCP-1 and mKC levels were accessed by biochemical methods. H&E staining and Oil red O staining were used to identify the amelioration of liver histopathology. Immunohistochemistry of a-SMA, Masson trichrome staining and Sirius red staining were used to identify the amelioration of hepatic fibrosis. The quantitative real-time-PCR and Western blot were applied to observe the expression changes of key factors involved in triglyceride synthesis, free fatty acid β-oxidation and hepatic fibrosis. Calycosin significantly inhibited body weight loss induced by MCD diet, decreased the ALT and AST activities, MCP-1 and mKC in a dose-dependent manner. The H&E and Oil red O staining indicated calycosin effectively improved hepatic steatosis, improved the degree of triglyceride accumulation. Masson trichrome and Sirius red staining indicated that calycosin treatment remarkably attenuated the degree of hepatic fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry of a-SMA demonstrated that calycosin attenuated hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting hepatic stellate cell activation. Further, calycosin inhibited the expression of SREBP-1c, FASN, ACC and SCD1 involved in triglyceride synthesis, promoted the expression of PPARa, CPT1, Syndecan-1 and LPL involved in free fatty

  18. Rosmarinic Acid Attenuates Airway Inflammation and Hyperresponsiveness in a Murine Model of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhengmin; Xu, Yangfeng; Wen, Xuemei; Nie, Haiying; Hu, Tingjun; Yang, Xiaofeng; Chu, Xiao; Yang, Jian; Deng, Xuming; He, Jiakang

    2016-06-13

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) has numerous pharmacologic effects, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects. This study aimed to evaluate the preventive activity of RA in a murine model of asthma and to investigate its possible molecular mechanisms. Female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (Ova) were pretreated with RA (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) at 1 h before Ova challenge. The results demonstrated that RA markedly inhibited increases in inflammatory cells and Th2 cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), significantly reduced the total IgE and Ova-specific IgE concentrations, and greatly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) compared with the control Ova-induced mice. Histological analyses showed that RA substantially decreased the number of inflammatory cells and mucus hypersecretion in the airway. In addition, our results suggested that the protective effects of RA might be mediated by the suppression of ERK, JNK and p38 phosphorylation and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Furthermore, RA pretreatment resulted in a noticeable reduction in AMCase, CCL11, CCR3, Ym2 and E-selectin mRNA expression in lung tissues. These findings suggest that RA may effectively delay the progression of airway inflammation.

  19. Rosmarinic Acid Attenuates Airway Inflammation and Hyperresponsiveness in a Murine Model of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengmin Liang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rosmarinic acid (RA has numerous pharmacologic effects, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects. This study aimed to evaluate the preventive activity of RA in a murine model of asthma and to investigate its possible molecular mechanisms. Female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (Ova were pretreated with RA (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg at 1 h before Ova challenge. The results demonstrated that RA markedly inhibited increases in inflammatory cells and Th2 cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, significantly reduced the total IgE and Ova-specific IgE concentrations, and greatly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR compared with the control Ova-induced mice. Histological analyses showed that RA substantially decreased the number of inflammatory cells and mucus hypersecretion in the airway. In addition, our results suggested that the protective effects of RA might be mediated by the suppression of ERK, JNK and p38 phosphorylation and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB. Furthermore, RA pretreatment resulted in a noticeable reduction in AMCase, CCL11, CCR3, Ym2 and E-selectin mRNA expression in lung tissues. These findings suggest that RA may effectively delay the progression of airway inflammation.

  20. Attenuated Bordetella pertussis vaccine strain BPZE1 modulates allergen-induced immunity and prevents allergic pulmonary pathology in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, H; Noone, C; Cahill, E; English, K; Locht, C; Mahon, B P

    2010-06-01

    Virulent Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, exacerbates allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization. A live genetically attenuated B. pertussis mucosal vaccine, BPZE1, has been developed that evokes full protection against virulent challenge in mice but the effect of this attenuated strain on the development of allergic responses is unknown. To assess the influence of attenuated B. pertussis BPZE1 on OVA priming in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. Mice were challenged with virulent or attenuated strains of B. pertussis, and sensitized to allergen (OVA) at the peak of bacterial carriage. Subsequently, airway pathology, local inflammation and OVA-specific immunity were examined. In contrast to virulent B. pertussis, live BPZE1 did not exacerbate but reduced the airway pathology associated with allergen sensitization. BPZE1 immunization before allergen sensitization did not have an adjuvant effect on allergen specific IgE but resulted in a statistically significant decrease in airway inflammation in tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. BPZE1 significantly reduced the levels of OVA-driven IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 but induced a significant increase in IFN-gamma in response to OVA re-stimulation. These data demonstrate that, unlike virulent strains, the candidate attenuated B. pertussis vaccine BPZE1 does not exacerbate allergen-driven airway pathology. BPZE1 may represent an attractive T-helper type 1 promoting vaccine candidate for eradication of whooping cough that is unlikely to promote atopic disease.

  1. A Live, Attenuated Bordetella pertussis Vaccine Provides Long-Term Protection against Virulent Challenge in a Murine Model▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerry, Ciaran M.; Mahon, Bernard P.

    2011-01-01

    Despite successful mass vaccination programs, whooping cough remains a significant cause of neonatal mortality. Immunity induced by current vaccines wanes in adolescence, requiring additional immunizations to prevent resurgence. There is a need for a new generation of vaccines capable of conferring long-lasting immunity from birth. Recently, a live, attenuated whooping cough vaccine, BPZE1, has been developed. Here, an established murine immunization model was used to examine the induction and longevity of immunological memory. In this predictive model, BPZE1 conferred a level of protection against virulent bacterial challenge comparable to that conferred by recovery from prior infection, up to 1 year after immunization. One year after immunization with BPZE1, a pertussis-specific persistent response, with high levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), could be detected from spleen cells restimulated with inactivated Bordetella pertussis. BPZE1 induced low levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17) and no IL-10 or IL-5. BPZE1 immunization induced long-lasting, efficacious memory B-cell and specific antibody responses dominated by IgG2a, which were boosted by subsequent challenge. Finally, the antibody induced by BPZE1 was functionally relevant and could clear a virulent B. pertussis infection in antibody-deficient mice following passive transfer. This study suggests that BPZE1 is capable of conferring a high level of long-lived effective protection against virulent B. pertussis. PMID:21147936

  2. A live, attenuated Bordetella pertussis vaccine provides long-term protection against virulent challenge in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerry, Ciaran M; Mahon, Bernard P

    2011-02-01

    Despite successful mass vaccination programs, whooping cough remains a significant cause of neonatal mortality. Immunity induced by current vaccines wanes in adolescence, requiring additional immunizations to prevent resurgence. There is a need for a new generation of vaccines capable of conferring long-lasting immunity from birth. Recently, a live, attenuated whooping cough vaccine, BPZE1, has been developed. Here, an established murine immunization model was used to examine the induction and longevity of immunological memory. In this predictive model, BPZE1 conferred a level of protection against virulent bacterial challenge comparable to that conferred by recovery from prior infection, up to 1 year after immunization. One year after immunization with BPZE1, a pertussis-specific persistent response, with high levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), could be detected from spleen cells restimulated with inactivated Bordetella pertussis. BPZE1 induced low levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17) and no IL-10 or IL-5. BPZE1 immunization induced long-lasting, efficacious memory B-cell and specific antibody responses dominated by IgG2a, which were boosted by subsequent challenge. Finally, the antibody induced by BPZE1 was functionally relevant and could clear a virulent B. pertussis infection in antibody-deficient mice following passive transfer. This study suggests that BPZE1 is capable of conferring a high level of long-lived effective protection against virulent B. pertussis.

  3. Bifidobacterium lactis attenuates onset of inflammation in a murine model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, David; Favre, Laurent; Foata, Francis; Adolfsson, Oskar; Perruisseau-Carrier, Genevieve; Vidal, Karine; Reuteler, Gloria; Dayer-Schneider, Johanna; Mueller, Christoph; Blum, Stéphanie

    2011-01-28

    To assess the anti-inflammatory effect of the probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis (B. lactis) in an adoptive transfer model of colitis. Donor and recipient mice received either B. lactis or bacterial culture medium as control (deMan Rogosa Sharpe) in drinking water for one week prior to transfer of a mix of naive and regulatory T cells until sacrifice. All recipient mice developed signs of colonic inflammation, but a significant reduction of weight loss was observed in B. lactis-fed recipient mice compared to control mice. Moreover, a trend toward a diminution of mucosal thickness and attenuated epithelial damage was revealed. Colonic expression of pro-inflammatory and T cell markers was significantly reduced in B. lactis-fed recipient mice compared to controls. Concomitantly, forkhead box protein 3, a marker of regulatory T cells, was significantly up-regulated by B. lactis. Daily oral administration of B. lactis was able to reduce inflammatory and T cells mediators and to promote regulatory T cells specific markers in a mouse model of colitis.

  4. Therapeutic targeting of CCR1 attenuates established chronic fungal asthma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kristin J; Ewing, Jillian L; Schuh, Jane M; Ness, Traci L; Kunkel, Steven L; Aparici, Monica; Miralpeix, Montserrat; Hogaboam, Cory M

    2005-08-01

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) represents a promising target in chronic airway inflammation and remodeling due to fungus-associated allergic asthma. The present study addressed the therapeutic effect of a nonpeptide CCR1 antagonist, BX-471, in a model of chronic fungal asthma induced by Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. BX-471 treatment of isolated macrophages inhibited CCL22 and TNF-alpha and promoted IL-10 release. BX-471 also increased toll like receptor-9 (TLR9) and decreased TLR2 and TLR6 expression in these cells. When administered daily by intraperitoneal injection, from days 15 to 30 after the initiation of chronic fungal asthma, BX-471 (3, 10, or 30 mg kg(-1)) dose-dependently reduced airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness, and remodeling at day 30 after conidia challenge. The maximal therapeutic effect was observed at the 10 mg kg(-1) dose. In summary, the therapeutic administration of BX-471 significantly attenuated experimental fungal asthma via its effects on both innate and adaptive immune processes.

  5. Splenectomy attenuates murine liver fibrosis with hypersplenism stimulating hepatic accumulation of Ly-6C(lo) macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Akito; Iimuro, Yuji; Uyama, Naoki; Uda, Yugo; Okada, Toshihiro; Fujimoto, Jiro

    2015-10-01

    Splenectomy in cirrhotic patients has been reported to improve liver function; however the underlying mechanism remains obscure. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism using a murine model, which represents well the compensated liver cirrhosis. C57BL/6 male mice were allowed to drink water including thioacetamide (TAA: 300 mg/L) ad libitum for 32 weeks. After splenectomy at 32 weeks, mice were sacrificed on days one, seven, and 28, respectively, while TAA-administration was continued. Perioperative changes in peripheral blood and liver tissues were analyzed. TAA treatment of mice for 32 weeks reproducibly achieved advanced liver fibrosis with splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, and leukocytopenia. After splenectomy, liver fibrosis was attenuated, and macrophages/monocytes were significantly increased in peripheral blood, as well as in the liver. Progenitor-like cells expressing CK-19, EpCAM, or CD-133 appeared in the liver after TAA treatment, and gradually disappeared after splenectomy. Macrophages/monocytes accumulated in the liver, most of which were negative for Ly-6C, were adjacent to the hepatic progenitor-like cells, and quantitative RT-PCR indicated increased canonical Wnt and decreased Notch signals. As a result, a significant amount of β-catenin accumulated in the progenitor-like cells. Moreover, relatively small Ki67-positive hepatic cells were significantly increased. Protein expression of MMP-9, to which Ly-6G-positive neutrophils contributed, was also increased in the liver after splenectomy. The hepatic accumulation of macrophages/monocytes, most of which are Ly-6C(lo), the reduction of fibrosis, and the gradual disappearance of hepatic progenitor-like cells possibly play significant roles in the tissue remodeling process in cirrhotic livers after splenectomy. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Losartan attenuates the coronary perivasculitis through its local and systemic anti-inflammatory properties in a murine model of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Eisuke; Niimura, Fumio; Matsuda, Shinichi; Ukawa, Toshiko; Nakamura, Hideaki; Sekine, Kaori; Kato, Masahiko; Aiba, Yuji; Koga, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Kuniyoshi; Takahashi, Osamu; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Kawasaki disease is a common systemic vasculitis that leads to coronary artery lesions. Besides its antihypertensive effects, losartan can modulate inflammation in cardiovascular disease. We examined whether losartan can attenuate coronary inflammation in a murine model of Kawasaki disease. Five-wk-old C57/BL6J male mice were intraperitoneally injected with Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract to induce coronary inflammation and divided into four groups: placebo, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), losartan, and IVIG+losartan. After 2 wk, mice were harvested. The coronary perivasculitis was significantly attenuated by losartan but not by IVIG alone, and further dramatic attenuation by IVIG+losartan was observed. The frequency of Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract-induced myocarditis (80%) was markedly lowered by losartan (22%) and IVIG+losartan (0%). Furthermore, interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA was markedly attenuated by IVIG+losartan. Serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, and IL-10 after Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract injection were slightly decreased by IVIG or losartan. Moreover, IL-1β, IL-10, and MCP-1 levels were significantly decreased by IVIG+losartan. The addition of losartan to IVIG strongly attenuated the severity of coronary perivasculitis and the incidence of myocarditis, along with suppressing systemic/local cytokines as well as the activated macrophage infiltration. Therefore, losartan may be a potentially useful additive drug for the acute phase of Kawasaki disease to minimize coronary artery lesions.

  7. Therapeutic immunization strategies against cervical cancer : induction of cell-mediated immunity in murine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bungener, Laura Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis is the development of a therapeutic immunization strategy against cervical cancer and pre-malignant precursor lesions of cervical cancer (CIN lesions). Cervical cancer is caused by high risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Two of the early proteins of high

  8. Determination of the safety and efficacy of therapeutic neutralization of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) using AZD9773, an anti-TNF-α immune Fab, in murine CLP sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newham, Peter; Ross, Daniel; Ceuppens, Peter; Das, Shampa; Yates, James W T; Betts, Catherine; Reens, Jaimini; Randall, Kevin J; Knight, Richard; McKay, Jennifer S

    2014-02-01

    TNF-α neutralization is associated with increased mortality in mouse cecal ligation puncture (CLP) models. AZD9773 is an ovine polyclonal human TNF-α immune Fab, with pharmacological properties that differ from previously studied anti-TNF-α agents. We explored the safety and efficacy of therapeutically administered AZD9773 in mouse CLP sepsis. A moderate/severe-grade CLP model resulting in 20-30 % 5-day survival and a mild-grade CLP model resulting in ~70 % 5-day survival were established in human TNF-α transgene/murine TNF null (Tg1278/-/-) mice. Mice received saline resuscitation and imipenem administration every 12 h (0-72 h post-CLP). AZD9773 (or DigiFab control) was dosed 24, 36, 48 and 60 h post-CLP. Therapeutic dosing of AZD9773 in moderate/severe-grade CLP resulted in significantly increased survival (>70 %) compared with DigiFab (27 %, P CLP did not significantly affect survival outcome compared with DigiFab or imipenem alone (~60-70 % survival). These data demonstrate that TNF-α neutralization can improve survival in moderate/severe CLP sepsis. TNF-α suppression in mild-grade models was not associated with survival benefit and did not increase 5-day mortality. These findings suggest that therapeutic benefit following TNF-α attenuation in models of sepsis may depend on model severity.

  9. Therapeutic potential of paclitaxel-radiation treatment of a murine ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milas, L; Saito, Y; Hunter, N; Milross, C G; Mason, K A

    1996-08-01

    Paclitaxel has been shown to radiosensitize tumor cells in culture by arresting them in the most radiosensitive G2 and M cell cycle phases. In vivo preclinical studies are now necessary to obtain full insight into the radiopotentiating potential of this drug and its ability to increase the therapeutic gain of radiotherapy. We tested its ability to enhance the tumor radioresponse of an ovarian carcinoma and to influence the normal tissue radioresponse of recipient mice. Mice bearing 8-mm isotransplants of a syngeneic ovarian carcinoma, designated OCA-I, in their legs were treated with 40 mg/kg paclitaxel i.v., 14-60 Gy single-dose local tumor irradiation, or both; radiation was given under ambient conditions 1-96 h after paclitaxel. Tumor growth delay, tumor cure rate (TCD50 assay), and delay in tumor recurrences were measured. Normal tissue radioresponse was determined using jejunal crypt cell survival at 3.5 days after exposure of mice to 9-14 Gy single dose of total body irradiation; the mice were untreated or treated with 40 mg/kg i.v. paclitaxel 4-96 h before irradiation. Paclitaxel alone was effective against OCA-I, but its combination with irradiation produced supra-additive tumor growth delay. It also reduced TCD50 values and delayed tumor recurrences. The enhancement of tumor radioresponse ranged from 1.33 to 1.96; the value increased as the time between paclitaxel administration and tumor irradiation increased up to 48 h, but then decreased again at 96 h. In contrast, paclitaxel protected jejunum against radiation damage by factors of 1.03 to 1.07 when given 24-96 h before irradiation. It showed some potentiation of damage (by a factor of 1.07), but only when given 4 h before irradiation. Paclitaxel potentiated tumor radioresponse if given within 4 days before irradiation, whereas it caused radioprotection of normal tissue (jejunum) at that time. Therefore, paclitaxel significantly increased therapeutic gain and so has potential for use in combination with

  10. Therapeutic vaccination against a murine lymphoma by intratumoral injection of a cationic anticancer peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Gerd; Eliassen, Liv Tone; Camilio, Ketil Andre; Bartnes, Kristian; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur; Rekdal, Oystein

    2010-08-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) exhibit promising anticancer activities. In the present study, we have examined the in vivo antitumoral effects of a 9-mer peptide, LTX-302, which is derived from the CAP bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB). A20 B cell lymphomas of BALB/c origin were established by subcutaneous inoculation in syngeneic mice. Intratumoral LTX-302 injection resulted in tumor necrosis and infiltration of inflammatory cells followed by complete regression of the tumors in the majority of the animals. This effect was T cell dependent, since the intervention was inefficient in nude mice. Successfully treated mice were protected against rechallenge with A20 cells, but not against Meth A sarcoma cells. Tumor resistance could be adoptively transferred with spleen cells from LTX-302-treated mice. Resistance was abrogated by depletion of T lymphocytes, or either the CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cell subsets. Taken together, these data suggest that LTX-302 treatment induced long-term, specific cellular immunity against the A20 lymphoma and that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were required. Thus, intratumoral administration of lytic peptide might, in addition to providing local tumor control, confer a novel strategy for therapeutic vaccination against cancer.

  11. Defining immunological impact and therapeutic benefit of mild heating in a murine model of arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ting Lee

    Full Text Available Traditional treatments, including a variety of thermal therapies have been known since ancient times to provide relief from rheumatoid arthritis (RA symptoms. However, a general absence of information on how heating affects molecular or immunological targets relevant to RA has limited heat treatment (HT to the category of treatments known as "alternative therapies". In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of mild HT in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model which has been used in many previous studies to evaluate newer pharmacological approaches for the treatment of RA, and tested whether inflammatory immune activity was altered. We also compared the effect of HT to methotrexate, a well characterized pharmacological treatment for RA. CIA mice were treated with either a single HT for several hours or daily 30 minute HT. Disease progression and macrophage infiltration were evaluated. We found that both HT regimens significantly reduced arthritis disease severity and macrophage infiltration into inflamed joints. Surprisingly, HT was as efficient as methotrexate in controlling disease progression. At the molecular level, HT suppressed TNF-α while increasing production of IL-10. We also observed an induction of HSP70 and a reduction in both NF-κB and HIF-1α in inflamed tissues. Additionally, using activated macrophages in vitro, we found that HT reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, an effect which is correlated to induction of HSF-1 and HSP70 and inhibition of NF-κB and STAT activation. Our findings demonstrate a significant therapeutic benefit of HT in controlling arthritis progression in a clinically relevant mouse model, with an efficacy similar to methotrexate. Mechanistically, HT targets highly relevant anti-inflammatory pathways which strongly support its increased study for use in clinical trials for RA.

  12. Th1-biased immunomodulation and therapeutic potential of Artemisia annua in murine visceral leishmaniasis.

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    Mohammad Islamuddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of vaccines and limitations of currently available chemotherapy, development of safe and efficacious drugs is urgently needed for visceral leishmaniasis (VL that is fatal, if left untreated. Earlier we reported in vitro apoptotic antileishmanial activity of n-hexane fractions of Artemisia annua leaves (AAL and seeds (AAS against Leishmania donovani. In the present study, we investigated the immunostimulatory and therapeutic efficacy of AAL and AAS.Ten-weeks post infection, BALB/c mice were orally administered AAL and AAS for ten consecutive days. Significant reduction in hepatic (86.67% and 89.12% and splenic (95.45% and 95.84% parasite burden with decrease in spleen weight was observed. AAL and AAS treated mice induced the strongest DTH response, as well as three-fold decrease in IgG1 and two-fold increase in IgG2a levels, as compared to infected controls. Cytometric bead array further affirmed the elicitation of Th1 immune response as indicated by increased levels of IFN-γ, and low levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10 in serum as well as in culture supernatant of lymphocytes from treated mice. Lymphoproliferative response, IFN-γ producing CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and nitrite levels were significantly enhanced upon antigen recall in vitro. The co-expression of CD80 and CD86 on macrophages was significantly augmented. CD8+ T cells exhibited CD62Llow and CD44hi phenotype, signifying induction of immunological memory in AAL and AAS treated groups. Serum enzyme markers were in the normal range indicating inertness against nephro- and hepato-toxicity.Our results establish the two-prong antileishmanial efficacy of AAL and AAS for cure against L. donovani that is dependent on both the direct leishmanicidal action as well as switching-on of Th1-biased protective cell-mediated immunity with generation of memory. AAL and AAS could represent adjunct therapies for the treatment of leishmaniasis, either alone or in combination with

  13. Rosmarinic Acid Attenuates the Activation of Murine Microglial N9 Cells through the Downregulation of Inflammatory Cytokines and Cleaved Caspase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Vanessa Rodrigues; Viau, Cassiana Macagnan; Staub, Renata Bartolomeu; De Souza, Marcele Silva; Pflüger, Pricila; Regner, Gabriela Gregory; Pereira, Patrícia; Saffi, Jenifer

    2017-01-01

    The present study evaluated the ability of rosmarinic acid (RA) to inhibit microglia activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the N9 murine microglial cell line, and investigated the putative mechanisms involved in this process. In all tests, N9 murine microglial cells were pretreated with RA (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μM) for 20 h and exposed to LPS (1 μM/mL) for 4 h. Cell viability was measured by Trypan blue exclusion assay. Flow cytometry was used to detect reactive oxygen species (ROS), quantify cleaved caspase-3, and analyze the mitochondrial electrochemical potential. iNOS, Arg-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 proteins were analyzed by Western blotting, and their antigens were detected using the chemiluminescence technique. The effect of RA on DNA was evaluated by the Comet assay. RA attenuated the expression of the M1 marker iNOS and the levels of proinflammatory factors, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6; it increased the expression of the M2 marker Arg-1, and inhibited, at least in part, ROS generation and loss of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization through the inhibition of cleaved caspase-3 activation. RA also inhibited DNA damage, reassuring cell protection. The results suggested a protective effect of RA through downregulation of inflammatory cytokines and cleaved caspase-3. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Transplantation of As-MiR-937-Expressing Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Cunfu; Wang, Xiao; Xu, Shunliang

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common dementias among aged people, and is clinically characterized by progressive memory loss, behavioral and learning dysfunction and cognitive deficits. So far, this is no cure for AD. A therapeutic effect of transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into murine model of AD has been reported, but remains to be further improved. Brn-4 is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in neuronal development, whereas the effects of Brn-4 overexpression in transplanted MSCs on AD are unknown. MSCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow and induced to overexpress antisense of miRNA-937 (as-miR-937) through adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated transduction, and purified by flow cytometry based on expression of a GFP co-transgene in the cells. The Brn-4 levels in mouse MSCs were examined in miR-937-modified MSCs by RT-qPCR and by Western blot. These miR-937-modified MSCs were then transplanted into an APP/PS1 transgenic AD model in mice. The effects of saline control, MSCs and asmiR-937 MSCs on AD mice were examined by deposition of amyloid-beta peptide aggregates (Aβ), social recognition test (SR), Plus-Maze Discriminative Avoidance Task (PM-DAT) and the levels of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mouse brain. MSCs expressed high levels of Brn-4 transcripts but low levels of Brn-4 protein. Poor protein vs mRNA levels of Brn-4 in MSCs appeared to result from the presence of high levels of miR-937 in MSCs. miR-937 inhibited translation of Brn-4 mRNA through binding to the 3'-UTR of the Brn-4 mRNA in MSCs. Expression of as-miR-937 significantly increased Brn-4 protein levels in MSCs. Transplantation of as-miR-937-expressing MSCs significantly reduced the deposition of Aβ, increased the levels of BDNF, and significantly improved the appearance in SR and PM-DAT in AD mice. Overexpression of as-miR-937 in MSCs may substantially improve the therapeutic effects of MSCs on AD, possibly through augmenting Brn

  15. Therapeutic potency of IL2-caspase 3 targeted treatment in a murine experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteingart, S; Rapoport, M; Grodzovski, I; Sabag, O; Lichtenstein, M; Eavri, R; Lorberboum-Galski, H

    2009-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises primarily the two disorders - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease - that involve deregulated T cell responses. The ever-increasing incidence rate of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis during recent decades, combined with the limited efficacy and potential adverse effects of current treatments, explain the real need for seeking more specific and selective methods for treating these diseases. To investigate the ability of interleukin 2 (IL2)-caspase 3 chimeric protein, designed to target activated T lymphocytes that express the high-affinity IL2 receptor, to ameliorate the clinical symptoms of acute murine experimental colitis, using a mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Mice with DSS-induced colitis were treated with IL2-caspase 3 for 7 days and disease severity was assessed in parallel to control, non-treated mice, receiving only daily injections of phosphate-buffered saline. IL2-caspase 3 was tested both for its ability to prevent the development of colitis, and for its therapeutic potential to cure on-going, active acute disease. In addition, colon tissue samples were used for myeloperoxidase assays and RNA isolation followed by polymerase chain reaction to determine mRNA expression levels of specific genes. Treatment with IL2-caspase 3 dose-dependently ameliorated the disease activity index (DAI) of mice colitis. We achieved up to 78% improvement in DAI with intravenous injections of 15 microg/mouse/day. Furthermore, IL2-caspase 3 decreased neutrophil and macrophage infiltration to the inflamed tissue by up to 57%. IL2-caspase 3 was proven as a therapeutic reagent in another model, where treatment begins only after disease onset. Here we demonstrated a 70% decrease in DAI when compared to non-treated sick mice. A reduction in mRNA expression levels of both IL1 beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha was found in lysates of total colon tissue of treated mice, as compared to sick, untreated

  16. Therapeutic Effects of Transplantation of As-MiR-937-Expressing Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Alzheimer's disease (AD is one of the most common dementias among aged people, and is clinically characterized by progressive memory loss, behavioral and learning dysfunction and cognitive deficits. So far, this is no cure for AD. A therapeutic effect of transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs into murine model of AD has been reported, but remains to be further improved. Brn-4 is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in neuronal development, whereas the effects of Brn-4 overexpression in transplanted MSCs on AD are unknown. Methods: MSCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow and induced to overexpress antisense of miRNA-937 (as-miR-937 through adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated transduction, and purified by flow cytometry based on expression of a GFP co-transgene in the cells. The Brn-4 levels in mouse MSCs were examined in miR-937-modified MSCs by RT-qPCR and by Western blot. These miR-937-modified MSCs were then transplanted into an APP/PS1 transgenic AD model in mice. The effects of saline control, MSCs and asmiR-937 MSCs on AD mice were examined by deposition of amyloid-beta peptide aggregates (Aβ, social recognition test (SR, Plus-Maze Discriminative Avoidance Task (PM-DAT and the levels of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the mouse brain. Results: MSCs expressed high levels of Brn-4 transcripts but low levels of Brn-4 protein. Poor protein vs mRNA levels of Brn-4 in MSCs appeared to result from the presence of high levels of miR-937 in MSCs. miR-937 inhibited translation of Brn-4 mRNA through binding to the 3'-UTR of the Brn-4 mRNA in MSCs. Expression of as-miR-937 significantly increased Brn-4 protein levels in MSCs. Transplantation of as-miR-937-expressing MSCs significantly reduced the deposition of Aβ, increased the levels of BDNF, and significantly improved the appearance in SR and PM-DAT in AD mice. Conclusion: Overexpression of as-miR-937 in MSCs may substantially improve the

  17. F3-targeted cisplatin-hydrogel nanoparticles as an effective therapeutic that targets both murine and human ovarian tumor endothelial cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Ira; Wang, Shouyan; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Lee, Youg-Eun Koo; Fan, Wenzhe; Gong, Yusong; Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; Spahlinger, Greg; Kopelman, R; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2010-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that ovarian cancer may be highly responsive to antivascular therapeutics. We have developed an antivascular tumor therapeutic using the F3 peptide to target cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles (F3-Cis-Np) to tumor vessels. We show that although F3-Cis-Np bind with high specificity to both human ovarian tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells in vitro, they only show cytotoxic activity against the tumor endothelial cells. In vivo these nanoparticles bind primarily to tumor endothelial cells. Therapeutic studies in both flank and orthotopic i.p. murine ovarian tumor models, as well as human tumor xenograft models, show rapid tumor regression with treatment. Treatment was associated with significant vascular necrosis consistent with an antivascular effect. Furthermore, treatment was active in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant cell lines. Importantly, we show that F3-Cis-Np bind to human tumor endothelial cells in vitro and to human tumor vessels in vivo. Therapy targeting human vasculature in vivo with F3-Cis-Np led to near complete loss of all human tumor vessels in a murine model of human tumor vasculature. Our studies indicate that F3-targeted vascular therapeutics may be an effective treatment modality in human ovarian cancer. ©2010 AACR.

  18. LF-15 & T7, synthetic peptides derived from tumstatin, attenuate aspects of airway remodelling in a murine model of chronic OVA-induced allergic airway disease.

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    Karryn T Grafton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumstatin is a segment of the collagen-IV protein that is markedly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Tumstatin can play an important role in the development of airway remodelling associated with asthma due to its anti-angiogenic properties. This study assessed the anti-angiogenic properties of smaller peptides derived from tumstatin, which contain the interface tumstatin uses to interact with the αVβ3 integrin. METHODS: Primary human lung endothelial cells were exposed to the LF-15, T3 and T7 tumstatin-derived peptides and assessed for cell viability and tube formation in vitro. The impact of the anti-angiogenic properties on airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR was then examined using a murine model of chronic OVA-induced allergic airways disease. RESULTS: The LF-15 and T7 peptides significantly reduced endothelial cell viability and attenuated tube formation in vitro. Mice exposed to OVA+ LF-15 or OVA+T7 also had reduced total lung vascularity and AHR was attenuated compared to mice exposed to OVA alone. T3 peptides reduced cell viability but had no effect on any other parameters. CONCLUSION: The LF-15 and T7 peptides may be appropriate candidates for use as novel pharmacotherapies due to their small size and anti-angiogenic properties observed in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Amelioration of murine passive immune thrombocytopenia by IVIg and a therapeutic monoclonal CD44 antibody does not require the Myd88 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Crow

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP is an autoimmune bleeding disorder characterized by a low platelet count and the production of anti-platelet antibodies. The majority of ITP patients have antibodies to platelet integrin α(IIbβ₃ (GPIIbIIIa which can direct platelet phagocytosis by macrophages. One effective treatment for patients with ITP is intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg which rapidly reverses thrombocytopenia. The exact mechanism of IVIg action in human patients is unclear, although in mouse models of passive ITP, IVIg can rapidly increase platelet counts in the absence of adaptive immunity. Another antibody therapeutic that can similarly increase platelet counts independent of adaptive immunity are CD44 antibodies. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors which play a central role in helping direct the innate immune system. Dendritic cells, which are notable for their expression of TLRs, have been directly implicated in IVIg function as an initiator cell, while CD44 can associate with TLR2 and TLR4. We therefore questioned whether IVIg, or the therapeutic CD44 antibody KM114, mediate their ameliorative effects in a manner dependent upon normal TLR function. Here, we demonstrate that the TLR4 agonist LPS does not inhibit IVIg or KM114 amelioration of antibody-induced thrombocytopenia, and that these therapeutics do not ameliorate LPS-induced thrombocytopenia. IVIg was able to significantly ameliorate murine ITP in C3H/HeJ mice which have defective TLR4. All known murine TLRs except TLR3 utilize the Myd88 adapter protein to drive TLR signaling. Employing Myd88 deficient mice, we found that both IVIg and KM114 ameliorate murine ITP in Myd88 deficient mice to the same extent as normal mice. Thus both IVIg and anti-CD44 antibody can mediate their ameliorative effects in murine passive ITP independent of the Myd88 signaling pathway. These data help shed light on the mechanism of action of IVIg and KM114 in the amelioration of

  20. [Therapeutic effects and related mechanisms of erythropoietin sustained-release gelatin hydrogel microspheres on a murine model of hindlimb ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, J W; Li, L H; Hong, B Z; Xiao, J Q; Wei, D M; Jin, Z

    2016-06-24

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of erythropoietin sustained-release gelatin hydrogel microspheres (EPO-GHM) on a murine model of hindlimb ischemia and related mechanisms. Fifty two ten weeks old male C57BL/6J mice were assigned to 5 groups: sham-operated group (the right femoral artery suture was passed through the right femoral artery but not tied, n=8); saline group (right femoral artery ligation and intramuscular injection of saline at a dose of 4 ml/kg into the right hind limb, n=12); EPO group(right femoral artery ligation and intramuscular injection of EPO at a dose of 5 000 IU/kg into the right hind limb, n=12), empty GHM group (right femoral artery ligation and intramuscular injection of empty GHM at a dose of 4 ml/kg into the right hind limb, n=8); EPO-GHM group(right femoral artery ligation and intramuscular injection of EPO-GHM at a dose of 5 000 IU/kg into the right hind limb, n=12). The blood flow ratio of ischemic limb (right)/nonischemic limb (left) was measured using a laser Doppler perfusion imager. After 8 weeks, immunohistochemical analysis were used to evaluate the vessel density (vessel density of CD31 positive), arteriole density(vessel density of α-smooth muscle actin(α-SMA) positive) and muscle area(HHF35 positive area). The proliferating index of vessels was evaluated by double immunofluorescent labeling to evaluate effect of EPO-GHM on angiogenesis of ischemia limb. Western blot was used to evaluate the protein expression of EPO receptor, protein kinase B(AKT), p-AKT, endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS), p-eNOS and matrix metalloproteinase 2(MMP-2). (1) Eight weeks later, the blood flow ratio of ischemic limb/nonischemic limb was significantly higher in the EPO-GHM group compared with other groups(0.810±0.080, 0.563±0.051, 0.570±0.056 and 0.561±0.052 respectively, all P0.05). (4)The proliferating index of vessels was higher in the EPO-GHM group compared with other groups(P0.05). RESULTS from present study suggest EPO

  1. Allogeneic Compact Bone-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Attenuates the Severity of Idiopathic Pneumonia Syndrome in a Murine Bone Marrow Transplantation Model

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    Shu-kai Qiao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS is a serious and life-threatening lung complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT and currently no effective therapies exist. This study was designed to determine whether transplantation of allogeneic murine compact bone derived- mesenchymal stem cells (CB-MSCs could prevent the development of IPS. Methods: We tested the effects of CB-MSCs transplantation on IPS using an established murine model of C57BL/6 (H-2b→BALB/c (H-2d. Survival rates, body weight change, clinical GVHD scores, lung histological changes were assessed after IPS induction. Mechanistically, concentrations of cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-4 and chemokines (CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF from the recipient mice were measured at different time point post-transplantation. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell (Treg percentage, CCR5, CXCR3 and CCR7 expression on CD3+ T cells, and lung CXCR3, CCR5, CCR7, T-bet and GATA-3 mRNA levels were also evaluated at different time point post-transplantation. Results: Co-transplantation of CB-MSCs significantly attenuated the severity of lung injuries and increased survival rate of mice compared to non-cotransplanted mice. A higher Treg percentage, reduction of TNF-α, IFN-γ, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels, down-regulation of CXCR3 and CCR5, as well as up-regulation of CCR7, were observed in MSCs co-transplantation mice. Also, the prophylactic effect of CB-MSCs was associated with a shift of Th1/Th2 balance toward anti-inflammatory Th2 polarization. Conclusions: Allogeneic CB-MSCs effectively controlled the occurrence of IPS due to its profound immunomodulatory capacity. This may offer a novel prophylactic approach for IPS after allo-HSCT.

  2. Live-Attenuated Bacterial Vectors: Tools for Vaccine and Therapeutic Agent Delivery

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    Ivan Y. C. Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Genetically attenuated microorganisms, including pathogenic and commensal bacteria, can be engineered to carry and deliver heterologous antigens to elicit host immunity against both the vector as well as the pathogen from which the donor gene is derived. These live attenuated bacterial vectors have been given much attention due to their capacity to induce a broad range of immune responses including localized mucosal, as well as systemic humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity. In addition, the unique tumor-homing characteristics of these bacterial vectors has also been exploited for alternative anti-tumor vaccines and therapies. In such approach, tumor-associated antigen, immunostimulatory molecules, anti-tumor drugs, or nucleotides (DNA or RNA are delivered. Different potential vectors are appropriate for specific applications, depending on their pathogenic routes. In this review, we survey and summarize the main features of the different types of live bacterial vectors and discussed the clinical applications in the field of vaccinology. In addition, different approaches for using live attenuated bacterial vectors for anti-cancer therapy is discussed, and some promising pre-clinical and clinical studies in this field are outlined.

  3. Distamycin A Inhibits HMGA1-Binding to the P-Selectin Promoter and Attenuates Lung and Liver Inflammation during Murine Endotoxemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Rebecca M.; Lopez-Guzman, Silvia; Riascos, Dario F.; Macias, Alvaro A.; Layne, Matthew D.; Cheng, Guiying; Harris, Cailin; Chung, Su Wol; Reeves, Raymond; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Perrella, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The architectural transcription factor High Mobility Group-A1 (HMGA1) binds to the minor groove of AT-rich DNA and forms transcription factor complexes (“enhanceosomes”) that upregulate expression of select genes within the inflammatory cascade during critical illness syndromes such as acute lung injury (ALI). AT-rich regions of DNA surround transcription factor binding sites in genes critical for the inflammatory response. Minor groove binding drugs (MGBs), such as Distamycin A (Dist A), interfere with AT-rich region DNA binding in a sequence and conformation-specific manner, and HMGA1 is one of the few transcription factors whose binding is inhibited by MGBs. Objectives To determine whether MGBs exert beneficial effects during endotoxemia through attenuating tissue inflammation via interfering with HMGA1-DNA binding and modulating expression of adhesion molecules. Methodology/Principal Findings Administration of Dist A significantly decreased lung and liver inflammation during murine endotoxemia. In intravital microscopy studies, Dist A attenuated neutrophil-endothelial interactions in vivo following an inflammatory stimulus. Endotoxin induction of P-selectin expression in lung and liver tissue and promoter activity in endothelial cells was significantly reduced by Dist A, while E-selectin induction was not significantly affected. Moreover, Dist A disrupted formation of an inducible complex containing NF-κB that binds an AT-rich region of the P-selectin promoter. Transfection studies demonstrated a critical role for HMGA1 in facilitating cytokine and NF-κB induction of P-selectin promoter activity, and Dist A inhibited binding of HMGA1 to this AT-rich region of the P-selectin promoter in vivo. Conclusions/Significance We describe a novel targeted approach in modulating lung and liver inflammation in vivo during murine endotoxemia through decreasing binding of HMGA1 to a distinct AT-rich region of the P-selectin promoter. These studies highlight

  4. Distamycin A inhibits HMGA1-binding to the P-selectin promoter and attenuates lung and liver inflammation during murine endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Baron

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The architectural transcription factor High Mobility Group-A1 (HMGA1 binds to the minor groove of AT-rich DNA and forms transcription factor complexes ("enhanceosomes" that upregulate expression of select genes within the inflammatory cascade during critical illness syndromes such as acute lung injury (ALI. AT-rich regions of DNA surround transcription factor binding sites in genes critical for the inflammatory response. Minor groove binding drugs (MGBs, such as Distamycin A (Dist A, interfere with AT-rich region DNA binding in a sequence and conformation-specific manner, and HMGA1 is one of the few transcription factors whose binding is inhibited by MGBs.To determine whether MGBs exert beneficial effects during endotoxemia through attenuating tissue inflammation via interfering with HMGA1-DNA binding and modulating expression of adhesion molecules.Administration of Dist A significantly decreased lung and liver inflammation during murine endotoxemia. In intravital microscopy studies, Dist A attenuated neutrophil-endothelial interactions in vivo following an inflammatory stimulus. Endotoxin induction of P-selectin expression in lung and liver tissue and promoter activity in endothelial cells was significantly reduced by Dist A, while E-selectin induction was not significantly affected. Moreover, Dist A disrupted formation of an inducible complex containing NF-kappaB that binds an AT-rich region of the P-selectin promoter. Transfection studies demonstrated a critical role for HMGA1 in facilitating cytokine and NF-kappaB induction of P-selectin promoter activity, and Dist A inhibited binding of HMGA1 to this AT-rich region of the P-selectin promoter in vivo.We describe a novel targeted approach in modulating lung and liver inflammation in vivo during murine endotoxemia through decreasing binding of HMGA1 to a distinct AT-rich region of the P-selectin promoter. These studies highlight the ability of MGBs to function as molecular tools for dissecting

  5. Interactions of silica nanoparticles with therapeutics for oxidative stress attenuation in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Schenk, Desiree; Shi, Riyi; Leary, James F.

    2015-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in many disease pathologies, notably in the central nervous system (CNS). For instance, after initial spinal cord injury, the injury site tends to increase during a secondary chemical injury process based on oxidative stress from necrotic cells and the inflammatory response. Prevention of this secondary chemical injury would represent a major advance in the treatment of people with spinal cord injuries. Few therapeutics are useful in combating such stress in the CNS due to side effects, low efficacy, or half-life. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles show promise for delivering therapeutics based on the formation of a porous network during synthesis. Ideally, they increase the circulation time of loaded therapeutics to increase the half-life while reducing overall concentrations to avoid side effects. The current study explored the use of silica nanoparticles for therapeutic delivery of anti-oxidants, in particular, the neutralization of acrolein which can lead to extensive tissue damage due to its ability to generate more and more copies of itself when it interacts with normal tissue. Both an FDA-approved therapeutic, hydralazine, and natural product, epigallocatechin gallate, were explored as antioxidants for acrolein with nanoparticles for increased efficacy and stability in neuronal cell cultures. Not only were the nanoparticles explored in neuronal cells, but also in a co-cultured in vitro model with microglial cells to study potential immune responses to near-infrared (NIRF)-labeled nanoparticles and uptake. Studies included nanoparticle toxicity, uptake, and therapeutic response using fluorescence-based techniques with both dormant and activated immune microglia co-cultured with neuronal cells.

  6. Attenuation of 7-ketocholesterol-induced overproduction of reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and autophagy by dimethyl fumarate on 158N murine oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, Amira; Nury, Thomas; Karym, El-Mostafa; Vejux, Anne; Sghaier, Randa; Gondcaille, Catherine; Andreoletti, Pierre; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Debbabi, Meryam; Fromont, Agnès; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Moreau, Thibault; Lizard, Gérard

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress are involved in several non demyelinating or demyelinating neurodegenerative diseases. Some of them, including multiple sclerosis (MS), are associated with lipid peroxidation processes leading to increased levels of 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). So, the eventual protective effect of dimethylfumarate (DMF), which is used for the treatment of MS, was evaluated on 7KC-treated oligodendrocytes, which are myelin synthesizing cells. To this end, murine oligodendrocytes 158N were exposed to 7KC (25, 50μM) for 24h without or with DMF (1, 25, 50μM). The biological activities of DMF associated or not with 7KC were evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, crystal violet and MTT tests. The impact on transmembrane mitochondrial potential (ΔYm), O 2 - and H 2 O 2 production, apoptosis and autophagy was measured by microscopical and flow cytometric methods by staining with DiOC 6 (3), dihydroethidine and dihydrorhodamine 123, Hoechst 33342, and by Western blotting with the use of specific antibodies raised against uncleaved and cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and LC3-I/II. DMF attenuates the different effects of 7KC, namely: cell growth inhibition and/or loss of cell adhesion, decrease of ΔΨm, O 2 - and H 2 O 2 overproduction, PARP and caspase-3 cleavage, nuclear condensation and fragmentation, and activation of LC3-I into LC3-II. The ability of DMF to attenuate 7KC-induced reactive oxygen species overproduction, apoptosis, and autophagy on oligodendrocytes reinforces the interest for this molecule for the treatment of MS or other demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic Effects of Korean Red Ginseng Extract in a Murine Model of Atopic Dermatitis: Anti-pruritic and Anti-inflammatory Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2017-04-01

    Korean red ginseng (KRG) and ginsenosides exhibit diverse biological effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic. We aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of KRG in a murine model of atopic dermatitis (AD) is mediated whether by diminishing the pruritus or by suppressing the inflammation. Thirty NC/Nga mice were randomly divided to 5 groups. AD-like skin lesions were induced by percutaneous challenge with 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chrolobenzene (TNCB) on the ears and backs of NC/Nga mice. KRG extract, evening primrose oil, cyclosporine, and phosphate-buffered saline were administered orally by a gastric tube. Each study group was also divided into scratching-permitted and scratching-restricted subgroups to evaluate the impact of scratching behavior on AD. The effects of KRG and the other agents were assessed by measuring the clinical severity score, ear thickness, extent of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), number of scratching movements, total systemic immunoglobulin E (IgE) and interleukin (IL)-31 levels, histologic changes of cutaneous lesions, and mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and IL-31. KRG exerts therapeutic effects against AD by inhibiting the T helper 2 (Th2) mediated inflammation as well as by diminishing the itching sensation. Moreover, restricting scratching behavior suppresses the vicious cycle of itching and scratching, thus reducing clinical and systemic inflammation in our murine model of AD. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  8. Pre-treatment with allopurinol or uricase attenuates barrier dysfunction but not inflammation during murine ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T Kuipers

    Full Text Available Uric acid released from injured tissue is considered a major endogenous danger signal and local instillation of uric acid crystals induces acute lung inflammation via activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI is mediated by the NLRP3 inflammasome and increased uric acid levels in lung lavage fluid are reported. We studied levels in human lung injury and the contribution of uric acid in experimental VILI.Uric acid levels in lung lavage fluid of patients with acute lung injury (ALI were determined. In a different cohort of cardiac surgery patients, uric acid levels were correlated with pulmonary leakage index. In a mouse model of VILI the effect of allopurinol (inhibits uric acid synthesis and uricase (degrades uric acid pre-treatment on neutrophil influx, up-regulation of adhesion molecules, pulmonary and systemic cytokine levels, lung pathology, and regulation of receptors involved in the recognition of uric acid was studied. In addition, total protein and immunoglobulin M in lung lavage fluid and pulmonary wet/dry ratios were measured as markers of alveolar barrier dysfunction.Uric acid levels increased in ALI patients. In cardiac surgery patients, elevated levels correlated significantly with the pulmonary leakage index. Allopurinol or uricase treatment did not reduce ventilator-induced inflammation, IκB-α degradation, or up-regulation of NLRP3, Toll-like receptor 2, and Toll-like receptor 4 gene expression in mice. Alveolar barrier dysfunction was attenuated which was most pronounced in mice pre-treated with allopurinol: both treatment strategies reduced wet/dry ratio, allopurinol also lowered total protein and immunoglobulin M levels.Local uric acid levels increase in patients with ALI. In mice, allopurinol and uricase attenuate ventilator-induced alveolar barrier dysfunction.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy and microSPECT/CT imaging of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome in a C26 murine colon carcinoma solid tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-J.; Chang, C.-H.; Yu, C.-Y.; Chang, T.-J.; Chen, L.-C. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, M.-H. [National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan (China); Lee, T.-W. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Ting Gann [National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: gann.ting@msa.hinet.net

    2010-01-15

    Nanocarriers can selectively target cancer sites and carry payloads, thereby improving diagnostic and therapeutic effectiveness and reducing toxicity. The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of a new co-delivery radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-N,N-bis (2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylethylenediamine (BMEDA)-labeled pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (DXR) ({sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome) in a C26 murine colon carcinoma solid tumor model. To evaluate the targeting and localization of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome in C26 murine tumor-bearing mice, biodistribution, microSPECT/CT imaging and pharmacokinetic studies were performed. The antitumor effect of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome was assessed by tumor growth inhibition, survival ratio and histopathological hematoxylin-eosin staining. The tumor target and localization of the nanoliposome delivery radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome were demonstrated in the biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and in vivo nuclear imaging studies. In the study on therapeutic efficacy, the tumor-bearing mice treated with bimodality radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome showed better mean tumor growth inhibition rate (MGI) and longer median survival time (MGI=0.048; 74 days) than those treated with radiotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-liposome (MGI=0.134; 60 days) and chemotherapeutics of Lipo-Dox (MGI=0.413; 38 days). The synergistic tumor regression effect was observed with the combination index (CI) exceeding 1 (CI=1.145) for co-delivery radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome. Two (25%) of the mice treated with radiochemotherapeutics were completely cured after 120 days. The therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-liposome and the synergistic effect of the combination radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome have been demonstrated in a C26 murine solid tumor animal model, which pointed to the potential benefit and promise of the co-delivery of

  10. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor signaling significantly attenuates growth of murine pancreatic carcinoma grafts in syngeneic mice

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    Troyer Deryl

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with a very poor prognosis. To evaluate the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2 expression in the host's body on the growth of pancreatic carcinoma, we have investigated the growth of mouse pancreatic ductal carcinoma grafts in syngeneic wild type and AT2 receptor-deficient (AT2-KO mice. Methods The role of AT2 receptor-signaling in stromal cells on the growth of murine pancreatic carcinoma cells (PAN02 was studied using various in vitro and in vivo assays. In vivo cell proliferation, apoptosis, and vasculature in tumors were monitored by Ki-67 immunostaining, TUNEL assay, and von Willebrand factor immunostaining, respectively. In the co-culture study, cell proliferation was measured by MTT cell viability assay. All the data were analyzed using t-test and data were treated as significant when p Results Our results show that the growth of subcutaneously transplanted syngeneic xenografts of PAN02 cells, mouse pancreatic ductal carcinoma cells derived from the C57/BL6 strain, was significantly faster in AT2-KO mice compared to control wild type mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue revealed significantly more Ki-67 positive cells in xenografts grown in AT2-KO mice than in wild type mice. The index of apoptosis is slightly higher in wild type mice than in AT2-KO mice as evaluated by TUNEL assay. Tumor vasculature number was significantly higher in AT2-KO mice than in wild type mice. In vitro co-culture studies revealed that the growth of PAN02 cells was significantly decreased when grown with AT2 receptor gene transfected wild type and AT2-KO mouse-derived fibroblasts. Faster tumor growth in AT2-KO mice may be associated with higher VEGF production in stromal cells. Conclusions These results suggest that Ang II regulates the growth of pancreatic carcinoma cells through modulating functions of host stromal cells; Moreover, Ang II AT2

  11. MSC-derived Extracellular Vesicles Attenuate Immune Responses in Two Autoimmune Murine Models: Type 1 Diabetes and Uveoretinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemoto-Kuroda, Taeko; Oh, Joo Youn; Kim, Dong-Ki; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Park, Se Yeon; Lee, Hyun Ju; Park, Jong Woo; Kim, Tae Wan; An, Su Yeon; Prockop, Darwin J; Lee, Ryang Hwa

    2017-05-09

    Accumulating evidence shows that extracellular vesicles (EVs) produced by mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) exert their therapeutic effects in several disease models. We previously demonstrated that MSCs suppress autoimmunity in models of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Therefore, here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of MSC-derived EVs using our established mouse models for autoimmune diseases affecting the pancreas and the eye: T1D and EAU. The data demonstrate that MSC-derived EVs effectively prevent the onset of disease in both T1D and EAU. In addition, the mixed lymphocyte reaction assay with MSC-derived EVs indicated that EVs inhibit activation of antigen-presenting cells and suppress development of T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells. These results raise the possibility that MSC-derived EVs may be an alternative to cell therapy for autoimmune disease prevention. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. RGD Peptide Cell-Surface Display Enhances the Targeting and Therapeutic Efficacy of Attenuated Salmonella-mediated Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Hwan; Zheng, Jin Hai; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Szardenings, Michael; Min, Jung Hyun; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based anticancer therapies aim to overcome the limitations of current cancer therapy by actively targeting and efficiently removing cancer. To achieve this goal, new approaches that target and maintain bacterial drugs at sufficient concentrations during the therapeutic window are essential. Here, we examined the tumor tropism of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium displaying the RGD peptide sequence (ACDCRGDCFCG) on the external loop of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). RGD-displaying Salmonella strongly bound to cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3, but weakly bound to αvβ3-negative cancer cells, suggesting the feasibility of displaying a preferential homing peptide on the bacterial surface. In vivo studies revealed that RGD-displaying Salmonellae showed strong targeting efficiency, resulting in the regression in αvβ3-overexpressing cancer xenografts, and prolonged survival of mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and human melanoma (MDA-MB-435). Thus, surface engineering of Salmonellae to display RGD peptides increases both their targeting efficiency and therapeutic effect.

  13. Taheebo Polyphenols Attenuate Free Fatty Acid-Induced Inflammation in Murine and Human Macrophage Cell Lines As Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase-2

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    Sihui Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of studyTaheebo polyphenols (TP are water extracts of Tabebuia spp. (Bignoniaceae, taken from the inner bark of the Tabebuia avellanedae tree, used extensively as folk medicine in Central and South America. Some anti-inflammatory drugs act by inhibiting both cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and COX-1 enzymes. COX-2 syntheses prostaglandin (PG E2, which is a species of endogenous pain-producing substance, whereas COX-1 acts as a house-keeping enzyme. Inhibiting both COX-1 and -2 simultaneously can have side effects such as gastrointestinal bleeding and renal dysfunction. Some polyphenols have been reported for its selective inhibiting activity toward COX-2 expression. Our study aimed to demonstrate the potential and mechanisms of TP as an anti-inflammation action without the side effects of COX-1 inhibition.Materials and methodsFree fatty acid-stimulated macrophage cell lines were employed to mimic macrophage behaviors during lifestyle-related diseases such as atherosclerosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to detect expression of inflammatory cytokine mRNA. Griess assay was used to measure the production of nitric oxide (NO. ELISA was used to measure PG E2 production. Molecular docking was adopted to analyze the interactions between compounds from T. avellanedae and COX-2.ResultsTP significantly suppressed the production of NO production, blocked the mRNA expression of iNOS, and COX-2 in both cell lines, blocked the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and PGE2 in the murine cell line. However, there was no inhibitory effect on COX-1. Molecular docking result indicated that the inhibitory effects of TP on COX-2 and PGE2 could be attributed to acteoside, which is the main compound of TP that could bind to the catalytic zone of COX-2. After the interaction, catalytic ability of COX-2 is possibly inhibited, followed by which PGE2 production is attenuated. COX inhibitor screening assay showed TP as a

  14. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

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    Jeong, Young-Il [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyun [Div. of AIDS, National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min [Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yang-San (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Eun, E-mail: ondalgl@cdc.go.kr [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  15. Donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response in murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 through inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Mikihiko; Kakinuma, Yoshihiko; Noguchi, Tatsuya; Todaka, Hiroshi; Sato, Takayuki

    2016-10-15

    We have previously demonstrated that the pharmacotherapy with donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, suppresses cardiac remodeling in a mouse model of ischemic heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the precise mechanisms of the cardioprotective effect of donepezil have not been completely delineated. Because post-ischemic inflammation is a pathological key event in the cardiac remodeling process following MI, we investigated the hypothesis that donepezil acts as an inhibitor of inflammatory mediators. RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells were pretreated with donepezil (100µM) prior to a pro-inflammatory stimulation by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10ng/ml). Donepezil significantly reduced intra- and extracellular levels of various kinds of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-18 after the LPS stimulation, and attenuated LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). These results indicate that donepezil possesses an anti-inflammatory property. However, the inhibitory effect of donepezil on the macrophage inflammatory responses was never reproduced by ACh, nor was disrupted by ACh receptor blockers. Moreover, other kinds of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors failed to inhibit the inflammatory responses in LPS-stimulated macrophage cells. These results suggest that a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway would not be involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of donepezil and that the specific characteristics of donepezil in suppressing the LPS-induced cytokine release and the NF-κB activation would be independent of its acetylcholinesterase inhibition. The present study showed that donepezil exerts an anti-inflammatory effect independently of acetylcholinesterase inhibitory action, thereby donepezil may contribute to cardioprotection during cardiac remodeling process in an ischemic heart failure after MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound and Microbubble Mediated Doxil Delivery in a Murine Breast Cancer Model: Therapeutic Efficacy Dependence on Tumor Growth Rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seip, R.; Leyvi, E.; Raju, B.I.; Shi, W.T.; Bohmer, M.R.; Chlon, C.H.T.; Sio, C.F.; Reibling, K.; Swanson, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background, Motivation and Objective: Localized drug delivery couldimprove the therapeutic efficacy for treatment of pathological lesions and reduce toxic exposure to healthy organs and tissues. The objective is to develop image-guided, ultrasound-activated tumor chemotherapy with intravenously

  17. Therapeutic attenuation of neuroinflammation and apoptosis by black tea theaflavin in chronic MPTP/probenecid model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan

    2013-02-01

    Neuroinflammation and apoptosis in the dopaminergic neurons of substantia nigra play an important role in the pathogenesis of experimental and clinical Parkinson's disease (PD). This study focused on the possible anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of theaflavin (TF), a black tea polyphenol against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced neurotoxicity in mice. C57BL/6 male mice were treated with 10 doses of MPTP (25 mg/kg, s.c.) and probenecid (250 mg/kg, i.p.) for 3.5 days interval. TF (10 mg/kg) was administered 1 h prior to the administration of MPTP for 35 days of experimental period. MPTP/p treatment upregulates the release of interleukin-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-10, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Bax, and downregulates anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2. Oral treatment of black tea polyphenol TF significantly attenuates MPTP-induced neuroinflammation as well as apoptosis. Behavioral studies (catalepsy and akinesia) were carried out to confirm these molecular studies. The results demonstrate that TF mediated its neuroprotection against chronic MPTP-induced toxicity through the involvement of multiple molecular events. It was concluded that TF may provide a precious therapeutic strategy for the treatment of progressive neurodegenerative disease such as PD in future.

  18. TLR-7 agonist attenuates airway reactivity and inflammation through Nrf2-mediated antioxidant protection in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Siddiqui, Nahid; Al-Harbi, Naif O; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) through innate immune system recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns and play an important role in host defense against bacteria, fungi and viruses. TLR-7 is responsible for sensing single stranded nucleic acids of viruses but its activation has been shown to be protective in mouse models of asthma. The NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes family mainly produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the lung and is involved in regulation of airway inflammation in response to TLRs activation. However, NOX-4 mediated signaling in response to TLR-7 activation in a mouse model of allergic asthma has not been explored previously. Therefore, this study investigated the role TLR-7 activation and downstream oxidant-antioxidant signaling in a murine model of asthma. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) intraperitoneally and treated with TLR-7 agonist, resiquimod (RSQ) intranasally before each OVA challenge from days 14 to 16. Mice were then assessed for airway reactivity, inflammation, and NOX-4 and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) related signaling [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD)]. Treatment with RSQ reduced allergen induced airway reactivity and inflammation. This was paralleled by a decrease in ROS which was due to induction of Nrf2 and Cu/Zn SOD in RSQ treated group. Inhibition of MyD88 reversed RSQ-mediated protective effects on airway reactivity/inflammation due to reduction in Nrf2 signaling. SOD inhibition produced effects similar to MyD88 inhibition. The current study suggests that TLR-7 agonist is beneficial and may be developed into a therapeutic option in allergic asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  20. Thymidine phosphorylase is both a therapeutic and a suicide gene in a murine model of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Estévez, S; Ferrer, G; Torres-Torronteras, J; Mansilla, M J; Casacuberta-Serra, S; Martorell, L; Hirano, M; Martí, R; Barquinero, J

    2014-07-01

    Suicide gene therapy (SGT) is a promising strategy for treating cancer. In this work, we show that thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficiency, the underlying genetic defect in mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), presents an opportunity to apply SGT using capecitabine, a commonly used prodrug that is converted into 5-fluorouracil by TP. Using an immortalised B-lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with MNGIE, the tumourigenic EL-4 cell line, lentiviral vectors encoding TP and a double knockout (Tymp(-/-)Upp1(-/-)) murine model, we found that EL-4 cell-derived TP(+) tumours were exquisitely sensitive to capecitabine and generated a significant local bystander effect. In addition, we detected a spontaneous cytolytic immune response in a significant fraction of the animals surviving more than 20 days after termination of the therapy. These data indicate that, in individuals lacking TP expression, TP is a highly specific suicide gene, which can be used to treat tumours that could hypothetically arise in MNGIE patients undergoing gene therapy, as these tumours will likely originate from the gene-modified cells and will be selectively targeted by capecitabine. These observations have important implications for gene therapy for MNGIE.

  1. Therapeutic effect of anti-αv integrin mAb on Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiki, Hiroki; Kaneyama, Tomoki; Kobayashi, Kunitoshi; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2014-03-15

    We examined the regulatory role of αv integrins in the development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD), a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Blockade of αv integrins by anti-αv integrin monoclonal antibody (mAb) in the effector phase significantly suppressed the development of TMEV-IDD both clinically and histologically. The number of infiltrating mononuclear cells (MNCs) in the CNS was significantly decreased in mice treated with anti-αv integrin mAb. Flow cytometric analysis of cytokine staining revealed that absolute numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing CD4+ and IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells were significantly decreased in the CNS of mice treated with anti-αv integrin mAb. These data suggest that αv integrins may play important roles in the development of TMEV-IDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Argan Oil-Mediated Attenuation of Organelle Dysfunction, Oxidative Stress and Cell Death Induced by 7-Ketocholesterol in Murine Oligodendrocytes 158N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Badreddine

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Argan oil is widely used in Morocco in traditional medicine. Its ability to treat cardiovascular diseases is well-established. However, nothing is known about its effects on neurodegenerative diseases, which are often associated with increased oxidative stress leading to lipid peroxidation and the formation of 7-ketocholesterol (7KC resulting from cholesterol auto-oxidation. As 7KC induces oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death, it is important to identify compounds able to impair its harmful effects. These compounds may be either natural or synthetic molecules or mixtures of molecules such as oils. In this context: (i the lipid profiles of dietary argan oils from Berkane and Agadir (Morocco in fatty acids, phytosterols, tocopherols and polyphenols were determined by different chromatographic techniques; and (ii their anti-oxidant and cytoprotective effects in 158N murine oligodendrocytes cultured with 7KC (25–50 µM; 24 h without and with argan oil (0.1% v/v or α-tocopherol (400 µM, positive control were evaluated with complementary techniques of cellular and molecular biology. Among the unsaturated fatty acids present in argan oils, oleate (C18:1 n-9 and linoleate (C18:1 n-6 were the most abundant; the highest quantities of saturated fatty acids were palmitate (C16:0 and stearate (C18:0. Several phytosterols were found, mainly schottenol and spinasterol (specific to argan oil, cycloartenol, β-amyrin and citrostadienol. α- and γ-tocopherols were also present. Tyrosol and protocatechic acid were the only polyphenols detected. Argan and extra virgin olive oils have many compounds in common, principally oleate and linoleate, and tocopherols. Kit Radicaux Libres (KRL and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP tests showed that argan and extra virgin olive oils have anti-oxidant properties. Argan oils were able to attenuate the cytotoxic effects of 7KC on 158N cells: loss of cell adhesion, cell growth inhibition, increased plasma

  3. Aerosol exposure to Rift Valley fever virus causes earlier and more severe neuropathology in the murine model, which has important implications for therapeutic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Reed

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an important mosquito-borne veterinary and human pathogen that can cause severe disease including acute-onset hepatitis, delayed-onset encephalitis, retinitis and blindness, or a hemorrhagic syndrome. Currently, no licensed vaccine or therapeutics exist to treat this potentially deadly disease. Detailed studies describing the pathogenesis of RVFV following aerosol exposure have not been completed and candidate therapeutics have not been evaluated following an aerosol exposure. These studies are important because while mosquito transmission is the primary means for human infection, it can also be transmitted by aerosol or through mucosal contact. Therefore, we directly compared the pathogenesis of RVFV following aerosol exposure to a subcutaneous (SC exposure in the murine model by analyzing survival, clinical observations, blood chemistry, hematology, immunohistochemistry, and virus titration of tissues. Additionally, we evaluated the effectiveness of the nucleoside analog ribavirin administered prophylactically to treat mice exposed by aerosol and SC. The route of exposure did not significantly affect the survival, chemistry or hematology results of the mice. Acute hepatitis occurred despite the route of exposure. However, the development of neuropathology occurred much earlier and was more severe in mice exposed by aerosol compared to SC exposed mice. Mice treated with ribavirin and exposed SC were partially protected, whereas treated mice exposed by aerosol were not protected. Early and aggressive viral invasion of brain tissues following aerosol exposure likely played an important role in ribavirin's failure to prevent mortality among these animals. Our results highlight the need for more candidate antivirals to treat RVFV infection, especially in the case of a potential aerosol exposure. Additionally, our study provides an account of the key pathogenetic differences in RVF disease following two potential

  4. Benzimidazoles Promote Anti-TNF Mediated Induction of Regulatory Macrophages and Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenberg, Manon E; Levin, Alon D; Ceroni, Alessandro; Guo, Zhen; Koelink, Pim J; Hakvoort, Theodorus B M; Westera, Liset; Bloemendaal, Felicia M; Brandse, Johannan F; Simmons, Alison; D'Haens, Geert R; Ebner, Daniel; van den Brink, Gijs R

    2017-12-04

    Regulatory macrophages play a critical role in tissue repair, and we have previously shown that anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] antibodies induce these macrophages in vitro and in vivo in IBD patients. The induction of regulatory macrophages can be potentiated using the combination of anti-TNF and thiopurines, consistent with the enhanced efficacy of this combination therapy described in clinical trials. As thiopurines are unfortunately associated with significant side effects, we here aimed to identify alternatives for combination therapy with anti-TNF, using the macrophage induction model as a screening tool. Mixed lymphocyte reactions were treated with anti-TNF and a library of 1600 drug compounds. Induction of CD14+CD206+ macrophages was analysed by flow cytometry. Positive hits were validated in vitro and in the T cell transfer model of colitis. Among the 98 compounds potentiating the induction of regulatory macrophages by anti-TNF were six benzimidazoles, including albendazole. Albendazole treatment in the presence of anti-TNF resulted in alterations in the tubulin skeleton and signalling though AMPK, which was required for the enhanced induction. Combination therapy also increased expression levels of the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10. In vivo, albendazole plus anti-TNF combination therapy was superior to monotherapy in a model of colitis, in terms of both induction of regulatory macrophages and improvement of clinical symptoms. Albendazole enhances the induction of regulatory macrophages by anti-TNF and potentiates clinical efficacy in murine colitis. Given its favourable safety profile, these data indicate that the repurposing of albendazole may be a novel option for anti-TNF combination therapy in IBD.

  5. A novel nanoparticulate formulation of arsenic trioxide with enhanced therapeutic efficacy in a murine model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Richard W; Chen, Feng; Chen, Haimei; Stern, Stephan T; Clogston, Jeffrey D; Patri, Anil K; Raja, Meera R; Swindell, Elden P; Parimi, Vamsi; Cryns, Vincent L; O'Halloran, Thomas V

    2010-07-15

    The clinical success of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) in hematologic malignancies has not been replicated in solid tumors due to poor pharmacokinetics and dose-limiting toxicity. We have developed a novel nanoparticulate formulation of As(2)O(3) encapsulated in liposomal vesicles or "nanobins" [(NB(Ni,As)] to overcome these hurdles. We postulated that nanobin encapsulation of As(2)O(3) would improve its therapeutic index against clinically aggressive solid tumors, such as triple-negative breast carcinomas. The cytotoxicity of NB(Ni,As), the empty nanobin, and free As(2)O(3) was evaluated against a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. The plasma pharmacokinetics of NB(Ni,As) and free As(2)O(3) were compared in rats to measure drug exposure. In addition, the antitumor activity of these agents was evaluated in an orthotopic model of human triple-negative breast cancer. The NB(Ni,As) agent was much less cytotoxic in vitro than free As(2)O(3) against a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. In contrast, NB(Ni,As) dramatically potentiated the therapeutic efficacy of As(2)O(3) in vivo in an orthotopic model of triple-negative breast cancer. Reduced plasma clearance, enhanced tumor uptake, and induction of tumor cell apoptosis were observed for NB(Ni,As). Nanobin encapsulation of As(2)O(3) improves the pharmacokinetics and antitumor efficacy of this cytotoxic agent in vivo. Our findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of this nanoscale agent and provide a foundation for future clinical studies in breast cancer and other solid tumors. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  6. Genetically engineered murine models--contribution to our understanding of the genetics, molecular pathology and therapeutic targeting of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Louis; Weiss, William A

    2011-10-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) have made major contributions to a molecular understanding of several adult cancers and these results are increasingly being translated into the pre-clinical setting where GEMM will very likely make a major impact on the development of targeted therapeutics in the near future. The relationship of pediatric cancers to altered developmental programs, and their genetic simplicity relative to adult cancers provides unique opportunities for the application of new advances in GEMM technology. In neuroblastoma the well-characterized TH-MYCN GEMM is increasingly used for a variety of molecular-genetic, developmental and pre-clinical therapeutics applications. We discuss: the present and historical application of GEMM to neuroblastoma research, future opportunities, and relevant targets suitable for new GEMM strategies in neuroblastoma. We review the potential of these models to contribute both to an understanding of the developmental nature of neuroblastoma and to improved therapy for this disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic silencing of HPV 16 E7 by systemic administration of siRNA-neutral DOPC nanoliposome in a murine cervical cancer model with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapoy-Villanueva, Hector; Martinez-Carlin, Ivonne; Lopez-Berestein, G; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a neutral DOPC nanoliposome system for the delivery of siRNA to tumor cells in an obese murine cervical cancer model. In vitro silencing of E6-E7 mRNA and E7 protein using siRNAE6 or siRNAE7 was analyzed in TC-1 cells by RT-PCR and Western blot. Silencing and antitumor capacities of siRNAE7-DOPC-nanoparticles (NP) were tested in vivo in both normal and obese mice using qPCR. These NPs were administered twice a week for 15 days and tumor volume and weight were recorded. Levels of in vitro E6-E7 silencing were 90% for mRNA and 60% for protein when siRNAE7 was used. On the other hand when siRNAE6 was used, the levels of silencing were 50% for E6-E7 mRNA and only 20% for protein. In vivo E7 mRNA silencing by siRNAE7-DOPC-NP was similar (60%) in both non-obese and obese mouse models. The therapeutic study showed a 65% decrease in tumor volume and a 57% reduction in tumor weight as compared to the control groups. There was no negative impact of obesity on the antitumor activity of siRNA-DOPC-NP in obese mice.

  8. Therapeutic benefit derived from RNAi-mediated ablation of IMPDH1 transcripts in a murine model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Lawrence C S; Kiang, Anna-Sophia; Kennan, Avril; Kenna, Paul F; Chadderton, Naomi; Ader, Marius; Palfi, Arpad; Aherne, Aileen; Ayuso, Carmen; Campbell, Matthew; Reynolds, Alison; McKee, Alex; Humphries, Marian M; Farrar, G Jane; Humphries, Pete

    2008-07-15

    Mutations within the inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase 1 (IMPDH1) gene cause the RP10 form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), an early-onset retinopathy resulting in extensive visual handicap owing to progressive death of photoreceptors. Apart from the prevalence of RP10, estimated to account for 5-10% of cases of adRP in United States and Europe, two observations render this form of RP an attractive target for gene therapy. First, we show that while recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated expression of mutant human IMPDH1 protein in the mouse retina results in an aggressive retinopathy modelling the human counterpart, expression of a normal human IMPDH1 gene under similar conditions has no observable pathological effect on retinal function, indicating that over-expression of a therapeutic replacement gene may be relatively well tolerated. Secondly, complete absence of IMPDH1 protein in mice with a targeted disruption of the gene results in relatively mild retinal dysfunction, suggesting that significant therapeutic benefit may be derived even from the suppression-only component of an RNAi-based gene therapy. We show that AAV-mediated co-expression in the murine retina of a mutant human IMPDH1 gene together with short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) validated in vitro and in vivo, targeting both human and mouse IMPDH1, substantially suppresses the negative pathological effects of mutant IMPDH1, at a point where, in the absence of shRNA, expression of mutant protein in the RP10 model essentially ablates all photoreceptors in transfected areas of the retina. These data strongly suggest that an RNAi-mediated approach to therapy for RP10 holds considerable promise for human subjects.

  9. Regulatory T Cell Induced by Poria cocos Bark Exert Therapeutic Effects in Murine Models of Atopic Dermatitis and Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Min-Jung; See, Hye-Jeong; Choi, Gyeyoung; Kang, Chang-Yuil; Shon, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Hee Soon

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis (AD) and food allergy (FA) has increased dramatically in pediatric populations, but there is no effective drug available for their management. Therefore, trials are required for the development of safe therapeutic agents such as herbal medicines. We determined whether orally administered Poria cocos bark (PCB) extract could exert immunosuppressive effects on allergic and inflammatory symptoms of AD and FA. For both AD, which was induced using house dust mite extract, and FA, which was induced by exposure to ovalbumin, model mice were orally treated with PCB extract for 62 days and 18 days, respectively. We also investigated the inductive effect of PCB extract on the generation and maintenance of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). The symptoms of AD and FA were ameliorated by the administration of PCB extract. Furthermore, PCB extract inhibited the Th2-related cytokines and increased the population of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) Tregs in both AD and FA models. In ex vivo experiments, PCB extract promoted the functional differentiation of Foxp3(+)CD4(+) Tregs, which is dependent on aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation. Thus, PCB extract has potential as an oral immune suppressor for the treatment of AD and FA through the generation of Tregs.

  10. Regulatory T Cell Induced by Poria cocos Bark Exert Therapeutic Effects in Murine Models of Atopic Dermatitis and Food Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Jung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis (AD and food allergy (FA has increased dramatically in pediatric populations, but there is no effective drug available for their management. Therefore, trials are required for the development of safe therapeutic agents such as herbal medicines. We determined whether orally administered Poria cocos bark (PCB extract could exert immunosuppressive effects on allergic and inflammatory symptoms of AD and FA. For both AD, which was induced using house dust mite extract, and FA, which was induced by exposure to ovalbumin, model mice were orally treated with PCB extract for 62 days and 18 days, respectively. We also investigated the inductive effect of PCB extract on the generation and maintenance of Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs. The symptoms of AD and FA were ameliorated by the administration of PCB extract. Furthermore, PCB extract inhibited the Th2-related cytokines and increased the population of Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs in both AD and FA models. In ex vivo experiments, PCB extract promoted the functional differentiation of Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs, which is dependent on aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation. Thus, PCB extract has potential as an oral immune suppressor for the treatment of AD and FA through the generation of Tregs.

  11. mRNA and microRNA transcriptomics analyses in a murine model of dystrophin loss and therapeutic restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Roberts

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a pediatric, X-linked, progressive muscle-wasting disorder caused by loss of function mutations affecting the gene encoding the dystrophin protein. While the primary genetic insult in DMD is well described, many details of the molecular and cellular pathologies that follow dystrophin loss are incompletely understood. To investigate gene expression in dystrophic muscle we have applied mRNA and microRNA (miRNA microarray technology to the mdx mouse model of DMD. This study was designed to generate a complete description of gene expression changes associated with dystrophic pathology and the response to an experimental therapy which restores dystrophin protein function. These datasets have enabled (1 the determination of gene expression changes associated with dystrophic pathology, (2 identification of differentially expressed genes that are restored towards wild-type levels after therapeutic dystrophin rescue, (3 investigation of the correlation between mRNA and protein expression (determined by parallel mass spectrometry proteomics analysis, and (4 prediction of pathology associated miRNA-target interactions. Here we describe in detail how the data were generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in Human Molecular Genetics with PMID 26385637. The data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE64420.

  12. Functional analysis of the murine cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor homologue M33: ablation of constitutive signaling is associated with an attenuated phenotype in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, Ruth; Sharp, Emma; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2007-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) M33 gene is conserved among all betaherpesviruses and encodes a homologue of seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMR) with the capacity for constitutive signaling. Previous studies have demonstrated that M33 is important for MCMV dissemination to or replication within...

  13. [Therapeutic effects of histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat on air inflammation and high airway resistance in a murine asthma model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, X M; Ren, Y; Kong, L F; Kang, J

    2017-02-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effects of givinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), on the development of chronic asthma with airway inflammation, airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Methods: BALB/C mice were randomly divided into control group, asthma group, dexamethasone group and givinostat group (n=12 per group). AHR was assessed. Total cell numbers and differential counts, interleukin-4(IL-4), interleukin-5(IL-5) and interferon-γ (IFNγ) levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured in the above 4 groups. The pathology of lung tissue was evaluated. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and Western blot were used to detect α smooth muscle actin(α-SMA) and transforming growth factor-β1(TGFβ1). Results: Compared with the asthma only group, givinostat treatment relieved airway resistance (2.96±1.01 vs 6.50±0.79, P0.05] was enhanced in BALF. Inflammatory cell infiltration around the airway was reduced, with decreased inflammatory cell score[(1.60±0.69)points vs (3.40±0.68) points, P<0.01] and inflammatory cell number (111.65±31.41 vs 601.25±186.85, P<0.01). The goblet cell metaplasia [(26.36±2.33)% vs (57.21±11.56)%] and collagen deposition area [(52.77±7.58)μm(2)/μm vs (111.81±12.40)μm(2)/μm] were obviously reduced (P<0.01). The expressions of α-SMA and TGFβ1 in the lung tissue were both significantly decreased (P<0.01). Conclusion: Givinostat treatment can reduce airway inflammation, airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness in chronic asthma. Its effect is comparable to that of glucocorticoid hormone treatment.

  14. 4-1BB Aptamer-Based Immunomodulation Enhances the Therapeutic Index of Radiation Therapy in Murine Tumor Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaduce, Ana Paula; Brenneman, Randall; Schrand, Brett; Pollack, Alan; Gilboa, Eli; Ishkanian, Adrian, E-mail: aishkanian@med.miami.edu

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To report a novel strategy using oligonucleotide aptamers to 4-1BB as an alternate method for costimulation, and show that combinatorial therapy with radiation improves the therapeutic ratio over equivalent monoclonal antibodies. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous 4T1 (mouse mammary carcinoma) tumors were established (approximately 100 mm{sup 3}), and a radiation therapy (RT) dose/fractionation schedule that optimally synergizes with 4-1BB monoclonal antibody (mAb) was identified. Comparable tumor control and animal survival was observed when either 4-1BB antibody or aptamer were combined with RT using models of breast cancer and melanoma (4T1 and B16-F10). Off-target CD8{sup +} T-cell toxicity was evaluated by quantification of CD8{sup +} T cells in livers and spleens of treated animals. Results: When combined with 4-1BB mAb, significant differences in tumor control were observed by varying RT dose and fractionation schedules. Optimal synergy between RT and 4-1BB mAb was observed at 5 Gy × 6. Testing 4-1BB mAb and aptamer independently using the optimal RT (5 Gy × 6 for 4T1/Balb/c and 12 Gy × 1 for B16/C57BL6J mouse models) revealed equivalent tumor control using 4-1BB aptamer and 4-1BB mAb. 4-1BB mAb, but not 4-1BB aptamer-treated animals, exhibited increased lymphocytic liver infiltrates and increased splenic and liver CD8{sup +} T cells. Conclusions: Radiation therapy synergizes with 4-1BB mAb, and this effect is dependent on RT dose and fractionation. Tumor control by 4-1BB aptamer is equivalent to 4-1BB mAb when combined with optimal RT dose, without eliciting off-target liver and spleen CD8{sup +} expansion. 4-1BB aptamer-based costimulation affords a comparable and less toxic strategy to augment RT-mediated tumor control.

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Shark Anti-ICOSL VNAR Domains is Exemplified in a Murine Model of Autoimmune Non-Infectious Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kovaleva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Induced costimulatory ligand (ICOSL plays an important role in the activation of T cells through its interaction with the inducible costimulator, ICOS. Suppression of full T cell activation can be achieved by blocking this interaction and has been shown to be an effective means of ameliorating disease in models of autoimmunity and inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of a novel class of anti-ICOSL antigen-binding single domains derived from sharks (VNARs to effectively reduce inflammation in a murine model of non-infectious uveitis. In initial selections, specific VNARs that recognized human ICOSL were isolated from an immunized nurse shark phage display library and lead domains were identified following their performance in a series of antigen selectivity and in vitro bioassay screens. High potency in cell-based blocking assays suggested their potential as novel binders suitable for further therapeutic development. To test this hypothesis, surrogate anti-mouse ICOSL VNAR domains were isolated from the same phage display library and the lead VNAR clone selected via screening in binding and ICOS/ICOSL blocking experiments. The VNAR domain with the highest potency in cell-based blocking of ICOS/ICOSL interaction was fused to the Fc portion of human IgG1 and was tested in vivo in a mouse model of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein-induced uveitis. The anti-mICOSL VNAR Fc, injected systemically, resulted in a marked reduction of inflammation in treated mice when compared with untreated control animals. This approach inhibited disease progression to an equivalent extent to that seen for the positive corticosteroid control, cyclosporin A, reducing both clinical and histopathological scores. These results represent the first demonstration of efficacy of a VNAR binding domain in a relevant clinical model of disease and highlight the potential of VNARs for the treatment of auto-inflammatory conditions.

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of Cintredekin Besudotox (IL13-PE38QQR in murine lung fibrosis is unaffected by immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério S Rosada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously explored a therapeutic strategy for specifically targeting the profibrotic activity of IL-13 during experimental pulmonary fibrosis using a fusion protein comprised of human IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (IL13-PE and observed that the intranasal delivery of IL13-PE reduced bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis through its elimination of IL-13-responsive cells in the lung. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the presence of an immune response to P. aeruginosa and/or its exotoxin A (PE would diminish the anti-fibrotic properties of IL13-PE.Fourteen days after P. aeruginosa infection, C57BL/6 mice were injected with bleomycin via the intratracheal route. Other groups of mice received 4 doses of saline or IL13-PE by either intranasal or intraperitoneal application, and were challenged i.t. with bleomycin 28 days later. At day 21 after bleomycin, all mice received either saline vehicle or IL13-PE by the intranasal route and histopatological analyses of whole lung samples were performed at day 28 after bleomycin. Intrapulmonary P. aeruginosa infection promoted a neutralizing IgG2A and IgA antibody response in BALF and serum. Surprisingly, histological analysis showed that a prior P. aeruginosa infection attenuated the development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, which was modestly further attenuated by the intranasal administration of IL13-PE. Although prior intranasal administration of IL13-PE failed to elicit an antibody response, the systemic administration of IL13-PE induced a strong neutralizing antibody response. However, the prior systemic sensitization of mice with IL13-PE did not inhibit the anti-fibrotic effect of IL13-PE in fibrotic mice.Thus, IL13-PE therapy in pulmonary fibrosis works regardless of the presence of a humoral immune response to Pseudomonas exotoxin A. Interestingly, a prior infection with P. aeruginosa markedly attenuated the pulmonary fibrotic

  17. Blockade of CTLA-4 promotes the development of effector CD8+ T lymphocytes and the therapeutic effect of vaccination with an attenuated protozoan expressing NY-ESO-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Luara Isabela; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; de Faria, Paula Cristina; Junqueira, Caroline; Dutra, Miriam Santos; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Ritter, Gerd; Bannard, Oliver; Fearon, Douglas Thomas; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes

    2015-03-01

    The development of cancer immunotherapy has long been a challenge. Here, we report that prophylactic vaccination with a highly attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi strain expressing NY-ESO-1 (CL-14-NY-ESO-1) induces both effector memory and effector CD8(+) T lymphocytes that efficiently prevent tumor development. However, the therapeutic effect of such a vaccine is limited. We also demonstrate that blockade of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA-4) during vaccination enhances the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific effector CD8(+) T cells producing IFN-γ and promotes lymphocyte migration to the tumor infiltrate. As a result, therapy with CL-14-NY-ESO-1 together with anti-CTLA-4 is highly effective in controlling the development of an established melanoma.

  18. Investigation of molecular mechanism of recognition between citral and MARK4: A newer therapeutic approach to attenuate cancer cell progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Farha; Khan, Faez Iqbal; Mohammad, Taj; Khan, Parvez; Manzoor, Saaliqa; Hasan, Gulam Mustafa; Lobb, Kevin A; Luqman, Suaib; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2018-02-01

    Microtubule affinity regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) is a member of AMP-activated protein kinase, found to be involved in apoptosis, inflammation and many other regulatory pathways. Since, its aberrant expression is directly associated with the cell cycle and thus cancer. Therefore, MARK4 is being considered as a potential drug target for cancer therapy. Here, we investigated the mechanism of inhibition of MARK4 activity by citral. Docking studies suggested that citral effectively binds to the active site cavity, and complex is stabilized by several interactions. We further performed molecular dynamics simulation of MARK4-citral complex under explicit water condition for 100ns and observed that binding of citral to MARK4 was quite stable. Fluorescence binding studies suggested that citral strongly binds to MARK4 and thereby inhibits its enzyme activity which was measured by the kinase inhibition assay. We further performed MTT assay and observed that citral inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This work provides a newer insight into the use of citral as novel cancer therapeutics through the MARK4 inhibition. Results may be employed to design novel therapeutic molecule using citral as a scaffold for MARK4 inhibition to fight related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Glycomacropeptide, a low-phenylalanine protein isolated from cheese whey, supports growth and attenuates metabolic stress in the murine model of phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solverson, Patrick; Murali, Sangita G.; Brinkman, Adam S.; Nelson, David W.; Clayton, Murray K.; Yen, Chi-Liang Eric

    2012-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is caused by a mutation in the phenylalanine (phe) hydroxylase gene and requires a low-phe diet plus amino acid (AA) formula to prevent cognitive impairment. Glycomacropeptide (GMP) contains minimal phe and provides a palatable alternative to AA formula. Our objective was to compare growth, body composition, and energy balance in Pahenu2 (PKU) and wild-type mice fed low-phe GMP, low-phe AA, or high-phe casein diets from 3–23 wk of age. The 2 × 2 × 3 design included main effects of genotype, sex, and diet. Fat and lean mass were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and acute energy balance was assessed by indirect calorimetry. PKU mice showed growth and lean mass similar to wild-type littermates fed the GMP or AA diets; however, they exhibited a 3–15% increase in energy expenditure, as reflected in oxygen consumption, and a 3–30% increase in food intake. The GMP diet significantly reduced energy expenditure, food intake, and plasma phe concentration in PKU mice compared with the casein diet. The high-phe casein diet or the low-phe AA diet induced metabolic stress in PKU mice, as reflected in increased energy expenditure and intake of food and water, increased renal and spleen mass, and elevated plasma cytokine concentrations consistent with systemic inflammation. The low-phe GMP diet significantly attenuated these adverse effects. Moreover, total fat mass, %body fat, and the respiratory exchange ratio (CO2 produced/O2 consumed) were significantly lower in PKU mice fed GMP compared with AA diets. In summary, GMP provides a physiological source of low-phe dietary protein that promotes growth and attenuates the metabolic stress induced by a high-phe casein or low-phe AA diet in PKU mice. PMID:22297302

  20. Immunoglobulin G, Plasma Cells, and Lymphocytes in the Murine Vagina after Vaginal or Parenteral Immunization with Attenuated Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Earl L.; Parr, Margaret B.

    1998-01-01

    This investigation evaluated immunity to vaginal herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection after local or parenteral immunization with attenuated HSV-2. Vaginal immunization induced sterilizing immunity against challenge with a high dose of wild-type virus, whereas parenteral immunizations protected against neurologic disease but did not entirely prevent infection of the vagina. Vaginal immunization caused 86- and 31-fold increases in the numbers of immunoglobulin G (IgG) plasma cells in the vagina at 6 weeks and 10 months after immunization, whereas parenteral immunizations did not increase plasma cell numbers in the vagina. Vaginal secretion/serum titer ratios and specific antibody activities in vaginal secretions and serum indicated that IgG viral antibody was produced in the vagina and released into vaginal secretions at 6 weeks and 10 months after vaginal immunization but not after parenteral immunizations. In contrast to the case for plasma cells, the numbers of T and B lymphocytes in the vagina were similar in vaginally and parenterally immunized mice. Also, lymphocyte numbers in the vagina were markedly but similarly increased by vaginal challenge with HSV-2 in both vaginally and parenterally immunized mice. Lymphocyte recruitment to the vagina after virus challenge appeared to involve memory lymphocytes, because it was not observed in nonimmunized mice. Thus, local vaginal immunization with attenuated HSV-2 increased the number of IgG plasma cells in the vagina and increased vaginal secretion/serum titer ratios to 3.0- to 4.7-fold higher than in parenterally immunized groups but caused little if any selective homing of T and B lymphocytes to the vagina. PMID:9573285

  1. Reducing TRPC1 Expression through Liposome-Mediated siRNA Delivery Markedly Attenuates Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheuk-Kwan Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that Lipofectamine siRNA delivery to deplete transient receptor potential cation channel (TRPC 1 protein expression can suppress hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH in mice. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were equally divided into group 1 (normal controls, group 2 (hypoxia, and group 3 (hypoxia + siRNA TRPC1. By day 28, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP, number of muscularized arteries, right ventricle (RV, and lung weights were increased in group 2 than in group 1 and reduced in group 3 compared with group 2. Pulmonary crowded score showed similar pattern, whereas number of alveolar sacs exhibited an opposite pattern compared to that of RVSP in all groups. Protein expressions of TRPCs, HIF-1α, Ku-70, apoptosis, and fibrosis and pulmonary mRNA expressions of inflammatory markers were similar pattern, whereas protein expressions of antifibrosis and VEGF were opposite to the pattern of RVSP. Cellular markers of pulmonary DNA damage, repair, and smooth muscle proliferation exhibited a pattern similar to that of RVSP. The mRNA expressions of proapoptotic and hypertrophy biomarkers displayed a similar pattern, whereas sarcomere length showed an opposite pattern compared to that of RVSP in all groups. Lipofectamine siRNA delivery effectively reduced TRPC1 expression, thereby attenuating PAH-associated RV and pulmonary arteriolar remodeling.

  2. Attenuation of cadmium chloride induced cytotoxicity in murine hepatocytes by a protein isolated from the leaves of the herb Cajanus indicus L.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Mahua; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C. [Bose Institute, Department of Chemistry, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2007-06-15

    Cadmium has been recognized as a strong environmental pollutant. Exposure to this heavy metal occurs through the intake of foodstuffs, drinking water and also via the inhalation of air. Present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of a 43 kDa protein, isolated from the leaves of the herb Cajanus indicus, against cadmium-induced cytotoxicity in hepatocytes. For this study, cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) has been used as the source of cadmium. Treatment of hepatocytes with 800 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2} for 3 h caused significant reduction in cell viability in association with the increased levels of glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) leakage. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase, and the levels of cellular metabolites, reduced glutathione (GSH) as well as total thiols have also been decreased under the same treatment. In addition, the toxin enhanced the levels of the lipid peroxidation end products and oxidized glutathione (GSSG). Incubation of hepatocytes with the protein at a dose of 0.1 mg/ml for 3 h prior to the toxin treatment (at a dose of 800 {mu}M for 3 h) restored the activities of all the antioxidant enzymes, the levels of GSH, total thiols, cell viability and also attenuated the increased levels of GPT, ALP, lipid peroxidation and GSSG. In addition, the protein resisted CdCl{sub 2} induced alterations of all the parameters when applied in combination with CdCl{sub 2}. Effects of a known antioxidant, vitamin E, and a non-relevant protein, bovine serum albumin against CdCl{sub 2} induced cytotoxicity have also been included in the study. Combining all, we would like to say that the protein possessed protective activity against CdCl{sub 2} induced cytotoxicity in mouse hepatocytes probably via its antioxidant property. (orig.)

  3. Live AttenuatedLeishmania donovaniCentrin Gene-Deleted Parasites Induce IL-23-Dependent IL-17-Protective Immune Response against Visceral Leishmaniasis in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Antara; Bhattacharya, Parna; Dagur, Pradeep K; Karmakar, Subir; Ismail, Nevien; Joshi, Amritanshu B; Akue, Adovi D; KuKuruga, Mark; McCoy, John Philip; Dey, Ranadhir; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2018-01-01

    No vaccine exists against visceral leishmaniasis. To develop effective vaccines, we have previously reported protective role of live attenuated centrin gene-deleted Leishmania donovani ( LdCen -/- ) parasites through induction of Th1 type immune response in mice, hamsters, and dogs. In this study, we specifically explored the role of Th17 cells in LdCen -/- -induced host protection in mice. Our results showed that compared with wild-type L. donovani infection, LdCen -/- parasites induce significantly higher expression of Th17 differentiation cytokines in splenic dendritic cells. There was also induction of IL-17 and its promoting cytokines in total splenocytes and in both CD4 and CD8 T cells following immunization with LdCen -/- Upon challenge with wild-type parasites, IL-17 and its differentiating cytokines were significantly higher in LdCen -/- -immunized mice compared with nonimmunized mice that resulted in parasite control. Alongside IL-17 induction, we observed induction of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells as reported earlier. However, Th17 cells are generated before Th1 cells. Neutralization of either IL-17 or IFN-γ abrogated LdCen -/- -induced host protection further confirming the essential role of Th17 along with Th1 cytokines in host protection. Treatment with recombinant IL-23, which is required for stabilization and maintenance of IL-17, heightened Th17, and Tc17 responses in immunized mice splenocytes. In contrast, Th17 response was absent in immunized IL-23R -/- mice that failed to induce protection upon virulent Leishmania challenge suggesting that IL-23 plays an essential role in IL-17-mediated protection by LdCen -/- parasites. This study unveiled the role of IL-23-dependent IL-17 induction in LdCen -/- parasite-induced immunity and subsequent protection against visceral leishmaniasis.

  4. Absence of Notch1 in murine myeloid cells attenuates the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by affecting Th1 and Th17 priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Miriam; Monsalve, Eva M; López-López, Susana; Ruiz-García, Almudena; Mellado, Susana; Caminos, Elena; García-Ramírez, José Javier; Laborda, Jorge; Tranque, Pedro; Díaz-Guerra, María José M

    2017-12-01

    Inhibition of Notch signalling in T cells attenuates the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Growing evidence indicates that myeloid cells are also key players in autoimmune processes. Thus, the present study evaluates the role of the Notch1 receptor in myeloid cells on the progression of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) 35-55 -induced EAE, using mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of the Notch1 gene (MyeNotch1KO). We found that EAE progression was less severe in the absence of Notch1 in myeloid cells. Thus, histopathological analysis revealed reduced pathology in the spinal cord of MyeNotch1KO mice, with decreased microglia/astrocyte activation, demyelination and infiltration of CD4 + T cells. Moreover, these mice showed lower Th1 and Th17 cell infiltration and expression of IFN-γ and IL-17 mRNA in the spinal cord. Accordingly, splenocytes from MyeNotch1KO mice reactivated in vitro presented reduced Th1 and Th17 activation, and lower expression of IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, IL-6, and CD86. Moreover, reactivated wild-type splenocytes showed increased Notch1 expression, arguing for a specific involvement of this receptor in autoimmune T cell activation in secondary lymphoid tissues. In summary, our results reveal a key role of the Notch1 receptor in myeloid cells for the initiation and progression of EAE. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Comparative Antitumor Effect of Preventive versus Therapeutic Vaccines Employing B16 Melanoma Cells Genetically Modified to Express GM-CSF and B7.2 in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador F. Aliño

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer vaccines have always been a subject of gene therapy research. One of the most successful approaches has been working with genetically modified tumor cells. In this study, we describe our approach to achieving an immune response against a murine melanoma model, employing B16 tumor cells expressing GM-CSF and B7.2. Wild B16 cells were injected in C57BL6 mice to cause the tumor. Irradiated B16 cells transfected with GM-CSF, B7.2, or both, were processed as a preventive and therapeutic vaccination. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. Blood samples were taken from mice, and IgGs of each treatment group were also measured. The regulatory T cells (Treg of selected groups were quantified using counts of images taken by confocal microscopy. Results: one hundred percent survival was achieved by preventive vaccination with the group of cells transfected with p2F_GM-CSF. Therapeutic vaccination achieved initial inhibition of tumor growth but did not secure overall survival of the animals. Classical Treg cells did not vary among the different groups in this therapeutic vaccination model.

  6. Caprylic triglyceride as a novel therapeutic approach to effectively improve the performance and attenuate the symptoms due to the motor neuron loss in ALS disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and finally death. ALS patients suffer from asthenia and their progressive weakness negatively impacts quality of life, limiting their daily activities. They have impaired energy balance linked to lower activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzymes in ALS spinal cord, suggesting that improving mitochondrial function may present a therapeutic approach for ALS. When fed a ketogenic diet, the G93A ALS mouse shows a significant increase in serum ketones as well as a significantly slower progression of weakness and lower mortality rate. In this study, we treated SOD1-G93A mice with caprylic triglyceride, a medium chain triglyceride that is metabolized into ketone bodies and can serve as an alternate energy substrate for neuronal metabolism. Treatment with caprylic triglyceride attenuated progression of weakness and protected spinal cord motor neuron loss in SOD1-G93A transgenic animals, significantly improving their performance even though there was no significant benefit regarding the survival of the ALS transgenic animals. We found that caprylic triglyceride significantly promoted the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate in vivo. Our results demonstrated that caprylic triglyceride alleviates ALS-type motor impairment through restoration of energy metabolism in SOD1-G93A ALS mice, especially during the overt stage of the disease. These data indicate the feasibility of using caprylic acid as an easily administered treatment with a high impact on the quality of life of ALS patients.

  7. Therapy with radio-attenuated vaccine in experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis showed enhanced T cell and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels, suppressed tumor growth factor-beta production with higher expression of some signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sanchita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) or Kala-Azar (KA) is one of the most deadly forms of disease among all neglected tropical diseases. There are no satisfactory drugs or vaccine candidates available for this dreaded disease. Our previous studies showed promising therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of the live, radio-attenuated parasites through intramuscular (I.M.) and intraperitoneal (I.P.) route in BALB/c mice model. The T-cell proliferation level, the mRNA expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor growth factor-beta (TGF-β) genes and finally the phosphorylation levels of phosphoinositide dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) molecules were checked in BALB/c mice model immunized with radio-attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites through I.M. route. Higher T-cell proliferation, increased iNOS level, and suppressed TGF-β level were found in treated infected animal groups (100 and 150Gy) in relation to untreated infected animals. Likewise, phosphorylation levels of PDK1, PI3K and p38MAPK of these two groups were increased when compared to untreated infected controls. The clearance of the parasites from treated infected groups of animals may be mediated by the restoration of T-cell due to therapy with radio-attenuated L. donovani parasites. The killing of parasites was mediated by increase in nitric oxide release through PDK1, PI3K and p38MAPK signaling pathways. A lower TGF-β expression has augmented the restored Th1 ambience in the 100 and 150Gy treated animal groups proving further the efficacy of the candidate vaccine. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  8. Murine model of TB meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Datta Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated the design of a novel murine model of CNS-TB using a C3 strain and that replicated events of EPTB dissemination. This model will promote efforts to understand the pathogenesis CNS-TB infection for development of improved therapeutic interventions in the future.

  9. MRI-assessed therapeutic effects of locally administered PLGA nanoparticles loaded with anti-inflammatory siRNA in a murine arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Te Boekhorst, Bernard C M; Jensen, Linda B; Colombo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    for disease remission. We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed against TNF-a in vitro and in vivo. The siRNA-loaded PLGA nanoparticles mediated a dose-dependent TNF-a silencing...... with nanoparticles loaded with TNF-a siRNA (1µg) resulted in a reduction in disease activity, evident by a significant decrease of the paw scores and joint effusions, as compared to treatment with PLGA nanoparticles loaded with non-specific control siRNA, whereas the degree of bone marrow edema in the tibial...... and femoral head remained unchanged. When the siRNA dose was 5 or 10µg, there was no difference between the specific and the non-specific siRNA treatment groups. These findings suggest that MRI is a promising method for evaluation of early disease progression and treatment in murine arthritis models...

  10. Targeting Phospholipase D4 Attenuates Kidney Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Priyanka; Kumar, Ramya K; Iyer, Ashwin; Boswell, Sarah; Gerarduzzi, Casimiro; Dadhania, Vivekkumar P; Herbert, Zach; Joshi, Nikita; Luyendyk, James P; Humphreys, Benjamin D; Vaidya, Vishal S

    2017-12-01

    Phospholipase D4 (PLD4), a single-pass transmembrane glycoprotein, is among the most highly upregulated genes in murine kidneys subjected to chronic progressive fibrosis, but the function of PLD4 in this process is unknown. Here, we found PLD4 to be overexpressed in the proximal and distal tubular epithelial cells of murine and human kidneys after fibrosis. Genetic silencing of PLD4, either globally or conditionally in proximal tubular epithelial cells, protected mice from the development of fibrosis. Mechanistically, global knockout of PLD4 modulated innate and adaptive immune responses and attenuated the upregulation of the TGF-β signaling pathway and α1-antitrypsin protein (a serine protease inhibitor) expression and downregulation of neutrophil elastase (NE) expression induced by obstructive injury. In vitro, treatment with NE attenuated TGF-β-induced accumulation of fibrotic markers. Furthermore, therapeutic targeting of PLD4 using specific siRNA protected mice from folic acid-induced kidney fibrosis and inhibited the increase in TGF-β signaling, decrease in NE expression, and upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Immunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry and coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that PLD4 binds three proteins that interact with neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase 1, a receptor also known as TrkA that upregulates mitogen-activated protein kinase. PLD4 inhibition also prevented the folic acid-induced upregulation of this receptor in mouse kidneys. These results suggest inhibition of PLD4 as a novel therapeutic strategy to activate protease-mediated degradation of extracellular matrix and reverse fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  11. Improvement of Therapeutic Efficacy of Oral Immunotherapy in Combination with Regulatory T Cell-Inducer Kakkonto in a Murine Food Allergy Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Nagata

    Full Text Available Oral immunotherapy (OIT has been considered a promising approach for food allergies (FAs. However, the current OIT strategy is limited in terms of the long-term efficacy and safety. We have previously demonstrated that kakkonto, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, suppresses the occurrence of allergic symptoms in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA-induced FA, which is attributed to the induction of the Foxp3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells. In this study, we established an OIT model using the FA mice with already established allergic symptoms and determined whether kakkonto could improve the efficacy of OIT. The OIT method consisted of initially administrating a very small amount of OVA and slowly increasing the amount. Allergic symptoms decreased in the OIT-treated FA mice. OIT significantly downregulated Th2 immune response-related gene expression in the FA mouse colon, and decreased the level of mouse mast cell protease-1, a marker of mast cell degranulation in the FA mouse plasma. Moreover, the concomitant use of kakkonto significantly enhanced the effectiveness of OIT on the allergic symptoms, and the combination therapy further suppressed the Th2 immune responses and the mast cell degranulation. In addition, OIT significantly increased the population of Foxp3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells in the FA mouse colon, and this population was further increased by OIT in combination with kakkonto. Furthermore, the combined therapy with kakkonto reduced the expression of RA-degrading enzyme CYP26B1 mRNA in the FA mouse colon. These findings indicated that the combination of OIT with kakkonto represents a promising approach for FA treatment.

  12. Therapeutic hypothermia attenuates global cerebral reperfusion-induced mitochondrial damage by suppressing dynamin-related protein 1 activation and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in a cardiac arrest rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jingjing; Cai, Shenquan; Zhong, Hao; Cao, Liangbin; Hui, Kangli; Xu, Miaomiao; Duan, Manlin; Xu, Jianguo

    2017-04-24

    Therapeutic hypothermia is effective to attenuate brain ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury after cardiac arrest, and multiple mechanisms have been proposed. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), a large GTPases of dynamin superfamily, predominantly controls mitochondrial fission and is related to IR-induced Cyt C release and apoptosis. However, the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on Drp1 and mitochondrial fission after cardiac arrest remains still unclear. In this study, non-cardiac arrest and post-cardiac arrest rats received 6-h normothermia (37-38°C) or therapeutic hypothermia (32-34°C), and the hippocampus was harvested at 6h and 72h after cardiac arrest. Results showed the expression of Drp1 and Cyt C increased after cardiac arrest, but therapeutic hypothermia partially reversed this increase at 6h after cardiac arrest. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) also showed a change in morphology following therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Moreover, therapeutic hypothermia could decrease the histopathological damage, inhibit the apoptosis of CA1 neurons and improve the survival and neurological outcomes at 72h after cardiac arrest. Taken together, our study demonstrates that therapeutic hypothermia is neuroprotective against global cerebral I/R injury, which is, at least partially, ascribed to the inhibition Drp1 and Cyt C expression and the protection of mitochondrial structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Therapeutic effect of (Z)-3-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) acrylonitrile (DMMA) against Staphylococcus aureus infection in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ki-Bong; Nam, Kung-Woo; Ahn, Hyunjin; Shin, Jongheon; Kim, Sanghee; Mar, Woongchon

    2010-05-28

    Sortase enzymes belong to a family of transpeptidases found in Gram-positive bacteria. Sortase is responsible for the reaction that anchors surface protein virulence factors to the peptidoglycan cell wall of the bacteria. The compound (Z)-3-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) acrylonitrile (DMMA) has previously been reported as a novel sortase inhibitor in vitro, but the in vivo effects of DMMA have not been studied. Here, we evaluated the in vivo effects of DMMA against infection by wild-type and sortase A- and/or sortase B-deficient Staphylococcus aureus in Balb/c mice. With DMMA treatment, survival rates increased and kidney and joint infection rates decreased (p<0.01) in a dose-dependent manner. The rate of kidney infection was significantly reduced in the mice treated with sortase A knock-out S. aureus (p<0.01). These results indicate that by acting as a potent inhibitor of sortase A and moderate inhibitor of sortase B, DMMA can decrease kidney and joint infection rates and reduce mortality in mice infected with S. aureus. These findings suggest that DMMA is a promising therapeutic compound against Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF THE TRANSPLANTATION OF VEGF OVEREXPRESSING BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS OF MURINE MODEL OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina de Oliveira Garcia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer´s disease (AD is clinically characterized by progressive memory loss, behavioural and learning dysfunction and cognitive deficits, such as alterations in social interactions. The major pathological features of AD are the formation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles together with neuronal and vascular damage. The double transgenic mouse model of AD (2xTg-AD with the APPswe/PS1dE9 mutations shows characteristics that are similar to those observed in AD patients, including social memory impairment, senile plaque formation and vascular deficits. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, when transplanted into the brain, produce positive effects by reducing Aβ deposition in transgenic APP/PS1 mice. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, exhibits neuroprotective effects against the excitotoxicity implicated in the AD neurodegeneration.The present study investigates the effects of MSCs overexpressing VEGF in hippocampal neovascularization, cognitive dysfunction and senile plaques present in 2xTg-AD transgenic mice. MSC were transfected with uP-VEGF vector, by electroporation and expanded at the 14th passage. 2xTg-AD animals at 6, 9 and 12 months old were transplanted with MSC-VEGF or MSC. The animals were tested for behavioral tasks to access locomotion, novelty exploration, learning and memory, and their brains were analyzed by IHC for vascularization and Aβ plaques. MSC-VEGF treatment favored the neovascularization and diminished senile plaques in hippocampal specific layers. Consequently, the treatment was able to provide behavioral benefits and reduce cognitive deficits by recovering the innate interest to novelty and counteracting memory deficits present in these AD transgenic animals. Therefore, this study has important therapeutic implications for the vascular damage in the neurodegeneration promoted by Alzheimer’s disease.

  15. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yujun [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Li, Jian-Dong [Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Yan, Chen, E-mail: Chen_Yan@urmc.rochester.edu [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  16. Murine model of hepatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikhi, Rishi; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Deas, Olivier; Svalina, Matthew N; Bial, John; Mansoor, Atiya; Cairo, Stefano; Keller, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in this population. Breast cancer related deaths have declined due to screening and adjuvant therapies, yet a driving clinical need exists to better understand the cause of the deadliest aspect of breast cancer, metastatic disease. Breast cancer metastasizes to several distant organs, the liver being the third most common site. To date, very few murine models of hepatic breast cancer exist. In this study, a novel murine model of liver breast cancer using the MDA-MB-231 cell line is introduced as an experimental (preclinical) model. Histological typing revealed consistent hepatic breast cancer tumor foci. Common features of the murine model were vascular invasion, lung metastasis and peritoneal seeding. The novel murine model of hepatic breast cancer established in this study provides a tool to be used to investigate mechanisms of hepatic metastasis and to test potential therapeutic interventions.

  17. Attenuation of Carcinogenesis and the Mechanism Underlying by the Influence of Indole-3-carbinol and Its Metabolite 3,3'-Diindolylmethane: A Therapeutic Marvel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthanila, V L; Poornima, J; Mirunalini, S

    2014-01-01

    Rising evidence provides credible support towards the potential role of bioactive products derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage, brussels sprouts, turnips, kohlrabi, bok choy, and radishes. Many epidemiological studies point out that Brassica vegetable protects humans against cancer since they are rich sources of glucosinolates in addition to possessing a high content of flavonoids, vitamins, and mineral nutrients. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) belongs to the class of compounds called indole glucosinolate, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, and is well-known for tits anticancer properties. In particular, I3C and its dimeric product, 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), have been generally investigated for their value against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. This paper reviews an in-depth study of the anticancer activity and the miscellaneous mechanisms underlying the anticarcinogenicity thereby broadening its therapeutic marvel.

  18. Attenuation of Carcinogenesis and the Mechanism Underlying by the Influence of Indole-3-carbinol and Its Metabolite 3,3′-Diindolylmethane: A Therapeutic Marvel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Maruthanila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rising evidence provides credible support towards the potential role of bioactive products derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage, brussels sprouts, turnips, kohlrabi, bok choy, and radishes. Many epidemiological studies point out that Brassica vegetable protects humans against cancer since they are rich sources of glucosinolates in addition to possessing a high content of flavonoids, vitamins, and mineral nutrients. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C belongs to the class of compounds called indole glucosinolate, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, and is well-known for tits anticancer properties. In particular, I3C and its dimeric product, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM, have been generally investigated for their value against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. This paper reviews an in-depth study of the anticancer activity and the miscellaneous mechanisms underlying the anticarcinogenicity thereby broadening its therapeutic marvel.

  19. Tacrolimus prevents murine cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lam Quoc; Nhi, Dang My; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hamano, Shinjiro; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil are immunosuppressants frequently used in human organ transplantation. Tacrolimus is also reported to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro. Here, we report that tacrolimus prevented the death from cerebral malaria of Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected C57BL/6J mice, but not their death from malaria due to the high parasitaemia and severe anaemia. The mycophenolate mofetil-treated mice showed higher mortality from cerebral malaria and succumbed to malaria earlier than tacrolimus-treated littermates. Tacrolimus attenuated the infiltration of mononuclear cells including pathogenic CD8+ T cells into the brain. It appears to prevent murine cerebral malaria through the inhibition of cerebral infiltration of CD8+ T cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Role of the Vagus Nerve: Modulation of the Inflammatory Reaction in Murine Polymicrobial Sepsis

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    Wolfram Kessler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The particular importance of the vagus nerve for the pathophysiology of peritonitis becomes more and more apparent. In this work we provide evidence for the vagal modulation of inflammation in the murine model of colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP. Vagotomy significantly increases mortality in polymicrobial sepsis. This effect is not accounted for by the dilatation of gastric volume following vagotomy. As the stimulation of cholinergic receptors by nicotine has no therapeutic effect, the lack of nicotine is also not the reason for the reduced survival rate. In fact, increased septic mortality is a consequence of the absent modulating influence of the vagus nerve on the immune system: we detected significantly elevated serum corticosterone levels in vagotomised mice 24 h following CASP and a decreased ex vivo TNF-alpha secretion of Kupffer cells upon stimulation with LPS. In conclusion, the vagus nerve has a modulating influence in polymicrobial sepsis by attenuating the immune dysregulation.

  1. The Role of the Vagus Nerve: Modulation of the Inflammatory Reaction in Murine Polymicrobial Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Wolfram; Diedrich, Stephan; Menges, Pia; Ebker, Tobias; Nielson, Michael; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Traeger, Tobias; Cziupka, Katharina; van der Linde, Julia; Puls, Ralf; Busemann, Alexandra; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Maier, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The particular importance of the vagus nerve for the pathophysiology of peritonitis becomes more and more apparent. In this work we provide evidence for the vagal modulation of inflammation in the murine model of colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP). Vagotomy significantly increases mortality in polymicrobial sepsis. This effect is not accounted for by the dilatation of gastric volume following vagotomy. As the stimulation of cholinergic receptors by nicotine has no therapeutic effect, the lack of nicotine is also not the reason for the reduced survival rate. In fact, increased septic mortality is a consequence of the absent modulating influence of the vagus nerve on the immune system: we detected significantly elevated serum corticosterone levels in vagotomised mice 24 h following CASP and a decreased ex vivo TNF-alpha secretion of Kupffer cells upon stimulation with LPS. In conclusion, the vagus nerve has a modulating influence in polymicrobial sepsis by attenuating the immune dysregulation. PMID:22547905

  2. Salmonella and cancer: from pathogens to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorobik, Paulina; Czaplicki, Dominik; Ossysek, Karolina; Bereta, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cancer therapy is a concept more than 100 years old - yet, all things considered, it is still in early development. While the use of many passive therapeutics is hindered by the complexity of tumor biology, bacteria offer unique features that can overcome these limitations. Microbial metabolism, motility and sensitivity can lead to site-specific treatment, highly focused on the tumor and safe to other tissues. Activation of tumor-specific immunity is another important mechanism of such therapies. Several bacterial strains have been evaluated as cancer therapeutics so far, Salmonella Typhimurium being one of the most promising. S. Typhimurium and its derivatives have been used both as direct tumoricidal agents and as cancer vaccine vectors. VNP20009, an attenuated mutant of S. Typhimurium, shows significant native toxicity against murine tumors and was studied in a first-in-man phase I clinical trial for toxicity and anticancer activity. While proved to be safe in cancer patients, insufficient tumor colonization of VNP20009 was identified as a major limitation for further clinical development. Antibody-fragment-based targeting of cancer cells is one of the few approaches proposed to overcome this drawback.

  3. Dietary Fructo-Oligosaccharides Attenuate Early Activation of CD4+ T Cells Which Produce both Th1 and Th2 Cytokines in the Intestinal Lymphoid Tissues of a Murine Food Allergy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Masato; Arakawa, Haruka; Ishii, Narumi; Ubukata, Chihiro; Michimori, Mana; Noda, Masanari; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Hosono, Akira

    2017-11-17

    Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) are prebiotic agents with immunomodulatory effects involving improvement of the intestinal microbiota and metabolome. In this study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms through which FOS modulate intestinal antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in food allergy, using OVA23-3 mice. OVA23-3 mice were fed an experimental diet containing either ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA and FOS for 1 week. Body weight and mucosal mast cell protease 1 in the serum were measured as the indicator of intestinal inflammation. Single-cell suspensions were prepared from intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues for cellular analysis. Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Activation markers and intracellular cytokines in CD4+ T cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Activated CD4+ T cells were purified to examine cytokine production. Dietary intake of FOS provided moderate protection from the intestinal inflammation induced by the OVA-containing diet. FOS significantly reduced food allergy-induced Th2 cytokine responses in intestinal tissues but not in systemic tissues. FOS decreased OVA diet-induced IFN-γ+IL-4+ double-positive CD4+ T cells and early-activated CD45RBhighCD69+CD4+ T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, we confirmed that these CD45RBhighCD69+CD4+ T cells are able to produce high levels of IFN-γ and moderate level of IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13. Dietary intake of FOS during the development of food allergy attenuates the induction of intestinal Th2 cytokine responses by regulating early activation of naïve CD4+ T cells, which produce both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Our results suggest FOS might be a potential food agent for the prevention of food allergy by modulating oral sensitization to food antigens. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus as a vaccine candidate for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelko, Kevin D; Girtman, Megan A; Mitsunaga, Yoshihiro; Mendez-Fernandez, Yanice V; Bell, Michael P; Hansen, Michael J; Allen, Kathleen S; Rodriguez, Moses; Pease, Larry R

    2011-01-01

    The induction of sterilizing T-cell responses to tumors is a major goal in the development of T-cell vaccines for treating cancer. Although specific components of anti-viral CD8+ immunity are well characterized, we still lack the ability to mimic viral CD8+ T-cell responses in therapeutic settings for treating cancers. Infection with the picornavirus Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces a strong sterilizing CD8+ T-cell response. In the absence of sterilizing immunity, the virus causes a persistent infection. We capitalized on the ability of TMEV to induce strong cellular immunity even under conditions of immune deficiency by modifying the virus to evaluate its potential as a T-cell vaccine. The introduction of defined CD8+ T-cell epitopes into the leader sequence of the TMEV genome generates an attenuated vaccine strain that can efficiently drive CD8+ T-cell responses to the targeted antigen. This virus activates T-cells in a manner that is capable of inducing targeted tissue damage and glucose dysregulation in an adoptive T-cell transfer model of diabetes mellitus. As a therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of established melanoma, epitope-modified TMEV can induce strong cytotoxic T-cell responses and promote infiltration of the T-cells into established tumors, ultimately leading to a delay in tumor growth and improved survival of vaccinated animals. We propose that epitope-modified TMEV is an excellent candidate for further development as a human T-cell vaccine for use in immunotherapy.

  5. Neuroprotective effect of bilberry extract in a murine model of photo-stressed retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Hideto; Okamoto, Tomohiro; Kawashima, Hirohiko; Toda, Eriko; Miyake, Seiji; Nagai, Norihiro; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Excessive exposure to light promotes degenerative and blinding retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, the underlying mechanisms of photo-induced retinal degeneration are not fully understood, and a generalizable preventive intervention has not been proposed. Bilberry extract is an antioxidant-rich supplement that ameliorates ocular symptoms. However, its effects on photo-stressed retinas have not been clarified. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effects of bilberry extract against photo-stress in murine retinas. Light-induced visual function impairment recorded by scotopic and phototopic electroretinograms showing respective rod and cone photoreceptor function was attenuated by oral administration of bilberry extract through a stomach tube in Balb/c mice (750 mg/kg body weight). Bilberry extract also suppressed photo-induced apoptosis in the photoreceptor cell layer and shortening of the outer segments of rod and cone photoreceptors. Levels of photo-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, as measured by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, were reduced by bilberry extract treatment. Reduction of ROS by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a well-known antioxidant also suppressed ER stress. Immunohistochemical analysis of activating transcription factor 4 expression showed the presence of ER stress in the retina, and at least in part, in Müller glial cells. The photo-induced disruption of tight junctions in the retinal pigment epithelium was also attenuated by bilberry extract, repressing an oxidative stress marker, although ER stress markers were not repressed. Our results suggest that bilberry extract attenuates photo-induced apoptosis and visual dysfunction most likely, and at least in part, through ROS reduction, and subsequent ER stress attenuation in the retina. This study can help understand the mechanisms of photo-stress and

  6. H. pylori attenuates TNBS-induced colitis via increasing mucosal Th2 cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Zhong; Tan, Gao; Wu, Fang; Zhi, Fa-Chao

    2017-09-26

    There is an epidemiological inverse relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and Crohn's disease (CD). However, whether H. pylori plays a protective role against CD remains unclear. Since 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis is thought to resemble CD, we investigated whether H. pylori can attenuate TNBS-induced colitis in mice. Here we show that H. pylori can attenuate the severity of TNBS-induced colitis. In addition, H. pylori not only down-regulates Th17 and Th1 cytokine expression, but can up-regulate Th2 cytokine expression and increase the Th2:Th17 ratio of CD4+ T in the colonic mucosa of TNBS-induced colitis. Our results indicate that H. pylori attenuates TNBS-induced colitis mainly through increasing Th2 cells in murine colonic mucosa. Our finding offers a novel view on the role of H. pylori in regulating gastrointestinal immunity, and may open a new avenue for development of therapeutic strategies in CD by making use of asymptomatic H. pylori colonization.

  7. Hexanic fraction of turmeric powder attenuates murine model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The current study was conducted to further examine the antinociceptive activity of hexane fraction of turmeric powder (HFTP) and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of action underlying its antinociceptive activity in various experimental models of chemical- and thermal-induced nociception. Materials and ...

  8. Osteopontin attenuates aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Novella; Sacma, Mehmet; Ständker, Ludger; Soller, Karin; Marka, Gina; Eiwen, Karina; Weiss, Johannes M; Kirchhoff, Frank; Weil, Tanja; Cancelas, Jose A; Florian, Maria Carolina; Geiger, Hartmut

    2017-04-03

    Upon aging, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo changes in function and structure, including skewing to myeloid lineages, lower reconstitution potential and loss of protein polarity. While stem cell intrinsic mechanisms are known to contribute to HSC aging, little is known on whether age-related changes in the bone marrow niche regulate HSC aging. Upon aging, the expression of osteopontin (OPN) in the murine bone marrow stroma is reduced. Exposure of young HSCs to an OPN knockout niche results in a decrease in engraftment, an increase in long-term HSC frequency and loss of stem cell polarity. Exposure of aged HSCs to thrombin-cleaved OPN attenuates aging of old HSCs, resulting in increased engraftment, decreased HSC frequency, increased stem cell polarity and a restored balance of lymphoid and myeloid cells in peripheral blood. Thus, our data suggest a critical role for reduced stroma-derived OPN for HSC aging and identify thrombin-cleaved OPN as a novel niche informed therapeutic approach for ameliorating HSC phenotypes associated with aging. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  9. Conventional housing conditions attenuate the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

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    Andreas Arndt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS has remained unclear, but a causative contribution of factors outside the central nervous system (CNS is conceivable. It was recently suggested that gut bacteria trigger the activation of CNS-reactive T cells and the development of demyelinative disease. METHODS: C57BL/6 (B6 mice were kept either under specific pathogen free or conventional housing conditions, immunized with the myelin basic protein (MBP-proteolipid protein (PLP fusion protein MP4 and the development of EAE was clinically monitored. The germinal center size of the Peyer's patches was determined by immunohistochemistry in addition to the level of total IgG secretion which was assessed by ELISPOT. ELISPOT assays were also used to measure MP4-specific T cell and B cell responses in the Peyer's patches and the spleen. Ear swelling assays were performed to determine the extent of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions in specific pathogen free and conventionally housed mice. RESULTS: In B6 mice that were actively immunized with MP4 and kept under conventional housing conditions clinical disease was significantly attenuated compared to specific pathogen free mice. Conventionally housed mice displayed increased levels of IgG secretion in the Peyer's patches, while the germinal center formation in the gut and the MP4-specific TH17 response in the spleen were diminished after immunization. Accordingly, these mice displayed an attenuated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH reaction in ear swelling assays. CONCLUSIONS: The data corroborate the notion that housing conditions play a substantial role in the induction of murine EAE and suggest that the presence of gut bacteria might be associated with a decreased immune response to antigens of lower affinity. This concept could be of importance for MS and calls for caution when considering the therapeutic approach to treat patients with antibiotics.

  10. Critical Role of PepT1 in Promoting Colitis-Associated Cancer and Therapeutic Benefits of the Anti-inflammatory PepT1-Mediated Tripeptide KPV in a Murine ModelSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Viennois

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The human intestinal peptide transporter 1 (hPepT1, is expressed in the small intestine at low levels in the healthy colon and up-regulated during inflammatory bowel disease. hPepT1 plays a role in mouse colitis and human studies have shown that chronic intestinal inflammation leads to colorectal cancer (colitis-associated cancer; CAC. Hence, we assessed here the role of PepT1 in CAC. Methods: Mice with hPepT1 overexpression in intestinal epithelial cells (transgenic [TG] or PepT1 (PepT1-knockout [KO] deletion were used and CAC was induced by azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate. Results: TG mice had larger tumor sizes, increased tumor burdens, and increased intestinal inflammation compared with wild-type (WT mice. Conversely, tumor number and size and intestinal inflammation were decreased significantly in PepT1-KO mice. Proliferating crypt cells were increased in TG mice and decreased in PepT1-KO mice. Analysis of human colonic biopsy specimens showed increased expression of PepT1 in patients with colorectal cancer, suggesting that PepT1 might be targeted for the treatment of CAC. The use of an anti-inflammatory tripeptide Lys-Pro-Val (KPV transported by PepT1 was able to prevent carcinogenesis in WT mice. When administered to PepT1-KO mice, KPV did not trigger any of the inhibitory effect on tumorigenesis observed in WT mice. Conclusions: The observations that PepT1 was highly expressed in human colorectal tumor and that its overexpression and deletion in mice increased and decreased colitis-associated tumorigenesis, respectively, suggest that PepT1 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Keywords: Colitis-Associated Cancer, Intestinal Inflammation, PepT1, KPV Peptide

  11. Stretching Reduces Skin Thickness and Improves Subcutaneous Tissue Mobility in a Murine Model of Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Urso, Katia; Olenich, Sara; Muskaj, Igla; Badger, Gary J; Aliprantis, Antonios; Lafyatis, Robert; Langevin, Helene M

    2017-01-01

    Although physical therapy can help preserve mobility in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), stretching has not been used systematically as a treatment to prevent or reverse the disease process. We previously showed in rodent models that stretching promotes the resolution of connective tissue inflammation and reduces new collagen formation after injury. Here, we tested the hypothesis that stretching would impact scleroderma development using a mouse sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease (sclGvHD) model. The model consists in the adoptive transfer (allogeneic) of splenocytes from B10.D2 mice (graft) into Rag2(-/-) BALB/c hosts (sclGvHD), resulting in skin inflammation followed by fibrosis over 4 weeks. SclGvHD mice and controls were randomized to stretching in vivo for 10 min daily versus no stretching. Weekly ultrasound measurements of skin thickness and subcutaneous tissue mobility in the back (relative tissue displacement during passive trunk motion) successfully captured the different phases of the sclGvHD model. Stretching reduced skin thickness and increased subcutaneous tissue mobility compared to no stretching at week 3. Stretching also reduced the expression of CCL2 and ADAM8 in the skin at week 4, which are two genes known to be upregulated in both murine sclGvHD and the inflammatory subset of human SSc. However, there was no evidence that stretching attenuated inflammation at week 2. Daily stretching for 10 min can improve skin thickness and mobility in the absence of any other treatment in the sclGvHD murine model. These pre-clinical results suggest that a systematic investigation of stretching as a therapeutic modality is warranted in patients with SSc.

  12. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 deficiency inhibits the induction of murine colitis-associated colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Toshio; Hashizume, Chieko; Taniguchi, Makoto; Furumoto, Hidehiro; Han, Jia; Gao, Rongfen; Kinami, Shinichi; Kosaka, Takeo; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2017-09-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is the synthetic enzyme of sphingomyelin (SM), which regulates membrane fluidity and microdomain structure. SMS2 plays a role in LPS-induced lung injury and inflammation; however, its role in inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis is unclear. We investigated the effect of SMS2 deficiency on dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced murine colitis and found inhibition of DSS-induced inflammation in SMS2-deficient (SMS2-/-) mice. DSS treatment induced a significant increase in ceramide levels, with a decrease of SM levels in SMS2-/- colon tissue, and demonstrated attenuation of the elevation of both inflammation-related gene expression and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, leukocyte infiltration, and MAPK and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. After undergoing transplantation of wild-type bone marrow, SMS2-/- mice also exhibited inhibition of DSS-induced inflammation in the colon, which suggested that SMS2 deficiency in bone marrow-derived immune cells was not involved in the inhibition of colitis. Finally, in an azoxymethane/DSS-induced cancer model, SMS2 deficiency significantly decreased tumor incidence in the colon. Our results demonstrate that SMS2 deficiency inhibits DSS-induced colitis and subsequent colitis-associated colon cancer via inhibition of colon epithelial cell-mediated inflammation; therefore, inhibition of SMS2 may be a potential therapeutic target for human colitis and colorectal cancer.-Ohnishi, T., Hashizume, C., Taniguchi, M., Furumoto, H., Han, J., Gao, R., Kinami, S., Kosaka, T., Okazaki, T. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 deficiency inhibits the induction of murine colitis-associated colon cancer. © FASEB.

  13. Recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor 121 decreases vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in murine pre-eclampsia model placenta

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    Sri Sulistyowati

    2016-11-01

    Mean VCAM-1 expression in normal (0.97 ± 0.54% murine placentas, compared with placentas (2.94 ± 0.96% of murine preeclampsia models (p=0.000, while mean VCAM-1 expression in placentas of murine preeclampsia models with VEGF intervention was 2.14 ± 0.68% (p=0.030. Conclusion Recombinant VEGF-121 can reduce VCAM-1 expression in placentas of murine preeclampsia models. The present study has shown the potential benefits of VEGF therapy, justifying serious consideration of this therapeutic approach for use in women with preeclampsia.

  14. Cathepsin L is required for ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection in NIH3T3 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Hiroaki; Kamiyama, Haruka; Minematsu, Kazuo; Goto, Kensuke; Mizota, Tsutomu; Oishi, Kazunori; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2009-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that a cathepsin B inhibitor, CA-074Me, attenuates ecotropic murine leukemia virus (Eco-MLV) infection in NIH3T3 cells, suggesting that cathepsin B is required for the Eco-MLV infection. However, cathepsin B activity was negative or extremely low in NIH3T3 cells. How did CA-074Me attenuate the Eco-MLV infection? The CA-074Me treatment of NIH3T3 cells inhibited cathepsin L activity, and a cathepsin L specific inhibitor, CLIK148, attenuated the Eco-MLV vector infec...

  15. Effect of Shin’iseihaito (Xinyiqingfeitang on Acute Streptococcus pneumoniae Murine Sinusitis via Macrophage Activation

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    Masaaki Minami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae causes sinusitis. The general treatment of S. pneumonia sinusitis is by using antibiotics; however, one of their serious problems is the attenuation of their effect. Shin’iseihaito (Xinyiqingfeitang, a formula of Japanese traditional Kampo medicine, has been used for the treatment of sinusitis in Japan. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of Shin’iseihaito against S. pneumoniae-caused sinusitis in mice. Oral administration of Shin’iseihaito extract (SSHT decreased the nasal colonization of S. pneumoniae in both prophylactic and therapeutic treatments, respectively, and the former was more effective than the latter. Histopathological analysis revealed that the epithelial tissue from S. pneumoniae-infected nose under SSHT treatment recovered the tissue destruction in comparison to infected nose. We also confirmed this result by scanning electron microscopic analysis. Murine peritoneal macrophages from SSHT-treated mice had significant phagocytic activity in comparison to those from untreated group. We also found that tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels and the migration of macrophages from S. pneumoniae-infected mice with the treatment with SSHT were increased compared to those from untreated group. Our data suggest that Shin’iseihaito may be useful for the treatment of S. pneumoniae-induced sinusitis.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of the effects of a fish oil enriched diet on murine brains.

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    Rasha Hammamieh

    Full Text Available The health benefits of fish oil enriched with high omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA are widely documented. Fish oil as dietary supplements, however, show moderate clinical efficacy, highlighting an immediate scope of systematic in vitro feedback. Our transcriptomic study was designed to investigate the genomic shift of murine brains fed on fish oil enriched diets. A customized fish oil enriched diet (FD and standard lab diet (SD were separately administered to two randomly chosen populations of C57BL/6J mice from their weaning age until late adolescence. Statistical analysis mined 1,142 genes of interest (GOI differentially altered in the hemibrains collected from the FD- and SD-fed mice at the age of five months. The majority of identified GOI (∼ 40% encodes proteins located in the plasma membrane, suggesting that fish oil primarily facilitated the membrane-oriented biofunctions. FD potentially augmented the nervous system's development and functions by selectively stimulating the Src-mediated calcium-induced growth cascade and the downstream PI3K-AKT-PKC pathways. FD reduced the amyloidal burden, attenuated oxidative stress, and assisted in somatostatin activation-the signatures of attenuation of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and affective disorder. FD induced elevation of FKBP5 and suppression of BDNF, which are often linked with the improvement of anxiety disorder, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Hence we anticipate efficacy of FD in treating illnesses such as depression that are typically triggered by the hypoactivities of dopaminergic, adrenergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic networks. Contrastingly, FD's efficacy could be compromised in treating illnesses such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, which are triggered by hyperactivities of the same set of neuromodulators. A more comprehensive investigation is recommended to elucidate the implications of fish oil on disease pathomechanisms, and the

  17. Interleukin-17 Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Intervention in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infection and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Daniel; Taylor, Patricia; Fletcher, Dave; van Heeckeren, Rolf; Eastman, Jean; van Heeckeren, Anna; Davis, Pamela; Chmiel, James F; Pearlman, Eric; Bonfield, Tracey L

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by an excessive neutrophilic inflammatory response within the airway as a result of defective cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor (CFTR) expression and function. Interleukin-17A induces airway neutrophilia and mucin production associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, which is associated with the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. The objectives of this study were to use the preclinical murine model of cystic fibrosis lung infection and inflammation to investigate the role of IL-17 in CF lung pathophysiology and explore therapeutic intervention with a focus on IL-17. Cftr-deficient mice (CF mice) and wild-type mice (WT mice) infected with P. aeruginosa had robust IL-17 production early in the infection associated with a persistent elevated inflammatory response. Intratracheal administration of IL-17 provoked a neutrophilic response in the airways of WT and CF animals which was similar to that observed with P. aeruginosa infection. The neutralization of IL-17 prior to infection significantly improved the outcomes in the CF mice, suggesting that IL-17 may be a therapeutic target. We demonstrate in this report that the pathophysiological contribution of IL-17 may be due to the induction of chemokines from the epithelium which is augmented by a deficiency of Cftr and ongoing inflammation. These studies demonstrate the in vivo contribution of IL-17 in cystic fibrosis lung disease and the therapeutic validity of attenuating IL-17 activity in cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Pressure surge attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Alan M.; Snyder, Kurt I.

    1985-01-01

    A pressure surge attenuation system for pipes having a fluted region opposite crushable metal foam. As adapted for nuclear reactor vessels and heads, crushable metal foam is disposed to attenuate pressure surges.

  19. Topical Apigenin Alleviates Cutaneous Inflammation in Murine Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Qiang Man

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines have been used in preventing and treating skin disorders for centuries. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration of chrysanthemum extract exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether topical applications of apigenin, a constituent of chrysanthemum extract, influence cutaneous inflammation is still unclear. In the present study, we first tested whether topical applications of apigenin alleviate cutaneous inflammation in murine models of acute dermatitis. The murine models of acute allergic contact dermatitis and acute irritant contact dermatitis were established by topical application of oxazolone and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA, respectively. Inflammation was assessed in both dermatitis models by measuring ear thickness. Additionally, the effect of apigenin on stratum corneum function in a murine subacute allergic contact dermatitis model was assessed with an MPA5 physiology monitor. Our results demonstrate that topical applications of apigenin exhibit therapeutic effects in both acute irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis models. Moreover, in comparison with the vehicle treatment, topical apigenin treatment significantly reduced transepidermal water loss, lowered skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration in a subacute murine allergic contact dermatitis model. Together, these results suggest that topical application of apigenin could provide an alternative regimen for the treatment of dermatitis.

  20. Cross-reactivity of autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with murine collagen VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Kinga; Sesarman, Alina; Oswald, Eva; Feldrihan, Vasile; Fritsch, Anja; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2010-04-01

    The pathomechanism of antibody-mediated tissue damage in autoimmune diseases can be best studied in experimental models by passively transferring specific autoantibodies into animals. The reproduction of the disease in animals depends on several factors, including the cross-reactivity of patient autoantibodies with the animal tissue. Here, we show that autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease, recognize multiple epitopes on murine collagen VII. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that EBA patients' IgG cross-reacts with mouse skin. Overlapping, recombinant fragments of murine collagen VII were used to characterize the reactivity of EBA sera and to map the epitopes on the murine antigen by ELISA and immunoblotting. The patients' autoantibody binding to murine collagen VII triggered pathogenic events as demonstrated by a complement fixing and an ex vivo granulocyte-dependent dermal-epidermal separation assay. These findings should greatly facilitate the development of improved disease models and novel therapeutic strategies.

  1. Antiflammin-1 attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wan, Jing; Han, Jian-Zhong; Li, Chen; Feng, Dan-Dan; Yue, Shao-Jie; Huang, Yan-Hong; Chen, Yi; Cheng, Qing-Mei; Li, Yang; Luo, Zi-Qiang

    2013-10-08

    Antiflammin-1 (AF-1), a derivative of uteroglobin (UG), is a synthetic nonapeptide with diverse biological functions. In the present study, we investigated whether AF-1 has a protective effect against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. C57BL/6 mice were injected with bleomycin intratracheally to create an animal model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. On Day 7 and Day 28, we examined the anti-inflammatory effect and antifibrotic effect, respectively, of AF-1 on the bleomycin-treated mice. The effects of AF-1 on the transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1)-induced proliferation of murine lung fibroblasts (NIH3T3) were examined by a bromodeoxycytidine (BrdU) incorporation assay and cell cycle analysis. Severe lung inflammation and fibrosis were observed in the bleomycin-treated mice on Day 7 and Day 28, respectively. Administration of AF-1 significantly reduced the number of neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in the lung homogenates on Day 7. Histological examination revealed that AF-1 markedly reduced the number of infiltrating cells on Day 7 and attenuated the collagen deposition and destruction of lung architecture on Day 28. The hydroxyproline (HYP) content was significantly decreased in the AF-1-treated mice. In vitro, AF-1 inhibited the TGF-β1-induced proliferation of NIH3T3 cells, which was mediated by the UG receptor. AF-1 has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic actions in bleomycin-induced lung injury. We propose that the antifibrotic effect of AF-1 might be related to its suppression of fibroblast growth in bleomycin-treated lungs and that AF-1 has potential as a new therapeutic tool for pulmonary fibrosis.

  2. The Probiotic Compound VSL#3 Modulates Mucosal, Peripheral, and Systemic Immunity Following Murine Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Ekmekciu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence linking the commensal intestinal microbiota with host health and, in turn, antibiotic induced perturbations of microbiota composition with distinct pathologies. Despite the attractiveness of probiotic therapy as a tool to beneficially alter the intestinal microbiota, its immunological effects are still incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of the probiotic formulation VSL#3 consisting of eight distinct bacterial species (including Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, B. longum, B. infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. plantarum, L. paracasei, and L. delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus in reversing immunological effects of microbiota depletion as compared to reassociation with a complex murine microbiota. To address this, conventional mice were subjected to broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy for 8 weeks and perorally reassociated with either VSL#3 bacteria or a complex murine microbiota. VSL#3 recolonization resulted in restored CD4+ and CD8+ cell numbers in the small and large intestinal lamina propria as well as in B220+ cell numbers in the former, whereas probiotic intervention was not sufficient to reverse the antibiotic induced changes of respective cell populations in the spleen. However, VSL#3 application was as efficient as complex microbiota reassociation to attenuate the frequencies of regulatory T cells, activated dendritic cells and memory/effector T cells in the small intestine, colon, mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen. Whereas broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment resulted in decreased production of cytokines such as IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-22, and IL-10 by CD4+ cells in respective immunological compartments, VSL#3 recolonization was sufficient to completely recover the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 without affecting pro-inflammatory mediators. In summary, the probiotic compound VSL#3 has an extensive impact on mucosal, peripheral, and

  3. Leishmanial lipid suppresses the bacterial endotoxin-induced inflammatory response with attenuation of tissue injury in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nabanita; Das, Subhadip; Bose, Dipayan; Banerjee, Somenath; Jha, Tarun; Saha, Krishna Das

    2014-08-01

    The use of live, attenuated, or genetically modified microbes or their cellular component(s) or metabolites has begun to emerge as a potential new approach in medicinal research to deliver biologically active entities. Thus, advancing our knowledge of such microbe-mediated therapy may suggest new avenues for therapeutic intervention in many diseases. We had earlier reported that the total lipid of attenuated Leishmania donovani suppressed the inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Our present study reveals that the pLLD, isolated from pathogenic L. donovani, decreases the inflammatory level of bacterial endotoxin in stimulated mouse macrophages, as also in the in vivo murine system. It exerts the activity by reducing the level of different mediators, such as cytokine-chemokine(s). It also suppresses the expression of the ubiquitous transcription factor NF-κBp65 in stimulated macrophage cells, improves the endotoxin-associated liver damage, reduces the vascular permeability factors, such as VEGF, and suppresses the expression of cell adhesion molecules, including ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, P-selectin, and E-selectin, in liver of septic mice. These findings indicate that pLLD may prove to be a potential anti-inflammatory agent and protect from endotoxin-induced sepsis in hepatic impairment. © 2014 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  4. Glucocorticoid-resistant Th17 cells are selectively attenuated by cyclosporine A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewitz-Bowers, Lauren P.; Lait, Philippa J. P.; Copland, David A.; Chen, Ping; Wu, Wenting; Dhanda, Ashwin D.; Vistica, Barbara P.; Williams, Emily L.; Liu, Baoying; Jawad, Shayma; Li, Zhiyu; Tucker, William; Hirani, Sima; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Zhu, Jun; Sen, Nida; Conway-Campbell, Becky L.; Gery, Igal; Dick, Andrew D.; Wei, Lai; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Lee, Richard W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids remain the cornerstone of treatment for inflammatory conditions, but their utility is limited by a plethora of side effects. One of the key goals of immunotherapy across medical disciplines is to minimize patients’ glucocorticoid use. Increasing evidence suggests that variations in the adaptive immune response play a critical role in defining the dose of glucocorticoids required to control an individual’s disease, and Th17 cells are strong candidate drivers for nonresponsiveness [also called steroid resistance (SR)]. Here we use gene-expression profiling to further characterize the SR phenotype in T cells and show that Th17 cells generated from both SR and steroid-sensitive individuals exhibit restricted genome-wide responses to glucocorticoids in vitro, and that this is independent of glucocorticoid receptor translocation or isoform expression. In addition, we demonstrate, both in transgenic murine T cells in vitro and in an in vivo murine model of autoimmunity, that Th17 cells are reciprocally sensitive to suppression with the calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporine A. This result was replicated in human Th17 cells in vitro, which were found to have a conversely large genome-wide shift in response to cyclosporine A. These observations suggest that the clinical efficacy of cyclosporine A in the treatment of SR diseases may be because of its selective attenuation of Th17 cells, and also that novel therapeutics, which target either Th17 cells themselves or the effector memory T-helper cell population from which they are derived, would be strong candidates for drug development in the context of SR inflammation. PMID:25775512

  5. Mechanism of attenuation of skeletal muscle atrophy by zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Steven T; Tisdale, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    The mechanism by which the adipokine zinc-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG) increases the mass of gastrocnemius, but not soleus muscle of diabetic mice, has been evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. There was an increased phosphorylation of both double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase and its substrate, eukaryotic initiation factor-2α, which was attenuated by about two-thirds in gastrocnemius but not soleus muscle of ob/ob mice treated with ZAG (50 μg, iv daily) for 5 d. ZAG also reduced the expression of the phospho forms of p38MAPK and phospholipase A2, as well as expression of the ubiquitin ligases (E3) muscle atrophy F-box/atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger protein, and the increased activity of both caspase-3 and casapse-8 to values found in nonobese controls. ZAG also increased the levels of phospho serine-threonine kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin in gastrocnemius muscle and reduced the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (Ser307) associated with insulin resistance. Similar changes were seen with ZAG when murine myotubes were incubated with high glucose concentrations (10 and 25 mm), showing that the effect of ZAG was direct. ZAG produced an increase in cAMP in murine myotubes, and the effects of ZAG on protein synthesis and degradation in vitro could be replicated by dibutyryl cAMP. ZAG increased cAMP levels of gastrocnemius but not soleus muscle. These results suggest that protein accretion in skeletal muscle in response to ZAG may be due to changes in intracellular cAMP and also that ZAG may have a therapeutic application in the treatment of muscle wasting conditions.

  6. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  7. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus-induced fusion of murine cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinter, A.; Chen, T.; Lowy, A.; Cortez, N.G.; Silagi, S.

    1986-03-01

    Extensive fusion occurs upon cocultivation of murine fibroblasts producing ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with a large variety of murine cell lines in the presence of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B, the active component of the antifungal agent Fungizone. The resulting polykaryocytes contain nuclei from both infected and uninfected cells, as evidenced by autoradiographic labeling experiments in which one or the other parent cell type was separately labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine and fused with an unlabeled parent. This cell fusion specifically requires the presence of an ecotropic MuLV-producing parent and is not observed for cells producing xenotropic, amphotropic, or dualtropic viruses. Mouse cells infected with nonecotropic viruses retain their sensitivity toward fusion, whereas infection with ecotropic viruses abrogates the fusion of these cells upon cocultivation with other ecotropic MuLV-producing cells. Nonmurine cells lacking the ecotropic gp70 receptor are not fused under similar conditions. Fusion is effectively inhibited by monospecific antisera to gp70, but not by antisera to p15(E), and studies with monoclonal antibodies identify distinct amino- and carboxy-terminal gp70 regions which play a role in the fusion reaction. The enhanced fusion which occurs in the presence of amphotericin B provides a rapid and sensitive assay for the expression of ecotropic MuLVs and should facilitate further mechanistic studies of MuLV-induced fusion of murine cells.

  8. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia : An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone

  9. Low-dose hydralazine prevents fibrosis in a murine model of acute kidney injury-to-chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampe, Björn; Steinle, Ulrike; Tampe, Désirée; Carstens, Julienne L; Korsten, Peter; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M; Müller, Gerhard A; Kalluri, Raghu; Zeisberg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) are intrinsically tied syndromes. In this regard, the acutely injured kidney often does not achieve its full regenerative capacity and AKI directly transitions into progressive CKD associated with tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Underlying mechanisms of such AKI-to-CKD progression are still incompletely understood and specific therapeutic interventions are still elusive. Because epigenetic modifications play a role in maintaining tissue fibrosis, we used a murine model of ischemia-reperfusion injury to determine whether aberrant promoter methylation of RASAL1 contributes causally to the switch between physiological regeneration and tubulointerstitial fibrogenesis, a hallmark of AKI-to-CKD progression. It is known that the antihypertensive drug hydralazine has demethylating activity, and that its optimum demethylating activity occurs at concentrations below blood pressure-lowering doses. Administration of low-dose hydralazine effectively induced expression of hydroxylase TET3, which catalyzed RASAL1 hydroxymethylation and subsequent RASAL1 promoter demethylation. Hydralazine-induced CpG promoter demethylation subsequently attenuated renal fibrosis and preserved excretory renal function independent of its blood pressure-lowering effects. In comparison, RASAL1 demethylation and inhibition of tubulointerstitial fibrosis was not detected upon administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor Ramipril in this model. Thus, RASAL1 promoter methylation and subsequent transcriptional RASAL1 suppression plays a causal role in AKI-to-CKD progression. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  11. RAGE-aptamer attenuates deoxycorticosterone acetate/salt-induced renal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kensei; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Yokoro, Miyuki; Ito, Sakuya; Kodama, Goh; Kaida, Yusuke; Nakayama, Yosuke; Ando, Ryotaro; Yamada-Obara, Nana; Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Matsui, Takanori; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Brooks, Craig R; Ueda, Seiji; Okuda, Seiya; Fukami, Kei

    2018-02-08

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and its downstream signaling play an important role in hypertensive renal injury. The interaction of advanced glycation end products (AGE) with their receptor (RAGE) is involved in the progression of renal disease. However, the pathological crosstalk between AGE-RAGE axis and MR system in kidney derangement remains unclear. We screened DNA-aptamer directed against RAGE (RAGE-apt) in vitro and examined its effects on renal injury in uninephrectomized deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/salt-induced hypertensive mice. RAGE, GTP-bound Rac-1 (Rac1), and MR were co-localized in the podocytes of DOCA mice. The deletion of RAGE gene significantly inhibited mesangial matrix expansion and tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DOCA mice, which was associated with the reduction of glomerular oxidative stress, MR, Rac1, and urinary albumin excretion (UAE) levels. RAGE-apt attenuated the increase in carboxymethyllysine (CML), RAGE, nitrotyrosine, Rac1, and MR levels in the kidneys and reduced UAE in DOCA mice. Aldosterone (Aldo) increased nitrotyrosine, CML, and RAGE gene expression in murine podocytes, whereas CML stimulated MR and Rac1 levels, which were blocked by RAGE-apt. The present study indicates the crosstalk between the AGE-RAGE axis and Aldo-MR system, suggesting that RAGE-apt may be a novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of MR-associated renal diseases.

  12. Astragalin suppresses inflammatory responses via down-regulation of NF-κB signaling pathway in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengyang; Liang, Dejie; Yang, Zhengtao; Wang, Tiancheng; Wang, Wei; Song, Xiaojing; Guo, Mengyao; Zhou, Ershun; Li, Depeng; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2013-10-01

    Mastitis is a prevalent and economic disease around the world and defined as infection and inflammation of the mammary gland. Astragalin, a bioactive component isolated from persimmon or Rosa agrestis, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. To investigate the potential therapeutic effect of astragalin in mastitis, a murine model of mastitis was induced by administration of LPS in mammary gland. Astragalin was applied 1h before and 12h after LPS treatment. The results showed that astragalin attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Western blotting results showed that astragalin efficiently blunt decreased nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation by inhibiting the degradation and phosphorylation of IκBα and the nuclear translocation of p65. These results suggested that astragalin exerts anti-inflammatory properties in LPS-mediated mastitis, possibly through inhibiting inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which mediates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Astragalin may be a potential therapeutic agent against mastitis. © 2013.

  13. Antibody humanization methods for development of therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Farajnia, Safar; Feizi, Mohammad Ali Hosseinpour; Nejad, Ramezan Ali Khavari

    2014-04-01

    Recombinant antibody technologies are rapidly becoming available and showing considerable clinical success. However, the immunogenicity of murine-derived monoclonal antibodies is restrictive in cancer immunotherapy. Humanized antibodies can overcome these problems and are considered to be a promising alternative therapeutic agent. There are several approaches for antibody humanization. In this article we review various methods used in the antibody humanization process.

  14. Novel Intriguing Strategies Attenuating to Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiro Sakuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass, is characterized by a deterioration of muscle quantity and quality leading to a gradual slowing of movement, a decline in strength and power, increased risk of fall-related injury, and, often, frailty. Since sarcopenia is largely attributed to various molecular mediators affecting fiber size, mitochondrial homeostasis, and apoptosis, the mechanisms responsible for these deleterious changes present numerous therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Resistance training combined with amino acid-containing supplements is often utilized to prevent age-related muscle wasting and weakness. In this review, we summarize more recent therapeutic strategies (myostatin or proteasome inhibition, supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA or ursolic acid, etc. for counteracting sarcopenia. Myostatin inhibitor is the most advanced research with a Phase I/II trial in muscular dystrophy but does not try the possibility for attenuating sarcopenia. EPA and ursolic acid seem to be effective as therapeutic agents, because they attenuate the degenerative symptoms of muscular dystrophy and cachexic muscle. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α in skeletal muscle by exercise and/or unknown supplementation would be an intriguing approach to attenuating sarcopenia. In contrast, muscle loss with age may not be influenced positively by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor or antioxidant.

  15. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  16. A Genetically Modified attenuated Listeria Vaccine Expressing HPV16 E7 Kill Tumor Cells in Direct and Antigen-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yan Jia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes, LM induces specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses, and has been identified as a promising cancer vaccine vector. Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, with human papillomavirus (HPV, particularly type 16, being the main etiological factor. The therapeutic HPV vaccines are urgently needed. The E7 protein of HPV is necessary for maintaining malignancy in tumor cells. Here, a genetically modified attenuated LM expressing HPV16 E7 protein was constructed. Intraperitoneal vaccination of LM4Δhly::E7 significantly reduced tumor size and even resulted in complete regression of established tumors in a murine model of cervical cancer. We provided evidence that recombinant LM strains could enter the tumor tissue and induce non-specific tumor cell death, probably via activation of reactive oxygen species and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. LM4Δhly::E7 effectively triggered a strong antigen-specific cellular immunity in tumor-bearing mice, and elicited significant infiltration of T cells in the intratumoral milieu. In summary, these data showed LM4Δhly::E7 to be effective in a cervical cancer model and LM4Δhly::E7 induced an antitumor effect by antigen-specific cellular immune responses and direct killing of tumor cells, indicating a potential application against cervical cancer.

  17. Murine model of rotavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, N; Franco, M A; Greenberg, H B

    1997-01-01

    The murine model of homologous rotavirus infection has been used to study the determinants of protection. The local IgA immune response appears to be the critical factor in generating protective immunity after natural infection. A series of knockout mice were used to evaluate the contribution of T cells and B cells to immunity and resolution from primary infection. Both arms of immune system played a role in the resolution of primary infection but antibody was much more important for prevention of reinfection.

  18. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM; Burrell, Anthony K [Los Alamos, NM; Agrawal, Anoop [Tucson, AZ; Hall, Simon B [Palmerston North, NZ

    2009-01-20

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  19. Natural attenuation of herbicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, Nina; Højberg, Anker Lajer; Broholm, Mette Martina

    2002-01-01

    A field injection experiment in a sandy, aerobic aquifer showed that two phenoxy acids MCPP (mecoprop) and dichlorprop were degraded within I in downgradient of the injection wells after an apparent lag period. The plume development and microbial measurements indicated that microbial growth....... The observations may be important for application of natural attenuation as a remedy in field scale systems....

  20. Syneilesis palmata (Thunb.) Maxim. extract attenuates inflammatory responses via the regulation of TRIF-dependent signaling and inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Won; Shim, Do-Wan; Shim, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Myong-Ki; Shin, Yong-Kook; Kwak, Su-Bin; Koppula, Sushruta; Kim, Tack-Joong; Kang, Tae-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2015-05-26

    Syneilesis palmata (Thunb.) Maxim. (S. palmata, Asteraceae) is a traditional Korean therapeutic herb widely used to treat pain, arthritis, and other symptoms. This study provides the scientific basis for the anti-inflammatory effects of S. palmata extract (SP) in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages were used to study the regulatory effect of SP on the inflammatory mediators in vitro. Bone marrow-derived macrophages were used to study the effects of SP on inflammasome activation. Escherichia coli-induced sepsis mouse model and LPS-induced endotoxin shock model were employed to study the effect of SP on in vivo efficacy. SP inhibited the LPS-stimulated release of proinflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide and interleukin (IL)-6 in RAW 264.7 cells. SP treatment also attenuated IL-1β secretion via the inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by monosodium urate, ATP, and nigericin. Further, SP ameliorated the severity of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated symptoms in LPS-induced endotoxin and E. coli-induced sepsis mouse models. Mechanistic studies revealed that inhibitory effects of SP were mediated through the regulation of TRIF-dependent signaling and inflammasome activation. This study was the first to reveal mechanistic-based evidence substantiating the traditional claims of SP in the treatment of inflammation-related disorders, such as pain and arthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ablation of cytochrome P450 omega-hydroxylase 4A14 gene attenuates hepatic steatosis and fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Sha; Zhou, Yunfeng; Su, Wen; Ruan, Xiongzhong; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Feng; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Guan, Youfei

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by simple hepatic steatosis (SS), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hepatic fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Dysregulated fatty acid metabolism in the liver plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Cytochrome P450 omega-hydroxylase 4A14 (CYP4A14) is a homolog of human CYP4A hydroxylase that catalyzes omega-hydroxylation of medium-chain fatty acids and arachidonic acid in mice. The goal of this study was to determine the role of CYP4A14 in the development and the progression of NAFLD. Here, we showed that hepatic CYP4A expression was up-regulated in the livers of patients and three murine models of NAFLD. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of CYP4A14 in the livers of C57BL/6 mice resulted in a fatty liver phenotype with a significant increase in hepatic fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) expression. In contrast, CYP4A14 gene-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet or a methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet exhibited attenuated liver lipid accumulation and reduced hepatic FAT/CD36 expression. In addition, hepatic inflammation and fibrosis was markedly ameliorated in MCD diet-fed CYP4A14-deficient mice. Collectively, CYP4A14 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of both SS and NASH and may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:28270609

  2. Indole-TEMPO conjugates alleviate ischemia-reperfusion injury via attenuation of oxidative stress and preservation of mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Wei; Bi, Yue; Gao, Xiang; Li, Pengfei; Hou, Shanshan; Zhang, Yanrong; Bammert, Cathy; Jockusch, Steffen; Legalley, Thomas D; Michael Gibson, K; Bi, Lanrong

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative damage contributes to a wide range of pathologies including ischemia/reperfusion injury. Accordingly, protecting mitochondria from oxidative damage should possess therapeutic relevance. In the present study, we have designed and synthesized a series of novel indole-TEMPO conjugates that manifested good anti-inflammatory properties in a murine model of xylene-induced ear edema. We have demonstrated that these compounds can protect cells from simulated ischemia/reperfusion (s-I/R)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction and mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that indole-TEMPO conjugates can attenuate organ damage induced in rodents via intestinal I/R injury. We therefore propose that the pharmacological profile and mechanism of action of these indole-TEMPO conjugates involve convergent roles, including the ability to decrease free radical production via lipid peroxidation which couples to an associated decrease in ROS-mediated activation of the inflammatory process. We further hypothesize that the protective effects of indole-TEMPO conjugates partially reside in maintaining optimal mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Therapeutic misadventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, N J

    2010-10-01

    Therapeutic misadventure can be defined as an injury or an adverse event caused by medical management rather than by an underlying disease. Within the National Health Service there were over 86,000 reported adverse incidents in 2007. In the USA medication errors have been rated as the fourth highest cause of death. Unfortunately one of the greatest contributors to iatrogenic injury is human error. The potential types of misadventure are infinite. Medication errors are a major part of this, being responsible for over 70% of cases that cause serious harm. However, many medication errors caused by slips, lapses, technical errors and mistakes are preventable; intentional violations of safe operating procedures are not. While medication errors were tolerated by society in the past, the readiness to institute criminal proceedings against health-care professionals has increased greatly in the UK over the last decade. The medication process consists of writing prescriptions, dispensing the product, administering it and monitoring its effects. Prescription errors arise owing to incomplete information, lack of appropriate labelling, environmental factors and human blunders. Even with a perfect prescription the right medication must be dispensed and appropriately labelled. Dispensing errors are not uncommon and may be compounded by non-clinical considerations. Administration of a drug by injection is one of the most dangerous aspects of the medication process, especially in inexperienced hands. The final component of medication supply is monitoring the effect of the medication. With short courses of medication such monitoring is easy, but with long-term medication, particularly with potent drugs where the margin between efficacy and toxicity is small, active procedures may be required to ensure toxicity does not ensue. Despite the endeavour of health-care professions to stick to the rule of 'first, do no harm', in reality this is difficult to achieve all of the time. When

  4. Host and bacterial proteases influence biofilm formation and virulence in a murine model of enterococcal catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Flores-Mireles, Ana L; Cusumano, Zachary T; Takagi, Enzo; Hultgren, Scott J; Caparon, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a leading causative agent of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), the most common hospital-acquired infection. Its ability to grow and form catheter biofilm is dependent upon host fibrinogen (Fg). Examined here are how bacterial and host proteases interact with Fg and contribute to virulence. Analysis of mutants affecting the two major secreted proteases of E. faecalis OG1RF (GelE, SprE) revealed that while the loss of either had no effect on virulence in a murine CAUTI model or for formation of Fg-dependent biofilm in urine, the loss of both resulted in CAUTI attenuation and defective biofilm formation. GelE - , but not SprE - mutants, lost the ability to degrade Fg in medium, while paradoxically, both could degrade Fg in urine. The finding that SprE was activated independently of GelE in urine by a host trypsin-like protease resolved this paradox. Treatment of catheter-implanted mice with inhibitors of both host-derived and bacterial-derived proteases dramatically reduced catheter-induced inflammation, significantly inhibited dissemination from bladder to kidney and revealed an essential role for a host cysteine protease in promoting pathogenesis. These data show that both bacterial and host proteases contribute to CAUTI, that host proteases promote dissemination and suggest new strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Wedelolactone mitigates UVB induced oxidative stress, inflammation and early tumor promotion events in murine skin: plausible role of NFkB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farrah; Khan, Bilal Azhar; Sultana, Sarwat

    2016-09-05

    UVB (Ultra-violet B) radiation is one of the major etiological factors in various dermal pathology viz. dermatitis, actinic folliculitis, solar urticaria, psoriasis and cancer among many others. UVB causes toxic manifestation in tissues by inciting inflammatory and tumor promoting events. We have designed this study to assess the anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor promotion effect of Wedelolactone (WDL) a specific IKK inhibitor. Results indicate significant restoration of anti-oxidative enzymes due to WDL treatments. We also found that WDL was effective in mitigating inflammatory markers consisting of MPO (myeloperoxidase), Mast cells trafficking, Langerhans cells suppression and COX 2 expression up regulation due to UVB exposure. We also deduce that WDL presented a promising intervention in attenuating early tumor promotion events caused by UVB exposure as indicated by the results of ODC (Ornithine Decarboxylase), Thymidine assay, Vimentin and VEGF (Vascular-endothelial growth factor) expression. This study was able to provide substantial cues for the therapeutic ability of Wedelolactone against inflammatory and tumor promoting events in murine skin depicting plausible role of NFkB pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Three-dimensional in vivo imaging of the murine liver: a micro-computed tomography-based anatomical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Fiebig

    Full Text Available Various murine models are currently used to study acute and chronic pathological processes of the liver, and the efficacy of novel therapeutic regimens. The increasing availability of high-resolution small animal imaging modalities presents researchers with the opportunity to precisely identify and describe pathological processes of the liver. To meet the demands, the objective of this study was to provide a three-dimensional illustration of the macroscopic anatomical location of the murine liver lobes and hepatic vessels using small animal imaging modalities. We analysed micro-CT images of the murine liver by integrating additional information from the published literature to develop comprehensive illustrations of the macroscopic anatomical features of the murine liver and hepatic vasculature. As a result, we provide updated three-dimensional illustrations of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver and hepatic vessels using micro-CT. The information presented here provides researchers working in the field of experimental liver disease with a comprehensive, easily accessable overview of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver.

  7. Ixeris dentata (Thunb) Nakai attenuates cognitive impairment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ixeris dentata (Thunb) Nakai attenuates cognitive impairment in MPTP-treated mouse model of Parkinson's disease. ... Therefore, IDE could potentially be developed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Keywords: Ixeris dentata, Neurodegenerative disease, MPTP, Parkinson's ...

  8. Shigella mediated depletion of macrophages in a murine breast cancer model is associated with tumor regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Galmbacher

    Full Text Available A tumor promoting role of macrophages has been described for a transgenic murine breast cancer model. In this model tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent a major component of the leukocytic infiltrate and are associated with tumor progression. Shigella flexneri is a bacterial pathogen known to specificly induce apotosis in macrophages. To evaluate whether Shigella-induced removal of macrophages may be sufficient for achieving tumor regression we have developed an attenuated strain of S. flexneri (M90TDeltaaroA and infected tumor bearing mice. Two mouse models were employed, xenotransplantation of a murine breast cancer cell line and spontanous breast cancer development in MMTV-HER2 transgenic mice. Quantitative analysis of bacterial tumor targeting demonstrated that attenuated, invasive Shigella flexneri primarily infected TAMs after systemic administration. A single i.v. injection of invasive M90TDeltaaroA resulted in caspase-1 dependent apoptosis of TAMs followed by a 74% reduction in tumors of transgenic MMTV-HER-2 mice 7 days post infection. TAM depletion was sustained and associated with complete tumor regression.These data support TAMs as useful targets for antitumor therapy and highlight attenuated bacterial pathogens as potential tools.

  9. Convection enhanced delivery of carmustine to the murine brainstem: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewing, A Charlotte P; Caretti, Viola; Lagerweij, Tonny; Schellen, Pepijn; Jansen, Marc H A; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Idema, Sander; Molthoff, Carla F M; Vandertop, W Peter; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Noske, David P; Hulleman, Esther

    2014-12-30

    Systemic delivery of therapeutic agents remains ineffective against diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), possibly due to an intact blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and to dose-limiting toxicity of systemic chemotherapeutic agents. Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) into the brainstem may provide an effective local delivery alternative for DIPG patients. The aim of this study is to develop a method to perform CED into the murine brainstem and to test this method using the chemotherapeutic agent carmustine (BiCNU). To this end, a newly designed murine CED catheter was tested in vitro and in vivo. After determination of safety and distribution, mice bearing VUMC-DIPG-3 and E98FM-DIPG brainstem tumors were treated with carmustine dissolved in DW 5% or carmustine dissolved in 10% ethanol. Our results show that CED into the murine brainstem is feasible and well tolerated by mice with and without brainstem tumors. CED of carmustine dissolved in 5% DW increased median survival of mice with VUMC-DIPG-3 and E98FM-DIPG tumors with 35% and 25% respectively. Dissolving carmustine in 10% ethanol further improved survival to 45% in mice with E98FM-DIPG tumors. Since genetically engineered and primary DIPG models are currently only available in mice, murine CED studies have clear advantages over CED studies in other animals. CED in the murine brainstem can be performed safely, is well tolerated and can be used to study efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents orthotopically. These results set the foundation for more CED studies in murine DIPG models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluid dynamic bowtie attenuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Hermus, James

    2015-03-01

    Fluence field modulated CT allows for improvements in image quality and dose reduction. To date, only 1-D modulators have been proposed, the extension to 2-D modulation is difficult with solid-metal attenuation-based modulators. This work proposes to use liquids and gas to attenuate the x-ray beam which can be arrayed allowing for 2-D fluence modulation. The thickness of liquid and the pressure for a given path length of gas were determined that provided the same attenuation as 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Gaseous Xenon and liquid Iodine, Zinc Chloride, and Cerium Chloride were studied. Additionally, we performed some proof-of-concept experiments in which (1) a single cell of liquid was connected to a reservoir which allowed the liquid thickness to be modulated and (2) a 96 cell array was constructed in which the liquid thickness in each cell was adjusted manually. Liquid thickness varied as a function of kV and chemical composition, with Zinc Chloride allowing for the smallest thickness; 1.8, 2.25, 3, and 3.6 cm compensated for 30 cm of soft tissue at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV respectively. The 96 cell Iodine attenuator allowed for a reduction in both dynamic range to the detector and scatter to primary ratio. Successful modulation of a single cell was performed at 0, 90, and 130 degrees using a simple piston/actuator. The thickness of liquids and the Xenon gas pressure seem logistically implementable within the constraints of CBCT and diagnostic CT systems.

  11. Optimization of a therapeutic electromagnetic field (EMF) to retard breast cancer tumor growth and vascularity

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, Ivan L.; Markov, Marko S; Hardman, W Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background This study provided additional data on the effects of a therapeutic electromagnetic field (EMF) device on growth and vascularization of murine 16/C mammary adenocarcinoma cells implanted in C3H/HeJ mice. Methods The therapeutic EMF device generated a defined 120 Hz semi sine wave pulse signal of variable intensity. Murine 16/C mammary adenocarcinoma tumor fragments were implanted subcutaneously between the scapulae of syngeneic C3H mice. Once the tumor grew to 100 mm3, daily EMF tr...

  12. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibition With Rapamycin Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in a Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Joo [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Sowers, Anastasia; Thetford, Angela [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); McKay-Corkum, Grace; Chung, Su I. [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Citrin, Deborah E., E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIPF) is a late toxicity of therapeutic radiation. Signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin drives several processes implicated in RIPF, including inflammatory cytokine production, fibroblast proliferation, and epithelial senescence. We sought to determine if mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition with rapamycin would mitigate RIPF. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6NCr mice received a diet formulated with rapamycin (14 mg/kg food) or a control diet 2 days before and continuing for 16 weeks after exposure to 5 daily fractions of 6 Gy of thoracic irradiation. Fibrosis was assessed with Masson trichrome staining and hydroxyproline assay. Cytokine expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Senescence was assessed by staining for β-galactosidase activity. Results: Administration of rapamycin extended the median survival of irradiated mice compared with the control diet from 116 days to 156 days (P=.006, log-rank test). Treatment with rapamycin reduced hydroxyproline content compared with the control diet (irradiation plus vehicle, 45.9 ± 11.8 μg per lung; irradiation plus rapamycin, 21.4 ± 6.0 μg per lung; P=.001) and reduced visible fibrotic foci. Rapamycin treatment attenuated interleukin 1β and transforming growth factor β induction in irradiated lungs compared with the control diet. Type II pneumocyte senescence after irradiation was reduced with rapamycin treatment at 16 weeks (3-fold reduction at 16 weeks, P<.001). Conclusions: Rapamycin protected against RIPF in a murine model. Rapamycin treatment reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, extracellular matrix production, and senescence in type II pneumocytes.

  13. Development of a radiofrequency ablation platform in a clinically relevant murine model of hepatocellular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaoqiang; Li, Guangfu; Liu, Dai; Motamarry, Anjan; Huang, Xiangwei; Wolfe, A. Marissa; Helke, Kristi L.; Haemmerich, Dieter; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F; Kimchi, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    RFA is used in treatment of patients with hepatocellular cancer (HCC); however, tumor location and size often limit therapeutic efficacy. The absence of a realistic animal model and a radiofrequency ablation (RFA) suitable for small animals presents significant obstacles in developing new strategies. To establish a realistic RFA platform that allows the development of effective RFA-integrated treatment in an orthotopic murine model of HCC, a human cardiac radiofrequency generator was modified for murine use. Parameters were optimized and RFA was then performed in normal murine livers and HCCs. The effects of RFA were monitored by measuring the ablation zone and transaminases. The survival of tumor-bearing mice with and without RFA was monitored, ablated normal liver and HCCs were evaluated macroscopically and histologically. We demonstrated that tissue-mimicking media was able to optimize RFA parameters. Utilizing this information we performed RFA in normal and HCC-bearing mice. RFA was applied to hepatic parenchyma and completely destroyed small tumors and part of large tumors. Localized healing of the ablation and normalization of transaminases occurred within 7 days post RFA. RFA treatment extended the survival of small tumor-bearing mice. They survived at least 5 months longer than the controls; however, mice with larger tumors only had a slight therapeutic effect after RFA. Collectively, we performed RFA in murine HCCs and observed a significant therapeutic effect in small tumor-bearing mice. The quick recovery of tumor-bearing mice receiving RFA mimics observations in human subjects. This platform provides us a unique opportunity to study RFA in HCC treatment. PMID:26537481

  14. Attenuation of aortic aneurysms with stem cells from different genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John P; Salmon, Morgan; Pope, Nicolas H; Lu, Guanyi; Su, Gang; Sharma, Ashish K; Ailawadi, Gorav; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2015-11-01

    No medical therapies are yet available to slow abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth. This study sought to investigate the effect of different genders of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on AAA growth in a murine AAA model. Given the decreased rate of AAA in women, it is hypothesized that female MSC would attenuate AAA growth more so than male MSC. Aortas of 8-10-wk-old male C57Bl/6 mice were perfused with purified porcine pancreatic elastase to induce AAA formation. Bone marrow-derived MSC from male and female mice were dosed via tail vein injection (3 million cells per dose, 500 μL of volume per injection) on postaortic perfusion days 1, 3, and 5. Aortas were harvested after 14 d. Mean aortic dilation in the elastase group was 121 ± 5.2% (mean ± standard error of the mean), while male MSC inhibited AAA growth (87.8 ± 6.9%, P = 0.008) compared with that of elastase. Female MSC showed the most marked attenuation of AAA growth (75.2 ± 8.3% P = 0.0004). Proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) were only decreased in tissues treated with female MSC (P = 0.017, P = 0.001, and P < 0.0001, respectively, when compared with elastase). These data exhibit that female MSC more strongly attenuate AAA growth in the murine model. Furthermore, female MSC and male MSC inhibit proinflammatory cytokines at varying levels. The effects of MSC on aortic tissue offer a promising insight into biologic therapies for future medical treatment of AAAs in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemoimmunotherapy of murine bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogdill, B J; Lamm, D L; Livingston, R B

    1981-11-01

    The lethality of invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) has prompted a search for effective, minimally toxic, adjuvant therapy. Such agents were evaluated in a murine bladder cancer (MBT2) model which parallels the clinical disease. One hundred C3H/He mice were inoculated i.d. with 2.5 x 10(4) viable MBT2 tumor cells and randomized to receive either normal saline (control), cis-Platinum (CPT), cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), BCG, (CY + MTX), or (CY + MTX + BCG). Chemotherapy was given intraperitoneally weekly starting on day 7 after inoculation. Immunotherapy was given intralesionally on days 1 and 10 only. All mice were treated for 5 weeks followed by 5 weeks of observation. At 5 weeks, tumors of mice receiving cyclophosphamide alone or either of the combinations of therapy were smaller (P less than 0.01) than tumors of controls or other single agents alone. Each regimen increased survival, but only the combination regimen increase survival significantly (P less than 0.01). In the doses and schedule used in this model. Combination chemotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy significantly delay tumor growth and increase duration of survival (P less than 0.01) when compared with controls or single agent groups.

  16. FJU-C4, a new 2-pyridone compound, attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation via p38MAPK and NF-κB in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Sen Liu

    Full Text Available Despite advances in antibiotic therapy and intensive care, the mortality caused by systemic inflammatory response syndrome and severe sepsis remains high. The use of anti-inflammatory agents to attenuate inflammatory response during acute systemic inflammatory reactions may improve survival rates. Here we show that a newly synthesized 2-pyridone compound (FJU-C4 can suppress the expression of late inflammatory mediators such as iNOS and COX-2 in murine macrophages. The pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6, were dose-dependently suppressed by FJU-C4 both in mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the expression of TNFα was inhibited from as early as 2 hours after exposure to LPS stimulation. The production of mature pro-inflammatory cytokines was also suppressed by pretreatment with FJU-C4 in either cell culture medium or mice serum when stimulated by LPS. FJU-C4 prolongs mouse survival and prevents mouse death from LPS-induced systemic inflammation when the dose of FJU-C4 is over 5 mg/kg. The activities of ERK, JNK, and p38MAPK were induced by LPS stimulation on murine macrophage cell line, but only p38MAPK signaling was dramatically suppressed by pretreatment with the FJU-C4 compound in a dose-dependent manner. NF-κB activation also was suppressed by FJU-C4 compound. These findings suggest that the FJU-C4 compound may act as a promising therapeutic agent against inflammatory diseases by inhibiting the p38MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathway.

  17. Anti-inflammatory Potential of Petiveria alliacea on Activated RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Rosa Martha Perez; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Defense and protection to multiple harmful stimuli are the inflammation, when is self-amplified and uncontrolled is the basis of the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory illness. The aim of this study was to evaluate if Petiveria alliacea could attenuate inflammation in a murine model of RAW264 macrophages the involved model and its involved mechanism. The ethanol extract from P. alliacea was precipitated with water and supernatant was used for this study (PW). The anti-inflammatory effects of PW were investigated through evaluating of the production of several cytokines, chemokines, and expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Also was determined the ability to decrease the oxidative stress in RAW264.7 cells with carboxy-2',7'-dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate. PW significantly suppress the secretion of prostaglandin E2, leukotriene C4, interleukin (IL)-1 β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon gamma nitric oxide (NO), inducible NO synthase, IL-1 β, IL-4, in RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PW also markedly inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. PW produced significant anti-inflammatory activity through inhibiting the production of inflammatory mediators through the NF-κB inactivation in the LPS-stimulated RAW24.7 cells. PW exerts significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, and this effect can be attributed in part, to the presence of dibenzyl disulfide, dibenzyl trisulfide pinitol, coumarin, myricetin, glutamyl-S-benzyl cysteine, and petiveriins A and B. Treatment with ethanol extract from Petiveria alliacea which was previously precipitated with water and supernatant (PE) was tested in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. PE suppressed the level of oxidative stress and the induction of proinflammatory mediators, as PGE2, LTC4, IL-1 ß, IL-6, IL-10, IFN- NO, iNOS, IL-1 ß, IL-4, in RAW264.7 macrophages through NF-B inactivation. These findings suggest

  18. Murine Hepatitis Virus nsp14 Exoribonuclease Activity Is Required for Resistance to Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, James Brett; Li, Yize; Elliott, Ruth; Lu, Xiaotao; Graepel, Kevin W; Sexton, Nicole R; Smith, Everett Clinton; Weiss, Susan R; Denison, Mark R

    2018-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-sense RNA viruses that infect numerous mammalian and avian species and are capable of causing severe and lethal disease in humans. CoVs encode several innate immune antagonists that counteract the host innate immune response to facilitate efficient viral replication. CoV nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14) encodes 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity (ExoN), which performs a proofreading function and is required for high-fidelity replication. Outside of the order Nidovirales, arenaviruses are the only RNA viruses that encode an ExoN, which functions to degrade double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) replication intermediates. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that CoV ExoN also functions to antagonize the innate immune response. We demonstrate that viruses lacking ExoN activity [ExoN(-)] are sensitive to cellular pretreatment with interferon beta (IFN-β) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ExoN(-) virus replication was attenuated in wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) and partially restored in interferon alpha/beta receptor-deficient (IFNAR-/-) BMMs. ExoN(-) virus replication did not result in IFN-β gene expression, and in the presence of an IFN-β-mediated antiviral state, ExoN(-) viral RNA levels were not substantially reduced relative to those of untreated samples. However, ExoN(-) virus generated from IFN-β-pretreated cells had reduced specific infectivity and decreased relative fitness, suggesting that ExoN(-) virus generated during an antiviral state is less viable to establish a subsequent infection. Overall, our data suggest murine hepatitis virus (MHV) ExoN activity is required for resistance to the innate immune response, and antiviral mechanisms affecting the viral RNA sequence and/or an RNA modification act on viruses lacking ExoN activity.IMPORTANCE CoVs encode multiple antagonists that prevent or disrupt an efficient innate immune response. Additionally, no specific antiviral therapies or vaccines currently

  19. Calcitonin gene-related peptide exerts anti-inflammatory property through regulating murine macrophages polarization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jia-Xi; Zhou, Yong; Zhou, Ai-Yuan; Guan, Xin-Xin; Liu, Tian; Yang, Hui-Hui; Xie, Hui; Chen, Ping

    2017-11-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a condition resulting from direct or indirect lung injury associated with high mortality and morbidity. The phenotype of macrophages in lung contributes to the pathological progress of ALI. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in lung, and attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in rats. However, the exact effect of CGRP on the activation of macrophages remains unknown. Here we investigate the effect of CGRP on the macrophages activation and inflammation in murine macrophages in vitro. We found that LPS increased the expression of CGRP in a LPS-induced ALI murine model and LPS-stimulated murine macrophages. Although CGRP didn't alter the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (a marker of pro-inflammatory phenotype of macrophages, M1 macrophages) or Arginase 1 (Arg1, a marker of M2 macrophages) in non-differentiated macrophages, CGRP significantly reduced the NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β mRNA expression induced by LPS, as well as NLRP3 protein and IL-1β secretion induced by LPS+ATP in macrophages in vitro. On the other hand, CGRP dramatically enhanced the Arg1 expression and activity induced by IL-4 in the time- and dose-dependent manners. CGRP also promoted the expression of markers of M2 macrophages (IL-10, Fizz1 and Mrc1) induced by IL-4 in murine macrophages. These effects of CGRP were also observed in primary murine peritoneal macrophages. In addition, we found that CGRP regulated macrophages polarization partially through calmodulin, PKC and PKA pathways. Specifically, CGRP could inhibit the degradation of I-κB induced by LPS, and enhance the phosphorylation of STAT6 induced by IL-4 in macrophages. In conclusion, our results indicate that CGRP regulates macrophage polarization and inhibits inflammation in murine macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dendritic Immunotherapy Improvement for an Optimal Control Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Rangel-Reyes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic protocols in immunotherapy are usually proposed following the intuition and experience of the therapist. In order to deduce such protocols mathematical modeling, optimal control and simulations are used instead of the therapist’s experience. Clinical efficacy of dendritic cell (DC vaccines to cancer treatment is still unclear, since dendritic cells face several obstacles in the host environment, such as immunosuppression and poor transference to the lymph nodes reducing the vaccine effect. In view of that, we have created a mathematical murine model to measure the effects of dendritic cell injections admitting such obstacles. In addition, the model considers a therapy given by bolus injections of small duration as opposed to a continual dose. Doses timing defines the therapeutic protocols, which in turn are improved to minimize the tumor mass by an optimal control algorithm. We intend to supplement therapist’s experience and intuition in the protocol’s implementation. Experimental results made on mice infected with melanoma with and without therapy agree with the model. It is shown that the dendritic cells’ percentage that manages to reach the lymph nodes has a crucial impact on the therapy outcome. This suggests that efforts in finding better methods to deliver DC vaccines should be pursued.

  1. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ inhibits lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation in part via downregulated NF-κB and p38/JNK activation in microglial and attenuates microglia activation in lipopolysaccharide treatment mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongfei Yang

    Full Text Available Therapeutic strategies designed to inhibit the activation of microglia may lead to significant advancement in the treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ is a naturally occurring redox cofactor that acts as an essential nutrient, antioxidant, and has been reported to exert potent immunosuppressive effects. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of PQQ was investigated in LPS treated primary microglia cells. Our observations showed that pretreatment with PQQ significantly inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 and suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators such as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-a, IL-1b, IL-6, MCP-1 and MIP-1a in LPS treated primary microglia cells. The nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the phosphorylation level of p65, p38 and JNK MAP kinase pathways were also inhibited by PQQ in LPS stimulated primary microglia cells. Further a systemic LPS treatment acute inflammation murine brain model was used to study the suppressive effects of PQQ against neuroinflammation in vivo. Mice treated with PQQ demonstrated marked attenuation of neuroinflammation based on Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis of Iba1-against antibody in the brain tissue. Indicated that PQQ protected primary cortical neurons against microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. These results collectively suggested that PQQ might be a promising therapeutic agent for alleviating the progress of neurodegenerative diseases associated with microglia activation.

  2. CD44 antibodies and immune thrombocytopenia in the amelioration of murine inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Mott

    Full Text Available Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7, also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics.

  3. Klebsiella pneumoniae FimK Promotes Virulence in Murine Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David A; Hilliard, Julia K; Tiemann, Kristin M; Todd, Elizabeth M; Morley, S Celeste; Hunstad, David A

    2016-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a chief cause of nosocomial pneumonia, is a versatile and commonly multidrug-resistant human pathogen for which further insight into pathogenesis is needed. We show that the pilus regulatory gene fimK promotes the virulence of K. pneumoniae strain TOP52 in murine pneumonia. This contrasts with the attenuating effect of fimK on urinary tract virulence, illustrating that a single factor may exert opposing effects on pathogenesis in distinct host niches. Loss of fimK in TOP52 pneumonia was associated with diminished lung bacterial burden, limited innate responses within the lung, and improved host survival. FimK expression was shown to promote serum resistance, capsule production, and protection from phagocytosis by host immune cells. Finally, while the widely used K. pneumoniae model strain 43816 produces rapid dissemination and death in mice, TOP52 caused largely localized pneumonia with limited lethality, thereby providing an alternative tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis and control within the lung. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Structure of the murine Thy-1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Giguere; K-I. Isobe; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have cloned the murine Thy-1.1 (AKR) and Thy-1.2 (Balb/c) genes. The complete exon/intron structure and the nucleotide sequence of the Thy-1.2 gene was determined. The gene contains four exons and three intervening sequences. The complete transcriptional unit gives rise to a tissue

  5. Murine Typhus in Child, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Velázquez, Jorge E.; Uicab, Justo Eduardo Sulú

    2009-01-01

    A case of murine typhus in Yucatan was diagnosed in a child with nonspecific signs and symptoms. The finding of Rickettsia typhi increases the number of Rickettsia species identified in Yucatan and shows that studies are needed to determine the prevalence and incidence of rickettsioses in Mexico. PMID:19523307

  6. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in the US

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-21

    Dr. Lucas Blanton discusses the Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston Texas in 2013.  Created: 4/21/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2015.

  7. Localization and phenotypical characterization of murine macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. de Jong

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the experimental work described in this thesis is to localize and characterize phenotypically the distinct macrophage sub populations present in murine organs in detail. To this end an immunohistochemical approach was chosen. A panel of macrophage and dendrocyte-specific

  8. Dasatinib Attenuates Pressure Overload Induced Cardiac Fibrosis in a Murine Transverse Aortic Constriction Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaravadivel Balasubramanian

    Full Text Available Reactive cardiac fibrosis resulting from chronic pressure overload (PO compromises ventricular function and contributes to congestive heart failure. We explored whether nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NTKs play a key role in fibrosis by activating cardiac fibroblasts (CFb, and could potentially serve as a target to reduce PO-induced cardiac fibrosis. Our studies were carried out in PO mouse myocardium induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC. Administration of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dasatinib, via an intraperitoneally implanted mini-osmotic pump at 0.44 mg/kg/day reduced PO-induced accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins and improved left ventricular geometry and function. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment inhibited NTK activation (primarily Pyk2 and Fak and reduced the level of FSP1 positive cells in the PO myocardium. In vitro studies using cultured mouse CFb showed that dasatinib treatment at 50 nM reduced: (i extracellular accumulation of both collagen and fibronectin, (ii both basal and PDGF-stimulated activation of Pyk2, (iii nuclear accumulation of Ki67, SKP2 and histone-H2B and (iv PDGF-stimulated CFb proliferation and migration. However, dasatinib did not affect cardiomyocyte morphologies in either the ventricular tissue after in vivo administration or in isolated cells after in vitro treatment. Mass spectrometric quantification of dasatinib in cultured cells indicated that the uptake of dasatinib by CFb was greater that that taken up by cardiomyocytes. Dasatinib treatment primarily suppressed PDGF but not insulin-stimulated signaling (Erk versus Akt activation in both CFb and cardiomyocytes. These data indicate that dasatinib treatment at lower doses than that used in chemotherapy has the capacity to reduce hypertrophy-associated fibrosis and improve ventricular function.

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment attenuates coagulation imbalance in a lethal murine model of sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Ting; Li, Yongqing; Liu, Baoling

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sepsis has a profound impact on the inflammatory and hemostatic systems. In addition to systemic inflammation, it can produce disseminated intravascular coagulation, microvascular thrombosis, consumptive coagulopathy, and multiple organ failure. We have shown that treatment with suber......BACKGROUND: Sepsis has a profound impact on the inflammatory and hemostatic systems. In addition to systemic inflammation, it can produce disseminated intravascular coagulation, microvascular thrombosis, consumptive coagulopathy, and multiple organ failure. We have shown that treatment...... with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), improves survival in a lethal model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice, but its effect on coagulation remains unknown. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of SAHA treatment on coagulopathy in sepsis. METHODS...

  10. Morin hydrate attenuates the acrylamide-induced imbalance in antioxidant enzymes in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    SINGH, MAHENDRA PAL; JAKHAR, REKHA; KANG, SUN CHUL

    2015-01-01

    Liver diseases are among the most serious health issues nowadays. Hepatocellular carcinoma, one of the most lethal types of cancer worldwide, can be caused by chemically-induced oxidative stress. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the protective effects of morin hydrate (MH) against acrylamide (AA)-induced hepatotoxicity in male ICR mice. The mice were randomly allocated into 4 groups [the control, the group subcutaneously injected with AA alone (50 mg/kg body weight), the group subcutaneously injected with AA (50 mg/kg body weight) and MH (5 mg/kg body weight) and the group subcutaneously injected with AA (50 mg/kg body weight) and MH (15 mg/kg body weight) for 5 consecutive days]. Histopathological evaluations were performed and the levels of serum hepatic enzymes were analyzed to determine initial liver injury, and the mice in the AA-treated groups were compared with the mice receiving no treatment and with the mice administered MH in combination with AA. Furthermore, oxidative stress, hepatic inflammation and the levels of DNA damage-related markers were evaluated to determine the extent of liver damage induced by AA within a short-term period. The subcutaneous administration of AA induced severe hepatic injury, and combined treatment with AA and MH resulted in a significant improvement in all evaluated parameters. This recovery was most obvious in the group receiving AA and 15 mg/kg body weight dose of MH. The findings of our study demonstrated that MH protected mice from severe hepatic injury induced by AA. Moreover, MH is a natural polyphenolic compound, and thus it has potential for use in the treatment of severe liver diseases, in place of many synthetic drugs. PMID:26252199

  11. Ethanol extract of Prunus mume fruit attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis involving Nrf2/HO-1 activation in C2C12 myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sook Kang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The fruit of the Prunus mume (Siebold Siebold & Zucc., Rosaceae (Korean name: Maesil has long been used as a health food or valuable medicinal material in traditional herb medicine in Southeast Asian countries. In this study, we determined the potential therapeutic efficacy of the ethanol extract of P. mume fruits (EEPM against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in the murine skeletal muscle myoblast cell line C2C12, and sought to understand the associated molecular mechanisms. The results indicated that exposure of C2C12 cells to H2O2 caused a reduction in cell viability by increasing the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and by disrupting mitochondrial membrane permeability, leading to DNA damage and apoptosis. However, pretreatment of the cells with EEPM before H2O2 exposure effectively attenuated these changes, suggesting that EEPM prevented H2O2-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, the increased ex-pression and phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a phase II antioxidant enzyme, were detected in EEPM-treated C2C12 cells. We also found that zinc protoporphyrin IX, an HO-1 inhibitor, attenuated the protective effects of EEPM against H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation and cytotoxicity. Therefore, these results indicate that the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway might be involved in the protection of EEPM against H2O2-induced cellular oxidative damage. In conclusion, these results show that EEPM contributes to the prevention of oxidative damage and could be used as a nutritional agent for oxidative stress-related diseases.

  12. DNA damage enhanced by the attenuation of SLD5 delays cell cycle restoration in normal cells but not in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yuan Gong

    Full Text Available SLD5 is a member of the GINS complex composed of PSF1, PSF2, PSF3 and SLD5, playing a critical role in the formation of the DNA replication fork with CDC45 in yeast. Previously, we had isolated a PSF1 orthologue from a murine hematopoietic stem cell DNA library and were then able to identify orthologues of all the other GINS members by the yeast two hybrid approach using PSF1 as the bait. These GINS orthologues may also function in DNA replication in mammalian cells because they form tetrameric complexes as observed in yeast, and gene deletion mutants of both PSF1 and SLD5 result in a lack of epiblast proliferation and early embryonic lethality. However, we found that PSF1 is also involved in chromosomal segregation in M phase, consistent with recent suggestions that homologues of genes associated with DNA replication in lower organisms also regulate cellular events other than DNA replication in mammalian cells. Here we analyzed the function of SLD5 other than DNA replication and found that it is active in DNA damage and repair. Attenuation of SLD5 expression results in marked DNA damage in both normal cells and cancer cells, suggesting that it protects against DNA damage. Attenuation of SLD5 delays the DNA repair response and cell cycle restoration in normal cells but not in cancer cells. These findings suggest that SLD5 might represent a therapeutic target molecule acting at the level of tumor stromal cells rather than the cancerous cells themselves, because development of the tumor microenvironment could be delayed or disrupted by the suppression of its expression in the normal cell types within the tumor.

  13. Efficient Generation of Bispecific Murine Antibodies for Pre-Clinical Investigations in Syngeneic Rodent Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labrijn, Aran F.; Meesters, Joyce I.; Bunce, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    for the generation of therapeutic human IgG1 bispecific antibodies (bsAb). To facilitate the investigation of dual-Targeting concepts in immuno-competent mice, we now applied and optimized our method for the generation of murine bsAbs. We show that the optimized combinations of matched point-mutations enabled...... efficient generation of murine bsAbs for all subclasses studied (mouse IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b; rat IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG2c). The mutations did not adversely affect the inherent effector functions or pharmacokinetic properties of the corresponding subclasses. Thus, cFAE can be used to efficiently......Therapeutic concepts exploiting tumor-specific antibodies are often established in pre-clinical xenograft models using immuno-deficient mice. More complex therapeutic paradigms, however, warrant the use of immuno-competent mice, that more accurately capture the relevant biology that is being...

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  15. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-04-01

    Wave-induced variations of pore pressure in a partially-saturated reservoir result in oscillatory liquid flow. The viscous losses during this flow are responsible for wave attenuation. The same viscous effects determine the changes in the dynamic bulk modulus of the system versus frequency. These changes are necessarily linked to attenuation via the causality condition. We analytically quantify the frequency dependence of the bulk modulus of a partially saturated rock by assuming that saturation is patchy and then link these changes to the inverse quality factor. As a result, the P-wave attenuation is quantitatively linked to saturation and thus can serve as a saturation indicator.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in primates. The example of the mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus: From detection of pathological aging to therapeutic evaluations Imagerie par résonance magnétique chez les primates. L’exemple du microcèbe murin (Microcebus murinus : De la détection du vieillissement cérébral pathologique à l'évaluation thérapeutique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine El Tannir El Tayara

    2011-02-01

    also be used during therapeutic interventions by selecting animals to be involved in therapeutic trials and also by following specific MR biomarkers. MRI is thus critical to better characterize cerebral aging in the mouse lemur and to better carry out longitudinal studies in this primate model.Le vieillissement cérébral est un problème majeur de santé public. Il est associé dans certains cas à des maladies neurodégénératives telles que la maladie d’Alzheimer (MA. La compréhension de la physiopathologie du vieillissement cérébral et l'évaluation de nouvelles thérapies nécessitent l’utilisation de modèles animaux. Les souris transgéniques sont très utilisées mais restent peu représentatives de l’ensemble des aspects des maladies humaines. Les modèles primates sont plus proches phylogénétiquement de l’homme et sont plus prédictifs de l’efficacité de médicaments chez l'homme. Le microcèbe murin est un petit primate (environ 12cm, 100g qui est un modèle de vieillissement cérébral et un modèle potentiel de la MA. En effet certains animaux développent avec l’âge des altérations cérébrales telles que de l’amyloïdose. Des méthodes d'imagerie non-invasives comme l’imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM peuvent être utilisées pour étudier les altérations cérébrales chez ces animaux. Nous montrons ici comment l'IRM permet d'étudier le microcèbe et présentons l'utilisation de l'IRM pour l'évaluation de thérapies et d'autres applications. Chez le microcèbe, l’IRM a permis de décrire l’anatomie cérébrale, le système vasculaire cérébral (grâce à l’angiographie par RMN et aussi de caractériser l’atrophie cérébrale liée à l’âge ainsi que des processus entraînant une accumulation de fer intracérébrale. La consommation cérébrale de glucose a aussi pu être étudiée par une autre modalité d’imagerie in vivo, la tomographie par émission de positons (TEP. Dans ce cas, l’IRM sert de support

  17. Attenuated strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis as vaccine candidates against Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Erik W; Kink, John A; Talaat, Adel

    2014-04-11

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Johne's disease has a severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. In an effort to combat this disease, we screened several transposon mutants that were attenuated in the murine model of paratuberculosis for the potential use as live attenuated vaccines. Using the murine model, two vaccine candidates (pgs1360, pgs3965 with mutations of fabG2_2 and umaA1, respectively) were at or below the limit of detection for tissue colonization suggesting their low level persistence and hence safety. Prior to challenge, both candidates induced a M. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ, an indication of eliciting cell-mediated immunity. Following challenge with a virulent strain of M. paratuberculosis, the two vaccine candidates significantly reduced bacterial colonization in organs with reduced histological scores compared to control animals. In addition, one of the vaccine candidates (pgs3965) also induced IL-17a, a cytokine associated with protective immunity in mycobacterial infection. Our analysis suggested that the pgs3965 vaccine candidate is a potential live-attenuated vaccine that could be tested further in ruminant models of paratuberculosis. The analysis also validated our screening strategy to identify effective vaccine candidates against intracellular pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. P-selectin, carcinoma metastasis and heparin: novel mechanistic connections with therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varki A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a multistep cascade initiated when malignant cells penetrate the tissue surrounding the primary tumor and enter the bloodstream. Classic studies indicated that blood platelets form complexes around tumor cells in the circulation and facilitate metastases. In other work, the anticoagulant drug heparin diminished metastasis in murine models, as well is in preliminary human studies. However, attempts to follow up the latter observation using vitamin K antagonists failed, indicating that the primary mechanism of heparin action was unrelated to its anticoagulant properties. Other studies showed that the overexpression of sialylated fucosylated glycans in human carcinomas is associated with a poor prognosis. We have now brought all these observations together into one mechanistic explanation, which has therapeutic implications. Carcinoma cells expressing sialylated fucosylated mucins can interact with platelets, leukocytes and endothelium via the selectin family of cell adhesion molecules. The initial organ colonization of intravenously injected carcinoma cells is attenuated in P-selectin-deficient mice, in mice receiving tumor cells pretreated with O-sialoglycoprotease (to selectively remove mucins from cell surfaces, or in mice receiving a single dose of heparin prior to tumor cell injection. In each case, we found that formation of a platelet coating on cancer cells was impeded, allowing increased access of leukocytes to the tumor cells. Several weeks later, all animals showed a decrease in the extent of established metastasis, indicating a long-lasting effect of the short-term intervention. The absence of obvious synergism amongst the three treatments suggests that they all act via a common pathway. Thus, a major mechanism of heparin action in cancer may be inhibition of P-selectin-mediated platelet coating of tumor cells during the initial phase of the metastatic process. We therefore suggest that heparin use in cancer be re

  19. Polyphenols: Multipotent Therapeutic Agents in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Khushwant S.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Aging leads to numerous transitions in brain physiology including synaptic dysfunction and disturbances in cognition and memory. With a few clinically relevant drugs, a substantial portion of aging population at risk for age-related neurodegenerative disorders require nutritional intervention. Dietary intake of polyphenols is known to attenuate oxidative stress and reduce the risk for related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Polyphenols exhibit strong potential to address the etiology of neurological disorders as they attenuate their complex physiology by modulating several therapeutic targets at once. Firstly, we review the advances in the therapeutic role of polyphenols in cell and animal models of AD, PD, MS, and HD and activation of drug targets for controlling pathological manifestations. Secondly, we present principle pathways in which polyphenol intake translates into therapeutic outcomes. In particular, signaling pathways like PPAR, Nrf2, STAT, HIF, and MAPK along with modulation of immune response by polyphenols are discussed. Although current polyphenol researches have limited impact on clinical practice, they have strong evidence and testable hypothesis to contribute clinical advances and drug discovery towards age-related neurological disorders. PMID:23840922

  20. Integrated Microfluidic Variable Optical Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-28

    indices , the optical output power is gradually attenuated. We obtain a maximum attenuation of 28 dB when the fluid refractive index changes from 1.557 to...Electron. 23, pp. 1348-1354 (2005). 14. J. M. Ruano, V. Benoit, J. S. Aitchison , and J. M. Cooper, “Flame hydrolysis deposition of glass on silicon for...different refractive indices flowing in a microfluidic channel as the cladding for a segment of straight optical waveguide. Recently, the integration of

  1. Signaling pathways regulating murine pancreatic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle

    2012-01-01

    The recent decades have seen a huge expansion in our knowledge about pancreatic development. Numerous lineage-restricted transcription factor genes have been identified and much has been learned about their function. Similarly, numerous signaling pathways important for pancreas development have b...... been identified and the specific roles have been investigated by genetic and cell biological methods. The present review presents an overview of the principal signaling pathways involved in regulating murine pancreatic growth, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation....

  2. Increased in vitro glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, telomerase activity, and telomere length after productive human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in murine astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Diego; López-Costa, Juan José; Sede, Mariano; López, Ester María; Berria, María Isabel; Quarleri, Jorge

    2014-02-01

    Although HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) result from injury and loss of neurons, productive infection routinely takes place in cells of macrophage lineage. In such a complex context, astrocytosis induced by local chemokines/cytokines is one of the hallmarks of HIV neuropathology. Whether this sustained astrocyte activation is able to alter telomere-aging process is unknown. We hypothesized that interaction of HIV with astrocytes may impact astrocyte telomerase activity (TA) and telomere length in a scenario of astrocytic activation measured by expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). To test this hypothesis, cultured murine astrocytes were challenged with pseudotyped HIV/vesicular stomatitis virus (HIV/VSV) to circumvent the absence of viral receptors; and GFAP, telomerase activity, and telomere length were quantified. As an early and transient event after HIV infection, both TA activity and telomere length were significantly augmented (P < 0.001). Later, a strong negative correlation (-0.8616, P < 0.0001) between virus production and telomerase activity was demonstrated. Once HIV production had reached a peak (7 dpi), the TA decreased, showing levels similar to those of noninfected cells. In contrast, the astrocyte became activated, exhibiting significantly increased levels of GFAP expression directly related to the level of HIV/VSV replication (P < 0.0001). Our results suggest that HIV-infected astrocytes exhibit early disturbance in their cellular functions, such as telomerase activity and telomere length, that may attenuate cell proliferation and enhance the astrocyte dysregulation, contributing to HIV neuropathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in HIV-mediated persistence by altering the telomere-related aging processes could aid in the development of therapeutic modalities for neurological complications of HIV infection. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Establishment of the retrovirus-mediated murine model with MLL-AF9 leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Si-Miao; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Mi; Zhao, Xue-Jiao; Qin, Yu; Zhang, Pei-Ling; Yuan, Rui-Feng; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Fang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to establish a retrovirus-mediated murine model with MLL-AF9 leukemia, so as to provide a basis for further investigation of the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategy of MLL associated leukemia. Murine (CD45.2) primary hematopoietic precursor positively selected for expression of the progenitor marker c-Kit by means of MACS were transduced with a retrovirus carrying MLL-AF9 fusion gene. After cultured in vitro, the transduced cells were injected intravenously through the tail vein into the lethally irradiated mice (CD45.1). PCR, flow cytometry and morphological observation were employed to evaluate the murine leukemia model system. The results showed that MLL-AF9 fusion gene was expressed in the infected cells, and the cells had a dramatically enhanced potential to generate myeloid colonies with primitive and immature morphology. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the immortalized cells highly expressed myeloid lineage surface markers Gr-1 and Mac-1. Moreover, the expression levels of Hoxa9 and Meis1 mRNA were significantly higher in the MLL-AF9 cells than that in control. The mice transplanted with MLL-AF9 cells displayed typical signs of leukemia within 6-12 weeks. Extensive infiltration leukemic cells was observed in the Wright-Giemsa stained peripheral blood smear and bone marrow, and also in the histology of liver and spleen. Flow cytometric analysis of the bone marrow and spleen cells demonstrated that the CD45.2 populations expressed highly myeloid markers Gr-1 and Mac-1. The leukemic mice died within 12 weeks. It is concluded that the retrovirus-mediated murine model with MLL-AF9 leukemia is successfully established, which can be applied in the subsequent researches.

  4. Exploring the translational disconnect between the murine and human inflammatory response: analysis of LPS dose–response relationship in murine versus human cell lines and implications for translation into murine models of sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarron EP

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eamon P McCarron,1 Dominic P Williams,1 Daniel J Antoine,1 Anja Kipar,2 Jana Lemm,3 Sebastian Stehr,3 Ingeborg D Welters,4 1Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Centre for Drug Safety Science, Institute of Translational Medicine, 2Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; 3Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany; 4Department of Obesity and Endocrinology, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK Background: Inflammation forms an important part of the human innate immune system and is largely dependent on the activation of the "classical" NF-κB pathway through Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Understanding this has allowed researchers to explore roles of therapeutic targets in managing conditions such as sepsis. Recapitulating an inflammatory response using lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a "sterile" technique, can provide information that is dissimilar to the clinical condition. By examining NF-κB activation (through immunoblotting of the p65 subunit in two separate cell lines (murine and human and analyzing two murine models of sepsis (intraperitoneal [IP] LPS and IP stool inoculation, an evaluation of the translational disconnect between experimental and clinical sepsis can be made. Methods: THP-1 (human cells and RAW 264.7 (murine cells were dosed with concentrations of LPS (human, 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL; murine, 30 pg/mL to 1,000 ng/mL and nuclear actin and p65 were immunoblotted to measure changes in nuclear density. In vivo, C57BL/6 mice received either IP injection of stool suspension (5 µL/g or LPS (25 mg/kg or saline (1 mL/kg. Animals were culled at 6 hours and tissues were analyzed. Results: An increase in basal p65:actin density in THP-1 cells (mean 0.214, standard error of the mean 0.024 was seen at doses as small as 0.1 ng/mL (0.519±0.064. In contrast to RAW 264.7 cells, basal increases (0.170±0

  5. [Effects of inhibitory activity on mycelial growth of Candida albicans and therapy for murine oral candidiasis by the combined use of terpinen-4-ol and a middle-chain fatty acid, capric acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kentaro; Hayama, Kazumi; Ishijima, Sanae; Takahashi, Miki; Kurihara, Junichi; Abe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The combined effect of terpinen-4-ol, the main component of tea tree oil, and capric acid against mycelial growth of Candida albicans and murine oral candidiasis was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Mycelial growth of C. albicans was estimated by the Cristal violet method. Combination of these compounds revealed a potent synergistic inhibition of growth. Therapeutic efficacy of the combination was evaluated microbiologically in murine oral candidiasis, and its application of the compounds clearly demonstrated therapeutic activity. Based on these results, the combined agent of terpinen-4-ol and capric acid was discussed as a possible candidate for oral candidiasis therapy.

  6. Murine Typhus: An Important Consideration for the Nonspecific Febrile Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Gurjot Basra; Megan A. Berman; Lucas S. Blanton

    2012-01-01

    Murine typhus is a widely distributed flea-borne infection caused by Rickettsia typhi. Symptoms of murine typhus are nonspecific and mimic a variety of other infectious diseases. We herein report a case of murine typhus in an area where the broad use of DDT in the mid-20th century has now made it a rare disease. The patient described presented with headache, fever, and a faint macular rash. Initial laboratory studies revealed a slight transaminase elevation. Further questioning revealed expos...

  7. Therapeutic use exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J; Kirkendall, D; Vouillamoz, M

    2006-01-01

    Football players who have either physical symptoms or disease after injury may need to be treated with specific medicines that are on the list of prohibited substances. Therapeutic use exemption may be granted to such players, in accordance with strictly defined criteria—these are presented in this article. Procedures of how to request for an abbreviated or a standard therapeutic use exemption are explained, and data on therapeutic use exemptions (UEFA and FIFA, 2004 and 2005) are also presented. PMID:16799102

  8. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  9. Regulation of murine hypersensitive responses by Fc receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Takai

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Humoral and cellular immune responses communicate with each other via Fc receptors (FcR expressed on various hematopoietic cells. Recent studies on several FcR knockout mice demonstrated pivotal roles of an IgG/FcγR system in the regulation of immune responses and the onset of hypersensitivity. The γ subunit of FcR is an essential component of the complex and is required for both receptor assembly and signal transduction. FcR γ chain-deficient mice have lost the functional expression of FcεRI, FcγRI, and FcγRIII and are unable to mount several types of hypersensitive reactions, including the skin Arthus reaction. In contrast, FcγRII-deficient mice exhibit augmented humoral immune responses and IgG-mediated anaphylaxis reactions. Thus, the regulatory system of murine hypersensitive responses involves both positive and negative signaling through FcR. In B cells, FcγRIIb modulates membrane Ig-induced Ca2+ mobilization by inhibiting Ca2+ influx through phosphorylation of its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif and recruitment of cytoplasmic phosphatases. Elucidation of the detailed mechanisms of negative regulatory signaling in the inflammatory effector cells by FcγRIIb as well as several groups of potent inhibitory molecules expressed on such cells should be valuable in the development of novel therapeutic procedures for allergic disorders.

  10. Attenuation in Superconducting Circular Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Yeap

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis on wave propagation in superconducting circular waveguides. In order to account for the presence of quasiparticles in the intragap states of a superconductor, we employ the characteristic equation derived from the extended Mattis-Bardeen theory to compute the values of the complex conductivity. To calculate the attenuation in a circular waveguide, the tangential fields at the boundary of the wall are first matched with the electrical properties (which includes the complex conductivity of the wall material. The matching of fields with the electrical properties results in a set of transcendental equations which is able to accurately describe the propagation constant of the fields. Our results show that although the attenuation in the superconducting waveguide above cutoff (but below the gap frequency is finite, it is considerably lower than that in a normal waveguide. Above the gap frequency, however, the attenuation in the superconducting waveguide increases sharply. The attenuation eventually surpasses that in a normal waveguide. As frequency increases above the gap frequency, Cooper pairs break into quasiparticles. Hence, we attribute the sharp rise in attenuation to the increase in random collision of the quasiparticles with the lattice structure.

  11. Attenuation coefficient of the light in skin of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C. R.; Camargo, C. F. M.; Aureliano, D. P.; De Pretto, L. R.; Freitas, A. Z.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Optical properties of the biological tissue play an important role to a correct use of optical techniques for therapy and diagnosis. The mice skin presents morphological differences due to characteristics such as gender, body mass and age. Murine models are frequently used in pre-clinical trials in optical therapy and diagnosis. Therefore, the assessment of the skin tissue in animal models is needed for a proper understanding of how light interacts with skin. Noninvasive techniques such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) have been used to obtain optical information of the tissue, as the attenuation coefficient, with the advantage of obtaining sectional images in real time. In this study, eight female BALB/c albino mice (twenty-four weeks old) and eight male C57BL/6 black mice (eight weeks old) were used to measure the attenuation coefficient of the light in the skin, utilizing the OCT technique, aiming to check for influence of the aging process. Two moments were assessed twenty-two weeks apart from each other. Our data show that the aging process significantly affects the light attenuation coefficient in mice skin. Twenty-two weeks after, statistical significant differences were observed between groups within a same strain. We conclude that light attenuation coefficient of mice skin may be influenced by factors such as disorganization of the dermis. Morphological aspects of skin should be taken into account in studies that involve optical strategies in murine models.

  12. The analgesic effect of orexin-A in a murine model of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Satoshi; Shimoyama, Naohito; Shimoyama, Megumi

    2017-02-01

    Orexins are neuropeptides that are localized to neurons in the lateral and dorsal hypothalamus but its receptors are distributed to many different regions of the central nervous system. Orexins are implicated in a variety of physiological functions including sleep regulation, energy homeostats, and stress reactions. Furthermore, orexins administered exogenously have been shown to have analgesic effects in animal models. A type of intractable pain in patients is pain due to chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Several chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of malignant diseases induce dose-limiting neuropathic pain that compromises patients' quality of life. Here, we examined the analgesic effect of orexin-A in a murine model of CIPN, and compared it with the effect of duloxetine, the only drug recommended for the treatment of CIPN pain in patients. CIPN was induced in male BALB/c mice by repeated intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin, a platinum chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. Neuropathic mechanical allodynia was assessed by the von Frey test, and the effect on acute thermal pain was assessed by the tail flick test. Intracerebroventricularly administered orexin-A dose-dependently attenuated oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and increased tail flick latencies. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was completely reversed by orexin-A at a low dose that did not increase tail flick latency. Duloxetine only partially reversed mechanical allodynia and had no effect on tail flick latency. The analgesic effect of orexin-A on oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was completely antagonized by prior intraperitoneal injection of SB-408124 (orexin type-1 receptor antagonist), but not by prior intraperitoneal injection of TCS-OX2-29 (orexin type-2 receptor antagonist). Our findings suggest that orexin-A is more potent than duloxetine in relieving pain CIPN pain and its analgesic effect is

  13. Chicanoizing the Therapeutic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, William S.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Focusing on the drug addiction problem and its antecedent conditions in a Chicano population, the article examines several therapeutic interventions suggested by these conditions and indicates how they might be incorporated into a drug addiction Therapeutic Community treatment program designed to meet the needs of Chicano drug addicts. (Author/NQ)

  14. Therapeutic Crisis Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Martha J.; Powers, Jane Levine

    1993-01-01

    Describes Therapeutic Crisis Intervention (TCI) program as providing staff with skills, knowledge, and confidence to manage child in crisis to bring about a "maximum amount of lasting response." Contends that, by applying principles of TCI training, direct care worker can attain therapeutic control and maintain dignity of both adult and child…

  15. Trends in Therapeutic Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the rapid, dramatic changes taking place in therapeutic recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The article notes the impact of changes in managed care, examines programming trends in therapeutic recreation (adventure/outdoor education, competitive sports, handcycling, health enhancement activities, and…

  16. Purification and characterization of recombinant full-length and protease domain of murine MMP-9 expressed in Drosophila S2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Morten G; Lund, Ida K.; Illemann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a 92-kDa soluble pro-enzyme implicated in pathological events including cancer invasion. It is therefore an attractive target for therapeutic intervention studies in mouse models. Development of inhibitors requires sufficient amounts of correctly folded murine...... MMP-9. Constructs encoding zymogens of full-length murine MMP-9 and a version lacking the O-glycosylated linker region and hemopexin domains were therefore generated and expressed in stably transfected Drosophila S2 insect cells. After 7 days of induction the expression levels of the full....... No immunoreactivity was observed when the antibody was probed against skin wound material from MMP-9 deficient mice. In conclusion, we have generated and purified two proteolytically active recombinant murine MMP-9 protein constructs, which are critical reagents for future cancer drug discovery studies....

  17. Melatonin attenuates titanium particle-induced osteolysis via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Zichuan; Hu, Xuanyang; Wang, Liangliang; Shi, Jiawei; Tao, Yunxia; Wu, Xiexing; Hou, Zhenyang; Guo, Xiaobin; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Huilin; Xu, Yaozeng; Wang, Zhirong; Geng, Dechun

    2017-03-15

    Wear debris-induced inhibition of bone regeneration and extensive bone resorption were common features in peri-prosthetic osteolysis (PPO). Here, we investigated the effect of melatonin on titanium particle-stimulated osteolysis in a murine calvariae model and mouse-mesenchymal-stem cells (mMSCs) culture system. Melatonin inhibited titanium particle-induced osteolysis and increased bone formation at osteolytic sites, confirmed by radiological and histomorphometric data. Furthermore, osteoclast numbers decreased dramatically in the low- and high-melatonin administration mice, as respectively, compared with the untreated animals. Melatonin alleviated titanium particle-induced depression of osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization in mMSCs. Mechanistically, melatonin was found to reduce the degradation of β-catenin, levels of which were decreased in presence of titanium particles both in vivo and in vitro. To further ensure whether the protective effect of melatonin was mediated by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, ICG-001, a selective β-catenin inhibitor, was added to the melatonin-treated groups and was found to attenuate the effect of melatonin on mMSC mineralization. We also demonstrated that melatonin modulated the balance between receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and osteoprotegerin via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings strongly suggest that melatonin represents a promising candidate in the treatment of PPO. Peri-prosthetic osteolysis, initiated by wear debris-induced inhibition of bone regeneration and extensive bone resorption, is the leading cause for implant failure and reason for revision surgery. In the current study, we demonstrated for the first time that melatonin can induce bone regeneration and reduce bone resorption at osteolytic sites caused by titanium-particle stimulation. These effects might be mediated by activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and enhancing osteogenic

  18. The effects of dsRNA mycoviruses on growth and murine virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Muhammad F; Jamal, Atif; Petrou, Michael A; Cairns, Timothy C; Bignell, Elaine M; Coutts, Robert H A

    2011-11-01

    Some isolates of the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus are known to be infected with mycoviruses. The dsRNA genomes of two of these mycoviruses, which include a chrysovirus and a partitivirus, have been completely sequenced and an RT-PCR assay for the viruses has been developed. Through curing virus-infected A. fumigatus isolates by cycloheximide treatment and transfecting virus-free isolates with purified virus, as checked by RT-PCR, isogenic virus-free and virus-infected lines of the fungus were generated whose phenotypes and growth have been directly compared. Mycovirus infection of A. fumigatus with either the chrysovirus or the partitivirus resulted in significant aberrant phenotypic alterations and attenuation of growth of the fungus but had no effect on susceptibility to common antifungals. Chrysovirus infection of A. fumigatus caused no significant alterations to murine pathogenicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Wogonin Induces Eosinophil Apoptosis and Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, David A.; Sharma, Sidharth; Rennie, Jillian; Felton, Jennifer M.; Alessandri, Ana L.; Duffin, Rodger; Schwarze, Jurgen; Haslett, Christopher; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Eosinophils are key effector cells in allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, eczema, and asthma. Their tissue presence is regulated by both recruitment and increased longevity at inflamed sites. Objectives: To investigate the ability of the flavone wogonin to induce eosinophil apoptosis in vitro and attenuate eosinophil-dominant allergic inflammation in vivo in mice. Methods: Human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in response to wogonin was investigated by cellular morphology, flow cytometry, mitochondrial membrane permeability, and pharmacological caspase inhibition. Allergic lung inflammation was modeled in mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were examined for inflammation, mucus production, and inflammatory mediator production. Airway hyperresponsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was measured. Measurements and Main Results: Wogonin induced time- and concentration-dependent human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. Wogonin-induced eosinophil apoptosis occurred with activation of caspase-3 and was inhibited by pharmacological caspase inhibition. Wogonin administration attenuated allergic airway inflammation in vivo with reductions in BAL and interstitial eosinophil numbers, increased eosinophil apoptosis, reduced airway mucus production, and attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness. This wogonin-induced reduction in allergic airway inflammation was prevented by concurrent caspase inhibition in vivo. Conclusions: Wogonin induces eosinophil apoptosis and attenuates allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that it has therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic inflammation in humans. PMID:25629436

  20. Macropinocytosis is the entry mechanism of amphotropic murine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Izabela; Vilhardt, Frederik

    2015-02-01

    The entry mechanism of murine amphotropic retrovirus (A-MLV) has not been unambiguously determined. We show here that A-MLV is internalized not by caveolae or other pinocytic mechanisms but by macropinocytosis. Thus, A-MLV infection of mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient for caveolin or dynamin, and NIH 3T3 cells knocked down for caveolin expression, was unaffected. Conversely, A-MLV infection of NIH 3T3 and HeLa cells was sensitive to amiloride analogues and actin-depolymerizing drugs that interfere with macropinocytosis. Further manipulation of the actin cytoskeleton through conditional expression of dominant positive or negative mutants of Rac1, PAK1, and RhoG, to increase or decrease macropinocytosis, similarly correlated with an augmented or inhibited infection with A-MLV, respectively. The same experimental perturbations affected the infection of viruses that use clathrin-coated-pit endocytosis or other pathways for entry only mildly or not at all. These data agree with immunofluorescence studies and cryo-immunogold labeling for electron microscopy, which demonstrate the presence of A-MLV in protrusion-rich areas of the cell surface and in cortical fluid phase (dextran)-filled macropinosomes, which also account for up to a half of the cellular uptake of the cell surface-binding lectin concanavalin A. We conclude that A-MLV use macropinocytosis as the predominant entry portal into cells. Binding and entry of virus particles into mammalian cells are the first steps of infection. Understanding how pathogens and toxins exploit or divert endocytosis pathways has advanced our understanding of membrane trafficking pathways, which benefits development of new therapeutic schemes and methods of drug delivery. We show here that amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV) pseudotyped with the amphotropic envelope protein (which expands the host range to many mammalian cells) gains entry into host cells by macropinocytosis. Macropinosomes form as large, fluid

  1. Advances in the development of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli vaccines using murine models of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Angulo, Victor A.; Kalita, Anjana; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains are food borne pathogens with importance in public health. EHEC colonizes the large intestine and causes diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and in some cases, life-threatening hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) due to the production of Shiga toxins (Stx). The lack of effective clinical treatment, sequelae after infection and mortality rate in humans supports the urgent need of prophylactic approaches, such as development of vaccines. Shedding from cattle, the main EHEC reservoir and considered the principal food contamination source, has prompted the development of licensed vaccines that reduce EHEC colonization in ruminants. Although murine models do not fully recapitulate human infection, they are commonly used to evaluate EHEC vaccines and the immune/protective responses elicited in the host. Mice susceptibility differs depending of the EHEC inoculums; therefore, displaying different mortality rates and Stx-mediated renal damage. Therefore, several experimental protocols have being pursued in this model to develop EHEC-specific vaccines. Recent candidate vaccines evaluated include those composed of virulence factors alone or as fused-subunits, DNA-based, attenuated bacteria and bacterial ghosts. In this review, we summarize progress in the design and testing of EHEC vaccines and the use of different strategies for the evaluation of novel EHEC vaccines in the murine model. PMID:23707170

  2. Reporting therapeutic discourse in a therapeutic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, G E

    1988-03-01

    Research in nurses' communications has concentrated on nurse to patient interactions. Those few studies which focus on nurse to nurse communications seem to be generated by a pragmatic and normative concern with effective information sharing. In this paper, which describes one aspect of a larger case study of a hospital-based therapeutic community, the description and analysis of nurses' reports flows not from a normative model of professional practice, but rather an exploration of how professional practice is articulated as discourse in nurses' written accounts. Foucault's ideas about therapeutic discourse inform the theoretical framework of the research. Ethnomethodological concerns with the importance of documentary analysis provide the methodological rationale for examining nurses' 24-hour report documents, as official discourse, reflecting therapeutic practice in this setting. A content analysis of nurses' reports, collected over a period of 4 months, demonstrated the importance of domesticity and ordinary everyday activities in nurses' accounts of hospital life. Disruption to the 'life as usual' domesticity in the community seemed to be associated with admission to and discharge from the hospital when interpersonal and interactional changes between patients occur. It is suggested that nurses in general hospital wards and more orthodox psychiatric settings might usefully consider the impact of admissions and discharges on the group of patients they manage, and make this a discursive focus of their work.

  3. Attenuation in silica-based optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandel, Marie Emilie

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis on attenuation in silica based optical fibers results within three main topics are reported. Spectral attenuation measurements on transmission fibers are performed in the wide wavelength range 290 nm – 1700 nm. The measured spectral attenuation is analyzed with special emphasis...... on absorption peaks in order to investigate the cause of an unusual high attenuation in a series of transmission fibers. Strong indications point to Ni2+ in octahedral coordination as being the cause of the high attenuation. The attenuation of fibers having a high core refractive index is analyzed and the cause...... of the high attenuation measured in such fibers is described as being due to scattering of light on fluctuations of the core diameter. A novel semi-empirical model for predicting the attenuation of high index fibers is presented. The model is shown to be able to predict the attenuation of high index fibers...

  4. Iron-overload injury and cardiomyopathy in acquired and genetic models is attenuated by resveratrol therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhash K; Wang, Wang; Zhabyeyev, Pavel; Basu, Ratnadeep; McLean, Brent; Fan, Dong; Parajuli, Nirmal; DesAulniers, Jessica; Patel, Vaibhav B; Hajjar, Roger J; Dyck, Jason R B; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2015-12-07

    Iron-overload cardiomyopathy is a prevalent cause of heart failure on a world-wide basis and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with secondary iron-overload and genetic hemochromatosis. We investigated the therapeutic effects of resveratrol in acquired and genetic models of iron-overload cardiomyopathy. Murine iron-overload models showed cardiac iron-overload, increased oxidative stress, altered Ca(2+) homeostasis and myocardial fibrosis resulting in heart disease. Iron-overload increased nuclear and acetylated levels of FOXO1 with corresponding inverse changes in SIRT1 levels in the heart corrected by resveratrol therapy. Resveratrol, reduced the pathological remodeling and improved cardiac function in murine models of acquired and genetic iron-overload at varying stages of iron-overload. Echocardiography and hemodynamic analysis revealed a complete normalization of iron-overload mediated diastolic and systolic dysfunction in response to resveratrol therapy. Myocardial SERCA2a levels were reduced in iron-overloaded hearts and resveratrol therapy restored SERCA2a levels and corrected altered Ca(2+) homeostasis. Iron-mediated pro-oxidant and pro-fibrotic effects in human and murine cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were suppressed by resveratrol which correlated with reduction in iron-induced myocardial oxidative stress and myocardial fibrosis. Resveratrol represents a clinically and economically feasible therapeutic intervention to reduce the global burden from iron-overload cardiomyopathy at early and chronic stages of iron-overload.

  5. The Antimalarial Chloroquine Suppresses LPS-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Confers Protection against Murine Endotoxic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, which catalyzes maturation of proinflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18, is implicated and essentially involved in many kinds of inflammatory disorders. Chloroquine (CQ is a traditional antimalarial drug and also possesses an anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we investigated whether CQ suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation and thereby confers protection against murine endotoxic shock. CQ attenuated NF-κB and MAPK activation and prohibited expression of IL-1β, IL-18, and Nlrp3 in LPS treated murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on the priming signal of NLRP3 activation. Then, CQ was shown to inhibit caspase-1 activation and ASC specks formation in BMDMs, which indicates that CQ also suppresses inflammasome assembly, the second signal for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In a murine endotoxic shock model, CQ effectively improved survival and markedly reduced IL-1β and IL-18 production in serum, peritoneal fluid, and lung tissues. Moreover, CQ reduced protein levels of NLRP3 and caspases-1 p10 in lung homogenates of mice with endotoxic shock, which may possibly explain its anti-inflammatory activity and life protection efficacy in vivo. Overall, our results demonstrate a new role of CQ that facilitates negative regulation on NLRP3 inflammasome, which thereby confers protection against lethal endotoxic shock.

  6. Cytotoxic effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles on murine photoreceptor cells via potassium channel block and Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Bu, Wenjuan; Ding, Hongyan; Li, Qin; Wang, Dabo; Bi, Hongsheng; Guo, Dadong

    2017-06-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles can exhibit toxicity towards organisms and oxidative stress is often hypothesized to be one of the most important factors. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanism of toxicity-induced by ZnO nanoparticles has not been completely addressed. The present study aimed to investigate the toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles on the expression and activity of Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase and on potassium channel block. In the present study, we explored the cytotoxic effect of ZnO nanoparticles on murine photoreceptor cells using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) determination, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δφm) measurement, delayed rectifier potassium current recordings and Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase expression and activity monitoring. The results indicated that ZnO nanoparticles could increase the LDH release in medium, aggravate the ROS level within cells, collapse the Δφm, block the delayed rectifier potassium current, and attenuate the expressions of Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase at both mRNA and protein levels and its activity, and thus exert cytotoxic effects on murine photoreceptor cells, finally damaging target cells. Our findings will facilitate the understanding of the mechanism involved in ZnO nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity in murine photoreceptor cells via potassium channel block and Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase inhibition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Antimalarial Chloroquine Suppresses LPS-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Confers Protection against Murine Endotoxic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Lu, Yongling; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, which catalyzes maturation of proinflammatory cytokines like IL-1 β and IL-18, is implicated and essentially involved in many kinds of inflammatory disorders. Chloroquine (CQ) is a traditional antimalarial drug and also possesses an anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we investigated whether CQ suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation and thereby confers protection against murine endotoxic shock. CQ attenuated NF- κ B and MAPK activation and prohibited expression of IL-1 β , IL-18, and Nlrp3 in LPS treated murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), demonstrating its inhibitory effect on the priming signal of NLRP3 activation. Then, CQ was shown to inhibit caspase-1 activation and ASC specks formation in BMDMs, which indicates that CQ also suppresses inflammasome assembly, the second signal for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In a murine endotoxic shock model, CQ effectively improved survival and markedly reduced IL-1 β and IL-18 production in serum, peritoneal fluid, and lung tissues. Moreover, CQ reduced protein levels of NLRP3 and caspases-1 p10 in lung homogenates of mice with endotoxic shock, which may possibly explain its anti-inflammatory activity and life protection efficacy in vivo. Overall, our results demonstrate a new role of CQ that facilitates negative regulation on NLRP3 inflammasome, which thereby confers protection against lethal endotoxic shock.

  8. Transplantation sites for human and murine islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Rebecca A; Cheng, Kim; Lalwani, Amit; Swarbrick, Michael M; Thomas, Helen E; Loudovaris, Thomas; Kay, Tom W; Hawthorne, Wayne J; O'Connell, Philip J; Gunton, Jenny E

    2017-10-01

    Beta cell replacement is a potential cure for type 1 diabetes. In humans, islet transplants are currently infused into the liver via the portal vein, although this site has disadvantages. Here, we investigated alternative transplantation sites for human and murine islets in recipient mice, comparing the portal vein with quadriceps muscle and kidney, liver and spleen capsules. Murine islets were isolated from C57BL6/J mice and transplanted into syngeneic recipients. Human islets were isolated and transplanted into either severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG-1) immunodeficient recipient mice. All recipient mice were 8-12 weeks of age and had been rendered diabetic (defined as blood glucose concentrations ≥20 mmol/l on two consecutive days before transplantation) by alloxan tetrahydrate treatment. Islets were transplanted into five different sites (portal vein, quadriceps muscle, kidney, liver and spleen capsules). Blood glucose concentrations were monitored twice weekly until mice were killed. Dose-response studies were also performed to determine the minimum number of islets required to cure diabetes ('cure' is defined for this study as random fed blood glucose of <15 mmol/l). For transplantation of murine islets into the different sites, the kidney yielded 100% success, followed by muscle (70%), portal vein (60%), spleen capsule (29%) and liver capsule (0%). For human islets, transplantation into the kidney cured diabetes in 75-80% of recipient mice. Transplantation into muscle and portal vein had intermediate success (both 29% at 2000 islet equivalents), while transplantation into liver and spleen capsule failed (0%). With increased islet mass, success rates for muscle grafts improved to 52-56%. For both human and murine islets, equivalent or superior glucose lowering results were obtained for transplantation into skeletal muscle, compared with the portal vein. Unfortunately, kidney grafts are not feasible in human

  9. Structure of the murine Thy-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguére, V; Isobe, K; Grosveld, F

    1985-01-01

    We have cloned the murine Thy-1.1 (AKR) and Thy-1.2 (Balb/c) genes. The complete exon/intron structure and the nucleotide sequence of the Thy-1.2 gene was determined. The gene contains four exons and three intervening sequences. The complete transcriptional unit gives rise to a tissue and developmental stage-specific mRNA of 1850 bp. The 5' end of the gene has multiple initiation sites and a non-TATA box promoter. The 3' end shows a single polyadenylation site after a very long untranslated region. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:2866091

  10. Murine erythrocytes contain high levels of lysophospholipase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, J.A.F. op den; Roelofsen, B.; Sanderink, G.; Middelkoop, E.; Hamer, R.

    1984-01-01

    Murine erythrocytes were found to be unique in the high levels of lysophospholipase activity in the cytosol of these cells. The specific activity of the enzyme in the cytosol of the murine cells is 10-times higher than in the cytosol of rabbit erythrocytes and approximately three orders of magnitude

  11. Seismic attenuation imaging with causality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, B.; Mulder, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seismic data enable imaging of the Earth, not only of velocity and density but also of attenuation contrasts. Unfortunately, the Born approximation of the constant-density visco-acoustic wave equation, which can serve as a forward modelling operator related to seismic migration, exhibits an

  12. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc bias...

  13. Compact plasmonic variable optical attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Rosenzveig, Tiberiu; Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate plasmonic nanowire-based thermo-optic variable optical attenuators operating in the 1525-1625 nm wavelength range. The devices have a footprint as low as 1 mm, extinction ratio exceeding 40 dB, driving voltage below 3 V, and full modulation bandwidth of 1 kHz. The polarization...

  14. Flagella overexpression attenuates Salmonella pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghong Yang

    Full Text Available Flagella are cell surface appendages involved in a number of bacterial behaviors, such as motility, biofilm formation, and chemotaxis. Despite these important functions, flagella can pose a liability to a bacterium when serving as potent immunogens resulting in the stimulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Previous work showing appendage overexpression, referred to as attenuating gene expression (AGE, was found to enfeeble wild-type Salmonella. Thus, this approach was adapted to discern whether flagella overexpression could induce similar attenuation. To test its feasibility, flagellar filament subunit FliC and flagellar regulon master regulator FlhDC were overexpressed in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium wild-type strain H71. The results show that the expression of either FliC or FlhDC alone, and co-expression of the two, significantly attenuates Salmonella. The flagellated bacilli were unable to replicate within macrophages and thus were not lethal to mice. In-depth investigation suggests that flagellum-mediated AGE was due to the disruptive effects of flagella on the bacterial membrane, resulting in heightened susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide and bile. Furthermore, flagellum-attenuated Salmonella elicited elevated immune responses to Salmonella presumably via FliC's adjuvant effect and conferred robust protection against wild-type Salmonella challenge.

  15. Flagella Overexpression Attenuates Salmonella Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Suo, Zhiyong; Jun, SangMu; Robison, Amanda; Li, Jinquan; Lim, Timothy; Cao, Ling; Hoyt, Teri; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Flagella are cell surface appendages involved in a number of bacterial behaviors, such as motility, biofilm formation, and chemotaxis. Despite these important functions, flagella can pose a liability to a bacterium when serving as potent immunogens resulting in the stimulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Previous work showing appendage overexpression, referred to as attenuating gene expression (AGE), was found to enfeeble wild-type Salmonella. Thus, this approach was adapted to discern whether flagella overexpression could induce similar attenuation. To test its feasibility, flagellar filament subunit FliC and flagellar regulon master regulator FlhDC were overexpressed in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium wild-type strain H71. The results show that the expression of either FliC or FlhDC alone, and co-expression of the two, significantly attenuates Salmonella. The flagellated bacilli were unable to replicate within macrophages and thus were not lethal to mice. In-depth investigation suggests that flagellum-mediated AGE was due to the disruptive effects of flagella on the bacterial membrane, resulting in heightened susceptibilities to hydrogen peroxide and bile. Furthermore, flagellum-attenuated Salmonella elicited elevated immune responses to Salmonella presumably via FliC’s adjuvant effect and conferred robust protection against wild-type Salmonella challenge. PMID:23056473

  16. [PLURAL THERAPEUTIC ITINERARIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the strategies employed by Nahua community of Mexixo to deal with health problems. Drawing on qualitative research, it discusses the choice of plural therapeutic itineraries, including the use of informal and formal healthcare.

  17. Functional Genomics to Identify Therapeutic Targets in Cancer Stem Cells Using a Novel Murine CRPC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    skin , intestine, and pancreas, the role for the Hippo–YAP pathway in prostate cancer biology is emerging [9-11]. Consistent with the in silico analysis...pathway plays an important role in development and cancer in organs such as the liver, skin , intestine, and pan- creas ( 25–27 ), the role for the Hippo...neutrophils of patients with laryngeal carcinoma and antioxidative enzyme activity in their blood . Acta Oncol 2004 ; 43 : 252 – 8 . 16. Schmielau J

  18. Enhanced gene transfer efficiency in the murine striatum and an orthotopic glioblastoma tumor model, using AAV-7- and AAV-8-pseudotyped vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Thomas C; Dickinson, Peter J; Roberts, Byron N; Yendluri, Satya; Gonzalez-Edick, Melissa; Lecouteur, Richard A; Jooss, Karin U

    2006-08-01

    In this study, recombinant AAV vectors pseudotyped with viral capsids derived from AAV serotypes 7 and 8 were evaluated for gene transfer in the murine striatum relative to vectors pseudotyped with AAV serotypes 2, 5, and 6. In comparison with rAAV serotype 2, pseudotyped vectors derived from AAV-7 and AAV-8 have increased transduction efficiency in the murine CNS, with the rank order rAAV-7 > rAAV-8 > rAAV-5 > rAAV-2 = rAAV-6, with all vectors demonstrating a marked tropism for neuronal transduction. Pseudotyped rAAV vector gene transfer in the brain after preimplantation of a murine 4C8 glioblastoma tumor was also evaluated. Efficiency of gene transfer to the orthotopic tumor was increased when using AAV-6, -7, and -8 capsid proteins in comparison with serotype 2, with the order rAAV-8 = rAAV-7 > rAAV-6 > rAAV-2 > rAAV-5. The increased gene transfer efficiency of rAAV vectors pseudotyped with the rAAV-8 capsid also provided enhanced therapeutic efficacy in a mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme, using vectors encoding an inhibitor of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. These studies demonstrate that rAAV vectors pseudotyped with capsids derived from AAV serotypes 7 and 8 provide enhanced gene transfer in the murine CNS and may offer increased therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of neurological disease.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of rebamipide eyedrop administration on ocular lesions in a murine model of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieko Arakaki

    Full Text Available Topical therapy is effective for dry eye, and its prolonged effects should help in maintaining the quality of life of patients with dry eye. We previously reported that the oral administration of rebamipide (Reb, a mucosal protective agent, had a potent therapeutic effect on autoimmune lesions in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome (SS. However, the effects of topical treatment with Reb eyedrops on the ocular lesions in the murine model of SS are unknown.Reb eyedrops were administered to the murine model of SS aged 4-8 weeks four times daily. Inflammatory lesions of the extraorbital and intraorbital lacrimal glands and Harderian gland tissues were histologically evaluated. The direct effects of Reb on the lacrimal glands were analyzed using cultured lacrimal gland cells. Tear secretions of Reb-treated mice were significantly increased compared with those of untreated mice. In addition to the therapeutic effect of Reb treatment on keratoconjunctivitis, severe inflammatory lesions of intraorbital lacrimal gland tissues in this model of SS were resolved. The mRNA expression levels of IL-10 and mucin 5Ac in conjunctival tissues from Reb-treated mice was significantly increased compared with those of control mice. Moreover, lactoferrin production from lacrimal gland cells was restored by Reb treatment.Topical Reb administration had an anti-inflammatory effect on the ocular autoimmune lesions in the murine model of SS and a protective effect on the ocular surfaces.

  20. A novel murine model for keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnej, Alja; Omoto, Masahiro; Dohlman, Thomas H; Graney, John M; Dohlman, Claes H; Drnovsek-Olup, Brigita; Dana, Reza

    2014-05-15

    To establish a murine model for keratoprosthesis. A miniature keratoprosthesis (m-KPro) device was created consisting of a poly[methyl methacrylate] front part and a titanium back plate, designed after the Boston KPro, which is in widespread clinical use. BALB/c mice were used and a 2 mm in diameter donor cornea was punched out. After 2-mm trepanation of the syngeneic recipient cornea, extracapsular crystalline lens extraction was performed. The m-KPro was assembled onto the cornea button in a similar manner to human KPro implantation. The cornea-device complex was secured to the recipient bed with eight interrupted 11-0 sutures. All mice (n = 10) were followed up for 8 weeks postoperatively. All m-KPros were successfully implanted and retained in all 10 animals. There were no critical complications such as endophthalmitis, corneal melting, device extrusions, leakage, extensive inflammation, or weight loss in the animals. We observed mild to moderate donor and host corneal neovascularization in all cases throughout the follow-up period. We have established a novel murine model of KPro implantation that we anticipate will serve as a good experimental system for evaluating host responses after KPro surgery. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  1. An incomplete TCA cycle increases survival of Salmonella Typhimurium during infection of resting and activated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Steven D; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hinton, Jay C D; Thompson, Arthur

    2010-11-08

    In comparison to the comprehensive analyses performed on virulence gene expression, regulation and action, the intracellular metabolism of Salmonella during infection is a relatively under-studied area. We investigated the role of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in the intracellular replication of Salmonella Typhimurium in resting and activated macrophages, epithelial cells, and during infection of mice. We constructed deletion mutations of 5 TCA cycle genes in S. Typhimurium including gltA, mdh, sdhCDAB, sucAB, and sucCD. We found that the mutants exhibited increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated murine macrophages compared to the wild-type. In contrast, an epithelial cell infection model showed that the S. Typhimurium ΔsucCD and ΔgltA strains had reduced net intracellular replication compared to the wild-type. The glyoxylate shunt was not responsible for the net increased replication of the TCA cycle mutants within resting macrophages. We also confirmed that, in a murine infection model, the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD strains are attenuated for virulence. Our results suggest that disruption of the TCA cycle increases the ability of S. Typhimurium to survive within resting and activated murine macrophages. In contrast, epithelial cells are non-phagocytic cells and unlike macrophages cannot mount an oxidative and nitrosative defence response against pathogens; our results show that in HeLa cells the S. Typhimurium TCA cycle mutant strains show reduced or no change in intracellular levels compared to the wild-type. The attenuation of the S. Typhimurium ΔsucAB and ΔsucCD mutants in mice, compared to their increased net intracellular replication in resting and activated macrophages suggest that Salmonella may encounter environments within the host where a complete TCA cycle is advantageous.

  2. Mammalian Models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Pathological Characteristics and Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Nakamura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a devastating X-linked muscle disorder characterized by muscle wasting which is caused by mutations in the DMD gene. The DMD gene encodes the sarcolemmal protein dystrophin, and loss of dystrophin causes muscle degeneration and necrosis. Thus far, therapies for this disorder are unavailable. However, various therapeutic trials based on gene therapy, exon skipping, cell therapy, read through therapy, or pharmaceutical agents have been conducted extensively. In the development of therapy as well as elucidation of pathogenesis in DMD, appropriate animal models are needed. Various animal models of DMD have been identified, and mammalian (murine, canine, and feline models are indispensable for the examination of the mechanisms of pathogenesis and the development of therapies. Here, we review the pathological features of DMD and therapeutic applications, especially of exon skipping using antisense oligonucleotides and gene therapies using viral vectors in murine and canine models of DMD.

  3. Lung attenuation measurements in healthy young adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, H.J.M.; Golding, R.P.; Schramel, F.M.N.H.; Devillé, W.L.; Manoliu, R.A.; Postmus, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    Background: High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) attenuation measurements may be more sensitive in finding early emphysematous changes in relatively young subjects than lung function measurements. Objectives: To define lung attenuation parameters in smokers and never-smokers. Methods: A

  4. Inner Core Anisotropy in Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W.; Wen, L.

    2004-12-01

    It is now well established that the compressional velocity in the Earth's inner core varies in both direction and geographic location. The compressional waves travel faster along the polar directions than along the equatorial directions. Such polar-equatorial difference is interpreted as a result of inner core anisotropy in velocity (with a magnitude of about 3%) and such anisotropy appears to be stronger in the ``western hemisphere" (180oW -40oE) than in the ``eastern hemisphere" (40oE-180oE). Along the equatorial paths, the compressional velocity also exhibits a hemispheric pattern with the eastern hemisphere being about 1% higher than the western hemisphere. Possible explanations for the causes of the velocity in anisotropy and the hemispheric difference in velocity along the equatorial paths include different geometric inclusions of melt or different alignments of iron crystals which are known to be anisotropic in velocities. Here, we report an observation of ubiquitous correlation between small (large) amplitude and fast (slow) travel time of the PKIKP waves sampling the top 300 km of the inner core. We study this correlation by jointly analyzing the differential travel times and amplitude ratios of the PKiKP-PKIKP and the PKPbc-PKIKP phases recorded by the Global Seismographic Network (1990-2001), various regional seismic networks (BANJO, BLSP, FREESIA, GEOFON, GEOSCOPE, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz, MEDNET, and OHP), and several PASSCAL Networks deployed in Alaska and Antarctica (XE: 1999-2001, XF: 1995-1996, and YI: 1998-1999). Our dataset consists of 310 PKiKP-PKIKP and 240 PKPbc-PKIKP phases, selected from a total of more than 16,000 observations. PKIKP waves exhibit relatively smaller amplitudes for those sampling the eastern hemisphere along the equatorial paths and even smaller amplitudes for those sampling the polar paths in the western hemisphere. One simple explanation for the velocity-attenuation relation is that the inner core is anisotropic in attenuation

  5. Monitoring Therapeutic Treatments against Burkholderia Infections Using Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M. Mott

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, are Category B select agents with biothreat potential, and yet effective therapeutic treatments are lacking. In this study, we showed that CpG administration increased survival, demonstrating protection in the murine glanders model. Bacterial recovery from infected lungs, liver and spleen was significantly reduced in CpG-treated animals as compared with non-treated mice. Reciprocally, lungs of CpG-treated infected animals were infiltrated with higher levels of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes, as compared to control animals. Employing the B. mallei bioluminescent strain CSM001 and the Neutrophil-Specific Fluorescent Imaging Agent, bacterial dissemination and neutrophil trafficking were monitored in real-time using multimodal in vivo whole body imaging techniques. CpG-treatment increased recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs and reduced bioluminescent bacteria, correlating with decreased bacterial burden and increased protection against acute murine glanders. Our results indicate that protection of CpG-treated animals was associated with recruitment of neutrophils prior to infection and demonstrated, for the first time, simultaneous real time in vivo imaging of neutrophils and bacteria. This study provides experimental evidence supporting the importance of incorporating optimized in vivo imaging methods to monitor disease progression and to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic treatment during bacterial infections.

  6. Biomarkers of disease and treatment in murine and cynomolgus models of chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louten, Jennifer; Mattson, Jeanine D; Malinao, Maria-Christina; Li, Ying; Emson, Claire; Vega, Felix; Wardle, Robert L; Van Scott, Michael R; Fick, Robert B; McClanahan, Terrill K; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Beaumont, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    Biomarkers facilitate early detection of disease and measurement of therapeutic efficacy, both at clinical and experimental levels. Recent advances in analytics and disease models allow comprehensive screening for biomarkers in complex diseases, such as asthma, that was previously not feasible. Using murine and nonhuman primate (NHP) models of asthma, identify biomarkers associated with early and chronic stages of asthma and responses to steroid treatment. The total protein content from thymic stromal lymphopoietin transgenic (TSLP Tg) mouse BAL fluid was ascertained by shotgun proteomics analysis. A subset of these potential markers was further analyzed in BAL fluid, BAL cell mRNA, and lung tissue mRNA during the stages of asthma and following corticosteroid treatment. Validation was conducted in murine and NHP models of allergic asthma. Over 40 proteins were increased in the BAL fluid of TSLP Tg mice that were also detected by qRT-PCR in lung tissue and BAL cells, as well as in OVA-sensitive mice and house dust mite-sensitive NHP. Previously undescribed as asthma biomarkers, KLK1, Reg3γ, ITLN2, and LTF were modulated in asthmatic mice, and Clca3, Chi3l4 (YM2), and Ear11 were the first lung biomarkers to increase during disease and the last biomarkers to decline in response to therapy. In contrast, GP-39, LCN2, sICAM-1, YM1, Epx, Mmp12, and Klk1 were good indicators of early therapeutic intervention. In NHP, AMCase, sICAM-1, CLCA1, and GP-39 were reduced upon treatment with corticosteroids. These results significantly advance our understanding of the biomarkers present in various tissue compartments in animal models of asthma, including those induced early during asthma and modulated with therapeutic intervention, and show that BAL cells (or their surrogate, induced sputum cells) are a viable choice for biomarker examination.

  7. ENHANCEMENTS TO NATURAL ATTENUATION: SELECTED CASE STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K; W. H. Albright, W; E. S. Becvar, E; C. H. Benson, C; T. O. Early, T; E. Hood, E; P. M. Jardine, P; M. Lorah, M; E. Majche, E; D. Major, D; W. J. Waugh, W; G. Wein, G; O. R. West, O

    2007-05-15

    In 2003 the US Department of Energy (DOE) embarked on a project to explore an innovative approach to remediation of subsurface contaminant plumes that focused on introducing mechanisms for augmenting natural attenuation to achieve site closure. Termed enhanced attenuation (EA), this approach has drawn its inspiration from the concept of monitored natural attenuation (MNA).

  8. A fully integrated optofluidic attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Philipp; Kloss, Anton; Liebetraut, Peter; Mönch, Wolfgang; Zappe, Hans

    2011-12-01

    A fast and reliable, fully integrated optofluidic optical attenuator is demonstrated. The concept employs only liquid and thus has no mechanically moving parts. Transparent and opaque aqueous liquid droplets are displaced using an on-chip electrowetting actuator and, due to the flexibility in the choice of liquids, various transmission spectra can be defined. The microfluidic attenuator system is fabricated using wafer-level bonding and dry film resists resulting in an ultra-compact (11×23×1.6 mm3) device requiring no external components for operation. The measured dynamic range of optical transmission is up to 47 dB, while the response times are below 100 ms for a 2 mm input beam. Using a novel double-actuator configuration, actuation speeds of the liquids of up to 39 mm s-1 were measured.

  9. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-01-01

    In Section 1 of this first report we will describe the work we are doing to collect and analyze rock physics data for the purpose of modeling seismic attenuation from other measurable quantities such as porosity, water saturation, clay content and net stress. This work and other empirical methods to be presented later, will form the basis for ''Q pseudo-well modeling'' that is a key part of this project. In Section 2 of this report, we will show the fundamentals of a new method to extract Q, dispersion, and attenuation from field seismic data. The method is called Gabor-Morlet time-frequency decomposition. This technique has a number of advantages including greater stability and better time resolution than spectral ratio methods.

  10. SOUND ATTENUATION IN FERROELECTRIC SOLIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Naithani, U.; Semwal, B.

    1981-01-01

    An expression for the sound-attenuation constant in doped displacive ferroelectrics, in the presence of an external electric field, is obtained by using the double-time thermal- Green's -functions technique. The mass and force constant changes between the impurity and the host lattice atoms are taken into account in the Silverman Hamiltonian augmented with higher -order anharmonic and electric-moment terms. The defect-dependent, electric- field-dependent, and anharmonic contributions to the a...

  11. Flagella Overexpression Attenuates Salmonella Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Xinghong Yang; Theresa Thornburg; Zhiyong Suo; SangMu Jun; Amanda Robison; Jinquan Li; Timothy Lim; Ling Cao; Teri Hoyt; Recep Avci; Pascual, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Flagella are cell surface appendages involved in a number of bacterial behaviors, such as motility, biofilm formation, and chemotaxis. Despite these important functions, flagella can pose a liability to a bacterium when serving as potent immunogens resulting in the stimulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Previous work showing appendage overexpression, referred to as attenuating gene expression (AGE), was found to enfeeble wild-type Salmonella. Thus, this approach was adapted to...

  12. Murine and human CFTR exhibit different sensitivities to CFTR potentiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guiying; McCarty, Nael A

    2015-10-01

    Development of therapeutic molecules with clinical efficacy as modulators of defective CFTR includes efforts to identify potentiators that can overcome or repair the gating defect in mutant CFTR channels. This has taken a great leap forward with the identification of the potentiator VX-770, now available to patients as "Kalydeco." Other small molecules with different chemical structure also are capable of potentiating the activity of either wild-type or mutant CFTR, suggesting that there are features of the protein that may be targeted to achieve stimulation of channel activity by structurally diverse compounds. However, neither the mechanisms by which these compounds potentiate mutant CFTR nor the site(s) where these compounds bind have been identified. This knowledge gap partly reflects the lack of appropriate experimental models to provide clues toward the identification of binding sites. Here, we have compared the channel behavior and response to novel and known potentiators of human CFTR (hCFTR) and murine (mCFTR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both hCFTR and mCFTR were blocked by GlyH-101 from the extracellular side, but mCFTR activity was increased with GlyH-101 applied directly to the cytoplasmic side. Similarly, glibenclamide only exhibited a blocking effect on hCFTR but both blocked and potentiated mCFTR in excised membrane patches and in intact oocytes. The clinically used CFTR potentiator VX-770 transiently increased hCFTR by ∼13% but potentiated mCFTR significantly more strongly. Our results suggest that mCFTR pharmacological sensitivities differ from hCFTR, which will provide a useful tool for identifying the binding sites and mechanism for these potentiators. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Hepatocyte growth factor, a determinant of airspace homeostasis in the murine lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Calvi

    Full Text Available The alveolar compartment, the fundamental gas exchange unit in the lung, is critical for tissue oxygenation and viability. We explored hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, a pleiotrophic cytokine that promotes epithelial proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and resistance to apoptosis, as a candidate mediator of alveolar formation and regeneration. Mice deficient in the expression of the HGF receptor Met in lung epithelial cells demonstrated impaired airspace formation marked by a reduction in alveolar epithelial cell abundance and survival, truncation of the pulmonary vascular bed, and enhanced oxidative stress. Administration of recombinant HGF to tight-skin mice, an established genetic emphysema model, attenuated airspace enlargement and reduced oxidative stress. Repair in the TSK/+ mouse was punctuated by enhanced akt and stat3 activation. HGF treatment of an alveolar epithelial cell line not only induced proliferation and scattering of the cells but also conferred protection against staurosporine-induced apoptosis, properties critical for alveolar septation. HGF promoted cell survival was attenuated by akt inhibition. Primary alveolar epithelial cells treated with HGF showed improved survival and enhanced antioxidant production. In conclusion, using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function maneuvers, we show that HGF signaling is necessary for alveolar homeostasis in the developing lung and that augmentation of HGF signaling can improve airspace morphology in murine emphysema. Our studies converge on prosurvival signaling and antioxidant protection as critical pathways in HGF-mediated airspace maintenance or repair. These findings support the exploration of HGF signaling enhancement for diseases of the airspace.

  14. Coupling agents in therapeutic ultrasound: Acoustic and thermal behavior

    OpenAIRE

    CASAROTTO, Raquel Aparecida; Adamowski, Julio Cesar; Fallopa, Flávio [UNIFESP; Bacanelli, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    Casarotto RA, Adamowski JC, Fallopa F, Bacanelli F. Coupling agents in therapeutic ultrasound: acoustic and thermal behavior. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2004;85:162-5.Objective: To compare transmissivity data and thermal behavior of 4 coupling media.Design: Experimental.Setting: Postgraduate rehabilitation program in Brazil.Specimens: Four coupling media: gel, mineral oil, white petrolatum, and degassed water.Interventions: Not applicable.Main Outcome Measures: the transmission, attenuation, refle...

  15. Anatomy and Histology of the Human and Murine Prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittmann, Michael

    2017-10-16

    The human and murine prostate glands have similar functional roles in the generation of seminal fluid to assist in reproduction. There are significant differences in the anatomy and histology of murine and human prostate and knowledge of the normal anatomy and histology of the murine prostate is essential to interpreting changes in genetically engineered mouse models. In this review, the normal anatomy and histology of both human and mouse prostate will be described. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  17. Physical characteristics and attenuation of foam earplugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.R.; Broughton, R.M.; Wilmoth, J.N.; Borton, T.E.; Mozo, B.T.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was twofold: (1) to determine the physical characteristics of five types of foam earplugs; and (2) to relate their physical characteristics to attenuation of noise. The results indicate that: (1) all commercial polymer foam earplugs have similar physical properties, (2) frequency is the single most important variable in determining attenuation of commercial foam earplugs, (3) all earplugs evaluated provided essentially the same attenuation at frequencies >500 Hz. One non-commercial earplug provided significantly more attenuation at 125 Hz than the other earplugs. This non-commercial experimental plug has significantly different physical and chemical properties. No other consistent effects of physical properties on attenuation were found.

  18. Kant and therapeutic privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Chris

    2008-08-01

    Given Kant's exceptionless moral prohibition on lying, one might suspect that he is committed to a similar prohibition on withholding diagnostic and prognostic information from patients. I confirm this suspicion by adapting arguments against therapeutic privilege from his arguments against lying. However, I show that all these arguments are importantly flawed and submit that they should be rejected. A more compelling Kantian take on informed consent and therapeutic privilege is achievable, I argue, by focusing on Kant's duty of beneficence, which requires us to aim at furthering others' ends. But I show that there are some cases in which furthering a patient's ends requires withholding material medical information from her. Although I concede that these cases are probably quite rare, I conclude that the best Kantian thinking agrees with that of therapeutic privilege's advocates.

  19. Adiponectin and plant-derived mammalian adiponectin homolog exert a protective effect in murine colitis

    KAUST Repository

    Arsenescu, Violeta

    2011-04-11

    Background: Hypoadiponectinemia has been associated with states of chronic inflammation in humans. Mesenteric fat hypertrophy and low adiponectin have been described in patients with Crohn\\'s disease. We investigated whether adiponectin and the plant-derived homolog, osmotin, are beneficial in a murine model of colitis. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were injected (i.v.) with an adenoviral construct encoding the full-length murine adiponectin gene (AN+DSS) or a reporter-LacZ (Ctr and V+DSS groups) prior to DSS colitis protocol. In another experiment, mice with DSS colitis received either osmotin (Osm+DSS) or saline (DSS) via osmotic pumps. Disease progression and severity were evaluated using body weight, stool consistency, rectal bleeding, colon lengths, and histology. In vitro experiments were carried out in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Results: Mice overexpressing adiponectin had lower expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1β), adipokines (angiotensin, osteopontin), and cellular stress and apoptosis markers. These mice had higher levels of IL-10, alternative macrophage marker, arginase 1, and leukoprotease inhibitor. The plant adiponectin homolog osmotin similarly improved colitis outcome and induced robust IL-10 secretion. LPS induced a state of adiponectin resistance in dendritic cells that was reversed by treatment with PPARγ agonist and retinoic acid. Conclusion: Adiponectin exerted protective effects during murine DSS colitis. It had a broad activity that encompassed cytokines, chemotactic factors as well as processes that assure cell viability during stressful conditions. Reducing adiponectin resistance or using plant-derived adiponectin homologs may become therapeutic options in inflammatory bowel disease. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  20. Angiogenic effect of platelet-rich plasma combined with gelatin hydrogel granules injected into murine subcutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakudo, Natsuko; Morimoto, Naoki; Ogawa, Takeshi; Hihara, Masakatsu; Notodihardjo, Priscilla Valentin; Matsui, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2017-07-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which contains highly concentrated platelets, is produced by centrifuging whole blood. It is a safe and readily available source of a wide range of growth factors necessary for angiogenesis. Gelatin hydrogel granules have been designed and prepared for the controlled release of many growth factors. The angiogenic effect of human PRP was examined in vitro, and the effect of its subcutaneous injection with gelatin hydrogel granules into murine subcutis was evaluated. Human PRP was prepared using a double-spin method. The concentration of growth factors and the platelet count were examined in PRP and in vitro, and the angiogenic activity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in co-culture with human dermal fibroblast cells (NHDFs) in the presence and absence of PRP was evaluated. Then, in vivo, PRP, either free or with gelatin hydrogel granules, was injected subcutaneously into tiebacks on mice. Using a microscope and Kurabo angiogenesis image analyser software, the area containing newly formed capillaries was evaluated histologically and the microvascular network score was calculated. PRP was shown to contain high concentrations of PDGF, VEGF and TGFβ and had an angiogenic effect on the co-culture system. PRP with gelatin hydrogel granules significantly enlarged the area containing newly formed capillaries and promoted the microvascular network in murine subcutaneous tissue. PRP encapsulated in gelatin hydrogel microspheres shows promise for enhancing angiogenic effects in murine subcutis and could represent a potential therapeutic combination for the treatment of ischaemic disorders. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Method for Estimating Total Attenuation from a Spatial Map of Attenuation Slope for Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlicki, Alexander D.; O'Brien, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating total ultrasound attenuation from backscatter data is essential in the field of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) because of the need to compensate for attenuation when estimating the backscatter coefficient and QUS parameters. This work uses a reference phantom method of attenuation estimation to create a spatial map of attenuation slope (AS) from backscatter radio-frequency (RF) data of three phantoms and a rat mammary adenocarcinoma tumor (MAT). The attenuation maps show changes in ...

  2. Lymphedema and Therapeutic Lymphangiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Saito

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema is a disorder of the lymphatic vascular system characterized by impaired lymphatic return and swelling of the extremities. Lymphedema is divided into primary and secondary forms based on the underlying etiology. Despite substantial advances in both surgical and conservative techniques, therapeutic options for the management of lymphedema are limited. Although rarely lethal, lymphedema is a disfiguring and disabling condition with an associated decrease in the quality of life. The recent impressive expansion of knowledge on the molecular mechanisms governing lymphangiogenesis provides new possibilities for the treatment of lymphedema. This review highlights the lymphatic biology, the pathophysiology of lymphedema, and the therapeutic lymphangiogenesis using hepatocyte growth factor.

  3. Therapeutic development in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Jeffrey M; Leonardi, Craig L

    2014-06-01

    Advances in molecular biology have provided the basis for development of new therapeutic approaches to psoriasis. New, more effective therapies target specific molecules in the inflammatory cascade involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.The biologic era of psoriasis therapy began with inhibitors of T-cell activation, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin (IL)-12/23. Continued investigation has led to therapies and therapeutic candidates that target IL-17, IL-23, phosphodiesterase-4, and isomers of Janus kinase. 2014 by Frontline Medical Communications Inc.

  4. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  5. Inhibition of protein kinase C delta attenuates allergic airway inflammation through suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/HIF-1 alpha/VEGF pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ho Choi

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is supposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic airway disease. VEGF expression is regulated by a variety of stimuli such as nitric oxide, growth factors, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α. Recently, inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been shown to alleviate cardinal asthmatic features, including airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and increased vascular permeability in asthma models. Based on these observations, we have investigated whether mTOR is associated with HIF-1α-mediated VEGF expression in allergic asthma. In studies with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, we have elucidated the stimulatory role of a mTOR-HIF-1α-VEGF axis in allergic response. Next, the mechanisms by which mTOR is activated to modulate this response have been evaluated. mTOR is known to be regulated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt or protein kinase C-delta (PKC δ in various cell types. Consistent with these, our results have revealed that suppression of PKC δ by rottlerin leads to the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activity and the subsequent blockade of a mTOR-HIF-1α-VEGF module, thereby attenuating typical asthmatic attack in a murine model. Thus, the present data indicate that PKC δ is necessary for the modulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade, resulting in a tight regulation of HIF-1α activity and VEGF expression. In conclusion, PKC δ may represent a valuable target for innovative therapeutic treatment of allergic airway disease.

  6. Inhibition of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Attenuates Transforming Growth Factor-β-Dependent Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition and Differentiation of Fibroblasts to Myofibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitaro Omori

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β is central during the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, in which the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 also has an established role. TGF-β is also known to be the strongest inducer of PAI-1. To investigate the link between PAI-1 and TGF-β in fibrotic processes, we evaluated the effect of SK-216, a PAI-1-specific inhibitor, in TGF-β-dependent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation. In human alveolar epithelial A549 cells, treatment with TGF-β induced EMT, whereas co-treatment with SK-216 attenuated the occurrence of EMT. The inhibition of TGF-β-induced EMT by SK-216 was also confirmed in the experiment using murine epithelial LA-4 cells. Blocking EMT by SK-216 inhibited TGF-β-induced endogenous production of PAI-1 and TGF-β in A549 cells as well. These effects of SK-216 were not likely mediated by suppressing either Smad or ERK pathways. Using human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells, we demonstrated that SK-216 inhibited TGF-β-dependent differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. We also observed this inhibition by SK-216 in human primary lung fibroblasts. Following these in vitro results, we tested oral administration of SK-216 into mice injected intratracheally with bleomycin. We found that SK-216 reduced the degree of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Although the precise mechanisms underlying the link between TGF-β and PAI-1 regarding fibrotic process were not determined, PAI-1 seems to act as a potent downstream effector on the pro-fibrotic property of TGF-β. In addition, inhibition of PAI-1 activity by a PAI-1 inhibitor exerts an antifibrotic effect even in vivo. These data suggest that targeting PAI-1 as a downstream effector of TGF-β could be a promising therapeutic strategy for pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Effects of β-blockers on house dust mite-driven murine models pre- and post-development of an asthma phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Radhika; Valdez, Daniel; Kim, Hosu; Eikenburg, Douglas C; Knoll, Brian J; Bond, Richard A

    2017-10-01

    Our previous studies suggested certain β-adrenoceptor blockers (β-blockers) attenuate the asthma phenotype in ovalbumin driven murine models of asthma. However, the ovalbumin model has been criticized for lack of clinical relevance. We tested the non-selective β-blockers, carvedilol and nadolol, in house dust mite (HDM) driven murine asthma models where drugs were administered both pre- and post-development of the asthma phenotype. We measured inflammation, mucous metaplasia, and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR). We also measured the effects of the β-blockers on extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation in lung homogenates. We show that nadolol, but not carvedilol, attenuated inflammation and mucous metaplasia, and had a moderate effect attenuating AHR. Following HDM exposure, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was elevated, but the level of phosphorylation was unaffected by β-blockers, suggesting ERK1/2 phosphorylation becomes dissociated from the asthma phenotype. Our findings in HDM models administering drugs both pre- and post-development of the asthma phenotype are consistent with previous results using ovalbumin models and show differential effects for nadolol and carvedilol on the asthma phenotype. Lastly, our data suggest that ERK1/2 phosphorylation may be involved in development of the asthma phenotype, but may have a limited role in maintaining the phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cannabinoids attenuate cancer pain and proliferation in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghafi, Negin; Lam, David K; Schmidt, Brian L

    2011-01-25

    We investigated the effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on (1) oral cancer cell viability in vitro and (2) oral cancer pain and tumor growth in a mouse cancer model. We utilized immunohistochemistry and Western blot to show that human oral cancer cells express CBr1 and CBr2. When treated with WIN55,212-2 (non-selective), ACEA (CBr1-selective) or AM1241 (CBr2-selective) agonists in vitro, oral cancer cell proliferation was significantly attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, systemic administration (0.013M) of WIN55,212-2, ACEA, or AM1241 significantly attenuated cancer-induced mechanical allodynia. Tumor growth was also significantly attenuated with systemic AM1241 administration. Our findings suggest a direct role for cannabinoid mechanisms in oral cancer pain and proliferation. The systemic administration of cannabinoid receptor agonists may have important therapeutic implications wherein cannabinoid receptor agonists may reduce morbidity and mortality of oral cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  10. Therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ken; Roosinovich, Elena; Ma, Barbara; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that most cervical cancers are causally associated with HPV infection. This realization has led to efforts to control HPV-associated malignancy through prevention or treatment of HPV infection. Currently, commercially available HPV vaccines are not designed to control established HPV infection and associated premalignant and malignant lesions. To treat and eradicate pre-existing HPV infections and associated lesions which remain prevalent in the U.S. and worldwide, effective therapeutic HPV vaccines are needed. DNA vaccination has emerged as a particularly promising form of therapeutic HPV vaccines due to its safety, stability and ability to induce antigen-specific immunity. This review focuses on improving the potency of therapeutic HPV vaccines through modification of dendritic cells (DCs) by [1] increasing the number of antigen-expressing/antigen-loaded DCs, [2] improving HPV antigen expression, processing and presentation in DCs, and [3] enhancing DC and T cell interaction. Continued improvement in therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines may ultimately lead to an effective DNA vaccine for the treatment of HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:20066511

  11. Phytochemical profiles and biological activity evaluation of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim seed against asthma in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weizhuo; Xie, Qiangmin; Guan, Jian; Jin, Saihong; Zhao, Yuqing

    2014-03-28

    Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim seed (ZBMS) has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as an ingredient of polyherbal formulations for the treatment of inflammation and asthma. The aim of this study was to analyze the major composition and to evaluate the anti-asthma activity of ZBMS. Some murine models including acetylcholine/histamine-induced asthma, ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, ear edema and toe swelling measurement, citric acid-induced cough, and anti-stress abilities were investigated to fully study the anti-asthma activity of ZBMS.GC chromatography was also performed to analyze the major fatty acid composition of ZBMS. The results demonstrated that the major fatty acid composition of ZBMS includes oleic acid (20.15%), linoleic acid (26.54%), and α-linolenic acid (30.57%), which was the leading component of ZBMS, and that the total fatty acid content of ZBMS was 77.27%. The murine models demonstrated that ZBMS displays a protective effect on guinea pig sensitization, a dose-dependent inhibition of the increases in RL and decreases in Cdyn, which resulted in the relief of auricle edema and toe swelling in mice and anti-stress activity. Our results validate the traditional use of ZBMS for the treatment of asthma and other inflammatory joint disorders, and suggest that ZBMS has potential as a new therapeutic agent for asthma management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sorting Behavior of a Transgenic Erythropoietin–Growth Hormone Fusion Protein in Murine Salivary Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuni, Yuval; Cawley, Niamh X.; Zheng, Changyu; Cotrim, Ana P.; Loh, Y. Peng; Baum, Bruce J.

    2017-01-01

    Salivary glands are useful gene transfer target sites for the production of therapeutic proteins, and can secrete proteins into both saliva and the bloodstream. The mechanisms involved in this differential protein sorting are not well understood, although it is believed, at least in part, to be based on the amino acid sequence of the encoded protein. We hypothesized that a transgenic protein, human erythropoietin (hEpo), normally sorted from murine salivary glands into the bloodstream, could be redirected into saliva by fusing it with human growth hormone (hGH). After transfection, the hEpo–hGH fusion protein was expressed and glycosylated in both HEK 293 and A5 cells. When packaged in an adenovirus serotype 5 vector and delivered to murine submandibular cells in vivo via retroductal cannulation, the hEpo–hGH fusion protein was also expressed, albeit at ~26% of the levels of hEpo expression. Importantly, in multiple experiments with different cohorts of mice, the hEpo–hGH fusion protein was sorted more frequently into saliva, versus the bloodstream, than was the hEpo protein (p salivary gland cells after gene transfer in vivo, a finding that may facilitate developing novel treatments for certain upper gastrointestinal tract disorders. PMID:18303958

  13. Quantifying mechanical properties in a murine fracture healing system using inverse modeling: preliminary work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miga, Michael I.; Weis, Jared A.; Granero-Molto, Froilan; Spagnoli, Anna

    2010-03-01

    Understanding bone remodeling and mechanical property characteristics is important for assessing treatments to accelerate healing or in developing diagnostics to evaluate successful return to function. The murine system whereby mid-diaphaseal tibia fractures are imparted on the subject and fracture healing is assessed at different time points and under different therapeutic conditions is a particularly useful model to study. In this work, a novel inverse geometric nonlinear elasticity modeling framework is proposed that can reconstruct multiple mechanical properties from uniaxial testing data. To test this framework, the Lame' constants were reconstructed within the context of a murine cohort (n=6) where there were no differences in treatment post tibia fracture except that half of the mice were allowed to heal 4 days longer (10 day, and 14 day healing time point, respectively). The properties reconstructed were a shear modulus of G=511.2 +/- 295.6 kPa, and 833.3+/- 352.3 kPa for the 10 day, and 14 day time points respectively. The second Lame' constant reconstructed at λ=1002.9 +/-42.9 kPa, and 14893.7 +/- 863.3 kPa for the 10 day, and 14 day time points respectively. An unpaired Student t-test was used to test for statistically significant differences among the groups. While the shear modulus did not meet our criteria for significance, the second Lame' constant did at a value pfracture healing research community were not found to be statistically significant.

  14. Rapamycin Inhibits ALDH Activity, Resistance to Oxidative Stress, and Metastatic Potential in Murine Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common primary malignancy of bone. Mortality is determined by the presence of metastatic disease, but little is known regarding the biochemical events that drive metastases. Two murine OS cell lines, K7M2 and K12, are related but differ significantly in their metastatic potentials: K7M2 is highly metastatic whereas K12 displays much less metastatic potential. Using this experimental system, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway has been implicated in OS metastasis. We also discovered that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH, a stem cell marker activity is higher in K7M2 cells than K12 cells. Rapamycin treatment reduces the expression and enzymatic activity of ALDH in K7M2 cells. ALDH inhibition renders these cells more susceptible to apoptotic death when exposed to oxidative stress. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment reduces bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF gene expression and inhibits K7M2 proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. Inhibition of ALDH with disulfiram correlated with decreased mTOR expression and activity. In conclusion, we provide evidence for interaction between mTOR activity, ALDH activity, and metastatic potential in murine OS cells. Our work suggests that mTOR and ALDH are therapeutic targets for the treatment and prevention of OS metastasis.

  15. Newly Characterized Murine Undifferentiated Sarcoma Models Sensitive to Virotherapy with Oncolytic HSV-1 M002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K. Ring

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in conventional chemotherapy, surgical techniques, and radiation, outcomes for patients with relapsed, refractory, or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas are dismal. Survivors often suffer from lasting morbidity from current treatments. New targeted therapies with less toxicity, such as those that harness the immune system, and immunocompetent murine sarcoma models to test these therapies are greatly needed. We characterized two new serendipitous murine models of undifferentiated sarcoma (SARC-28 and SARC-45 and tested their sensitivity to virotherapy with oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1. Both models expressed high levels of the primary HSV entry molecule nectin-1 (CD111 and were susceptible to killing by interleukin-12 (IL-12 producing HSV-1 M002 in vitro and in vivo. M002 resulted in a significant intratumoral increase in effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and activated monocytes, and a decrease in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in immunocompetent mice. Compared to parent virus R3659 (no IL-12 production, M002 resulted in higher CD8:MDSC and CD8:T regulatory cell (Treg ratios, suggesting that M002 creates a more favorable immune tumor microenvironment. These data provide support for clinical trials targeting sarcomas with oncolytic HSV-1. These models provide an exciting opportunity to explore combination therapies for soft tissue sarcomas that rely on an intact immune system to reach full therapeutic potential.

  16. Toxicity and Immunogenicity in Murine Melanoma following Exposure to Physical Plasma-Derived Oxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Bekeschus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma is an aggressive and deadly disease. Therapeutic advance has been achieved by antitumor chemo- and radiotherapy. These modalities involve the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, affecting cellular viability, migration, and immunogenicity. Such species are also created by cold physical plasma, an ionized gas capable of redox modulating cells and tissues without thermal damage. Cold plasma has been suggested for anticancer therapy. Here, melanoma cell toxicity, motility, and immunogenicity of murine metastatic melanoma cells were investigated following plasma exposure in vitro. Cells were oxidized by plasma, leading to decreased metabolic activity and cell death. Moreover, plasma decelerated melanoma cell growth, viability, and cell cycling. This was accompanied by increased cellular stiffness and upregulation of zonula occludens 1 protein in the cell membrane. Importantly, expression levels of immunogenic cell surface molecules such as major histocompatibility complex I, calreticulin, and melanocortin receptor 1 were significantly increased in response to plasma. Finally, plasma treatment significantly decreased the release of vascular endothelial growth factor, a molecule with importance in angiogenesis. Altogether, these results suggest beneficial toxicity of cold plasma in murine melanomas with a concomitant immunogenicity of potential interest in oncology.

  17. Pardaxin, a Fish Antimicrobial Peptide, Exhibits Antitumor Activity toward Murine Fibrosarcoma in Vitro and in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Ping; Huang, Tsui-Chin; Lin, Ching-Chun; Hui, Cho-Fat; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2012-01-01

    The antitumor activity of pardaxin, a fish antimicrobial peptide, has not been previously examined in in vitro and in vivo systems for treating murine fibrosarcoma. In this study, the antitumor activity of synthetic pardaxin was tested using murine MN-11 tumor cells as the study model. We show that pardaxin inhibits the proliferation of MN-11 cells and reduces colony formation in a soft agar assay. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that pardaxin altered the membrane structure similar to what a lytic peptide does, and also produced apoptotic features, such as hollow mitochondria, nuclear condensation, and disrupted cell membranes. A qRT-PCR and ELISA showed that pardaxin induced apoptosis, activated caspase-7 and interleukin (IL)-7r, and downregulated caspase-9, ATF 3, SOCS3, STAT3, cathelicidin, p65, and interferon (IFN)-γ suggesting that pardaxin induces apoptosis through the death receptor/nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway after 14 days of treatment in tumor-bearing mice. An antitumor effect was observed when pardaxin (25 mg/kg; 0.5 mg/day) was used to treat mice for 14 days, which caused significant inhibition of MN-11 cell growth in mice. Overall, these results indicate that pardaxin has the potential to be a novel therapeutic agent to treat fibrosarcomas. PMID:23015777

  18. Epigenetic therapy as a novel approach for GFI136N-associated murine/human AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botezatu, Lacramioara; Michel, Lars C; Helness, Anne; Vadnais, Charles; Makishima, Hideki; Hönes, Judith M; Robert, François; Vassen, Lothar; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Al-Matary, Yahya; Lams, Robert F; Schütte, Judith; Giebel, Bernd; Görgens, André; Heuser, Michael; Medyouf, Hind; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Dührsen, Ulrich; Möröy, Tarik; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-08-01

    Epigenetic changes can contribute to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a malignant disease of the bone marrow. A single-nucleotide polymorphism of transcription factor growth factor independence 1 (GFI1) generates a protein with an asparagine at position 36 (GFI1(36N)) instead of a serine at position 36 (GFI1(36S)), which is associated with de novo AML in humans. However, how GFI1(36N) predisposes to AML is poorly understood. To explore the mechanism, we used knock-in mouse strains expressing GFI1(36N) or GFI1(36S). Presence of GFI1(36N) shortened the latency and increased the incidence of AML in different murine models of myelodysplastic syndrome/AML. On a molecular level, GFI1(36N) induced genomewide epigenetic changes, leading to expression of AML-associated genes. On a therapeutic level, use of histone acetyltransferase inhibitors specifically impeded growth of GFI1(36N)-expressing human and murine AML cells in vitro and in vivo. These results establish, as a proof of principle, how epigenetic changes in GFI1(36N)-induced AML can be targeted. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía de Munck

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA, a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS.

  20. Clearance kinetics and external dosimetry of 131I-labeled murine and humanized monoclonal antibody A33 in patients with colon cancer: radiation safety implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Lawrence T; Boylan, Daniel C; Williamson, Matthew J; St Germain, Jean; Larson, Steven M

    2009-05-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb) A33 detects a membrane antigen that is expressed on greater than 95% of metastatic human colorectal cancers. Previous studies have shown excellent tumor-targeting of (131)I-labeled murine and humanized forms of the mAb. A retrospective analysis of whole-body clearance in the murine form was performed for comparison to the humanized form. Serial whole-body dose rate measurements were obtained for 55 treatments on 30 patients participating in phase I/II dose escalation studies of therapeutic (131)I-murine A33 mAb. Whole-body retention fractions over time were derived. Each treatment was fit with exponential curves to determine the effective half-lives and corresponding clearance fractions. There was a large variability in the calculated mono-exponential clearance effective half-life time, with a mean value of 36.5 h +/- 8.5 h. A bi-exponential fit of all combined data shows that 60% of the administered dose rapidly clears with a biological half-time of 23.9 h and 40% clears with a slower biological half-time of 101.2 h. The whole-body clearance proved to be more rapid in the murine form when compared with recent studies on the humanized form of radiolabeled A33 mAb. The variability in whole-body clearance reinforces the need for patient-specific tracer dosimetry for clinical care and radiation safety precautions. In addition, the slower clearance of the humanized form of the A33 mAb requires longer term radiation safety precautions than the earlier murine form. As other monoclonal antibodies progress from murine to humanized forms, radiopharmacokinetics should be evaluated for clinical and radiation safety implications.

  1. Superoxide dismutase 3 attenuates experimental Th2-driven allergic conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Shin, Soojung; Kim, Tae-Yoon; Chung, So-Hyang

    2017-03-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis is an inflammatory eye disease mediated by Th2 type immune response. The role of extracellular superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3) in immune response and allergic conjunctival inflammation was examined in a murine model for experimental allergic conjunctivitis (EAC). Allergic conjunctivitis was induced in mice by allergen challenge with ovalbumin in alum via the conjunctival sac. SOD3 was topically applied and allergy indicators were compared. Clinical signs associated with conjunctivitis, such as OVA-specific IgE production, IgG1/G2a ratio and eosinophil infiltration, were drastically reduced in mice treated with SOD3. They also had less dendritic cells and CD4(+) T cells in conjunctiva than controls. Attenuated allergic inflammation was accredited to reduced Th2 type cytokine responses and increased Treg cytokine in draining lymph node. The characteristics of EAC were attributed to the absence of SOD3. Our findings suggest that SOD3 might be considered as a potential target for Th2-driven allergic conjunctival inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular cloning and chromosome assignment of murine N-ras.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, J.; Hart, C.P.; Ruddle, F H

    1984-01-01

    The murine N-ras gene was cloned by screening an EMBL-3 recombinant phage library with a human N-ras specific probe. Hybridization of two separate unique sequence N-ras probes, isolated from the 5' and 3' flanking sequences of the murine gene, to a mouse-Chinese hamster hybrid mapping panel assigns the N-ras locus to mouse chromosome three.

  3. Murine and human tissue-engineered esophagus form from sufficient stem/progenitor cells and do not require microdesigned biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Ryan Gregory; Speer, Allison L; Hou, Xiaogang; El-Nachef, Wael N; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-03-01

    Tissue-engineered esophagus (TEE) may serve as a therapeutic replacement for absent foregut. Most prior esophagus studies have favored microdesigned biomaterials and yielded epithelial growth alone. None have generated human TEE with mesenchymal components. We hypothesized that sufficient progenitor cells might only require basic support for successful generation of murine and human TEE. Esophageal organoid units (EOUs) were isolated from murine or human esophagi and implanted on a polyglycolic acid/poly-l-lactic acid collagen-coated scaffold in adult allogeneic or immune-deficient mice. Alternatively, EOU were cultured for 10 days in vitro prior to implantation. TEE recapitulated all key components of native esophagus with an epithelium and subjacent muscularis. Differentiated suprabasal and proliferative basal layers of esophageal epithelium, muscle, and nerve were identified. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple EOU could contribute to the epithelium and mesenchyme of a single TEE. Cultured murine EOU grew as an expanding sphere of proliferative basal cells on a neuromuscular network that demonstrated spontaneous peristalsis in culture. Subsequently, cultured EOU generated TEE. TEE forms after transplantation of mouse and human organ-specific stem/progenitor cells in vivo on a relatively simple biodegradable scaffold. This is a first step toward future human therapies.

  4. Method for estimating total attenuation from a spatial map of attenuation slope for quantitative ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlicki, Alexander D; O'Brien, William D

    2013-04-01

    Estimating total ultrasound attenuation from backscatter data is essential in the field of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) because of the need to compensate for attenuation when estimating the backscatter coefficient and QUS parameters. This work uses a reference phantom method of attenuation estimation to create a spatial map of attenuation slope (AS) from backscatter radio-frequency (RF) data of three phantoms and a rat mammary adenocarcinoma tumor (MAT). The attenuation maps show changes in attenuation between different regions of the phantoms and the MAT tumor. Analyses of the attenuation maps of the phantoms suggest that the AS estimates are in good quantitative agreement with the known values for the phantoms. Furthermore, estimates of total attenuation from the attenuation maps are likewise in good quantitative agreement with known values.

  5. IL-37 inhibits inflammasome activation and disease severity in murine aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Moretti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since IL-37 transgenic mice possesses broad anti-inflammatory properties, we assessed whether recombinant IL-37 affects inflammation in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Recombinant human IL-37 was injected intraperitoneally into mice prior to infection and the effects on lung inflammation and inflammasome activation were evaluated. IL-37 markedly reduced NLRP3-dependent neutrophil recruitment and steady state mRNA levels of IL-1β production and mitigated lung inflammation and damage in a relevant clinical model, namely aspergillosis in mice with cystic fibrosis. The anti-inflammatory activity of IL-37 requires the IL-1 family decoy receptor TIR-8/SIGIRR. Thus, by preventing activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and reducing IL-1β secretion, IL-37 functions as a broad spectrum inhibitor of the innate response to infection-mediated inflammation, and could be considered to be therapeutic in reducing the pulmonary damage due to non-resolving Aspergillus infection and disease.

  6. Rg propagation: Scatter versus Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M.; Phillips, W. S.; MacCarthy, J.

    2016-12-01

    At near local distances, the Rg seismic phase is often the largest seismic arrival for shallow sources. While Rg is classically defined for the period range of 8-12 s, we use the term generically to refer to short-period observations of Rayleigh waves from shallow sources [e.g. Langston, 1987; Bonner and Russell, 2013]. There is significant interest in using Rg as a basis for seismic discrimination and magnitude (e.g. Bonner and Russell, 2013). However, the propagation of this phase is poorly understood. At Nevada National Security Site, while Rg is well observed near the source, it quickly disappears at greater distances. This observation raises the fundamental question of how much of the Rg energy is simply attenuating versus scattering into other seismic phases. Understanding this is critical to interpreting not only the observed Rg seismic energy, but also the possible enrichment of other seismic phases resulting from Rg scattering. In this study, we use waveform data from the Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE) and Source Physics Experiment (SPE) to investigate Rg propagation, looking to identify how much energy from the phase attenuates with distance and how much scatters into other seismic phases.

  7. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  9. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  10. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    Oral administration of therapeutic peptides could benefit millions of chronically ill people worldwide, through easier and less stigmatized therapy, and likely improve the long-term effects of currently widespread disease mismanagement. However, oral peptide delivery is a formidable task due......, but it is not widely studied in an oral context. As acylation furthermore increases interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells, it offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation...... to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation...

  11. Therapeutic use of cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Kay; Green, Anita J

    Therapeutic cannabis use raises a number of dilemmas for nurses. This article examines the legal, political and ethical challenges raised by the use of cannabis by people with life-limiting or terminal illnesses in their own homes. (Throughout this paper, the term cannabis refers to illegal cannabis unless specified.) A literature review of databases from 1996 was conducted and internet material was also examined. Evidence on the therapeutic use of cannabis suggests it may produce improvements in quality of life, which has led to increased use among people with life-limiting illnesses. The cannabis used is usually obtained illegally, which can have consequences for both those who use it and nurses who provide treatment in the community.

  12. Immunomodulatory properties of silver nanoparticles contribute to anticancer strategy for murine fibrosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Biswajit; Pal, Ramkrishna; Ali, Mohammed; Singh, Leichombam Mohindro; Shahidur Rahman, Dewan; Kumar Ghosh, Sujit; Sengupta, Mahuya

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology in nanoparticle-based cancer therapeutics is gaining impetus due to the unique biophysical properties of nanoparticles at the quantum level. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been reported as one type of potent therapeutic nanoparticles. The present study is aimed to determine the effect of AgNPs in arresting the growth of a murine fibrosarcoma by a reductive mechanism. Initially, a bioavailability study showed that mouse serum albumin (MSA)-coated AgNPs have enhanced uptake; therefore, toxicity studies of AgNP-MSA at 10 different doses (1–10 mg/kg b.w.) were performed in LACA mice by measuring the complete blood count, lipid profile and histological parameters. The complete blood count, lipid profile and histological parameter results showed that the doses from 2 to 8 mg (IC50: 6.15 mg/kg b.w.) sequentially increased the count of leukocytes, lymphocytes and granulocytes, whereas the 9- and 10-mg doses showed conclusive toxicity. In an antitumor study, the incidence and size of fibrosarcoma were reduced or delayed when murine fibrosarcoma groups were treated by AgNP-MSA. Transmission electron micrographs showed that considerable uptake of AgNP-MSA by the sentinel immune cells associated with tumor tissue and a morphologically buckled structure of the immune cells containing AgNP-MSA. Because the toxicity studies revealed a relationship between AgNPs and immune function, the protumorigenic cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were also assayed in AgNP-MSA-treated and non-treated fibrosarcoma groups, and these cytokines were found to be downregulated after treatment with AgNP-MSA. PMID:25938978

  13. Immunomodulatory properties of silver nanoparticles contribute to anticancer strategy for murine fibrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Biswajit; Pal, Ramkrishna; Ali, Mohammed; Singh, Leichombam Mohindro; Shahidur Rahman, Dewan; Kumar Ghosh, Sujit; Sengupta, Mahuya

    2016-03-01

    The use of nanotechnology in nanoparticle-based cancer therapeutics is gaining impetus due to the unique biophysical properties of nanoparticles at the quantum level. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been reported as one type of potent therapeutic nanoparticles. The present study is aimed to determine the effect of AgNPs in arresting the growth of a murine fibrosarcoma by a reductive mechanism. Initially, a bioavailability study showed that mouse serum albumin (MSA)-coated AgNPs have enhanced uptake; therefore, toxicity studies of AgNP-MSA at 10 different doses (1-10 mg/kg b.w.) were performed in LACA mice by measuring the complete blood count, lipid profile and histological parameters. The complete blood count, lipid profile and histological parameter results showed that the doses from 2 to 8 mg (IC50: 6.15 mg/kg b.w.) sequentially increased the count of leukocytes, lymphocytes and granulocytes, whereas the 9- and 10-mg doses showed conclusive toxicity. In an antitumor study, the incidence and size of fibrosarcoma were reduced or delayed when murine fibrosarcoma groups were treated by AgNP-MSA. Transmission electron micrographs showed that considerable uptake of AgNP-MSA by the sentinel immune cells associated with tumor tissue and a morphologically buckled structure of the immune cells containing AgNP-MSA. Because the toxicity studies revealed a relationship between AgNPs and immune function, the protumorigenic cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were also assayed in AgNP-MSA-treated and non-treated fibrosarcoma groups, and these cytokines were found to be downregulated after treatment with AgNP-MSA.

  14. Breast imaging using waveform attenuation tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Sandhu, Gursharan Y.; Boone, Michael; Duric, Neb

    2017-03-01

    Ex vivo studies using our ultrasound waveform attenuation algorithm have shown promising results for detection and characterization of lesions of different types. Our preliminary in vivo study shows that the waveform attenuation image has much higher resolution and can better delineate breast lesions boundaries than the corresponding ray-based attenuation image. In this study, we preprocessed our time domain waveforms acquired with a ring array and explored the directional transducer beam pattern to better match calculated wave fields with respect to the acquired wave fields. We have applied waveform attenuation to in vivo data and compared the resulting waveform attenuation images with the ray-based counterparts to assess the resolution and accuracy of the waveform attenuation reconstruction.

  15. Adenoviral-mediated correction of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficiency in murine fibroblasts and human hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korson Mark

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA, a common organic aciduria, is caused by deficiency of the mitochondrial localized, 5'deoxyadenosylcobalamin dependent enzyme, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT. Liver transplantation in the absence of gross hepatic dysfunction provides supportive therapy and metabolic stability in severely affected patients, which invites the concept of using cell and gene delivery as future treatments for this condition. Methods To assess the effectiveness of gene delivery to restore the defective metabolism in this disorder, adenoviral correction experiments were performed using murine Mut embryonic fibroblasts and primary human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficient hepatocytes derived from a patient who harbored two early truncating mutations, E224X and R228X, in the MUT gene. Enzymatic and expression studies were used to assess the extent of functional correction. Results Primary hepatocytes, isolated from the native liver after removal subsequent to a combined liver-kidney transplantation procedure, or Mut murine fibroblasts were infected with a second generation recombinant adenoviral vector that expressed the murine methylmalonyl-CoA mutase as well as eGFP from distinct promoters. After transduction, [1-14C] propionate macromolecular incorporation studies and Western analysis demonstrated complete correction of the enzymatic defect in both cell types. Viral reconstitution of enzymatic expression in the human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficient hepatocytes exceeded that seen in fibroblasts or control hepatocytes. Conclusion These experiments provide proof of principle for viral correction in methylmalonic acidemia and suggest that hepatocyte-directed gene delivery will be an effective therapeutic treatment strategy in both murine models and in human patients. Primary hepatocytes from a liver that was unsuitable for transplantation provided an important resource for these studies.

  16. Leech Therapeutic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Abdualkader, A. M.; A M Ghawi; Alaama, M.; M. Awang; A Merzouk

    2013-01-01

    Hematophagous animals including leeches have been known to possess biologically active compounds in their secretions, especially in their saliva. The blood-sucking annelids, leeches have been used for therapeutic purposes since the beginning of civilization. Ancient Egyptian, Indian, Greek and Arab physicians used leeches for a wide range of diseases starting from the conventional use for bleeding to systemic ailments, such as skin diseases, nervous system abnormalities, urinary and reproduct...

  17. Wave attenuation charcteristics of tethered float system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.

    parameters. The effect of drag on wave attenuation is studied for varying drag coefficient values. Theoretical results are compared with experimental values and it is found that theory overestimates wave attenuation which may probably be due to various... 15 and 16, respectively. These figures show that theory overestimates the wave attenuation and this may probably be due to various linearisations involved in the theoretical formulation. Experimental results are also not very accurate because...

  18. Lung attenuation measurements in healthy young adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, H.J.M.; Golding, R.P.; Schramel, F.M.N.H.; Devillé, W.L.; Manoliu, R.A.; Postmus, P. E.

    2003-01-01

    Background: High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) attenuation measurements may be more sensitive in finding early emphysematous changes in relatively young subjects than lung function measurements. Objectives: To define lung attenuation parameters in smokers and never-smokers. Methods: A prospective comparative study in a university hospital setting was designed with 20 healthy smoking and 20 nonsmoking volunteers. Attenuation measurements on spirometrically controlled HRCT at three leve...

  19. Caspase-2 mediated apoptotic and necrotic murine macrophage cell death induced by rough Brucella abortus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chen

    Full Text Available Brucella species are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause zoonotic brucellosis. Survival and replication inside macrophages is critical for establishment of chronic Brucella infection. Virulent smooth B. abortus strain 2308 inhibits programmed macrophage cell death and replicates inside macrophages. Cattle B. abortus vaccine strain RB51 is an attenuated rough, lipopolysaccharide O antigen-deficient mutant derived from smooth strain 2308. B. abortus rough mutant RA1 contains a single wboA gene mutation in strain 2308. Our studies demonstrated that live RB51 and RA1, but not strain 2308 or heat-killed Brucella, induced both apoptotic and necrotic cell death in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and bone marrow derived macrophages. The same phenomenon was also observed in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages from mice immunized intraperitoneally with vaccine strain RB51 using the same dose as regularly performed in protection studies. Programmed macrophage cell death induced by RB51 and RA1 was inhibited by a caspase-2 inhibitor (Z-VDVAD-FMK. Caspase-2 enzyme activation and cleavage were observed at the early infection stage in macrophages infected with RB51 and RA1 but not strain 2308. The inhibition of macrophage cell death promoted the survival of rough Brucella cells inside macrophages. The critical role of caspase-2 in mediating rough B. abortus induced macrophage cell death was confirmed using caspase-2 specific shRNA. The mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was activated in macrophages infected with rough B. abortus as demonstrated by increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability and the release of cytochrome c to cytoplasm in macrophages infected with rough Brucella. These results demonstrate that rough B. abortus strains RB51 and RA1 induce apoptotic and necrotic murine macrophage cell death that is mediated by caspase-2. The biological relevance of Brucella O antigen and caspase-2-mediated macrophage cell death in Brucella

  20. Caspase-2 mediated apoptotic and necrotic murine macrophage cell death induced by rough Brucella abortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; He, Yongqun

    2009-08-28

    Brucella species are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause zoonotic brucellosis. Survival and replication inside macrophages is critical for establishment of chronic Brucella infection. Virulent smooth B. abortus strain 2308 inhibits programmed macrophage cell death and replicates inside macrophages. Cattle B. abortus vaccine strain RB51 is an attenuated rough, lipopolysaccharide O antigen-deficient mutant derived from smooth strain 2308. B. abortus rough mutant RA1 contains a single wboA gene mutation in strain 2308. Our studies demonstrated that live RB51 and RA1, but not strain 2308 or heat-killed Brucella, induced both apoptotic and necrotic cell death in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and bone marrow derived macrophages. The same phenomenon was also observed in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages from mice immunized intraperitoneally with vaccine strain RB51 using the same dose as regularly performed in protection studies. Programmed macrophage cell death induced by RB51 and RA1 was inhibited by a caspase-2 inhibitor (Z-VDVAD-FMK). Caspase-2 enzyme activation and cleavage were observed at the early infection stage in macrophages infected with RB51 and RA1 but not strain 2308. The inhibition of macrophage cell death promoted the survival of rough Brucella cells inside macrophages. The critical role of caspase-2 in mediating rough B. abortus induced macrophage cell death was confirmed using caspase-2 specific shRNA. The mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was activated in macrophages infected with rough B. abortus as demonstrated by increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability and the release of cytochrome c to cytoplasm in macrophages infected with rough Brucella. These results demonstrate that rough B. abortus strains RB51 and RA1 induce apoptotic and necrotic murine macrophage cell death that is mediated by caspase-2. The biological relevance of Brucella O antigen and caspase-2-mediated macrophage cell death in Brucella pathogenesis and

  1. CTGF/CCN2 Postconditioning Increases Tolerance of Murine Hearts towards Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Jørgen Kaasbøll

    Full Text Available Previous studies of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI in hearts from mice with cardiac-restricted overexpression of CCN2 have shown that CCN2 increases tolerance towards IRI. The objectives of this study were to investigate to what extent post-ischemic administration of recombinant human CCN2 (rhCCN2 would limit infarct size and improve functional recovery and what signaling pathways are involved.Isolated mice hearts were perfused ad modum Langendorff, subjected to no-flow, global ischemia, and subsequently, exposed to mammalian cell derived, full-length (38-40kDa rhCCN2 (250 nM or vehicle during the first 15 min of a 60 min reperfusion period.Post-ischemic administration of rhCCN2 resulted in attenuation of infarct size from 58 ± 4% to 34 ± 2% (p < 0.001 which was abrogated by concomitant administration of the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 (45 ± 3% vs. 50 ± 3%, ns. In congruence with reduction of infarct size rhCCN2 also improved recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (p < 0.05. Western blot analyses of extracts of ex vivo-perfused murine hearts also revealed that rhCCN2 evoked concentration-dependent increase of cardiac phospho-GSK3β (serine-9 contents.We demonstrate that post-ischemic administration of rhCCN2 increases the tolerance of ex vivo-perfused murine hearts to IRI. Mechanistically, this postconditioning effect of rhCCN2 appeared to be mediated by activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinase pathway as demonstrated by sensitivity to PI3 kinase inhibition and increased CCN2-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β (Ser-9. Thus, the rationale for testing rhCCN2-mediated post-ischemic conditioning of the heart in more complex models is established.

  2. Noiseless attenuation using an optical parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, R. A.; Nodurft, I. C.; Pittman, T. B.; Franson, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    The process of heralded noiseless amplification, and the inverse process of heralded noiseless attenuation, have potential applications in the context of quantum communications. Although several different physical implementations of heralded noiseless amplifiers have now been demonstrated, the research on heralded noiseless attenuators has been largely confined to a beam-splitter based approach. Here we show that an optical parametric amplifier (OPA), combined with appropriate heralding, can also serve as a heralded noiseless attenuator. The counterintuitive use of an optical amplifier as an attenuator is only possible due to the probabilistic nature of the device.

  3. Artemisone effective against murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waknine-Grinberg Judith H

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinins are the newest class of drug approved for malaria treatment. Due to their unique mechanism of action, rapid effect on Plasmodium, and high efficacy in vivo, artemisinins have become essential components of malaria treatment. Administration of artemisinin derivatives in combination with other anti-plasmodials has become the first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria. However, their efficiency in cases of cerebral malaria (CM remains to be determined. Methods The efficacy of several artemisinin derivatives for treatment of experimental CM was evaluated in ICR or C57BL/6 mice infected by Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Both mouse strains serve as murine models for CM. Results Artemisone was the most efficient drug tested, and could prevent death even when administered at relatively late stages of cerebral pathogenesis. No parasite resistance to artemisone was detected in recrudescence. Co-administration of artemisone together with chloroquine was more effective than monotherapy with either drug, and led to complete cure. Artemiside was even more effective than artemisone, but this substance has yet to be submitted to preclinical toxicological evaluation. Conclusions Altogether, the results support the use of artemisone for combined therapy of CM.

  4. Histamine regulates murine primary dendritic cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Heiko; Neumann, Detlef; Kloth, Christina

    2016-10-01

    The modulation of antigen uptake and activation of dendritic cells (DCs) by histamine may function as a regulator of inflammation. Therefore, we sought to determine the impact of histamine on antigen uptake by and activation of murine DCs. DCs from spleen and lung were either identified by flow cytometry or were immunomagnetically enriched. Cells were stimulated with histamine, and the regulation of MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecule expression (CD80, CD86, and ICOS-L) and antigen uptake were quantified by flow cytometry. Individual contributions of the histamine receptor subtypes were determined by using the antagonists mepyramine (histamine H1-receptor: H1R), famotidine (H2R), and JNJ 7777120 (H4R). Histamine accelerated the uptake of soluble antigen via the H1R, H2R, and H4R in splenic DCs. Co-stimulatory molecule expression was enhanced already by enrichment procedures, thus, the analyses were performed in unseparated cell populations. Histamine enhanced the expression of CD86 and ICOS-L while expression of CD80 was unaffected. Antagonism at H1R, H2R, and H4R and at H1R and H4R reduced the histamine-induced enhanced expression of CD86 and ICOS-L, respectively. Histamine contributes to the regulation of the immunological synapse by stimulation of antigen uptake and activation of DCs via H1R, H2R, and H4R.

  5. Frankincense--therapeutic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yasiry, Ali Ridha Mustafa; Kiczorowska, Bożena

    2016-01-04

    Recently, increasing interest in natural dietary and therapeutic preparations used as dietary supplements has been observed. One of them is frankincense. This traditional medicine of the East is believed to have anti-inflammatory, expectorant, antiseptic, and even anxiolytic and anti-neurotic effects. The present study aims to verify the reported therapeutic properties of Boswellia resin and describe its chemical composition based on available scientific studies. The main component of frankincense is oil (60%). It contains mono- (13%) and diterpenes (40%) as well as ethyl acetate (21.4%), octyl acetate (13.4%) and methylanisole (7.6%). The highest biological activity among terpenes is characteristic of 11-keto-ß-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl-11-keto-ß-boswellic acid and acetyl-α-boswellic acid. Contemporary studies have shown that resin indeed has an analgesic, tranquilising and anti-bacterial effects. From the point of view of therapeutic properties, extracts from Boswellia serrata and Boswellia carterii are reported to be particularly useful. They reduce inflammatory conditions in the course of rheumatism by inhibiting leukocyte elastase and degrading glycosaminoglycans. Boswellia preparations inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and prevent the release of leukotrienes, thus having an anti-inflammatory effect in ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis and sinusitis. Inhalation and consumption of Boswellia olibanum reduces the risk of asthma. In addition, boswellic acids have an antiproliferative effect on tumours. They inhibit proliferation of tumour cells of the leukaemia and glioblastoma subset. They have an anti-tumour effect since they inhibit topoisomerase I and II-alpha and stimulate programmed cell death (apoptosis).

  6. Frankincense – therapeutic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ridha Mustafa Al-Yasiry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing interest in natural dietary and therapeutic preparations used as dietary supplements has been observed. One of them is frankincense. This traditional medicine of the East is believed to have anti-inflammatory, expectorant, antiseptic, and even anxiolytic and anti-neurotic effects. The present study aims to verify the reported therapeutic properties of Boswellia resin and describe its chemical composition based on available scientific studies. The main component of frankincense is oil (60%. It contains mono- (13% and diterpenes (40% as well as ethyl acetate (21.4%, octyl acetate (13.4% and methylanisole (7.6%. The highest biological activity among terpenes is characteristic of 11-keto-ß-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl-11-keto-ß-boswellic acid and acetyl-α-boswellic acid. Contemporary studies have shown that resin indeed has an analgesic, tranquilising and anti-bacterial effects. From the point of view of therapeutic properties, extracts from Boswellia serrata and Boswellia carterii are reported to be particularly useful. They reduce inflammatory conditions in the course of rheumatism by inhibiting leukocyte elastase and degrading glycosaminoglycans. Boswellia preparations inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and prevent the release of leukotrienes, thus having an anti-inflammatory effect in ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis and sinusitis. Inhalation and consumption of Boswellia olibanum reduces the risk of asthma. In addition, boswellic acids have an antiproliferative effect on tumours. They inhibit proliferation of tumour cells of the leukaemia and glioblastoma subset. They have an anti-tumour effect since they inhibit topoisomerase I and II-alpha and stimulate programmed cell death (apoptosis.

  7. [Therapeutic applications of digestive endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, J A; Pérez, L; Madureri, V

    1976-01-01

    Endoscopy has proven useful as a diagnostic tool and recently many useful therapeutic possibilities have been proposed. The authors discuss their experience with therapeutic endoscopic procedures and present new ones for treatment of Acalasia and small sliding hiatal hernia.

  8. Therapeutic approaches to cellulite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jeremy B; Cohen, Joel L; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Kaminer, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Cellulite is a condition that affects the vast majority of women. Although it is of no danger to one's overall health, cellulite can be psychosocially debilitating. Consequently, much research has been devoted to understanding cellulite and its etiopathogenesis. With additional insights into the underlying causes of its clinical presentation, therapeutic modalities have been developed that offer hope to cellulite sufferers. This review examines evidence for topical treatments, noninvasive energy-based devices, and recently developed minimally invasive interventions that may finally provide a solution. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  9. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis y Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. [Is therapeutic deadlock inevitable?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignat, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Many long-term treatments appear to be an expression of therapeutic deadlock. The situation leads to a questioning of the concept of chronicity and the identification of the determining factors of situations which are apparently blocked, marked by the search for solutions taking a back seat to the taking of action. The interaction between patients' mental apparatus and the care apparatus lies at the heart of the question, interpreted from an institutional, collective and individual perspective, supported by the clinical and psychopathological approach, and the return to the prioritisation of the thought. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Murine Typhus: An Important Consideration for the Nonspecific Febrile Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjot Basra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine typhus is a widely distributed flea-borne infection caused by Rickettsia typhi. Symptoms of murine typhus are nonspecific and mimic a variety of other infectious diseases. We herein report a case of murine typhus in an area where the broad use of DDT in the mid-20th century has now made it a rare disease. The patient described presented with headache, fever, and a faint macular rash. Initial laboratory studies revealed a slight transaminase elevation. Further questioning revealed exposure to opossums, prompting the consideration of murine typhus as a diagnosis. Although typhus group antibodies were not present during the patient’s acute illness, empiric therapy with doxycycline was initiated, and the patient defervesced. One month after convalescence, the patient returned to clinic with serum that contained typhus group antibodies with an IgG titer of 1 : 1024. Murine typhus is an important consideration during the workup of a patient with a nonspecific febrile illness. Exposure to reservoir hosts and the flea vector place humans at risk for this disease. Clinician recognition of this entity is required for diagnosis and effective therapy.

  12. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yuasa, Shinsuke, E-mail: yuasa@a8.keio.jp [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tabata, Hidenori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Kazunori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi [Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function and Dynamics, Advanced Technology Development Group, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukuda, Keiichi [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  13. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a key molecule in modulating low-degree inflammatory conditions such as diabetes. The role of PTP1B in other chronic inflammations, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS-induced murine experimental colitis via expanding CD11b(+Gr-1(+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Employing DSS-induced murine experimental colitis as inflammatory animal model, we found that, compared with wild-type littermates, PTP1B-null mice demonstrated greater resistance to DSS-induced colitis, as reflected by slower weight-loss, greater survival rates and decreased PMN and macrophage infiltration into the colon. The evidence collectively also demonstrated that the resistance of PTP1B-null mice to DSS-induced colitis is based on the expansion of MDSCs. First, PTP1B-null mice exhibited a greater frequency of MDSCs in the bone marrow (BM, peripheral blood and spleen when compared with wild-type littermates. Second, PTP1B levels in BM leukocytes were significantly decreased after cells were induced into MDSCs by IL-6 and GM-CSF, and the MDSC induction occurred more rapidly in PTP1B-null mice than in wild-type littermates, suggesting PTP1B as a negative regulator of MDSCs. Third, the adoptive transfer of MDSCs into mice with DSS-colitis significantly attenuated colitis, which accompanies with a decreased serum IL-17 level. Finally, PTP1B deficiency increased the frequency of MDSCs from BM cells likely through enhancing the activities of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidences that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via expanding MDSCs.

  14. Multiple attenuation using eigenvalue decomposition | Aigbedion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple reflections constitute one of the most troublesome forms of coherent noise in seismic exploration, especially in marine surveys. There are many approaches to attenuating or suppressing multiples, but none can remove all multiple reflections under all conditions. We have eveloped two new methods to attenuate ...

  15. ATTENUATION AND FLANKING TRANSMISSION IN LIGHTWEIGHT STRUCTURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Lhomond, Alice; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the attenuation and flanking transmissions of impact noise in lightweight building structures is studied using a modal approach. The structural field is mainly analysed, putting the main attention to the parts being important in the modelling. The amount of attenuation produced...

  16. Precision Model for Microwave Rotary Vane Attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandsen, Tom

    1979-01-01

    A model for a rotary vane attenuator is developed to describe the attenuator reflection and transmission coefficients in detail. All the parameters of the model can be measured in situ, i.e., without diassembling any part. The tranmission errors caused by internal reflections are calculated from...

  17. Attenuation coefficients for water quality trading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Arturo A; Chen, Xiaoli; Fox, Jessica; Fulda, Matt; Dorsey, Rebecca; Seapy, Briana; Glenday, Julia; Bray, Erin

    2014-06-17

    Water quality trading has been proposed as a cost-effective approach for reducing nutrient loads through credit generation from agricultural or point source reductions sold to buyers facing costly options. We present a systematic approach to determine attenuation coefficients and their uncertainty. Using a process-based model, we determine attenuation with safety margins at many watersheds for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) loads as they transport from point of load reduction to the credit buyer. TN and TP in-stream attenuation generally increases with decreasing mean river flow; smaller rivers in the modeled region of the Ohio River Basin had TN attenuation factors per km, including safety margins, of 0.19-1.6%, medium rivers of 0.14-1.2%, large rivers of 0.13-1.1%, and very large rivers of 0.04-0.42%. Attenuation in ditches transporting nutrients from farms to receiving rivers is 0.4%/km for TN, while for TP attenuation in ditches can be up to 2%/km. A 95 percentile safety margin of 30-40% for TN and 6-10% for TP, applied to the attenuation per km factors, was determined from the in-stream sensitivity of load reductions to watershed model parameters. For perspective, over 50 km a 1% per km factor would result in 50% attenuation = 2:1 trading ratio.

  18. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  19. Gene expression profiling during murine tooth development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A dos Santos silva Landin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the expression of genes, including ameloblastin (Ambn, amelogenin X chromosome (Amelx and enamelin (Enam during early (pre-secretory tooth development. The expression of these genes has predominantly been studied at post-secretory stages. Deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays were used to study gene expression during development of the murine first molar tooth germ at 24h intervals, starting at the eleventh embryonic day (E11.5 and up to the seventh day after birth (P7. The profile search function of Spotfire software was used to select genes with similar expression profile as the enamel genes (Ambn, Amelx and Enam. Microarray results where validated using real-time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (real-time RT-PCR, and translated proteins identified by Western blotting. In situ localisation of the Ambn, Amelx and Enam mRNAs were monitored from E12.5 to E17.5 using deoxyoligonucleotide probes. Bioinformatics analysis was used to associate biological functions with differentially (p ≤0.05 expressed (DE genes.Microarray results showed a total of 4362 genes including Ambn, Amelx and Enam to be significant differentially expressed throughout the time-course. The expression of the three enamel genes was low at pre-natal stages (E11.5-P0 increasing after birth (P1-P7. Profile search lead to isolation of 87 genes with significantly similar expression to the three enamel proteins. The mRNAs expressed in dental epithelium and epithelium derived cells. Although expression of Ambn, Amelx and Enam were lower during early tooth development compared to secretory stages enamel proteins were detectable by Western blotting. Bioinformatic analysis associated the 87 genes with multiple biological functions. Around thirty-five genes were associated with fifteen transcription factors.

  20. The mechanical fingerprint of murine excisional wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensalfini, Marco; Haertel, Eric; Hopf, Raoul; Wietecha, Mateusz; Werner, Sabine; Mazza, Edoardo

    2018-01-01

    A multiscale mechanics approach to the characterization of murine excisional wounds subjected to uniaxial tensile loading is presented. Local strain analysis at a physiological level of tension uncovers the presence of two distinct regions within the wound: i) a very compliant peripheral cushion and ii) a core area undergoing modest deformation. Microstructural visualizations of stretched wound specimens show negligible engagement of the collagen located in the center of a 7-day old wound; fibers remain coiled despite the applied tension, confirming the existence of a mechanically isolated wound core. The compliant cushion located at the wound periphery appears to protect the newly-formed tissue from excessive deformation during the phase of new tissue formation. The early remodeling phase (day 14) is characterized by a restored mechanical connection between far field and wound center. The latter remains less deformable, a characteristic possibly required for cell activities during tissue remodeling. The distribution of fibrillary collagens at these two time points corresponds well to the identified heterogeneity of mechanical properties of the wound region. This novel approach provides new insight into the mechanical properties of wounded skin and will be applicable to the analysis of compound-treated wounds or wounds in genetically modified tissue. Biophysical characterization of healing wounds is crucial to assess the recovery of the skin barrier function and the associated mechanobiological processes. For the first time, we performed highly resolved local deformation analysis to identify mechanical characteristics of the wound and its periphery. Our results reveal the presence of a compliant cushion surrounding a stiffer wound core; we refer to this heterogeneous mechanical behavior as "mechanical fingerprint" of the wound. The mechanical response is shown to progress towards that of the intact skin as healing takes place. Histology and multiphoton microscopy

  1. Mechanisms of Plasma Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2015-09-01

    In this talk, I address research directed towards biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasma such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy. The field has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that plasmas readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. It is postulated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) can trigger a therapeutic shielding response in tissue in part by creating a time- and space-localized, burst-like form of oxy-nitrosative stress on near-surface exposed cells through the flux of plasma-generated RONS. RONS-exposed surface layers of cells communicate to the deeper levels of tissue via a form of the ``bystander effect,'' similar to responses to other forms of cell stress. In this proposed model of CAP therapeutics, the plasma stimulates a cellular survival mechanism through which aerobic organisms shield themselves from infection and other challenges.

  2. Therapeutic Uses of Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharias E. Suntres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are membrane vesicles with a diameter of 40–100 nm that are secreted by many cell types into the extracellular milieu. Exosomes are found in cell culture supernatants and in different biological fluids and are known to be secreted by most cell types under normal and pathological conditions. Considerable research is focusing on the exploitation of exosomes in biological fluids for biomarkers in the diagnosis of disease. More recently, exosomes are being exploited for their therapeutic potential. Exosomes derived from dendritic cells, tumor cells, and malignant effusions demonstrate immunomodulatory functions and are able to present antigens to T-cells and stimulate antigen-specific T-cell responses. Exosomes have also been examined for their therapeutic potential in the treatment of infections such as toxoplasmosis, diphtheria, tuberculosis and atypical severe acute respiratory syndrome as well as autoimmune diseases. Attempts to find practical applications for exosomes continue to expand with the role of exosomes as a drug delivery system for the treatment of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases and cancers.

  3. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, James

    2016-05-15

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. © 2016 Shorter. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Ultrasound fields in an attenuating medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gandhi,, D; O'Brien,, W.D., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    of the rectangles and sums all contributions to arrive at the spatial impulse response for the aperture and field point. This approach makes it possible to model all transducer apertures, and the program can readily calculate the emitted, pulse-echo and continuous wave field. Attenuation is included by splitting...... it into a frequency dependent part and frequency independent part. The latter results in an attenuation factor that is multiplied onto the responses from the individual elements, and the frequency dependent part is handled by attenuating the basic one-dimensional pulse. The influence on ultrasound fields from......Ultrasound fields propagating in tissue will undergo changes in shape not only due to diffraction, but also due to the frequency dependent attenuation. Linear fields can be fairly well predicted for a non-attenuating medium like water by using the Tupholme-Stepanishen method for calculating...

  5. PTP1B: a new therapeutic target for Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautz, Lutz

    2015-08-03

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by successive loss of acquired cognitive, social, and motor skills and development of autistic behavior. RTT affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live female births and is the second most common cause of severe mental retardation in females, after Down syndrome. Currently, there is no cure or effective therapy for RTT. Approved treatment regimens are presently limited to supportive management of specific physical and mental disabilities. In this issue, Krishnan and colleagues reveal that the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is upregulated in patients with RTT and in murine models and provide strong evidence that targeting PTP1B has potential as a viable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RTT.

  6. Needleless intranasal administration of HVJ-E containing allergen attenuates experimental allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, Eri; Oshima, Kazuo; Tamai, Katsuto; Kubo, Takeshi; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2007-03-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common chronic diseases. Although current medications are highly effective in controlling its symptoms, they do not reverse the allergen-specific hypersensitivities that underlie the disease. Immunoglobulin E is a key mediator of AR, and preventing its production is clinically important. In this study, we developed an efficient needleless intranasal protein delivery system using the hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope vector (HVJ-E). Intranasal delivery of ovalbumin (OVA) once a week for 3 weeks using this system enhanced OVA-induced interferon-gamma production by murine splenocytes. This treatment also attenuated the OVA-induced release interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-5 from splenocytes and the production of plasma OVA-specific immunoglobulin E in OVA-sensitive AR model mice. Thus, allergen-containing HVJ-E may be useful for noninvasive treatment of AR.

  7. Evaluation of profertility effect of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 2621 in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Bhandari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Urogenital infections of bacterial origin have a high incidence among the female population at reproductive age, affecting the fertility. Strains of Escherichia coli can colonize the vagina and replace natural microflora. Lactobacillus the predominant vaginal microorganism in healthy women, maintains the acidic vaginal pH which inhibits pathogenic microorganisms. Studies on Lactobacillus have shown that these can inhibit E. coli growth and vaginal colonization. An alternative therapeutic approach to antimicrobial therapy is to re-establish Lactobacillus in this microbiome through probiotic administration to resurge fertility. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the capability of L. plantarum 2621 strain with probiotic properties, to prevent the vaginal colonization of E. coli causing agglutination of sperms and to evaluate its profertility effect in a murine model. m0 ethods: Screened mice were divided into five groups i.e. control group, E. coli group, Lactobacillus group, prophylactic and therapeutic groups. The control group was infused with 20 µl PBS, E.coli group was administered with 10 [6] cfu/20 µl E. coli, and probiotic group was administered with Lactobacillus (10 [8] cfu/20 µl for 10 consecutive days. In prophylactic group, the vagina was colonized with 10 consecutive doses of Lactobacillus (10 [8] cfu/20 µl. After 24 h, it was followed by 10 day intravaginal infection with E. coli (10 [6] cfu/20 µl whereas for the therapeutic group vagina was colonized with (10 [6] cfu/20 µl E. coli for 10 consecutive days, followed by 10 day intravaginal administration with Lactobacillus after 24 h. Results: Upon mating and completion of gestation period, control, probiotic and the therapeutic groups had litters in contrast to the prophylactic group and the group administered with E. coli. Interpretation & conclusions: Results indicated that Lactobacillus intermitted colonization of pathogenic

  8. Comparison of effects of ivabradine versus carvedilol in murine model with the Coxsackievirus B3-induced viral myocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yue-Chun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated heart rate is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. The selective I(f current inhibitor ivabradine reduces heart rate without affecting cardiac contractility, and has been shown to be cardioprotective in the failing heart. Ivabradine also exerts some of its beneficial effects by decreasing cardiac proinflammatory cytokines and inhibiting peroxidants and collagen accumulation in atherosclerosis or congestive heart failure. However, the effects of ivabradine in the setting of acute viral myocarditis and on the cytokines, oxidative stress and cardiomyocyte apoptosis have not been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was designed to compare the effects of ivabradine and carvedilol in acute viral myocarditis. In a coxsackievirus B3 murine myocarditis model (Balb/c, effects of ivabradine and carvedilol (a nonselective β-adrenoceptor antagonist on myocardial histopathological changes, cardiac function, plasma noradrenaline, cytokine levels, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase contents were studied. Both ivabradine and carvedilol similarly and significantly reduced heart rate, attenuated myocardial lesions and improved the impairment of left ventricular function. In addition, ivabradine treatment as well as carvedilol treatment showed significant effects on altered myocardial cytokines with a decrease in the amount of plasma noradrenaline. The increased myocardial MCP-1, IL-6, and TNF-α. in the infected mice was significantly attenuated in the ivabradine treatment group. Only carvedilol had significant anti-oxidative and anti-apoptoic effects in coxsackievirus B3-infected mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that the protective effects of heart rate reduction with ivabradine and carvedilol observed in the acute phase of coxsackievirus B3 murine myocarditis may be due not only to the heart rate reduction itself but also to the downregulation of

  9. Roles of chaperone/usher pathways of Yersinia pestis in a murine model of plague and adhesion to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatkoff, Matthew; Runco, Lisa M; Pujol, Celine; Jayatilaka, Indralatha; Furie, Martha B; Bliska, James B; Thanassi, David G

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia pestis and many other Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria use the chaperone/usher (CU) pathway to assemble virulence-associated surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae. Y. pestis has two well-characterized CU pathways: the caf genes coding for the F1 capsule and the psa genes coding for the pH 6 antigen. The Y. pestis genome contains additional CU pathways that are capable of assembling pilus fibers, but the roles of these pathways in the pathogenesis of plague are not understood. We constructed deletion mutations in the usher genes for six of the additional Y. pestis CU pathways. The wild-type (WT) and usher deletion strains were compared in the murine bubonic (subcutaneous) and pneumonic (intranasal) plague infection models. Y. pestis strains containing deletions in CU pathways y0348-0352, y1858-1862, and y1869-1873 were attenuated for virulence compared to the WT strain by the intranasal, but not subcutaneous, routes of infection, suggesting specific roles for these pathways during pneumonic plague. We examined binding of the Y. pestis WT and usher deletion strains to A549 human lung epithelial cells, HEp-2 human cervical epithelial cells, and primary human and murine macrophages. Y. pestis CU pathways y0348-0352 and y1858-1862 were found to contribute to adhesion to all host cells tested, whereas pathway y1869-1873 was specific for binding to macrophages. The correlation between the virulence attenuation and host cell binding phenotypes of the usher deletion mutants identifies three of the additional CU pathways of Y. pestis as mediating interactions with host cells that are important for the pathogenesis of plague.

  10. S100-alarmins: potential therapeutic targets for arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austermann, Judith; Zenker, Stefanie; Roth, Johannes

    2017-07-01

    In arthritis, inflammatory processes are triggered by numerous factors that are released from joint tissues, promoting joint destruction and pathological progression. During inflammation, a novel family of pro-inflammatory molecules called alarmins is released, amplifying inflammation and joint damage. Areas covered: With regard to the role of the alarmins S100A8 and S100A9 in the pathogenesis of arthritis, recent advances and the future prospects in terms of therapeutic implications are considered. Expert opinion: There is still an urgent need for novel treatment strategies addressing the local mechanisms of joint inflammation and tissue destruction, offering promising therapeutic alternatives. S100A8 and S100A9, which are the most up-regulated alarmins during arthritis, are endogenous triggers of inflammation, defining these proteins as promising targets for local suppression of arthritis. In murine models, the blockade of S100A8/S100A9 ameliorates inflammatory processes, including arthritis, and there are several lines of evidence that S100-alarmins may already be targeted in therapeutic approaches in man.

  11. Therapeutic Impact of Nanoparticle Therapy Targeting Tumor Associate Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Courtney; Yang, Kun; Zong, Hong; Lim, Jae-Young; Cole, Alex; Yang, Dongli; Baker, James; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2017-11-13

    Antiangiogenic therapies, despite initial encouragement, have demonstrated a limited benefit in ovarian cancer. Laboratory studies suggest anti-angiogenic therapy induced hypoxia can induce tumor "stemness' as resistance to antiangiogenic therapy develops and limits the therapeutic benefit. Resistance to antiangiogenic therapy and an induction of tumor stemness may be mediated by proangiogenic tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). As such TAMs have been proposed as a therapeutic target. We demonstrate here that ovarian TAMs express high levels of the folate receptor-2 (FOLR2) and can be selectively targeted using G5-dendrimer nanoparticles using methotrexate as both a ligand and a toxin. G5-methotrexate (G5-MTX) Nps deplete tumor associated macrophages in both solid tumor and ascites models of ovarian cancer. As a therapeutic these nanoparticles are more effective than cisplatin. Importantly, these nanoparticles could (i) overcome resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy, (ii) prevent antiangiogenic therapy induced increases in cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumor cell models, and (iii) prevent anti-angiogenic therapy induced increases in VEGF-C (iv) prevent anti-angiogenic therapy induce BRCA1 gene expression. Combine this work strongly supports the development of TAM targeted nanoparticle therapy. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Prevalence of murine norovirus infection in Korean laboratory animal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Rhan; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Kim, Dong Jae; Baek, Min-Won; Na, Yi-Rang; Han, Ju-Hee; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jae-Hak; Turner, Patricia V; Chung, Doo Hyun; Kang, Byeong-Cheol

    2011-05-01

    Currently, murine noroviruses (MNV) are the most prevalent viral pathogens identified in laboratory animal facilities. While several reports exist concerning the prevalence of MNV in North American research facilities, very few reports are available for other parts of the world, including Korea. This study evaluated the prevalence of MNV infection in 745 murine sera collected from 15 animal facilities in Korea by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Positive cases were subcategorized by murine strain/genetics, housing environments and animal sources. In summary, 6.6% of inbred/outbred mice purchased from commercial vendors were seropositive, 9.6% of in-house colonies were seropositive and 27.0% of genetically modified mice (GMM) were seropositive. Partial gene amplification of fecal isolates from infected animals showed that they were homologous (100%) with MNV-4.

  13. Protective effects of Cinnamomum cassia (Lamaceae) against gout and septic responses via attenuation of inflammasome activation in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woo-Young; Shim, Do-Wan; Kim, Myong-Ki; Sun, Xiao; Koppula, Sushruta; Yu, Sang-Hyeun; Kim, Han-Bi; Kim, Tack-Joong; Kang, Tae-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2017-06-09

    Cinnamomum cassia (C. cassia, Lauraceae family), commonly used for treating dyspepsia, gastritis, blood circulation, and inflammatory diseases is considered as one of the 50 fundamental herbs in traditional Chinese medicine. The anti-inflammatory action of an ethanol extract of C. cassia (CA), and its underlying mechanisms were explored in both in vitro cellular and in vivo murine models. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) were used to study the regulatory effect of CA on inflammasome activation. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis mouse model and a monosodium urate (MSU)-induced gout model were employed to study the effect of CA on in vivo efficacy. CA improved the survival rate in the LPS-induced septic shock mouse model and inhibited inflammasome activation including NLRP3, NLRC4, and AIM2, leading to suppression of interleukin-1β secretion. Further, ASC oligomerization and its speck formation in cytosol were attenuated by CA treatment. Furthermore, CA improved both survival rate of LPS-induced septic shock and gout murine model. CA treatment significantly attenuated danger signals-induced inflammatory responses via regulation of inflammasome activation, substantiating the traditional claims of its use in the treatment of inflammation-related disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. HDAC8, A Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Lopez

    Full Text Available HDAC isoform-specific inhibitors may improve the therapeutic window while limiting toxicities. Developing inhibitors against class I isoforms poses difficulties as they share high homology among their catalytic sites; however, HDAC8 is structurally unique compared to other class I isoforms. HDAC8 inhibitors are novel compounds and have affinity for class I HDAC isoforms demonstrating anti-cancer effects; little is known about their activity in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST. Recently, we demonstrated anti-MPNST efficacy of HDAC8i in human and murine-derived MPNST pre-clinical models; we now seek to consider the potential therapeutic inhibition of HDAC8 in MPNST.Four Human MPNST cell lines, a murine-derived MPNST cell line, and two HDAC8 inhibitors (PCI-34051, PCI-48012; Pharmacyclics, Inc. Sunnyvale, CA were studied. Proliferation was determined using MTS and clonogenic assays. Effects on cell cycle were determined via PI FACS analysis; effects on apoptosis were determined using Annexin V-PI FACS analysis and cleaved caspase 3 expression. In vivo growth effects of HDAC8i were evaluated using MPNST xenograft models. 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify potential HDAC8 deacetylation substrates.HDAC8i induced cell growth inhibition and marked S-phase cell cycle arrest in human and murine-derived MPNST cells. Relative to control, HDAC8i induced apoptosis in both human and murine-derived MPNST cells. HDAC8i exhibited significant effects on MPNST xenograft growth (p=0.001 and tumor weight (p=0.02. Four potential HDAC8 substrate targets were identified using a proteomic approach: PARK7, HMGB1, PGAM1, PRDX6.MPNST is an aggressive sarcoma that is notoriously therapy-resistant, hence the urgent need for improved anti-MPNST therapies. HDAC8 inhibition may be useful for MPNST by improving efficacy while limiting toxicities as compared to pan-HDACis.

  15. A method for generation phage cocktail with great therapeutic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin Gu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriophage could be an alternative to conventional antibiotic therapy against multidrug-resistant bacteria. However, the emergence of resistant variants after phage treatment limited its therapeutic application. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, an approach, named "Step-by-Step" (SBS, has been established. This method takes advantage of the occurrence of phage-resistant bacteria variants and ensures that phages lytic for wild-type strain and its phage-resistant variants are selected. A phage cocktail lytic for Klebsiella pneumoniae was established by the SBS method. This phage cocktail consisted of three phages (GH-K1, GH-K2 and GH-K3 which have different but overlapping host strains. Several phage-resistant variants of Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated after different phages treatments. The virulence of these variants was much weaker [minimal lethal doses (MLD>1.3×10(9 cfu/mouse] than that of wild-type K7 countpart (MLD = 2.5×10(3 cfu/mouse. Compared with any single phage, the phage cocktail significantly reduced the mutation frequency of Klebsiella pneumoniae and effectively rescued Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia in a murine K7 strain challenge model. The minimal protective dose (MPD of the phage cocktail which was sufficient to protect bacteremic mice from lethal K7 infection was only 3.0×10(4 pfu, significantly smaller (p<0.01 than that of single monophage. Moreover, a delayed administration of this phage cocktail was still effective in protection against K7 challenge. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data showed that the phage cocktail was more effective in reducing bacterial mutation frequency and in the rescue of murine bacteremia than monophage suggesting that phage cocktail established by SBS method has great therapeutic potential for multidrug-resistant bacteria infection.

  16. Defining the binding region in factor H to develop a therapeutic factor H-Fc fusion protein against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy M. Wong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi cause a range of illnesses including otitis media, sinusitis, and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infections that contribute to the problem of antibiotic resistance and are themselves often intractable to standard antibiotic treatment regimens. We investigated a strategy to exploit binding of the complement inhibitor Factor H (FH to NTHi as a functional target for an immunotherapeutic containing the NTHi binding domain of FH fused to the Fc domain of IgG1. Chimeric proteins containing the regions that most FH-binding bacteria use to engage human FH, domains 6 and 7 (FH6,7/Fc and/or 18 through 20 (FH18-20/Fc, were evaluated for binding to NTHi. FH6,7/Fc bound strongly to each of seven NTHi clinical isolates tested and efficiently promoted complement-mediated killing by normal human serum. FH18-20/Fc bound weakly to three of the strains but did not promote complement dependent killing. Outer-membrane protein P5 has been implicated in FH binding by NTHi, and FH6,7/Fc binding was greatly diminished in five of seven P5 deficient isogenic mutant strains tested, implicating an alternative FH binding protein in some strains. Binding of FH18-20/Fc was decreased in the P5 mutant of one strain. A murine model was used to evaluate potential therapeutic application of FH6,7/Fc. FH6,7/Fc efficiently promoted binding of C3 to NTHi exposed to mouse serum, and intranasal delivery of FH6,7/Fc resulted in significantly enhanced clearance of NTHi from the lung. Moreover, a P5 deficient mutant was attenuated for survival in the lung model, suggesting that escape mutants lacking P5 would be less likely to replace strains susceptible to FH6,7/Fc. These results provide evidence for the potential utility of FH6,7/Fc as a therapeutic against NTHi lung infection. FH binding is a common property of many respiratory tract pathogens and FH/Fc chimeras may represent promising alternative or adjunctive

  17. Screening of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Mutants for Attenuation in a Bovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise A Lamont

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination remains a major tool for prevention and progression of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteritis of ruminants worldwide. Currently there is only one licensed vaccine within the United States and two vaccines licensed internationally against Johne’s disease. All licensed vaccines reduce fecal shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP and delay disease progression. However, there are no available vaccines that prevent disease onset. A joint effort by the Johne’s Disease Integrated Program (JDIP, a USDA-funded consortium, and USDA- APHIS/VS sought to identify transposon insertion mutant strains as vaccine candidates in part of a three phase study. The focus of the Phase I study was to evaluate MAP mutant attenuation in a well-defined in vitro bovine monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM model. Attenuation was determined by colony forming unit (CFUs counts and slope estimates. Based on CFU counts alone, the MDM model did not identify any mutant that significantly differed from the wild-type control, MAP K-10. Slope estimates using mixed models approach identified six mutants as being attenuated. These were enrolled in protection studies involving murine and baby goat vaccination-challenge models. MDM based approach identified trends in attenuation but this did not correlate with protection in a natural host model. These results suggest the need for alternative strategies for Johne’s disease vaccine candidate screening and evaluation.

  18. Therapeutic and diagnostic nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Devasena T

    2017-01-01

    This brief highlights nanoparticles used in the diagnosis and treatment of prominent diseases and toxic conditions. Ecofriendly methods which are ideal for the synthesis of medicinally valued nanoparticles are explained and the characteristic features of these particles projected. The role of these particles in the therapeutic field, and the induced biological changes in some diseases are discussed. The main focus is on inflammation, oxidative stress and cellular membrane integrity alterations. The effect of nanoparticles on these changes produced by various agents are highlighted using in vitro and in vivo models. The mechanism of nanoparticles in ameliorating the biological changes is supported by relevant images and data. Finally, the brief demonstrates recent developments on the use of nanoparticles in diagnosis or sensing of some biological materials and biologically hazardous environmental materials.

  19. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  20. Therapeutic applications of melatonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a methoxyindole synthesized within the pineal gland. The hormone is secreted during the night and appears to play multiple roles within the human organism. The hormone contributes to the regulation of biological rhythms, may induce sleep, has strong antioxidant action and appears to contribute to the protection of the organism from carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. At a therapeutic level as well as in prevention, melatonin is used for the management of sleep disorders and jet lag, for the resynchronization of circadian rhythms in situations such as blindness and shift work, for its preventive action in the development of cancer, as additive therapy in cancer and as therapy for preventing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23515203

  1. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  2. Therapeutic effects of reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín HIDALGO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reading is an act that requires isolation and loneliness, which allows rewriting the narratives through the identification between the reader and the character, the involvement in the fact narrated and singular recreation by every single reader. The act of reading allows stepping aside from reality. The reading as well as the writing perform the therapeutic effect of helping to understand the illness and to know experiences of others patients that can be useful for the accompaniment, overcoming and/or making decisions. There is not a concrete literary that could be universally recommend to every patient, but all the genre can be useful to some patient. However, poetry, novel and autobiographies are frequently referred as the manuscripts that provide help and consolation.

  3. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    polymerized in a controlled manner with carrier monomers of historically proven biocompatible polymers. The carrier polymers, the loading of ribavirin as well as the size of the polymer were varied systematically with the aid of an automated synthesis platform. These polymers were tested in a cellular assay...... of reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, which not only controls the size of polymer, but also allows the introduction of a terminal amine on the polymer which can be used for further conjugation. This has allowed for not only fluorescent labeling of the polymer, but also protein......The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...

  4. Transport and attenuation of radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Nimal, J C

    2003-01-01

    This article treats of the calculation methods used for the dimensioning of the protections against radiations. The method consists in determining for a given point the flux of particles coming from a source at a given time. A strong attenuation (of about some few mu Sv.h sup - sup 1) is in general expected between the source and the areas accessible to the personnel or the public. The calculation has to take into account a huge number of radiation-matter interactions and to solve the integral-differential transport equation which links the particles flux to the source. Several methods exist from the simplified physical model with numerical developments to the more or less precise resolution of the transport equation. These methods allows also the calculation of the uncertainties of equivalent dose rates, heat sources, structure damages using the data covariances (efficient cross-sections, modeling, etc..): 1 - transport equation; 2 - Monte-Carlo method; 3 - semi-numerical methods S sub N; 4 - methods based o...

  5. Minocycline attenuates cardiac dysfunction in tumor-burdened mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Raymond D; Eichenseer, Clayton M; Wold, Loren E

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular dysfunction as a result of tumor burden is becoming a recognized complication; however, the mechanisms remain unknown. A murine model of cancer cachexia has shown marked increases of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), known mediators of cardiac remodeling, in the left ventricle. The extent to which MMPs are involved in remodeling remains obscured. To this end a common antibiotic, minocycline, with MMP inhibitory properties was used to elucidate MMP involvement in tumor induced cardiovascular dysfunction. Tumor-bearing mice showed decreased cardiac function with reduced posterior wall thickness (PWTs) during systole, increased MMP and collagen expression consistent with fibrotic remodeling. Administration of minocycline preserved cardiac function in tumor bearing mice and decreased collagen RNA expression in the left ventricle. MMP protein levels were unaffected by minocycline administration, with the exception of MMP-9, indicating minocycline inhibition mechanisms are directly affecting MMP activity. Cancer induced cardiovascular dysfunction is an increasing concern; novel therapeutics are needed to prevent cardiac complications. Minocycline is a well-known antibiotic and recently has been shown to possess MMP inhibitory properties. Our findings presented here show that minocycline could represent a novel use for a long established drug in the prevention and treatment of cancer induced cardiovascular dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Isoforms of murine and human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Hackler, R; Kold, B

    1998-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) and immunofixation of murine serum amyloid P component (SAP), purified and in serum, showed a distinct and strain-dependent isoform pattern with up to seven bands (pI 5.1-5.7). Neuraminidase treatment caused a shift of the isoforms to more basic pI values, but did...... of isoforms of human SAP required the presence of urea and higher SAP concentrations. TEF and immunofixation of SAP monomers showed five to eight isoforms, ranging from pI 4.7-5.7. IEF of SAP in human serum resulted in a less distinct pattern and more acidic isoforms. As with murine SAP, neuraminidase...

  7. Dual effect of LPS on murine myeloid leukemia cells: Pro-proliferation and anti-proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lingling [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Zhao, Yingmin [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Gu, Xin; Wang, Jijun; Pang, Lei; Zhang, Yanqing; Li, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xin [Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Gu, Jian [Department of Hematology, Yangzhou University School of Clinical Medicine, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Yu, Duonan, E-mail: duonan@yahoo.com [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine for Prevention and Treatment of Senile Disease, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Institute of Comparative Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Disease and Zoonosis, Yangzhou 225001 (China)

    2016-06-10

    Modification of the bone marrow microenvironment is considered as a promising strategy to control leukemic cell proliferation, diseases progression and relapse after treatment. However, due to the diversity and complexity of the cellular and molecular compartments in the leukemic microenvironment, it is extremely difficult to dissect the role of each individual molecule or cell type in vivo. Here we established an in vitro system to dissect the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stromal cells and endothelial cells in the growth of mouse myeloid tumor cells and B-lymphoma cells. We found that either LPS or bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer in culture is required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. Surprisingly, the growth of myeloid leukemic cells on stromal cells is strongly inhibited when coupled with LPS in culture. This opposing effect of LPS, a complete switch from pro-proliferation to antitumor growth is due, at least in part, to the rapidly increased production of interleukin 12, Fas ligand and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 from stromal cells stimulated by LPS. These results demonstrate that LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor cell proliferation, thus changing the disease course of myeloid leukemias through its direct effect or modulation of the tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • LPS alone in culture is required for the proliferation of murine myeloid tumor cells. • Bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer is also required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. • However, the growth of myeloid tumor cells is inhibited when LPS and stromal cells are both available in culture. • Thus LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor growth through its direct effect or modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  8. Therapeutic Approaches in CLIPPERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Guillaume; Allou, Thibaut; Labauge, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    CLIPPERS for chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids, is a steroid-sensitive and steroid-dependent brainstem inflammatory disease of unknown origin. Since its first description in 2010, about 60 cases have been reported throughout the world. The mean age at onset is 50 years and men seem to be more frequently affected. In patients without chronic corticosteroid therapy or immunosuppressive agents, the disease had a relapsing remitting course, and the mean annualized relapse rate was 0.5. During attacks, although clinical and radiological improvement after high doses of corticosteroids was systematically observed, patients could display subsequent disability and hindbrain atrophy. Since no progressive course was observed, clinical and radiological sequelae were correlated with previous severe attacks. Therefore, maintaining the disease in remission may prevent the accumulation of disability. In the literature, no relapse occurred when chronic corticosteroid therapy was maintained above 20 mg per day. However, steroids side effects led to propose corticosteroid-sparing therapies. Unfortunately, no controlled therapy studies for CLIPPERS have been performed yet, and no therapeutic recommendations exist. Using the PubMed database, all articles having the following keywords "chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids" and "CLIPPERS" have been analysed. Considering that the mean annual relapse rate was 0.5, and that no relapse occurred when corticosteroid therapy was maintained above 20 mg per day, the therapeutic efficiency of corticosteroid-sparing agents was considered as "probable" when patients had a relapse-free period ≥24 months, in the absence of concomitant corticosteroid therapy. Corticosteroid-sparing agents whose efficiency is "probable" are methotrexate in two cases, cyclophosphamide in one case and hydroxychloroquine in one case. Considering the

  9. A rapid murine coma and behavior scale for quantitative assessment of murine cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Carroll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field. The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed.

  10. Sinus node dysfunction in ATX-II-induced in-vitro murine model of long QT3 syndrome and rescue effect of ranolazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjing; Cheng, Longxian; Lammers, Wim J; Wu, Lin; Wang, Xin; Shryock, John C; Belardinelli, Luiz; Lei, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the role of the late Na+ current (I(Na,L)) as a mechanism for induction of both tachy and bradyarrhythmias in murine heart and sino-atrial node tissue. The sea anemone toxin ATX-II and ranolazine were used to increase and inhibit, respectively, I(Na,L). In sixteen hearts studied, exposure to 1-10nM ATX-II caused a slowing of intrinsic heart rate and prolongations of the P-R and QT intervals, the duration of the monophasic action potential, and the sinus node recovery time, accompanied by frequent occurrences of early after depolarisations, delayed after depolarisations and rapid, repetitive ventricular tachy and sino-atrial bradyarrhythmias. ATX-II also slowed sinus node pacemaking, and induced bradycardic arrhythmias in isolated sino-atrial preparations (n=5). The ATX-II-induced alteration of electrophysiological properties and occurrence of arrhythmic events were significantly attenuated by 10 microM ranolazine in intact hearts (n=11) and isolated sino-atrial preparations (n=5). In conclusion, the I(Na,L) enhancer ATX-II causes both tachy and bradyarrhythmias in the murine heart, and these arrhythmias are markedly attenuated by the I(Na,L) blocker, ranolazine (10 microM). The results suggest that I(Na,L) blockade may be the mechanism underlying the reductions of both brady and tachyarrhythmias by ranolazine that were observed during the MERLIN-TIMI clinical outcomes trial.

  11. Regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and immunologic function contributed to the anti-inflammatory effect of acupuncture in the OVA-induced murine asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying; Dong, Ming; Zhong, Ling; Liu, Jiaqi; Luo, Qingli; Lv, Yubao; Mo, Shuming; Sun, Jing; Liu, Feng; Xu, Fei; Yan, Chen; Dong, Jingcheng

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a complex inflammatory disease of the airways and acupuncture is one of the effective therapies widely used to treat asthma in China. The aim of the study was to evaluate the regulatory role of acupuncture in airway inflammation and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in OVA-induced murine asthma model. Our results demonstrated that acupuncture was effective in suppression of AHR, inhibition of total leukocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte and eosinophil counts in BALF, attenuation of airway inflammation and TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-5 and eotaxin secretion. Furthermore, the HPA axis activity was also regulated by acupuncture, which included promotion of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol secretion in the plasma. Our findings revealed that acupuncture could attenuate airway inflammation and regulate HPA axis and immunologic function in the OVA-induced murine asthma model, which may provide support to better understand the contribution of acupuncture to the regulation of airway inflammation and HPA axis activity in asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Minocycline attenuates noise-induced hearing loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Song, Yong-Li; Tian, Ke-Yong; Qiu, Jian-Hua

    2017-02-03

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious health concern and prevention of hair cell death or therapeutic intervention at the early stage of NIHL is critical to preserve hearing. Minocycline is a semi-synthetic derivative of tetracycline and has been shown to have otoprotective effects in ototoxic drug-induced hearing impairment, however, whether minocycline can protect against NIHL has not been investigated. The present study demonstrated elevated ABR (auditory brainstem response) thresholds and outer hair cell loss following traumatic noise exposure, which was mitigated by intraperitoneal administration of minocycline (45mg/kg/d) for 5 consecutive days. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that minocycline, a clinically approved drug with a good safety profile, can attenuate NIHL in rats and may potentially be used for treatment of hearing loss in clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibodies against Ebolavirus Glycoproteins Show Protection in a Murine Challenge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duehr, James; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Oestereich, Lisa; Chromikova, Veronika; Amanat, Fatima; Rajendran, Madhusudan; Gomez-Medina, Sergio; Mena, Ignacio; tenOever, Benjamin R; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Basler, Christopher F; Munoz-Fontela, Cesar; Krammer, Florian

    2017-08-15

    Out of an estimated 31,100 cases since their discovery in 1976, ebolaviruses have caused approximately 13,000 deaths. The vast majority (∼11,000) of these occurred during the 2013-2016 West African epidemic. Three out of five species in the genus are known to cause Ebola Virus Disease in humans. Several monoclonal antibodies against the ebolavirus glycoprotein are currently in development as therapeutics. However, there is still a paucity of monoclonal antibodies that can cross-react between the glycoproteins of different ebolavirus species, and the mechanism of these monoclonal antibody therapeutics is still not understood in detail. Here, we generated a panel of eight murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) utilizing a prime-boost vaccination regimen with a Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein expression plasmid followed by infection with a vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein. We tested the binding breadth of the resulting monoclonal antibodies using a set of recombinant surface glycoproteins from Reston, Taï Forest, Bundibugyo, Zaire, Sudan, and Marburg viruses and found two antibodies that showed pan-ebolavirus binding. An in vivo Stat2-/- mouse model was utilized to test the ability of these MAbs to protect from infection with a vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein. Several of our antibodies, including the broadly binding ones, protected mice from mortality despite lacking neutralization capability in vitro, suggesting their protection may be mediated by Fc-FcR interactions. Indeed, three antibodies displayed cellular phagocytosis and/or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro Our antibodies, specifically the two identified cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (KL-2E5 and KL-2H7), might add to the understanding of anti-ebolavirus humoral immunity.IMPORTANCE This study describes the generation of a panel of novel anti-ebolavirus glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies, including two

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 end-products carbon monoxide and biliverdin ameliorate murine collagen induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, M; Savitskaya, A; Steiner, C-W; Rath, E; Bilban, M; Wagner, O; Bach, F H; Smolen, J S; Scheinecker, C

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which degrades Heme to free iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO) plays an important role in inflammation. There are, however, conflicting data concerning the role of HO-1 in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the therapeutic potential of individual heme degradation products remains to be determined. We therefore investigated the effect of CO and biliverdin upon therapeutic administration in the murine collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. CIA was induced in DBA/1 mice. Anti-CII antibody levels were determined by ELISA. Mice were scored for paw swelling and grip strength. After the first clinical signs of arthritis one group of animals was treated with biliverdin, the second group was treated with CO. After 60 days all animals were sacrificed and analysed for histomorphological signs of arthritis. All animals immunised with CII developed serum anti-CII antibodies. Antibody levels were decreased in the CO-treated group. Both, Biliverdin and the CO-treated animals, showed an improvement in clinical disease activity. Histological analysis revealed significantly less inflammation, erosion and reduced numbers of osteoclasts in CO-treated animals only, whereas cartilage degradation was prevented in both biliverdin and CO-treated animals. Our data demonstrate a beneficial effect of CO, in particular, and biliverdin, on inflammation and bone destruction in the CIA mouse model.

  15. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuccitelli, Richard, E-mail: rich@bioelectromed.com [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Tang, Jean Y. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  16. Losartan Attenuates Scar Formation in Filtering Bleb After Trabeculectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huimin; Wang, Huiying; Fu, Shuhao; Xu, Kang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Yiqin; Ye, Wen

    2017-03-01

    To examine the effects of losartan on scar formation after trabeculectomy and on fibrotic changes of human Tenon's fibroblasts (HTFs). Trabeculectomy was performed on New Zealand rabbits. They were randomized to receive one of the following treatments: 0.9% normal saline, mitomycin-C, or one of the three doses of losartan. Bleb morphology, IOP, and histopathology examination were performed. Primary cultured HTFs were treated with losartan or vehicle, with or without angiotensin II (Ang II). Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, and cell migration was detected by scratch wound and transwell assay. Transdifferentiation was evaluated through the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) by immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, and Western blot. The expression of fibronectin (FN) was evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blot. An amount of 5 mg/mL of losartan subconjunctival injection significantly decreased IOP postoperatively and attenuated wound healing of the filtering bleb in the rabbit model. Immunostaining results showed less myofibroblast and collagen deposition around the bleb area in the losartan-treated eyes. Losartan (10-5 M) in vitro significantly attenuated Ang II's stimulatory effects on proliferation and migration of HTFs. Expressions of α-SMA and FN in these cells were also decreased by losartan pretreatment. Losartan attenuates scar formation of filtering bleb after trabeculectomy likely via decreasing proliferation, migration, transdifferentiation, and extracellular matrix deposition of Tenon's fibroblasts. These results indicate that losartan may be an effective therapeutic agent in preventing bleb scar formation and in improving surgical outcome after trabeculectomy.

  17. Melatonin attenuates postmyocardial infarction injury via increasing Tom70 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Hai-Feng; Hou, Juan-Ni; Wei, Fei-Peng; Xue, Qiang; Zhang, Fan; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Yang, Yi; Tian, Yue; Feng, Juan; Du, Jin; He, Lei; Li, Xiu-Chuan; Gao, Er-He; Li, De; Yang, Yong-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overload, exacerbating injury in myocardial infarction (MI). As a receptor for translocases in the outer mitochondrial membrane (Tom) complex, Tom70 has an unknown function in MI, including melatonin-induced protection against MI injury. We delivered specific small interfering RNAs against Tom70 or lentivirus vectors carrying Tom70a sequences into the left ventricles of mice or to cultured neonatal murine ventricular myocytes (NMVMs). At 48 h post-transfection, the left anterior descending coronary arteries of mice were permanently ligated, while the NMVMs underwent continuous hypoxia. At 24 h after ischemia/hypoxia, oxidative stress was assessed by dihydroethidium and lucigenin-enhanced luminescence, mitochondrial damage by transmission electron microscopy and ATP content, and cell apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling and caspase-3 assay. At 4 weeks after ischemia, cardiac function and fibrosis were evaluated in mice by echocardiography and Masson's trichrome staining, respectively. Ischemic/hypoxic insult reduced Tom70 expression in cardiomyocytes. Tom70 downregulation aggravated post-MI injury, with increased mitochondrial fragmentation and ROS overload. In contrast, Tom70 upregulation alleviated post-MI injury, with improved mitochondrial integrity and decreased ROS production. PGC-1α/Tom70 expression in ischemic myocardium was increased with melatonin alone, but not when combined with luzindole. Melatonin attenuated post-MI injury in control but not in Tom70-deficient mice. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reversed the adverse effects of Tom70 deficiency in mitochondria and cardiomyocytes, but at a much higher concentration than melatonin. Our findings showed that Tom70 is essential for melatonin-induced protection against post-MI injury, by breaking the cycle of mitochondrial impairment and ROS generation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  18. Rosiglitazone attenuates pulmonary fibrosis and radiation-induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangoni, M.; Gerini, C.; Sottili, M.; Cassani, S.; Stefania, G.; Biti, G. [Radiotherapy Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Castiglione, F. [Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E.; Bottoncetti, A.; Pupi, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Clinical Physiopathology Department, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.-The aim of the study was to evaluate radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone (RGZ) on a murine model of late pulmonary damage and of acute intestinal damage. Methods.- Lung fibrosis: C57 mice were treated with the radiomimetic agent bleomycin, with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). To obtain an independent qualitative and quantitative measure for lung fibrosis we used high resolution CT, performed twice a week during the entire observation period. Hounsfield Units (HU) of section slides from the upper and lower lung region were determined. On day 31 lungs were collected for histological analysis. Acute intestinal damage: mice underwent 12 Gy total body irradiation with or without rosiglitazone. Mice were sacrificed 24 or 72 h after total body irradiation and ileum and colon were collected. Results.- Lung fibrosis: after bleomycin treatment, mice showed typical CT features of lung fibrosis, including irregular septal thickening and patchy peripheral reticular abnormalities. Accordingly, HU lung density was dramatically increased. Rosiglitazone markedly attenuated the radiological signs of fibrosis and strongly inhibited HU lung density increase (60% inhibition at the end of the observation period). Histological analysis revealed that in bleomycin-treated mice, fibrosis involved 50-55% of pulmonary parenchyma and caused an alteration of the alveolar structures in 10% of parenchyma, while in rosiglitazone-treated mice, fibrosis involved only 20-25% of pulmonary parenchyma, without alterations of the alveolar structures. Acute intestinal damage: 24 h after 12 Gy of total body irradiation intestinal mucosa showed villi shortening, mucosal thickness and crypt necrotic changes. Rosiglitazone showed a histological improvement of tissue structure, with villi and crypts normalization and oedema reduction. Conclusion.- These results demonstrate that rosiglitazone displays a protective effect on pulmonary fibrosis and radiation

  19. Viral and murine interleukin-10 are correctly processed and retain their biological activity when produced in tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avesani Linda

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, with therapeutic applications in several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Oral administration of this cytokine alone, or in combination with disease-associated autoantigens could confer protection form the onset of a specific autoimmune disease through the induction of oral tolerance. Transgenic plants are attractive systems for production of therapeutic proteins because of the ability to do large scale-up at low cost, and the low maintenance requirements. They are highly amenable to oral administration and could become effective delivery systems without extensive protein purification. We investigated the ability of tobacco plants to produce high levels of biologically-active viral and murine IL-10. Results Three different subcellular targeting strategies were assessed in transient expression experiments, and stable transgenic tobacco plants were generated with the constructs that yielded the highest accumulation levels by targeting the recombinant proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. The best yields using this strategy in T1 plants were 10.8 and 37.0 μg/g fresh leaf weight for viral and murine IL-10, respectively. The recombinant proteins were purified from transgenic leaf material and characterized in terms of their N-glycan composition, dimerization and biological activity in in vitro assays. Both molecules formed stable dimers, were able to activate the IL-10 signaling pathway and to induce specific anti-inflammatory responses in mouse J774 macrophage cells. Conclusion Tobacco plants are able to correctly process viral and murine IL-10 into biologically active dimers, therefore representing a suitable platform for the production for these cytokines. The accumulation levels obtained are high enough to allow delivery of an immunologically relevant dose of IL-10 in a reasonable amount of leaf material, without extensive purification. This study paves the

  20. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  1. Pre-Treatment with Allopurinol or Uricase Attenuates Barrier Dysfunction but Not Inflammation during Murine Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Maria T.; Aslami, Hamid; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Tuip-de Boer, Anita M.; Hegeman, Maria A.; Jongsma, Geartsje; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J.; Wieland, Catharina W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Uric acid released from injured tissue is considered a major endogenous danger signal and local instillation of uric acid crystals induces acute lung inflammation via activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is mediated by the NLRP3 inflammasome and

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cells inhibit murine syngeneic anti-tumor immune responses by attenuating inflammation and reorganizing the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiano, Jaime F; Lindborg, Beth A; McElmurry, Ron T; Lewellen, Mitzi; Forster, Colleen L; Zamora, Edward A; Schaack, Jerome; Bellgrau, Donald; O'Brien, Timothy D; Tolar, Jakub

    2015-11-01

    The potential of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor immunity is becoming increasingly well recognized, but the precise steps affected by these cells during the development of an anti-tumor immune response remain incompletely understood. Here, we examined how MSCs affect the steps required to mount an effective anti-tumor immune response following administration of adenovirus Fas ligand (Ad-FasL) in the Lewis lung carcinoma (LL3) model. Administration of bone marrow-derived MSCs with LL3 cells accelerated tumor growth significantly. MSCs inhibited the inflammation induced by Ad-FasL in the primary tumors, precluding their rejection; MSCs also reduced the consequent expansion of tumor-specific T cells in the treated hosts. When immune T cells were transferred to adoptive recipients, MSCs impaired, but did not completely abrogate the ability of these T cells to promote elimination of secondary tumors. This impairment was associated with a modest reduction in tumor-infiltrating T cells, with a significant reduction in tumor-infiltrating macrophages, and with a reorganization of the stromal environment. Our data indicate that MSCs in the tumor environment reduce the efficacy of immunotherapy by creating a functional and anatomic barrier that impairs inflammation, T cell priming and expansion, and T cell function-including recruitment of effector cells.

  3. Differential effect of protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) on survival of experimental murine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, I; Collado, A; Garcia Lora, A; Garrido, F

    1999-03-01

    The effect of protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) on the survival of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice after intravenous injections of syngeneic murine sarcomas (GR9.B9 and Meth-A), LSTRA lymphoma and B16 melanoma cells was studied. Pretreatment of mice with PSK significantly increased survival after the injection of either type of sarcoma cells, although the effect was attenuated when high numbers of cells were injected. Survival was not modified significantly in LSTRA lymphoma or B16 melanoma. Mice pretreated with anti-asialo GMI serum showed significantly decreased survival from all tumors in comparison with untreated mice injected with tumors, regardless of cell dose used. We observed an inverse correlation between H-2 antigen expression and in vitro NK sensitivity of tumor cells from all lines except B16 melanoma cells. These results clearly suggest that pretreatment of mice with PSK prolongs survival and inhibits metastasis formation in mice injected with sarcoma cells, being this effect highly selective, since survival was not improved in mice injected with LSTRA lymphoma or B16 melanoma.

  4. Viral Population Changes during Murine Norovirus Propagation in RAW 264.7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kitamoto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory adaptation of viruses is an essential technique for basic virology research, including the generation of attenuated vaccine strains, although the principles of cell adaptation remain largely unknown. Deep sequencing of murine norovirus (MuNoV S7 during serial passages in RAW264.7 cells showed that the frequencies of viral variants were altered more dynamically than previously reported. Serial passages of the virus following two different multiplicity of infections gave rise to distinct haplotypes, implying that multiple cell-adaptable sequences were present in the founder population. Nucleotide variants lost during passage were assembled into a viral genome representative of that prior to cell adaptation, which was unable to generate viral particles upon infection in cultured cells. In addition, presence of the reconstructed genome interfered with production of infectious particles from viruses that were fully adapted to in vitro culture. Although the key nucleotide changes dictating cell adaptation of MuNoV S7 viral infection are yet to be elucidated, our results revealed the elaborate interplay among selected sequences of viral variants better adapted to propagation in cell culture. Such knowledge will be instrumental in understanding the processes necessary for the laboratory adaptation of viruses, especially to those without relevant cell culture systems.

  5. Nonessential Role for the NLRP1 Inflammasome Complex in a Murine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brickler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI elicits the immediate production of proinflammatory cytokines which participate in regulating the immune response. While the mechanisms of adaptive immunity in secondary injury are well characterized, the role of the innate response is unclear. Recently, the NLR inflammasome has been shown to become activated following TBI, causing processing and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLR, caspase-1, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC. ASC is upregulated after TBI and is critical in coupling the proteins during complex formation resulting in IL-1β cleavage. To directly test whether inflammasome activation contributes to acute TBI-induced damage, we assessed IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 expression, contusion volume, hippocampal cell death, and motor behavior recovery in Nlrp1−/−, Asc−/−, and wild type mice after moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI injury. Although IL-1β expression is significantly attenuated in the cortex of Nlrp1−/− and Asc−/− mice following CCI injury, no difference in motor recovery, cell death, or contusion volume is observed compared to wild type. These findings indicate that inflammasome activation does not significantly contribute to acute neural injury in the murine model of moderate CCI injury.

  6. Fumigaclavine C ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis via NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of Fumigaclavine C, a fungal metabolite, on murine experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS and its possible mechanism were examined in vivo and vitro. Oral administration of Fumigaclavine C dose-dependently attenuated the loss of body weight and shortening of colon length induced by DSS. The disease activity index, histopathologic scores of musco was also significantly reduced by Fumigaclavine C treatment. Protein and mRNA levels of DSS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in colon, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-17A, were markedly suppressed by Fumigaclavine C. At the same time, decreased activation of caspase-1 in peritoneal macrophages was detected in Fumigaclavine C -treated mice which suggested that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation was suppressed. Furthermore, in the LPS plus ATP cell model, we found that Fumigaclavine C dose-dependent inhibited IL-1β release and caspase-1 activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate the ability of Fumigaclavine C to inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and give some evidence for its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  7. Suppression of inflammation by dexamethasone prolongs adenoviral vector-mediated transgene expression in murine nasal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumahara, Keiichiro; Nagata, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Ken; Shimizu, Norio; Arimoto, Yukiko; Isoyama, Kyoko; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2005-12-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that suppression of inflammation by dexamethasone attenuates the host immune response against adenoviral-mediated gene transfection and thereby prolongs transgene expression in murine nasal mucosa. Gene transfer using a recombinant adenovirus is a good tool for research and clinical applications, but the immune response to adenoviral vectors can induce inflammation and loss of transgene expression in transfected tissues. In this study we investigated the effects of dexamethasone-induced immunosuppression on adenovirus gene transfer in the nasal mucosa of the mouse. We administered the recombinant adenovirus Ax1CAlacZ, which encodes Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (lacZ gene), to the nasal mucosa of mice treated with or without i.p. dexamethasone and evaluated the expression of the lacZ gene on Days 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28. The nasal mucosa was dissected out, and the mRNA level was measured using a LightCycler. The expression of the exogenous beta-galactosidase was detected by means of histochemistry. Dexamethasone treatment significantly increased the mRNA level compared with that in the controls at Days 4, 7 and 14. Histochemistry showed that the expression of beta-galactosidase protein persisted in the dexamethasone-treated mice at Days 7 and 14 but had diminished almost to nothing in the control group.

  8. Attenuation caused by infrequently updated covariates in survival analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Liestøl, Knut

    2003-01-01

    Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates......Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates...

  9. Murine Models of Sepsis and Trauma: Can We Bridge the Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortz, Julie A; Raymond, Steven L; Mira, Juan C; Moldawer, Lyle L; Mohr, Alicia M; Efron, Philip A

    2017-07-01

    Sepsis and trauma are both leading causes of death in the United States and represent major public health challenges. Murine models have largely been used in sepsis and trauma research to better understand the pathophysiological changes that occur after an insult and to develop potential life-saving therapeutic agents. Mice are favorable subjects for this type of research given the variety of readily available strains including inbred, outbred, and transgenic strains. In addition, they are relatively easy to maintain and have a high fecundity. However, pharmacological therapies demonstrating promise in preclinical mouse models of sepsis and trauma often fail to demonstrate similar efficacy in human clinical trials, prompting considerable criticism surrounding the capacity of murine models to recapitulate complex human diseases like sepsis and traumatic injury. Fundamental differences between the two species include, but are not limited to, the divergence of the transcriptomic response, the mismatch of temporal response patterns, differences in both innate and adaptive immunity, and heterogeneity within the human population in comparison to the homogeneity of highly inbred mouse strains. Given the ongoing controversy, this narrative review aims to not only highlight the historical importance of the mouse as an animal research model but also highlight the current benefits and limitations of the model as it pertains to sepsis and trauma. Lastly, this review will propose future directions that may promote further use of the model. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Evaluation of antithrombotic activity of thrombin DNA aptamers by a murine thrombosis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zavyalova

    Full Text Available Aptamers are nucleic acid based molecular recognition elements with a high potential for the theranostics. Some of the aptamers are under development for therapeutic applications as promising antithrombotic agents; and G-quadruplex DNA aptamers, which directly inhibit the thrombin activity, are among them. RA-36, the 31-meric DNA aptamer, consists of two thrombin binding pharmacophores joined with the thymine linker. It has been shown earlier that RA-36 directly inhibits thrombin in the reaction of fibrinogen hydrolysis, and also it inhibits plasma and blood coagulation. Studies of both inhibitory and anticoagulation effects had indicated rather high species specificity of the aptamer. Further R&D of RA-36 requires exploring its efficiency in vivo. Therefore the development of a robust and adequate animal model for effective physiological studies of aptamers is in high current demand. This work is devoted to in vivo study of the antithrombotic effect of RA-36 aptamer. A murine model of thrombosis has been applied to reveal a lag and even prevention of thrombus formation when RA-36 was intravenous bolus injected in high doses of 1.4-7.1 µmol/kg (14-70 mg/kg. A comparative study of RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin reveals that both direct thrombin inhibitors have similar antithrombotic effects for the murine model of thrombosis; though in vitro bivalirudin has anticoagulation activity several times higher compared to RA-36. The results indicate that both RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin are direct thrombin inhibitors of different potency, but possible interactions of the thrombin-inhibitor complex with other components of blood coagulation cascade level the physiological effects for both inhibitors.

  11. Production and characterization of murine models of classic and intermediate maple syrup urine disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins Simon

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase. MSUD has several clinical phenotypes depending on the degree of enzyme deficiency. Current treatments are not satisfactory and require new approaches to combat this disease. A major hurdle in developing new treatments has been the lack of a suitable animal model. Methods To create a murine model of classic MSUD, we used gene targeting and embryonic stem cell technologies to create a mouse line that lacked a functional E2 subunit gene of branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase. To create a murine model of intermediate MSUD, we used transgenic technology to express a human E2 cDNA on the knockout background. Mice of both models were characterized at the molecular, biochemical, and whole animal levels. Results By disrupting the E2 subunit gene of branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase, we created a gene knockout mouse model of classic MSUD. The homozygous knockout mice lacked branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase activity, E2 immunoreactivity, and had a 3-fold increase in circulating branched-chain amino acids. These metabolic derangements resulted in neonatal lethality. Transgenic expression of a human E2 cDNA in the liver of the E2 knockout animals produced a model of intermediate MSUD. Branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase activity was 5–6% of normal and was sufficient to allow survival, but was insufficient to normalize circulating branched-chain amino acids levels, which were intermediate between wildtype and the classic MSUD mouse model. Conclusion These mice represent important animal models that closely approximate the phenotype of humans with the classic and intermediate forms of MSUD. These animals provide useful models to further characterize the pathogenesis of MSUD, as well as models to test novel therapeutic strategies, such as gene and cellular therapies, to treat this devastating

  12. Differential Immune Microenvironments and Response to Immune Checkpoint Blockade among Molecular Subtypes of Murine Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina D; Flores, Catherine; Yang, Changlin; Pinheiro, Elaine M; Yearley, Jennifer H; Sayour, Elias J; Pei, Yanxin; Moore, Colin; McLendon, Roger E; Huang, Jianping; Sampson, John H; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Mitchell, Duane A

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant strides in the identification and characterization of potential therapeutic targets for medulloblastoma, the role of the immune system and its interplay with the tumor microenvironment within these tumors are poorly understood. To address this, we adapted two syngeneic animal models of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-driven and group 3 medulloblastoma for preclinical evaluation in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were used to phenotype and characterize immune infiltrating cells within established cerebellar tumors. We observed significantly higher percentages of dendritic cells, infiltrating lymphocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages in murine SHH model tumors compared with group 3 tumors. However, murine group 3 tumors had higher percentages of CD8(+) PD-1(+) T cells within the CD3 population. PD-1 blockade conferred superior antitumor efficacy in animals bearing intracranial group 3 tumors compared with SHH group tumors, indicating that immunologic differences within the tumor microenvironment can be leveraged as potential targets to mediate antitumor efficacy. Further analysis of anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody localization revealed binding to PD-1(+) peripheral T cells, but not tumor infiltrating lymphocytes within the brain tumor microenvironment. Peripheral PD-1 blockade additionally resulted in a marked increase in CD3(+) T cells within the tumor microenvironment. This is the first immunologic characterization of preclinical models of molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma and demonstration that response to immune checkpoint blockade differs across subtype classification. Our findings also suggest that effective anti-PD-1 blockade does not require that systemically administered antibodies penetrate the brain tumor microenvironment. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Burkholderia pseudomallei known siderophores and hemin uptake are dispensable for lethal murine melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Kvitko

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a mostly saprophytic bacterium, but can infect humans where it causes the difficult-to-manage disease melioidosis. Even with proper diagnosis and prompt therapeutic interventions mortality rates still range from >20% in Northern Australia to over 40% in Thailand. Surprisingly little is yet known about how B. pseudomallei infects, invades and survives within its hosts, and virtually nothing is known about the contribution of critical nutrients such as iron to the bacterium's pathogenesis. It was previously assumed that B. pseudomallei used iron-acquisition systems commonly found in other bacteria, for example siderophores. However, our previous discovery of a clinical isolate carrying a large chromosomal deletion missing the entire malleobactin gene cluster encoding the bacterium's major high-affinity siderophore while still being fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model suggested that other iron-acquisition systems might make contributions to virulence. Here, we deleted the major siderophore malleobactin (mba and pyochelin (pch gene clusters in strain 1710b and revealed a residual siderophore activity which was unrelated to other known Burkholderia siderophores such as cepabactin and cepaciachelin, and not due to increased secretion of chelators such as citrate. Deletion of the two hemin uptake loci, hmu and hem, showed that Hmu is required for utilization of hemin and hemoglobin and that Hem cannot complement a Hmu deficiency. Prolonged incubation of a hmu hem mutant in hemoglobin-containing minimal medium yielded variants able to utilize hemoglobin and hemin suggesting alternate pathways for utilization of these two host iron sources. Lactoferrin utilization was dependent on malleobactin, but not pyochelin synthesis and/or uptake. A mba pch hmu hem quadruple mutant could use ferritin as an iron source and upon intranasal infection was lethal in an acute murine melioidosis model. These data suggest that B

  14. Amphipathic DNA polymers exhibit antiviral activity against systemic Murine Cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juteau Jean-Marc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorothioated oligonucleotides (PS-ONs have a sequence-independent, broad spectrum antiviral activity as amphipathic polymers (APs and exhibit potent in vitro antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of herpesviruses: HSV-1, HSV-2, HCMV, VZV, EBV, and HHV-6A/B, and in vivo activity in a murine microbiocide model of genital HSV-2 infection. The activity of these agents against animal cytomegalovirus (CMV infections in vitro and in vivo was therefore investigated. Results In vitro, a 40 mer degenerate AP (REP 9 inhibited both murine CMV (MCMV and guinea pig CMV (GPCMV with an IC50 of 0.045 μM and 0.16 μM, respectively, and a 40 mer poly C AP (REP 9C inhibited MCMV with an IC50 of 0.05 μM. Addition of REP 9 to plaque assays during the first two hours of infection inhibited 78% of plaque formation whereas addition of REP 9 after 10 hours of infection did not significantly reduce the number of plaques, indicating that REP 9 antiviral activity against MCMV occurs at early times after infection. In a murine model of CMV infection, systemic treatment for 5 days significantly reduced virus replication in the spleens and livers of infected mice compared to saline-treated control mice. REP 9 and REP 9C were administered intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days at 10 mg/kg, starting 2 days prior to MCMV infection. Splenomegaly was observed in infected mice treated with REP 9 but not in control mice or in REP 9 treated, uninfected mice, consistent with mild CpG-like activity. When REP 9C (which lacks CpG motifs was compared to REP 9, it exhibited comparable antiviral activity as REP 9 but was not associated with splenomegaly. This suggests that the direct antiviral activity of APs is the predominant therapeutic mechanism in vivo. Moreover, REP 9C, which is acid stable, was effective when administered orally in combination with known permeation enhancers. Conclusion These studies indicate that APs exhibit potent, well tolerated

  15. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  16. GM-CSF in murine psoriasiform dermatitis: Redundant and pathogenic roles uncovered by antibody-induced neutralization and genetic deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tatjana; Weigert, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard; Sadik, Christian D; Böhm, Beate; Burkhardt, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic, Th17-derived cytokine thought to critically contribute to the pathogenesis of diverse autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. Treatment with monoclonal antibodies that block GM-CSF activity is associated with favorable therapeutic effects in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We evaluated the role of GM-CSF as a potential target for therapeutic interference in psoriasis using a combined pharmacologic and genetic approach and the mouse model of imiquimod-induced psoriasiform dermatitis (IMQPD). Neutralization of murine GM-CSF by an anti-GM-CSF antibody ameliorated IMQPD. In contrast, genetic deficiency in GM-CSF did not alter the course of IMQPD, suggesting the existence of mechanisms compensating for chronic, but not acute, absence of GM-CSF. Further investigation uncovered an alternative pathogenic pathway for IMQPD in the absence of GM-CSF characterized by an expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cell population and release of IFNα and IL-22. This pathway was not activated in wild-type mice during short-term anti-GM-CSF treatment. Our investigations support the potential value of GM-CSF as a therapeutic target in psoriatic disease. The discovery of an alternative pathogenic pathway for psoriasiform dermatitis in the permanent absence of GM-CSF, however, suggests the need for monitoring during therapeutic use of long-term GM-CSF blockade.

  17. Polyopes affinis alleviates airway inflammation in a murine model of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marine algae have been utilized in food as well as medicine products for a variety of purposes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an ethanol extract of Polyopes affinis (P.affinis) can inhibit the pathogenesis of T helper 2 (Th2)-mediated allergen-induced airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma.

  18. Pharmacodynamics of Doxycycline in a Murine Malaria Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Batty, Kevin T.; Law, Angela S. F.; Stirling, Verity; Moore, Brioni R

    2007-01-01

    Doxycycline is reported to impair second-generation parasite schizogony. The effects of doxycycline alone and combined with dihydroartemisinin were investigated in a murine malaria model. Doxycycline lowered the rate of parasite growth within 2 days, with maximum effect in 6 days. Addition of dihydroartemisinin led to an additive antimalarial effect.

  19. Reversal of Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Murine Schistosomiasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, pharmacological effect and mechanism of action of an antifibrotic compound, safironil (SAF)/praziquantel (PZQ) combination on reversal of liver fibrogenesis in chronic murine Schistosomiasis mansoni. Methods: The antifibrotic effect of 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/ml of SAF was evaluated in vitro ...

  20. Comparison of murine B-cell proliferative response to bacterial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Comparison of murine B-cell proliferative response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and DNP derivative of. Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. ANILA PRABHU and R Κ SAXENA. School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067, India. MS received 21 July 1993; revised 29 October 1993. Abstract.

  1. Embryonic expression and cloning of the murine GATA-3 gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. George; M.W. Leonard; M.E. Roth (Matthew); K.H. Lieuw (Ken); D. Kioussis; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.D. Engel (Douglas)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractWe describe the embryonic expression pattern as well as the cloning and initial transcriptional regulatory analysis of the murine (m) GATA-3 gene. In situ hybridization shows that mGATA-3 mRNA accumulation is temporally and spatially regulated during early development: although found

  2. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of systemic bovine zygomycosis by murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbaek, B.; Lind, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against water-soluble somatic antigens (WSSA) and the wall fraction (WF) from Rhizopus arrhizus (Rhizopus oryzae) were produced in vitro by fusion of splenocytes from immunized BALB/c mice with mouse myeloma X63-Ag 8.653 cells. Supernatants reacting only...

  3. Protective antitumor activity induced by a fusion vaccine with murine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting angiogenesis is an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. The vascular endothelialcadherin (VE-cad) regulated angiogenesis is a potential target for anti-angiogenesis. Here, we develop a fusion vaccine plasmid DNA pSec-MBD2-VE-cad from VE-cad and murine beta defensin2 (MBD2) to induce immunity for ...

  4. Therapeutic vaccines for leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamesipour, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Numerous therapeutic strategies are used to treat leishmaniasis. The treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is solely depends on antimonate derivatives with safety issues and questionable efficacy and there is no fully effective modality to treat CL caused by Leishmania tropica and Leishmania braziliensis. There is no prophylactic vaccine available against any form of leishmaniasis. Immunotherapy for CL has a long history; immunotherapy trials of first and second generation vaccines showed promising results. The current article briefly covers the prophylactic vaccines and explains different immunotherapy strategies that have been used to treat leishmaniasis. This paper does not include experimental vaccines and only lays emphasis on human trials and those vaccines which reached human trials. Immunotherapy is currently used to successfully treat several disorders; Low cost, limited side effects and no possibility to develop resistance make immunotherapy a valuable choice especially for infectious disease with chemotherapy problems. Efforts are needed to explore the immunological surrogate marker(s) of cure and protection in leishmaniasis and overcome the difficulties in standardization of crude Leishmania vaccines. One of the reasons for anti-leishmaniasis vaccine failure is lack of an appropriate adjuvant. So far, not enough attention has been paid to develop vaccines for immunotherapy of leishmaniasis.

  5. Kinetoplastida: new therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croft S.L.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available New formulations and therapeutic switching of the established drugs, amphotericin B and paromomycin, together with the discovery of miltefosine, have significantly improved the opportunities for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL chemotherapy. However, for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, Chagas disease and cutaneous leishmaniases there has been limited progress. For HAT, a novel diamidine, parfuramidine, is in phase III clinical trial for early-stage disease, but for the treatment of late-stage disease there are no new drugs and combinations of eflornithine with melarsoprol or nifurtimox have been the focus of clinical studies. For Chagas disease, different classes of compounds that have validated biochemical targets, sterol biosynthesis methylases and cysteine proteases, are in various stages of development. The genome sequences that are now available for the pathogens that cause the leishmaniases and trypanosomiases, and new methods for rapid validation of targets, are part of the solution to discover new drugs. The integration of medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics, project planning and interaction with the pharma/biotech sector are essential if progress is to be made. Although there are financial constraints, the appearance of new funding sources and not-for-profit product development partnerships offers hope for drug development.

  6. Therapeutic uses of magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Mary P; Volpe, Stella Lucia; Mao, Jun James

    2009-07-15

    Magnesium is an essential mineral for optimal metabolic function. Research has shown that the mineral content of magnesium in food sources is declining, and that magnesium depletion has been detected in persons with some chronic diseases. This has led to an increased awareness of proper magnesium intake and its potential therapeutic role in a number of medical conditions. Studies have shown the effectiveness of magnesium in eclampsia and preeclampsia, arrhythmia, severe asthma, and migraine. Other areas that have shown promising results include lowering the risk of metabolic syndrome, improving glucose and insulin metabolism, relieving symptoms of dysmenorrhea, and alleviating leg cramps in women who are pregnant. The use of magnesium for constipation and dyspepsia are accepted as standard care despite limited evidence. Although it is safe in selected patients at appropriate dosages, magnesium may cause adverse effects or death at high dosages. Because magnesium is excreted renally, it should be used with caution in patients with kidney disease. Food sources of magnesium include green leafy vegetables, nuts, legumes, and whole grains.

  7. Leech Therapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdualkader, A. M.; Ghawi, A. M.; Alaama, M.; Awang, M.; Merzouk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Hematophagous animals including leeches have been known to possess biologically active compounds in their secretions, especially in their saliva. The blood-sucking annelids, leeches have been used for therapeutic purposes since the beginning of civilization. Ancient Egyptian, Indian, Greek and Arab physicians used leeches for a wide range of diseases starting from the conventional use for bleeding to systemic ailments, such as skin diseases, nervous system abnormalities, urinary and reproductive system problems, inflammation, and dental problems. Recently, extensive researches on leech saliva unveiled the presence of a variety of bioactive peptides and proteins involving antithrombin (hirudin, bufrudin), antiplatelet (calin, saratin), factor Xa inhibitors (lefaxin), antibacterial (theromacin, theromyzin) and others. Consequently, leech has made a comeback as a new remedy for many chronic and life-threatening abnormalities, such as cardiovascular problems, cancer, metastasis, and infectious diseases. In the 20th century, leech therapy has established itself in plastic and microsurgery as a protective tool against venous congestion and served to salvage the replanted digits and flaps. Many clinics for plastic surgery all over the world started to use leeches for cosmetic purposes. Despite the efficacious properties of leech therapy, the safety, and complications of leeching are still controversial. PMID:24019559

  8. Seismic attenuation system for a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liszkai, Tamas; Cadell, Seth

    2018-01-30

    A system for attenuating seismic forces includes a reactor pressure vessel containing nuclear fuel and a containment vessel that houses the reactor pressure vessel. Both the reactor pressure vessel and the containment vessel include a bottom head. Additionally, the system includes a base support to contact a support surface on which the containment vessel is positioned in a substantially vertical orientation. An attenuation device is located between the bottom head of the reactor pressure vessel and the bottom head of the containment vessel. Seismic forces that travel from the base support to the reactor pressure vessel via the containment vessel are attenuated by the attenuation device in a direction that is substantially lateral to the vertical orientation of the containment vessel.

  9. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice. PMID:12949262

  10. Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 82 NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron effective attenuation lengths (EALs) in solid elements and compounds at selected electron energies between 50 eV and 2,000 eV. The database was designed mainly to provide EALs (to account for effects of elastic-eletron scattering) for applications in surface analysis by Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  11. Post-Retrieval Extinction Attenuates Cocaine Memories

    OpenAIRE

    Sartor, Gregory C.; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that post-retrieval extinction training attenuates fear and reward-related memories in both humans and rodents. This noninvasive, behavioral approach has the potential to be used in clinical settings to treat maladaptive memories that underlie several psychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. However, few studies to date have used a post-retrieval extinction approach to attenuate addiction-related memories. In the current study, we attempted to disrupt cocaine...

  12. Attenuation of Shock Waves using Perforated Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan Kumar, CH V. L. C. S.; Hitesh Reddy, C.; Rahul Sai, L.; Dharani Kumar, K. S. S.; Nagaraja, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    The shock/blast waves generated due to explosions cause wide spread damage to the objects in its path. Different techniques have been used to attenuate shock wave over pressure, to reduce the catastrophic effects. Perforated plates can be used effectively to attenuate the shock wave pressure. In this paper shock wave interaction with perforated plates is simulated using COMSOL multiphysics software. The pressure drop varied from 43.75% to 26% for porosity varying from 10% to 40.

  13. Attenuation coefficients for water quality trading

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, AA; Chen, X.; Fox, J; Fulda, M; Dorsey, R.; Seapy, B; Glenday, J; E Bray

    2014-01-01

    Water quality trading has been proposed as a cost-effective approach for reducing nutrient loads through credit generation from agricultural or point source reductions sold to buyers facing costly options. We present a systematic approach to determine attenuation coefficients and their uncertainty. Using a process-based model, we determine attenuation with safety margins at many watersheds for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) loads as they transport from point of load reduction t...

  14. Attenuation of the DNA Damage Response by Transforming Growth Factor-Beta Inhibitors Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Shisuo; Bouquet, Sophie; Lo, Chen-Hao; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Bolourchi, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Parry, Renate [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen, E-mail: mhbarcellos-hoff@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inhibition increases the response to radiation therapy in human and mouse non–small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: TGF-β–mediated growth response and pathway activation were examined in human NSCLC NCI-H1299, NCI-H292, and A549 cell lines and murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC) cells. Cells were treated in vitro with LY364947, a small-molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β type 1 receptor kinase, or with the pan-isoform TGF-β neutralizing monoclonal antibody 1D11 before radiation exposure. The DNA damage response was assessed by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) or Trp53 protein phosphorylation, γH2AX foci formation, or comet assay in irradiated cells. Radiation sensitivity was determined by clonogenic assay. Mice bearing syngeneic subcutaneous LLC tumors were treated with 5 fractions of 6 Gy and/or neutralizing or control antibody. Results: The NCI-H1299, A549, and LLC NSCLC cell lines pretreated with LY364947 before radiation exposure exhibited compromised DNA damage response, indicated by decreased ATM and p53 phosphorylation, reduced γH2AX foci, and increased radiosensitivity. The NCI-H292 cells were unresponsive. Transforming growth factor-β signaling inhibition in irradiated LLC cells resulted in unresolved DNA damage. Subcutaneous LLC tumors in mice treated with TGF-β neutralizing antibody exhibited fewer γH2AX foci after irradiation and significantly greater tumor growth delay in combination with fractionated radiation. Conclusions: Inhibition of TGF-β before radiation attenuated DNA damage recognition and increased radiosensitivity in most NSCLC cells in vitro and promoted radiation-induced tumor control in vivo. These data support the rationale for concurrent TGF-β inhibition and RT to provide therapeutic benefit in NSCLC.

  15. Attenuation limits in longitudinal phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luschi, L.; Iannaccone, G.; Pieri, F.

    2017-12-01

    The acoustic attenuation inside the bandgaps is, together with the bandgap width, a fundamental design parameter for phononic-crystal-based systems. We discuss approximate expressions for the maximum attenuation inside the bandgaps of one-dimensional longitudinal phononic crystals and its dependence on the acoustic contrast and the fractional bandwidth. We provide different approximations at small and large fractional bandwidths, computed from the trace of the transmission matrix of the crystal elementary cell. We show that, for relatively small gaps, the attenuation is roughly proportional to the fractional bandwidth, in analogy with the flexural case. For larger gaps, a large attenuation can be obtained only for high (and possibly impractical) acoustic contrasts. Approximate expressions are validated through comparison with FEM results. We also derive asymptotic upper limits for the bandgap borders and show that high contrasts do not necessarily lead to wide bandgaps, a fact connected to geometrical phase inversion for the acoustic wave in the crystal. We finally compare the attenuation of flexural and longitudinal waves at a fixed fractional bandwidth and derive regions of optimum attenuation for the two propagation modes.

  16. Mechanisms of geometrical seismic attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor B. Morozov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In several recent reports, we have explained the frequency dependence of the apparent seismic quality-factor (Q observed in many studies according to the effects of geometrical attenuation, which was defined as the zero-frequency limit of the temporal attenuation coefficient. In particular, geometrical attenuation was found to be positive for most waves traveling within the lithosphere. Here, we present three theoretical models that illustrate the origin of this geometrical attenuation, and we investigate the causes of its preferential positive values. In addition, we discuss the physical basis and limitations of both the conventional and new attenuation models. For waves in media with slowly varying properties, geometrical attenuation is caused by variations in the wavefront curvature, which can be both positive (for defocusing and negative (for focusing. In media with velocity/density contrasts, incoherent reflectivity leads to geometrical-attenuation coefficients which are proportional to the mean squared reflectivity and are always positive. For «coherent» reflectivity, the geometrical attenuation is approximately zero, and the attenuation process can be described according to the concept of «scattering Q». However, the true meaning of this parameter is in describing the mean reflectivity within the medium, and not that of the traditional resonator quality factor known in mechanics. The general conclusion from these models is that non-zero and often positive levels of geometrical attenuation are common in realistic, heterogeneous media, both observationally and theoretically. When transformed into the conventional Q-factor form, this positive geometrical attenuation leads to Q values that quickly increase with frequency. These predictions show that the positive frequency-dependent Q observed in many datasets might represent artifacts of the transformations of the attenuation coefficients into Q.

  1. Exploiting the therapeutic potential of leptin signaling in cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Robert H; Cheung, Wai W; Gertler, Arieh

    2014-12-01

    The anorexia-cachexia syndrome is a complication of many chronic conditions including cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Leptin levels are significantly elevated in CKD patients and are associated with markers of poor nutritional status as well as mortality and morbidity. This review will focus on the mechanism and exploit the therapeutic potential of leptin signaling in CKD-associated cachexia. Studies in db/db mice show that the lack of leptin receptor is protective against CKD-induced cachexia. Blockade of leptin's downstream mediators, such as melanocortin-4 receptor, attenuated CKD-associated cachexia. Pegylation of leptin antagonists resulted in a potent and effective long-acting reagents suitable for in-vivo studies or therapies. Pegylated leptin antagonist treatment ameliorates CKD-associated cachexia in mice. Leptin antagonism may represent a viable therapeutic strategy for cachexia in CKD.

  2. Therapeutical aspect of trichomoniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukićević Jelica

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichomoniasis is frequent, parasitic and sexually transmitted infection of genitourinary tract. It is treated by metronidazole (5-nitroimidazole according to protocol recommended by Center for Disease Control (CDC formerly called: Communicable Disease Center [19]. The resistance of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV strains to metronidazole (MND was described in USA in 1960, and later on in many European countries [8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]. In these cases, due to persistent trichomonas infection, it is necessary to repeat MND treatment with moderate modification of dose and/or length of its application. Nevertheless, oncogenic and toxic effects of MND have to be taken into consideration. OBJECT The aim of this study was to investigate and analyze the incidence of TV in STD and lower susceptibility of certain TV strains to MND were analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS In three-year period (1999-2001 612 patients (244 females and 368 males suspected of STD were examined clinically and microbiologically at the Institute of Dermatovenereology in Belgrade. The patients detected for TV were treated according to CDC protocol. The affected were considered cured if there was no manifest clinical infection, and no TV verified by microbiological test. Results TV was isolated in 216 patients (35.29 % of all subjects. Trichomonas infection was found in 90 (36.88 % out of 244 tested females and in 126 (32.34 % of 368 males. Clinically manifested infection, with extensive urethral and vaginal secretion, was recorded in 161 patients, while the asymptomatic form was found in 55 subjects. This result indicates the predominance of manifested trichomonas infections (75.54 % of cases. The difference of distribution of clinical forms of trichomoniasis, in relation to sex, was not statistically significant (c2=0.854; p>0.05. The patients with verified trichomonas infection were treated by metronidazole according to CDC protocol. The recommended therapeutical scheme consisted of three

  3. Inactivated Sendai virus suppresses murine melanoma growth by inducing host immune responses and down-regulating β-catenin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Yuan, Wei Feng; Zhai, Guo Qin; Zhu, Shan Yuan; Xue, Zheng Feng; Zhu, Hong Fei; Xu, Xiang Ming

    2012-10-01

    This paper aims to investigate the anti-tumor mechanism of inactivated Sendai virus (Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope, HVJ-E) for murine melanoma (B16F10). The murine dendritic cells (DCs) were treated with HVJ-E, and then the cytokines secreted from DCs and costimulation-related molecules on DCs were measured. Meanwhile, the expression of β-catenin in HVJ-E treated murine melanoma cells was detected. In addition, HVJ-E was intratumorally injected into the melanoma on C57BL/6 mice, and the immune cells, CTL response and tumor volume were analyzed. HVJ-E injected into B16F10 melanoma obviously inhibited the growth of the tumor and prolonged the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice. Profiles of cytokines secreted by dendritic cells (DCs) after HVJ-E stimulation showed that the number of cytokines released was significantly higher than that elicited by PBS (1PHVJ-E treatment. Meanwhile, real-time reverse transcription PCR revealed that HVJ-E induced a remarkable infiltration of CD11c positive cells, chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) molecules, interleukin-2 (IL-2) molecule, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells into HVJ-E injected tumors. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of β-catenin in the HVJ-E injected tumors was also down-regulated. In addition, B16F10-specific CTLs were induced significantly after HVJ-E was injected into the tumor-bearing mice. This is the first report to show the effective inhibition of melanoma tumors by HVJ-E alone and the mechanism through which it induces antitumor immune responses and regulates important signal pathways for melanoma invasion. Therefore, HVJ-E shows its prospect as a novel therapeutic for melanoma therapy. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biotherapeutic target or sink: analysis of the macrophage mannose receptor tissue distribution in murine models of lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin Sheen; Brondyk, William; Lydon, John T; Thurberg, Beth L; Piepenhagen, Peter A

    2011-06-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are metabolic disorders caused by enzyme deficiencies that lead to lysosomal accumulation of undegraded substrates. Enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) have been developed as treatments for patients with Gaucher, Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Pompe diseases. Depending on the disease, the corresponding therapeutic enzyme is designed to be internalized by diseased cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis via macrophage mannose receptors (MMR) or mannose-6-phosphate receptors (M6PR). Enzymes developed to treat Gaucher and Niemann-Pick diseases are meant to target MMR-expressing cells, and in the case of Cerezyme [recombinant human β-glucocerebrosidase (rhβGC)] for treating Gaucher disease, glycans on the enzyme are modified to increase specificity toward this receptor. Due to heterogeneity in glycosylation on enzymes intended to target the M6PR, however, there may also be some unintended targeting to MMR-expressing cells, which could act as unwanted sinks. Examples include Fabrazyme [recombinant human α-galactosidase A (rhαGal)] for treating Fabry disease and Myozyme [recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA)] for treating Pompe disease. It is therefore of great interest to better understand the cell type and tissue distribution of MMR in murine LSD models used to evaluate ERT efficacy and mechanism of action. In this study, we generated affinity-purified polyclonal antibody against murine MMR and used it to carry out a systematic examination of MMR protein localization in murine models of Gaucher, Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Pompe diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy, we examined MMR distribution in liver, spleen, lung, kidney, heart, diaphragm, quadriceps, and triceps in these animal models and compared them with MMR distribution in wild-type mice.

  5. Open Tracheostomy Gastric Acid Aspiration Murine Model of Acute Lung Injury Results in Maximal Acute Nonlethal Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alluri, Ravi; Kutscher, Hilliard L; Mullan, Barbara A; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul R

    2017-02-26

    Acid pneumonitis is a major cause of sterile acute lung injury (ALI) in humans. Acid pneumonitis spans the clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), characterized by neutrophilic alveolitis, and injury to both alveolar epithelium and vascular endothelium. Clinically, ARDS is defined by acute onset of hypoxemia, bilateral patchy pulmonary infiltrates and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Human studies have provided us with valuable information about the physiological and inflammatory changes in the lung caused by ARDS, which has led to various hypotheses about the underling mechanisms. Unfortunately, difficulties determining the etiology of ARDS, as well as a wide range of pathophysiology have resulted in a lack of critical information that could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies. Translational animal models are valuable when their pathogenesis and pathophysiology accurately reproduce a concept proven in both in vitro and clinical settings. Although large animal models (e.g., sheep) share characteristics of the anatomy of human trachea-bronchial tree, murine models provide a host of other advantages including: low cost; short reproductive cycle lending itself to greater data acquisition; a well understood immunologic system; and a well characterized genome leading to the availability of a variety of gene deletion and transgenic strains. A robust model of low pH induced ARDS requires a murine ALI that targets mainly the alveolar epithelium, secondarily the vascular endothelium, as well as the small airways leading to the alveoli. Furthermore, a reproducible injury with wide differences between different injurious and non-injurious insults is important. The murine gastric acid aspiration model presented here using hydrochloric acid employs an open tracheostomy and recreates a pathogenic scenario that reproduces the low pH pneumonitis injury in humans. Additionally, this model can be used to examine interaction of a

  6. Modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine dendritic cells (DCs) by purified Achyranthes bidentata polysaccharide (ABP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yaxuan; Meng, Jingjuan; Chen, Wenna; Liu, Jingling; Li, Xuan; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2011-08-01

    There are a large number of interactions at molecular and cellular levels between the plant polysaccharides and immune system. Plant polysaccharides present an interesting effects as immunomodulators, particularly in the induction of the cells both in innate and adaptive immune systems. Activation of DCs could improve antitumoral responses usually diminished in cancer patients, and natural adjuvants provide a possibility of inducing this activation. ABP is a purified polysaccharide isolated from Achyranthes bidentata, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The aim of this study is to investigate modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine DCs by ABP. Both phenotypic and functional activities were assessed with use of conventional scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) for the morphology of the DC, transmitted electron microscopy (TEM) for intracellular lysosomes inside the DC, cellular immunohistochemistry for phagocytosis by the DCs, flow cytometry (FCM) for the changes in key surface molecules, bio-assay for the activity of acidic phosphatases (ACP), and ELISA for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12. In fact, we found that purified ABP induced phenotypic maturation revealed by increased expression of CD86, CD40, and MHC II. Functional experiments showed the down-regulation of ACP inside DCs (which occurs when phagocytosis of DCs is decreased, and antigen presentation increased with maturation). Finally, ABP increased the production of IL-12. These data reveal that ABP promotes effective activation of murine DCs. This adjuvant-like activity may have therapeutic applications in clinical settings where immune responses need boosting. It is therefore concluded that ABP can exert positive modulation to murine DCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic effects of rapamycin on alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xilin; Wang, Chao; Ru, Xiaoxue; Jing, Lili; Zhou, Lijun; Jing, Ling

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether rapamycin has therapeutic potential as a treatment for alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Rats were divided into eight groups (n=7 in each group): The control group; the alcohol group; abstinence in the first week; abstinence in the third week; abstinence in the fourth week; abstinent+rapamycin (AB-RAP) until the first week (AB-RAP 1); AB-RAP until the third week (AB-RAP 3); and AB-RAP until the fourth week (AB-RAP 4). Subsequently, echocardiography, and hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's staining were performed, followed by electron microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay. Finally, expression levels of B cell lymphoma-2, Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The levels of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension in AB-RAP 3 (7.00±0.41) and AB-RAP 4 (6.33±0.68) groups were significantly lower when compared with the alcohol group (8.01±0.30; P<0.05). Compared with the alcohol group, the apoptosis rate of left ventricular myocardial tissue in the AB+RAP 3 (37.68±2.15) and AB+RAP 4 (26.97±2.11) groups was significantly reduced (P<0.05). To conclude, rapamycin may be considered as a therapeutic tool to attenuate alcoholic cardiomyopathy and improve cardiac function through increasing autophagy and reducing apoptosis.

  8. Attenuation of β-Amyloid Deposition and Neurotoxicity by Chemogenetic Modulation of Neural Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Grutzendler, Jaime

    2016-01-13

    Aberrant neural hyperactivity has been observed in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may be a driving force in the progression of amyloid pathology. Evidence for this includes the findings that neural activity may modulate β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide secretion and experimental stimulation of neural activity can increase amyloid deposition. However, whether long-term attenuation of neural activity prevents the buildup of amyloid plaques and associated neural pathologies remains unknown. Using viral-mediated delivery of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs), we show in two AD-like mouse models that chronic intermittent increases or reductions of activity have opposite effects on Aβ deposition. Neural activity reduction markedly decreases Aβ aggregation in regions containing axons or dendrites of DREADD-expressing neurons, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Importantly, activity attenuation is associated with a reduction in axonal dystrophy and synaptic loss around amyloid plaques. Thus, modulation of neural activity could constitute a potential therapeutic strategy for ameliorating amyloid-induced pathology in AD. A novel chemogenetic approach to upregulate and downregulate neuronal activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice was implemented. This led to the first demonstration that chronic intermittent attenuation of neuronal activity in vivo significantly reduces amyloid deposition. The study also demonstrates that modulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) release can occur at both axonal and dendritic fields, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Activity reductions also led to attenuation of the synaptic pathology associated with amyloid plaques. Therefore, chronic attenuation of neuronal activity could constitute a novel therapeutic approach for AD. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/360632-10$15.00/0.

  9. READING PHILEMON AS THERAPEUTIC NARRATIVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-29

    Mar 29, 2010 ... Contrary to an initial impression, the narrative therapeutic approach does not emerge from a completely psychological ... Furthermore, a narrative therapeutic reading does not exist in a vacuum, therefore this investigation ..... converted to Christianity, Philemon supported other believers in various ways ...

  10. PPARα inhibition modulates multiple reprogrammed metabolic pathways in kidney cancer and attenuates tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Donohoe, Dallas; Bultman, Scott; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Tim; Hellerstein, Marc; Weiss, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Kidney cancer [renal cell carcinoma (RCC)] is the sixth-most-common cancer in the United States, and its incidence is increasing. The current progression-free survival for patients with advanced RCC rarely extends beyond 1-2 yr due to the development of therapeutic resistance. We previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-α (PPARα) as a potential therapeutic target for this disease and showed that a specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in RCC cell lines associated with attenuation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. We now extend that work and show that PPARα inhibition attenuates components of RCC metabolic reprogramming, capitalizing on the Warburg effect. The specific PPARα inhibitor GW6471, as well as a siRNA specific to PPARα, attenuates the enhanced fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation associated with glycolysis inhibition, and PPARα antagonism also blocks the enhanced glycolysis that has been observed in RCC cells; this effect did not occur in normal human kidney epithelial cells. Such cell type-specific inhibition of glycolysis corresponds with changes in protein levels of the oncogene c-Myc and has promising clinical implications. Furthermore, we show that treatment with GW6471 results in RCC tumor growth attenuation in a xenograft mouse model, with minimal obvious toxicity, a finding associated with the expected on-target effects on c-Myc. These studies demonstrate that several pivotal cancer-relevant metabolic pathways are inhibited by PPARα antagonism. Our data support the concept that targeting PPARα, with or without concurrent inhibition of glycolysis, is a potential novel and effective therapeutic approach for RCC that targets metabolic reprogramming in this tumor.

  11. Clinical applications of therapeutic phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim KH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kyung Hee Kim,1 Ki Young Oh,2 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, South Korea Abstract: Phlebotomy is the removal of blood from the body, and therapeutic phlebotomy is the preferred treatment for blood disorders in which the removal of red blood cells or serum iron is the most efficient method for managing the symptoms and complications. Therapeutic phlebotomy is currently indicated for the treatment of hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with hyperferritinemia. This review discusses therapeutic phlebotomy and the related disorders and also offers guidelines for establishing a therapeutic phlebotomy program. Keywords: therapeutic phlebotomy, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

  12. Rethinking Therapeutic Misconception in Biobanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tupasela, Aaro; Snell, Karoliina; Cañada, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Some authors have noted that in biobank research participants may be guided by what is called therapeutic misconception, whereby participants attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures.This article argues that the notion of therapeutic misconception is increasingly less justified when...... evaluating biobanks. We present four examples taken from recent developments in biobanking to argue why the notion of therapeutic misconception is problematic in that biobanking practices are increasingly seeking to bridge research and treatment in diff erent ways. In this article we explore examples where...... underpinnings for the need to separate research and treatment, and thus the notion of therapeutic misconception in the fi rst place. We call this tension between research and treatment ambivalent research advancement to highlight the difficulties that various actors have in managing such shifts within...

  13. Honey: A Therapeutic Agent for Disorders of the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline McLoone

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Problems with conventional treatments for a range of dermatological disorders have led scientists to search for new compounds of therapeutic value. Efforts have included the evaluation of natural products such as honey. Manuka honey, for example, has been scientifically recognised for its anti-microbial and wound healing properties and is now used clinically as a topical treatment for wound infections. In this review, scientific evidence for the effectiveness of honey in the treatment of wounds and other skin conditions is evaluated. A plethora of in vitro studies have revealed that honeys from all over the world have potent anti-microbial activity against skin relevant microbes. Moreover, a number of in vitro studies suggest that honey is able to modulate the skin immune system. Clinical research has shown honey to be efficacious in promoting the healing of partial thickness burn wounds while its effectiveness in the treatment of non-burn acute wounds and chronic wounds is conflicted. Published research investigating the efficacy of honey in the treatment of other types of skin disorders is limited. Nevertheless, positive effects have been reported, for example, kanuka honey from New Zealand was shown to have therapeutic value in the treatment of rosacea. Anti-carcinogenic effects of honey have also been observed in vitro and in a murine model of melanoma.  It can be concluded that honey is a biologically active and clinically interesting substance but more research is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of its medicinal value in dermatology.

  14. Honey: A Therapeutic Agent for Disorders of the Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoone, Pauline; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Warnock, Mary; Fyfe, Lorna

    2016-01-01

    Problems with conventional treatments for a range of dermatological disorders have led scientists to search for new compounds of therapeutic value. Efforts have included the evaluation of natural products such as honey. Manuka honey, for example, has been scientifically recognised for its anti-microbial and wound healing properties and is now used clinically as a topical treatment for wound infections. In this review, scientific evidence for the effectiveness of honey in the treatment of wounds and other skin conditions is evaluated. A plethora of in vitro studies have revealed that honeys from all over the world have potent antimicrobial activity against skin relevant microbes. Moreover, a number of in vitro studies suggest that honey is able to modulate the skin immune system. Clinical research has shown honey to be efficacious in promoting the healing of partial thickness burn wounds while its effectiveness in the treatment of non-burn acute wounds and chronic wounds is conflicted. Published research investigating the efficacy of honey in the treatment of other types of skin disorders is limited. Nevertheless, positive effects have been reported, for example, kanuka honey from New Zealand was shown to have therapeutic value in the treatment of rosacea. Anti-carcinogenic effects of honey have also been observed in vitro and in a murine model of melanoma. It can be concluded that honey is a biologically active and clinically interesting substance but more research is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of its medicinal value in dermatology. PMID:29138732

  15. Postperfusion lung syndrome: physiopathology and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but can be lethal. The underlying mechanism remains uncertain but triggering inflammatory cascades have become an accepted etiology. A better understanding of the pathophysiology and the roles of inflammatory mediators in the development of the syndrome is imperative in the determination of therapeutic options and promotion of patients' prognosis and survival. Postperfusion lung syndrome is similar to adult respiratory distress syndrome in clinical features, diagnostic approaches and management strategies. However, the etiologies and predisposing risk factors may differ between each other. The prognosis of the postperfusion lung syndrome can be poorer in comparison to acute respiratory distress syndrome due to the secondary multiple organ failure and triple acid-base imbalance. Current management strategies are focusing on attenuating inflammatory responses and preventing from pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury. Choices of cardiopulmonary bypass circuit and apparatus, innovative cardiopulmonary bypass techniques, modified surgical maneuvers and several pharmaceutical agents can be potential preventive strategies for acute lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  16. Therapeutic Potential of Polyphenols in Cardiac Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac fibrosis, in response to injury and stress, is central to a broad constellation of cardiovascular diseases. Fibrosis decreases myocardial wall compliance due to extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation, leading to impaired systolic and diastolic function and causing arrhythmogenesis. Although some conventional drugs, such as β-blockers and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS inhibitors, have been shown to alleviate cardiac fibrosis in clinical trials, these traditional therapies do not tend to target all the fibrosis-associated mechanisms, and do not hamper the progression of cardiac fibrosis in patients with heart failure. Polyphenols are present in vegetables, fruits, and beverages and had been proposed as attenuators of cardiac fibrosis in different models of cardiovascular diseases. Together with results found in the literature, we can show that some polyphenols exert anti-fibrotic and myocardial protective effects by mediating inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrotic molecular signals. This review considers an overview of the mechanisms of cardiac fibrosis, illustrates their involvement in different animal models of cardiac fibrosis treated with some polyphenols and projects the future direction and therapeutic potential of polyphenols on cardiac fibrosis.

  17. Gene therapy for oral cancer: efficient delivery of a 'suicide gene' to murine oral cancer cells in physiological milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark; Overlid, Nathan; Konopka, Krystyna; Düzgünes, Nejat

    2005-12-01

    Gene therapy is a new therapeutic modality in which defective genes are replaced with functional ones, or genes are delivered that can specifically kill cancer cells. Efficient gene delivery is an important component of gene therapy approaches. Potential safety problems with viral vectors necessitate the development of efficient nonviral vectors. DNA complexes with synthetic cationic liposomes or polymers constitute a simple means of transferring DNA into target cells. Gene delivery mediated by many nonviral vectors, however, is inhibited by serum components, and this is expected to limit the efficiency of gene delivery in vivo. In this study, the authors examined two novel gene transfection reagents, Metafectene and GeneJammer, for their ability to deliver a reporter gene to SCCVII murine squamous cell carcinoma cells in the presence of high concentrations of mouse serum. After establishing conditions that achieved significant gene delivery, the authors introduced the Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene into the cells using the cationic liposome reagent, Metafectene, followed by the administration of ganciclovir. After seven days of incubation, 90 percent and 82 percent cytotoxicity was observed in 0 percent and 60 percent mouse serum, respectively. The authors' observations suggest that Metafectene may be useful for the gene therapy of oral squamous cell carcinoma in a murine model involving the induction of oral tumors by SCCVII cells.

  18. Murine and human pancreatic tumor exosome recovery in mouse serum: Diagnostic and prognostic potential and target cell delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ulrike; Zhao, Kun; Wang, Zhe; Xiao, Li; Zöller, Margot

    2017-09-10

    Exosomes (Exo), powerful intercellular communicators, are recovered in all body fluids, suggesting suitability for diagnosis and prognosis. Easy in vitro manipulation recommends Exo as drug vehicles. Aiming to consolidate diagnostic and therapeutic potential of Exo, we evaluated recovery and fate of tumor (TEX) and exogenous Exo in syngeneic and xenogeneic mice bearing a murine or a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A significant increase in serum (S)-TEX was observed 2 weeks after tumor cell application. Instead, S-TEX declined within 3-6 days after tumor excision. Intravenously injected dye-labeled TEX were rapidly cleared from the serum. Partly being degraded in the liver, the majority is taken-up by PBL, liver, bone marrow and lung cells. In the tumor-bearing host TEX persisted longer becoming enriched in tumor cells and metastatic organs. Accordingly, an antibody blockade of a TEX marker hampered disseminated tumor cell settlement in selected organs. In brief, a tumor marker panel appears suited for S-TEX recovery. In murine models, S-TEX are qualified for therapy control and follow-up studies. Despite rapid clearance from the serum, Exo uptake by host cells is most promising for tailored Exo as drug transporter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in maintenance of ex vivo murine bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey; Lin Lin, Winnie Hii; Abdalla, Basma Jibril; Bee Yuen, Ong; Latif, Elda Surhaida; Mohamed, Jamaludin; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Paik Wah, Chow; Wak Harto, Muhd Khairul Akmal; Budin, Siti Balkis

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells- (HSCs-) based therapy requires ex vivo expansion of HSCs prior to therapeutic use. However, ex vivo culture was reported to promote excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), exposing HSCs to oxidative damage. Efforts to overcome this limitation include the use of antioxidants. In this study, the role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in maintenance of cultured murine bone marrow-derived HSCs was investigated. Aqueous extract of Roselle was added at varying concentrations (0-1000 ng/mL) for 24 hours to the freshly isolated murine bone marrow cells (BMCs) cultures. Effects of Roselle on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and DNA damage were investigated. Roselle enhanced the survival (P < 0.05) of BMCs at 500 and 1000 ng/mL, increased survival of Sca-1(+) cells (HSCs) at 500 ng/mL, and maintained HSCs phenotype as shown from nonremarkable changes of surface marker antigen (Sca-1) expression in all experimental groups. Roselle increased (P < 0.05) the GSH level and SOD activity but the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was unaffected. Moreover, Roselle showed significant cellular genoprotective potency against H2O2-induced DNA damage. Conclusively, Roselle shows novel property as potential supplement and genoprotectant against oxidative damage to cultured HSCs.

  20. Access to follicular dendritic cells is a pivotal step in murine chronic lymphocytic leukemia B-cell activation and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinig, Kristina; Gätjen, Marcel; Grau, Michael; Stache, Vanessa; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Gerlach, Kerstin; Niesner, Raluca A; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Hauser, Anja E; Lenz, Peter; Hehlgans, Thomas; Brink, Robert; Westermann, Jörg; Dörken, Bernd; Lipp, Martin; Lenz, Georg; Rehm, Armin; Höpken, Uta E

    2014-12-01

    In human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis, B-cell antigen receptor signaling seems important for leukemia B-cell ontogeny, whereas the microenvironment influences B-cell activation, tumor cell lodging, and provision of antigenic stimuli. Using the murine Eμ-Tcl1 CLL model, we demonstrate that CXCR5-controlled access to follicular dendritic cells confers proliferative stimuli to leukemia B cells. Intravital imaging revealed a marginal zone B cell-like leukemia cell trafficking route. Murine and human CLL cells reciprocally stimulated resident mesenchymal stromal cells through lymphotoxin-β-receptor activation, resulting in CXCL13 secretion and stromal compartment remodeling. Inhibition of lymphotoxin/lymphotoxin-β-receptor signaling or of CXCR5 signaling retards leukemia progression. Thus, CXCR5 activity links tumor cell homing, shaping a survival niche, and access to localized proliferation stimuli. CLL and other indolent lymphoma are not curable and usually relapse after treatment, a process in which the tumor microenvironment plays a pivotal role. We dissect the consecutive steps of CXCR5-dependent tumor cell lodging and LTβR-dependent stroma-leukemia cell interaction; moreover, we provide therapeutic solutions to interfere with this reciprocal tumor-stroma cross-talk. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Comparison of non-attenuation corrected and attenuation corrected myocardial perfusion SPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Raza

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates that CT based attenuation corrected Tc-99mm sestamibi SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging significantly improved the specificity of the RCA territory compared with non-attenuation corrected Tc-99mm sestamibi SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in both genders irrespective of BMI.

  2. Coupling agents in therapeutic ultrasound: acoustic and thermal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarotto, Raquel Aparecida; Adamowski, Julio Cesar; Fallopa, Flávio; Bacanelli, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    To compare transmissivity data and thermal behavior of 4 coupling media. Experimental. Postgraduate rehabilitation program in Brazil. Four coupling media: gel, mineral oil, white petrolatum, and degassed water. Not applicable. The transmission, attenuation, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance of gel, mineral oil, white petrolatum, and degassed water were measured with a density measurement cell. The temperature variation in the therapeutic ultrasound transducer was measured with a thermocouple. The transmissivity data showed that the water and gel presented the highest transmission coefficient, the lowest reflection, and an attenuation coefficient and acoustic impedance close to that of the skin. The thermal data revealed the highest heating in the transducer during the insonation with white petrolatum and mineral oil, resulting from the thermal conductivity features of each medium. Transmissivity data obtained showed that water and gel present the best acoustic features. In ultrasound therapy, with the direct contact technique using thin layers of coupling agents, any product may be used, because the effect of the attenuation coefficient does not play a significant role when layers are as thin as those used in this experiment.

  3. Sound attenuation of tanker’s headphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Młyński

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crew of military vehicles, which is exposed to the noise associated with the engine running, as well as to shots from firearms, is equipped with headphones. The article presents the results of noise reduction by HC-98 headphone for steady state and impulsive noise. Two methods of research were used: sound attenuation measurements with participation of subjects and transmission loss measurements with the use of acoustic test fixture — device reflecting the properties of the head. Data for headphone were compared with noise reduction of two different, commonly used earmuffs (one light, the other strong limiting noise. The results indicated that measured headphone meets the requirements that allow for treating it as hearing protection, however, this headphone does not provide hearing protection such as earmuffs. Relatively low values of attenuation of acoustic impulses through the headphone versus the results for earmuffs were observed. Furthermore, in the case of headphone, in the frequency range 63-2000 Hz, the lower values of steady state noise sound attenuation, from about 2 up to even a 19 dB with respect to the attenuation of ear muffs were measured.[b]Keywords[/b]: acoustics, noise control, noise, sound attenuation

  4. Long-term correction of murine lipoprotein lipase deficiency with AAV1-mediated gene transfer of the naturally occurring LPL(S447X) beneficial mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Colin J D; Twisk, Jaap; Meulenberg, Janneke M; Liu, Guoqing; van den Oever, Karin; Moraal, Ewoud; Hermens, Wim T; Rip, Jaap; Kastelein, John J P; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Hayden, Michael R

    2004-09-01

    Human lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency causes profound hypertriglyceridemia and life-threatening pancreatitis. We recently developed an adult murine model for LPL deficiency: LPL -/- mice display grossly elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) levels (>200-fold) and very low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C AAV1-LPL(S447X)) in muscle for the treatment of LPL deficiency. Intramuscular administration of AAV1-LPL(S447X) resulted in dose-dependent expression of hLPL protein and LPL activity (up to 33% of normal murine levels) in postheparin plasma. Remarkably, visible hyperlipidemia was resolved within 1 week; plasma TG was reduced to near-normal levels (from 99.0 to 1.8 mmol/L), and plasma HDL-C was increased 6-fold (from 0.2 to 1.1 mmol/L). At 8 months after administration of AAV1-LPL(S447X), an intravenous lipid challenge showed efficient, near-normal clearance of plasma TG. Histologic analyses of injected muscle further indicated that abnormal muscle morphology observed in LPL -/- mice was reversed after treatment. Expression of therapeutic levels of LPL(S447X), and the subsequent beneficial effect on plasma lipid levels, has lasted for more than 1 year. We therefore conclude that AAV1-mediated transfer of LPL(S447X) into murine skeletal muscle results in long-term near-correction of dyslipidemia associated with LPL deficiency.

  5. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  6. Inverse agonism and its therapeutic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilnani, Gurudas; Khilnani, Ajeet Kumar

    2011-09-01

    ) inverse agonist, attenuates psychosis in patients with Parkinson's disease with psychosis and is devoid of extrapyramidal side effects. This dissociation is also evident from the development of anxioselective benzodiazepines devoid of habit-forming potential. Hemopressin is a peptide ligand that acts as an antagonist as well as inverse agonist. This agent acts as an antinociceptive agent in different in vivo models of pain. Treatment of obesity by drugs having inverse agonist activity at CB(1/2) receptors is also underway. An exciting development is evaluation of β-blockers in chronic bronchial asthma-a condition akin to congestive heart failure where β-blockade has become the standard mode of therapy. Synthesis and evaluation of selective agents is underway. Therefore, inverse agonism is an important aspect of drug-receptor interaction and has immense untapped therapeutic potential.

  7. ICAM-1-based rabies virus vaccine shows increased infection and activation of primary murine B cells in vitro and enhanced antibody titers in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Norton

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV-based vaccines infect and directly activate murine and human primary B cells in-vitro, which we propose can be exploited to help develop a single-dose RABV-based vaccine. Here we report on a novel approach to utilize the binding of Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1 to its binding partner, Lymphocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1, on B cells to enhance B cell activation and RABV-specific antibody responses. We used a reverse genetics approach to clone, recover, and characterize a live-attenuated recombinant RABV-based vaccine expressing the murine Icam1 gene (rRABV-mICAM-1. We show that the murine ICAM-1 gene product is incorporated into virus particles, potentially exposing ICAM-1 to extracellular binding partners. While rRABV-mICAM-1 showed 10-100-fold decrease in viral titers on baby hamster kidney cells compared to the parental virus (rRABV, rRABV-mICAM-1 infected and activated primary murine B cells in-vitro more efficiently than rRABV, as indicated by significant upregulation of CD69, CD40, and MHCII on the surface of infected B cells. ICAM-1 expression on the virus surface was responsible for enhanced B cell infection since pre-treating rRABV-mICAM-1 with a neutralizing anti-ICAM-1 antibody reduced B cell infection to levels observed with rRABV alone. Furthermore, 100-fold less rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce antibody titers in immunized mice equivalent to antibody titers observed in rRABV-immunized mice. Of note, only 10(3 focus forming units (ffu/mouse of rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce significant anti-RABV antibody titers as early as five days post-immunization. As both speed and potency of antibody responses are important in controlling human RABV infection in a post-exposure setting, these data show that expression of Icam1 from the RABV genome, which is then incorporated into the virus particle, is a promising strategy for the development of a

  8. ICAM-1-based rabies virus vaccine shows increased infection and activation of primary murine B cells in vitro and enhanced antibody titers in-vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, James E; Lytle, Andrew G; Shen, Shixue; Tzvetkov, Evgeni P; Dorfmeier, Corin L; McGettigan, James P

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccines infect and directly activate murine and human primary B cells in-vitro, which we propose can be exploited to help develop a single-dose RABV-based vaccine. Here we report on a novel approach to utilize the binding of Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1) to its binding partner, Lymphocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1), on B cells to enhance B cell activation and RABV-specific antibody responses. We used a reverse genetics approach to clone, recover, and characterize a live-attenuated recombinant RABV-based vaccine expressing the murine Icam1 gene (rRABV-mICAM-1). We show that the murine ICAM-1 gene product is incorporated into virus particles, potentially exposing ICAM-1 to extracellular binding partners. While rRABV-mICAM-1 showed 10-100-fold decrease in viral titers on baby hamster kidney cells compared to the parental virus (rRABV), rRABV-mICAM-1 infected and activated primary murine B cells in-vitro more efficiently than rRABV, as indicated by significant upregulation of CD69, CD40, and MHCII on the surface of infected B cells. ICAM-1 expression on the virus surface was responsible for enhanced B cell infection since pre-treating rRABV-mICAM-1 with a neutralizing anti-ICAM-1 antibody reduced B cell infection to levels observed with rRABV alone. Furthermore, 100-fold less rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce antibody titers in immunized mice equivalent to antibody titers observed in rRABV-immunized mice. Of note, only 10(3) focus forming units (ffu)/mouse of rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce significant anti-RABV antibody titers as early as five days post-immunization. As both speed and potency of antibody responses are important in controlling human RABV infection in a post-exposure setting, these data show that expression of Icam1 from the RABV genome, which is then incorporated into the virus particle, is a promising strategy for the development of a single-dose RABV

  9. Matrix Metalloproteinases as Therapeutic Targets for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Vanessa J.; Zhang, Li; Hagood, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a restrictive lung disease that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Current medical therapies are not fully effective at limiting mortality in patients with IPF, and new therapies are urgently needed. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteinases that, together, can degrade all components of the extracellular matrix and numerous nonmatrix proteins. MMPs and their inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IPF based upon the results of clinical studies reporting elevated levels of MMPs (including MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-8, and MMP-9) in IPF blood and/or lung samples. Surprisingly, studies of gene-targeted mice in murine models of pulmonary fibrosis (PF) have demonstrated that most MMPs promote (rather than inhibit) the development of PF and have identified diverse mechanisms involved. These mechanisms include MMPs: (1) promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMP-3 and MMP-7); (2) increasing lung levels or activity of profibrotic mediators or reducing lung levels of antifibrotic mediators (MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-8); (3) promoting abnormal epithelial cell migration and other aberrant repair processes (MMP-3 and MMP-9); (4) inducing the switching of lung macrophage phenotypes from M1 to M2 types (MMP-10 and MMP-28); and (5) promoting fibrocyte migration (MMP-8). Two MMPs, MMP-13 and MMP-19, have antifibrotic activities in murine models of PF, and two MMPs, MMP-1 and MMP-10, have the potential to limit fibrotic responses to injury. Herein, we review what is known about the contributions of MMPs and TIMPs to the pathogenesis of IPF and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for IPF. PMID:26121236

  10. Matrix metalloproteinases as therapeutic targets for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Vanessa J; Zhang, Li; Hagood, James S; Owen, Caroline A

    2015-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a restrictive lung disease that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Current medical therapies are not fully effective at limiting mortality in patients with IPF, and new therapies are urgently needed. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteinases that, together, can degrade all components of the extracellular matrix and numerous nonmatrix proteins. MMPs and their inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IPF based upon the results of clinical studies reporting elevated levels of MMPs (including MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-8, and MMP-9) in IPF blood and/or lung samples. Surprisingly, studies of gene-targeted mice in murine models of pulmonary fibrosis (PF) have demonstrated that most MMPs promote (rather than inhibit) the development of PF and have identified diverse mechanisms involved. These mechanisms include MMPs: (1) promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMP-3 and MMP-7); (2) increasing lung levels or activity of profibrotic mediators or reducing lung levels of antifibrotic mediators (MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-8); (3) promoting abnormal epithelial cell migration and other aberrant repair processes (MMP-3 and MMP-9); (4) inducing the switching of lung macrophage phenotypes from M1 to M2 types (MMP-10 and MMP-28); and (5) promoting fibrocyte migration (MMP-8). Two MMPs, MMP-13 and MMP-19, have antifibrotic activities in murine models of PF, and two MMPs, MMP-1 and MMP-10, have the potential to limit fibrotic responses to injury. Herein, we review what is known about the contributions of MMPs and TIMPs to the pathogenesis of IPF and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for IPF.

  11. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature...... obvious therapeutic potential, hypothermia as a form of neuroprotection for stroke has been investigated in only a few very small studies. Therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in acute stroke but owing to serious side-effects--such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, and pneumonia--it is still thought...

  12. Frontiers in nano-therapeutics

    CERN Document Server

    Tasnim, Nishat; Sai Krishna, Katla; Kalagara, Sudhakar; Narayan, Mahesh; Noveron, Juan C; Joddar, Binata

    2017-01-01

    This brief highlights recent research advances in the area of nano-therapeutics. Nanotechnology holds immense potential for application in a wide range of biological and engineering applications such as molecular sensors for disease diagnosis, therapeutic agents for the treatment of diseases, a vehicle for delivering therapeutics and imaging agents for theranostic applications, both in-vitro and in-vivo. The brief is grouped into the following sections namely, A) Discrete Nanosystems ; B) Anisotropic Nanoparticles; C) Nano-films/coated/layered and D) Nano-composites.

  13. [Therapeutic management of neurodermatitis atopica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kägi, M K

    1998-08-01

    The therapy of atopic dermatitis remains a challenge. The success of any therapeutic concept is based on a broad and early diagnostic approach which allows to rule out relevant provocation factors and allergens. During remission periods the regular use of a topical basic therapy consisting of drug-free emolients is recommended. Topical corticosteroids as well as systemic or local antimicrobial therapy and antihistamines are essential during periods of acute exacerbations. Although during the last years a great number of new therapeutic approaches have been published, data of most of these therapeutic modalities are not sufficient to allow an unrestricted use in all patients with atopic dermatitis.

  14. [Current Therapeutic Approaches to Sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Carmen; Skowasch, Dirk; Grohé, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis represents a non-caseating, granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology whose clinical manifestation is heterogeneous and frequently multisystemic. The portion of patients needing systemic treatment varies: though many patients may undergo spontaneous remission, organ-threatening courses demand systemic therapy. Corticosteroids are the first-line treatment option; however, disease´s progression and/or major corticosteroid side effects may require second- and third-line therapeutics. A current stepwise therapeutic algorithm to sarcoidosis that characterizes additive and alternative therapeutic agents is given in the following review. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Sodium valproate does not augment Prpsc in murine neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, C; Casagrande, F; Andrieu, T; Dormont, D; Clayette, P

    2007-10-01

    Sodium valproate (VPA) has been reported to increase the accumulation of the pathologic isoform of prion protein (PrPsc) in scrapie-infected murine neuroblastoma cells. In this study, the effect of VPA on PrPsc accumulation was investigated in murine N2a neuroblastoma cells chronically infected with scrapie strain 22L (N2a-22L). No accumulation of PrPsc was detected after short-term (3 days) or long-term (21 days) treatment of N2a-22L cells with 4.8, 12, 18 or 24 microM VPA. Higher VPA concentrations (240 and 600 microM) also failed to augment PrPsc expression. In conclusion, in our experimental conditions, no deleterious effect was induced by VPA on prions replication.

  16. T Cell Integrin Overexpression as a Model of Murine Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Raymond L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrin adhesion molecules have important adhesion and signaling functions. They also play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Over the past few years we have described a T cell adoptive transfer model to investigate the role of T cell integrin adhesion molecules in the development of autoimmunity. This report summarizes the methods we used in establishing this murine model. By treating murine CD4+ T cells with DNA hypomethylating agents and by transfection we were able to test the in vitro effects of integrin overexpression on T cell autoreactive proliferation, cytotoxicity, adhesion and trafficking. Furthermore, we showed that the ability to induce in vivo autoimmunity may be unique to the integrin lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1.

  17. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed S. Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, S. Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis and S. Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines. PMID:25902362

  18. The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, attenuates abdominal aortic aneurysm development via suppression of tissue remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack H Wang

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a prevalent vascular disease that can progressively enlarge and rupture with a high rate of mortality. Inflammation and active remodeling of the aortic wall have been suggested to be critical in its pathogenesis. Meanwhile, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA are known to reduce cardiovascular events, but its role in AAA management remains unclear. Here, we show that EPA can attenuate murine CaCl2-induced AAA formation. Aortas from BALB/c mice fed an EPA-diet appeared less inflamed, were significantly smaller in diameter compared to those from control-diet-fed mice, and had relative preservation of aortic elastic lamina. Interestingly, CT imaging also revealed markedly reduced calcification of the aortas after EPA treatment. Mechanistically, MMP2, MMP9, and TNFSF11 levels in the aortas were reduced after EPA treatment. Consistent with this finding, RAW264.7 macrophages treated with EPA showed attenuated Mmp9 levels after TNF-α simulation. These results demonstrate a novel role of EPA in attenuating AAA formation via the suppression of critical remodeling pathways in the pathogenesis of AAAs, and raise the possibility of using EPA for AAA prevention in the clinical setting.

  19. Pre- and post-exposure safety and efficacy of attenuated rabies virus vaccines are enhanced by their expression of IFNγ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhouse, Darryll A. [Department of Cancer Biology, 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Center for Neurovirology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Faber, Milosz [Center for Neurovirology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 465, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Hooper, D. Craig, E-mail: douglas.hooper@jefferson.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Center for Neurovirology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with evidence of a strong correlation between interferon gamma (IFNγ) production and rabies virus (RABV) clearance from the CNS, we recently demonstrated that engineering a pathogenic RABV to express IFNγ highly attenuates the virus. Reasoning that IFNγ expression by RABV vaccines would enhance their safety and efficacy, we reverse-engineered two proven vaccine vectors, GAS and GASGAS, to express murine IFNγ. Mortality and morbidity were monitored during suckling mice infection, immunize/challenge experiments and mixed intracranial infections. We demonstrate that GASγ and GASγGAS are significantly attenuated in suckling mice compared to the GASGAS vaccine. GASγ better protects mice from lethal DRV4 RABV infection in both pre- and post-exposure experiments compared to GASGAS. Finally, GASγGAS reduces post-infection neurological sequelae, compared to control, during mixed intracranial infection with DRV4. These data show IFNγ expression by a vaccine vector can enhance its safety while increasing its efficacy as pre- and post-exposure treatment. - Highlights: • IFNγ expression improves attenuated rabies virus safety and immunogenicity. • IFNγ expression is safer and more immunogenic than doubling glycoprotein expression. • Co-infection with IFNγ-expressing RABV prevents wild-type rabies virus lethality. • Vaccine safety and efficacy is additive for IFNγ and double glycoprotein expression.

  20. CD69+NK cells contribute to the murine hepatitis virus strain 3-induced murine hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; Chen, Tao; Wang, Xiao-jing; Zhou, Li; Shi, Ai-chao; Ning, Qin

    2013-08-01

    The role of hepatic CD69+ natural killer (NK) cells in virus-induced severe liver injury and subsequent hepatic failure is not well defined. In this study, a mouse model of fulminant liver failure (FHF) induced by murine hepatitis virus strain 3 (MHV-3) was used to study the role of hepatic CD69+NK cells in the development of FHF. The CD69 expression in NK cells in the liver, spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood was detected by using flow cytometry. The correlation between the CD69 level in hepatic NK cells and liver injury was studied. The functional marker (CD107a), and activating and inhibitory receptor (NKG2D and NKG2A) expressed on CD69+NK cells and CD69-NK cells were detected by using flow cytometry. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-9, IFN-γ and TNF-α) were also examined by using intracellular staining. After MHV-3 infection, the number of CD69+NK cells in the liver of BALB/cJ mice was increased markedly and peaked at 72 h post-infection. Similar changes were also observed in the spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood. Meanwhile, the CD69 expression in hepatic NK cells was highly correlated with the serum level of ALT and AST. The expression of CD107a and NKG2D, as well as the production of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-9 in hepatic CD69+NK cells was all significantly up-regulated during 48-72 h post-infection. In contrast, the NKG2A expression was increased in hepatic CD69-NK cells but not in CD69+NK cells. These results suggested that hepatic CD69+NK cells play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of FHF by enhancing degranulation and cytotoxic ability of NK cells and increasing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  1. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV.Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations.Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  2. Murine cytomegalovirus infection leads to increased levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a murine aortic allograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Christian; Abele-Ohl, Silke; Eckl, Sebastian; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Mahmoudian, Shohreh; Weyand, Michael; Stamminger, Thomas; Ensminger, Stephan M

    2010-08-27

    Cytomegalovirus infection after heart transplantation is considered as risk factor for the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) as a single risk factor on transplant arteriosclerosis in an experimental aortic allograft model. Major histocompatibility complex class I-mismatched aortas of C.B10-H2(b)/LilMcdJ donor were transplanted into BALB/c recipients, which were either mock-infected or infected with MCMV (strain Smith) on day 7 and harvested 37 days after transplantation. In one experimental group animals received a daily dose of everolimus to increase the viral load of recipients. Grafts were analyzed by histology, morphometry, and immunofluorescence. Intragraft cytokine mRNA production was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and persistence of cytomegalovirus infection was confirmed by TaqMan PCR. After infection with MCMV, there was significantly more intimal proliferation when compared with uninfected controls (intimal proliferation 83.5%+/-9.6% [MCMV] vs. 43.9%+/-5.1% [MCMV]), indicating that MCMV plays a role in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Even after treatment with everolimus, MCMV infection pronounced significantly more intimal proliferation (intimal proliferation 52.5%+/-7.3% [MCMV] vs. 20.2%+/-1.7% [MCMV]). Intragraft mRNA expression showed significantly higher production of CD62E, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 after infection with MCMV. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly more CD4, CD8, and dendritic cells. We could also confirm the presence of MCMV for the duration of the experimental protocol by PCR within the spleen, liver, salivary glands, lung, and the aortic transplant. These data suggest that MCMV infection plays an important role in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis.

  3. Proliferative Role of Kv11 Channels in Murine Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Barrese

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available K+ channels encoded by the ether-a-go-go related gene (ERG1 or KCNH2 are important determinants of the cardiac action potential. Expression of both cardiac isoforms (ERG1a and ERG1b were identified in murine portal vein and distinctive voltage-gated K+ currents were recorded from single myocytes. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the expression and functional impact of ERG channels in murine arteries.Methods: Quantitative RT-PCR was undertaken on RNA extracted from a number of murine arteries. Immunofluorescence was performed on single vascular smooth muscle cells using antibodies against the ERG1 expression product (Kv11.1. Single cell electrophysiology was performed on myocytes from portal vein and several different arteries, complimented by isometric tension recordings. Proliferation assays were undertaken on smooth muscle cells isolated from femoral arteries.Results: ERG1 transcripts were detected in all murine blood vessels, and Kv11.1 immunofluorescence was observed in all smooth muscle cells. However, K+ currents with properties consistent with ERG channels were only recorded in portal vein myocytes. Moreover, ERG channel blockers (E4031 or dofetilide, 1 μM failed to depolarize carotid arteries or produce contraction. Proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells was associated with a marked increase in ERG1 expression and ERG blockers suppressed proliferation significantly.Conclusions: These data reveal that arterial blood vessels express ERG channels that appear to be functional silent in contractile smooth muscle but contribute to proliferative response.

  4. Host Cell Cathepsins Potentiate Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nachagari, Deepa; Fields, Carolyn; Franks, John; Albritton, Lorraine M.

    2007-01-01

    The roles of cellular proteases in Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection were investigated using MLV particles pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoprotein as a control for effects on core MLV particles versus effects specific to Moloney MLV envelope protein (Env). The broad-spectrum inhibitors cathepsin inhibitor III and E-64d gave comparable dose-dependent inhibition of Moloney MLV Env and VSV G pseudotypes, suggesting that the decrease did not involve the envelo...

  5. Dystrophic Spinal Deformities in a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Murine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Steven D.; Wei Zhang; Dalong Yang; Hao Yang; Shi Chen; Xiaohua Wu; Xiaohong Li; Xianlin Yang; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Guise, Theresa A.; Bergner, Amanda L.; Stevenson, David A.; Feng-Chun Yang

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf...

  6. Vascular dysfunction in a murine model of severe hemolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Frei, Anne C.; Guo, Yihe; Jones, Deron W.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Fagan, Karen A.; Hogg, Neil; Wandersee, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrin is the backbone of the erythroid cytoskeleton; sph/sph mice have severe hereditary spherocytosis (HS) because of a mutation in the murine erythroid α-spectrin gene. sph/sph mice have a high incidence of thrombosis and infarction in multiple tissues, suggesting significant vascular dysfunction. In the current study, we provide evidence for both pulmonary and systemic vascular dysfunction in sph/sph mice. We found increased levels of soluble cell adhesion molecules in sph/sph mice, sug...

  7. Murine intestinal antibody response to heterologous rotavirus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, A A; Groene, W S; Cheng, E H; Shaw, R D

    1991-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the design of a vaccine that will prevent disease, but development of a more effective vaccine strategy may require progress in the understanding of the mucosal immune response to replicating viral antigens. In this article, we report the characterization of the intestinal antibody response of a murine model to heterologous infection with the rhesus rotavirus vaccine strain. We ha...

  8. Turnover of T cells in murine gammaherpesvirus 68-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Doherty, P C

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory challenge of C57BL/6 mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 induces proliferation of T lymphocytes early after infection, as evidenced by incorporation of the DNA precursor bromodeoxyuridine. Using pulse-chase analysis, splenic and peripheral blood activated T lymphocytes were found...... to continue dividing for at least a month after the initial virus challenge. The results are in accord with the idea that T cells are stimulated for a substantial time after the acute, lytic phase of virus infection is resolved....

  9. Two-dimensional dynamic fluid bowtie attenuators

    OpenAIRE

    Hermus, James R.; Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Fluence field modulated (FFM) CT allows for improvements in image quality and dose reduction. To date, only one-dimensional modulators have been proposed, as the extension to two-dimensional (2-D) modulation is difficult with solid-metal attenuation-based fluence field modulated designs. This work proposes to use liquid and gas to attenuate the x-ray beam, as unlike solids, these materials can be arranged allowing for 2-D fluence modulation. The thickness of liquid and the pressure for a give...

  10. Mast cell-derived mediators promote murine neutrophil effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doener, Fatma; Michel, Anastasija; Reuter, Sebastian; Friedrich, Pamela; Böhm, Livia; Relle, Manfred; Codarri, Laura; Tenzer, Stefan; Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias; Schmitt, Edgar; Schild, Hansjörg; Radsak, Markus Philipp; Taube, Christian; Stassen, Michael; Becker, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Mast cells are able to trigger life-saving immune responses in murine models for acute inflammation. In such settings, several lines of evidence indicate that the rapid and protective recruitment of neutrophils initiated by the release of mast cell-derived pro-inflammatory mediators is a key element of innate immunity. Herein, we investigate the impact of mast cells on critical parameters of neutrophil effector function. In the presence of activated murine bone marrow-derived mast cells, neutrophils freshly isolated from bone marrow rapidly lose expression of CD62L and up-regulate CD11b, the latter being partly driven by mast cell-derived TNF and GM-CSF. Mast cells also strongly enhance neutrophil phagocytosis and generation of reactive oxygen species. All these phenomena partly depend on mast cell-derived TNF and to a greater extend on GM-CSF. Furthermore, spontaneous apoptosis of neutrophils is greatly diminished due to the ability of mast cells to deliver antiapoptotic GM-CSF. Finally, we show in a murine model for acute lung inflammation that neutrophil phagocytosis is impaired in mast cell-deficient Kit (W-sh) /Kit (W-sh) mice but can be restored upon mast cell engraftment. Thus, a previously underrated feature of mast cells is their ability to boost neutrophil effector functions in immune responses.

  11. Enhancement of tumor radioresponse by combined chemotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify drugs that can enhance radioresponse of murine hepatocarcinoma. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 8 mm tumors of murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l, were treated with 25 Gy radiation and one of the following drugs: 5-Fu, 150 mg/kg; adriamycin, 8 mg/kg; cisplatin, 6 mg/kg; paclitaxel, 40 mg/kg; and gemcitabine, 50 mg/kg. Tumor response to the treatment was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by enhancement factor. Apoptotic level was assessed in tissue sections. Expression of regulating molecules was analyzed by western blotting for p53, 8c1-2, Sax, Bel-XL, Bd-XS, and p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}. Among the drugs tested, only gemcitabine enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation, with enhancement factor of 1.6. Induction of apoptosis by a combination of gerncitabine and radiation was shown as only additive level. In analysis of radiation-induced expression of regulating molecules, the most significant change by combining gemcitabine was activation of p21 {sup WAF1/CIP1}. Gemcitabine is the first drug showing an enhancement of radioresponse in murine hepatocarcinoma, when combined with radiation. The key element of enhancement is thought to be p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}.

  12. Infection with influenza virus induces IL-33 in murine lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goffic, Ronan; Arshad, Muhammad Imran; Rauch, Michel; L'Helgoualc'h, Annie; Delmas, Bernard; Piquet-Pellorce, Claire; Samson, Michel

    2011-12-01

    IL-33, a novel IL-1 family member, is crucially expressed and involved in pulmonary diseases, but its regulation in viral diseases such as influenza A virus (IAV) remains unclear. This study aimed to characterize the expression and release of IL-33 in lungs of IAV-infected mice in vivo and in murine respiratory epithelial cells (MLE-15) in vitro. Our results provide evidence of up-regulation of IL-33 mRNA in IAV-infected murine lungs, compared with noninfected control mice. The overexpression of IL-33 was positively correlated with a significant increase in mRNA encoding the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-6, and was also associated with an increase in IFN-β mRNA. A profound overexpression of IL-33 protein was evident in IAV-infected murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages of influenza-infected mice, compared with low concentrations in naive lungs in vivo. Immunolocalization highlighted the cellular expression of IL-33 in alveolar epithelial and endothelial cells, along with increased infiltrate cells in virus-infected lungs. Further in vitro experiments showed an induction of IL-33 transcript-in MLE-15 cells and human epithelial cells (A549) infected with different strains of IAV in comparison with noninfected cells. In conclusion, our findings evidenced a profound expression of IL-33 in lungs during both in vivo and in vitro IAV infections, suggesting a role for IL-33 in virus-induced lung infections.

  13. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouton, J.W.; Aarnoutse, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of dose adjustments of antimicrobials based on measured concentrations in an individual ('therapeutic drug monitoring', TDM) is increasingly recognized. There are several reasons for this. First, there is a better understanding of the relationships between doses administered,

  14. Reversal of Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Murine Schistosomiasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    smooth muscle α-actin protein extract. ... The mechanism is probably through inhibition of new liver injury induced by ... deposition and interruption of collagen type I synthesis with attenuation of .... through subcutaneous injection of 50 S.

  15. Therapeutic Vaccines for Chronic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Combadiere, Béhazine; Debre, Patrice

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to prevent severe complications of a chronic infection by reinforcing host defenses when some immune control, albeit insufficient, can already be demonstrated and when a conventional antimicrobial therapy either is not available or has limited efficacy. We focus on the rationale and challenges behind this still controversial strategy and provide examples from three major chronic infectious diseases-human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and human papillomavirus-for which the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines is currently being evaluated.

  16. N-Acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase inhibition increases colon N-palmitoylethanolamine levels and counteracts murine colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhouayek, Mireille; Bottemanne, Pauline; Subramanian, Kumar V.; Lambert, Didier M.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Cani, Patrice D.; Muccioli, Giulio G.

    2015-01-01

    N-Palmitoylethanolamine or palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an anti-inflammatory compound that was recently shown to exert peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-dependent beneficial effects on colon inflammation. The actions of PEA are terminated following hydrolysis by 2 enzymes: fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and the less-studied N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA). This study aims to investigate the effects of inhibiting the enzymes responsible for PEA hydrolysis in colon inflammation in order to propose a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Two murine models of IBD were used to assess the effects of NAAA inhibition, FAAH inhibition, and PEA on macroscopic signs of colon inflammation, macrophage/neutrophil infiltration, and the expression of proinflammatory mediators in the colon, as well as on the colitis-related systemic inflammation. NAAA inhibition increases PEA levels in the colon and reduces colon inflammation and systemic inflammation, similarly to PEA. FAAH inhibition, however, does not increase PEA levels in the colon and does not affect the macroscopic signs of colon inflammation or immune cell infiltration. This is the first report of an anti-inflammatory effect of a systemically administered NAAA inhibitor. Because NAAA is the enzyme responsible for the control of PEA levels in the colon, we put forth this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target in chronic inflammation in general and IBD in particular.—Alhouayek, M., Bottemanne, P., Subramanian, K. V., Lambert, D. M., Makriyannis, A., Cani, P. D., and Muccioli, G. G. N-Acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase inhibition increases colon N-palmitoylethanolamine levels and counteracts murine colitis. PMID:25384424

  17. Murine models in critical care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haouzi, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    therapeutic approaches applicable in critical care patients should be understood in light of the specificity of the metabolic, respiratory, and circulatory responses of mice to a hypoxic insult, since many of these adaptations have no clear equivalent in humans.

  18. RNAi targeting Nogo Receptor enhanced survival and proliferation of murine retinal ganglion cells during N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced optic nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kun; Zhong, Bo; Shen, Xiao-Li; Fang, Min; Lin, Bao-Tao; Ma, Da-Hui

    2017-09-12

    We investigated the effects of lentivirus-mediated RNAi targeting of Nogo Receptor ( NgR ) on the proliferation and survival of murine retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) in vitro and in vivo . Cultured mRGCs and C57BL/6 male mice were divided into 4 experimental groups: blank, model [100 μM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)], nscRNA (100 μM NMDA+ nscRNA vectors) and siNgR (100 μM NMDA+ siNgR vectors). CCK-8 and flow cytometry analyses revealed that silencing NgR enhanced proliferation, cell cycling and survival of NMDA-treated mRGCs. H&E staining showed that NgR silencing enhanced mRGC cell density and reduced angiogenesis in NMDA-treated retinal tissues. TUNEL assays showed that mRGC apoptosis was significantly diminished by NgR silencing in NMDA-treated retinal tissues. Western blotting and qRT-PCR analysis in NMDA-treated mRGCs and murine retinal tissues revealed that NgR silencing resulted in downregulation of RhoA signaling (RhoA and ROCK2). Western blotting showed that levels of activated Bax and cleaved caspase 3 were decreased, while Bcl-2 and pro-caspase 3 were increased in NMDA-treated mRGCs and murine retinal tissues, which corroborated the decreased apoptosis. These findings indicate that NgR gene silencing increases proliferation and survival of mRGCs in NMDA-treated murine retinas, which suggests a potential for therapeutic application to preventing optic nerve damage.

  19. A Yersinia pestis tat mutant is attenuated in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic challenge models of infection but not as attenuated by intranasal challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher K; Chance, Taylor; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Kern, Steven J; Kijek, Todd K; Jenkins, Amy; Mou, Sherry; Moody, Krishna; Fritz, David; Robinson, Camenzind G; Bell, Todd; Worsham, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial proteins destined for the Tat pathway are folded before crossing the inner membrane and are typically identified by an N-terminal signal peptide containing a twin arginine motif. Translocation by the Tat pathway is dependent on the products of genes which encode proteins possessing the binding site of the signal peptide and mediating the actual translocation event. In the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis, the tatA gene was deleted. The mutant was assayed for loss of virulence through various in vitro and in vivo assays. Deletion of the tatA gene resulted in several consequences for the mutant as compared to wild-type. Cell morphology of the mutant bacteria was altered and demonstrated a more elongated form. In addition, while cultures of the mutant strain were able to produce a biofilm, we observed a loss of adhesion of the mutant biofilm structure compared to the biofilm produced by the wild-type strain. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed a partial disruption of the F1 antigen on the surface of the mutant. The virulence of the ΔtatA mutant was assessed in various murine models of plague. The mutant was severely attenuated in the bubonic model with full virulence restored by complementation with the native gene. After small-particle aerosol challenge in a pneumonic model of infection, the mutant was also shown to be attenuated. In contrast, when mice were challenged intranasally with the mutant, very little difference in the LD50 was observed between wild-type and mutant strains. However, an increased time-to-death and delay in bacterial dissemination was observed in mice infected with the ΔtatA mutant as compared to the parent strain. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an essential role for the Tat pathway in the virulence of Y. pestis in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic infection but less important role for intranasal challenge.

  20. A Yersinia pestis tat mutant is attenuated in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic challenge models of infection but not as attenuated by intranasal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Bozue

    Full Text Available Bacterial proteins destined for the Tat pathway are folded before crossing the inner membrane and are typically identified by an N-terminal signal peptide containing a twin arginine motif. Translocation by the Tat pathway is dependent on the products of genes which encode proteins possessing the binding site of the signal peptide and mediating the actual translocation event. In the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis, the tatA gene was deleted. The mutant was assayed for loss of virulence through various in vitro and in vivo assays. Deletion of the tatA gene resulted in several consequences for the mutant as compared to wild-type. Cell morphology of the mutant bacteria was altered and demonstrated a more elongated form. In addition, while cultures of the mutant strain were able to produce a biofilm, we observed a loss of adhesion of the mutant biofilm structure compared to the biofilm produced by the wild-type strain. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed a partial disruption of the F1 antigen on the surface of the mutant. The virulence of the ΔtatA mutant was assessed in various murine models of plague. The mutant was severely attenuated in the bubonic model with full virulence restored by complementation with the native gene. After small-particle aerosol challenge in a pneumonic model of infection, the mutant was also shown to be attenuated. In contrast, when mice were challenged intranasally with the mutant, very little difference in the LD50 was observed between wild-type and mutant strains. However, an increased time-to-death and delay in bacterial dissemination was observed in mice infected with the ΔtatA mutant as compared to the parent strain. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an essential role for the Tat pathway in the virulence of Y. pestis in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic infection but less important role for intranasal challenge.

  1. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor attenuates melanoma tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Dillenburg-Pilla

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that does not respond well to standard therapeutic approaches, such as radio- and chemotherapies. Furthermore, acquiring the ability to metastasize in melanoma and many other tumor types is directly related to incurable disease. The B1 kinin receptor participates in a variety of cancer-related pathophysiological events, such as inflammation and angiogenesis. Therefore, we investigated whether this G protein-coupled receptor plays a role in tumor progression. We used a murine melanoma cell line that expresses the kinin B1 receptor and does not express the kinin B2 receptor to investigate the precise contribution of activation of the B1 receptor in tumor progression and correlated events using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor in the absence of B2 receptor inhibits cell migration in vitro and decreases tumor formation in vivo. Moreover, tumors formed from cells stimulated with B1-specific agonist showed several features of decreased aggressiveness, such as smaller size and infiltration of inflammatory cells within the tumor area, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines implicated in the host anti-tumor immune response, lower number of cells undergoing mitosis, a poorer vascular network, no signs of invasion of surrounding tissues or metastasis and increased animal survival. Our findings reveal that activation of the kinin B1 receptor has a host protective role during murine melanoma tumor progression, suggesting that the B1 receptor could be a new anti-tumor GPCR and provide new opportunities for therapeutic targeting.

  2. High-Resolution X-Ray Structure and Functional Analysis of the Murine Norovirus 1 Capsid Protein Protruding Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taube, Stefan; Rubin, John R.; Katpally, Umesh; Smith, Thomas J.; Kendall, Ann; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Wobus, Christiane E. (Michigan); (Danforth)

    2010-07-23

    Murine noroviruses (MNV) are closely related to the human noroviruses (HuNoV), which cause the majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Unlike HuNoV, MNV grow in culture and in a small-animal model that represents a tractable model to study norovirus biology. To begin a detailed investigation of molecular events that occur during norovirus binding to cells, the crystallographic structure of the murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) capsid protein protruding (P) domain has been determined. Crystallization of the bacterially expressed protein yielded two different crystal forms (Protein Data Bank identifiers [PDB ID], 3LQ6 and 3LQE). Comparison of the structures indicated a large degree of structural mobility in loops on the surface of the P2 subdomain. Specifically, the A{prime}-B{prime} and E{prime}-F{prime} loops were found in open and closed conformations. These regions of high mobility include the known escape mutation site for the neutralizing antibody A6.2 and an attenuation mutation site, which arose after serial passaging in culture and led to a loss in lethality in STAT1{sup -/-} mice, respectively. Modeling of a Fab fragment and crystal structures of the P dimer into the cryoelectron microscopy three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction of the A6.2/MNV-1 complex indicated that the closed conformation is most likely bound to the Fab fragment and that the antibody contact is localized to the A{prime}-B{prime} and E{prime}-F{prime} loops. Therefore, we hypothesize that these loop regions and the flexibility of the P domains play important roles during MNV-1 binding to the cell surface.

  3. The Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptide 19-2.5 Interacts with Heparanase and Heparan Sulfate in Murine and Human Sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Martin

    Full Text Available Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains from their proteoglycans. Thereby, heparanase liberates highly potent circulating heparan sulfate-fragments (HS-fragments and triggers the fatal and excessive inflammatory response in sepsis. As a potential anti-inflammatory agent for sepsis therapy, peptide 19-2.5 belongs to the class of synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides; however, its activity is not restricted to Gram-negative bacterial infection. We hypothesized that peptide 19-2.5 interacts with heparanase and/or HS, thereby reducing the levels of circulating HS-fragments in murine and human sepsis. Our data indicate that the treatment of septic mice with peptide 19-2.5 compared to untreated control animals lowers levels of plasma heparanase and circulating HS-fragments and reduces heparanase activity. Additionally, mRNA levels of heparanase in heart, liver, lung, kidney and spleen are downregulated in septic mice treated with peptide 19-2.5 compared to untreated control animals. In humans, plasma heparanase level and activity are elevated in septic shock. The ex vivo addition of peptide 19-2.5 to plasma of septic shock patients decreases heparanase activity but not heparanase level. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed a strong exothermic reaction between peptide 19-2.5 and heparanase and HS-fragments. However, a saturation character has been identified only in the peptide 19-2.5 and HS interaction. In conclusion, the findings of our current study indicate that peptide 19-2.5 interacts with heparanase, which is elevated in murine and human sepsis and consecutively attenuates the generation of circulating HS-fragments in systemic inflammation. Thus, peptide 19-2.5 seems to be a potential anti-inflammatory agent in sepsis.

  4. A paclitaxel-loaded recombinant polypeptide nanoparticle outperforms Abraxane in multiple murine cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Bellucci, Joseph J.; Weitzhandler, Isaac; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Li, Xinghai; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-08-01

    Packaging clinically relevant hydrophobic drugs into a self-assembled nanoparticle can improve their aqueous solubility, plasma half-life, tumour-specific uptake and therapeutic potential. To this end, here we conjugated paclitaxel (PTX) to recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into ~60 nm near-monodisperse nanoparticles that increased the systemic exposure of PTX by sevenfold compared with free drug and twofold compared with the Food and Drug Administration-approved taxane nanoformulation (Abraxane). The tumour uptake of the CP-PTX nanoparticle was fivefold greater than free drug and twofold greater than Abraxane. In a murine cancer model of human triple-negative breast cancer and prostate cancer, CP-PTX induced near-complete tumour regression after a single dose in both tumour models, whereas at the same dose, no mice treated with Abraxane survived for >80 days (breast) and 60 days (prostate), respectively. These results show that a molecularly engineered nanoparticle with precisely engineered design features outperforms Abraxane, the current gold standard for PTX delivery.

  5. Modified pectin from Theobroma cacao induces potent pro-inflammatory activity in murine peritoneal macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Juliana C; Vriesmann, Lucia Cristina; Petkowicz, Carmen L O; Martinez, Glaucia Regina; Noleto, Guilhermina R

    2016-11-01

    In vitro effects of acetylated pectin (OP) isolated from cacao pod husks (Theobroma cacao L.), its partially deacetylated and de-esterified form (MOP), and a commercial homogalacturonan (PG) were investigated on murine peritoneal macrophages. MOP stood out among the studied pectins. After 48h of incubation, compared with the control group, it was able to promote significant macrophage morphological differentiation from resident to activated stage and also stimulated nitric oxide production, which reached a level of 85% of that of LPS stimulus. In the presence of the highest tested concentration of MOP (200μg·mL-1), the levels of the cytokines TNF-α (6h) and IL-12 and IL-10 (48h) increased substantially in relation to untreated cells. Our results show that the partial deacetylation and de-esterification of pectin extracted from cacao pod husks (T. cacao L.) produced a polymer with greater ability than its native form to activate macrophages to a cytotoxic phenotype. Like this, they provide the possibility of a therapeutic application to MOP, which could lead to a decreased susceptibility to microbial infection besides antitumor activity. Additionally, the present results also corroborate with the proposition of that the chemical modifications of the biopolymers can result in an improved molecule with new possibilities of application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of the murine immune response to pulmonary delivery of precisely fabricated nano- and microscale particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid A Roberts

    Full Text Available Nanomedicine has the potential to transform clinical care in the 21(st century. However, a precise understanding of how nanomaterial design parameters such as size, shape and composition affect the mammalian immune system is a prerequisite for the realization of nanomedicine's translational promise. Herein, we make use of the recently developed Particle Replication in Non-wetting Template (PRINT fabrication process to precisely fabricate particles across and the nano- and micro-scale with defined shapes and compositions to address the role of particle design parameters on the murine innate immune response in both in vitro and in vivo settings. We find that particles composed of either the biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA or the biocompatible polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG do not cause release of pro-inflammatory cytokines nor inflammasome activation in bone marrow-derived macrophages. When instilled into the lungs of mice, particle composition and size can augment the number and type of innate immune cells recruited to the lungs without triggering inflammatory responses as assayed by cytokine release and histopathology. Smaller particles (80×320 nm are more readily taken up in vivo by monocytes and macrophages than larger particles (6 µm diameter, yet particles of all tested sizes remained in the lungs for up to 7 days without clearance or triggering of host immunity. These results suggest rational design of nanoparticle physical parameters can be used for sustained and localized delivery of therapeutics to the lungs.

  7. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates Amifostine induced preservation of bone mineralization patterns in the irradiated murine mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Gong, Bo; Poushanchi, Behdod; Donneys, Alexis; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Gallagher, K Kelly; Deshpande, Sagar S; Goldstein, Steven A; Morris, Michael D; Buchman, Steven R

    2013-02-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy in the management of head and neck cancer remains severely debilitating. Fortunately, newly developed agents aimed at decreasing radiation-induced damage have shown great promise. Amifostine (AMF) is a compound, which confers radio-protection to the exposed normal tissues, such as bone. Our intent is to utilize Raman spectroscopy to demonstrate how AMF preserves the mineral composition of the murine mandible following human equivalent radiation. Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into 3 experimental groups: control (n=5), XRT (n=5), and AMF-XRT (n=5). Both XRT and AMF groups underwent bioequivalent radiation of 70Gy in 5 fractions to the left hemimandible. AMF-XRT received Amifostine prior to radiation. Fifty-six days post-radiation, the hemimandibles were harvested, and Raman spectra were taken in the region of interest spanning 2mm behind the last molar. Bone mineral and matrix-specific Raman bands were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, with statistical significance at p0.05) in both Raman metrics. Computer-aided spectral subtraction further confirmed these results where AMF-XRT was spectrally similar to the control. Interestingly, the collagen cross-link ratio did not differ between XRT and AMF-XRT (pemerging and exceptionally attractive clinical translational technology to investigate and monitor both the destructive effects of radiation and the therapeutic remediation of AMF on the structural, physical and chemical qualities of bone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Curcumin increases the pathogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya A Marathe

    Full Text Available Curcumin has gained immense importance for its vast therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Contrary to this, our study reveals that it regulates the defense pathways of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium to enhance its pathogenicity. In a murine model of typhoid fever, we observed higher bacterial load in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and liver, when infected with curcumin-treated Salmonella. Curcumin increased the resistance of S. Typhimurium against antimicrobial agents like antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This increased tolerance might be attributed to the up-regulation of genes involved in resistance against antimicrobial peptides--pmrD and pmrHFIJKLM and genes with antioxidant function--mntH, sodA and sitA. We implicate that iron chelation property of curcumin have a role in regulating mntH and sitA. Interestingly, we see that the curcumin-mediated modulation of pmr genes is through the PhoPQ regulatory system. Curcumin downregulates SPI1 genes, required for entry into epithelial cells and upregulates SPI2 genes required to intracellular survival. Since it is known that the SPI1 and SPI2 system can be regulated by the PhoPQ system, this common regulator could explain curcumin's mode of action. This data urges us to rethink the indiscriminate use of curcumin especially during Salmonella outbreaks.

  9. The BET Family of Proteins Targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integration near Transcription Start Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan De Rijck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome into host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here, we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 and MLV integrase specifically interact and colocalize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins’ chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75 retargets MLV integration away from transcription start sites and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conforming to the HIV integration pattern. Together, these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors.

  10. Humanization and Characterization of an Anti-Human TNF-α Murine Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Wei-Chun; Lai, Ya-Ping; Chou, Min-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody, m357, showing the highly neutralizing activities for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) was chosen to be humanized by a variable domain resurfacing approach. The non-conserved surface residues in the framework regions of both the heavy and light chain variable regions were identified via a molecular modeling of m357 built by computer-assisted homology modeling. By replacing these critical surface residues with the human counterparts, a humanized version, h357, was generated. The humanized h357 IgG1 was then stably expressed in a mammalian cell line and the purified antibody maintained the high antigen binding affinity as compared with the parental m357 based on a soluble TNF-α neutralization bioassay. Furthermore, h357 IgG1 possesses the ability to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement dependent cytotoxicity upon binding to cells bearing the transmembrane form of TNF-α. In a mouse model of collagen antibody-induced arthritis, h357 IgG significantly inhibited disease progression by intra-peritoneal injection of 50 µg/mouse once-daily for 9 consecutive days. These results provided a basis for the development of h357 IgG as therapeutic use. PMID:21305012

  11. Recombinant AAV serotype 1 transduction efficiency and tropism in the murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Wang, C-M; Clark, K R; Sferra, T J

    2003-08-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (rAAV2) vectors have shown promise as therapeutic agents for neurologic disorders. However, intracerebral administration of this vector leads to preferential transduction of neurons and a restricted region of transgene expression. The recently developed rAAV vectors based upon nonserotype 2 viruses have the potential to overcome these limitations. Therefore, we directly compared a rAAV type 1 to a type 2 vector in the murine brain. The vectors were engineered to carry identical genomes (AAV2 terminal repeat elements flanking an enhanced green fluorescent protein expression cassette) and were administered by stereotaxic-guided intracerebral injection. We found that the rAAV1 vector (rAAV1-GFP) had a 13- to 35-fold greater transduction efficiency than that of the rAAV2 vector (rAAV2-GFP). Also, rAAV1-transduced cells were observed at a greater distance from the injection site than rAAV2-transduced cells. Neurons were the predominant cell type transduced by both vector types. However, in contrast to rAAV2-GFP, rAAV1-GFP was capable of transducing glial and ependymal cells. Thus, rAAV1-based vectors have biologic properties within the brain distinct from that of rAAV2. These differences might be capitalized upon to develop novel gene transfer strategies for neurologic disorders.

  12. The Metabolic Syndrome and Microvascular Complications in a Murine Model of Type 2 Diabetes

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    Hur, Junguk; Dauch, Jacqueline R.; Hinder, Lucy M.; Hayes, John M.; Backus, Carey; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kretzler, Matthias; Brosius, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    To define the components of the metabolic syndrome that contribute to diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we treated the BKS db/db mouse, an established murine model of T2DM and the metabolic syndrome, with the thiazolidinedione class drug pioglitazone. Pioglitazone treatment of BKS db/db mice produced a significant weight gain, restored glycemic control, and normalized measures of serum oxidative stress and triglycerides but had no effect on LDLs or total cholesterol. Moreover, although pioglitazone treatment normalized renal function, it had no effect on measures of large myelinated nerve fibers, specifically sural or sciatic nerve conduction velocities, but significantly improved measures of small unmyelinated nerve fiber architecture and function. Analyses of gene expression arrays of large myelinated sciatic nerves from pioglitazone-treated animals revealed an unanticipated increase in genes related to adipogenesis, adipokine signaling, and lipoprotein signaling, which likely contributed to the blunted therapeutic response. Similar analyses of dorsal root ganglion neurons revealed a salutary effect of pioglitazone on pathways related to defense and cytokine production. These data suggest differential susceptibility of small and large nerve fibers to specific metabolic impairments associated with T2DM and provide the basis for discussion of new treatment paradigms for individuals with T2DM and DPN. PMID:25979075

  13. Prospective Isolation of Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Based on Surface Markers

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    Yo Mabuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are currently defined as multipotent stromal cells that undergo sustained in vitro growth and can give rise to cells of multiple mesenchymal lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. The regenerative and immunosuppressive properties of MSCs have led to numerous clinical trials exploring their utility for the treatment of a variety of diseases (e.g., acute graft-versus-host disease, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, and cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, conventionally cultured MSCs reflect heterogeneous populations that often contain contaminating cells due to the significant variability in isolation methods and the lack of specific MSC markers. This review article focuses on recent developments in the MSC research field, with a special emphasis on the identification of novel surface markers for the in vivo localization and prospective isolation of murine and human MSCs. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological importance of MSC subtypes in vivo with specific reference to data supporting their contribution to HSC niche homeostasis. The isolation of MSCs using selective markers (combination of PDGFRα and Sca-1 is crucial to address the many unanswered questions pertaining to these cells and has the potential to enhance their therapeutic potential enormously.

  14. Heat Shock Response Associated with Hepatocarcinogenesis in a Murine Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I

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    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Roy, Vincent; Orejuela, Diana; Tanguay, Robert M., E-mail: robert.tanguay@ibis.ulaval.ca [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Genetics, Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS) and PROTEO, 1030 avenue de la médecine, Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2014-04-23

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione). However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC.

  15. SCLLTargeting FGFR1 to suppress leukemogenesis in syndromic and de novo AML in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Bhole, Aaron; Qin, Haiyan; Karp, Judith; Malek, Sami; Cowell, John K; Ren, Mingqiang

    2016-08-02

    Although over expression of chimeric FGFR1 kinase consistently leads to the development of AML in the rare Stem Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma syndrome, we now show that overexpression of FGFR1 is also seen in up to 20% of non-syndromic, de novo AML. To determine whether targeting FGFR1 in both of these AML subtypes can suppress leukemogenesis, we evaluated the effects of different FGFR1 inhibitors in a side-by-side comparison for their ability to affect in vitro proliferation in FGFR1 overexpressing murine and human cells lines. Three newly developed pan-FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547, BGJ398 and JNJ42756493, show a significantly improved efficacy over the more established FGFR inhibitors, PD173074 and TKI258. To examine whether targeting FGFR1 suppresses leukemogenesis in de novo AML in vivo, we created xenografts in immunocompromized mice from primary, de novo AML that showed > 3-fold increased expression of FGFR1. Using BGJ398, the most potent inhibitor identified in the in vitro studies, AML progression in these mice was significantly suppressed compared with vehicle treated animals and overall survival improved. Importantly, no difference in disease course or survival was seen in AML xenografts that did not show overexpression of FGFR1. These observations support the idea that FGFR1 is a driver oncogene in de novo, FGFR1-overexpressing AML and that molecularly targeted therapies using FGFR1 inhibitors may provide a valuable therapeutic regimen for all FGFR1-overexpressing AML.

  16. Detection of Spontaneous Schwannomas by MRI in a Transgenic Murine Model of Neurofibromatosis Type 2

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    S.M. Messerli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous schwannomas were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in a transgenic murine model of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 expressing a dominant mutant form of merlin under the Schwann cell-specific PO promoter. Approximately 85% of the investigated mice showed putative tumors by 24 months of age. Specifically, 21% of the mice showed tumors in the intercostal muscles, 14% in the limb muscles, 7% in the spinal cord and spinal ganglia, 7% in the external ear, 14% in the muscle of the abdominal region, and 7% in the intestine; 66% of the female mice had uterine tumors. Multiple tumors were detected by MRI in 21% of mice. The tumors were isointense with muscle by T1-weighted MRI, showed strong enhancement following administration of gadolinium-DTPA, and were markedly hyperintense by T2-weighted MRI, all hallmarks of the clinical manifestation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumors consisted of schwannomas and Schwann cell hyperplasias. The lesions stained positively for S-100 protein and a marker antigen for the mutated transgenic NF2 protein, confirming that the imaged tumors and areas of hyperplasia were of Schwann cell origin and expressed the mutated NF2 protein. Tumors were highly infectable with a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, hrR3, which contains the reporter gene, lacZ. The ability to develop schwannoma growth with a noninvasive imaging technique will allow assessment of therapeutic interventions.

  17. Microcarrier-based expansion of adult murine side population stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A Pacak

    Full Text Available The lack of reliable methods to efficiently isolate and propagate stem cell populations is a significant obstacle to the advancement of cell-based therapies for human diseases. One isolation technique is based on efflux of the fluorophore Hoechst 33342. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, a sub-population containing adult stem cells has been identified in a multitude of tissues in every mammalian species examined. These rare cells are referred to as the 'side population' or SP due to a distinctive FACS profile that results from weak staining by Hoechst dye. Although the SP contains multi-potent cells capable of differentiating toward hematopoietic and mesenchymal lineages; there is currently no method to efficiently expand them. Here, we describe a spinner-flask culture system containing C2C12 myoblasts attached to spherical microcarriers that act to support the growth of non-adherent, post-natal murine skeletal muscle and bone marrow SP cells. Using FACS and hemocytometry, we show expansion of unfractionated EGFP⁺ SP cells over 6 wks. A significant number of these cells retain characteristics of freshly-isolated, unfractionated SP cells with respect to protein expression and dye efflux capacity. Expansion of the SP will permit further study of these heterogeneous cells and determine their therapeutic potential for regenerative and reparative therapies.

  18. Assessing the accuracy and reproducibility of modality independent elastography in a murine model of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Jared A.; Flint, Katelyn M.; Sanchez, Violeta; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Cancer progression has been linked to mechanics. Therefore, there has been recent interest in developing noninvasive imaging tools for cancer assessment that are sensitive to changes in tissue mechanical properties. We have developed one such method, modality independent elastography (MIE), that estimates the relative elastic properties of tissue by fitting anatomical image volumes acquired before and after the application of compression to biomechanical models. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of the method using phantoms and a murine breast cancer model. Magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired, and the MIE method was used to estimate relative volumetric stiffness. Accuracy was assessed using phantom data by comparing to gold-standard mechanical testing of elasticity ratios. Validation error was elasticity imaging metric in a preclinical cancer model. Our results suggest that the MIE method can reproducibly generate accurate estimates of the relative mechanical stiffness and provide guidance on the degree of change needed in order to declare biological changes rather than experimental error in future therapeutic studies. PMID:26158120

  19. Cardiovascular calcifications in chronic kidney disease: Potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Górriz, José Luis; Lloret, María Jesús; da Silva, Iara; Ruiz-García, César; Chang, Pamela; Rodríguez, Mariano; Ballarín, José

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is a highly prevalent condition at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is directly associated with increased CV and global morbidity and mortality. In the first part of this review, we have shown that CV calcifications represent an important part of the CKD-MBD complex and are a superior predictor of clinical outcomes in our patients. However, it is also necessary to demonstrate that CV calcification is a modifiable risk factor including the possibility of decreasing (or at least not aggravating) its progression with iatrogenic manoeuvres. Although, strictly speaking, only circumstantial evidence is available, it is known that certain drugs may modify the progression of CV calcifications, even though a direct causal link with improved survival has not been demonstrated. For example, non-calcium-based phosphate binders demonstrated the ability to attenuate the progression of CV calcification compared with the liberal use of calcium-based phosphate binders in several randomised clinical trials. Moreover, although only in experimental conditions, selective activators of the vitamin D receptor seem to have a wider therapeutic margin against CV calcification. Finally, calcimimetics seem to attenuate the progression of CV calcification in dialysis patients. While new therapeutic strategies are being developed (i.e. vitamin K, SNF472, etc.), we suggest that the evaluation of CV calcifications could be a diagnostic tool used by nephrologists to personalise their therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. B-Cell Depletion Reduces the Maturation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations in Murine Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Austin, Cecilia; Moore, Thomas; Lightle, Rhonda; Zhang, Lingjiao; Wu, Meijing; Cao, Ying; Gunel, Murat; Louvi, Angeliki; Rorrer, Autumn; Gallione, Carol; Marchuk, Douglas A; Awad, Issam A

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are relatively common vascular malformations, characterized by increased Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, vascular hyper-permeability and the presence of blood degradation products including non-heme iron. Previous studies revealed robust inflammatory cell infiltration, selective synthesis of IgG, in situ antigen driven B-cell clonal expansion, and deposition of immune complexes and complement proteins within CCM lesions. We aimed to evaluate the impact of suppressing the immune response on the formation and maturation of CCM lesions, as well as lesional iron deposition and ROCK activity. Two murine models of heterozygous Ccm3 (Pdcd10), which spontaneously develop CCM lesions with severe and milder phenotypes, were either untreated or received anti-mouse BR3 to deplete B cells. Brains from anti-mouse BR3-treated mice exhibited significantly fewer mature CCM lesions and smaller lesions compared to untreated mice. B cell depletion halted the progression of lesions into mature stage 2 lesions but did not prevent their genesis. Non-heme iron deposition and ROCK activity was decreased in lesions of B cell depleted mice. This represents the first report of the therapeutic benefit of B-cell depletion in the development and progression of CCMs, and provides a proof of principle that B cells play a critical role in CCM lesion genesis and maturation. These findings add biologics to the list of potential therapeutic agents for CCM disease. Future studies would characterize the putative antigenic trigger and further define the mechanism of immune response in the lesions.